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Sample records for nuclear industry workers

  1. Psychological attitudes of nuclear industry workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faes, M.; Stoppie, J.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was carried out within the frame of occupational medicine on the psychological attitudes of workers in the nuclear industry towards ionizing radiations. Three aspects were considered: awareness of the danger; feeling of safety in the working environment; workers' feelings following incidents or accidents; satisfaction level felt by the workers in the plant [fr

  2. Temporary worker in the nuclear power industry: an equity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melville, M.H.

    1981-01-01

    There are clear indications based both on the statistical data and on empirical evidence that the employment of large numbers of temporary workers has become a permanent and growing characteristic of the industry. It appears that the size of that work force has been seriously underestimated and that it receives a disproportionate share of the occupational radiation. In order to stay within the limits governing individual exposure in the workplace, the risk has been spread among a larger segment of the population. These facts raise important and ongoing issues of societal and employer responsibility. By the reckonings of this study, the total number of workers employed on a temporary basis by the nuclear power industry is eighteen times greater than those much more narrowly defined by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as transient workers: individuals hired and terminating employment with two or more employers in one quarter. It is estimated that the whole temporary work force numbered about 23,520 in 1976, over a third (35%) of the industry total, and absorbed 47.5% of the total occupational radiation dose. The problems, then, are not inconsiderable: they affect thousands of individuals, a significant segment of the nuclear power industry's work force, members of society who are subjected to a disproportionate burden of radiation risk. Among the conclusions is that it may be necessary to establish special standards, limitations, and records for temporary workers to ensure adequate health protection, follow-up, and care

  3. Doses to worker groups in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    This article presents some of the results of a study carried out at the Brookhaven National Laboratory's ALARA Center on doses to various worker groups in the U.S. nuclear industry. In this study, data from workers in the industry were divided into male and female groups; the average radiation dose of these tow groups and the correlation of dose with age are presented. The male and female workers were further considered in the various sectors of the industry, and correlations of dose with age for each sector were investigated. For male workers, a downward correlation with age was observed, while for women there appeared to be a slight upward correlation. Data form 13 PWR and 9 BWR plants shows that a small, but important, group of workers would be affected by the NCRP proposed constraint of workers' lifetime dose in rem being maintained less than their ages. Various techniques proposed by the plants to reduce dose to this critical group of workers are also presented

  4. Health effects study of the nuclear industry workers in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiko Iwasaki

    1997-01-01

    To clarify the effects of low-dose and low-dose-rate exposure to the human body, study on the health effects of the nuclear industry workers in Japan was conducted since 1990 by the Institute of Radiation Epidemiology, the Radiation Effects Association, which had been entrusted by the Science and Technology Agency of the Japanese Government. In the first phase analysis between 1986 and 1992, the study population was selected from among persons who were engaged in radiation work at nuclear power plants and associated facilities, and registered in the Radiation Dose Registration Center for Workers. The cohort consisted of 114,900 persons who satisfied the criteria of nationality, age, sex, etc. The average follow-up period was 4.6 years, and the average cumulative dose per person was 13.9 mSv. The total number of deaths among the study population was 1,758, including 661 deaths due to all malignant neoplasms. The Standardized Mortality Ratio of various death causes was compared. Furthermore, the cohort was grouped by five different dose levels, and the O/E was calculated to test whether there is a trend for the death rate to increase with dose. Among nuclear workers no significant increase in deaths nor any relationship with radiation dose was found, except the pancreatic cancer with 10-years lag. Since many previous studies of nuclear industry workers have demonstrated no significant association between exposure dose and pancreatic cancer, we cannot immediately conclude a causal relationship between with radiation. (author)

  5. The ''healthy worker effect'' and other determinants of mortality in workers in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beral, V.; Carpenter, L.; Booth, M.; Inskip, H.; Brown, A.

    1987-01-01

    Workers in the nuclear industry has been found to have lower mortality rates than the national average. This is in part due to the ''healthy worker effect'' - the recruitment of healthy individuals into the workforce. Employees of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority had especially low mortality rates in the 15 years following first employment. Thereafter mortality rates remained about 20% below the national average. Social class was a clear predictor of mortality, the professional and executive classes (Social Classes I and II) having mortality rates about 40% below the national average. Mortality was not related to duration of employment. Radiation and non-radiation workers generally showed similar patterns of mortality. (author)

  6. Second analysis of mortality of nuclear industry workers in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Motoi; Ohshima, Sumio; Kudo, Shin-ichi

    2002-01-01

    A cohort study of nuclear industry workers was begun in 1990 to determine the possible health effect of low dose radiation exposure. A follow-up study of about 244,000 male workers was conducted using residence registration records. About 176,000 subjects were successfully followed up, and 5,527 deaths were ascertained during the period of observation 1986 through 1997. Underlying causes of death were identified by record linkage with magnetic tape records of national vital statistics data. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was calculated with Japanese males in general as the reference population. Tests for trends in death rates were made against cumulative radiation dose. The SMR (and its 95% confidence interval) was 0.90 (0.87-0.92) for all causes, 0.80 (0.77-0.84) for non-neoplastic diseases and 0.94 (0.90-0.98) for all cancer, respectively. The lower SMR was ascribed to possible healthy worker effects, etc. In the trend analyses, the death rate for neither all cancers sites nor leukemia showed any positive correlation with radiation dose, while significantly positive correlations were found for cancers of the esophagus (p<0.001), stomach (p<0.05) and rectum (p<0.05), and also for external causes (p<0.001). In lifestyle survey studies of 49,000 workers, both smoking and drinking habits were positively correlated with radiation dose. These lifestyle characteristics may have been important factors affecting the present results

  7. Health check on radiation workers in the nuclear energy industry using Todai Health Index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Takehiko; Norimura, Toshiyuki; Kumashiro, Masaharu; Sudo, Seiji; Hashimoto, Tetsuaki.

    1986-01-01

    In the nuclear energy industry, the plants are located far from urban areas and the working environments are generally separate from each other for radiation protection purposes. The health investigation on radiation workers in the nuclear energy industry was carried out using the Todai Health Index questionnaire in 1982, 1983 and 1984. As a control study non-radiation workers on the other several working fields were investigated in the same manner. The results showed that the status of radiation workers in the nuclear energy industry is similar to that of the workers in the other working fields and the THI questionnaire is useful to know health and working status of a group of workers. (author)

  8. Temporary workers in the nuclear power industry: implications for the waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melville, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    The employment of large number of temporary workers has become a growing and permanent characteristic of the nuclear power industry. In order to stay within the limits governing individual exposure to radiation in the workplace, the occupational risk has been spread among a larger segment of the population. Temporary workers, who make up one-third of the industry's work force, bear a disproportionate share of half the total annual occupational radiation dose. At issue is whether temporary workers should be grouped with the public at large or with the nuclear industry's work force, whose maximum limits are at least 10 times higher. This issue is relevant at a time when the search for a way to manage the mounting radioactive wastes will increase both the permanent and temporary work force. 44 references, 4 figures, 4 tables

  9. The 15-Country Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardis, E; Vrijheid, M; Blettner, M

    2007-01-01

    A 15-Country collaborative cohort study was conducted to provide direct estimates of cancer risk following protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. Analyses included 407,391 nuclear industry workers monitored individually for external radiation and 5.2 million person-years of follow-up. A sign...

  10. A survey of doses to worker groups in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The the US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has suggested ''...as guidance for radiation programs that cumulative exposure not exceed the age of the individual in years x 10 mSv (years x 1 rem).'' The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recommended a dose limit of 10 rem averaged over 5 years. With these developments in mind, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested the ALARA Center of the Brookhaven National Laboratory to undertake two parallel studies. One study, which is still ongoing, is to examine the impact of the newly recommended dose limits on the nuclear industry as a whole; the other study was intended to assist in this larger project by looking more closely at the nuclear power industry. Preliminary data had indicated that the critical industry as far as the impact of new regulatory limits were concerned would be the nuclear power industry, because, it was conjectured, there existed a core of highly skilled workers in some groups which routinely get higher than average exposures. The objectives of the second study were to get a better understanding of the situation vis grave a vis the nuclear power industry, by identifying the high-dose worker groups, quantifying the annual and lifetime doses to these groups to see the extent of the problem if there was one, and finally to determine if there were any dose-reduction techniques which were particularly suited to reducing doses to these groups. In this presentation we describe some of the things learned during our work on the two projects. For more detailed information on the project on dose-reduction techniques for high-dose worker groups in the nuclear power industry, see NUREG/CR-5139. An industry/advisory committee has been set up which is in the process of evaluating the data from the larger project on the impact of new dose limits and will shortly produce its report. 7 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  11. Comparison between worker-deaths in modern industries and in nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failla, L.

    1977-01-01

    The author examines the statistical data related to the deaths of workers in modern industries. This analysis regards deaths by accident. It regards some particular countries in the world; these particular countries have been selected because their data are comparable. The analysis in modern industry regards different years (1965 - 1974). For the worker deaths caused by professional diseases, some particular considerations are made in this paper. Due to the fact that international statistics for worker deaths due to professional diseases don't exist, it was necessary to resort to the existing correllation between professional diseases and accidents in industry, to extrapolate, with some approximation, the number of deaths due to professional disease. Using these considerations it is possible to find some interesting data. Then the author examines the statistics in order to compare them with those pertinent to nuclear energy. With regard to this topic, the author considers the mortal-risks from radiation exposures. Then the author compares the philosophy that is used in modern industry and in the nuclear energy field. A special discussion is carried on about ICRP conception, expressed in Publication 22; ''Implications of Commission Recommendations that Doses be kept as Low as Readily Achievable''

  12. Comparison between worker-deaths in modern industries and in nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failla, L.

    1977-01-01

    The statistical data related to the deaths of workers in modern industries, are examined. This analysis regards deaths by accident. It regards some particular countries in the world; these particular countries have been selected because their data are comparable. The analysis in modern industry regards different years. For the worker deaths caused by professional diseases, some particular considerations are made. Due to the fact that international statistics for worker deaths due to professional diseases don't exist, it was necessary to resort to the existing corollation between professional diseases and accidents in industry, to extrapolate, with some approximation, the number of deaths due to professional disease. Using these considerations it is possible to find some interesting data. The statistics are examined in order to compare them with those pertinent to nuclear energy. With regard to this topic, the mortal-risks from radiation exposures are considered. The philosophies used in modern industry and in the nuclear energy field, are compared. A special discussion is carried on about ICRP conception, expressed in Publication 22: 'Implications of Commission Recommendations that Doses be kept as Low as Readily Achievable'

  13. First analysis of mortality of nuclear industry workers in Japan, 1986-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoda, Yutaka; Kuba, Michiyoshi; Miyake, Toshio

    1997-01-01

    The health effects or low doses and low dose rates exposure to human bodies have not been clarified yet. Under this situation, the Radiation Effects Association entrusted by the Science and Technology Agency of the Japanese Government began a survey entitled 'The Epidemiological Study on Nuclear Industry Workers.' The study population consisted of 114,900 workers in the nuclear industry. Their vital status and identification of cause of death were confirmed by residence registration records and by magnetic tapes of National Vital Statistics, respectively. Their dose information was obtained from the Radiation Dose Registration Center for Workers. The total population dose of the study population was 1,598.5 person-Sv, and the mean cumulative dose per individual was 13.9 mSv. The study period was between 1986 and 1992, average follow-up period being 4.6 years. There were 1,758 deaths including 661 of all malignant neoplasms among the population. The SMR was used to compare mortality among members of the study population and that of Japanese males in general after adjustment for age distribution. Furthermore, members of the population were grouped by cumulative dose groups, and the O/E was calculated to test whether there is a trend for the death rate to increase with dose. The present study demonstrated no evidence of any effect of low level radiation upon health, particularly upon the cancer mortality. (author)

  14. Second analysis of mortality of nuclear industry workers in Japan, 1986-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Sumio; Murata, Motoi

    2001-01-01

    This article is a commentary concerning the second report of the study in the title committed by the Science and Technology Agency (the present Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) to Radiation Effects Association. The study is an epidemiological one as for the relationships between long-term low dose radiation and its health effects in workers of nuclear industry like nuclear power plant and uses the cohort methodology for the factor (exposure dose) and diseases (mortality). In about 244,000 personnel, mortality was calculated from obtainable 179,000 resident cards of object males. For those died during the study period, cause of death was checked with the card for the movement of population (Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare). The exposure dose was checked with the dose records of radiation workers stored in the registration center. Analysis results of standardized mortality ratio (comparison of mortality of the objects and non-object Japanese males) and of correlation of integrated dose and mortality gave no clear evidence that the low dose radiation exposure affects the mortality due to cancer. (K.H.)

  15. Health Effects Study of Nuclear Industry Workers in Japan: Results of the Second Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, M.; Ohshima, S.; Miyake, T.; Yamagishi, C.; Kaneko, M.; Matsudaira, H.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: A cohort study of nuclear industry workers in Japan was initiated in 1990 aiming to clarify health effects of low dose radiation. About 24 000 male workers were followed up by using municipal residence registration records. About 176,000 subjects were successfully followed up and 5527 deaths were detected during the observation period of 1986 through 1997. Underlying causes of death were identified by record linkage with magnetic tapes of National Vital Statistics. The collective dose of the study population was about 2109 person-Sv. Both external and internal comparisons were made. For external comparisons, standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated with Japanese males as the reference population. For internal comparisons, trend analyses of death rates were done against cumulative radiation dose. SMRs (95% confidence interval) were 0.90 (0.87-0.92), 0.80 (0.77-0.84) and 0.94 (0.90-0.98) for all causes, non-malignant diseases and cancers, respectively. These lower SMRs were ascribed to possible healthy worker effects and others. No causes of death showed significantly higher SMRs. With the trend analyses, neither death rates for cancer of all sites nor for leukemia showed positive correlations with radiation dose, while significantly positive correlations were found for cancers of the esophagus (p<0.05) and the stomach (p<0.01), and also for the external causes (p<0.001). Besides this study, we conducted life style studies for some (about 49,000) of those workers. Both smoking and drinking habits were positively correlated with cumulative radiation doses. Thus we consider that these life styles can be an important factor which affects the present results. (author)

  16. Practical approach in training (on-the-job) for workers in nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianna, Vilson Bedim; Rocha, Janine Gandolpho da

    2005-01-01

    This work approaches the 'on-the-job training' - a method of practical training - used in nuclear industries for workers who handle radioactive nuclides. The required training must, in accordance with the ISO 9000 standard, be geared to meet the needs of the organization, including the minimization of errors in operation with radionuclides, which involves various aspects (standard, social, environmental, personal and process safety etc.). Therefore, the training process must have the commitment of everybody and have a logical and documented sequence, where both the individual and the needs of the company are raised and analyzed. The clear identification of the radiological risks associated to the hands-on training is critical to the safety of who is being trained and should be part of the training content. However, the greatest challenge is a mechanism allowing to transform the hands-on training in practical learning. The role of training in the modern nuclear industry should not be restricted to provide conditions for better training or development of the employee, but also motivate the continuous improvement of the company and of the productive process

  17. Fifth analysis of mortality of nuclear industry workers in Japan, 1991-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Shin'ichi; Ishida, Jun'ichi; Yoshimoto, Keiko; Mizuno, Shoichi; Ohshima, Sumio; Furuta, Hiroshige; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Effects Association has carried out radiation epidemiological study for nuclear industry workers during 1990-2010. We assembled a cohort of 204,103 workers. The average cumulative dose was 13.8 mSv (median 1.0 mSv, interquartile range (IQR) 0.0-10.7 mSv) and the average follow-up period was 14.2 year. The present report has not concluded that low-dose radiation increases cancer mortality based on the follow-up data through 2010. One reason is that analyses among 75,442 respondents —the average cumulative dose was 25.8 mSv (median 6.3 mSv, IQR 0.2-28.0 mSv) and the average follow-up period was 8.3 year— to the lifestyle surveys revealed the decrease of the ERR after adjusting for smoking habits or educational year, suggesting that confounder has a large effect on the association between radiation exposure and mortalities in the cohort. Another reason is that in analyses on all cohort members, no significant ERR was observed in all death, and leukemia excluding chronic lymphoid leukemia. Significant ERR was seen in all cancers excluding leukemia, but this significance of the ERR might be affected by confounder such as smoking, because the significance of the ERR in all cancers excluding leukemia originates in the significance of the ERR in lung cancer. (author)

  18. Mortality studies among cohorts of nuclear industry workers in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cragle, D.L.; Fry, S.A.; Dupree, E.A.; Groer, P.G.; Lushbaugh, C.C.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Shy, C.M.; Watson, J.E.; Frome, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    Health and mortality studies of nuclear workers of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have been ongoing for more than 20 y. To date, reports have been published for eight populations of active or formerly employed workers at DOE or DOE contractor sites. Many of these sites have employed workers since the 1940s, affording long periods of observation for large numbers of workers. The published studies have identified increases in deaths related to radiation exposure only for multiple myeloma in the population of workers at the Hanford facility. This finding has not been replicated among the populations that we have studied with similar radiation exposure levels. Increases in lung cancer, brain cancer, and leukemia deaths among two of the populations do not appear to be related to increasing levels of either internal or external radiation dose. Follow-up of these eight populations is continuing, and we anticipate publishing reports for four more populations in the next 2 y

  19. An epidemiology survey on the worker's accident death in China nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Shouchen; Gao Zenglin; Chang Xuezhang

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the worker's accident death in China nuclear industry, the author adopted epidemiological method, ICD-9 death classification principle in investigating the cause of all deaths in 11 units from their setting up to the end of 1990. There were 786 cases of accident death which was in the second place among all death causation. The crude mortality was 50.98 x 10 -5 , standard mortality 46.56 x 10 -5 , and SMR 1.20 (P>0.01). Average death age was 34.93 years. There wasn't obvious increase or decrease trends over the years (P>0.05). The most accident death was injury suffered on the job (29.90%), the second was suicide (22.52%), third, transport accident (10.81%) and next, drowning (8.40%), accidental fall (6.87%), poisoning (4.20%). Potential life lose was 25743 years. Relative risk (RR) for accident death of male is bigger than that of female. and the higher RR in radiation group compared with non-radiation group, came from uranium geological teams and mines mainly, while without proof of radioactivity itself

  20. Progress in radiation protection techniques for workers in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradel, J.; Zettwoog, P.; Rouyer, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    The increasingly stringent safety requirements of workers and the general public in the face of occupational and in particular nuclear risks call for continual improvements in radiation protection techniques. The Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety (IPSN), especially the Technical Protection Services belonging to the Protection Department, and also the various radiation protection services of the French Atomic Energy Commission's nuclear centres and Electricite de France (EDF) are carrying out substantial research and development programmes on the subject. For this reason, IPSN organized a specialists' meeting to take stock of the efforts being made and to try to identify what steps seem most promising or should have priority at the national level. The authors summarize the presentations and discussions on three topics: (1) Progress in the analysis of the mechanism of exposure of workers; (2) Progress achieved from the radiation protection standpoint in the field of facility design and instrumentation; and (3) Application of the optimization principle

  1. A primary liver cancer death's survey and risk factors analysis of the workers in China nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Shouchen; Chang Xuezhang; Gao Zenglin; Xiong Jinlian; Zhang Xuzong; Zhang Zhongren

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate primary liver cancer death in the workers of China nuclear industry and to discuss the risk factors probably for making protection and cure measures, the workers of 11 units are surveyed from the time of foundation to the end of 1990 by groups, trades and sex, and the results are analyzed with the relevant physical examinations, the results in laboratory test, and some clinic epidemiological data concerned. The accumulative rough mortality is 19.20 x 10 -5 , standard mortality 10.09 x 10 -5 , the most is at the age of 35 to 54. SMR 1.00 (P > 0.05), RR value in uranium mines is 3.67 (P < 0.01) and others does not increase. The incidence of hepatomegalia and GPT rising are lower than or about 10%, while the incidence of HBsAg is lower than 8%, a middle-levelled infection in the country. And HBsAg incidence in liver cancer cases is 61.6% and chronic hepatitis in liver cancer cases is 53.4%. The liver cancer case increase in the workers in nuclear industry is not found, but significant increase is found in uranium mine workers; whereas there is no evidence that can be attributed to radiation operation, and the death risk may be considered mainly to be related to HBV infection, then chronic hepatitis or environment factors

  2. Radioepidemiological studies on the occupational exposure of workers in nuclear industry of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shiquan; Li Suyun; Yuan Liyun; Wang Yinzhang

    1993-11-01

    The results of retrospective-cohort radioepidemiological studies on the workers exposed to occupational radiation in the uranium and nuclear plants and uranium mines governed by China National Nuclear Corporation is reported. Period of follow-up is 1971 ∼ 1985, total number of observation 40122, person years of follow-up 575411. The per caput dose of external radiation in workers of reactor, nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and research units was 57 mSv. For fuel element fabrication and gaseous diffusion plants, it was less than 5 mSv and about 3/4 of which came from the committed effective dose of internal radiation. SMR of total death and cancer death was generally less than 1.0 in exposure group of nuclear plants. There was no evidence of increment of the risk of radiogenic cancer. 31786 offsprings of workers in nuclear plants were subjected to the study on hereditary effects. The results was also negative. The only exception was uranium mines. Owing to the high concentration of radon before the 1960's, the average cumulative exposure of radon daughters of uranium miner was about 80 WLM, relative risk of miner lung cancer was about 2.0. the absolute risk coefficient was about 1/10 to 1/3 of the results of Western countries because of the low baseline rate of lung cancer in China. The excess relative risk coefficient was similar to the value presented by other countries. Radon contamination and increment of miner lung cancer encountered prominently in some non-uranium mines in China

  3. Optimization of the workers radiation protection in the electro nuclear, industrial and medical fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This conference is devoted to the radiation protection and the best way to optimize it. It reviews each area of the nuclear industry, and explores also the medical sector. Dosimetry, ALARA principle and new regulation are important points of this meeting. (N.C.)

  4. Workers moving the industry forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Power Workers' Union represents workers at Ontario Hydro's nuclear stations and AECL operators at Chalk River. Although labour relations are far from perfect, the union does its best to protect the industry. Avoiding confrontation as much as possible, this union is happy to be regarded as a partner in the business. The union is impressed by the consultants' report on Ontario Hydro's nuclear operations. Whatever the future may bring, the present is not really pleasant for nuclear workers generally, in that the work itself is very demanding technically, and must be performed with great diligence because the responsibility for safety is enormous. Considering the actual safety record, some caricatures or ''cheap shots'' from antinuclear politicians and special interest groups seem quite offensive. As a partner in public relations, the union has produced draft fact sheets on topics such as: transporting radioactive material; the burning of plutonium from dismantled weaponry; deep geological storage of nuclear waste; the sale of Candu reactors to China. The author closes with some advice on how to improve industrial relations, based on the union's experience

  5. Nuclear Industry Family Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This is a copy of the U.K.A.E.A. Question and Answer brief concerning an epidemiological study entitled the Nuclear Industry Family Study, to investigate the health of children of AEA, AWE, and BNFL Workers. The study is being carried out by an independent team of medical research workers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and the Imperial Cancer Research Fund. (UK)

  6. Adjustment for smoking reduces radiation risk: fifth analysis of mortality of nuclear industry workers in Japan, 1999-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, S.; Ishida, J.; Yoshimoto, K.; Mizuno, S.; Ohshima, S.; Kasagi, F., E-mail: s_kudo@rea.or.jp [Instituto of Radiation Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Association, 1-9-16 Kajicho, Chiyoda-ku, 101-0044 Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Many cohort studies among nuclear industry workers have been carried out to determine the possible health effects of low-level radiation. In those studies, confounding factors, for example, age was adjusted to exclude the effect of difference of mortality by age to estimate radiation risk. But there are few studies adjusting for smoking that is known as a strong factor which affects mortality. Radiation Effects Association (Rea) initiated a cohort study of nuclear industry workers mortality in 1990. To examine non-radiation factors confounding on the mortality risk among the radiation workers, Rea have performed life-style questionnaire surveys among the part of workers at 1997 and 2003 and found the correlation between radiation dose and smoking rate. Mortality follow-up were made on 75,442 male respondents for an average of 8.3 years during the observation period 1999-2010. Estimates of Excess Relative Risk percent (Err %) per 10 mSv were obtained by using the Poisson regression. The Err for all causes was statistically significant (1.05 (90 % CI 0.31 : 1.80)), but no longer significant after adjusting for smoking (0.45 (-0.24 : 1.13)). The Err for all cancers excluding leukemia was not significant (0.92 (-0.30 : 2.16)), but after adjusting for smoking, it decreased (0.36 (-0.79 : 1.50)). Thus smoking has a large effect to obscure a radiation risk, so adjustment for smoking is important to estimate radiation risk. (Author)

  7. Adjustment for smoking reduces radiation risk: fifth analysis of mortality of nuclear industry workers in Japan, 1999-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, S.; Ishida, J.; Yoshimoto, K.; Mizuno, S.; Ohshima, S.; Kasagi, F.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: Many cohort studies among nuclear industry workers have been carried out to determine the possible health effects of low-level radiation. In those studies, confounding factors, for example, age was adjusted to exclude the effect of difference of mortality by age to estimate radiation risk. But there are few studies adjusting for smoking that is known as a strong factor which affects mortality. Radiation Effects Association (Rea) initiated a cohort study of nuclear industry workers mortality in 1990. To examine non-radiation factors confounding on the mortality risk among the radiation workers, Rea have performed life-style questionnaire surveys among the part of workers at 1997 and 2003 and found the correlation between radiation dose and smoking rate. Mortality follow-up were made on 75,442 male respondents for an average of 8.3 years during the observation period 1999-2010. Estimates of Excess Relative Risk percent (Err %) per 10 mSv were obtained by using the Poisson regression. The Err for all causes was statistically significant (1.05 (90 % CI 0.31 : 1.80)), but no longer significant after adjusting for smoking (0.45 (-0.24 : 1.13)). The Err for all cancers excluding leukemia was not significant (0.92 (-0.30 : 2.16)), but after adjusting for smoking, it decreased (0.36 (-0.79 : 1.50)). Thus smoking has a large effect to obscure a radiation risk, so adjustment for smoking is important to estimate radiation risk. (Author)

  8. An overview of equivalent doses in eye lens of occupational radiation workers in medical, industrial and nuclear areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, A.R.; Silva, F.C.A. da; Hunt, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Some epidemiological evidences were recently reviewed by the ICRP and it was suggested that, for the eye lens, the absorbed dose threshold for induction of late detriments is about 0.5 Gy. On this basis, on 2011, the ICRP has recommended changes to the occupational dose limit in planned exposure situations, reducing the eye lens dose equivalent limit of 150 mSv to 20 mSv per year, on average, during the period of 5 years, with exposure not exceeding 50 mSv in a single year. Following the ICRP recommendation, the Brazilian Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) adopted immediately the new limit to the eyes lens. This study aimed to show an overview about the doses in eye lens of occupational radiation workers in situations of planned exposures in the medical, industrial and nuclear areas, emphasizing the greatest radiological risks applications. It was observed that there are some limitations, such as example, to use individual monitor calibrated on Hp(3), to assess the equivalent dose in the eye lens. This limitation obstructs some experimental studies and monitoring of the levels of radiation received in the eye lens of radiation workers. Recent studies have showed that the lenses of eyes monitoring of workers, mainly in the planned exposure, must be follow-up. However, such researches were obtained only in medical exposures, mainly in interventional medicine procedures. Studies with planned exposure on nuclear and industrial areas are really needed and will be very important due to the new recommended by ICRP dose limits. (author)

  9. World Council of Nuclear Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisseu, Andre

    2007-01-01

    WONUC is an association of Trade Unions, Scientific Societies and Social Organizations of the employees, workers and professionals of the nuclear energy related industries and technologies; integrated by 35 Countries and 1.8 millions members. This paper expose the products and services that WONUC provide for the promotion of peaceful uses of nuclear energy and the result of their work around all the world

  10. Worker in nuclear activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goes Fischer, M.D. de; Associacao Brasileira de Direito Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro)

    1984-01-01

    Juridical aspects with respect to the workers in nuclear activity are presented. Special emphasis is given to the clauses of the statute of workers (Consolidacao das Leis do Trabalho) the rules of the Ministerio do Trabalho and the rules of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear. The performance of the international authorities is also emphasized such as the International Labour Organization, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the International Radiological Protection Commission. (Author) [pt

  11. ENDOCRINE-METABOLIC PATHOLOGY IN CHILDREN OF FEMALE WORKERS ON NUCLEAR INDUSTRY ENTERPRISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Sosnina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of deviations in health status of children whose parents were exposed to radiation on production enterprise is important for radiation safety of people of reproductive age and their subsequent generations.The purpose of the study: the analysis of endocrine-metabolic pathology in the offspring of female workers of nuclear production, which had accumulated preconceptual doses of external gamma-irradiation.Material and methods: Retrospective data analysis of medical records of 650 children under 15 years old was carried out, 130 of whom were the offspring of mothers exposed to radiation in the workplace. Methods of nonparametric statistics were applied. To identify latent factors, factor analysis by the main component method was used.Results: The range of preconceptive doses of external gamma irradiation to mothers’ gonads was 0.09–3523.7 mGy, the average absorbed dose for gonads was 423.2±52.2 mGy. The structure of the class «Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases» among the descendants of irradiated and intact mothers did not significantly differ. There was predominance of rickets, malnutrition among infants in both groups. Iodine-deficiency-related thyroid disorders were most frequently recorded in the structure of thyroid gland diseases without statistically significant differences in the groups. The gender dependence was noted: endocrine-metabolic pathology occurred in girls by 1.8 times more often than among boys. Frequent occurrence of polypathies and secondary endocrine pathology were indicated in the group of children of irradiated mothers. Factor analysis in study group identified four factors characterizing the antenatal period in children (19.4% of the variance, obstetric-gynecologic anamnesis (14.1% of the variance, mothers’ bad health habits (10.6% of the variance and preconceptional external gamma-radiation exposure of female workers (9.6% of the variance.Conclusion: The features identified in the analysis

  12. Analysis of the results for the AECL cohort in the IARC study on the radiogenic cancer risk among nuclear industry workers in fifteen countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashmore, J.P.; Gentner, N.E.; Osborne, R.V.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last two decades there have been attempts to estimate the risks from occupational exposure in the nuclear industry by epidemiological assessments on cohorts of workers. However, generally low doses and relatively small worker populations have limited the precision of such studies. In 1995 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) completed a study that involved workers from facilities in the USA, UK and AECL. In 2005, IARC completed a further study involving nuclear workers from 15 countries including Canada. Surprisingly, the risk ascribed to the Canadian cohort for all cancers excluding leukaemia, driven by the AECL component, was significantly higher than the cohort as a whole. The work described in this report is an attempt to unravel what might have accounted for the divergence between the results for the AECL cohort and the others

  13. Analysis of the results for the AECL cohort in the IARC study on the radiogenic cancer risk among nuclear industry workers in fifteen countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashmore, J.P. [Ponsonby and Associates, Manotick, Ontario (Canada); Gentner, N.E. [Consultant, Petawawa, Ontario (Canada); Osborne, R.V. [Ranasara Consultants Inc., Deep River, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-03-31

    Over the last two decades there have been attempts to estimate the risks from occupational exposure in the nuclear industry by epidemiological assessments on cohorts of workers. However, generally low doses and relatively small worker populations have limited the precision of such studies. In 1995 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) completed a study that involved workers from facilities in the USA, UK and AECL. In 2005, IARC completed a further study involving nuclear workers from 15 countries including Canada. Surprisingly, the risk ascribed to the Canadian cohort for all cancers excluding leukaemia, driven by the AECL component, was significantly higher than the cohort as a whole. The work described in this report is an attempt to unravel what might have accounted for the divergence between the results for the AECL cohort and the others.

  14. Ecological-genetic aspects of consequences of an irradiation at the workers of a nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telnov, V.I.

    2000-01-01

    The urgent problem of genetic consequences of radiation exposure at the workers of atomic plant ''Mayak'' is considered. Two basic aspects of this problem are allocated: influences of radiation on hereditary structures and processes, which is a prerogative of radiation genetics and role of the genetic factors in different reactions to an irradiation, that is a task of ecology genetics, which recently receives the increasing recognition. Proceeding from distinctions in reproduction biology of the human and experimental biological objects determining non-comparable mutation risk at them, is recognized expedient to expand a spectrum of genetic researches in the irradiated people. The results of different genetic researches in total in 2811 peoples executed in view of two named aspects discussed. At radiation-genetic investigation of distribution of genetic polymorphism system (haptoglobin -Hp, Gc-protein -Gc and blood groups ABO) the certain changes in distribution of Hp types and alleles of children of the irradiated workers connected with a gonad external gamma-radiation doses are established. The genetic structure of the grandsons of the irradiated workers has not any deviations. The increase of mutation frequency in minisatellite DNA in germline cells of irradiate workers was not found out. At ecological-genetic investigation the important meaning of haptoglobin genetic system in different radiation resistance of the people established at study of a role of a number of the genetic polymorphism systems (Hp, Gc and ABO) in radiation effects at different levels of biological organization. The integrated estimation of role of Hp genotypes in observable radiation effects carried out. (author)

  15. Poisson regression analysis of the mortality among a cohort of World War II nuclear industry workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frome, E.L.; Cragle, D.L.; McLain, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    A historical cohort mortality study was conducted among 28,008 white male employees who had worked for at least 1 month in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during World War II. The workers were employed at two plants that were producing enriched uranium and a research and development laboratory. Vital status was ascertained through 1980 for 98.1% of the cohort members and death certificates were obtained for 96.8% of the 11,671 decedents. A modified version of the traditional standardized mortality ratio (SMR) analysis was used to compare the cause-specific mortality experience of the World War II workers with the U.S. white male population. An SMR and a trend statistic were computed for each cause-of-death category for the 30-year interval from 1950 to 1980. The SMR for all causes was 1.11, and there was a significant upward trend of 0.74% per year. The excess mortality was primarily due to lung cancer and diseases of the respiratory system. Poisson regression methods were used to evaluate the influence of duration of employment, facility of employment, socioeconomic status, birth year, period of follow-up, and radiation exposure on cause-specific mortality. Maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters in a main-effects model were obtained to describe the joint effects of these six factors on cause-specific mortality of the World War II workers. We show that these multivariate regression techniques provide a useful extension of conventional SMR analysis and illustrate their effective use in a large occupational cohort study

  16. Ionizing radiation and risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the 15-country study of nuclear industry workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrijheid, Martine; Cardis, Elisabeth; Ashmore, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to other types of leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has long been regarded as non-radiogenic, i.e. not caused by ionizing radiation. However, the justification for this view has been challenged. We therefore report on the relationship between CLL mortality and external...... ionizing radiation dose within the 15-country nuclear workers cohort study. The analyses included, in seven countries with CLL deaths, a total of 295,963 workers with more than 4.5 million person-years of follow-up and an average cumulative bone marrow dose of 15 mSv; there were 65 CLL deaths....... In conclusion, the largest nuclear workers cohort study to date finds little evidence for an association between low doses of external ionizing radiation and CLL mortality. This study had little power due to low doses, short follow-up periods, and uncertainties in CLL ascertainment from death certificates...

  17. Practical approach in training (on-the-job) for workers in nuclear industries; Abordagem pratica no treinamento (on-the-job) para trabalhadores em industrias nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianna, Vilson Bedim; Rocha, Janine Gandolpho da [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil SA, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    This work approaches the 'on-the-job training' - a method of practical training - used in nuclear industries for workers who handle radioactive nuclides. The required training must, in accordance with the ISO 9000 standard, be geared to meet the needs of the organization, including the minimization of errors in operation with radionuclides, which involves various aspects (standard, social, environmental, personal and process safety etc.). Therefore, the training process must have the commitment of everybody and have a logical and documented sequence, where both the individual and the needs of the company are raised and analyzed. The clear identification of the radiological risks associated to the hands-on training is critical to the safety of who is being trained and should be part of the training content. However, the greatest challenge is a mechanism allowing to transform the hands-on training in practical learning. The role of training in the modern nuclear industry should not be restricted to provide conditions for better training or development of the employee, but also motivate the continuous improvement of the company and of the productive process.

  18. Process industry properties in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Hualing

    2005-01-01

    In this article the writer has described the definition of process industry, expounded the fact classifying nuclear industry as process industry, compared the differences between process industry and discrete industry, analysed process industry properties in nuclear industry and their important impact, and proposed enhancing research work on regularity of process industry in nuclear industry. (authors)

  19. Industrial screening programs for workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavine, M.P.

    1982-01-01

    Industrial screening efforts to identify classes of workers who are more susceptible to workplace hazards, by virtue of their fertility, genetic, or lifestyle characteristics, represent a relatively new approach to reducing workplace risks. Screening has already raised some important economic, legal, social, medical, and moral questions. Employers, employees, administrative agencies, and the courts are offering different, often conflicting answers. Ultimately the acceptability of various screening schemes rests upon judgments about how a society justifies the distribution of risk. The questions that industrial screening programs raise are only partially answered by empirical evidence; the rest is a matter of values

  20. The comparative analysis of traumas and poisonings incidence and mortality rates from them at workers and men-employees, workers of the nuclear industry, participants in the rectification of the consequences of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birukov A.P.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aims the estimation of incidence of traumas and poisonings, and mortality from them at workers of the Russian nuclear industry, participants in the rectification of the consequences of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station, in view of their social structure. Material and methods. Carrying out this research, we used the information base of the Register of the persons exposed by radiation after the Chernobyl accident. There had been registered as of January, 1, 1998: liquidators of 1986-1987 years — 12882 people (men — 84,3%, liquidators of 1988-1990 years —2313 people (men — 88,3%. There had been presented parameters of case rate and mortality of men, separately workers and employees of the given cohort. Results. Lower level of traumas and poisonings incidence at employees had been revealed (2-2,4 times lower, than at the workers, the mortality of traumas and poisonings at employees were also 1,1-2,9 times lower (on the average — in 2,0 times is revealed. The alcoholism essentially raises a traumatism at liquidators. The traumatism above at the liquidators, suffering a chronic alcoholism, in 1,9-3,3 times. The distinctions in coefficients of the mortality from traumas and poisonings and the incidence by them for age groups of the men-liquidators were revealed. Conclusion. The essential difference in parameters of men-liquidators' health, workers of the nuclear industry, and workers shows that a social factor renders significant influence on health of a studied contingent of persons. Age features in many respects define value of parameters of incidence of traumas and poisonings and death rates from them a studied contingent. In radiation epidemiological researches it is necessary to consider biological and social factors necessarily.

  1. Union innovation in Ontario's nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, D.

    2003-01-01

    Over the last decade the Power Worker's Union (PWU) has embarked on a number of innovative approaches that have provided significant benefit to the nuclear industry. These include advanced labour relations approaches, equity participation and groundbreaking skills training initiatives. This presentation outlines these and other initiatives in the context of the union's view of the nuclear generation industry's future. (author)

  2. Responsability of nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadiz Deleito, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Since the beginning of nuclear industry, civil responsibility with damages to the public health and properties was a critical problem, because the special conditions of this industry (nuclear accident, damages could be very high but probability of these events is very low). Legal precepts, universally accepted, in the first 60 years for all countries interested in nuclear energy are being revised, then 20 years of experience. The civil responsibility limited is being questioned and indemnities updated. (author)

  3. Spanish nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In this book published to commemorate the twentieth anniversary of the Spanish Nuclear Society, it is included a report on the Spanish Nuclear Industry. The Spanish Companies and Organizations in nuclear world are: CIEMAT, Empresarios Agrupados, ENRESA, ENUSA, ENDESA, Grupo Iberdrola, LAINSA, INITEC AND TECNATOM. Activities, history and research programs of each of them are included

  4. Spain's nuclear components industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaibel, E.

    1985-01-01

    Spanish industrial participation in supply of components for nuclear power plants has grown steadily over the last fifteen years. The share of Spanish companies in work for the five second generation nuclear power plants increased to 50% of total capital investments. The necessity to maintain Spanish technology and production in the nuclear field is emphasized

  5. Nuclear industry technology boomerang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholler, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    The benefits to the medical, pharmaceutical, semiconductor, computer, video, bioscience, laser, defense, and numerous high-tech industries from nuclear technology development fallout are indeed numerous and increase every day. Now those industries have made further progress and improvements that, in return, benefit the nuclear industry. The clean-air and particle-free devices and enclosures needed for protection and decontamination are excellent examples

  6. Nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This press dossier presented in Shanghai (China) in April 1999, describes first the activities of the Framatome group in the people's republic of China with a short presentation of the Daya Bay power plant and of the future Ling Ao project, and with a description of the technological cooperation with China in the nuclear domain (technology transfers, nuclear fuels) and in other industrial domains (mechanics, oil and gas, connectors, food and agriculture, paper industry etc..). The general activities of the Framatome group in the domain of energy (nuclear realizations in France, EPR project, export activities, nuclear services, nuclear fuels, nuclear equipments, industrial equipments) and of connectors engineering are presented in a second and third part with the 1998 performances. (J.S.)

  7. Nuclear: a world without worker?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, Pierre; Maziere, M.

    2014-01-01

    After having recalled some characteristics of the electro-nuclear sector in terms of employment (direct and indirect jobs, average age, number of persons controlled on the radiological level, exposure with respect to work location), the author outlines that workers of this sector are seldom evoked whereas investments, incidents and accidents are generally the main evoked and commented topics. He proposes some explanations about this image of the nuclear sector. He reports an incident which occurred in Marcoule and outlines how a set of imperfectly managed events resulted in this incident. He also outlines the importance of the role of workers and the difficulty to make the right choice in such situations. As a conclusion, the author draws some lessons, and particularly outlines that the commitment of workers should be put forward

  8. Nuclear techniques in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammad, F.H.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear techniques are utilized in almost every industry. The discussion in this paper includes discussions on tracer methods and uses nucleonic control systems technology; non-destructive testing techniques and radiation technology. 1 fig., 2 tabs

  9. Nuclear measurements in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozsa, S.

    1989-01-01

    In this book the author provides a description of nuclear measurements in industry, covering the physical principles, methods, instruments and equipment, and industrial applications. One of the great advantages of industrial nuclear measurements is that their use ensures the optimum use of raw material. The increasing cost of raw materials makes it essential to adhere strictly to the standards and prescriptions related to the product and this is possible only by the application of continuous and accurate measurements. As a result, the importance of nuclear instruments is rapidly growing particularly in fields where the application of alternative methods is not possible. This is illustrated by several practical examples described in the book. Similarly important are nuclear measuring the process control equipment which serve to optimize the use of energy in industrial processes

  10. Nuclear industry chart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    As part of a survey on Switzerland a pull-out organisation chart is presented of the nuclear industry showing Swiss government bodies and industrial concerns. Their interests, connections with each other and their associations with international and other national organizations and firms are indicated. (U.K.)

  11. Publication of new results from the INWORKS epidemiological study about the risk of cancer among nuclear industry workers chronically exposed to low ionizing radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    In this cohort study, 308297 workers in the nuclear industry from France, the United Kingdom, and the United States with detailed monitoring data for external exposure to ionising radiation were linked to death registries. Excess relative rate per Gy of radiation dose for mortality from cancer was estimated. Follow-up encompassed 8.2 million person years. Of 66632 known deaths by the end of follow-up, 17?957 were due to solid cancers. Results suggest a linear increase in the rate of cancer with increasing radiation exposure. The average cumulative colon dose estimated among exposed workers was 20.9 mGy (median 4.1 mGy). The estimated rate of mortality from all cancers excluding leukaemia increased with cumulative dose by 48% per Gy (90% confidence interval 20% to 79%), lagged by 10 years. Similar associations were seen for mortality from all solid cancers (47% (18% to 79%)), and within each country. The estimated association over the dose range of 0-100 mGy was similar in magnitude to that obtained over the entire dose range but less precise. Smoking and occupational asbestos exposure are potential confounders; however, exclusion of deaths from lung cancer and pleural cancer did not affect the estimated association. Despite substantial efforts to characterise the performance of the radiation dosimeters used, the possibility of measurement error remains. The study provides a direct estimate of the association between protracted low dose exposure to ionising radiation and solid cancer mortality. Although high dose rate exposures are thought to be more dangerous than low dose rate exposures, the risk per unit of radiation dose for cancer among radiation workers was similar to estimates derived from studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Quantifying the cancer risks associated with protracted radiation exposures can help strengthen the foundation for radiation protection standards

  12. Nuclear industry and territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc, B.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear industry being composed of plants, laboratories, nuclear power stations, uranium mines, power lines and fluxes of materials from one facility to another is a strong shaper of the national territory. Contrary to other European countries, French nuclear industry is present all over the national territory. In 64 departments out of 101 there is at least one enterprise whose half of the revenues depends on nuclear activities. The advantage of such a geographical dispersion is when a nuclear activity is given up the social impact is less important: people tend to find a new job in the same region. French Nuclear power plants are generally set in remote places where population density is low and being the first employer by far of the area and being a major contributor to the city revenues, they are perceived as a key element the local population is proud of. In Germany, nuclear power plants are set inside dense industrial regions and appear as an industry just like any other.(A.C.)

  13. Nuclear power industry, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    The intent of this publication is to provide a single volume of resource material that offers a timely, comprehensive view of the nuclear option. Chapter 1 discusses the development of commercial nuclear power from a historical perspective, reviewing the factors and events that have and will influence its progress. Chapters 2 through 5 discuss in detail the nuclear powerplant and its supporting fuel cycle, including various aspects of each element from fuel supply to waste management. Additional dimension is brought to the discussion by Chapters 6 and 7, which cover the Federal regulation of nuclear power and the nuclear export industry. This vast body of thoroughly documented information offers the reader a useful tool in evaluating the record and potential of nuclear energy in the United States

  14. Industrial nuclear property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepetre, M.

    1976-01-01

    The first requests for patents for the use of nuclear power filed in France in 1939. This paper reviews the regulations on industrial nuclear property in various countries. The patenting system in several socialist countries is characterized by the fact that inventions on the production and use of radioactive materials may not be patented. This equally applies in India. In the United States, this type of invention may be patented except for those involving military uses and which must be notified to the federal authorities. In France, all industrial nuclear property is grouped under the same body, Brevatome, created in 1958, which enables the allocation of rights to be negotiated between the different interested parties, the Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Electricite de France (EDF) and private industry. Under the Euratom Treaty, all inventions, even those governed by secrecy in Member countries, must be communicated to the Commission of the European Communities. (NEA) [fr

  15. Nuclear Industry in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cong, W., E-mail: eweike@263.net.cn [Bureau of Geology, China National Nuclear Corporation, Beijing (China)

    2014-05-15

    The paper presents an overview of the present situation and future plans for the development of nuclear power in China. In particular it looks at the present electricity generation system, future demand and plans for nuclear power plants to meet the increasing demands for electrical power in the country. It summarizes the state of uranium exploration activities and planned production of uranium resources, both nationally and internationally. In addition, it provides a brief overview of the existing administrative situation in the nuclear power industry in China and sets out the main challenges to future development. (author)

  16. Nuclear weapons industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, K.A.; Shaw, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    This unique study was written specifically as a reference source for institutional investors concerned about the threat posed to their stock portfolios by the debate over nuclear arms production. The authors focus their analysis on the 26 leading companies in the field. The perspective is neutral and refreshing. Background information on strategic policy, arms control and disarmament, and the influence of the industry on defense policy and the economy is presented rationally. The study also discusses the economic significance of both the conversion from military to civilian production and nuclear freeze initiatives. An appendix contains a fact-filled guide to nuclear weapon systems

  17. Industrial nuclear gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennerstedt, T.

    1986-01-01

    A great number of industrial nuclear gauges are used in Sweden. The administrative routines for testing, approval and licensing are briefly described. Safety standards, including basic ICRP criteria, are summarized and a theoretical background to the various measuring techniques is given. Numerous practical examples are given. (author)

  18. A view from the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Conference is reminded that the nuclear industry regards occupational radiation-induced cancer as a putative rather than a demonstrated hazard at current dose levels. Although epidemiological studies have shown possible dose-response correlation, all such studies of nuclear industry personnel show an overall risk of malignant disease lower than that for the general public. Doses to workers in the nuclear industry have been reducing since the 1970s, largely in consequence of the optimisation of radiation protection and the injunction ''to keep doses as low as reasonably achievable'' without reduction in occupational dose limits over this period. It is argued that further reduction in individual dose limits will act to increase collective dose. The nuclear industry no longer has either the highest individual average or collective radiation doses to its workforce within British industry; higher average individual doses occur in the non-coal mining industry and the collective dose to coal miners is greater than that of nuclear fuel cycle workers and comparable to the sum of collective doses to fuel cycle and power generation workers. (author)

  19. Industry plots nuclear revival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogee, A.

    1984-01-01

    A successful revival of the nuclear power industry will require standardization and a reduction in the number of companies managing construction, according to Atomic Industrial Forum spokesmen. In describing the concept of a few superutilities to build nuclear plants, they emphasize the need for a nuclear culture among construction management. Future plant designs emphasize small scale, with design, engineering, licensing, financing, operator training, and paperwork completed before the sale. Utilities continue to pursue economy-of-scale despite the evidence that small-scale reactors can be economical and are more appropriate for fluctuating demand growth. Financiers want more say in construction plans in the future, while utilities want to establish generating subsidiaries for wholesale power sales

  20. Human resources in the Japanese nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, M.

    1995-01-01

    Japan is becoming rapidly a nation with an elderly population. Japanese students are turning away from the manufacturing industries, including the nuclear industry, and turning towards more service oriented industries that are considered to be cleaner and to pay better. Studies have been performed to devise ways to attract young workers to the nuclear industry, which is projected to continue to grown under the current long range energy plants. The paper summarizes the findings and recommendations of the recent studies conducted by the nuclear industry and academic circles. All studies point out that insufficient emphasis is placed on science in the present Japanese educational programme and that implementation of effective programmes to revitalize education in science is most urgently needed to keep Japan in the forefront of high technology. Utilization of advanced computer technology and automation is promoted to improve working conditions and efficiency in the nuclear industry. In addition, the establishment of a professional status of engineers and technicians will be vital for an effective utilization of qualified workers in the nuclear industry. (author). 3 refs, 1 tab

  1. News from nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    A cooperation agreement has been signed between Indian and French governments concerning energy and research. This agreement opens the Indian market to Areva for the supply of power reactors. Areva will face Russian and American competitors. Areva is already present in India in the sectors of power transmission and distribution, it employs 3500 people and operates 8 industrial plants. Areva and Northrop Grumman have signed an agreement to build the biggest site on American soil dedicated to the manufacturing of big nuclear components like reactor vessels, steam generators and pressurizers. An opinion poll shows that 78% Americans favor the use of nuclear energy for producing electricity, while 24% are opposed to it and that nuclear power plants are considered safe by 78% of the population. The Areva-Bechtel corporation has signed an agreement with Unistar Nuclear Energy for doing the preliminary studies for the construction of an EPR near the Calvert Cliffs site. More than 500 engineers are working on the project that benefit from the feedback experience of 4 EPR that are presently being built in Finland, France and China. The European Commission wants the European Union to play a major role in nuclear safety, a task group has been created whose purpose is to define new regulations illustrating common priorities and approaches for unifying national nuclear safety standards among the member states. (A.C.)

  2. Occupational skin diseases in automotive industry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakut, Yunus; Uçmak, Derya; Akkurt, Zeynep Meltem; Akdeniz, Sedat; Palanci, Yilmaz; Sula, Bilal

    2014-03-01

    Studies on occupational skin diseases in workers of the automotive industry are few. To investigate the prevalence of occupational skin diseases in workers of the automotive industry. Between September and December 2011, a total of 405 workers from the automotive repair industry in Diyarbakır were interviewed. They were active workers in the repair industry who had been employed for at least six months. Business owners, sellers of spare parts and accounting officers were not included. The employees were examined at their workplaces and the working conditions were observed. Detailed dermatological examination was performed. The mean age of the 405 workers who participated in the study was 27.7 ± 10.3. The mean working time of employees was 13.3 ± 10.4 years. All of the employees were male. Dermatological diseases were not detected in 144 out of 405 workers (35.6%) and at least one condition was diagnosed in 261 (64.4%). The most frequent diagnosis was callus, hyperkeratosis, clavus (27.7%), followed by nail changes (16.8%) and superficial mycoses (12.1%). Contact dermatitis was seen at a rate of 5.9%. Traumatic lesions such as hyperkeratotic lesions and nail changes were found most frequently. Traumatic lesions were common among individuals who did not use gloves. Most nail changes were localized leuconychia, a finding not reported in the studies on automotive industry workers. In accordance with the literature, irritant contact dermatitis was observed in patients with a history of atopy and who had been working for a long time. Occupational skin diseases comprise an important field in dermatology, deserving much attention. Further studies on occupational dermatology are necessary.

  3. Nuclear industry almanac v.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, G.; Jeffs, E.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear Industry Almanac. National energy profiles of 17 Western European countries are given, concentrating on electricity supply and the role nuclear power plays in meeting the demand for electric power. The nuclear industries of Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom are described and addresses of establishments and industries are listed. (U.K.)

  4. Nuclear industry prepares fore shortage of engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauker, Lynn.

    1991-01-01

    It is predicted that the Canadian nuclear industry will experience a shortage of qualified personnel within the next five to ten years. The reasons for this prediction are as follows: enrollment in engineering courses, particularly five courses in nuclear engineering has been declining; immigration can no longer be expected to fill the gap; the workforce is aging. Solutions may include promotional campaigns, student employment programs, and educating workers to a professional level

  5. Health effects of low doses at low dose rates: dose-response relationship modeling in a cohort of workers of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz-Flamant, Camille

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to contribute to a better understanding of the health effects of chronic external low doses of ionising radiation. This work is based on the French cohort of CEA-AREVA NC nuclear workers. The mains stages of this thesis were (1) conducting a review of epidemiological studies on nuclear workers, (2) completing the database and performing a descriptive analysis of the cohort, (3) quantifying risk by different statistical methods and (4) modelling the exposure-time-risk relationship. The cohort includes monitored workers employed more than one year between 1950 and 1994 at CEA or AREVA NC companies. Individual annual external exposure, history of work, vital status and causes of death were reconstructed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios using French national mortality rates as external reference were computed. Exposure-risk analysis was conducted in the cohort using the linear excess relative risk model, based on both Poisson regression and Cox model. Time dependent modifying factors were investigated by adding an interaction term in the model or by using exposure time windows. The cohort includes 36, 769 workers, followed-up until age 60 in average. During the 1968- 2004 period, 5, 443 deaths, 2, 213 cancers, 62 leukemia and 1, 314 cardiovascular diseases were recorded. Among the 57% exposed workers, the mean cumulative dose was 21.5 milli-sieverts (mSv). A strong Healthy Worker Effect is observed in the cohort. Significant elevated risks of pleura cancer and melanoma deaths were observed in the cohort but not associated with dose. No significant association was observed with solid cancers, lung cancer and cardiovascular diseases. A significant dose-response relationship was observed for leukemia excluding chronic lymphatic leukemia, mainly for doses received less than 15 years before and for yearly dose rates higher than 10 mSv. This PhD work contributes to the evaluation of risks associated to chronic external radiation

  6. Health promoting behaviors in industrial workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulay Yilmazel

    2015-04-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Health promoting behaviors were found to be in moderate level among cement factory workers. In our country, health protection and development programs at the national level would be useful to standardize for employees in the industrial sector. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(2.000: 153-162

  7. Pumps for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, L.

    1978-01-01

    In order to meet the requirements of nuclear industry for the transfer of corrosive, toxic, humidity sensitive or very pure gases, different types of pumps were developped and commercialized. Their main characteristics are to prevent pollution of the transfered fluid by avoiding any contact between this fluid and the lubricated parts of the machine, and to prevent a contamination of the atmosphere or of the fluid by a total tightness. Patellar pumps have been particularly developped because the metallic bellows are quite reliable and resistant in this configuration. Two types are described: patellar pumps without friction and barrel pumps whose pistons are provided with rings sliding in the cylinders without lubrication [fr

  8. Nuclear industry will soon surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum has carried out the annual survey of nuclear industry from the very inception of the development of nuclear power in Japan. The aim is to research and analyze nuclear-related expenditures, sales and manpower, as well as the future prospect of mining and manufacturing industries, electric utilities, trading companies and other related industries. The 19th fact-finding survey investigated into the actual conditions of the nuclear industry from April, 1977, to March, 1978. The number of companies surveyed increased by 75 from the previous year to 1,244, of which 883 or 71% responded to the questions. 501 companies did the business in the field of nuclear power. The first thing to be pointed out about the economic conditions of the nuclear industry is that the nuclear related expenditures increased in electric utilities, mining and manufacturing industries and trading companies, and exceeded 1 trillion yen mark for the first time in the private sector. It is likely that the current nuclear-related activities of mining and manufacturing industries will soon increase, but it will not be easy to wipe off the cumulative deficit of the industries. The employees increased by more than 7% in the nuclear-related sectors of electric utilities and mining and manufacturing industries. The facilities of nuclear supply industry were operated at the average rate of 50%. (Kako, I.)

  9. Obsolescence in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, U.

    2000-01-01

    Most nuclear plants around the world are roughly 15 to 30 years old. The design and procurement of CANDU plants took place from the late 60's to mid 80's (i.e., 20 to 30 years vintage). Most equipment originally installed in these plants is obsolete or the manufactures are out of business or their production has been discontinued due to technological evolution. In order to maintain operation of nuclear plants with safety integrity and commercial viability, certain spare parts must be available at the plant all the time. The objective of this paper is to identify an optimum, cost-effective approach that solves obsolescence problem efficiently and without duplicating efforts. The Nuclear Utility Obsolescence Group (NUOG) has embarked upon the following major tasks: Developing a Guideline for use by the utilities that addresses obsolescence; Collection of obsolescence data in a database (Web-based) to be shared by all members; Motivation of the suppliers to engage them in obsolescence solutions; Increase in awareness among the utility management to consider obsolescence as a priority issue and allocate funds to address them pro-actively; and Coordination with other industry groups (EPRI, INPO, NEI, BWROG etc.) to avoid duplication of effort in obsolescence resolution process. The NUOG strategy is based upon the principles of sharing. It advocates sharing of obsolescence solutions and concerns among the utilities. Candu Owners Group Inc. (COG) has initiated self-assessment of obsolescence in the members' plants. The purpose of self-assessment is to provide baseline information that would help identification of obsolescence and coordination of their solutions. The following areas are covered in the self-assessment initiative: Identification of obsolete components in selected systems in the plant. Assess effectiveness of the current obsolescence identification process and in resolution of obsolescence Issues in the plant. Identification of common Candu plant design

  10. Optimization of the workers radiation protection in the electro nuclear, industrial and medical fields; Optimisation de la radioprotection des travailleurs dans les domaines electronucleaire, industriel et medical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This conference is devoted to the radiation protection and the best way to optimize it. It reviews each area of the nuclear industry, and explores also the medical sector. Dosimetry, ALARA principle and new regulation are important points of this meeting. (N.C.)

  11. Radiation exposure of workers in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujnova, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is an interdisciplinary department that deals with diagnosis and therapy using open sources. Therefore workers in nuclear medicine are in daily contact with ionizing radiation and thus it is essential to monitor a radiation load. Each work must therefore carry out monitoring of workers. It monitors compliance with the radiation limits set by law, allows an early detection of deviations from normal operation and to demonstrate whether the radiation protection at the workplace is optimized. This work describes the principles of monitoring of workers in nuclear medicine and monitoring methods for personal dosimetry. In the next section the author specifically deals with personal dosimetry at the Department of Nuclear Medicine St. Elizabeth Cancer Institute, Bratislava (KNM-Ba-OUSA). The main part of the work is to evaluate the results of a one-year monitoring of radiation workers KNM-Ba-OUSA. (author)

  12. Nuclear energy and the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    These notes have been prepared by the Department of Energy to provide information and to answer questions often raised about nuclear energy and the nuclear industry and in the hope that they will contribute to the public debate about the future of nuclear energy in the UK. The subject is dealt with under the headings; contribution of nuclear power, energy forecasts, nuclear fuels and reactor types, cost, thermal reactor strategy, planning margin, safety, nuclear licensing, unlike an atomic bomb, radiation, waste disposal, transport of nuclear materials, emergency arrangements at nuclear sites, siting of nuclear stations, security of nuclear installations, world nuclear programmes, international regulation and non-proliferation, IAEA safeguards arrangements in the UK, INFCE, and uranium supplies. (U.K.)

  13. Developing the next generation of nuclear workers at OPG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spekkens, P.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation is about developing the next generation of nuclear workers at Ontario Power Generation (OPG). Industry developments are creating urgent need to hire, train and retain new staff. OPG has an aggressive hiring campaign. Training organization is challenged to accommodate influx of new staff. Collaborating with colleges and universities is increasing the supply of qualified recruits with an interest in nuclear. Program for functional and leadership training have been developed. Knowledge retention is urgently required

  14. An epidemiological study of cancer incidence and mortality among nuclear industry workers at Lucas Heights Science and Technology centre in collaboration with IARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, R.R.; Kaldor, J.

    1999-01-01

    An epidemiological study is being undertaken at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) where the only nuclear reactor in Australia has been in operation since 1958. The study is part of an international collaborative study coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), and has dual objectives, first to assess whether workers at LHSTC have had different levels of mortality or cancer incidence from the New South Wales and the Australian populations, and second, as part of the IARC study, to estimate as precisely as possible, through collaboration with IARC, the risk of contracting cancer from low-level, long-term exposure to ionising radiation. The research project is a retrospective cohort study based on records of employment and exposure to radiation kept at LHSTC since 1957. Electronic linkage of all the available dosimetry and employment information with national registers of cancer incidence and mortality is being undertaken for the cohort of LHSTC workers, to allow for a passive follow-up of more than 7000 workers employed from 1957 onwards

  15. Epidemiological study of workers employed in the French nuclear fuel industry and analysis of the health effects of uranium compounds according to their solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhivin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    External γ-radiation exposure has been shown to be associated with mortality risk due to leukemia, solid cancer, and, possibly, circulatory diseases (CSD). By contrast, little information is available on health risks following the internal contamination, especially the inhalation of uranium compounds with respect to their physicochemical properties (PCP), such as solubility, isotopic composition and others. The aim of this PhD thesis was to estimate mortality risk of cancer and non-cancer diseases in French nuclear fuel cycle workers and comprises three objectives: (1) evaluation of the impact of uranium on mortality through a critical literature review, (2) analysis of cancer and non-cancer mortality in a cohort of uranium enrichment workers, (3) analysis of the relationship between CSD mortality and internal uranium dose in AREVA NC Pierrelatte workers. Existing epidemiological data on uranium PCP and associated health outcomes are scarce. Studies of nuclear fuel cycle workers by sub-groups within the specific stage of the cycle (e.g., uranium enrichment and fuel fabrication) are considered the most promising to shed light on the possible associations, given that such sub-groups present the advantage of a more homogenous uranium exposure. To study the mortality risk associated with exposure to rapidly soluble uranium compounds, we set up a cohort of 4,688 uranium enrichment workers with follow-up between 1968 and 2008. Individual annual exposure to uranium, external γ-radiation, and other non-radiological hazards (trichloroethylene, heat, and noise) were reconstructed from job-exposure matrixes (JEM) and dosimetry records. Over the follow-up period, 131,161 person-years at risk were accrued and 21% of the subjects had die. Analysis of Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMR) showed a strong healthy worker effect (SMR all deaths 0.69, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.65 to 0.74; n=1,010). Exposures to uranium and external γ-radiation were not significantly associated

  16. Industrial Applications of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This publication provides a detailed overview of the potential use of nuclear energy for industrial systems and/or processes which have a strong demand for process heat/steam and power, and on the mapping of nuclear power reactors proposed for various industrial applications. It describes the technical concepts for combined nuclear-industrial complexes that are being pursued in various Member States, and presents the concepts that were developed in the past to be applied in connection with some major industries. It also provides an analysis of the energy demand in various industries and outlines the potential that nuclear energy may have in major industrial applications such as process steam for oil recovery and refineries, hydrogen generation, and steel and aluminium production. The audience for this publication includes academia, industry, and government agencies.

  17. The nuclear industry in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.; Broughton, W.

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear industry in Canada comprises three identifiable groups: (1) Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), (2) electrical utilities that use nuclear power plants, (3) private engineering and manufacturing companies. At the end of World War II, AECL was charged with investigating and developing peaceful uses of atomic power. Included in the results is the Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, a peculiarly Canadian design. The AECL maintains research capability and operates as the prime nuclear steam supply system supplier. Utilities in three Canadian provinces operate nuclear power plants, New Brunswick, Quebec, and Ontario, with the majority in Ontario. From the beginning of the nuclear program in Canada, private industry has been an important partner to AECL and the utilities, filling roles as manufacturing subcontractors and as component designers. The prime objective of this paper is to illuminate the role of private industry in developing and maintaining a competitive world-class nuclear industry

  18. The nuclear industry in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degot, D.

    1981-02-01

    The French nuclear industry is organized around the following main participants: - The E.D.F., owners, industrial architects and operators of the power stations, - The C.E.A. for research and development, with its subsidiary the COGEMA, who deal with all problems involving the fuel cycle, - The Industry with FRAMATOME in charge of the manufacture of nuclear boilers, and ALSTHOM-ATLANTIQUE in charge of turbo-generator units. This paper deals with the activities covered by FRAMATOME and its industrial environment. The standardization of PWR power stations built by French industry and the possibilities of exporting PWR power stations are given a brief mention [fr

  19. Health and safety record of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, M.W.; Carruthers, E.; Button, J.C.E.

    1975-09-01

    This paper examines the claim of the nuclear industry to have an excellent safety record, in terms of health and accident records of workers in the industry. It does not consider accidents which have not resulted in harm to the workers' health. The nuclear industry is considered to include all work with ionising radiations and radioactive materials, in education, research, medicine and industry. Since 'safety' is not an absolute concept, comparisons are made with the published records of other industries, and a study is made of the performance of the nuclear industry in relation to its own safety criteria. Data are presented on the radiation exposure of nuclear workers in Europe, America, India and Australia, in relation to the internationally recommended limits, and there is some discussion of the risks involved in these limits. The death rate in parts of the nuclear industry in America, the United Kingdom, and Australia is presented and compared with the death rate for other industries in those countries, and a listing is made of deaths caused by radiation in the period 1945 to 1968. Injury rates for the US and Australian nuclear industries are also compared with the injury rates for other industries in these countries. Consideration is given to the safety record of individual components of the nuclear industry (using the wide definition of this industry given above), special attention being given to health records of uranium miners, plutonium workers and radiologists. Although there are difficulties in obtaining sufficiently detailed information of this kind it is considered that the data presented, relative to any reasonable standard, demonstrate that the nuclear industry has a safety record to be proud of. (author)

  20. A worker perspective on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigeau, T.

    2000-01-01

    The majority of the 15,000 members of the Power Workers Union (PWU) are employed in electricity production at Ontario Power Generation's nuclear generating stations and in nuclear technology research at the Chalk River Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Our members therefore have an obvious vested interest in any discussion related to their jobs. Workers in nuclear power plants have a clearly defined responsibility to ensure a safe working environment for themselves and their fellow workers. They have an overwhelming vested interest in ensuring that the plants are constructed, maintained, and operated safely. As will be detailed in the presentation to the CNS, all workers are required to learn and demonstrate knowledge of the hazards as an integral part of employment initiation and subsequent training. As their union, the PWU has a responsibility to ensure conditions of employment that not only permit workers to refuse work they perceive to be unsafe but require them to bring safety concerns forward for resolution to the satisfaction of both management and workers' representatives. The PWU has accomplished this through the development of workplace structures to ensure worker input is sought and acted on. The paper will describe the next steps required to improve workplace safety at Ontario Power Generation, which could be adapted to other facilities and workgroups. (author)

  1. The financing of nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazauran, B.

    1978-01-01

    Having first recalled the usual financing rules related to the economic activities, the author analyses the applying of those rules in the nuclear field, taking into account the specific characteristics of this industrial branch [fr

  2. Nuclear industry takes off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Plessis, A.; Stevens, R.C.B.

    1982-01-01

    For more than a decade irradiation sterilisation of medical and pharmaceutical products proved a highly successful semi-commercial operation at Pelindaba, until it made way recently for the first full-scale radiation processing industry in SA - a classic case of science transferring technology to industry

  3. U.S. nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, R.

    1979-01-01

    At present, 72 power reactors are in the condition of being able to operate in U.S., and the total installation capacity has reached 55 million kW, which is equivalent to about 9.5% of the total power generation capacity in U.S. The nuclear power stations produced 12.5% of the total electricity consumption in 1978. Especially in the north eastern part of the U.S., the nuclear power generation occupied 42% of the total power generation at the time of recent peak load, and 47 million barrels of crude oil and 517 million dollars of foreign currency were able to be saved. Moreover, 96 plants amounting to 105 million kW are under construction, and 30 plants of 35 million kW were ordered. Electric power companies, nuclear reactor makers, nuclear fuel and other related industries believe the merits of nuclear power generation and expect that it will flourish if a certain problem is solved. Especially serious problem to which the U.S. nuclear industry is facing now is the problem of uncertainty. Many orders of nuclear power plants have been canceled, and the constructions have been postponed. The capability of the U.S. nuclear industry to construct more than the required facilities, and its extent and the necessary conditions have been investigated by the Atomic Industrial Forum. The important national and international problems of atomic energy are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  4. Trends in occupational exposure within the UK civil nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    The UK civil nuclear industry was established in the 1950s and workers in the industry have received occupational radiation exposures since that time. Data on occupational exposures over this period show a reduction in annual doses. This trend was initiated by more restrictive statutory dose limitation requirements, and was achieved by greater emphasis on radiation protection methods. (Author)

  5. Industrial applications of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Celso

    2010-01-01

    Industrial applications of nuclear technology have been very diverse worldwide. This type of technology has begun to introduce in Costa Rica to evaluate and improve different industrial processes. These applications have been classified into two or three categories, according to the criteria used. Nucleonic control systems, the gamma logging and radiotracers are determined. (author) [es

  6. Radioactive wastes of Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This conference studies the radioactive waste of nuclear industry. Nine articles and presentations are exposed here; the action of the direction of nuclear installations safety, the improvement of industrial proceedings to reduce the waste volume, the packaging of radioactive waste, the safety of radioactive waste disposal and environmental impact studies, a presentation of waste coming from nuclear power plants, the new waste management policy, the international panorama of radioactive waste management, the international transport of radioactive waste, finally an economic analysis of the treatment and ultimate storage of radioactive waste. (N.C.)

  7. Russian nuclear industry exports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbatchev, A.

    2016-01-01

    Rosatom is the world leader for the export of nuclear technologies. 34 reactors of Russian technology are being built or planned worldwide. Most reactors proposed by Rosatom are third generation VVER-1200 units with an electric power output of 1200 MWe. Although the nuclear island is always built by Rosatom, the remain of the plant can be subcontracted to other enterprises and European companies are sought because they would bring a european quality touch to Russian works. One of the main assets of Rosatom is to propose an integrated offer from supplying nuclear fuel to managing nuclear waste via the turnkey building of nuclear power plants. Another important asset is the financial assistance of the Russian state through state credit or the support from Russian national banks that appears to be a decisive advantage in the international competition to win markets. We have to temper the Russian export perspectives by noting that most projects are set in countries that are prone to instabilities and that the economic crisis affecting Russia has a negative impact on its financial means. (A.C.)

  8. Special issue: the nuclear industry in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    This special issue contains papers on the following topics: French nuclear policy; nuclear energy development in Europe; nuclear diversification; Alsthom-Atlantique in the nuclear field; 1981 nuclear electricity generation; EDF siting policy; the N4 model of the 1300 MW series; Creys-Malville; the nuclear industry in Europe; pumps in the nuclear industry [fr

  9. Human capital in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    On June 7, 2010, as part of the Atomexpo 2010 exhibition, a round-table discussion took place on the topic Human capital in the nuclear industry: challenges and solutions. The article summarizes reports made during the meeting. Tatiana Kozhevnikova, deputy director general of the Rosatom Corporation, made a report about the strategy and best human resource management practices in member companies of the Corporation. She briefly described the state of the human capital in the Russian nuclear industry and outlined the key provisions of the human resource management strategy. Attendees to the round-table discussion elaborated further on the key statements of the report. The discussion has given an evidence that the Russian nuclear industry is giving an enormous importance to human resource management and is firmly intended on successfully tacking the issues associated with the provision of sufficient staff for the industry's safe and efficient development [ru

  10. Nuclear industry review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This review examines the consequences of projected excess electrical generating capacity for the maintenance of an independent nuclear power capability in Canada. Although consumption of electricity will continue to grow at rages well below historical averages, significant additions to capacity will be required in all parts of Canada in the 1990s. CANDU reactors are an attractive option for meeting load growth, particularly east of Manitoba. However, the absence of domestic orders in the 1980s may threaten the maintenance of this option. Even the most optimistic projections indicate that only one supplier of each component will remain in the nuclear business in the 1990s

  11. South Korea's nuclear fuel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    March 1990 marked a major milestone for South Korea's nuclear power program, as the country became self-sufficient in nuclear fuel fabrication. The reconversion line (UF 6 to UO 2 ) came into full operation at the Korea Nuclear Fuel Company's fabrication plant, as the last step in South Korea's program, initiated in the mid-1970s, to localize fuel fabrication. Thus, South Korea now has the capability to produce both CANDU and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. This article covers the nuclear fuel industry in South Korea-how it is structures, its current capabilities, and its outlook for the future

  12. Knowledge management for nuclear industry operating organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    The nuclear energy sector is characterized by lengthy time frames and technical excellence. Early nuclear plants were designed to operate for 40 years but their service life now frequently extends between 50 and 60 years. Decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear plants will also be spread over several years resulting in a life cycle - from cradle to grave - in excess of 100 years, which gives rise to two challenges for the nuclear industry: (1) Retention of existing skills and competencies for a period of over fifty years, particularly in countries where no new nuclear power plants are being planned; and (2) Development of new skills and competencies in the areas of decommissioning and radioactive waste management in many industrialized countries if younger workers cannot continue to be attracted to the nuclear disciplines. As many nuclear experts around the world are retiring, they are taking with them a substantial amount of knowledge and corporate memory. Typically, these retirees are individuals who can answer questions very easily and who possess tacit knowledge never before extracted from them. The loss of such employees who hold knowledge critical to either operations or safety poses a clear internal threat to the safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Therefore, the primary challenge of preserving such knowledge is to determine how best to capture tacit knowledge and transfer it to successors. These problems are exacerbated by the deregulation of energy markets around the world. The nuclear industry is now required to reduce its costs dramatically in order to compete with generators that have different technology life cycle profiles. In many countries, government funding has been dramatically reduced or has disappeared altogether while the profit margins of generators have been severely squeezed. The result has been lower electricity prices but also the loss of expertise as a result of downsizing to reduce salary costs, a loss of

  13. Transition in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olyniec, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Not long ago, nuclear energy was forecast to be the dominant force in the utility industry. An environmentally safe clean and inexpensive way to produce electricity would be welcomed by all. Civil engineering challenges on the leading edge of technology awaited the designer and constructor. As we now know, changes within the past 10 years have taken place that radically alter this outlook. Energy demand, thought to be ever increasing, was shocked by the rising costs. Plant construction delays, coupled with ever increasing regulatory requirements and higher interest rates, fueled the spiral or more cost. Economy of operation became overwhelmed by utility debt burden. Where is the nuclear utility industry now and what direction can we foresee. this symposium addresses the nuclear industry past, present, and future. The first session highlights some lessons learned from past experiences that must be applied in the future to be beneficial. Existing and future challenges are presented in the sessions on plant modifications and nuclear waste and decommissioning. The final session looks at the nuclear industry in transition from the perspectives of the different segments that make up the industry

  14. Cancer mortality among nuclear workers in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, H.; Holmstock, L.; Mieghem, E. Van; Swaen, G.M.; Wambersie, A.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate long term health effects of chronic exposure to low doses of ionising radiation, the Nuclear Research Center (SCK.CEN) in Mol set up a retrospective cohort study in 5 nuclear facilities in Belgium (SCK.CEN, Belgonucleaire, Belgoprocess, 2 Electrabel nuclear power plants). Cancer mortality among nuclear workers is studied in relation to occupational exposure to ionising radiation. This study is part of the 'International Collaborative Study on Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers', coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC/WHO), pooling data of 14 countries. During the period 1953-1994, all workers registered in one of the participating facilities were included in the study (n=7361). Data have been collected from different information sources: personnel registries (identification, occupational history), dosimetry records (e.g. annual effective dose), National Population Registry and local authorities (vital status). National Institute of Statistics (causes of death from the death certificates), National Radiation Registry/Ministry of Labour (transfer doses), questionnaires (e.g. smoking habits). Retrospective collection of data and privacy protection regulations specific to Belgium hampered the conduct of this study, causing labour intensive and time consuming procedures. Written informed consent of next-of-kin is required to obtain information from the death certificates. Before 1969 only family reported causes of death are available. Despite the above mentioned constraints, first results of Standardised Mortality Ratio (SMR) calculations are now available for SCK.CEN workers for the period 1969-1994 (n=3270, vital status ascertainment: 95%, underlying cause of death ascertainment: 80%). Available SMR's can be summarised as follows: male workers, no measurable dose (n=785): SMR all causes=75% (95%CI: 61-91), SMR all tumours=64% (95%CI: 42-93), 2 leukemia deaths were observed, whereas 1 is expected, male workers, measurable

  15. Nuclear energy and the nuclear energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromova, E.; Vargoncik, D.; Sovadina, M.

    2013-01-01

    A popular interactive multimedia publication on nuclear energy in Slovak. 'Nuclear energy and energy' is a modern electronic publication that through engaging interpretation, combined with a number of interactive elements, explains the basic principles and facts of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Operation of nuclear power plants, an important part of the energy resources of developed countries, is frequently discussed topic in different social groups. Especially important is truthful knowledgeability of the general public about the benefits of technical solutions, but also on the risks and safety measures throughout the nuclear industry. According to an online survey 'Nuclear energy and energy' is the most comprehensive electronic multimedia publication worldwide, dedicated to the popularization of nuclear energy. With easy to understand texts, interactive and rich collection of accessories stock it belongs to modern educational and informational titles of the present time. The basic explanatory text of the publication is accompanied by history and the present time of all Slovak nuclear installations, including stock photos. For readers are presented the various attractions legible for the interpretation, which help them in a visual way to make a more complete picture of the concerned issue. Each chapter ends with a test pad where the readers can test their knowledge. Whole explanatory text (72 multimedia pages, 81,000 words) is accompanied by a lot of stock of graphic materials. The publication also includes 336 photos in 60 thematic photo galleries, 45 stock charts and drawings, diagrams and interactive 31 videos and 3D models.

  16. Environmental management in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, K.C.; Bhat, I.S.

    1988-01-01

    Safety of the environment is given due attention right at the design state of nuclear energy installations. Besides this engineered safety environmental protection measures are taken on (a) site selection criteria (b) waste management practices (c) prescribing dose limits for the public (d) having intensive environmental surveillance programme and (e) emergency preparedness. The paper enumerates the application of these protection measures in the environmental management to make the nuclear industry as an example to follow in the goal of environmental safety. (author)

  17. Nuclear techniques in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnette, P.

    The long term development and successful utilization of the Tongonan geothermal field for electric power generation is ultimately a function of the response of the reservoir to extensive exploitation. A field drawdown test of several years duration has been planned to test this response. A number of nuclear chemical techniques have been incorporated into this to assist in quantitatively tracing the subsurface movements of both reservoir and reinjected fluids; and to provide an early warning of changes in the physical and chemical properties of the reservoir fluids with respect to natural recharge. The programme will be implemented by Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) under contract to Philippine National Oil Company - Energy Development Corporation (PNOC-EDC). (author)

  18. Nuclear industry and radioecological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, V. G.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of XXI century is marked with increasing public concern over impact of man-made activity, including nuclear technologies, on the environment. Currently, the anthropocentric principle is applied in the course of the radioecological safety guaranteeing for the environment, which postulates that human protectability serves as guarantee of the environmental one. However, this principle correctness is called in question recently. The ecocentric principle is proposed as an alternative doctrine, defining balance between human importance and that of any other elements of biota. The system recommended isn't intended for the regulatory standards development yet, because of substantial gaps in scientific knowledge. Nevertheless, renunciation of the anthropocentric principle can result in unwarranted tightened regulatory basis, decreasing of nuclear industry evolution rates, and, consequently, breaching of societal and economical priorities. It is obvious that for the safety guaranteeing, nuclear industry shouldn't stand out against a background of other fields of human activity involved hazard factors. Therefore, new conceptions applying within the regulatory system is to be weighted and exclude formal using of discussion theses. More than semi-centennial experience of the anthropocentric approach applying serves as an evidence of safe protection of ecosystems against radiation exposure that ensures safe ecological development of nuclear power industry and other fields of nuclear technologies application. (author)

  19. Study of dosimetry errors in the framework of a concerted international study about the risk of cancer in nuclear industry workers. Study of the errors made on dose estimations of 100 to 3000 keV photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry Chef, I.

    2000-01-01

    Ionizing radiations are uncontested factors of cancer risk and the radioprotection standards are defined on the basis of epidemiological studies of persons exposed to high doses of radiations (atomic bombs and therapeutic medical exposures). An epidemiological study of cancer risk has been carried out on nuclear industry workers from 17 countries in order to check these standards and to directly evaluate the risk linked with long duration exposures to low doses. The techniques used to measure the workers' doses have changed with time and these evolutions have been different in the different countries considered. The study of dosimetry errors aims at estimating the compatibility of the doses with respect to the periods of time and to the countries, and at quantifying the errors that could have disturbed the dose measurements during the first years and their consideration in the risk estimation. A compilation of the information available about dosimetry in the participating countries has been performed and the main sources of errors have been identified. Experiments have been carried out to test the response of the dosimeters used and to evaluate the conditions of exposure inside the companies. The biases and uncertainties have been estimated per company and per period of time and the most important correspond to the oldest measurements performed. This study contributes also to improve the knowledge of the working conditions and of the preciseness of dose estimations. (J.S.)

  20. Radiation safety in industrial applications of nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, E.S.

    1981-01-01

    The hazards associated with the use of industrial equipment is one of the undesirable by-products of advanced technology. The use of nuclear techniques is a good example. Due to the usefulness of such techniques, one may accept the risks involved if they can be brought down to manageable levels. Most of the nuclear techniques in use in industries in Malaysia require only minimal safety precautions as they make use of only small amounts of radioactive material. However, some large sources are also being used and safety precautions have to be strictly enforced. The management plays a critical role in these industries. The requirements for radiation safety include the monitoring of workers and work areas, the medical surveillance of workers and the provision of barriers and other safety precautions. The management should also look to the training of the workers and be prepared for any emergencies that may arise. (author)

  1. Radiation safety in industrial applications of nuclear techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, E S [Ministry of Health, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    1981-01-01

    The hazards associated with the use of industrial equipment is one of the undesirable by-products of advanced technology. The use of nuclear techniques is a good example. Due to the usefulness of such techniques, one may accept the risks involved if they can be brought down to manageable levels. Most of the nuclear techniques in use in industries in Malaysia require only minimal safety precautions as they make use of only small amounts of radioactive material. However, some large sources are also being used and safety precautions have to be strictly enforced. The management plays a critical role in these industries. The requirements for radiation safety include the monitoring of workers and work areas, the medical surveillance of workers and the provision of barriers and other safety precautions. The management should also look to the training of the workers and be prepared for any emergencies that may arise.

  2. The UK nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, J. G.

    1995-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, nuclear power plants are operated by three companies: Nuclear Electric (NE), Scottish Nuclear (SN), and British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL). The state-operated power industry was privatized in 1989 with the exception of nuclear power generation activities, which were made part of the newly founded (state-owned) NE and SN. At the same time, a moratorium on the construction of new nuclear power plants was agreed. Only Sizewell B, the first plant in the UK to be equipped with a pressurized water reactor, was to be completed. That unit was first synchronized with the power grid on February 14, 1995. Another decision in 1989 provided for a review to be conducted in 1994 of the future of the peaceful uses of nuclear power in the country. The results of the review were presented by the government in a white paper on May 9, 1995. Accordingly, NE and SN will be merged and privatized in 1996; the headquarters of the new holding company will be in Scotland. The review does not foresee the construction of more nuclear power plants. However, NE hopes to gain a competitive edge over other sources of primary energy as a result of this privatization, and advocates construction of a dual-unit plant identical with Sizewell B so as to avoid recurrent design and development costs. Outside the UK, the company plans to act jointly with the reactor vendor, Westinghouse, especially in the Pacific region; a bid submitted by the consortium has been shortisted by the future operator of the Lungmen nuclear power plant project in Taiwan. In upgrading the safety of nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe, the new company will be able to work through existing contacts of SN. (orig.) [de

  3. Computer systems and nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nkaoua, Th.; Poizat, F.; Augueres, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    This article deals with computer systems in nuclear industry. In most nuclear facilities it is necessary to handle a great deal of data and of actions in order to help plant operator to drive, to control physical processes and to assure the safety. The designing of reactors requires reliable computer codes able to simulate neutronic or mechanical or thermo-hydraulic behaviours. Calculations and simulations play an important role in safety analysis. In each of these domains, computer systems have progressively appeared as efficient tools to challenge and master complexity. (A.C.)

  4. Nuclear process steam for industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddon, W.A.

    1981-11-01

    A joint industrial survey funded by the Bruce County Council, the Ontario Energy Corporation and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited was carried out with the cooperation of Ontario Hydro and the Ontario Ministry of Industry and Tourism. Its objective was to identify and assess the future needs and interest of energy-intensive industries in an Industrial Energy Park adjacent to the Bruce Nuclear Power Development. The Energy Park would capitalize on the infrastructure of the existing CANDU reactors and Ontario Hydro's proven and unique capability to produce steam, as well as electricity, at a cost currently about half that from a comparable coal-fired station. Four industries with an integrated steam demand of some 1 x 10 6 lb/h were found to be prepared to consider seriously the use of nuclear steam. Their combined plants would involve a capital investment of over $200 million and provide jobs for 350-400 people. The high costs of transportation and the lack of docking facilities were considered to be the major drawbacks of the Bruce location. An indication of steam prices would be required for an over-all economic assessment

  5. Industry and Happiness. Democracy and Responsibility: Female Workers Utopian Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsén, Peter; Nielsen, Birger Steen; Nielsen, Kurt Aagaard

    2000-01-01

    Abstract An action research project, 'Industry and Happiness', with female workers from the danish fishing industry is presented and discussed. Future creating workshops and socalled research workshops were central. The aim was to develop ideas and concrete perspectives for a democratization...... in (danish) industrial work. The unusual experiences include problems as well as innovation. Reflections are made on the central concept of 'social imagination'...

  6. [Appraisal of occupational stressor in petrochemical industry workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-ping; Tian, Hong-er; Huang, Tong; Li, Zhi-yuan; Hu, Ke-ming; Ge, Xi-yong; Jin, Lei; Gao, Qi; Zhang, Jing-jing; Wang, Yu; Liu, Wen-he

    2009-12-01

    To discuss the origin of occupational stress among petrochemical industry workers and to access the main occupational stressors that impact job satisfaction and mental health of petrochemical industry workers. A survey on occupational stressor was carried out by Occupational Stress Indicator (OSI) in 532 petrochemical industry workers (345 chemical and 187 logistic workers). The environment in workplace of chemical group was worse than that of contrast. The chemical workers had less control over job and they experienced more hazards, monotonous as well as role stressors than the logistic group. The scores of job satisfaction and mental health of chemical group (36.867 +/- 0.656, 43.734 +/- 0.542, respectively) were higher than that of contrast (40.321 +/- 0.901, 46.714 +/- 0.745, respectively) (P job satisfaction and mental health with different levels.

  7. Mobile robotics application in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.L.; White, J.R. [REMOTEC, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Mobile robots have been developed to perform hazardous operations in place of human workers. Applications include nuclear plant inspection/maintenance, decontamination and decommissioning police/military explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), hostage/terrorist negotiations and fire fighting. Nuclear facilities have proven that robotic applications can be cost-effective solutions to reducing personnel exposure and plant downtime. The first applications of mobile robots in the nuclear industry began in the early 1980`s, with the first vehicles being one of a kind machines or adaptations of commercial EOD robots. These activities included efforts by numerous commercial companies, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, EPRI, and several national laboratories. Some of these efforts were driven by the recovery and cleanup activities at TMI which demonstrated the potential and need for a remote means of performing surveillance and maintenance tasks in nuclear plants. The use of these machines is now becoming commonplace in nuclear facilities throughout the world. The hardware maturity and the confidence of the users has progressed to the point where the applications of mobile robots is not longer considered a novelty. These machines are being used in applications where the result is to help achieve more aggressive goals for personnel radiation exposure and plant availability, perform tasks more efficiently, and allow plant operators to retrieve information from areas previously considered inaccessible. Typical examples include surveillance in high radiation areas (during operation and outage activities), radiation surveys, waste handling, and decontamination evolutions. This paper will discuss this evolution including specific applications experiences, examples of currently available technology, and the benefits derived from the use of mobile robotic vehicles in commercial nuclear power facilities.

  8. Mobile robotics application in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.L.; White, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Mobile robots have been developed to perform hazardous operations in place of human workers. Applications include nuclear plant inspection/maintenance, decontamination and decommissioning police/military explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), hostage/terrorist negotiations and fire fighting. Nuclear facilities have proven that robotic applications can be cost-effective solutions to reducing personnel exposure and plant downtime. The first applications of mobile robots in the nuclear industry began in the early 1980's, with the first vehicles being one of a kind machines or adaptations of commercial EOD robots. These activities included efforts by numerous commercial companies, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, EPRI, and several national laboratories. Some of these efforts were driven by the recovery and cleanup activities at TMI which demonstrated the potential and need for a remote means of performing surveillance and maintenance tasks in nuclear plants. The use of these machines is now becoming commonplace in nuclear facilities throughout the world. The hardware maturity and the confidence of the users has progressed to the point where the applications of mobile robots is not longer considered a novelty. These machines are being used in applications where the result is to help achieve more aggressive goals for personnel radiation exposure and plant availability, perform tasks more efficiently, and allow plant operators to retrieve information from areas previously considered inaccessible. Typical examples include surveillance in high radiation areas (during operation and outage activities), radiation surveys, waste handling, and decontamination evolutions. This paper will discuss this evolution including specific applications experiences, examples of currently available technology, and the benefits derived from the use of mobile robotic vehicles in commercial nuclear power facilities

  9. The political economy of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, J.

    1981-01-01

    The changing international context, in particular declining estimates of nuclear capacity and a depression in the nuclear reactor market will influence prospects for a nuclear industry in Australia. Effects of the opposition by trade unions and community groups to uranium mining are discussed. The relationship between political decisions and the economics of the nuclear power industry is stressed

  10. Predictors of Hearing Protection Use Among Industrial Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantranont, Kunlayanee; Codchanak, Nuntanat

    2017-08-01

    Promoting the use of hearing protection devices (HPDs) can prevent noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among workers who are exposed to excessive noise. In the present study, the authors examine factors that may explain HPD use among industrial workers from 15 manufacturing plants in Thailand. Participants consisted of 268 randomly selected workers exposed to harmful noise levels for which routine HPD use was required. Logistic regression analysis of study variables revealed the most powerful predictors of HPD use were perceived hearing status ( b = 0.66, p workers to use HPDs regularly.

  11. Corrosion management in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion is a major degradation mechanism of metals and alloys which significantly affects the global economy with an average loss of 3.5% of GDP of several countries in many important industrial sectors including chemical, petrochemical, power, oil, refinery, fertilizer etc. The demand for higher efficiency and achieving name plate capacity, in addition to ever increasing temperatures, pressures and complexities in equipment geometry of industrial processes, necessitate utmost care in adopting appropriate corrosion management strategies in selecting, designing, fabricating and utilising various materials and coatings for engineering applications in industries. Corrosion control and prevention is an important focus area as the savings achieved from practicing corrosion control and prevention would bring significant benefits to the industry. Towards this, advanced corrosion management strategies starting from design, manufacturing, operation, maintenance, in-service inspection and online monitoring are essential. At the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR) strategic corrosion management efforts have been pursued in order to provide solutions to practical problems emerging in the plants, in addition to innovative efforts to provide insight into mechanism and understanding of corrosion of various engineering materials and coatings. In this presentation the author highlights how the nuclear industry benefited from the practical approach to successful corrosion management, particularly with respect to fast breeder reactor programme involving both reactor and associated reprocessing plants. (author)

  12. Nuclear liability insurance: the Price-Anderson reparations system and the claims experience of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrone, J.

    1983-01-01

    The manner in which the Price-Anderson Law operates to provide reparations is reviewed, and the changes made in the law by Congress in 1975 are outlined. Nuclear liability insurers' response to the Three Mile Island accident is described, including emergency assistance funds advanced to qualified evacuees and the claims and litigations that followed. Other nuclear liability claims that have been asserted are described as being brought chiefly by onsite workers. Good health physics protection of workers is acknowledged, but the need to improve record keeping for transient workers is stressed. The nuclear industry is urged to implement a more effective record-keeping program for such workers

  13. Epidemiological studies of radiation workers in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Satoshi; Semba, Tsuyoshi; Ishida, Kenji; Takagi, Syunji; Igari, Takafumi

    2017-01-01

    Regarding workers at nuclear facilities, this paper described INWORKS epidemiological research published in 2015, cooperative cohort epidemiological research of IARC 15 countries 10 years before that (15-country study), and the flow of radiation epidemiological research in the period from 15-country study to INWORKS. INWORKS is a retrospective cohort study to investigate the correlation between mortality due to solid cancer, blood cancer, and cardiovascular diseases in workers in three countries of France / the U.K. / the U.S. and low dose exposure through long-term photon external exposure. It obtained the data showing the statistical significance of increased cancer death rate. However, from the subjects of the analysis, no significant evaluation was made on neutron exposure and internal exposure. Statistically significant cancer mortality was confirmed in 15-country study at low dose, low dose rate, and prolonged exposure, but significant cancer mortality rate could not be confirmed excluding Canadian data, which had problems in dose evaluation. In the epidemiological studies of cancer mortality rates of radiation workers in nuclear power industries performed in France / the U.K. / the U.S. in the period ranging from 15-country study to INWORKS, significant difference was not recognized between cancer death rate and excessive relative risk (ERR) compared with LSS epidemiological research studies that handled acute exposure. Several tasks are still remaining. (A.O.)

  14. Capitalizing the contribution of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnadieu, G.

    1984-01-01

    The main contributions of the French nuclear industry to the country, and ways to make the most of them are presented. The advantages acquired include the nuclear power stations built; mastering of the combustion cycle; a powerful, well structured nuclear construction industry; and a nuclear-industrial complex giving France an important industrial potential. It is recommended that the industrial and research effort be maintained. The proposed strategy consists of defining an electronuclear program and associated economic development program and sticking to them; promoting exports; possibly merging certain industrial capacities; and strengthening the national position and independence concerning the fuel cycle [fr

  15. Liver function in workers exposed of the cosmetics industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, T; Caciari, T; Rosati, M V; Biagi, M; De Sio, S; Andreozzi, G; Schifano, M P; Capozzella, A; Pimpinella, B; Tomei, G; Tomei, F

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess whether occupational exposure to substances used in the cosmetic factories may cause effects on the liver and blood counts in exposed workers. The study included 48 exposed workers and 86 unexposed controls. All workers included in the study underwent blood count, white blood count, total, direct and indirect bilirubin, transaminases, alkaline phosphatase and cholinesterase. The differences between the means and frequencies were compared using the Student's t-test and chi-square test with Yates correction and were considered significant when the p value was cosmetics industry had liver test values above the range. We noted a statistically significant higher prevalence of GPT (p cosmetics industry compared with the control group. The results obtained suggest that occupational exposure to low doses of substances used in the cosmetic industry is able to influence some liver parameters in occupationally exposed workers.

  16. Prevalence of bile duct cancer among printing industry workers in comparison with other industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Etsuji; Kikuchi, Kiyotaka; Endo, Ginji

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the risk of developing bile duct cancer among workers in the other printing industry in comparison with workers in all industries in general. Prevalence of bile duct cancer was compared between workers in the printing industry and age-standardized controls in all other industries using the claims database of the Japan Health Insurance Association, which insures workers of small-medium sized employers of all industries. Young (aged 30-49) male workers in the printing industry showed an elevated but insignificant standardized prevalence rate ratio (SPRR) for bile duct cancer in comparison with workers in all other industries (SPRR: 1.78; 95%CI: 0.63-5.00). The risk was higher for intrahepatic bile duct cancer but remained insignificant (SPRR: 3.03; 95%CI: 0.52-17.56). The sharply elevated risk of bile duct cancer observed among proof-printing workers of a printing factory in Osaka may not be generalizable to workers in the printing industry nationwide.

  17. Future jobs in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asquier, S.

    2017-01-01

    CEA leads research on fast reactors in the framework of Generation-4 reactors, it also brings technical support to industrial partners like EDF or AREVA for today operating reactors. Computerized simulation is strongly developed in order to get reliable computers codes able to simulate mechanical behavior of new materials or neutron transport in new reactor cores. CEA is also in charge of the dismantling and remediation of its own nuclear facilities, today about 1000 people work on the dismantling of 35 facilities. CEA is also participating in fusion research programs. This broad range of activities makes CEA an important recruiter of competencies in a lot of domains from nuclear engineering to biological impact of radiations via computer sciences. (A.C.)

  18. The nuclear industries in the European community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the nuclear industries within the European Community. The strategic importance of nuclear energy is outlined, along with the economic benefits of nuclear power. The objectives of the Community's nuclear programme are described, and include nuclear requirements in Europe, uranium supplies and management of radioactive waste. (UK)

  19. Reliability of individual doses relating to the epidemiological studies on nuclear industry workers in Japan (1). Historical changes on definition of radiation dose, historical changes on technical standards of measurement and radiation workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numakunai, Takao; Ishiguro, Hideharu; Kawada, Yasushi; Minami, Kentaro; Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko.

    1997-01-01

    Records of radiation workers collected in the Research Organization for Information of Science and Technology, concerning individual doses from 1957 to 1992 were used for epidemiological studies for obtaining the scientific information of the effect of low dose radiation. Since many changes were made on definition of radiation dose, dosimetry technology and so on during such a long time period, reliability of recorded individual doses and of their measurement should be evaluated for validation, which is the purpose of this paper. Followings were discussed and validation was made. Historical changes on standards for radiation protection: ICRP Recommendation and ICRU Report, and changes of law concerning radiation dose in Japan and of dose standards. Changes on dosimetry for radiation protection: ICRP Recommendation and working place dosimetry, trends of investigations for introduction of measured practical doses, ICRU sphere as a receptor, and introduction of measured practical doses. Characteristics of radiation field and radiation exposure: Radiation source and characteristics of radiation field; Research and development organizations for atomic power, atomic power plants, facilities for nuclear fuel, Classification of radiation works and characteristics of the exposure; BWR, PWR, GCR. Changes on the standards of individual dosemeter and on its use: method to use individual dosemeter and its installation, measurement of individual dose and Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS); Standard of the film badge for X and gamma rays, Standard of the film badge for neutron, Standard for thermoluminescence dosemeter, and changes on selection of the major apparatus and on its use. (K.H.)

  20. Industrial distributions of severe occupational injuries among workers in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Michiyo; Sithisarankul, Pornchai; Yorifuji, Takashi; Hengpraprom, Sarunya; Hiransuthikul, Narin; Doi, Hiroyuki; Takao, Soshi

    2014-01-01

    In industrializing countries, occupational safety and health have been affected by globalization. However, a lack of reliable data prevents evaluation of this situation. Therefore, we examined industrial distributions and risks of severe occupational injuries among workers in Thailand, which is one of the few industrializing countries that compiles nationwide data. Data on workers who made claims for occupational injuries from 2007 to 2009 were extracted from the Workmen's Compensation Fund records in Thailand. Among 501,334 claimants, we evaluated the industrial distributions of severe occupational injuries (i.e., permanent disability and death). We then examined the associations between industry and those injuries, using proportionate ratios (PRs) between each industrial category and the overall distribution of occupational injuries. The number of workers in manufacturing making claims for severe occupational injuries was the largest among all industrial categories (319,114/501,334 injuries), although the total number of occupational injuries recently declined. Additionally, workers in manufacturing experienced severe occupational injuries more often compared with the overall distribution of occupational injuries. The PRs (95% confidence interval) for manufacturing were 1.17 (1.14-1.20) in men and 1.33 (1.27-1.38) in women. After adjusting for individual characteristics, the results did not substantially change. Manufacturing seems to have the largest burden of occupational injuries in industrializing countries like Thailand.

  1. Projecting labor demand and worker immigration at nuclear power plant construction sites: an evaluation of methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, H.W. Jr; Schlottmann, A.M.; Schriver, W.R.

    1981-12-01

    The study evaluates methodology employed for the projection of labor demand at, and worker migration to, nuclear power plant construction sites. In addition, suggestions are offered as to how this projection methodology might be improved. The study focuses on projection methodologies which forecast either construction worker migration or labor requirements of alternative types of construction activity. Suggested methodological improvements relate both to institutional factors within the nuclear power plant construction industry, and to a better use of craft-specific data on construction worker demand/supply. In addition, the timeliness and availability of the regional occupational data required to support, or implement these suggestions are examined

  2. Basis for radiation protection of the nuclear worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guevara, F.A.

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of the standards for protection of persons who work in areas that have a potential for radiation exposure. A review is given of the units of radiation exposure and dose equivalent and of the value of the maximum permissible dose limits for occupational exposure. Federal Regulations and Regulatory Guides for radiation protection are discussed. Average occupational equivalent doses experienced in several operations typical of the United States Nuclear Industry are presented and shown to be significantly lower than the maximum permissible. The concept of maintaining radiation doses to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable is discussed and the practice of imposing engineering and administrative controls to provide effective radiation protection for the nuclear worker is described

  3. Risks associated with low level ionizing radiation (with special reference to nuclear power workers)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This document describes a project to use epidemiological studies of workers in the nuclear industry to estimate the cancer risk associated with low-dose chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. The project aims both to improve the basis for radiation risk assessment and to test the validity of currently used models for the extrapolation of radiation risk. This report focusses on the former aim, and summarizes discussions at two meetings held in June 1988. One of these was a small working group consisting mainly of epidemiologists who had carried out studies of nuclear workers; the other included nominees of the nuclear industries of eleven countries as well as epidemiologists and radiation physicists and biologists. As a result of the meetings, efforts are underway to pool existing data and a feasibility study is addressing the possibility of an international collaborative study of unstudied groups of nuclear workers

  4. Enhanced security in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frappier, G.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the security in the nuclear industry. After 9/11, Canada's nuclear regulator - the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) - determined that the entire industry (including its own organization) faced a need for significant enhancements in their approach to security.

  5. Directory of the French nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-10-01

    This directory includes data sheets on the French companies operating in the nuclear industry. It begins with an introduction containing information on the French nuclear industry: 1 - nuclear power development in France (national energy plan, history, organization, economic advantages, reactors); 2 - French operator: Electricite de France (EdF); 3 - the industry (Areva, Cogema, mining activities, uranium chemistry and enrichment, processing, recycling, engineering, services, Framatome ANP); 4 - R and D and knowledge dissemination: French atomic energy commission (CEA); 5 - nuclear safety, security, control and regulation: nuclear safety authority (ASN), general direction of nuclear safety and radioprotection (DGSNR), institute of radioprotection and nuclear safety (IRSN), radioactive wastes, ANDRA's role; 6 - associations: French atomic forum (FAF), French nuclear industry trade association (GIIN), French nuclear energy society (SFEN), French radiation protection society (SFRP). Then, the data sheets of the directory follows. (J.S.)

  6. Nuclear power industry and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivintsev, Yu.V.

    1979-01-01

    Estimated is the environmental impact of the developing nuclear power in the UK. The radiation levels of the population due to natural and artificial sources are considered. Among the natural sources singled out are the following ones: 238 U occuring in the surface layer of the earth-crust, 40 K which is the component of man muscles and which is the most important source of internal irradiation, and the cosmic radiation as well. Among the man-made radiation sources the dominant ones are X-ray diagnostics, nuclear tests and radioactive fall-out resulted from them. It is stated that nowdays the dose, caused by nuclear power industry in the UK, constitutes approximately 0.5 mrem/yr, which is considerably less than the dose variations due to residence change within the country or frequency of X-ray diagnostical examinations. The high level of the risk for the population in the NPS vicinity and for the personnel is estimated with the help of linear extrapolation of ''dose-response'' curve regarding the natural variations caused by residence variations and occupational hazard. According to the ICRP data, the risk of late effects is 10 -4 for man-rem. Considered are the existing and perspective management methods for NPS the high-level radioactive wastes in the UK as well as the equipment

  7. Nuclear power industry and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivintsev, Yu V

    1979-01-01

    Estimated is the environmental impact of the developing nuclear power in the UK. The radiation levels of the population due to natural and artificial sources are considered. Among the natural sources singled out are the following ones: /sup 238/U occuring in the surface layer of the earth-crust, /sup 40/K which is the component of man muscles and which is the most important source of internal irradiation, and the cosmic radiation as well. Among the man-made radiation sources the dominant ones are X-ray diagnostics, nuclear tests and radioactive fall-out resulted from them. It is stated that nowdays the dose, caused by nuclear power industry in the UK, constitutes approximately 0.5 mrem/y, which is considerably less than the dose variations due to residence change within the country or frequency of X-ray diagnostical examinations. The high level of the risk for the population in the NPS vicinity and for the personnel is estimated with the help of linear extrapolation of ''dose-response'' curve regarding the natural variations caused by residence variations and occupational hazard. According to the ICRP data, the risk of late effects is 10/sup -4/ for man-rem. Considered are the existing and perspective management methods for NPS the high-level radioactive wastes in the UK as well as the equipment.

  8. [Occupational digestive diseases in chemical industry workers of West Siberia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomytkina, T E; Pershin, A N

    2010-01-01

    The high incidence of chronic digestive diseases is recorded in chemical industry workers exposed to the isolated action of noxious substances. The aim of the investigation was to make a hygienic assessment of the risk for occupational digestive diseases in chemical industry workers exposed to a combination of noxious drugs. The working conditions and the prevalence of digestive diseases were studied in 4120 workers engaged in chemical and auxiliary processes. Under the isolated action of noxious substances, the workers had an average of 35% increase in the incidence of digestive diseases than unexposed ones (p 4.0-11.1 and 3.5-10.7 times higher, respectively (p < 0.05) than in the unexposed subjects.

  9. Estimation of annual radiation dose received by some industrial workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, Ajay; Chauhan, R.P.; Kumar, Sushil

    2013-01-01

    Radon and its progeny in the atmosphere, soil, ground water, oil and gas deposits contributes the largest fraction of the natural radiation dose to populations, enhanced interest exhibited in tracking its concentration is thus fundamental for radiation protection. The combustion of coal in various industrial units like thermal power plants. National fertilizer plants, paper mill etc. results in the release of some natural radioactivity to the atmosphere through formation of fly ash and bottom ash or slag. This consequent increases the radioactivity in soil, water and atmosphere around thermal power plants. Keeping this in mind the measurements of radon, thoron and their progeny concentration in the environment of some industrial units has been carried out using solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). The specially designed twin cup dosimeter used here consists two chambers of cylindrical geometry separated by a wall in the middle with each having length of 4.5 cm and radius of 3.1 cm. This dosimeter employs three SSNTDs out of which two detectors were placed in each chamber and a third one was placed on the outer surface of the dosimeter. One chamber is fitted with glass fiber filter so that radon and thoron both can diffuse into the chamber while in other chamber, a semi permeable membrane is used. The membrane mode measures the radon concentration alone as it can diffuse through the membrane but suppresses the thoron. The twin cup dosimeter also has a provision for bare mode enabling it to register tracks due to radon, thoron and their progeny in total. Therefore, using this dosimeter we can measure the individual concentration of radon, thoron, and their progeny at the same time. The annual effective doses received by the workers in some industrial units has been calculated. The results indicate some higher levels in coal handling and fly ash area of the plants. (author)

  10. Chemical sensors for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnanasekaran, K.I.

    2012-01-01

    Development of chemical sensors for detection of gases at trace levels for applications in nuclear industry will be highlighted. The sensors have to be highly sensitive, reliable and rugged with long term stability to operate in harsh industrial environment. Semiconductor and solid electrolyte based electrochemical sensors satisfy the requirements. Physico-chemical aspects underlying the development of H 2 sensors in sodium and in cover gas circuit of the Fast breeder reactors for its smooth functioning, NH 3 and H 2 S sensors for use in Heavy water production industries and NO x sensors for spent fuel reprocessing plants will be presented. Development of oxygen sensors to monitor the oxygen level in the reactor containments and sodium sensors for detection of sodium leakages will also be discussed. The talk will focus the general aspects of identification of the sensing material for the respective analyte species, development of suitable chemical route for preparing them as fine powders, the need for configuring them in thick film or thin film geometries and their performance. Pulsed laser deposition method, an elegant technique to prepare the high quality thin films of multicomponent oxides is demonstrated for preparation of nanostructured thin films of complex oxides and its use in tailoring the morphology of the complex sensing material in the desired form by optimizing the in-situ growth conditions. (author)

  11. Nasal manifestations in chromium industry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyer, R G; Kumar, Gaurav

    2003-04-01

    People working in mines, plating factories, cement industries are mainly exposed to chrome substances, IIexavalent chromium has been implicated for its toxic effect on the nasal mucosa. Hereby we present a rare study of 28 patients who attended out patient department of Otorhinolaryngology at SSG Hospital, Baroda from a nearby chromium industry. This study aims to present various nasal manifestations of toxic effects of prolonged chromium exposure.

  12. Implications of nuclear industry globalization for chinese nuclear industry: opportunities and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhifeng; Ding Qihua; Wang Zheng

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, globalization of the world nuclear industry has developed into a new phase. Chinese nuclear industry will be inevitably integrated into this trend. Globalization will bring both positive and adverse effects on Chinese nuclear industry. Facing the fierce competition, Chinese companies must rise to many challenges to enter the global nuclear market. And China need to make scientific decisions and take effective measures in various fields of nuclear industry to realized the goal of global development. (authors)

  13. Hand exposure of nuclear medicine workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, J.; Wrzesien, M.; Olszewski, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Workers of Nuclear Medicine units labelling radiopharmaceuticals with technetium 99mTc are exposed to gamma radiation. The general opinion that individual dosimetry, with the aid of personal dose meters worn on the radiopharmacists' body, reflects true exposure of that occupational group is false. The use of ring dose meters worn on the fingers does not provide a true indication of the exposure of the radiopharmacists' hands. Measurements performed in 2001 - 2005 by the Institute of Occupational Medicine, with the use of dose meters placed on radiopharmacists' fingers, revealed that the equivalent dose to the hands ranged from 5.5 mSv to 95 mSv. Mean annual dose was 29 mSv. The finger dose meter is usually worn at the base of the middle finger, even if it is the fingertips that are most exposed to the radiation. In 2004-2005, we determined the distributions of the doses to the radiopharmacists' hands. The determinations were performed during one working day. During those determinations, thermo luminescence detectors were placed at 19 locations on the left and right hands. The subjects were 13 workers of 5 nuclear medicine units. The recorded doses ranged from 0.02 to 28 mSv for the left hand, and from 0.01 to 18 mSv for the right hand. The results show that the tips of the thumb, index finger and middle finger were the most exposed areas. The chances that the skin of those three fingertips receives yearly doses in excess of the current limit of 500 mSv are fairly high. It is recommended, therefore, to use annual dose constraints for the dose recorded by the ring dose meter at the level of 100 mSv per year as a safe limit to protect workers from the risk of exceeding the limit value for the dermal exposure. Whenever the dose value approaches 100 mSv/u, where u is the number of determinations of the partial doses performed during the period of one year, steps must be undertaken to explain the reasons why such a level has been reached and suitable

  14. Manipulating meanings. [Advertising by the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, J. (University College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geography)

    Nuclear industry advertising in the United Kingdom is becoming more and more frequent, and is often controversial. The content and impact of recent campaigns are considered, especially the advertisement which portrays nuclear power as beneficial to the greenhouse effect. (author).

  15. Market competition in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, M.

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear industry provides a wide variety of specialized equipment and services to support the construction and operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). This includes the supply of NPPs themselves, the range of materials and services required in the nuclear fuel cycle, and the services and equipment needed for maintenance and upgrading. The markets to provide these have changed substantially as they have evolved from the government-led early stages of the nuclear industry to predominantly competitive, commercial markets today. (author)

  16. Industrial application of nuclear techniques in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easey, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    The applications of nuclear techniques in Australia was reviewed - the work has been to aid: mining and mineral sector, the manufacturing, chemical and petroleum industries, hydrology and sedimentology

  17. An anthropometric study of Serbian metal industry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omić, S; Brkić, V K Spasojevic; Golubović, T A; Brkić, A D; Klarin, M M

    2017-01-01

    There are recent studies using new industrial workers' anthropometric data in different countries, but for Serbia such data are not available. This study is the first anthropometric study of Serbian metal industry workers in the country, whose labor force is increasingly employed both on local and international markets. The metal industry is one of Serbia's most important economic sectors. To this end, we collected the basic static anthropometric dimensions of 122 industrial workers and used principal components analysis (PCA) to obtain multivariate anthropometric models. To confirm the results, the dimensions of an additional 50 workers were collected. The PCA methodology was also compared with the percentile method. Comparing both data samples, we found that 96% of the participants are within the tolerance ellipsoid. According to this study, multivariate modeling covers a larger extent of the intended population proportion compared to percentiles. The results of this research are useful for the designers of metal industry workstations. This information can be used in dimensioning the workplace, thus increasing job satisfaction, reducing the risk of injuries and fatalities, and consequently increasing productivity and safety.

  18. Mortality and career radiation doses for workers at a commercial nuclear power plant: feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, R.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Hrubec, Z.; Hurwitz, P.E.; Goff, T.E.; Wilson, J.

    1989-01-01

    Career radiation doses for 8,961 male workers at the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP) were determined for both utility (n = 4,960) and contractor (n = 4,001) employees. Workers were followed from the time of first employment at CCNPP (including plant construction) to the end of 1984 (mean follow-up = 5.4 y). Plant operation began in 1975. The mean duration of employment was 1.9 y at CCNPP and 3.1 y in the nuclear industry. Career radiation doses were determined from dosimetry records kept by the utility company and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). For all exposed workers, the average career dose was 21 mSv and was higher for contractor (30 mSv) than utility (13 mSv) workers. Career doses were also higher among those employed in the nuclear industry for greater than or equal to 15 y (111 mSv) and among workers classified as health physicists (56 mSv). Cumulative doses of greater than or equal to 50 mSv were received by 12% of the workers; the maximum career dose reported was 470 mSv. The availability of social security numbers for practically all employees facilitated record-linkage methods to determine mortality; 161 deaths were identified. On average the workers experienced mortality from all causes that was 15% less than that of the general population of the U.S., probably due to healthier members of the population being selected for employment. Our investigation demonstrates that historical information is available from which career doses could be constructed and that, in principle, it is feasible to conduct epidemiologic studies of nuclear power plant workers in the U.S. Although difficult, the approach taken could prove useful until such time as a comprehensive registry of U.S. radiation workers is established

  19. Aircraft industry workers in evacuation: conditions of life of evacuated plants' workers in 1941-1945

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Михаил Юрьевич Мухин

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the work of the factories in 1941-1945 in the evacuation. The author analyzes the living conditions of workers in evacuated aviation plants, their daily life, maintenance, etc. The author concludes that in the early years of the War the conditions of life of the aviation industry's workers were very difficult, and the welfare and financial situation improved in 1944, the sure sign of fracture in the Second world war.

  20. The analysis of the radiation induced cancer risks of workers of the nuclear industry - Liquidators of the accident on Chernobyl Atomic Station on the basis of modified poisson regressions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafransky, I.L.; Tukov, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of work consisted in reception of adequate estimations for additional relative risk in recalculation on 1 Sv in two dose diapason: up to 200 mSv and up to 500 mSv on the basis of materials on prevalence of malignant disease of workers of the nuclear industry - liquidators of the accident on Chernobyl Atomic Station. For this purpose methods of cohort analysis were used. This method realized on the basis of Poisson regression has been used. Estimations ERR on 1 Sv have been calculated as under the traditional scheme with use of module AMFIT (software EPICURE), and under the modified formula offered Paretzke. The received results have shown, that in some cases estimations for the risks, received on the modified formula, are more realistic, in other cases both estimations have close values. Also the lead analysis has shown no correct the procedure of carry of estimations of the risk received on one dose interval, on another a dose interval in a kind of nonlinear dependence of function of risk from a doze. As a whole, it is possible to tell, on an interval up to 200 mSv estimations of risk demand use of more complexes, than regression, models. In a range of dozes up to 500 mSv and even up to 1000 mSv the estimation of risk under the modified formula is more adequate. In a range of small doses application of the traditional approach on the basis of Linear non-threshold concept cannot be statistically justified and correct. (author)

  1. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hosokawa, Komei; Thomas, Steve; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Hazemann, Julie; Bradford, Peter A.

    2013-07-01

    Two years after the Fukushima disaster started unfolding on 11 March 2011, its impact on the global nuclear industry has become increasingly visible. Global electricity generation from nuclear plants dropped by a historic 7 percent in 2012, adding to the record drop of 4 percent in 2011. This World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2013 (WNISR) provides a global overview of the history, the current status and the trends of nuclear power programs worldwide. It looks at nuclear reactor units in operation and under construction. Annex 1 provides 40 pages of detailed country-by-country information. A specific chapter assesses the situation in potential newcomer countries. For the second time, the report looks at the credit-rating performance of some of the major nuclear companies and utilities. A more detailed chapter on the development patterns of renewable energies versus nuclear power is also included. Annex 6 provides an overview table with key data on the world nuclear industry by country. The 2013 edition of the World Nuclear Industry Status Report also includes an update on nuclear economics as well as an overview of the status, on-site and off-site, of the challenges triggered by the Fukushima disaster. However, this report's emphasis on recent post-Fukushima developments should not obscure an important fact: as previous editions (see www.WorldNuclearReport.org) detail, the world nuclear industry already faced daunting challenges long before Fukushima, just as the U.S. nuclear power industry had largely collapsed before the 1979 Three Mile Island accident. The nuclear promoters' invention that a global nuclear renaissance was flourishing until 3/11 is equally false: Fukushima only added to already grave problems, starting with poor economics. The performance of the nuclear industry over the year from July 2012 to July 2013 is summed up in this report

  2. Education, training and work experience among nuclear power plant workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, L.M.; Doggette, J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper uses a unique data set to examine the prior work experience, training, and education of skilled and technical workers in United States nuclear power plants. The data were collected in the latter half of 1977 by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) in a survey of union locals in nuclear power plants. The survey results provided substantial evidence that workers in United States nuclear power plants have a relatively high level of education, training, and skill development. Analysis of average education by age did not reveal any significant differences in years of schooling between younger and older workers. Very high rates of participation in formal training programmes were reported by all types of workers. The most common type of training programme was held on-site at the power plant and was provided by utility personnel. The majority of workers reported previous work experience related to nuclear power plant activities. Almost one-third of the workers had been directly involved in nuclear energy in a previous job, the majority of these through the United States Navy nuclear programme. However, the newer plants are hiring relatively fewer persons with previous nuclear experience. (author)

  3. Risk management of knowledge loss in nuclear industry organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-07-01

    Maintaining nuclear competencies in the nuclear industry and nuclear regulatory authorities will be one of the most critical challenges in the near future. As many nuclear experts around the world are retiring, they are taking with them a substantial amount of knowledge and corporate memory. The loss of such employees who hold knowledge critical to either operations or safety poses a clear internal threat to the safe and reliable operation of nuclear facilities. This publication is intended for senior and middle level managers of nuclear industry operating organizations and provides practical information on knowledge loss risk management. The information provided in this it is based upon the actual experiences of Member State operating organizations and is intended to increase awareness of the need to: develop a strategic approach and action plans to address the potential loss of critical knowledge and skills; provide processes and in conducting risk assessments to determine the potential for loss of critical knowledge caused by the loss of experienced workers; and enable nuclear organizations to utilize this knowledge to improve the skill and competence of new and existing workers In 2004, the IAEA published a report entitled The Nuclear Power Industry's Ageing Workforce: Transfer of Knowledge to the Next Generation (IAEA-TECDOC-1399). That report highlighted some of the knowledge management issues in Member States resulting from the large number of retiring nuclear power plant personnel who had been involved with the commissioning and initial operation of nuclear power plants. This publication complements that report by providing a practical methodology on knowledge loss risk management as one element of an overall strategic approach to workforce management which includes work force planning, recruitment, training, leadership development and knowledge retention

  4. Further activities of safety culture toward nuclear transportation industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Y.; Shimakura, D.

    2004-01-01

    On September 30, 1999, a criticality accident occurred at the uranium processing facility of the JCO Co. Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as ''JCO'') Tokai plant, located in Tokaimura, Ibaraki Prefecture. This was an unprecedented accident in Japan's history of peaceful use of nuclear power, resulting in three workers exposed to severe radiation, two of whom died, and the evacuation and enforced indoor confinement of local residents. Nuclear power suppliers must take personal responsibility for ensuring safety. In this connection, the electric power industry, heavy electric machinery manufacturers, fuel fabricators, and nuclear power research organizations gathered together to establish the Nuclear Safety Network (NSnet) in December 1999, based on the resolve to share and improve the level of the safety culture across the entire nuclear power industry and to assure that such an accident never occurs again. NSnet serves as a link between nuclear power enterprises, research organizations, and other bodies, based on the principles of equality and reciprocity. A variety of activities are pursued, such as diffusing a safety culture, implementing mutual evaluation among members, and exchanging safety-related information. Aiming to share and improve the safety culture throughout the entire nuclear power industry, NSnet thoroughly implements the principle of safety first, while at the same time making efforts to restore trust in nuclear power

  5. Further activities of safety culture toward nuclear transportation industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machida, Y.; Shimakura, D. [NSnet, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    On September 30, 1999, a criticality accident occurred at the uranium processing facility of the JCO Co. Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as ''JCO'') Tokai plant, located in Tokaimura, Ibaraki Prefecture. This was an unprecedented accident in Japan's history of peaceful use of nuclear power, resulting in three workers exposed to severe radiation, two of whom died, and the evacuation and enforced indoor confinement of local residents. Nuclear power suppliers must take personal responsibility for ensuring safety. In this connection, the electric power industry, heavy electric machinery manufacturers, fuel fabricators, and nuclear power research organizations gathered together to establish the Nuclear Safety Network (NSnet) in December 1999, based on the resolve to share and improve the level of the safety culture across the entire nuclear power industry and to assure that such an accident never occurs again. NSnet serves as a link between nuclear power enterprises, research organizations, and other bodies, based on the principles of equality and reciprocity. A variety of activities are pursued, such as diffusing a safety culture, implementing mutual evaluation among members, and exchanging safety-related information. Aiming to share and improve the safety culture throughout the entire nuclear power industry, NSnet thoroughly implements the principle of safety first, while at the same time making efforts to restore trust in nuclear power.

  6. Do workers' compensation laws protect industrial hygienists from lawsuits by injured workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, N C

    1993-11-01

    Workers' compensation laws provide injured employees with a swifter, more certain, and less litigious system of compensation than existed under the common law. Although workers' compensation is almost always an injured employee's exclusive remedy against the employer, the employee may bring a common-law tort action against a "third party" who may be liable in whole or in part for the employee's injury. This article investigates whether industrial hygienists are "third parties" and therefore subject to suit by injured employees who claim that industrial hygienists negligently caused their injuries. The author concludes that in most states, where the industrial hygienist and the injured worker are fellow employees, the industrial hygienist shares the employer's immunity from suit. As to the consultant who performs industrial hygiene services as an independent contractor, the author concludes that the employer's nondelegable duty to provide a safe workplace offers industrial hygiene consultants an argument that they share the employer's immunity from suit. Countervailing arguments, however, leave the industrial hygiene consultant vulnerable to negligence claims in many jurisdictions. There is a trend among the states to extend the employer's immunity to those who provide safety and health services to the employer.

  7. The Canadian nuclear industry - a national asset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    The economic importance of the Canadian nuclear industry in saving costs and creating jobs is expounded. The medical work of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is also extolled. The Canadian Nuclear Association urges the federal government to continue to support the industry at home, and to continue to promote nuclear exports. This report was prepared in response to the Federal Finance Minister's 'A New Direction for Canada'

  8. Quantity and quality in nuclear engineering professional skills needed by the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slember, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the challenge of work force requirements in the context of the full range of issues facing the nuclear power industry. The supply of skilled managers and workers may be a more serious problem if nuclear power fades away than if it is reborn in a new generation. An even greater concern, however, is the quality of education that the industry needs in all its future professionals. Both government and industry should be helping universities adapt their curricula to the needs of the future. This means building a closer relationship with schools that educate nuclear professionals, that is, providing adequate scholarships and funding for research and development programs, offering in-kind services, and encouraging internships and other opportunities for hands-on experience. The goal should not be just state-of-the-art engineering practices, but the broad range of knowledge, issues, and skills that will be required of the nuclear leadership of the twenty-first century

  9. Status of nuclear power industry in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadenko, I.M.; Vlasenko, M.I.

    2007-01-01

    There are five nuclear power plants and sites (NPPs) with 15 units in operation, 3 units under decommissioning and 1 drastically known as the 'Shelter' object in Ukraine. Ukraine has ambitions plans to develop nuclear industry based on own mineral, human financial resources as well as world wide international cooperation with nuclear countries

  10. The Canadian nuclear power industry. Background paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, A.

    1993-12-01

    Nuclear power, the production of electricity from uranium through nuclear fission, is by far the most prominent segment of the nuclear industry. The value of the electricity produced, $3.7 billion in Canada in 1992, far exceeds the value of any other product of the civilian nuclear industry. Power production employs many more people than any other sector, the capital investment is much greater, and nuclear power plants are much larger and more visible than uranium mining and processing facilities. They are also often located close to large population centres. This paper provides an overview of some of the enormously complex issues surrounding nuclear power. It describes the Canadian nuclear power industry, addressing i particular its performance so far and future prospects. (author). 1 tab

  11. The Canadian nuclear power industry. Background paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nixon, A [Library of Parliament, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Science and Technology Div.

    1993-12-01

    Nuclear power, the production of electricity from uranium through nuclear fission, is by far the most prominent segment of the nuclear industry. The value of the electricity produced, $3.7 billion in Canada in 1992, far exceeds the value of any other product of the civilian nuclear industry. Power production employs many more people than any other sector, the capital investment is much greater, and nuclear power plants are much larger and more visible than uranium mining and processing facilities. They are also often located close to large population centres. This paper provides an overview of some of the enormously complex issues surrounding nuclear power. It describes the Canadian nuclear power industry, addressing i particular its performance so far and future prospects. (author). 1 tab.

  12. Lead evaluation in blood of workers of batteries industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valbuena P, John J; Duarte, Martha; Marciales Clara

    2001-01-01

    In order to evaluate the occupational risk of exposure to lead of employees working in three small industries that recycle and manufacture acid lead batteries, the lead and zinc protoporphyrine (ZPP) blood content was determined. The determination was also performed on people not exposed in order to establish comparison values. Venous blood was collected in metal free heparinized glass tubes. Lead was analyzed by atomic absorption with graphite furnace and ZPP by fluorescence. According to Colombian legislation, it was found that around 31 % workers in this type of industries are in dangerous and intoxication exposure. It was also found that 91 % of workers exceed the level of 30 mg Pb/dL blood established as standard by the American Conference governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH)

  13. Questionnaire for low back pain in the garment industry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindra, Supreet; Sinha, A G K; Benjamin, A I

    2013-05-01

    Low back pain affects up to 90% of the world's population at some point in their lives. Until date no questionnaire has been designed for back pain in the garment industry workers. Therefore, the objective of this study is to design a questionnaire to determine the prevalence, risk factors, impact, health care service utilization and back pain features in the garment industry workers and gain preliminary experience of its use. The content validity and reliability of the questionnaire was established. Items showing acceptable internal consistency and moderate to high test re-test reliability were retained in the questionnaire. Items showing unacceptable internal consistency, low test re-test reliability or poor differentiation were reworded, redrafted and re-tested on the workers. It took 20 min to complete one interview schedule. Environmental factors such as the absence of the garment industry owner/supervisor or co-workers at the time of the interview and interview during leisure hours need to be standardized. Thus, final questionnaire is ready for use after necessary amendments and will be used on the larger sample size in the main study.

  14. Preliminary cost estimating for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klumpar, I.V.; Soltz, K.M.

    1985-01-01

    The nuclear industry has higher costs for personnel, equipment, construction, and engineering than conventional industry, which means that cost estimation procedures may need adjustment. The authors account for the special technical and labor requirements of the nuclear industry in making adjustments to equipment and installation cost estimations. Using illustrative examples, they show that conventional methods of preliminary cost estimation are flexible enough for application to emerging industries if their cost structure is similar to that of the process industries. If not, modifications can provide enough engineering and cost data for a statistical analysis. 9 references, 14 figures, 4 tables

  15. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony

    2004-12-01

    Fifty years ago, in September 1954, the head of the US Atomic Energy Commission stated that nuclear energy would become 'too cheap to meter': The cost to produce energy by nuclear power plants would be so low that the investment into electricity meters would not be justified. By coincidence the US prophecy came within three months of the announcement of the world's first nuclear power plant being connected to the grid in.. the then Soviet Union. In June 2004, the international nuclear industry celebrated the anniversary of the grid connection at the site of the world's first power reactor in Obninsk, Russia, under the original slogan '50 Years of Nuclear Power - The Next 50 Years'. This report aims to provide a solid basis for analysis into the prospects for the nuclear power industry. Twelve years ago, the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, WISE-Paris and Greenpeace International published the World Nuclear Industry Status Report 1992. In the current international atmosphere of revival of the nuclear revival debate - it has been a periodically recurring phenomenon for the past twenty years - two of the authors of the 1992 report, now independent consultants, have carried out an updated review of the status of the world nuclear industry. The performance of the nuclear industry over the past year is summed up in this report

  16. Nuclear energy and the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chester, K.

    1982-01-01

    In order to make a real contribution to the nuclear energy debate (is nuclear energy the limitless solution to man's energy problems or the path to man's destruction) people must be aware of the facts. The Science Reference Library (SRL) has a collection of the primary sources of information on nuclear energy - especially journals. This guideline aims to draw attention to the up-to-date literature on nuclear energy and its technology, freely available for consultation in the main Holborn reading room. After explanations of where to look for particular types of information and the SRL classification, the booklet gives lists and brief notes on the sources held. These are abstracting and indexing periodicals and periodicals. Reports, conference proceedings, patents, bibliographies, directories, year-books and buyer's guides are covered very briefly but not listed. Nuclear reactor data and organisations are also listed with brief details of each. (U.K.)

  17. Incidence and mortality by cancer among French nuclear workers of contracting companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerin, S.; Haddy, N.; Giardini, M.; Paoletti, C.; De Vathaire, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Current radiation protection standards of occupationally exposed workers are based on an extrapolation of cancer risks estimates derived from studies of the survivors of atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In order to confirm these standards, International Agency for Research Cancer coordinated a retrospective cohort study to estimate the risk of cancer death after low-level exposure to gamma-ray, in a worldwide population of 400 000 nuclear industry workers in 15 countries. Methods: The present study is part of the international study and includes about 13,000 French nuclear industry workers of 10 contracting companies and subsidiary companies. This study was restricted to workers who wore a radiation dosimeter or badge. Contracting companies were selected on the basis of at least 100 workers in activity in 1996. A retrospective cohort was constituted. For each worker, we collected data concerning personal identifiers, occupational history, exposure history, vital status and cause of death. In order to guarantee the reliability of dosimetry data, we confronted monthly doses of X and gamma rays obtained from each company with monthly doses obtained from the National Institute of Radio Protection (I.R.S.N.). The cut off date was the 31 December of 2000. An incidence study is running within this cohort. Data relatives to poly-exposures, incident cancers and other pathologies, have being collected through a questionnaire form. Results: A total of 12,690 workers were included in the cohort, 1,457 could not be identified. Among the 11,233 identified workers, 280 deaths were recorded and 36% of them were cancer. Most of the workers were men (96%) and the median age at cut off date was equal to 41 years old. Only 25% of workers were exposed seven years or more. The median cumulative dose was equal to 3.1 mSv and 25% of workers had a cumulative dose superior to 22 mSv. Conclusion: Median cumulative dose was lower than expected as

  18. The worldwide nuclear industry and its markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mons, L.

    2000-06-01

    The world nuclear industry has entered a phase of low activity since the beginning of the 90's. The opening of electricity markets to competition, the reserve of part of the public opinion with respect to nuclear energy and the competition of other power production sources explain the lack of dynamism of nuclear markets. In this context of uncertainties, the nuclear sector has started a re-structuration in depth with new strategic trends which will be decisive for the perenniality of the nuclear industry. The front-end of the fuel cycle is disturbed by production over-capacities which lead to strong tensions on prices. The veering of the German and Belgian policies has had strong impacts on the spent fuels reprocessing activity and the reactor construction activity is in decline in Europe and in the US. On the other hand, services are developing with the extension of the service life of nuclear plants and the waste management and dismantling markets are emerging. The main stakes that the occidental nuclear actors have to face today are: improving the competitiveness of nuclear industry, mastering the management of long-living radioactive wastes, proving the safeness of nuclear power, countering the arrival of Asian competitors. In front of these stakes, the nuclear actors have to take initiatives such as: concentration, vertical integration, technological innovation, communication, diversification etc.. This study examines the overall segments of the world nuclear industry. It comprises also a behaviour and strategy analysis of 13 major actors of this sector. (J.S.)

  19. NIASA: Nuclear Industry Association of South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollard, P.; Louf, P.H.; Gentet, G.; Doix, G.

    2015-01-01

    NIASA (Nuclear Industry Association of South Africa) aims at promoting the highest standards in the development and use of nuclear technologies. NIASA was founded in 2007. South-Africa has a long history in nuclear activity since the construction of the first nuclear power plant ever built on African soil was commissioned in 1984 in South-Africa (Koeberg plant equipped with two 900 MW reactors). There is also an important center for nuclear research near Pretoria that was founded in 1948 to regulate the prospecting for uranium. NECSA (South African Nuclear Energy Corporation is a state-owned public company) that manages nuclear research, operates the Safari-1 (2 MWe - commissioned in 1965) research reactor and manages the national radioactive waste center located at Vaalputs. The South African nuclear industry employs about 4000 people. (A.C.)

  20. I am decontamination officer in the nuclear industry - 'what is there behind these grates'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubout, Claude

    2010-01-01

    The author is 46 years old and has been working as a decontamination officer for about 30 years in the French nuclear industry. In this book he shares his experience and relates his different interventions in various nuclear facilities, both civil and military ones. The book is an eyewitness account, with many technical details, of an occupation practically ignored from the large public and also a tribute to all these 'invisible' workers of the nuclear industry. (J.S.)

  1. US nuclear policy and business trend of Japan's nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    As several countries in the east-Asia and middle-east area have been taking an increasing interest in the deployment of nuclear power generation, Japan's nuclear industries have promoted international business activities including the success in the bid of second nuclear power plants in Vietnam. While there are plans for more than thirty of new reactors in the US, the lifetime extension of existing aged reactors, development of non-existing natural gas and trend of greenhouse gases reduction measures have dampened these plans and probably most of new units will not start construction by 2030. This article reviewed the details of US's new nuclear power introduction, trend of recent government's policies, future perspective of nuclear power construction and business trend of Japan's nuclear industries. Japan's industries should be flexible regarding nuclear power as one option to realize low-carbon society. (T. Tanaka)

  2. Working in nuclear industry? why not?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechet, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Today 200 nuclear reactors are being built or scheduled in the world and despite this, nuclear energy in western countries seems to collapse under the weights of prejudices and false ideas. No matter what the opponents say, nuclear energy is safe and clean and is a bringer of jobs. In France nuclear industry is one of a few industrial sectors that have been spared by massive de-industrialization. Nuclear energy as a carbon-free energy, has an important role to play to mitigate climate warming by working with renewable energies to provide a reliable electric power. This future is a new future for nuclear energy as new challenges have to be overcome, for instance nuclear energy has to adapt itself to the intermittency of wind and solar energies, nuclear industry has to be innovative and has to fully appropriate numerical technologies. Nuclear industry is a promising sector that proposes interesting scientific and technical jobs and is also a vital interest for the country. (A.C.)

  3. [Occupational risks of a shoe industry from the workers' perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Fernanda Reinher da; Loro, Marli Maria; Zeitoune, Regina Célia Gollner; Kolankiewicz, Adriane Cristina Bernat; Rosanelli, Cleci Schmidt Piovesan

    2013-01-01

    This is a qualitative and descriptive study, which aimed to identify the occupational risks of a shoe industry, as well as the preventive measures taken against those risks, from the workers' perspective. The sample consisted of fifteen workers. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed according to content analysis. The ethical aspects were respected and the research was approved by the Committee of Ethics in Research of the Northwest Regional University of Rio Grande do Sul. The results showed that the workers are aware of the risks of their work process, made use of safety measures for personal protection, and the company offers safety devices, informing and performing periodical visits to the sectors, aiming to develop educational actions.

  4. Nuclear 101, a course on the nuclear sector for workers in the nuclear sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donev, J.M.K.C., E-mail: jason.donev@ucalgary.ca [Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Boreham, D.; Day, S., E-mail: boreham@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: dayse@mcmaster.ca [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada); Dranga, R.; Krasznai, J.; Matthews, R.; Whitlock, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    People who work in the nuclear science and technology community are often called upon in social situations to answer questions about the nuclear industry outside their area of direct expertise. In 2012 the Canadian Nuclear Society created 'Nuclear 101', a two-day general-level course to provide more information on the nuclear sector to people who are part of the nuclear science and technology community. This paper will discuss how Nuclear 101 aids public outreach discussions and the lessons learned after two years of operation, and will look at future directions for the course. (author)

  5. Nuclear 101, a course on the nuclear sector for workers in the nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donev, J.M.K.C.; Boreham, D.; Day, S.; Dranga, R.; Krasznai, J.; Matthews, R.; Whitlock, J.

    2014-01-01

    People who work in the nuclear science and technology community are often called upon in social situations to answer questions about the nuclear industry outside their area of direct expertise. In 2012 the Canadian Nuclear Society created 'Nuclear 101', a two-day general-level course to provide more information on the nuclear sector to people who are part of the nuclear science and technology community. This paper will discuss how Nuclear 101 aids public outreach discussions and the lessons learned after two years of operation, and will look at future directions for the course. (author)

  6. Investigation of bias in a study of nuclear shipyard workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, E.R.; Rosner, B.; Hennekens, C.; Rinsky, R.; Colton, T.

    1985-01-01

    The authors examined discrepant findings between a 1978 proportional mortality study and a 1981 cohort study of workers at the Portsmouth, New Hampshire Naval Shipyard to determine whether the healthy worker effect, selection bias, or measurement bias could explain why only the proportional mortality study found excess cancer deaths among nuclear workers. Lower mortality from noncancer causes in nuclear workers (the healthy worker effect) partly accounted for the observed elevated cancer proportional mortality. More important, however, was measurement bias which occurred in the proportional mortality study when nuclear workers who had not died of cancer were misclassified as not being nuclear workers based on information from their next of kin, thereby, creating a spurious association. Although the proportional mortality study was based on a small sample of all deaths occuring in the cohort, selection bias did not contribute materially to the discrepant results for total cancer deaths. With regard to leukemia, misclassification of occupation in the proportional mortality study and disagreement about cause of death accounted for some of the reported excess deaths. 16 references, 4 tables

  7. Atomic nanoscale technology in the nuclear industry

    CERN Document Server

    Woo, Taeho

    2011-01-01

    Developments at the nanoscale are leading to new possibilities and challenges for nuclear applications in areas ranging from medicine to international commerce to atomic power production/waste treatment. Progress in nanotech is helping the nuclear industry slash the cost of energy production. It also continues to improve application reliability and safety measures, which remain a critical concern, especially since the reactor disasters in Japan. Exploring the new wide-ranging landscape of nuclear function, Atomic Nanoscale Technology in the Nuclear Industry details the breakthroughs in nanosca

  8. Preventing Opioid Use Disorders among Fishing Industry Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Wangari Walter

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fishing industry workers are at high risk for work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs and injuries. Prescription opioids used to treat pain injuries may put these workers at increased risk for developing substance disorders. Using a Community-Based Participatory Research approach, formative research was conducted to inform the eventual development of relevant interventions to prevent and reduce opioid use disorders among fishing industry workers. Qualitative interviews (n = 21 were conducted to assess: knowledge and attitudes about opioid use disorders; features of fishing work that might affect use and/or access to treatment; and community and organizational capacity for prevention and treatment. Participants reported numerous pathways connecting commercial fishing with opioid use. The combination of high stress and physically tasking job duties requires comprehensive workplace interventions to prevent chronic pain and MSDs, in addition to tailored and culturally responsive treatment options to address opioid use disorders in this population. Public health programs must integrate workplace health and safety protection along with evidence-based primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions in order to address opioid use disorders, particularly among workers in strenuous jobs.

  9. Interesting article: cancer in children of nuclear industry employees: report on children aged under 25 years from nuclear industry family study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lallemand, J.

    1999-01-01

    This important study turns on the following of 46 107 children, whom 39 557 children of male workers and 8 883 children of female workers. Among these ones, 2 333 children were born from both parents working in nuclear industry. 111 cases of cancer whom 28 of leukemia are reported. 97% of the whole have been strictly identified. The results suggest that the incidence of malignant diseases ( leukemia and cancers) among children of parents working in nuclear industry is not different of this one observed for the entire of population. (N.C.)

  10. Nuclear industry: a young sector of excellence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varin, P.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear industry is the 3. industrial sector in France and is the good reason why the French energy mix is largely carbon-free. The medium term challenges that faces nuclear industry in this country is first to succeed the extensive refit of nuclear power plants with a view on getting the extension of their operating life and secondly to recruit the skilled staff nuclear industry needs. About 8000 jobs dispatched in the 2500 enterprises that forms the nuclear sector will be available each year up to 2020. The age pyramid shows that numerous retirements are expected in the years to come so the issue of skill and knowledge transfer is looming. 25% of recruitment will be made on the basis of work-study contracts particularly for technical jobs. Concerning recruitment, the nuclear sector is competing with other high-tech sectors like aeronautics or the automobile sector, which make things harder. The image that nuclear industry wants to promote of itself is the image of a young, modern, high-tech industry that appeared less than 50 years ago and whose main purpose is to provide a carbon-free electricity to an avid world. (A.C.)

  11. German robots: The impact of industrial robots on workers

    OpenAIRE

    Dauth, Wolfgang; Findeisen, Sebastian; Südekum, Jens; Wößner, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    We study the impact of rising robot exposure on the careers of individual manufacturing workers, and the equilibrium impact across industries and local labor markets in Germany. We find no evidence that robots cause total job losses, but they do affect the composition of aggregate employment. Every robot destroys two manufacturing jobs. This accounts for almost 23 percent of the overall decline of manufacturing employment in Germany over the period 1994-2014, roughly 275,000 jobs. But this lo...

  12. Working in the nuclear industry - Inquiry in the heart of a hazardous site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The author, who is today professor of sociology at the Aix-Marseille university (FR), has worked in the nuclear industry as a temp, as a trainee and as a subcontracting worker successively. In this book, he presents his vision from the inside of the daily work of nuclear workers. Inside teams, he has observed the behaviours, the relations between men, the ways to deal with an unsure knowledge, the conflicts which have occurred and the risks that the personnel has had to bear with. Beyond the ideological debate, and with no pro- or anti-position with respect to nuclear energy, the author presents a field report which allows to better comprehend the risk factors threatening the nuclear industry and the workers of this industry

  13. Nuclear industry chart no. 21 - France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    A fold-out chart shows the relationship between the government bodies and industrial concerns. Nuclear power plant orders under the 1970-84 programme are tabulated. A directory is included of national bodies, firms and establishments. (U.K.)

  14. Trends in risk management in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Inn Seock

    1996-01-01

    Safety management may be classified into three dimensions: risk management, accident management, and emergency management. This paper addresses the recent trends of safety management in nuclear industry, focussing on risk management and accident management

  15. Hazard and safety in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, J.

    1978-01-01

    Although the number of victims in the nuclear industry has been extremely low as compared with the number of victims in other spheres of human activity society has been willing to put up with a high number of accidents resulting in few victims per accident but refuses to accept an extremely rare accident resulting in a high number of victims. The U.S. nuclear industry is spending almost 2000 dollars for each reduction of a man x rem unit and this investment raises the ''man-life value'' in the nuclear industry to 10 million dollars as compared with 10,000 to 20,000 dollars spent in other activities (roentgen, early cancer detection, etc.). To reduce the exaggerated burden placed on the nuclear industry the safety expenditures should be spread over a maximum possible range of human activities. (B.G.)

  16. US nuclear power industry overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    The electric utilities in the United States are facing a number of challenges as deregulation proceeds. Cost control is one of these challenges that impacts directly the operators of nuclear power plants. This presentation reviews recent data on the performance of nuclear power plants and discusses technical developments to reduce operating costs, with particular reference to low-level radioactive waste issues

  17. Nuclear industry (Finance) Act 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the Act is to enable British Nuclear Fuels Limited to make borrowings backed by Government guarantees in order to finance its ten year investment programme. More specifically, the Act raises the financial limit applicable to British Nuclear Fuels Limited from pound 500 million to pound 1,000 million. (NEA) [fr

  18. Nuclear industry project audit and countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongxin; Zhang Jian

    2012-01-01

    With China's increasing use of nuclear energy, nuclear power related construction projects related to the deepening of the audit, some of the nuclear industry in construction field of the dominant issues have been more effective containment, such as inflated workload, high-set fixed standards, to improve billing unit price, which overestimate the risk calculation tools and behavior completed audit of the accounts have been able to escape his stuff. However, some nuclear industry construction field with a hidden problem because of its hidden nature, not easily found, and some even have intensified the trend. Construction funds to the country such problems caused by the loss of waste is enormous, to the breeding of corruption provided the soil is fertile, if not promptly and effectively to stop the breeding will spread. This paper on the current construction of the nuclear industry in several major areas of the hidden problems are discussed, and the angle from the audit of appropriate countermeasures. (authors)

  19. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie

    2012-07-01

    Twenty years after its first edition, World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2012 portrays an industry suffering from the cumulative impacts of the world economic crisis, the Fukushima disaster, ferocious competitors and its own planning and management difficulties. The report provides a global overview of the history, the current status and trends of nuclear power programs in the world. It looks at units in operation and under construction. Annex 1 also provides detailed country-by-country information. A specific chapter assesses the situation in potential newcomer countries. For the first time, the report looks at the credit-rating performance of some of the major nuclear companies and utilities. A more detailed chapter on the development patterns of renewable energies versus nuclear power is also included. The performance of the nuclear industry over the 18 months since the beginning of 2011 is summed up in this report

  20. Options contracts in the nuclear fuel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses options trading in the nuclear fuels industry. Although there now exists no formal options market in the nuclear industry, flexibilities, or embedded options, are actually quite common in the long-term supply contracts. The value of these flexibilities can be estimated by applying the methods used to evaluate options. The method used is the Black-Scholes Model, and it is applied to a number of examples

  1. Continuous improvement methods in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heising, Carolyn D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate management methods for improved safety in the nuclear power industry. Process improvement management, methods of business process reengineering, total quality management, and continued process improvement (KAIZEN) are explored. The anticipated advantages of extensive use of improved process oriented management methods in the nuclear industry are increased effectiveness and efficiency in virtually all tasks of plant operation and maintenance. Important spin off include increased plant safety and economy. (author). 6 refs., 1 fig

  2. Personal radiation protection in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'dshtejn, D.S.; Koshcheev, V.S.

    1983-01-01

    Specific peculiarities of organization of personal radiation protection at various nuclear industry enterprises when dealing with radioactive and other toxic substances are illuminated. Effect of heatin.g and cooling microclimate is discussed. Medical and technical requirements for personal protection means and tasks of personal protection in the field of nuclear industry are considered in short along with some peculiarities of application of different kinds of personal protection means and psychological aspects of personnel protection

  3. Proceedings of the Seminar on Environmental and Radiation Safety Aspect at Non-nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulyadi Rachmad; Muhammad Fathoni; Topo Suprihadi, PY.; Dumais, Johannes Robert; Eri Hiswara; Alatas, Zubaidah; Dahlan, Kgs.; Muhammad Isnaini

    2003-03-01

    The Seminar on Environmental and Radiation Safety Aspect at Non-nuclear Industry held on March 2003 in Jakarta. The purpose of this Seminar be able to information exchange among research workers in National Nuclear Energy Agency. The Seminar discussed about Science and Technology of Radiation Safety and Environment. There are 17 papers which have separated index. (PPIN)

  4. Malignant pleural mesothelioma risk among nuclear workers: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz-Flamant, C; Guseva Canu, I; Laurier, D

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to ionising radiation has been suggested as a causal risk factor for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Studies of patients treated by radiotherapy for primary cancers have suggested that radiation contributes to the development of secondary MPM. Here we examined the risk to nuclear workers of MPM related to exposure to low doses of occupational radiation at low dose rates. All results concerning MPM risk in published studies of nuclear workers were examined for their association with radiation exposure and potential confounders. We found 19 relevant studies. Elevated risks of pleural cancer were reported in most (15/17) of these studies. Eight reported risks higher for radiation monitored workers than for other workers. However, of 12 studies that looked at associations with ionising radiation, only one reported a significant dose-risk association. Asbestos was an important confounder in most studies. We conclude that studies of nuclear workers have not detected an association between ionising radiation exposure and MPM. Further investigations should improve the consideration of asbestos exposure at the same time as they address the risk of MPM related to occupational exposure of nuclear workers to low doses of ionising radiation at low dose rates. (review)

  5. Malignant pleural mesothelioma risk among nuclear workers: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz-Flamant, C; Guseva Canu, I; Laurier, D, E-mail: camille.metz@irsn.fr [Laboratory of Epidemiology, Institute of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2011-03-01

    Exposure to ionising radiation has been suggested as a causal risk factor for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Studies of patients treated by radiotherapy for primary cancers have suggested that radiation contributes to the development of secondary MPM. Here we examined the risk to nuclear workers of MPM related to exposure to low doses of occupational radiation at low dose rates. All results concerning MPM risk in published studies of nuclear workers were examined for their association with radiation exposure and potential confounders. We found 19 relevant studies. Elevated risks of pleural cancer were reported in most (15/17) of these studies. Eight reported risks higher for radiation monitored workers than for other workers. However, of 12 studies that looked at associations with ionising radiation, only one reported a significant dose-risk association. Asbestos was an important confounder in most studies. We conclude that studies of nuclear workers have not detected an association between ionising radiation exposure and MPM. Further investigations should improve the consideration of asbestos exposure at the same time as they address the risk of MPM related to occupational exposure of nuclear workers to low doses of ionising radiation at low dose rates. (review)

  6. Privatisation of the UK's nuclear power industry: nuclear's triple challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, W.R.I.

    1997-01-01

    At the British Nuclear Congress in December 1996, Lord Fraser of Caryllie, then UK energy minister, set out the three key issues the nuclear industry must tackle for a successful future: (1) increased competition from other energy sources, (2) a growing world market for its skills and (3) a continuing tough regulatory regime. Nuclear power, with electricity generated in the UK rising to 25%, has responded well to competition from other energy sources, and also to the further competition generated by privatisation which has already generated benefits for the public. As other countries with nuclear programmes diversify and upgrade their technology this will create new export opportunities for Britain over and above those already in existence, notably by BNFL in Japan. Other areas that Britain has to offer relate to safety improvements, notably in eastern Europe, and decommissioning, in which Magnox Electric is one of the few operators in the world with experience in decommissioning a full scale commercial reactor. The regulatory framework for the nuclear industry will continue to be as rigorous as ever, but, however the industry is structured, it should be noted that commercial success and continued safe operations are inextricably linked. The industry must operate within the framework of the development of international treaties and agreements in the nuclear field. The Government will continue to take a close interest in the safety, security and prosperity of the nuclear industry, and help Britain as a whole to be a successful and influential player in the international nuclear community. (UK)

  7. Long-Term Nuclear Industry Outlook - 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichmuth, Barbara A.; Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.

    2004-09-30

    The nuclear industry has become increasingly efficient and global in nature, but may now be poised at a crossroads between graceful decline and profound growth as a viable provider of electrical energy. Predicted population and energy-demand growth, an increased interest in global climate change, the desire to reduce the international dependence on oil as an energy source, the potential for hydrogen co-generation using nuclear power reactors, and the improved performance in the nuclear power industry have raised the prospect of a “nuclear renaissance” in which nuclear power would play an increasingly more important role in both domestic and international energy market. This report provides an assessment of the role nuclear-generated power will plan in the global energy future and explores the impact of that role on export controls.

  8. Dikkers Valves for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Most countries have adopted the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III, as the basis of their national requirements for licensing nuclear components. This Code gives clear directives for defining design requirements coupled with a controlled manufacturing system. It has always been and still is the policy of Dikkers to manufacture high-quality products. Dikkers manufacture nuclear products in accordance with this Code, Section III; indeed many features exceed these minimum requirements. At the Nuclex Exhibition in Basel, Dikkers Valves BV will exhibit its main products for use in nuclear power plants. (Auth.)

  9. Nuclear industry chart no. 20 - Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    A folding chart is presented of the Swedish nuclear industry, which shows the government bodies, companies, utilities and other groups who participate in the nuclear field. Their special interests and activities and affiliations with each other and with international organisations are indicated. (U.K.)

  10. Organization of the German nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Corporate ownership within the German nuclear industry has evolved constantly during the last decade, and recent acquisitions and mergers, reunification of the country, as well as preparation for a unified European power market, have led to many significant changes during the past two years. The country's nuclear industry continues to struggle under an increasingly anti-nuclear political environment, yet nuclear power provided more than one-third of Germany's total electricity generation in 1991. As in many countries, particularly in western Europe, many German companies involved in different facets of the nuclear industry are interrelated. Usually as a means of horizontal or vertical integration, the country's nuclear utilities own, directly or indirectly, shares in uranium mining projects; conversion, enrichment, and fabrication companies; or other utilities' nuclear power plants. The utilities own partial interests in companies in supporting industries as well, including transportation firms, waste management companies, uranium broker/traders, and nuclear equipment manufacturers. While the majority of the companies owned are German, numerous investments are made in non-German firms also

  11. Study of skin and mucous membrane disorders among workers engaged in the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and chrome plating industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Vijay Kumar; Deswal, Balbir Singh; Singh, Bachu Narayan

    2015-01-01

    Inhalation of dusts and fumes arising during the manufacture of sodium dichromate from chrome ore, chromic acid mist emitted during electroplating, and skin contact with chromate produce hazards to workers. (1) To elucidate the prevalence of skin and mucous membrane disorders among the workers engaged in the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and chrome plating industry. (2) To know the relationship of prevalence with the duration of exposure to chrome mist, dust, and fumes. A cross-sectional study was conducted among all the workers engaged in sodium dichromate manufacturing and chrome plating from several industries situated near the Delhi-Haryana border in the districts of Faridabad and Sonepat of Haryana, India from January 01, 2014 to December 31, 2014. All the workers available from the concerned industries for the study were interviewed and medically examined after obtaining their informed consent. A total of 130 workers comprising 66 workers from the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and 64 workers from the chrome plating industry were examined on a pretested schedule. Descriptive statistical methods (proportions, relative risk, and Chi-square test of significance with P value analyzed using Epi Info version 7). All the workers were found to be males and of the adult age group. Out of the total examined, 69.69% and 56.22% of the workers had disorders of the nasal mucous membrane in the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and the chrome plating industry, respectively. 42.42% and 28.22% of the workers had perforation of the nasal septum in the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and chrome plating industry, respectively. 6.06% and 3.12% workers had skin ulcers in the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and chrome plating industry, respectively. Nasal irritation and rhinorrhea were the most commonly found symptoms in both the processes. 48.48% and 90.52% of the workers were using hand gloves in the sodium dichromate manufacturing

  12. Westinghouse support for Spanish nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebollo, R.

    1999-01-01

    One of the major commitments Westinghouse has with the nuclear industry is to provide to the utilities the support necessary to have their nuclear units operating at optimum levels of availability and safety. This article outlines the organization the Energy Systems Business Unit of Westinghouse has in place to fulfill this commitment and describes the evolution of the support Westinghouse is providing to the operation o f the Spanish Nuclear Power plants. (Author)

  13. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report: 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavin, Christopher; Lenssen, Nicholas; Froggatt, Antony; Willis, John; Kondakji, Assad; Schneider, Mycle

    1992-05-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. This first WNISR Report was issued in 1992 in a joint publication with WISE-Paris, Greenpeace International and the World Watch Institute, Washington

  14. The American nuclear power industry. A handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearman, W.A.; Starr, P.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the history and current organization of the American nuclear power industry. Part I focuses on development of the industry, including the number, capacity, and type of plants in commercial operation as well as those under construction. Part II examines the safety, environmental, antitrust, and licensing issues involved in the use of nuclear power. Part III presents case studies of selected plants, such as Three Mile Island and Seabrook, to illustrate some of the issues discussed. The book also contains a listing of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission libraries and a subject index

  15. Prospects of nuclear industry in Latin American

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, S.; Consentino, J.; Eibenschuts, J.; Gasparian, A.E.; Lepecki, W.; Mueller, A.E.F.; Spitalnik, J.

    1984-01-01

    The prospects of nuclear generation in Latin America are presented. It is mentioned that prior to the implementation of a nuclear power programme a legal, organizational and industrial infrastructure has to be developed as a condition for an effetive technology transfer. It is also mentioned that by the expansion of regional cooperation, existing experience and know-how in Latin America nuclear industry, specially regarding small and medium power reactors, could become an important development factor for the whole region. (R.S.) [pt

  16. Chromosome aberrations in workers of beach sand mineral industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meenakshi, C.; Mohankumar, Mary N.

    2013-01-01

    Beach Sand Mining (BSM) is a profitable industry earning a sizable income for the country by way of foreign exchange. The Indian coast is rich in rare earths such as ilmenite, rutile, leucoxene, zircon, garnet and sillimanite, and is invariably associated with radioactive monazite. Due to the nature of the separation processes involved and the manual handling, workers in these factories are continuously being exposed to suspended particles containing naturally occurring radioactive materials. An attempt was made to estimate DNA damage using a chromosome aberration assay to monitor radiation effects in workers of BSM industries in India. The study group comprised 27 BSM workers and 20 controls. Percentage yields of dicentrics, acentric fragments and chromatid breaks observed in the control group were 0.058 ± 0.017, 0.073 ± 0.03 and 0.22 ± 0.112, respectively. Percentage yields of dicentrics + centric rings, acentric fragments and chromatid breaks observed in the BSM group were 0.029 ± 0.01 (P value 0.19), 0.24 ± 0.06 (P value 0.006) and 0.455 ± 0.06 (P value 0.0004), respectively. Elevated levels of fragments and chromatid aberrations are suggestive of low-dose radiation effects and also chemically-induced DNA damage. (authors)

  17. Nuclear industry is ready for digitalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc, B.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear industry is now embracing the digital revolution by adapting existing digital technologies concerning big data, additive manufacturing, connected objects or enhanced reality to the constraints of nuclear industry. The expected benefits will be manifold: to assure and improve the competitiveness of new reactors, to accelerate the implementation of innovations, to develop preventive maintenance, and to allow a better communication between teams working on the same project. In some big enterprises a chief digital officer has been commissioned to prioritize the introduction of digital technologies in industrial projects. (A.C.)

  18. Analysis of causes of radiation overexposures for radiation workers in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, J.M.; Massand, O.P.

    2001-01-01

    About 5500 radiation workers are monitored from industrial institutions in our country out of which 3600 radiation workers are working in industrial radiography institutions. These workers have a higher potential of receiving overexposure (equivalent dose 3 10 mSv) due to their nature of work. This paper presents analysis of overexposures and their causes for radiation workers working in industrial radiography institutions during the last seven years. (author)

  19. The nuclear industry and the young generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanti, A.

    2000-01-01

    The European Nuclear Society was founded in 1975. It is a federation of 25 nuclear societies from 24 countries-stretching from the Atlantic to the Urals and on across Russia to the Pacific. Through Russia's membership in the Pacific Nuclear Council. ENS is directly linked to that area, too. ENS comprises more than 20 000 professionals from industry, power stations, research centers and authorities, working to advance nuclear energy. ENS has three Member Societies in Australia, Israel and Morocco. Also it has collaboration agreements with the American Nuclear Society, the Argentinean Nuclear Energy Association, the Canadian and the Chinese Nuclear Societies. ENS is doing pioneering work with its Young Generation Network, standing for positive measures to recruit and educate young people as engineers, technicians and skilled staff ion the nuclear field: from school to university and in industry. The goals of the YGN are: to promote the establishment of national Young Generation networks; to promote the exchange of knowledge between older and younger generation cross-linked all over Europe; to encourage young people in nuclear technology to provide a resource for the future; to communicate nuclear issues to the public (general public, media, politicians). (N.C.)

  20. Situation of nuclear industry in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    This document is a reprint of a note published by the nuclear service of the French embassy in Japan. It evokes the present day situation of nuclear facilities in Japan, the public acceptance and its attitude in front of accidents, the national energy program, the deregulation and competitiveness of nuclear power, the carrying out of the nuclear program, the future reactors, the fast neutron reactors, the dismantling activities, the fuel enrichment and reprocessing of spent fuels, the use of MOX fuel, the off-site storage, the vitrified and radiological wastes, the geological disposal of wastes, the prospects of the nuclear program, the companies involved in the Japan nuclear industry, the French-Japanese bilateral cooperation, and the ITER project in the domain of nuclear fusion. (J.S.)

  1. Nuclear industry - challenges in chemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Sunder Rajan, N.S.; Balu, K.; Garg, R.K.; Murthy, L.G.K.; Ramani, M.P.S.; Rao, M.K.; Sadhukhan, H.K.; Venkat Raj, V.

    1978-01-01

    As chemical engineering processes and operations are closely involved in many areas of nuclear industry, the chemical engineer has a vital role to play in its growth and development. An account of the major achievements of the Indian chemical engineers in this field is given with view of impressing upon the faculty members of the Indian universities the need for taking appropriate steps to prepare chemical engineers suitable for nuclear industry. Some of the major achievements of the Indian chemical engineers in this field are : (1) separation of useful minerals from beach sand, (2) preparation of thorium nitrate of nuclear purity from monazite, (3) processing of zircon sand to obtain nuclear grade zirconium and its separation from hafnium to obtain zirconium metal sponge, (4) recovery of uranium from copper tailings, (5) economic recovery of nuclear grade uranium from low grade uranium ores found in India, (6) fuel reprocessing, (7) chemical processing of both low and high level radioactive wastes. (M.G.B.)

  2. Assurance of durable nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortescue, P [General Atomic Co.

    1976-10-01

    The problem of conservation of fuel resources resulting in a need for reactor systems with more economical fuel cycles, is discussed. Breeders and advanced converters are first considered. An examination is then made of symbiotic arrangements to form a self-sufficient power-producing complex. An illustration is given of a gas breeder-HTGR combination. The ratio of HTGR to breeder thermal power is calculated for a self-sufficient combination without provision of industry expansion, and also when allowing for industry expansion. It is shown that fuel resources can be extended and become most rapidly useful by proper portions of LWRs, fast breeders, and HTGRs.

  3. IEC ready for turnaround in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schomberg, R.; Corte, E.; Thompson, I.

    2005-01-01

    The activity of IEC Technical Committee (TC) 45 (Nuclear Instrumentation) in conditions of turnaround in nuclear industry is considered. TC 45's main task is to lay down a comprehensive strategy for itself and its two subcommittees as well as to improve the relevance of the nuclear safety standards. Subcommittee 45A develops standards that apply to the electronic and electrical functions and associated systems and equipment used in the instrumentation and control systems of nuclear energy generation facilities. Subcommittee 45B develops and issues standards covering all aspects of instrumentation associated with radiation protection including radiation detectors, radiation monitoring, dosimetry and radiology [ru

  4. Workers of the printing industry and hepatic damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancini, A; Caciari, T; Chighine, A; Gioffrè, P A; Andreozzi, G; Sacchi, L; Giubilati, R; Tomei, G; Suppi, A; Sacco, C; Tomei, F; Rosati, M V

    2014-01-01

    Typesetting industry is still the primary instrument of communication, despite the development of new technological systems. This study focuses on the analysis of the hepatic effects induced by the use of some organic solvents employed in the printing industry. We studied a group of 194 workers: 93 exposed and 101 not exposed. The level of the exposure to chemical pollutants were assessed through the environmental monitoring of blood concentrations and the analysis of airborne substances. The health survey was performed through the collection of the medical history and the use of hepatic tests, which were evaluated by calculating Mean, Standard Deviation, Student's t-test and X² test with Yates Correction, to investigate statistically significant differences in some hepatic parameters: AST, ALT, ALP, GGT, fractional and total bilirubin. The environmental data sometimes exceeded the TLV-TWA. The clinical evaluation of the hepatic parameters showed statistically significant differences as to the hematic concentrations of AST, ALT, GGT. The results we obtained support the hypothesis of a risk among the printing industrial workers attributable to the hepatotoxic solvents. This risk seems to be related to the use of a mixture of solvents, although at low doses, and the analysis of the results obtained confirms the validity of the investigation for the health screening protocol adopted in order to identify subjects and/or population at risk of hepatotoxicity.

  5. Contact dermatitis in tie and dye industry workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathur, N K; Mathur, A; Banerjee, K

    1985-01-01

    A survey of the Tie and Dye industry of Jodhpur City in India was made to investigate occupational dermatoses. 49 (16.6%) of 250 workers had incapacitating dermatitis. Skin lesions were seen mostly over the dorsa of the hands and fingers. 26 patients were patch tested with various dyes and chemicals; 14 were positive. Fast Red RC salt was the most potent sensitizer. Other dyes showing positive reactions were Orange GC salt, Bordeaux GP salt, Blue B salt, Red B base and naphthol.

  6. Cancer morbidity among workers in the telecommunications industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vågerö, D; Ahlbom, A; Olin, R; Sahlsten, S

    1985-03-01

    A retrospective cohort study of 2918 workers in the telecommunications industry in Sweden recorded the cancer morbidity for the period 1958-79. Cases of cancer were collected from the Swedish Cancer Registry for this period and information on work characteristics was collected for the entire period of employment. The total cancer morbidity was as expected. There was no excess risk of lung cancer but an excess risk of malignant melanoma of the skin was detected (SMR = 2.6, 12 cases). This excess risk was particularly associated with work environments where soldering was practised. Estimates of the SMR became larger with the assumption of a longer induction/latency period.

  7. What nuclear industry after Fukushima?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power experienced a fast growth during the 70's and 80's, but a quasi-stagnation during the 90's. Since the beginning of the 21. century, a so-called renaissance could be witnessed, fuelled by concerns about energy security of supply, volatility of oil and gas prices, fear of an incoming 'peak oil', and, last but not least, the threat of global climate change due to the anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse effect gases. Then, on March 11 2011, a monster earthquake followed by a violent tsunami triggered an accident which all but destroyed four nuclear reactors on the Fukushima-Daiichi site, on the east coast of Honshu, the main Japanese island. There was meltdown in three reactor cores, hydrogen explosions which blew off the upper structures of four reactor buildings, and massive radioactive contamination of a spread of land north-west of the site as well as radioactive releases to the ocean. This accident triggered reactions of various intensities throughout the world, awakening the fears, and questions raised 25 years before by the Chernobyl accident. But the tsunami did not make the fundamentals of the renaissance disappear. After a pause, to fully learn lessons from the accident, the renaissance is likely to start again, all the much since the 'third generation' nuclear plants would have survived unscathed the Fukushima earthquake and tsunami. (author)

  8. Commonalty initiatives in US nuclear power plants to improve radiation protection culture and worker efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, W.; Miller, D.

    2003-01-01

    Many US nuclear power plants have learned that common procedures, policies, instrumentation, tools and work practices achieve improvements to the radiation protection culture. Significant worker efficiency achievements are accomplished especially during refuelling outages. This paper discusses commonalty initiatives currently being implemented at many US Plants to address management challenges presented by deregulation of the US electric industry, reduction in the pool of outage contractors and aging of the experienced radiation worker population. The new INPO 2005 dose goals of 650 person-mSv/year for PWRs and 1200 person-mSv/yr for PWRs will require new approaches to radiation protection management to achieve these challenging goals by 2005. (authors)

  9. Training in radiation protection of workers at Electricite de France nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aye, Louis

    1980-01-01

    The safety of workers and the population is a major concern of the nuclear industry. In order to carry out its programme of PWR power plants, Electricite de France has largely developed the training in radiation protection of its personnel. Operation workers now represent some 5000 persons; they first receive a formation organized at the national level consisting in training courses, which are completed and continued on the spot. The training makes a wide use of audiovisuals; it is checked by tests and leads to better qualification. Close coordination is sought with outside competent organizations [fr

  10. Current status of personnel exposure at nuclear power plants and other medical, industrial and educational facilities in JAPAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Fumiaki

    1991-01-01

    The state of radiation exposure of the workers engaging in radiation works in Japanese nuclear power stations, the factors of the radiation exposure of the workers engaging in radiation works, the countermeasures for reducing exposure in nuclear power stations, the state of radiation exposure of doctors, the workers engaging in radiation works, researchers and others in medical, industrial, research and educational and other facilities in Japan, the factors of their radiation exposure and the countermeasures for reducing the exposure, and the comparison of the exposure in nuclear power stations with that in medical, industrial, research and educational facilities are reported. (K.I.)

  11. Corrosion issues in nuclear industry today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattant, F.; Crusset, D.; Feron, D.

    2008-01-01

    In the context of global warming, nuclear energy is a carbon-free source of power and so is a meaningful option for energy production without CO 2 emissions. Currently, there are more than 440 commercial nuclear reactors, accounting for about 15% of electric power generation in the world, and there has not been a major accident in over 20 years. The world's fleet of nuclear power plants is, on average, more than 20 years old. Even though the design life of a nuclear power plant is typically 30 or 40 years, it is quite feasible that many nuclear power plants will be able to operate for longer than this. The re-emergence of nuclear power today is founded on the present generation of nuclear reactors meeting the demands of extended service life, ensuring the cost competitiveness of nuclear power and matching enhanced safety requirements. Nuclear power plant engineers should be able to demonstrate such integrity and reliability of their system materials and components as to enable nuclear power plants to operate beyond their initial design life. Effective waste management is another challenge for sustainable nuclear energy today; more precisely, a solution is needed for the management of high-level and long-lived intermediate-level radioactive waste over the very long term. Most nuclear countries are currently gathering the data needed to assess the feasibility of a deep geological waste repository, including the prediction of the behaviour of materials over several thousands of years. The extended service life of nuclear power plants and the need for permanent disposal for nuclear waste are today's key issues in the nuclear industry. We focus here on the major role that corrosion plays in these two factors, and on the French approaches to these two issues. (authors)

  12. Future trends for electrolysers in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manifar, T.; Robinson, J.; Ozemoyah, P.; Robinson, V.; Suppiah, S.; Boniface, H.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear industry, through the application of electrolysers, can provide a solution to energy shortage with its competitive cost and can be one of the major future sources of hydrogen production with zero carbon emission. In addition, development of complementary, yet critical processes for upgrading or detritiation of the heavy water in the nuclear industry can be advanced with the application of electrolysers. Regardless of the technology, the electrolyser's development and application are facing many technical challenges including radiation and catalysis. In this paper, three main types of electrolysers are discussed along with their advantages and disadvantages. Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) electrolysers look promising for hydrogen (or its isotopes) production. For this reason, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) in collaboration with Tyne Engineering has started design and fabrication of PEM electrolysers with more than 60 Nm 3 /hr hydrogen production capacity for the application in nuclear industry. This electrolyser is being designed to withstand high concentrations of tritium. (author)

  13. Activities of nuclear human resource development in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujikura, Yonezo

    2010-01-01

    Since 2007, the JAIF (Japan Atomic Industrial Forum) had established the nuclear energy human resource development council to make analysis of the issue on nuclear human resource development. The author mainly contributed to develop its road map as a chairman of working group. Questionnaire survey to relevant parties on issues of nuclear human resource development had been conducted and the council identified the six relevant issues and ten recommendations. Both aspects for career design and skill-up program are necessary to develop nuclear human resource at each developing step and four respective central coordinating hubs should be linked to each sector participating in human resource development. (T. Tanaka)

  14. [Health problems and illness of female workers in textile industries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soonthorndhada, K

    1989-07-01

    This paper examines 3 major health-related issues: 1) existing health problems and illnesses resulting from physical environmental conditions at workplaces; 2) female workers' perception on illness and health protection; and 3) the relationship between illness and risk factors. The study area is textile factories in Bangkok and its peripheries. Data are drawn from the 1987 Survey of Occupational Health and Textile Industrial Development in Thailand: Effect on Health and Socioeconomics of Female Migrant Workers. This study shows that about 20% of female workers have ill-health problems and illness after a period of working mainly due to high levels of dust and noise, and inadequate light. These conditions are hazardous to the respiratory system (resulting in cough and chest tightness), the hearing system (pains as well as impaired and hearing loss), eye systems (irritation, reduced visual capacity) and skin allergy. Such illnesses are intensified in the long- run. The analysis of variances reveals that education, section of work, perception (particularly mask and ear plug) significantly affect these illnesses. This study concludes that health education and occupational health should be provided in factories with emphasis on health prevention and promotion.

  15. Absenteeism following a workplace intervention for older food industry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siukola, A; Virtanen, P; Huhtala, H; Nygård, C-H

    2011-12-01

    The effects of workplace interventions on sickness absence are poorly understood, in particular in ageing workers. To analyse the effects of a senior programme on sickness absence among blue-collar food industry workers of a food company in Finland. We followed up 129 employees aged 55 years or older, who participated in a senior programme (intervention group), and 229 employees of the same age from the same company who did not participate (control group). Total sickness absence days and spells of 1-3, 4-7, 8-21 and >21 days were recorded for the members of the intervention group from the year before joining the programme and for the control group starting at age 54 years. Both groups were followed for up to 6 years. The median number of sickness absence days per person-year increased significantly from baseline in both groups during the follow-up. Compared with the control group, the intervention group had increased risk for 1-3 days spells [rate ratio 1.34 (1.21-1.48)] and 4-7 days spells [rate ratio 1.23 (1.07-1.41)], but the risk for >21 days spells was decreased [rate ratio 0.68 (0.53-0.88)] after participation in the senior programme. A programme to enhance individual work well-being in ageing workers may increase short-term but reduce long-term sickness absence.

  16. The relationshipbetweenjob satisfactionwith general healthand job burnout workers inanautomotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-02-01

    Material and Method: This study was a descriptive - analytical study conducted among. 120 workers in an automobile manufacturing industry in Tehran.the samples were selected using simple sampling method. Data were collected using, job satisfaction questionnaire Barry field, GHQ-28 and self-evaluation scale questionnaire. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. . Result: In this study 95% of individuals had low job satisfaction and moderated. In addition, 73/6% significant of people were likely to burnout, and 55% were people with mental health disorders. There was Inverse relationship between job satisfaction and general health the whole item. The direct correlation between the variables of general health and burnout, and there was a significant variable. The inverse relationship between job satisfaction and burnout, there was significant. . Conclusion: Given the obvious relationship between burnout and job satisfaction with public health, industry executives need to learn and improve incentive programs to promote employment, human relations and feelings of efficacy and bring into force.

  17. Diffusion of information about the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvan, C.G.

    1983-01-01

    The diffusion of nuclear technology means a development of a large network of activities (e.g. capital goods, construction, metallurgical and chemical industries) than a path for solving energy problems. Its ties with the arms race cause specific non-proliferation problems. A close state-capital articulation emerges, which strengthens the subsumption of labour and introduces new processes of social control. Already fulfilled investments give impulse to this tendency. The Tlatelolco regime, banishing nuclear weapons from Latin America, seems to establish a pre-condition for a regional solution to the problems thus arising. But, besides the imperfect adhesion to the Treaty, technical and political reasons obstruct a regional integration of the nuclear fuel cycle. Among other things, a lack of regional integration in other industries makes nuclear expansion more dependent on extra-regional technological ties. (Author) [pt

  18. Mortality among plutonium and other workers at a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, G.S.; Voelz, G.L.; Acquavella, J.F.; Tietjen, G.L.; Reyes, M.; Brackbill, R.; Wiggs, L.

    1983-01-01

    Mortality among plutonium and other nuclear workers has been investigated to assess the effects of exposures to low levels of internal and external radiation. Standarized mortality ratios (SMRs) for white male workers employed at least two years from 1951 through 1977 were significantly lower than expected for all causes, all cancers, cancers of the respiratory system, and lung cancer. Benign neoplasms, all of which were intracranial tumors, were significantly elevated. No bone cancers were discovered and other radiogenic cancers did not differ significantly from expectation. Duration of employment and latency did not affect these results. SMRs for a subcohort of plutonium exposed workers were significantly low for all causes of deaths and all cancers. Estimates of relative risk for workers exposed to 2 or more nCi compared to unexposed workers were not significantly higher or lower than unity. These findings do not support the hypothesis of increased mortality among plutonium and other nuclear workers. The excess for benign and unspecified intracranial tumors is not consistent with previous studies on radiation induced brain tumors in terms of latency and exposure levels

  19. Big problems for Swedish nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmstroem, Anton; Runesson, Linda

    2006-01-01

    A report of the problems for Swedish nuclear industry the summer of 2006. A detailed description of the 25th of July incident at Forsmark 1 is provided. The incident was classified as level two on the INIS scale. The other Swedish nuclear plants were subject to security evaluations in the aftermath, and at Forsmark 2 similar weaknesses were found in the security system (ml)

  20. Burgundy, the exemplary success of nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugue, Didier

    2013-01-01

    This article comments the successful activity of mechanical and metallurgical industries in the French region of Burgundy in relationship with the nuclear sector. This is notably due to equipment renewal and to the continuity of the French nuclear program. Consequences are also positive for subcontracting small and medium-sized companies of the region. Collaborative action for exports is also an opportunity for the concerned companies, whether big or small

  1. The nuclear industry and its European markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This study gives an overview of the worldwide nuclear energy demand and reviews the different markets which are classified as 'mature' (uranium extraction, enrichment, conversion and reactors building), 'developing' (reprocessing, MOX fuel fabrication, maintenance and services) and 'emerging' (waste treatment and dismantling). Then, the study analyzes the evolution of demand and the answers of companies and presents the strategies and performances of nuclear industry leaders. (J.S.)

  2. The rebirth of the US nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitron, G.

    2008-01-01

    Fought during a long time by ecologists but recently rehabilitated by politicians, the US civil nuclear industry has started its comeback in the first power-consuming country of the world. Utilities and industrialists are already in action, and the first cooperation agreements with foreign groups, like EdF or Areva, have been signed. After three decades of stagnation, the US nuclear industry has to re-launch its fuel cycle activities, from the fuel enrichment to the waste management, and the recruitment of a new competent manpower is one of the main concerns. (J.S.)

  3. The nuclear industry - pollution and risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fremlin, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Unlike other power sources, the only pollution from the nuclear industry is radioactive pollution, which on average in Britain represents 0.2% of the annual dose due to natural background radiation. This 0.2% is not spread uniformly over the population and there is genuine concern about its effects where it is most concentrated. The only significant doses of radiation to the general public due to the nuclear industry are derived from the spent-fuel reprocessing plant at Sellafield, and in particular from the concentration of Caesium-134 and Caesium-137 in fish, Ruthenium-106 in edible seaweeds and plutonium in shellfish and in silt. The concern about the possible escape of high-level wastes stored at the Sellafield site is discussed, and the hazard compared with that dangerous chemicals stored at other industrial sites. The effects of pollution by the nuclear industry, based on the conventional and generally accepted view of radiation risks, add up to a few deaths per year in the 50 million population of England and Wales from an industry producing 15% of the electricity needs of those countries. When this is compared with the risk associated with other methods of electricity production, the author concludes that replacement by nuclear power of any major source of power using fossil fuel, with the possible exception of natural gas, would save lives

  4. C. The nuclear industry in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Most of the European states have made a large commitment to nuclear power. In some aspects, such as fast breeder technology and oxide fuel reprocessing, they clearly lead the rest of the world. The industry is highly competitive, and is able to win contracts over US firms, even though the products offered are basically of US designs. It is also characterised by a large degree of co-operation and dependency amongst member countries. Many developments and services are of a joint nature. To ensure growth in the industry, and reduce foreign involvement, many of the governments have bought large segments of domestic companies, often from US firms. Government agencies themselves have transformed their service departments (such as those involved in the fuel cycle business) so that they now operate under the guise of commercial enterprises. These steps have arisen principally because of the large financial commitments normally associated with nuclear power. As a result of this, and despite the recent economic depression, the nuclear industry in Europe generally appears healthy. It does not seem to be suffering to the same extent from the problems that the industry in the USA is currently facing. Even though some states are experiencing a decrease in the projected rate of growth of energy demand, expectations are that an increasing proportion of energy requirements in most European countries will be met from nuclear power. The industry, both for the construction of generating capacity and fuel cycle services, is anticipating growth and financial profit

  5. The European nuclear industry - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berke, Claus

    1994-01-01

    In his talk, the President of Foratom, Dr. Claus Berke, reviews the present state of the nuclear industry in Europe. The European nuclear park is still the largest of any region in the world. In some countries, there has been a moratorium on new construction in recent years. This has made life for the supplying industry very difficult. One positive side-effect o at has been a significant rationalisation of the industry. In the course of this the previous vertical integration within European states has given place to the creation of important new transnational structures. In his talk, Dr. Berke describes some of the most important facets of the 'Europeanisation' of the industry, both in the area of power-plants and of the nuclear fuel-cycle. He also describes the increasing cooperation between utilities and suppliers in Western Europe and the operators of nuclear power plant in Eastern Europe, which is aimed at introducing a safety culture and an institutional framework in the East as close as possible to that which exists in Western Europe. Dr. Berke concludes that, over the coming years, both economic and environmental arguments will start to reverse the present political opposition, in many European countries, to new building programmes, and that the industry is likely be in a healthier state by the end of the decade

  6. [Pulmonary disease due to asbestos in steel industry workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbriggen, Rita; Capone, Lilian

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos-related diseases are caused by the inhalation of asbestos fibers in their variety chrysotile or white asbestos. Although the ban in Argentina dates from 2003, there are numerous industries where work continues with this mineral, including iron and steel industries. It is currently known the high pathogenicity of this material, so that in many countries there are programs to monitoring the exposed workers. Here we describe the general characteristics and pulmonary manifestations in 27 patients who had worked in a very huge steel factory in South America. The diagnosis of asbestos-related diseases was made by a medical-occupational record, history of asbestos exposure, additional studies of lung function and chest images. Then the sources of exposure (occupational, domestic and environmental), exposure time and latency period were analyzed, in those patients in whom a related disease was detected. Smoking history was also taken into account. Twenty-two patients had benigns pathologies (81.4%), sixteen of them with lesions localyzed in pleura, and other six pulmonary asbestosis. The malignant pathologies occurred in five patients (18.5%), in four of them mesothelioma and in other one lung cancer. The problem of asbestos exposure has contemporary relevance. Hence the need for a surveillance program in workers exposed to asbestos in the past or currently, to detect, report, record and investigate the characteristics of these pathologies.

  7. Mortality experience among Minnesota taconite mining industry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Elizabeth M; Alexander, Bruce H; MacLehose, Richard F; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Mandel, Jeffrey H

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the mortality experience of Minnesota taconite mining industry workers. Mortality was evaluated between 1960 and 2010 in a cohort of Minnesota taconite mining workers employed by any of the seven companies in operation in 1983. Standardised mortality ratios (SMR) were estimated by comparing observed deaths in the cohort with expected frequencies in the Minnesota population. Standardised rate ratios (SRR) were estimated using an internal analysis to compare mortality by employment duration. The cohort included 31,067 workers with at least 1 year of documented employment. Among those, there were 9094 deaths, of which 949 were from lung cancer, and 30 from mesothelioma. Mortality from all causes was greater than expected in the Minnesota population (SMR=1.04, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.04). Mortality from lung cancer and mesothelioma was higher than expected with SMRs of 1.16 for lung cancer (95% CI 1.09 to 1.23) and 2.77 for mesothelioma (95% CI 1.87 to 3.96). Other elevated SMRs included those for cardiovascular disease (SMR=1.10, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.14), specifically for hypertensive heart disease (SMR=1.81, 95% CI 1.39 to 2.33) and ischemic heart disease (SMR=1.11, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.16). Results of the SRR analysis did not show variation in risk by duration of employment. This study provides evidence that taconite workers may be at increased risk for mortality from lung cancer, mesothelioma, and some cardiovascular disease. Occupational exposures during taconite mining operations may be associated with these increased risks, but non-occupational exposures may also be important contributors. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Overview of the Russian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-02-01

    In 2004, President Poutine decided to replace the atomic energy ministry (Minatom) by the federal atomic energy agency (Rosatom). Several projects were launched during the next two years which aimed at bringing back Russia to the fore front of the world leaders of nuclear energy use and nuclear technology export. In 2007, Rosatom agency was changed to a public holding company and a new company, named Atomenergoprom, was created which gathers all civil nuclear companies (AtomEnergoMash for the exploitation of power plants, Technabsexport (Tenex) specialized in enrichment or Atomstryexport in charge of export activities). Thus, Rosatom is at the head of all civilian and military nuclear companies, of all research centers, and of all nuclear and radiological safety facilities. In 2006, Russian nuclear power plants supplied 15.8% of the whole power consumption. Russia wishes to develop its nuclear program with the construction of new reactors in order to reach a nuclear electricity share of 25% from now to 2020. This paper presents first the 2007 institutional reform of the Russian atomic sector, and the three sectorial federal programmes: 1 - development of the nuclear energy industrial complex for the 2007-2010 era and up to 2015 (future power plants, nuclear fuel centers and reactor prototypes), 2 - nuclear safety and radioprotection for the 2008-2015 era (waste management, remedial actions, radiation protection), 3 - military program (confidential). Then, the paper presents: the international actions (export of Russian technology, cooperation agreements, non-proliferation), the situation of the existing nuclear park (reactors in operation, stopped, under construction and in project), the fuel cycle activities (production of natural uranium, enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste management), the nuclear R and D in Russia, and the nuclear safety authority. (J.S.)

  9. The nuclear industry in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasterstaedt, N.

    1990-01-01

    In its reference program of 1984, the Commission presented the guidelines for the objectives in the field of nuclear electricity production within the Community. In addition, the effects have been investigated which concern the realization of these objectives for all persons involved in nuclear energy: local government, utility companies and industry. The question of nuclear energy is part of the general energy policy. Therefore, the reference program of 1984 was one of the elements which has been considered up to 1995 by the Council when defining the objectives for energy economy. The guidelines of the Commission in the reference program of 1984 are still valid today. It is important, however, to check the effects of the completion of the internal market on nuclear industry. Therefore, the Commission announced in its working program of 1989 that it will revise the reference nuclear program with regard to the prospects of the European internal market. The present document fulfills this obligation. The problems of the industry for the design and construction of nuclear power plants are treated intentionally. After the Commission for Economic and Social Affairs has given its statement, the commission will publish the document officially. (orig./UA) [de

  10. Ranking French nuclear industry on international market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labbe, B.

    1987-01-01

    Based on the success of its own ambitious nuclear power station program, France has been able to export its technology to many parts of the world, providing everything from individual components to complete power stations on a turnkey basis. Industrial partners who regurarly work together have set up the necessary structures to ensure the dovetailing of their activities during joint operations on the foreign market. These structures are matched to the needs of individual clients, and can be dispensed with completely in cases where a sole supplier is involved. Not one single unit under construction has been halted and no contract cancelled after the Chernobyl accident. France, like Japan and the USSR, is pressing on with its nuclear power program. China has ordered two PWR units for Daya Bay, while Britain has decided to construct its first PWR at Sizewell. Although a number of countries have deferred decisions in this field, this has been mainly on financial grounds. The French nuclear power industry has demonstrated its mastery of the technology, which can now be placed at the disposal of countries wishing to build nuclear power units, to improve their existing nuclear capacity, to develop parts of this future-oriented industry, or to supply their power stations with advanced nuclear fuel

  11. Micronuclei Frequencies in Lymphocytes of Nuclear Malaysia Radiation Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Rodzi Ali; Aisyah Mohd Yusof; Rahimah Abdul Rahim; Juliana Mahamat Napiah; Yahaya Talib; Shafii Khamis

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the frequency of cell aberration in lymphocytes of the Nuklear Malaysia radiation workers. A total of 58 blood samples were collected from the radiation workers during their routine medical examination. The donor age range is between 23 to 58 years, 31 male and 27 female. Blood samples were cultured according to the standard protocol recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The mean micronuclei (MN) is 23.5 ± 0.9 MN/ 1000 binucleate, with the median value of 24 MN/ 1000 binucleate. The lowest number of MN was 9, and the highest was 43. There is no correlation between the number of MN in blood and yearly cumulative dose for radiation workers. The results indicate the MN expression due to small radiation exposure is almost negligible in Nuclear Malaysia radiation workers. (author)

  12. Competitiveness in Canada's nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirwald, R.

    1997-01-01

    Cameco, now a publicly traded company, mines and processes uranium. The mines are mostly in northern Saskatchewan. In 1996, Cameco increased its market share to about 15% of the western world's U 3 O 8 , and more than 20% of conversion to UF 6 . Cameco is the only commercial converter of uranium for Candu reactors. In 1996, sales were C$591 million. Net earnings last year were C$137.5 million - a fourfold increase over six years earlier - and long-term debt had been reduced to C$200 million. Cameco's position is secured by its substantial ownership position in Cigar Lake and McArthur River, the richest uranium deposits in the world. To answer questions by investors, Cameco has had to provide good public information about uranium and nuclear power

  13. Radiocontamination of agricultural workers due to nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, B.; Smelcerovic, M.; Djuric, G.; Popovic, D.

    1989-01-01

    In the radiocontamination of the environment due to nuclear accidents, agricultural workers should be considered as a critical group of population. The presented paper discusses this problem from the aspects of folder production. The values of the effective dose equivalent are estimated for different phases of the production process and certain procedures aimed to reduce the radiation risk are proposed (author)

  14. Radiocontamination of agricultural workers due to nuclear accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, B [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Beograd, (Serbia and Montenegro); Smelcerovic, M; Djuric, G; Popovic, D [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1989-07-01

    In the radiocontamination of the environment due to nuclear accidents, agricultural workers should be considered as a critical group of population. The presented paper discusses this problem from the aspects of folder production. The values of the effective dose equivalent are estimated for different phases of the production process and certain procedures aimed to reduce the radiation risk are proposed (author)

  15. Industry shutdown rates and permanent layoffs: evidence from firm-worker matched data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim P. Huynh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Firm shutdown creates a turbulent situation for workers as it leads directly to layoffs for its workers. An additional consideration is whether a firm’s shutdown within an industry creates turbulence for workers at other continuing firms. Using data drawn from the Longitudinal Worker File, a Canadian firm-worker matched employment database, we investigate the impact of industry shutdown rates on workers at continuing firm. This paper exploits variation in shutdown rates across industries and within an industry over time to explain the rate of permanent layoffs and the growth of workers’ earnings. We find an increase in industry shutdown rates increases the probability of permanent layoffs and decreases earnings growth for workers at continuing firms.

  16. National standards for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laing, W.R.; Corbin, L.T.

    1981-01-01

    Standards needs for the nuclear industry are being met by a number of voluntary organizations, such as ANS, ASTM, AWS, ASME, and IEEE. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) coordinates these activities and approves completed standards as American National Standards. ASTM has two all-nuclear committees, E-10 and C-26. A C-26 subcommittee, Test Methods, has been active in writing analytical chemistry standards for twelve years. Thirteen have been approved as ANSI standards and others are ready for ballot. Work is continuing in all areas of the nuclear fuel cycle

  17. Laser robot in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contre, M.

    1987-05-01

    Possibilities of power lasers for welding, cutting, drilling, plugging surface treatment and hard-facing are reviewed. CO 2 and Nd:YAG lasers only have adequate power for nuclear applications. Radiation effects on lasers and contamination problems are examined. Then examples of applications to nuclear industry are given: PWR fuel fabrication, oxide thickness measurement in Magnox reactors, laser cutting of a cylindrical piece of steel on the bottom of a fuel channel in a gas graphite reactor, nuclear plant dismantling and fuel reprocessing. 51 refs [fr

  18. Microprocessors applications in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethridge, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    Microprocessors in the nuclear industry, particularly at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, have been and are being utilized in a wide variety of applications ranging from data acquisition and control for basic physics research to monitoring special nuclear material in long-term storage. Microprocessor systems have been developed to support weapons diagnostics measurements during underground weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site. Multiple single-component microcomputers are now controlling the measurement and recording of nuclear reactor operating power levels. The CMOS microprocessor data-acquisition instrumentation has operated on balloon flights to monitor power plant emissions. Target chamber mirror-positioning equipment for laser fusion facilities employs microprocessors

  19. Crisis in the French nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nectoux, F.

    1991-02-01

    This report discusses the economics of the French nuclear power industry. It considers the dominant position of nuclear power in the French energy system, stresses the scale and causes of the current (1990) economic crisis and dispels the popular misconceptions on the cost efficiency of the French programme. The evidence is based on widely available French documents and articles. The report begins by looking at the background of nuclear power in France then discusses the problem of overcapacity, the technical problems and fall in load factors, generating costs and electricity prices and finally, strategic issues are considered. (UK)

  20. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie; Katsuta, Tadahiro; Ramana, M.V.; Rodriguez, Juan C.; Ruedinger, Andreas; Stienne, Agnes

    2017-09-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2017 (WNISR2017) provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. The WNISR2017 edition includes a new assessment from an equity analyst view of the financial crisis of the nuclear sector and some of its biggest industrial players. The Fukushima Status Report provides not only an update on onsite and offsite issues six years after the beginning of the catastrophe, but also the latest official and new independent cost evaluations of the disaster. Focus chapters provide in-depth analysis of France, Japan, South Korea, the United Kingdom and the United States. The Nuclear Power vs. Renewable Energy chapter provides global comparative data on investment, capacity, and generation from nuclear, wind and solar energy. Finally, Annex 1 presents a country-by-country overview of all other countries operating nuclear power plants

  1. Ion exchange in the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, J.

    1993-01-01

    Ion exchangers are used in many fields in the nuclear power industry. At nuclear power plants, organic ion exchange resins are mainly used for the removal of ionic and particulate contaminants from the primary circuit, condensate and fuel storage pond waters. Ion exchange resins are used for the solidification of low- and medium-active nuclear waste solutions. The number of applications of zeolites, and other inorganic ion exchangers, in the separation of radionuclides from nuclear waste solutions has been increasing since the 1980s. In nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, ion exchange is used for the solidification of low- and medium-active waste solutions, as well as for the partitioning of radioactive elements for further use. (Author)

  2. Nuclear relations with administrations of industry services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardez Garcia, A.

    2011-01-01

    The object of the article is to try to answer to the following question that can arise to the holder of a nuclear power station: What Administration of Industry must I myself direct to be able to support my complementary facilities of Industrial Security inside the in force legality?. The raised discussion arise between if the competent administration for the legal steps, is the Central Administration across his delegates and sub delegates of government, or is of the Territorial Services of Industry of Autonomous communities. (Author)

  3. Nuclear regulation of South African mines: An industry perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wymer, D.G.

    2001-01-01

    South African mines have become subject to a rigid and prescriptive system of nuclear regulation that has its roots in the past when South Africa embarked upon a period of nuclear development spanning the full nuclear fuel cycle, and in which the South African gold mining industry once played a major part in the supply of uranium as a low grade by-product. Radiation hazards in the mines are generally very moderate, even in the few gold mines associated with uranium by-product, and to not warrant the type of regulatory attention normally applied to nuclear installations, or even to uranium mines. The continued imposition of strict nuclear regulatory requirements has caused severe financial hardship and threatens the survival of certain mining operations, while seemingly having little or no health benefits to workers or the public. With the development of modern, comprehensive mine health and safety legislation, a more appropriate, effective, and far less costly vehicle for controlling radiation hazards in mines now exists, utilizing the resources of the Mine Health and Safety Inspectorate. This approach is now being proposed, in the drafting of new legislation, as constituting a better alternative to the nuclear regulation of mines. (author)

  4. Reviewing industrial safety in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    This document contains guidance and reference materials for Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) experts, in addition to the OSART Guidelines (TECDOC-449), for use in the review of industrial safety activities at nuclear power plants. It sets out objectives for an excellent industrial safety programme, and suggests investigations which should be made in evaluating industrial safety programmes. The attributes of an excellent industrial safety programme are listed as examples for comparison. Practical hints for reviewing industrial safety are discussed, so that the necessary information can be obtained effectively through a review of documents and records, discussions with counterparts, and field observations. There are several annexes. These deal with major features of industrial safety programmes such as safety committees, reporting and investigation systems and first aid and medical facilities. They include some examples which are considered commendable. The document should be taken into account not only when reviewing management, organization and administration but also in the review of related areas, such as maintenance and operations, so that all aspects of industrial safety in an operating nuclear power plant are covered

  5. Knowledge preservation in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents examples of knowledge loss in different areas related to attrition, retirements or layoff as well as the consequences of the loss of knowledge. The nature of the so called tacit knowledge and its role as a barrier to knowledge preservation is discussed. Strategies for knowledge preservation in the nuclear industry are presented

  6. High performance structural ceramics for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujari, Vimal K.; Faker, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A family of Saint-Gobain structural ceramic materials and products produced by its High performance Refractory Division is described. Over the last fifty years or so, Saint-Gobain has been a leader in developing non oxide ceramic based novel materials, processes and products for application in Nuclear, Chemical, Automotive, Defense and Mining industries

  7. A sign of change in industrial structure under stable growth: economic status of nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The real economical growth rate in fiscal year 1983 in Japan was 3.7 %, and the business trend showed the sign of restoration. The status of primary energy supply in Japan turned to 4.5 % increase as compared with the previous year. Petroleum increased by 3.5 %, coal by 1.6 %, and nuclear power by 11.1 %. As the result, the proportion of petroleum to total primary energy supply slightly decreased to 61 %. Electric power demand increased by 6.3 %, and the proportion of nuclear power to total generated power quantity increased to 20.4 %. As to the status of atomic energy industry in fiscal 1983, one nuclear power plant started the operation, and the construction of three nuclear power plants began. The investment for nuclear fuel cycle was enthusiastic, and the business progressed favorably. The total outlay related to atomic energy was 2.89 trillion yen, 14 % increase as compared with the previous year. The sales of mining and manufacturing industries was 1.367 trillion yen, 17 % increase. The number of workers related to atomic energy was 65,997, 2 % decrease. The mean capacity ratio of the production facilities for atomic energy products in fiscal 1983 was 66.5 %, far below the target 72 %. (Kako, I.)

  8. The human factor in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, Armand

    1998-01-01

    After having evoked the progressive reduction and stabilization of significant incidents occurring every year in French nuclear power plants, and the challenges faced by nuclear energy (loss of public confidence, loss of competitiveness), and then outlined the importance of safety to overcome these challenges, the author comments EDF's approach to the human factor. He first highlights the importance of information and communication towards the population. He briefly discusses the meaning of human factors for the nuclear industry, sometimes perceived as the contribution people to the company's safety and performance. He comments the evolution observed in the perception of human error in different industrial or technical environments and situations, and outlines what is at stake to reduce the production of faults and organize a 'hunt for latent defects'

  9. Health and Wellness Lifestyles of Private Industrial Workers in Kumasi, Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    ABASS, Ademola Olasupo; MOSES, Monday Omoniyi

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to good health and wellness lifestyles by workers is essential if industries would be maximally productive. This study examined exercise and fitness adherence, nutritional practices, tobacco smoking, alcohol and drugs use, emotional stress, safety practices and disease prevention lifestyles among industrial workers in Kumasi. 222 workers (mean age = 29.9±8.6years) sampled among ten allied industries participated in the study. Modified and revalidated questionnaire using split half t...

  10. The nuclear industry's communication efforts viewed from outside the industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuck, Moira

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the attitude towards nuclear power of a company specialised in behavioural communication, not employed exclusively by the nuclear power industry. Only one of it's clients has a nuclear interest and that is Eskom, South Africa electricity utility which runs 21 active power stations of which 13 are fossil-fueled, 2 hydro, 2 pump storage stations, 3 gas turbine stations and 1 nuclear. This company is a firm believer in the nuclear energy option for some very practical reasons and one or two abstract reasons. The practical reasons are the ones well known, the world needs ever-increasing amounts of base load energy in order to increase the quality of life. The world also needs clean energy so that the planet can be preserved beyond the next generation. The abstract reasons are perhaps 'not so often' thought about by nuclear, communication practitioners: in harnessing nuclear energy for the service of mankind humans have captured a miracle. The harnessing of nuclear energy is a mark of man's ability to think conceptually, to walk in the realms of the unseen and bring back from those realms a tool of progress. In more prosaic terms, the loss of nuclear expertise would, very simply be a retrogression of the human race. As behavioural communication specialist it s our job to find ways for our clients to speak truthfully about their endeavours to the hearts of their audience. It is not our job to (nor will we) either lie or cover up for our clients. That which is wrong is wrong and cannot be painted rightly spoken words or clever videos or ingenious advertising. In all cases our advice to our clients has been to assume that people will not argue against the greater good of humanity. And there is much about nuclear power that contributes to the greater good: of humanity. 'That is the factor that, is common to all of us in this room today and all our colleagues in the industry. W have only to tell the truth with words that our target audiences can

  11. A telerobot for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Industrial robots are not widely used in the nuclear industry. More use is made of telemanipulators, in which tasks are performed under total human control via a master-slave actuation system. AEA Technology have developed a Nuclear Engineered Advanced TEle Robot (NEATER), a telerobot which combines industrial robot technology with the skills of a human operator. It has been designed for use in radioactive decommissioning work and has a number of radiation tolerant properties. NEATER can be operated in a pure robotic mode using a standard computer controller and software. Or it can operate as a telerobot in a remote control mode via a television input. In this mode the operator controls the robot's movement by using a joystick or a simple six degrees of freedom input device. (UK)

  12. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Ayukawa, Yurika; Burnie, Shaun; Piria, Raffaele; Thomas, Steve; Hazemann, Julie; Suzuki, Tatsujiro

    2014-07-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2014 provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. A 20-page chapter on nuclear economics looks at the rapidly changing market conditions for nuclear power plants, whether operating, under construction, or in the planning stage. Reactor vendor strategies and the 'Hinkley Point C Deal' are analyzed in particular. The performance on financial markets of major utilities is documented. The WNISR2013 featured for the first time a Fukushima Status Report that triggered widespread media and analyst attention. The 2014 edition entirely updates that Fukushima chapter. The Nuclear Power vs. Renewable Energy chapter that provides comparative data on investment, capacity, and generation has been greatly extended by a section on system issues. How does nuclear power perform in systems with high renewable energy share? Is this the end of traditional baseload/ peak-load concepts? Finally, the 45-page Annex 1 provides a country-by-country overview of all 31 countries operating nuclear power plants, with extended Focus sections on China, Japan, and the United States

  13. Acceptable risks: occupational health in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    This thesis examines the risk of working in the nuclear power industry. It reviews the history of the industry, government regulatory activities, and current scientific evidence of the health effects of radiation exposure. A discussion of current controversies over reduction in exposure limits is presented along with an analysis of the issues and problems associated with determinations of acceptable workplace risks. The thesis analyzes the controversy in terms of the acceptability of risk. The question of acceptability does not lend itself to technical evaluations of risks, costs, and benefits but is a social judgment of the necessity of a particular occupation or industry in society. At issue is the level of profits foregone by reductions in risk. This document concludes that the legitimacy of decisions about acceptable risks rests on the informed participation of all interested parties, including workers, in a process of defining socially necessary production. There must be opportunities to refuse higher risk jobs without losing a livelihood and adequate compensation for workers who accept hazardous jobs for the benefit of society

  14. Socio-economic status of workers of building construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwary, Guddi; Gangopadhyay, P K; Biswas, S; Nayak, K; Chatterjee, M K; Chakraborty, D; Mukherjee, S

    2012-05-01

    Informal/unorganised sector covers 92% of the total work force in India. About 50% of the construction industrial workers belonged to informal/unorganised sector. The present study was undertaken to know the socio-economic status of construction worker and availing of the social security measures by this working group. The study covered 150 subjects with an average age of 32 years and mean duration of work was nine years. They were poorly paid with an average income of Rs. 4956/-per month. Though the literacy rate was high (79%) yet most of them were addicted to different habits like drinking alcohol, smoking bidi, tobacco chewing etc., Abusing the family members were noted in (30%) of the cases. Their regular intake of food, usually inadequate in quantity and was mainly consisted of rice, pulses, vegetables. Though most of the subjects (73%) were living in kacha houses yet the latrine facilities were available to 62% of total covered houses. Majority of them were unaware of the different social security schemes/measures. The details have been discussed here.

  15. The future of the nuclear plant industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, N.L.

    Against the background of world-wide controversy, the future of nuclear power in the United Kingdom is discussed. The various forecasts of electricity demand are considered in relation to the need for long-term planning in the nuclear industry. It is considered that towards the end of the century uranium will be in short supply for technical or political reasons, and that the emphasis would then be on the use of fast reactors (assuming nuclear power to be politically acceptable at that time). A possible UK programme is outlined, and the question of cooperation with other countries is referred to. Thermal reactors for use in the middle term are discussed. The possibilities of export are considered briefly. The effects of world economic recession, public opposition on environmental and other grounds, and the possibility of misuse of nuclear materials are considered. (U.K.)

  16. Exporting nuclear engineering and the industry's viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelt, K.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear energy offers all possibilities to reduce the energy problems in the world which arise with the world-wide increasing population and the energy demand connected with it. The Federal Republic of Germany lives on the exports of refined technical methods which also include nuclear engineering. The exports of nuclear engineering should lead to a technology transfer with guidance and training on an equal basis between the industrial and developing countries. The preconditions of exporting nuclear-technical systems are a well-functioning domestic market and a certain support by the government, especially with regard to giving guarantees for the special exports risks of these big projects. On the other hand, exports are also needed in order to be able to continue providing high-level technology for the domestic market. (UA) [de

  17. Cancer mortality among two different populations of French nuclear workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samson, Eric; Telle-Lamberton, Maylis; Caer-Lorho, Sylvaine [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). DRPH, SRBE, LEPID; and others

    2011-08-15

    The aim of this paper is to study the effect of external photon radiation on the mortality of two populations of French nuclear workers: workers exposed only to external photon radiation and workers potentially exposed also to internal contamination or to neutrons. External photon radiation has been measured through individual dosimeters. Potential exposure to internal contamination or to neutrons has been assessed by experts on the basis of quantitative measurements or of worksite and type of activity. The mortality observed in each population was compared with that expected from national mortality statistics, by computing standardized mortality ratios. Dose-effect relationships were analyzed through trend tests and log-linear Poisson regressions. 14,796 workers were exposed only to external photon radiation; 14,408 workers were also potentially exposed to internal radiation or to neutrons. Between 1968 and 1994, the number of deaths is respectively, 645 and 1,197. The mean external photon dose was respectively, 3.7 and 12.9 mSv. Similar Healthy Worker Effects were observed in the two populations (SMR = 0.59). SMR of 2.41 90% CI [1.39-3.90] was observed for malignant melanoma among workers of the second population. Significant dose-effect relationships were observed: among workers exposed only to external photon radiation for leukemia except CLL and in the other population, for cancers and other diseases related to tobacco or alcohol consumption. Results differed between the two populations. The increase in leukemia risk with dose in the first population will have to be confirmed with extended follow-up. In the other population, results may have been confounded by alpha-emitters inhalation, tobacco, or alcohol consumption.

  18. Cancer mortality among two different populations of French nuclear workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, Eric; Telle-Lamberton, Maylis; Caer-Lorho, Sylvaine

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the effect of external photon radiation on the mortality of two populations of French nuclear workers: workers exposed only to external photon radiation and workers potentially exposed also to internal contamination or to neutrons. External photon radiation has been measured through individual dosimeters. Potential exposure to internal contamination or to neutrons has been assessed by experts on the basis of quantitative measurements or of worksite and type of activity. The mortality observed in each population was compared with that expected from national mortality statistics, by computing standardized mortality ratios. Dose-effect relationships were analyzed through trend tests and log-linear Poisson regressions. 14,796 workers were exposed only to external photon radiation; 14,408 workers were also potentially exposed to internal radiation or to neutrons. Between 1968 and 1994, the number of deaths is respectively, 645 and 1,197. The mean external photon dose was respectively, 3.7 and 12.9 mSv. Similar Healthy Worker Effects were observed in the two populations (SMR = 0.59). SMR of 2.41 90% CI [1.39-3.90] was observed for malignant melanoma among workers of the second population. Significant dose-effect relationships were observed: among workers exposed only to external photon radiation for leukemia except CLL and in the other population, for cancers and other diseases related to tobacco or alcohol consumption. Results differed between the two populations. The increase in leukemia risk with dose in the first population will have to be confirmed with extended follow-up. In the other population, results may have been confounded by alpha-emitters inhalation, tobacco, or alcohol consumption.

  19. Nuclear industry after the Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branche, Thomas; Billes-Garabedian, Laurent; Salha, Bernard; Behar, Christophe; Dupuis, Marie-Claude; Labalette, Thibaud; Lagarde, Dominique; Planchais, Bernard; West, Jean-Pierre; Stubler, Jerome; Lancia, Bruno; Machenaud, Herve; Einaudi, Andre; Anglaret, Philippe; Brachet, Yves; Bonnave, Philippe; Knoche, Philippe; Gasquet, Denis

    2013-01-01

    This special dossier about the situation of nuclear industry two years after the Fukushima accident comprises 15 contributions dealing with: the nuclear industry two years after the Fukushima accident (Bernard Salha); a low-carbon electricity at a reasonable cost (Christophe Behar); nuclear engineering has to gain even more efficiency (Thomas Branche); how to dispose off the most radioactive wastes (Marie-Claude Dupuis, Thibaud Labalette); ensuring the continuation for more than 40 years onward (Denis Gasquet); developing and investing in the future (Philippe Knoche); more than just signing contracts (Dominique Lagarde); immersed power plants, an innovative concept (Bernard Planchais); R and D as a source of innovation for safety and performances (Jean-Pierre West); dismantlement, a very long term market (Jerome Stubler, Bruno Lancia); a reference industrial model (Herve Machenaud); recruiting and training (Andre Einaudi); a diversity of modern reactors and a world market in rebirth (Philippe Anglaret); an industrial revolution is necessary (Yves Brachet); contracts adapted to sensible works (Philippe Bonnave)

  20. UK strategy for nuclear industry LLW - 16393

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Matthew; Fisher, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    In March 2007 the UK Government and devolved administrations (for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, from here on referred to as 'Government') published their policy for the management of solid low level waste ('the Policy'). The Policy sets out a number of core principles for the management of low level waste (LLW) and charges the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority with developing a UK-wide strategy in the case of LLW from nuclear sites. The UK Nuclear Industry LLW Strategy has been developed within the framework of the principles set out in the policy. A key factor in the development of this strategy has been the strategic partnership the NDA shares with the Low Level Waste Repository near Drigg (LLWR), who now have a role in developing strategy as well as delivering an optimised waste management service at the LLWR. The strategy aims to support continued hazard reduction and decommissioning by ensuring uninterrupted capability and capacity for the management and disposal of LLW in the UK. The continued availability of a disposal route for LLW is considered vital by both the nuclear industry and non-nuclear industry low level waste producers. Given that the UK will generate significantly more low level waste (∼ 3.1 million m 3 ) than there is capacity at the LLWR (∼0.75 million m 3 ), developing alternative effective ways to manage LLW is critical. The waste management hierarchy is central to the strategy, which includes strategic goals at all levels of the hierarchy to improve its application across the industry. (authors)

  1. COPD and occupation: a retrospective cohort study of industrial workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazitova, Nailya N; Saveliev, Anatoly A; Berheeva, Zuhra M; Amirov, Nail Kh

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to ascertain chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) prevalence among industrial workers in the Russian Federation and determine relative contribution of smoking and occupational factors to COPD. We recruited 1,375 workers aged 30 or over. Six hundred and twenty-four of them were occupationally exposed to vapours, gases, dust, and fumes (VGDF). Physical examination and baseline spirometry were performed for all the participants of the study. Those with airfl ow limitation of FEV1/FVC<0.70 were considered having COPD and those with presence of cough and sputum production for at least three months in each of two consecutive years were considered having chronic bronchitis (CB), with no overlapping between these 2 groups. Data on occupational history and VGDF levels in the working area were collected from all participants. In total, 105 cases of COPD and 170 cases of CB were diagnosed in the cohort of examined workers. Occupational exposure to VGDF was twice as often present among COPD patients than among both patients with CB and the control group of healthy workers (p<0.05). More than 40 % of COPD patients were occupationally exposed to VGDF above the value of 3.0 of the occupational exposure limit (OEL) and more than 20 % to 6.0 OEL and higher. Overall odds ratio for COPD development due to occupational VGDF exposure was 5.9 (95 % CI=3.6 to 9.8, p=0.0001). Both smoking and VGDF seem to be important for the development of COPD. Analysis of the combined effect of tobacco smoking and occupational noxious particles and gases on COPD development has shown the following order of risk factors based on the strength of their infl uence: VGDF levels, smoking index, age, and heating microclimate. There is a statistically signifi cant level of relationship and "dose-effect" dependence between occupational exposures to VGDF and the development of COPD. The effect of VGDF composition on the probability of COPD development was not found in the study

  2. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie; Katsuta, Tadahiro; Ramana, M.V.; Thomas, Steve; Porritt, Jonathon

    2015-07-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2015 provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. Japan without nuclear power for a full calendar year for the first time since the first commercial nuclear power plant started up in the country 50 years ago. Nuclear plant construction starts plunge from fifteen in 2010 to three in 2014. 62 reactors under construction - five fewer than a year ago - of which at least three-quarters delayed. In 10 of the 14 building countries all projects are delayed, often by years. Five units have been listed as 'under construction' for over 30 years. Share of nuclear power in global electricity mix stable at less than 11% for a third year in a row. AREVA, technically bankrupt, downgraded to 'junk' by Standard and Poor's, sees its share value plunge to a new historic low on 9 July 2015-a value loss of 90 percent since 2007 China, Germany, Japan-three of the world's four largest economies-plus Brazil, India, Mexico, the Netherlands, and Spain, now all generate more electricity from non-hydro renewables than from nuclear power. These eight countries represent more than three billion people or 45 percent of the world's population. In the UK, electricity output from renewable sources, including hydropower, overtook the output from nuclear. Compared to 1997, when the Kyoto Protocol on climate change was signed, in 2014 there was an additional 694 TWh per year of wind power and 185 TWh of solar photovoltaics- each exceeding nuclear's additional 147 TWh

  3. Political crisis poses problems for nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitev, Lubomir [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-11-15

    The political crisis in Ukraine has given rise to several problematic issues for the nuclear industry, including the country's obvious dependence on Russia for nuclear fuel supplies and the transport of nuclear material. A 2013 report by the Polish Institute of International Affairs (PIIA) concluded that Ukraine will lean towards the development of ''intensive cooperation'' with Western nuclear regulators and companies as it seeks to increase its control over the sector and reduce its dependency on Russia. The PIIA report said the gas crises of 2006 and 2009, and especially the current destabilisation of the country, have highlighted Ukraine's ''excessive and problematic dependence'' on energy supply from Russia. The 'Energy Strategy of Ukraine Until 2030' assumes that the share of nuclear energy will remain the same in 2030 as it was in 2005 - about 50 % of the energy mix. To achieve its goals, Ukraine's strategy envisages several priority actions. Firstly, work should begin on identification of three or four sites for new nuclear stations. Secondly, the plan says that Khmelnistki-3 and -4 should be completed by 2016. Thirdly, the plan envisages six gigawatts of new nuclear capacity becoming operational between 2019 and 2021. Finally, lifetime extensions are planned for South Ukraine units 1 to 3, Zaporozhye units 1 to 6, Rovno units 2 and 3 and Khmelnitski-1.

  4. Nuclear emergency planning and response in industrial areas. Results of a qualitative study in 9 industrial companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, N.; Hardeman, F.; Soudan, K.

    1998-11-01

    Substantial economic losses and potential dangerous situations may result when industrial companies unexpectedly have to shut down their activities in an abrupt way. With respect to the industrial companies located in the Antwerp harbour region, the reason for such an unplanned shut-down could be the decision to (preventively) evacuate their workers, or to have them sheltered, in case of an alarm situation at a nearby nuclear power plant of Doel or in any other adjacent industrial factory. Between January and August 1998, the prevention advisors of nine industrial companies have been interviewed to gain insight in the scale and relative importance of several economic costs and practical difficulties that may arise. Moreover, the appropriateness of the existing nuclear emergency response decision structure and intervention philosophy was investigated. The main conclusions drawn from the interviews are reported. Recommendations are made to increase the efficiency of implementing countermeasures in industrial areas

  5. Nuclear emergency planning and response in industrial areas. Results of a qualitative study in 9 industrial companies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauwels, N.; Hardeman, F.; Soudan, K

    1998-11-01

    Substantial economic losses and potential dangerous situations may result when industrial companies unexpectedly have to shut down their activities in an abrupt way. With respect to the industrial companies located in the Antwerp harbour region, the reason for such an unplanned shut-down could be the decision to (preventively) evacuate their workers, or to have them sheltered, in case of an alarm situation at a nearby nuclear power plant of Doel or in any other adjacent industrial factory. Between January and August 1998, the prevention advisors of nine industrial companies have been interviewed to gain insight in the scale and relative importance of several economic costs and practical difficulties that may arise. Moreover, the appropriateness of the existing nuclear emergency response decision structure and intervention philosophy was investigated. The main conclusions drawn from the interviews are reported. Recommendations are made to increase the efficiency of implementing countermeasures in industrial areas.

  6. Nuclear engineering. Stable industry for bright minds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geisler, Maja

    2009-01-01

    The Deutsches Atomforum (DAtF) invited 35 students and graduate students for 'colloquies for professional orientation' to Luenen on March 8-11, 2009. Another 39 students were guests in Speyer between March 15 and 18 this year. Participants included graduates in physics, chemistry, radiation protection, and mechanical engineering as well as students of process engineering, electrical engineering and environmental technology. The colloquies for professional orientation are a service provided by the Informationskreis Kernenergie (IK) to member firms of DAtF. At the same time, the IK in this way fulfils its duty to promote young scientists and engineers within the framework of the DAtF's basic public relations activities. After all, nuclear technology in Germany is not about to end its life. Firms with international activities are in urgent need of highly qualified young staff members. Personnel is needed for a variety of activities ranging from nuclear power plant construction to fuel fabrication to waste management and the demolition and disposal of nuclear power plants. All these areas are in need of new qualified staff. Some 750 students so far have attended the DAtF colloquies for professional orientation since 2002. Many participants were hired by industries straight away or were given opportunities as trainees or students preparing their diploma theses in the nuclear industry. These contacts with the nuclear industry should not remain a one-off experience for the students. For this reason, the IK invites the participants in colloquies again this year to attend the Annual Meeting on Nuclear Technology in Dresden on May 12-14, 2009. (orig.)

  7. Nuclear industry prospects: A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morden, Reid

    1995-01-01

    Canada, with its proven, safe and versatile CANDU reactor is well poised for the second half-century of nuclear fission. Canada's nuclear pedigree goes back to the turn-of-the-century work of Ernest Rutherford in Montreal. This year, Canada's nuclear industry celebrates the 50th anniversary of the start-up of its first research reactor at Chalk River. Last year, the pioneering work of Bert ram Blockhouse in Physics was honoured with a Nobel Prize. Future international success for the nuclear industry, such as has been achieved here in Korea, depends on continued cooperative and collaborative team work between the public and private sectors, continued strong research and development backing by the government, and new strategic partnerships. The biggest challenge is financing for the emerging markets. The brightness or dimness of future prospects are relative to the intensity of the lessons learned from history. In Canada we have a fairly long nuclear pedigree, It goes back almost a century to 1898, when Ernest Rutherford set up a world centre at McGill University in Montreal for research into the structure of the atom and into radioactivity

  8. Quality management certification for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmer, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    Historically for safety critical items, the United Kingdom nuclear companies either conducted their own inspection and audit of suppliers or sub-contracted staff to do so on their behalf. However, it is becoming unrealistic for these services to be undertaken in-house for economic reasons. The power industry is looking outside its own immediate expertise to that of 3rd Party Certification Bodies. There is a danger of introducing an element of risk unless the Certification Body really does understand the industry and its requirements. The Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) makes it mandatory for nuclear installations to have in place Quality management systems that meet the requirements of BS 5882. This standard requires the use of quality assurance programmes and a greater degree of understanding of nuclear regulations and codes of practice than is required by BS 5750. This is a very significant factor, recognising as it does the need to harmonise the management interface between an operator of a nuclear installation and suppliers to that same installation. (author)

  9. Domestic safeguards in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 brought about markedly increased security requirements at nuclear power plants. NRC established a threat level against which the security forces were expected to defend. It is asserted that an inadequate legal basis exists for the NRC requirement that nuclear plants be defended by the use of deadly force, if necessary, and that complex issues such as apprehension, retention, and pursuit of intruders are left vague. Security measures patterned after the airline industry, resolution of the deadly force issue, and definition of a creditable threat level are proposed

  10. Economics on nuclear techniques application in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Masao

    1979-01-01

    The economics of the application of nuclear techniques to industry is discussed. Nuclear techniques were applied to gauging (physical measurement), analysis, a radioactive tracer method, electrolytic dissociation, and radiography and were found to be very economical. They can be applied to manufacturing, mining, oceano-engineering, environmental engineering, and construction, all of which have a great influence on economics. However, because the application of a radioactive tracer technique does not have a direct influence on economics, it is difficult to estimate how beneficial it is. The cost-benefit ratio method recommended by IAEA was used for economical calculations. Examples of calculations made in gauging and analysis are given. (Ueda, J.)

  11. Addressing Workers' Rights in the Textile and Apparel Industries: Consequences for the Bangladesh Economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, N.; Peerlings, J.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper applies a CGE model to analyze the effects of better addressing worker¿s rights in Bangladesh¿s textile and apparel industries. Results show that an increased minimum wage for unskilled, low-, and medium-skilled workers has negative impacts for these workers in aggregate and also for the

  12. Nuclear techniques in coal and chemical industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbern, A.W.; Leal, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    The use of nuclear techniques for the determination of important parameters in industrial installations is exemplified; advantages of these techniques over other methods conventionally used are pointed out. The use of radiotracers in the study of physical and chemical phenomena occurring in the chemical industry is discussed. It is also shown that, using certain radioisotopes, it is possible to construct devices which enable, for example, the determination of the ash content in coal samples. These devices are economical and easy to be installed for the on-line control during coal transportation. (C.L.B.) [pt

  13. SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF PROFESSIONAL ETHICS AMONG WORKERS IN INDUSTRIAL UNITS (A CASE STUDY OF INDUSTRIAL WORKERS IN ARDABIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoud Abdollahi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Professional ethics is a factor that is under the influence of external factors and with the help of individual conscience causes adherence in a person. As professional ethics is properly guided and strengthened by social or environmental elements, its effects will appear on the output or final product in a desirable way. The present study examines the social influential factors on individual’s level of professional ethics in the workplace. For this purpose, 400 workers in both branches of industrial townships of Ardabil participated in this study. The data for this study was collected from administering a researcher-made questionnaire (consisting of 78 questions, interview, and observation. The findings revealed that socio-cultural factors primarily and individual-personality factors secondarily, affect the person’s work ethics. In addition, social factors such as intimate relationship, gender, education, skill, income, religious belief, and job stability have a positive impact on a person's work ethics.

  14. Industrial environmental monitoring in non nuclear industry which potential to generate TENORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronica Tuka

    2011-01-01

    Constitution of the Republic of Indonesia Year 1945 states that the environment is good and healthy life is a human rights and constitutional rights of every citizen of Indonesia. In Indonesia has many industrial and mining activities that produce Norm (Naturally occurring Radioactive Materials) and TENORM (technologically Enhanced Naturally occurring Radioactive Materials). TENORM is a natural radioactive material which due to human activity or process technology increases the potential exposure when compared to the initial state and the potential radiological impact either external or internal radiation exposure. BAPETEN must ensure that the activities undertaken by non-nuclear industry, especially in the handling of radioactive waste at Norm and TENORM which can lead to chronic exposure, carried out securely and safely, both for workers, public and the environment. (author)

  15. The nuclear industry and public hearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansillon, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Major decisions about the French nuclear industry have been made, it is often said, without sufficiently informing and consulting the population. Laws in 1995 and 2002 provide for public hearings in order to inform the public and obtain its reactions to big projects of national interest. The responsibility for organizing a hearing is vested in an independent administrative authority, the National Commission of Public Debate (CNDP). Within 2 years, 5 issues related to the nuclear industry have been referred to it: 1) the ITER project at Cadarache in april 2003, 2) the George-Besse-II project to replace the present uranium enrichment plant at Tricastin in april 2004, 3) the research reactor Jules-Horowitz project at Cadarache in july 2004, 4) the EPR project at Flamanville in november 2004, and 5) the management of radioactive wastes in february 2005. The hearings already represent a fundamental innovation compared with earlier practices

  16. Evolution of stainless steels in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavassoli, Farhad

    2010-01-01

    Starting with the stainless steels used in the conventional industry, their adoption and successive evolutions in the nuclear industry, from one generation of nuclear reactors to another, is presented. Specific examples for several steels are given, covering fabrication procedures, qualification methods, property databases and design allowable stresses, to show how the ever-increasing demands for better performance and reliability, in particular under neutron irradiation, have been met. Particular attention is paid to the austenitic stainless steels types 304L, 316L, 316L(N), 316L(N)-IG, titanium stabilized grade 321, precipitation strengthened alloy 800, conventional and low activation ferritic/martensitic steels and their oxygen dispersion strengthening (ODS) derivatives. For each material, the evolution of the associated filler metal and welding techniques are also presented. (author)

  17. Grand Rounds: An Outbreak of Toxic Hepatitis among Industrial Waste Disposal Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Kim, Eun A; Choi, Jung-Keun; Choi, Sung-Bong; Suh, Jeong-Ill; Choi, Dae Seob; Kim, Jung Ran

    2006-01-01

    Context Industrial waste (which is composed of various toxic chemicals), changes to the disposal process, and addition of chemicals should all be monitored and controlled carefully in the industrial waste industry to reduce the health hazard to workers. Case presentation Five workers in an industrial waste plant developed acute toxic hepatitis, one of whom died after 3 months due to fulminant hepatitis. In the plant, we detected several chemicals with hepatotoxic potential, including pyridine...

  18. Computer aided design for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basson, Keith

    1986-01-01

    The paper concerns the new computer aided design (CAD) centre for the United Kingdom nuclear industry, and its applications. A description of the CAD system is given, including the current projects at the CAD centre. Typical applications of the 3D CAD plant based models, stress analysis studies, and the extraction of data from CAD drawings to produce associated documentation, are all described. Future developments using computer aided design systems are also considered. (U.K.)

  19. Problems and prospects of nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karelin, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    A consideration is given to problems associated with operating nuclear power plants in many countries and building new NPPs. A special attention is given to safety operation of nuclear plants, to reprocessing and transportation of spent nuclear fuel as well as to radioactive waste disposal. In connection with difficulties in solving the above-mentioned problems a proposition is made to resume work on designing NPPs with the use of nuclear liquid salt reactors based on molten fuel fluoride salts. Advantages and disadvantages of fuel compositions of LiF-BeF 2 -UF 4 -(ThF 4 ) are listed. It is recommended that fundamental studies be carried out into such compositions as KF + CsF; BaF 2 + KF + NaF; AlF 3 + Na 3 AlF 6 , eutectics on the basis of tin and zinc fluorides and their complex salts of M x Sn(Zn)F y . An international program is suggested to be developed to find some way out of crisis of nuclear power industry using research efforts in homogeneous liquid salt nuclear underground reactors with a U(233)-Th fuel cycle [ru

  20. A health and safety survey of Irish funeral industry workers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, N

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Those handling deceased individuals, including the funeral industry, face a variety of health and safety hazards including occupationally acquired infectious disease. AIMS: To identify the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of Irish funeral industry workers towards occupational hazards and infectious disease in 2009. METHODS: The sample analysed consisted of all listed member premises of the Irish Association of Funeral Directors as at 1 July 2009. A postal survey was sent to each premises in July 2009, with two rounds of follow-up reviews sent to non-responders. Four main areas were covered--occupational hazards, embalming, industry expertise and demographics. The quantitative and qualitative results were analysed to assess knowledge, attitudes and beliefs. Data collection was completed on 31 December 2009. RESULTS: Two hundred and thirty listed member premises were contacted. Twenty-two were unsuitable for the survey. One hundred and thirty-eight valid replies were received from 130 premises, representing a premises response rate of 63% (130\\/208). Seventy-three premises (56%) identified themselves as embalmers. Embalmers had variable vaccine uptake and variable knowledge, attitude and beliefs towards embalming those with blood-borne viruses. Fifteen per cent of respondents reported a work-related injury, back injury being the most common. Splash and sharps injuries were reported as a work-related injury, and infections believed to be work related were also reported. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates widespread occupational health concerns among this professional group. It confirms the need for occupational health advice and services. There is also a strong desire for regulation of this profession in Ireland.

  1. Mathematical model for production of an industry focusing on worker status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visalakshi, V.; kiran kumari, Sheshma

    2018-04-01

    Productivity improvement is posing a great challenge for industry everyday because of the difficulties in keeping track and priorising the variables that have significant impact on the productivity. The variation in production depends on the linguistic variables such as worker commitment, worker motivation and worker skills. Since the variables are linguistic we try to propose a model which gives an appropriate production of an industry. Fuzzy models aids the relationship between the factors and status. The model will support the industry to focus on the mentality of worker to increase the production.

  2. Nuclear energy and the steel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    Fossil fuels represent a large part of the cost of iron and steel making and their increasing cost has stimulated investigation of methods to reduce the use of fossil fuels in the steel industry. Various iron and steel making routes have been studied by the European Nuclear Steelmaking Club (ENSEC) and others to determine to what extent they could use energy derived from a nuclear reactor to reduce the amount of fossil fuel consumed. The most promising concept is a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor heating helium to a temperature sufficient to steam reform hydrocarbons into reducing gases for the direct reduction of iron ores. It is proposed that the reactor/reformer complex should be separate from the direct-reduction plant/steelworks and should provide reducing gas by pipeline, not only to a number of steel works but to other industrial users. The composition of suitable reducing gases and the methods of producing them from various feedstocks are discussed. Highly industrialised countries with large steel and chemical industries have shown greatest interest in the concept, but those countries with large iron-ore reserves and growing direct capacity should consider the future value of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor as a means of extending the life of their gas reserves. (author)

  3. Competency assessments for nuclear industry personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-04-01

    In 1996, the IAEA published Technical Reports Series No. 380, Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation: A Guidebook. This publication provides guidance for the development, implementation and evaluation of training programmes for all nuclear power plant personnel using the systematic approach to training (SAT) methodology. The SAT methodology has since been adopted and used for the development and implementation of training programmes for all types of nuclear facility and activities in the nuclear industry. The IAEA Technical Working Group on Training and Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel recommended that an additional publication be prepared to provide further guidance concerning competency assessments used for measuring the knowledge, skills and attitudes of personnel as the result of training. This publication has been prepared in response to that recommendation. A critical component of SAT (as part of the implementation phase) is the assessment of whether personnel have achieved the standards identified in the training objectives. The nuclear industry spends a significant amount of resources conducting competency assessments. Competency assessments are used for employee selection, trainee assessment, qualification, requalification and authorization (in some Member States the terminology may be 'certification' or 'licensing'), and job advancement and promotion. Ineffective testing methods and procedures, or inappropriate interpretation of test results, can have significant effects on both human performance and nuclear safety. Test development requires unique skills and, as with any skill, training and experience are needed to develop and improve them. Test item and examination development, use, interpretation of results and examination refinement, like all other aspects of SAT, should be part of an ongoing, systematic process. This publication is primarily intended for use by personnel responsible for developing and administering

  4. Corrosion engineering in nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prazak, M.; Tlamsa, J.; Jirousova, D.; Silber, K.

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion problems in nuclear power industry are discussed from the point of view of anticorrosion measures, whose aim is not only increasing the lifetime of the equipment but, first of all, securing ecological safety. A brief description is given of causes of corrosion damage that occurred at Czechoslovak nuclear power plants and which could have been prevented. These involve the corrosion of large-volume radioactive waste tanks made of the CSN 17247 steel and of waste piping of an ion exchange station made of the same material, a crack in a steam generator collector, contamination of primary circuit water with iron, and corrosion of CrNi corrosion-resistant steel in a spent fuel store. It is concluded that if a sufficient insight into the corrosion relationships exists and a reasonable volume of data is available concerning the corrosion state during the nuclear facility performance, the required safety can be achieved without adopting extremely costly anticorrosion measures. (Z.M.)

  5. The nuclear industry within the Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    As part of its 1989 working programme, the European Commission undertook to update the provisional nuclear programme in the view of the expected changes from the single European market. This document complies with that commitment and deals exclusively with the problems of the industry engaged in the design and construction of electro-nuclear power stations. Having analysed the context and prospects for the medium and long term development of nuclear investments, in particular in relation to the establishment of a ''common electricity market'', the practical possibility of opening up the equipment and services market is examined. Actions to be taken within the Community are indicated. Finally, the standard for power stations equipped with fast neutron breeder reactors, where European efforts are directed towards a single development project, is presented. (UK)

  6. Localization and indigenization of China nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xingfa

    2009-01-01

    It points out that China needs to develop nuclear power to solve the shortage of energy source. Localization and independence is the key for the development of nuclear power industry. Localized and independent nuclear power possesses economical competitiveness. China has the condition and capability to realize localization and independence of nuclear power industry. Technology introduction, adaptation and assimilation can enhance the R and D capability of China's nuclear power industry, and speed up the process of localization and independence. (authors)

  7. The structure of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaist, G.T.; Morisette, E.F.

    1981-01-01

    Since 1952, when Canadians began to study the application of reactors to power generation, the CANDU reactor design and the manufacturing and and engineering capability supporting it have evolved into a world-class technology. At present, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. works directly with provincial electrical utilities in developing their power reactor requirements. It assumes responsibility for the detailed design of the nuclear steam supply system of stations, undertakes some procurement activities, and may represent the utilities in licensing applications. The detailed design and supply of components for the remainder of the nuclear steam plant, as well as for the secondary plant, are provided in Ontario by Ontario Hydro together with manufacturers, and in Quebec and New Brunswick by private firms. Canadian utilities have always assumed the project managment function themselves, but with export sales AECL has taken turnkey responsiblity for either the nuclear steam plant or the complete power station. AECL owns design specifications and other documentation, the use of which it can license, but manufacturing technology resides with Canadian industry. Canadian manufacturers have supported AECL design licensing initiatives overseas. The Canadian nuclear industry's major problem is the current lack of a vigorous domestic market combined with an uncertain international one

  8. Subcontracting in nuclear industry - legal aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leger, M.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the legal framework of subcontracting in France. Subcontracting is considered as a normal mode of functioning for an enterprise: an enterprise contracts another enterprise to do what it can not do itself or does not want to do. According to the 1975 law, cascade subcontracting is allowed but subcontractors have to be accepted by the payer. In some cases the payer can share responsibility when the subcontracting enterprises do not comply to obligations like the payment of some taxes. The main subcontractor who is the one who contracted with the payer is the only one responsible for the right execution of the whole contract. In nuclear industry there are 2 exceptions to the freedom of subcontracting. The first one concerns radiation protection: in a nuclear facility the person in charge of radioprotection must be chosen among the staff. The second concerns the operations and activities that are considered important for radiation protection, it is forbidden to subcontract them. In some cases like maintenance in nuclear sector the law imposes some qualification certification for subcontracting enterprises. The end of the article challenges the common belief about subcontracting in nuclear industry. (A.C.)

  9. Situation of nuclear industry in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    This document presents the situation of nuclear industry in Japan: cooperation with France in the domain of the fuel cycle (in particular the back-end) and of for the industrial R and D about fast reactors and nuclear safety; present day situation characterized by a series of incidents in the domain of nuclear safety and by an administrative reorganization of the research and safety organizations; power of local representatives, results of April 2003 elections, liberalization of the electric power sector, impact of the TEPCO affair (falsification of safety reports) on the nuclear credibility, re-start up of the Monju reactor delayed by judicial procedures, stopping of the program of MOX fuel loading in Tepco's reactors, discovery of weld defects in the newly built Rokkasho-mura reprocessing plant, an ambitious program of reactors construction, the opportunity of Russian weapons dismantling for the re-launching of sodium-cooled fast reactors; the competition between France and Japan for the setting up of ITER reactor and its impact of the French/Japanese partnership. (J.S.)

  10. Industrial aspects of nuclear energy: French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebreton, G.

    1986-11-01

    France decides to develop nuclear energy on a wide scale about 12 years ago. To cope with this ambitious program, the roles have been distributed within a very cohesive organization, as follows: EDF, the french national electricity utility is owner, prime contractor, and plant operator. The Atomic Energy Commission, CEA performs part of the research and development work, and supplies the necessary technical support to the safety authorities. A few leading industrial firms design and build the major parts of the nuclear power plants. Among them is Framatome, which is responsible for the design, manufacture, erection, and startup of nuclear steam supply systems (the NSSSs), and related auxiliaries. Alsthom is responsible for the supply of the turbine and its auxiliaries. It would not be proper to describe the French nuclear industry without focussing our attention on the care given to transfer of technology. Technology transfer agreements can take several forms, but local factors have to be taken into account. These forms are discussed in this paper. A typical and highly significant example (KNU 9-10 project) is given

  11. Chromosome aberrations in workers of ignalina nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griciene, B.; Januskeviciute, I.; Mierauskiene, J.; Slapsyte, G. [Vilnius Univ. (Lithuania)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (I.N.P.P.) workers and outside workers including visitors constitute the largest occupational group exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in Lithuania. In 2004, the annual collective dose to these workers (4392 persons) was 6,83 man Sv. The maximum annual individual dose of I.N.P.P. workers was 19,16 mSv, and of outside workers was 29,41 mSv. However, according to calculations performed by the Lithuanian Radiation Protection Centre, the decommissioning of I.N.P.P. (the I.N.P.P. is to be shut down by 2009) will result in collective dose of 35 man Sv. Therefore, a special attention should be given to implementation of radiation protection programme. The importance of cytogenetic studies in the medical surveillance of radiation-exposed persons is generally acknowledged. The aim of the present study was to analyse chromosome aberration frequencies in lymphocytes of I.N.P.P. workers. The blood sampling of 27 male workers was performed in October 2004, after planned outage of I.N.P.P.. It was estimated that outages of I.N.P.P. Units contributed 84% to all annual occupational collective dose. Average cumulative dose of 18 workers was 290,7 mSv (group A), and of 9 workers - 71,7 mSv (group B). The mean annual doses averaged over the three-year-period were 15,2 mSv and 0,76 mSv, respectively. None of the exposed workers had ever exceeded the permissible dose limit. The average age of group A workers was 45,2 years, and group B 48,2 years. A questionnaire form with details on age, occupational history, smoking habit and alcohol intake, medication, history of recent illness was completed for each person at the time of blood collection. 64 non-exposed male donors approximately matched by age were used as controls (group C). Heparinized venous blood samples were taken and cultures were initiated within 24 h according to the standard procedures. At least 500 first cycle metaphases were analysed from each

  12. Chromosome aberrations in workers of ignalina nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griciene, B.; Januskeviciute, I.; Mierauskiene, J.; Slapsyte, G.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (I.N.P.P.) workers and outside workers including visitors constitute the largest occupational group exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in Lithuania. In 2004, the annual collective dose to these workers (4392 persons) was 6,83 man Sv. The maximum annual individual dose of I.N.P.P. workers was 19,16 mSv, and of outside workers was 29,41 mSv. However, according to calculations performed by the Lithuanian Radiation Protection Centre, the decommissioning of I.N.P.P. (the I.N.P.P. is to be shut down by 2009) will result in collective dose of 35 man Sv. Therefore, a special attention should be given to implementation of radiation protection programme. The importance of cytogenetic studies in the medical surveillance of radiation-exposed persons is generally acknowledged. The aim of the present study was to analyse chromosome aberration frequencies in lymphocytes of I.N.P.P. workers. The blood sampling of 27 male workers was performed in October 2004, after planned outage of I.N.P.P.. It was estimated that outages of I.N.P.P. Units contributed 84% to all annual occupational collective dose. Average cumulative dose of 18 workers was 290,7 mSv (group A), and of 9 workers - 71,7 mSv (group B). The mean annual doses averaged over the three-year-period were 15,2 mSv and 0,76 mSv, respectively. None of the exposed workers had ever exceeded the permissible dose limit. The average age of group A workers was 45,2 years, and group B 48,2 years. A questionnaire form with details on age, occupational history, smoking habit and alcohol intake, medication, history of recent illness was completed for each person at the time of blood collection. 64 non-exposed male donors approximately matched by age were used as controls (group C). Heparinized venous blood samples were taken and cultures were initiated within 24 h according to the standard procedures. At least 500 first cycle metaphases were analysed from each

  13. The industrial nuclear fuel cycle in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koll, J.H.; Kittl, J.E.; Parera, C.A.; Coppa, R.C.; Aguirre, E.J.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear power program of Argentina for the period 1976-85 is described, as a basis to indicate fuel requirements and the consequent implementation of a national fuel cycle industry. Fuel cycle activities in Argentina were initiated as soon as 1951-2 in the prospection and mining activities through the country. Following this step, yellow-cake production was initiated in plants of limited capacity. National production of uranium concentrate has met requirements up to the present time, and will continue to do so until the Sierra Pintada Industrial Complex starts operation in 1979. Presently, there is a gap in local production of uranium dioxide and fuel elements for the Atucha power station, which are produced abroad using Argentine uranium concentrate. With its background, the argentine program for the installation of nuclear fuel cycle industries is described, and the techno-economical implications considered. Individual projects are reviewed, as well as the present and planned infrastructure needed to support the industrial effort [es

  14. Nuclear industry - challenges in chemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Sunder Rajan, N.S.; Balu, K.; Garg, R.K.; Murthy, L.G.K.; Ramani, M.P.S.; Rao, M.K.; Sadhukhan, H.K.; Venkat Raj, V.

    1978-01-01

    Chemical engineering processes and operations are closely involved in every step of the nuclear fuel cycle. Starting from mining and milling of the ore through the production of fuel and other materials and their use in nuclear reactors, fuel reprocessing, fissile material recycle and treatment and disposal of fission product wastes, each step presents a challenge to the chemical engineer to evolve and innovate processes and techniques for more efficient utilization of the energy in the atom. The requirement of high recovery of the desired components at high purity levels is in itself a challenge. ''Nuclear Grade'' specifications for materials put a requirement which very few industries can satisfy. Recovery of uranium and thorium from low grade ores, of heavy water from raw water, etc. are examples. Economical and large scale separation of isotopes particularly those of heavy elements is a task for which processess are under various stages of development. Further design of chemical plants such as fuel reprocessing plants and high level waste treatment plants, which are to be operated and maintained remotely due to the high levels of radio-activity call for engineering skills which are being continually evolved. In the reactor, analysis of the fluid mechanics and optimum design of heat removal system are other examples where a chemical engineer can play a useful role. In addition to the above, the activities in the nuclear industry cover a very wide range of chemical engineering applications, such as desalination and other energy intensive processes, radioisotope and radiation applications in industry, medicine and agriculture. (auth.)

  15. Nuclear instrumentation for the industrial measuring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normand, S.

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with nuclear instrumentation and its application to industry, power plant fuel reprocessing plant and finally with homeland security. The first part concerns the reactor instrumentation, in-core and ex-core measurement system. Ionization Uranium fission chamber will be introduced with their acquisition system especially Campbell mode system. Some progress have been done on regarding sensors failure foresee. The second part of this work deals with reprocessing plant and associated instrumentation for nuclear waste management. Proportional counters techniques will be discussed, especially Helium-3 counter, and new development on electronic concept for reprocessing nuclear waste plant (one electronic for multipurpose acquisition system). For nuclear safety and security for human and homeland will be introduce. First we will explain a new particular approach on operational dosimetric measurement and secondly, we will show new kind of organic scintillator material and associated electronics. Signal treatment with real time treatment is embedded, in order to make neutron gamma discrimination possible even in solid organic scintillator. Finally, the conclusion will point out future, with most trends in research and development on nuclear instrumentation for next years. (author) [fr

  16. Occupational Dermatoses among Cottage Industry Workers of Kashmir Valley in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Saniya; Hassan, Iffat; Rasool, Farhan; Bhat, Yasmeen J; Sheikh, Gousia

    2017-01-01

    Cottage industry is usually a small-scale industry operated from home by family members using their own equipment. Kashmir has a unique cottage industry of its own which deals with production of many handicrafts, which may lead to a peculiar pattern of skin diseases in these artisans. Aim: The aim of this study was to find out the pattern of skin disorders in the cottage industry workers of Kashmir valley, with primary focus on the occupation-related dermatoses and to identify the most common cutaneous manifestation in these workers. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in which 1062 cottage industry workers engaged in different crafts were screened. A detailed history taking and examination was carried out in each worker and the diagnosis was made on clinical grounds. Wherever deemed necessary, relevant investigations were done to establish the nature of the disease. A total of 1062 workers were evaluated for the presence of skin disorders. The male-to-female ratio was 1:1.5. The mean age of the study group was 30.3 years ± 10.79 years, with maximum number of workers (164) belonging to the crewel embroidery industry. The mean duration of work was 6.4 ± 2.08 hours/day. A total of 953 workers (89.7%) had cutaneous manifestations, with callosities being the most common finding seen in 371 workers (35%), followed by cumulative insult dermatitis seen in 201 workers (19%). Cottage industry of Kashmir valley is a unique occupational group where a high percentage of workers had cutaneous manifestations related to their occupation, with callosities being the most common finding. Information and better knowledge regarding these dermatoses are important in devising strategies to improve the health scenario of these workers. Simple measures such as proper use of instruments, use of protective gloves, guarded use of chemicals, and hand washing may be very beneficial in reducing the burden of health problems in these workers.

  17. Upper extremity disorders in heavy industry workers in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouvaltzidou, Thomaella; Alexopoulos, Evangelos; Fragkakis, Ioannis; Jelastopulu, Eleni

    2017-06-18

    To investigate the disability due to musculoskeletal disorders of the upper extremities in heavy industry workers. The population under study consisted of 802 employees, both white- and blue-collar, working in a shipyard industry in Athens, Greece. Data were collected through the distribution of questionnaires and the recording of individual and job-related characteristics during the period 2006-2009. The questionnaires used were the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QD) Outcome Measure, the Work Ability Index (WAI) and the Short-Form-36 (SF-36) Health Survey. The QD was divided into three parameters - movement restrictions in everyday activities, work and sports/music activities - and the SF-36 into two items, physical and emotional. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed by means of the SPSS v.22 for Windows Statistical Package. The answers given by the participants for the QD did not reveal great discomfort regarding the execution of manual tasks, with the majority of the participants scoring under 5%, meaning no disability. After conducting multiple linear regression, age revealed a positive association with the parameter of restrictions in everyday activities (b = 0.64, P = 0.000). Basic education showed a statistically significant association regarding restrictions during leisure activities, with b = 2.140 ( P = 0.029) for compulsory education graduates. WAI's final score displayed negative charging in the regression analysis of all three parameters, with b = -0.142 ( P = 0.0), b = -0.099 ( P = 0.055) and b = -0.376 ( P = 0.001) respectively, while the physical and emotional components of SF-36 associated with movement restrictions only in daily activities and work. The participants' specialty made no statistically significant associations with any of the three parameters of the QD. Increased musculoskeletal disorders of the upper extremity are associated with older age, lower basic education and physical and mental/emotional health

  18. Study of stress in nuclear area workers: silent enemy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Maria da Penha Sanches; Vanni, Silvia Regina; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de; Sabundjian, Gaiane

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear accidents occurred in Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima were influenced by human factors. The objective of this paper is to study about the factors that influence the level of stress of the nuclear area workers. The paper is based on theoretical assumptions on occupational stress and its manifestations. The methodology used is based on questionnaires and interviews, obtained from Martins' work published in 2008 about the study of human factors focused on research reactor operators IEA-R1, of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN). In that study were analyzed the accidents occurred by human failure. The results presented in this paper showed some improvements in the reactors operators' work, and health. Operational reliability and facilities safety also improved. (author)

  19. Study of stress in nuclear area workers: silent enemy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Maria da Penha Sanches; Vanni, Silvia Regina [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha (CTMSP-SP), SP (Brazil); Andrade, Delvonei Alves de; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: delvonei@ipen.b, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The nuclear accidents occurred in Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima were influenced by human factors. The objective of this paper is to study about the factors that influence the level of stress of the nuclear area workers. The paper is based on theoretical assumptions on occupational stress and its manifestations. The methodology used is based on questionnaires and interviews, obtained from Martins' work published in 2008 about the study of human factors focused on research reactor operators IEA-R1, of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN). In that study were analyzed the accidents occurred by human failure. The results presented in this paper showed some improvements in the reactors operators' work, and health. Operational reliability and facilities safety also improved. (author)

  20. Efforts for nuclear energy human resource development by industry-government-academic sectors cooperation. Nuclear Energy Human Resource Development Council Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    The report consists of eighteen sections such as the present conditions of nuclear energy, decreasing students in the department of technology and decreasing numbers of nuclear-related subjects, The Nuclear Energy Human Resources Development Program (HRD Program), The Nuclear Energy Human Resources Development Council (HRD Council), the industry-academia partnership for human resource development, the present situation of new graduates in the nuclear field, new workers of nuclear industry, the conditions of technical experts in the nuclear energy industry, long-range forecast of human resource, increasing international efforts, nuclear energy human resources development road map, three points for HRD, six basic subjects for HRD, the specific efforts of the industrial, governmental and academic sectors, promoting a better understanding of nuclear energy and supporting job hunting and employment, students to play an active part in the world, and support of the elementary and secondary schools. Change of numbers of nuclear-related subjects of seven universities, change of number of new graduates in nuclear field of various companies from 1985 to 2006, number of people employed by nuclear industries from 1998 to 2007, number of technical experts in the electric companies and the mining and manufacturing industries and forecast of number of technical experts in total nuclear industries are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  1. Ergonomics study for workers at food production industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Fazi Hamizatun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The health constraint faced by production workers affects the quality of the work. The productivity of the workers is affected by the Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorder (WMSD which limits the movement of the workers. The comfort workplace condition, known as ergonomic environment is important to prevent the occurrence of the WMSD. Proper ergonomic workplace considers the condition of the workers while doing the assigned work. The objectives of this study are to identify the current problems related to ergonomic in food production process, to analyse the actual production data by using Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA and Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA and to recommend the ergonomic workplace environment based on the condition of the study. The study was done at a Small and Medium Enterprises (SME food production company in the Klang Valley of Malaysia. The condition of the workers affects the productivity of the company due to workers’ health deficiency. From the findings, the workers are exposed to the awkward postures which leads to the Work-Musculoskeletal Disorders (WMSDs. Besides, the best height of the worker at the study area (critical area to prevent the worker from WMSDs is within 155 cm to 160 cm. The results show that the workers are exposed to the WMSD in different level of risks which causes high absenteeism among the workers.

  2. Is nuclear energy safe for workers and the public. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, N.

    1976-01-01

    Dr. Rasmussen first examines the safety and economics records of nuclear power and finds them unassailable. Since these two items could not cause dissension, he observes that dissension evolves from safety of the power plant itself, the issue of diversion to use nuclear materials to make weapons, and from the disposal of wastes. He reviews how radioactivity can be released to cause an accident, and then cites figures comparing accidents each year in the U.S. with those projected for nuclear accidents. To date, not one person has been killed with the operation of a nuclear power plant. Dr. Rasmussen believes that taking advantage of nuclear power far outweighs its risks since ''we have seen what unemployment at the level of 9 or 10 percent has done in this country...to go without power that our industrial society needs to provide livelihood for our citizens will almost surely result in something much more dramatic than that.''

  3. Is nuclear energy safe for workers and the public. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, J.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Dr. McKenzie says a national energy policy does exist, being based on synthetic fuels from coal and nuclear energy to meet future demands, and based on a complete lack of attention to conservation. In meeting energy demands for the future, he feels the opportunity still exists to create the scenario that will require meaningful jobs in the process, jobs requiring less capital and less energy. On the risks of nuclear energy, Dr. McKenzie discusses the funding, research, and results of the Atomic Energy Commission's safety program. He airs his views on WASH-1400, the study by Professor Norman Rasmussen, dealing with the possibilities of reactor core meltdowns. He thinks a worse problem resulting from nuclear power plants is that of waste disposal and cites AEC's poor record of managing these wastes in Kansas and elsewhere. In concluding, Dr. McKenzie says: (1) nuclear power may not be the best thing in the world, maybe we should look at other alternatives; (2) conservation is most important, and creates jobs at the same time if handled correctly; (3) AFL-C10 should sponsor a study on energy systems investigating its employment potential, net energy, economic factors, and capital requirements; and (4) construction of nuclear and coal plants will create jobs, but building solar plants will create jobs with fewer restraints on the environment. A panel discussion follows this, the third paper, on nuclear safety for workers and the public

  4. Education for the nuclear power industry: Swedish perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.

    2005-01-01

    In the Swedish nuclear power industry staff, very few newly employed have a deep education in reactor technology. To remedy this, a joint education company, Nuclear Training and Safety Center (KSU), has been formed. To ensure that nuclear competence will be available also in a long-term perspective, the Swedish nuclear power industry and the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) have formed a joint center for support of universities, the Swedish Nuclear Technology Center (SKC). The activities of these organisations, their links to universities, and their impact on the competence development for the nuclear power industry will be outlined. (author)

  5. The Potential of NORM in Non-Nuclear Industry in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunto Wiharto; Syarbaini

    2003-01-01

    Industry with an activity of processing natural resources from crust of earth as raw materials could cause natural radioactivity in crust of earth to be accumulated in waste, by product and or main product of that industry. Natural radioactive elements which are mobilized and then accumulated in end industry process are known as NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials). NORM have a potential radiological impact such as external and internal radiation exposure. Therefore, the existence of NORM in these non-nuclear industries should be studied in order to handle properly the radiological impact of those material to the industrial workers, member of the public and the surrounding environment. This paper describes the non nuclear industrial sectors in Indonesia that have potential NORM sources and radiation safety aspects in connecting with NORM. (author)

  6. Commercial basis to nuclear industry skills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Mike

    1989-01-01

    The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) has considerable experience in measurement and control systems which it has designed for nuclear reactor use. It is now using this experience to help other industries needing to monitor variables such as flow, level, position, conductivity, thickness, temperature, density, sound, vibrations, light, movement, pressure, strain and radiation. Recently British Nuclear Fuels sought UKAEA's help to solve a process measurement problem at the Sellafield encapsulation plant which is used to recycle unspent fuel and immobilise liquid wastes using a cementation process. The level and specific gravity of the liquid waste slurry must be accurately measured before the correct amount of solidifying material can be added. The solution to this problem, using pneumacator technology, is described. (author)

  7. Industrial fans used in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Industrial fans are widely used in nuclear facilities, and their most common use is in building ventilation. To control the spread of contamination, airflows are maintained at high levels. Therefore, the selection of the fan and fan control are important to the safety of people, equipment and the environment. As a result, 80% of all energy used in nuclear facilities is fan energy. Safety evolves from the durability, control and redundancy in the system. In new or retrofit installations, testing and qualification of fans and systems are completed prior to start-up. Less important but necessary is the energy conservation aspect of fan selection and installations. Fan efficiency, type of control and system installation are evaluated for energy use

  8. Nuclear challenges in Asia, an industrial perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiffou, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The author first gives a brief overview of military programmes implemented by India, China, Pakistan and North Korea to develop and manufacture the various vectors of nuclear weapons (submarines, missiles, bombers), the objective being (not always reached) to possess a nuclear triad (intercontinental ground-based missiles, submarines, and bombers). In this respect, the author briefly comments the evolutions of defence budgets, discusses the evolutions of the Chinese defence industry since the end of World War II (strong relationship with USSR, emergence of other various trade relationships, a more independent production but with a search for new technological partnerships). The author then discusses whether China is a threatening military power, more particularly for some Asian countries like Japan and South Korea

  9. Nuclear energy for technology and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    It is a sad commentary on the complete lack of informed realism of the Government and people of Australia that, after thirty years of vacillation and political chicanery, nuclear technology, one of this nation's potential ''sunrise industries'' is in its death throes. Whilst our third world neighbours, in particular Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, the People's Republic of China and even impoverished Bangladesh are making giant strides to develop an autonomous expertise Australia's potential has been dissipated and its opportunities for leadership and technology transfer lost. By chance this paper was written some weeks before the nuclear accident at Chernobyl (U.S.S.R.) and many years after accidents at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant (U.S.A.) and the plutonium production reactor at Windscale (U.K.). None of these incidents alter the basic arguments or conclusions contained in this manuscript. (See Appendix). The year 1986 might represent the final opportunity for concerned professionals to seek to improve the quality of public education and information to end ''the war against the atom''. It will be necessary to re-motivate the public and private sector of a demoralised technology and to launch it on a road of responsible and successful expansion unshackled by beaurocratic interference. It is the purpose of this paper to examine why the first three decades of nuclear technology in Australia have been so singularly unsuccessful and to discuss a coherent and rational implementation of plans and policies for the future. (author)

  10. Design of nuclear instruments for industrial use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggio, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    Following an introduction to the atomic structure and the radioactive desintegration, the applications of radioisotopic sealed sources are described. The laws that govern the interaction of radiation with matter and the statistics applied to the radioactive measurements are presented. Different measurement techniques, basic equations of design, the way to provide the activity calculation of a source and the detector's characteristics are given, according to the parameters to be measured and the conditions imposed. Finally, the principles of operation and the most important characteristics of different nuclear instruments to be used in industrial measurements are described. (Author) [es

  11. Government intervention in the Canadian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doern, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    Several facets of government intervention in the Canadian nuclear industry are examined by reviewing the general historical evolution of intervention since the Second World War and by a more detailed analysis of three case studies. The case studies are the public sector - private sector content of the initial CANDU reactor program in the 1950's, the regulation of the health and safety of uranium miners in the late 1960's and early 1970's, and the Ontario Hydro decision in 1978 to enter into longer-term (40 year) contracts for uranium for its power reactors. (auth)

  12. Government intervention in the Canadian nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doern, G B [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). School of Public Administration

    1980-01-01

    Several facets of government intervention in the Canadian nuclear industry are examined by reviewing the general historical evolution of intervention since the Second World War and by a more detailed analysis of three case studies. The case studies are the public sector - private sector content of the initial CANDU reactor program in the 1950's, the regulation of the health and safety of uranium miners in the late 1960's and early 1970's, and the Ontario Hydro decision in 1978 to enter into longer-term (40 year) contracts for uranium for its power reactors.

  13. Nuclear analytical techniques in Cuban Sugar Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Riso, O.; Griffith Martinez, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is a review concerning the applications of Nuclear Analytical Techniques in the Cuban sugar industry. The most complete elemental composition of final molasses (34 elements ) and natural zeolites (38) this last one employed as an auxiliary agent in sugar technological processes has been performed by means of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis (XRFA). The trace elements sugar cane soil plant relationship and elemental composition of different types of Cuban sugar (rawr, blanco directo and refine) were also studied. As a result, valuable information referred to the possibilities of using these products in animal and human foodstuff so as in other applications are given

  14. Fibre optic cable in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Berwyn

    1987-01-01

    The uses of optical fibre cables to transmit light signals include medical applications and telecommunications. In the nuclear industry the applications include process control and monitoring, conventional datacoms, security fencing and sensors. Time division multiplexing is described and currently available fibre optic multipexers are listed and explained. Single and multimode fibres are mentioned. Fibre optics are also used in cryogenics, to monitor the integrity of the storage vessels for cryogenic liquids. The uses of fibre optics at Hartlepool, Heysham I and Torness are mentioned in particular. (UK)

  15. Economical state of nuclear industries in 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc., has carried out the survey of the actual state of atomic energy industries in Japan every year, and the 22nd survey was performed on the state in 1980. In this survey, the atomic energy industries are classified into electric power business, mining and manufacture, and trading companies. The actual results of expenditures, sales, the investment in facilities, backlogs, the volume of business, the number of employees and so on were surveyed by questionnaire, respectively. The data show the history of the atomic energy industries for a quarter of a century, and are utilized to search for the problems. The period of survey was from April 1, 1980, to March 31, 1981. The number of enterprises surveyed was 1234, and 924 companies replied, accordingly, the ratio of reply was 75%. 546 enterprises among the 924 had some results related to atomic energy, therefore, the results of survey were classified, totalized, examined and analyzed, based on the survey papers of these 546 enterprises. As for the Japanese economy, the real growth of economy was 3.8%, the index of mining and manufacturing production increased by 4.6%, but total energy consumption decreased by 4.4%, as compared with the previous year. One nuclear power plant began the operation, and 4000 centrifuges are operated in the uranium enrichment pilot plant. The trends of expenditures, sales and employees are shown. (Kako, I.)

  16. The relationship between spontaneous abortion and female workers in the semiconductor industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heechan; Kwon, Ho-Jang; Rhie, Jeongbae; Lim, Sinye; Kang, Yun-Dan; Eom, Sang-Yong; Lim, Hyungryul; Myong, Jun-Pyo; Roh, Sangchul

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between job type and the risk for spontaneous abortion to assess the reproductive toxicity of female workers in the semiconductor industry. A questionnaire survey was administered to current female workers of two semiconductor manufacturing plants in Korea. We included female workers who became pregnant at least 6 months after the start of their employment with the company. The pregnancy outcomes of 2,242 female workers who experienced 4,037 pregnancies were investigated. Personnel records were used to assign the subjects to one of three groups: fabrication process workers, packaging process workers, and clerical workers. To adjust for within-person correlations between pregnancies, a generalized estimating equation was used. The logistic regression analysis was limited to the first pregnancy after joining the company to satisfy the assumption of independence among pregnancies. Moreover, we stratified the analysis by time period (pregnancy in the years prior to 2008 vs. after 2009) to reflect differences in occupational exposure based on semiconductor production periods. The risk for spontaneous abortion in female semiconductor workers was not significantly higher for fabrication and packaging process workers than for clerical workers. However, when we stratified by time period, the odds ratio for spontaneous abortion was significantly higher for packaging process workers who became pregnant prior to 2008 when compared with clerical workers (odds ratio: 2.21; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-4.81). When examining the pregnancies of female semiconductor workers that occurred prior to 2008, packaging process workers showed a significantly higher risk for spontaneous abortions than did clerical workers. The two semiconductor production periods in our study (prior to 2008 vs. after 2009) had different automated processes, chemical exposure levels, and working environments. Thus, the conditions prior to 2008 may have increased the

  17. A study on exposure dose from injection work and elution work for radiation workers and frequent workers in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Yong Jin; Chung, Woon Kwan; Dong, Kyung Rae; Choi, Eun Jin; Kwak, Jong Gil; Ryu, Jae Kwang

    2017-01-01

    Compared to other occupations, there is a greater risk of exposure to radiation due to the use of radioisotopes in nuclear medicine for diagnostic evaluations and therapy. To consider ways to reduce exposure dose for those in nuclear medicine involved in injection work and elution work among radiation workers as well as for sanitation workers and trainees among frequent workers an investigation into exposure dose and situational analysis from changes in yearly exposure dose evaluations, changes in work environment and changes in forms of inspection were conducted. Exposure dose measurements were taken by using EPD MK2 worn during working hours for one injection worker, one elution worker, two sanitation workers, and one trainee at a general hospital in the Seoul area for three days from July 18th to 20th 2016. Radiation from radioisotopes which are a part of nuclear medicine can significantly affect not only radiation workers who deal with radioisotopes directly but also frequency works as well. According to this study the annual dose limit for elution workers and injection workers were considered safe as the amount of exposure was not large enough to have a signifcant effect. The limits of this study consist in the duration of this study and the quantity of participants. Also there was a limitation of the measurement device involving accumulated exposure, where the EPD MK2 cannot check the changes in exposure according to a particular activity

  18. A study on exposure dose from injection work and elution work for radiation workers and frequent workers in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yong Jin; Chung, Woon Kwan [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Jin; Kwak, Jong Gil [Dept. of Public Health and Medicine, Dongshin University Graduate School, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jae Kwang [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Compared to other occupations, there is a greater risk of exposure to radiation due to the use of radioisotopes in nuclear medicine for diagnostic evaluations and therapy. To consider ways to reduce exposure dose for those in nuclear medicine involved in injection work and elution work among radiation workers as well as for sanitation workers and trainees among frequent workers an investigation into exposure dose and situational analysis from changes in yearly exposure dose evaluations, changes in work environment and changes in forms of inspection were conducted. Exposure dose measurements were taken by using EPD MK2 worn during working hours for one injection worker, one elution worker, two sanitation workers, and one trainee at a general hospital in the Seoul area for three days from July 18th to 20th 2016. Radiation from radioisotopes which are a part of nuclear medicine can significantly affect not only radiation workers who deal with radioisotopes directly but also frequency works as well. According to this study the annual dose limit for elution workers and injection workers were considered safe as the amount of exposure was not large enough to have a signifcant effect. The limits of this study consist in the duration of this study and the quantity of participants. Also there was a limitation of the measurement device involving accumulated exposure, where the EPD MK2 cannot check the changes in exposure according to a particular activity.

  19. Radiation exposure analysis of female nuclear medicine radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ju Young; Park, Hoon Hee

    2016-01-01

    In this study, radiation workers who work in nuclear medicine department were analyzed to find the cause of differences of radiation exposure from General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition and Conduct, especially females working on nuclear medicine radiation, in order to pave the way for positive defense against radiation exposure. The subjects were 106 radiation workers who were divided into two groups of sixty-four males and forty-two females answered questions about their General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition, Conduct, and radiation exposure dose which was measured by TLD (Thermo Luminescence Dosimeter). The results of the analysis revealed that as the higher score of knowledge and conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in female groups, and as the higher score of conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in male groups. In the correlation analysis of female groups, the non-experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of knowledge and conduct was higher and the experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of recognition and conduct was higher. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of nuclear medicine radiation workers, the gender caused the meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of female groups compared to male groups. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of female groups, the factor of conduct showed a meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of the experienced in pregnancy was lower compared to the non-experienced. The conclusion of this study revealed that radiation exposure of female groups was lower than that of male groups. Therefore, male groups need to more actively defend themselves against radiation exposure. Among the female groups, the experienced in pregnancy who have an active defense tendency showed a lower radiation exposure. Thus

  20. Radiation exposure analysis of female nuclear medicine radiation workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Young [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering Graduate School, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hoon Hee [Dept. of Radiological Technologist, Shingu College, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In this study, radiation workers who work in nuclear medicine department were analyzed to find the cause of differences of radiation exposure from General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition and Conduct, especially females working on nuclear medicine radiation, in order to pave the way for positive defense against radiation exposure. The subjects were 106 radiation workers who were divided into two groups of sixty-four males and forty-two females answered questions about their General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition, Conduct, and radiation exposure dose which was measured by TLD (Thermo Luminescence Dosimeter). The results of the analysis revealed that as the higher score of knowledge and conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in female groups, and as the higher score of conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in male groups. In the correlation analysis of female groups, the non-experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of knowledge and conduct was higher and the experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of recognition and conduct was higher. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of nuclear medicine radiation workers, the gender caused the meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of female groups compared to male groups. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of female groups, the factor of conduct showed a meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of the experienced in pregnancy was lower compared to the non-experienced. The conclusion of this study revealed that radiation exposure of female groups was lower than that of male groups. Therefore, male groups need to more actively defend themselves against radiation exposure. Among the female groups, the experienced in pregnancy who have an active defense tendency showed a lower radiation exposure. Thus

  1. The world nuclear industry status report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.; Froggatt, A

    2007-11-15

    The status and perspectives of the nuclear industry in the world have been subject to a large number of publications and considerable media attention over the last few years. The present report attempts to provide solid elements of key information for intelligent analysis and informed decision-making. As of 1 November 2007 there are 439 nuclear reactors operating in the world. That is five less than five years ago. There are 32 units listed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as 'under construction'. That is about 20 less than in the late 1990's. In 1989 a total of 177 nuclear reactors had been operated in what are now the 27 EU Member States. That number shrank to 146 units as of 1 November 2007. In 1992 the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, WISE-Paris and Greenpeace International published the first World Nuclear Industry Status Report. As a first updated review in 2004 showed the 1992 analyses proved correct. In reality, the combined installed nuclear capacity of the 436 units operating in the world in the year 2000 was less than 352,000 megawatts - to be compared with the forecast of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from the 1970's of up to 4,450,000 megawatts. Today the 439 worldwide operating reactors total 371,000 megawatts. Nuclear power plants provide 16% of the electricity, 6% of the commercial primary energy and 2-3% of the final energy in the world - the tendency is downwards - less than hydropower alone. Twenty-one of the 31 countries operating nuclear power plants decreased their share of nuclear power within the electricity mix if compared with 2003. The average age of the operating power plants is 23 years. Some nuclear utilities envisage reactor lifetimes of 40 years or more. Considering the fact that the average age of all 117 units that have already been closed is equally about 22 years, the doubling of the operational lifetime seems already rather optimistic. However, we have assumed an average

  2. The world nuclear industry status report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.; Froggatt, A.

    2007-11-01

    The status and perspectives of the nuclear industry in the world have been subject to a large number of publications and considerable media attention over the last few years. The present report attempts to provide solid elements of key information for intelligent analysis and informed decision-making. As of 1 November 2007 there are 439 nuclear reactors operating in the world. That is five less than five years ago. There are 32 units listed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as 'under construction'. That is about 20 less than in the late 1990's. In 1989 a total of 177 nuclear reactors had been operated in what are now the 27 EU Member States. That number shrank to 146 units as of 1 November 2007. In 1992 the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, WISE-Paris and Greenpeace International published the first World Nuclear Industry Status Report. As a first updated review in 2004 showed the 1992 analyses proved correct. In reality, the combined installed nuclear capacity of the 436 units operating in the world in the year 2000 was less than 352,000 megawatts - to be compared with the forecast of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from the 1970's of up to 4,450,000 megawatts. Today the 439 worldwide operating reactors total 371,000 megawatts. Nuclear power plants provide 16% of the electricity, 6% of the commercial primary energy and 2-3% of the final energy in the world - the tendency is downwards - less than hydropower alone. Twenty-one of the 31 countries operating nuclear power plants decreased their share of nuclear power within the electricity mix if compared with 2003. The average age of the operating power plants is 23 years. Some nuclear utilities envisage reactor lifetimes of 40 years or more. Considering the fact that the average age of all 117 units that have already been closed is equally about 22 years, the doubling of the operational lifetime seems already rather optimistic. However, we have assumed an average lifetime of 40 years

  3. Trends in worker hearing loss by industry sector, 1981-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Elizabeth A; Deddens, James A; Themann, Christa L; Bertke, Stephen; Calvert, Geoffrey M

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the incidence and prevalence of hearing loss for noise-exposed U.S. workers by industry sector and 5-year time period, covering 30 years. Audiograms for 1.8 million workers from 1981-2010 were examined. Incidence and prevalence were estimated by industry sector and time period. The adjusted risk of incident hearing loss within each time period and industry sector as compared with a reference time period was also estimated. The adjusted risk for incident hearing loss decreased over time when all industry sectors were combined. However, the risk remained high for workers in Healthcare and Social Assistance, and the prevalence was consistently high for Mining and Construction workers. While progress has been made in reducing the risk of incident hearing loss within most industry sectors, additional efforts are needed within Mining, Construction and Healthcare and Social Assistance. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Consistency of external dosimetry in epidemiologic studies of nuclear workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, J.J.; Gilbert, E.S.

    1992-01-01

    Efforts are underway to pool data from epidemiologic studies of nuclear workers to obtain more precise estimates of radiation risk than would be possible from any single study. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) is coordinating combined analyses of data from studies in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. In the U.S., the Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) to provide investigators an opportunity to analyze data from several DOE laboratories. IARC investigators, in collaboration with those conducting the individual studies, have developed a dosimetry protocol for the international combined analyses. (author)

  5. Consistency of external dosimetry in epidemiologic studies of nuclear workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, J.J.; Gilbert, E.S.

    1992-05-01

    Efforts are underway to pool data from epidemiologic studies of nuclear workers to obtain more precise estimates of radiation risk than would be possible from any single study. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) is coordinating combined analyses of data from studies in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. In the US, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) to provide investigators an opportunity to analyze data from several DOE laboratories. IARC investigators, in collaboration with those conducting the individual studies, have developed a dosimetry protocol for the international combined analyses

  6. Standard Specification for Nuclear Facility Transient Worker Records

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1995-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers the required content and provides retention requirements for records needed for in-processing of nuclear facility transient workers. 1.2 This specification applies to records to be used for in-processing only. 1.3 This specification is not intended to cover specific skills records (such as equipment operating licenses, ASME inspection qualifications, or welding certifications). 1.4 This specification does not reduce any regulatory requirement for records retention at a licensed nuclear facility. Note 1—Nuclear facilities operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are not licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), nor are other nuclear facilities that may come under the control of the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) or individual agreement states. The references in this specification to licensee, the U.S. NRC Regulatory Guides, and Title 10 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations are to imply appropriate alternative nomenclature with respect to DOE, DOD...

  7. A Skill-based Robot Co-worker for Industrial Maintenance Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Paul Jacob; van Amstel, Marike Koch; Dębska, Patrycja

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the concept of a sensor based robot co-worker working in flexible industrial environments together with and alongside human operators. In this particular work, a realisation of a robot co-worker scenario is developed in order to demonstrate the implementation of a robot co......-worker from the starting point of an autonomous industrial mobile manipulator. The cobot is applied on the industrially relevant task of screwing by the use of a skill-based approach. The technical work on the human-robot interface and the screwing skill is described....

  8. Older Workers' Communication Satisfaction in the Lodging Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yao-Yi; Mount, Daniel J.

    2002-01-01

    Usable responses from 374 hotel employees compared the satisfaction with workplace communications of younger (n=80) and older workers (n=81). Differences in terms of downward and vertical communication, corporate information, communication climate, feedback, and coworker communication suggest different ways to manage workers. (Contains 33…

  9. Occupational employment trends in selected nuclear industry segments in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    The United States of America's nuclear energy industry expanded rapidly between 1968 and 1977, with total employment increasing by approximately 60%. Between 1973 and 1977 employment grew at a rate of 6.8% per year. The nuclear industry appears to have reached a mature status with the primary focus on commercial activities. The relative number of workers involved in research and development activities, outside of contract research facilities, has declined considerably since 1968 but appears to have stabilized. The industry labour force still has a relatively high proportion (43%) of scientific, engineering and technical workers. The occupational employment composition appears to have stabilized in the various nuclear segments indicating the emergence of longer run occupational distribution patterns. Employment expanded rapidly between 1968 and 1977 in most nuclear segments, with the exception of the research and development segment, where employment decreased by one-third. The present uncertainties concerning nuclear power development could have substantial impacts on the nuclear-related scientific, engineering, and technical labour force if a sizeable contraction occurs in reactor design and manufacturing and in design of nuclear facilities. (author)

  10. Problems of nuclear industry in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiyama, Hirokichi

    1976-01-01

    The past twenty years growth of Japanese reactor plant makers is historically reviewed in the first part of this report. The first ten years were devoted for the construction of research reactors and for the design studies of power plants. The next ten years were devoted for the construction of power stations. Total income and expenditures of Japanese makers for these two periods are presented. It is emphasized that expenditures always exceeded income. The second part previews the projected growth of nuclear power generation. Generating capacities of 49,000 MW at 1985 and 90,000 MW at 1990 is assumed. To meet this demand, Japanese makers must have the ability of supplying about 8000 MW per year and the number of personnel (at present, about 9,000) must be increased to 25,000 in next ten years. The third part discusses the roles of plant makers. Establishment of safe and reliable technology, promotion of standardization, improvement of economical bases, and the promotion of associated industries (such as nuclear fuel makers and operator training institutions) are the main subjects. The roles of government are also shortly discussed. The rest of this paper shortly discusses about the participation to the national project (ATR, FBR, and centrifuge enrichment) and about future problems in growing to an exporting industry. (Aoki, K.)

  11. Instructional skills evaluation in nuclear industry training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazour, T.J.; Ball, F.M.

    1985-11-01

    This report provides information to nuclear power plant training managers and their staffs concerning the job performance requirements of instructional personnel to implement prformance-based training programs (also referred to as the Systems Approach Training). The information presented in this report is a compilation of information and lessons learned in the nuclear power industry and in other industries using performance-based training programs. The job performance requirements in this report are presented as instructional skills objectives. The process used to develop the instructional skills objectives is described. Each objective includes an Instructional Skills Statement describing the behavior that is expected and an Instructional Skills Standard describing the skills/knowledge that the individual should possess in order to have achieved mastery. The instructional skills objectives are organized according to the essential elements of the Systems Approach to Training and are cross-referenced to three categories of instructional personnel: developers of instruction, instructors, and instructional managers/supervisors. Use of the instructional skills objectives is demonstrated for reviewing instructional staff training and qualification programs, developing criterion-tests, and reviewing the performance and work products of individual staff members. 22 refs

  12. JAERI FEL applications in nuclear energy industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, Eisuke J.

    2005-01-01

    The JAERI FEL has first discovered the new FEL lasing of 255fs ultra fast pulse, 6-9% high efficiency, 1GW high peak power, a few kilowatts average power, and wide tunability of medium and far infrared wavelength regions at the same time. Using the new lasing and energy-recovery linac technology, we could extend a more powerful and more efficient free-electron laser (FEL) than 10kW and 25%, respectively, for nuclear energy industries, and others. In order to realize such a tunable, highly-efficient, high average power, high peak power and ultra-short pulse FEL, we need the efficient and powerful FEL driven by the JAERI compact, stand alone and zero boil-off super-conducting RF linac with an energy-recovery geometry. Our discussions on the FEL will cover the application of non-thermal peeling, cutting, and drilling to prevent cold-worked stress-corrosion cracking failures in nuclear energy and other heavy industries. (author)

  13. Coating technologies in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaae, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Metallic, ceramic, and organic coatings are so commonly used in modern industry that virtually everyone can name several applications in which coatings are employed. Thus, it is no surprise that coating technologies are widely employed in the nuclear industry. Some of these technologies utilize processes that are mature and well developed, and others utilize processes that are new and state of the art. In this paper, five generic coating processes that include almost all vapor deposition processes are described, and then applications of each of these processes for deposition of specific materials in nuclear applications are described. These latter selections, of course, are very subjective, and others will be able to name other applications. Because of their wide range of application, coating technologies are considered to be national critical technologies. The generic coating processes that cover almost all vapor deposition technologies are as follows: (1) stationary substrate chemical vapor deposition; (2) fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition; (3) plasma-assisted chemical deposition; (4) sputtering; (5) evaporation

  14. Learning curve estimation techniques for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaurio, Jussi K.

    1983-01-01

    Statistical techniques are developed to estimate the progress made by the nuclear industry in learning to prevent accidents. Learning curves are derived for accident occurrence rates based on actuarial data, predictions are made for the future, and compact analytical equations are obtained for the statistical accuracies of the estimates. Both maximum likelihood estimation and the method of moments are applied to obtain parameters for the learning models, and results are compared to each other and to earlier graphical and analytical results. An effective statistical test is also derived to assess the significance of trends. The models used associate learning directly to accidents, to the number of plants and to the cumulative number of operating years. Using as a data base nine core damage accidents in electricity-producing plants, it is estimated that the probability of a plant to have a serious flaw has decreased from 0.1 to 0.01 during the developmental phase of the nuclear industry. At the same time the frequency of accidents has decreased from 0.04 per reactor year to 0.0004 per reactor year

  15. High nitrogen stainless steels for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen alloying in stainless steels (SS) has myriad beneficial effects, including solid solution strengthening, precipitation effects, phase control and corrosion resistance. Recent years have seen a rapid development of these alloys with improved properties owing to advances in processing technologies. Furthermore, unlimited demands for high-performance advanced steels for special use in advanced applications renewed the interest in high nitrogen steels (HNS). The combination of numbers of attractive properties such as strength, fracture toughness, wear resistance, workability, magnetic properties and corrosion resistance of HNS has given a unique advantage and offers a number of prospective applications in different industries. Based on extensive studies carried out at IGCAR, nitrogen alloyed type 304LN SS and 316LN SS have been chosen as materials of construction for many engineering components of fast breeder reactor (FBR) and associated reprocessing plants. HNS austenitic SS alloys are used as structural/reactor components, i.e., main vessel, inner vessel, control plug, intermediate heat exchanger and main sodium piping for fast breeder reactor. HNS type 304LN SS is a candidate material for continuous dissolver, nuclear waste storage tanks, pipings, etc. for nitric acid service under highly corrosive conditions. Recent developments towards the manufacturing and properties of HNS alloys for application in nuclear industry are highlighted in the presentation. (author)

  16. Environmental issues and the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castle, P.

    1995-01-01

    Health safety and environmental liabilities of the 'nuclear industry' reflect those of industry in general and may broadly be divided into two areas: criminal liability for regulatory non-compliance; and civil liability for damage caused to persons and their property (for example, neighbours, employees etc). In addition, environmental liability may be incurred as a result of powers of the regulatory authorities to clean up contamination and to recoup the cost. These are in addition to the regime of strict liability imposed, where relevant, by the Nuclear Installations Act 1965. In the case of environmental liabilities, 'owners;, 'occupiers', 'persons responsible', 'persons in control' may all be held to be liable and for the most part these terms remain undefined both under English law and European Community (now European Union) law. This potentially has ramifications for current and former owners and operators, their boards and senior managers, other employees, parent companies, shareholders and their lenders and investors - of particular relevance in the context of privatization. (author)

  17. Future contracts in the nuclear fuel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    In a modern futures market, standardized contracts for future delivery of a commodity are traded through an exchange that establishes contract terms and the rules of trading. The futures contract itself is simply an agreement between a buyer and a seller in which the seller is obligated to deliver and the buyer is obligated to accept a predetermined quantity of a specified commodity at a given location on a certain date in the future for a set price. Organized futures markets aid in price discovery; provide a risk management tool for those with commercial interests in a commodity; create speculative opportunities; and contribute to competitiveness, efficiency, and fairness in trading. There are, at present, no standardized futures contracts in the nuclear fuel industry, although the concept has been discovered for years. The idea has been raised again recently in relation to the disposition of Russian uranium. Some adaptation of traditional futures contracts, traded on an exchange composed of nuclear fuel industry participants, could provide many of the benefits found in other commodity futures markets

  18. Nuclear Regulator Knowledge Management in a Dynamic Nuclear Industry Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The paper outlines the experiences to date in developing mature knowledge management within the UK’s nuclear regulatory body The Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR). In 2010 concerns over the loss of knowledge due to the age profile within the organization instigated a review of knowledge management and the development of a knowledge management initiative. Initially activities focused on knowledge capture but in order to move to through life knowledge transfer, knowledge management was then aligned with organizational resilience initiatives. A review of progress highlighted the need to better engage the whole organization to achieve the desired level of maturity for knowledge management. Knowledge management activities now cover organizational culture and environment and all aspects of organizational resilience. Benefits to date include clear understanding of core knowledge requirements, better specifications for recruitment and training and the ability to deploy new regulatory approaches. During the period of implementing the knowledge management programme ONR undertook several organizational changes in moving to become a separate statutory body. The UK nuclear industry was in a period of increased activity including the planning of new nuclear reactors. This dynamic environment caused challenges for embedding knowledge management within ONR which are discussed in the paper. (author

  19. An innovative program to increase safety culture for workers on a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schryvers, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Full text: To implement the WENRA harmonized guidelines and the IAEA reference guides, Electrabel has recently introduced a major training program for both its own staff and the contractors working on the sites of its Nuclear Power Plants. This training program stresses the importance of safety culture on both theoretical and practical level and is mostly focused on the behavioural aspects during activities performed at the site of a Nuclear Power Plant. Further emphasis is put on radiation protection, industrial safety, environmental protection and explosion prevention. The training scheme for both the staff of Electrabel and contractors typically contains a theoretical part introducing the basic concepts of nuclear safety and safety culture and a practical exercise in a simulated environment. A novel element in the training cycle is the use of a simulated environment, where the actual working conditions in the nuclear part of the installation are simulated. This mock-up installation enables the workers to train the nuclear safety constraints linked to the actual installation and to enhance safety culture by responding on simulated problems and changing conditions possibly being encountered during an intervention at the real working site. To analyze the behaviour of the future workers, the activities are videotaped and commented for further improvement. A refresh of the training courses is implemented after 3 years.Although this training program has only been in operation for just 6 months, the response of the contractors and the staff to this training has been enthusiastic. At this moment, more than 1.000 workers have successfully completed the training course. (author)

  20. JAIF formulates policy for strengthening foundation of nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    With recognition that conditions surrounding the nuclear industry are becoming severe with the slowdown in the growth of the Japanese economy, the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum has been discussing ways and means of strengthening the foundations of the nuclear industry. A subcommittee of the Power Reactor Development Committee has been formed. It comprizes two divisions. The first division focused on economic and social prospects for the future and other basic questions. The second division dealt with specific problems viewed from the position of the nuclear quipment supply industry and measures to resolve them. The report was prepared based on the studies done by the two divisions, and focusing on the strengthening of the basis of the nuclear industry through the year 2010. The report estimates that construction of nuclear power plants will be less than 2 units a year in the coming five year period, and will continue at about 2 units a year until about the year 2000. From this outlook, it discusses the work facing the nuclear industry and the steps to be taken to reduce nuclear power generation costs, efficient research and development and the promotion of international cooperation. The report covers four sections: the position of nuclear power development in the national economy; the present state and tasks of the nuclear industry and the nuclear equipment supply industry; measures for maintaining and strengthening the foundations of the nuclear industry, and the tasks to be done. (Nogami, K.)

  1. A practicable signal processing algorithm for industrial nuclear instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Yaogeng; Gao Song; Yang Wujiao

    2006-01-01

    In order to reduce the statistical error and to improve dynamic performances of the industrial nuclear instrument, a practicable method of nuclear measurement signal processing is developed according to industrial nuclear measurement features. The algorithm designed is implemented with a single-chip microcomputer. The results of application in (radiation level gauge has proved the effectiveness of this method). (authors)

  2. Chromosome analyses of nuclear-power plant workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauchinger, M.; Kolin-Gerresheim, J.; Schmid, E.; Dresp, J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief report is given on chromosome aberration analyses of 57 healthy male employees of six German nuclear power plants. All had received annual doses below maximum permissible occupational limit of 5 rem and had worked with radiation for periods ranging from 1 - 14 years. Exposure was mainly due to external sources of γ rays and high energy x radiation. Controls were 11 healthy males with no radiation exposure except natural background. The yields of dicentrics and acentrics were significantly higher than in the unirradiated controls, but no dose dependence was apparent. These results are compared with the dose response dependence of dicentrics + rings found in nuclear dockyard workers by Evans et al. (1979). (U.K.)

  3. Mortality among workers at a nuclear fuels production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cragle, D.L.; McLain, R.W.; Qualters, J.R.; Hickey, J.L.; Wilkinson, G.S.; Tankersley, W.G.; Lushbaugh, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    A retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted in a population of workers employed at a facility with the primary task of production of nuclear fuels and other materials. Data for hourly and salaried employees were analyzed separately by time period of first employment and length of employment. The hourly (N = 6687 with 728 deaths) and salaried (N = 2745 with 294 deaths) employees had a mortality experience comparable to that of the United States and, in fact, exhibited significant fewer deaths in many categories of diseases that are traditionally associated with the healthy worker effect. Specifically, fewer deaths were noted in the categories of all causes, all cancers, cancer of the digestive organs, lung cancer, brain cancer (hourly workers only), diabetes, all diseases of the circulatory system, all respiratory diseases, all digestive system diseases, all diseases of the genitourinary system (hourly only), and all external causes of death. A statistically significant, and as yet unexplained increase in leukemia mortality (6 observed vs. 2.18 expected) appeared among a subset of the hourly employees, first hired before 1955, and employed between 5-15 years

  4. Political consciousness and political action of industrial workers in Ghana : a case study of VALCO workers at Tema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, P.J.J.

    1978-01-01

    What is the political consciousness of Ghanaian workers in large-scale foreign and state enterprises and what action have they engaged in? The present study, based on fieldwork in Ghana in 1975, attempts to answer these questions with regard to answer these questions with regard to industrial

  5. Education and training for workers of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Motoyuki

    1985-01-01

    On the education concerning radiation control for the workers of nuclear power plants, the notice of the Ministry of Labor is to be observed in nuclear power stations from April-June, 1985, and to make the standard for executing it in unified state, the working group was organized in the Federation of Electric Power Companies. It drew up the ''Standard for education on radiation control''. First, the notice from the director of the Labor Standards Bureau, the Ministry of Labor, issued on June 26, 1984, is explained. The objective is to reduce the radiation exposure of workers by giving them the necessary knowledge and skill regarding the works involving radiation. The kinds of the education is divided into that given at the time of beginning the works involving radiation and that given after having taken up the job. Both studies and practical techniques are given. The ''Standard for education on radiation control'' stipulates its objective, the contents of the education, the object persons of education, the requirement for lecturers, the education curriculum, and records. In this standard, the details of education contents are determined. The time limit of the effectiveness of education is determined, and after it has expired, re-education is carried out. (Kako, I.)

  6. Analysis on Japanese nuclear industrial technologies and their military implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H S; Yang, M H; Kim, H J. and others

    2000-10-01

    This study covered the following scopes : analysis of Japan's policy trend on the development and utilization of nuclear energy, international and domestic viewpoint of Japan's nuclear weapon capability, Japan's foreign affairs and international cooperation, status of Japan's nuclear technology development and its level, status and level of nuclear core technologies such as nuclear reactor and related fuel cycle technologies. Japan secures the whole spectrum of nuclear technologies including core technologies through the active implementation of nuclear policy for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy during the past five decades. Futhermore, as the result of the active cultivation of nuclear industry, Japan has most nuclear-related facilities and highly advanced nuclear industrial technologies. Therefore, it is reasonable that Japan might be recognized as one of countries having capability to get nuclear capability in several months.

  7. Analysis on Japanese nuclear industrial technologies and their military implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. S.; Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2000-10-01

    This study covered the following scopes : analysis of Japan's policy trend on the development and utilization of nuclear energy, international and domestic viewpoint of Japan's nuclear weapon capability, Japan's foreign affairs and international cooperation, status of Japan's nuclear technology development and its level, status and level of nuclear core technologies such as nuclear reactor and related fuel cycle technologies. Japan secures the whole spectrum of nuclear technologies including core technologies through the active implementation of nuclear policy for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy during the past five decades. Futhermore, as the result of the active cultivation of nuclear industry, Japan has most nuclear-related facilities and highly advanced nuclear industrial technologies. Therefore, it is reasonable that Japan might be recognized as one of countries having capability to get nuclear capability in several months

  8. Analysis on Japanese nuclear industrial technologies and their military implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. S.; Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2000-10-01

    This study covered the following scopes : analysis of Japan's policy trend on the development and utilization of nuclear energy, international and domestic viewpoint of Japan's nuclear weapon capability, Japan's foreign affairs and international cooperation, status of Japan's nuclear technology development and its level, status and level of nuclear core technologies such as nuclear reactor and related fuel cycle technologies. Japan secures the whole spectrum of nuclear technologies including core technologies through the active implementation of nuclear policy for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy during the past five decades. Futhermore, as the result of the active cultivation of nuclear industry, Japan has most nuclear-related facilities and highly advanced nuclear industrial technologies. Therefore, it is reasonable that Japan might be recognized as one of countries having capability to get nuclear capability in several months.

  9. Why Workers Are Reluctant Learners: The Case of the Canadian Pulp and Paper Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratton, John A.

    2001-01-01

    In the Canadian pulp/paper industry, management is focused on worker flexibility for productivity. Unions view workplace learning as a threat to job control and security. Although learning new skills enhances individual workers' flexibility and employability, collectively it weakens the union through job losses. (Contains 56 references.) (SK)

  10. The health and safety concerns of immigrant women workers in the Toronto sportswear industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannagé, C M

    1999-01-01

    Immigrant women's conditions of work have worsened with new government and managerial strategies to restructure the Canadian apparel industry. Changes in occupational health and safety legislation have both given and taken away tools that immigrant women workers could use to improve the quality of their working lives. The author outlines a methodology for eliciting the health and safety concerns of immigrant women workers.

  11. Dose-reduction techniques for high-dose worker groups in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Dionne, B.J.

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes the main findings of a study of the extent of radiation dose received by special work groups in the nuclear power industry. Work groups which chronically get large doses were investigated, using information provided by the industry. The tasks that give high doses to these work groups were examined and techniques described that were found to be particularly successful in reducing dose. Quantitative information on the extent of radiation doses to various work groups shows that significant numbers of workers in several critical groups receive doses greater than 1 and even 2 rem per year, particularly contract personnel and workers at BWR-type plants. The number of radiation workers whose lifetime dose is greater than their age is much less. Although the techniques presented would go some way in reducing dose, it is likely that a sizeable reduction to the high-dose work groups may require development of new dose-reduction techniques as well as major changes in procedures. 10 refs., 26 tabs

  12. Nuclear industrial and power complex of Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shemanskiy, V.A.; Cherepnin, Yu.S.; Zelenski, D.I.; Papafanasopulo, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    While selecting the national power supply strategy of economic potential development four factors are laid in the basis of discussions and technical and economic decisions: effect either power complexes on people health, consequences environmental, economics and resources existence. Atomic power requires the balanced approach to power politics which, by that, avoids the dependence on any energy source. The existing electric power generation structure in Kazakhstan is Featured by the following numbers: -TEPP on coal - 79%; - TEPP on gas-black-oil fuel - 12-13%; - HEPP - 6-7%; - Atomic PP - about 0.7%. The ground for nuclear power development is considerable uranium deposits and rather developed atomic industry. Kazakhstan atomic industry includes: - uranium extractive enterprise - State Holding Company 'Tselinnyi Mining-Chemical Plant' (SHC 'TCMP'), Stepnoy Ore Division (SOD), Central ore Division 6 (COD 6), KASKOR (Aktau); - plant on fuel pellets production for APP (JSC 'UMP'); - plants on production of rare and rare-earth metals - Irtysh Chemical and Metallurgical (JSC 'CMP') and Ulba Metallurgical Plant (JSC 'UMP'); - Mangyshlak Power Plant (MAEK); - Scientific Complex of NNC RK of Ministry of Science-Academy of Science. About 25% of world deposits and uranium resources are concentrated in Kazakhstan bowels. The scientific potential of atomic production complex of the Republic of Kazakhstan is concentrated in NNC RK divisions (IAE and INP) and at JSC 'UMP' and MAEK enterprises. Ministry Energy and Nature Resources is a Board responsible for the development of atomic industry and power branches. Atomic Energy Agency of the Republic Kazakhstan performs the independent effective state supervision and control providing safety of atomic industry power installations operation

  13. Dialogue between the nuclear industry and environmentalists is the key

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padley, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    'Nuclear energy - the good news for British Industry' was the title of a meeting organised by the Confederation of British Industry in July 1987. This article summarizes the contributions of each of the speakers. Between them they produced figures on the importance of the nuclear industry in various countries including the USA, France and the United Kingdom. The risks were mentioned, also the public fears following the accident at Chernobyl. The UK policy on the disposal of nuclear waste is summarized. The disposal is not technically difficult, only politically so because of adverse public opinion. These points also emerged; the nuclear industry must liaise with environmentalists and the UK manufacturing industry needs low cost energy which the nuclear industry could supply. However, the long-term development of nuclear power is only possible if there are no more reactor accidents leading to injury by radioactivity. (U.K.)

  14. Modifiers of the healthy worker effect and expression of the internal healthy worker effect in a female nuclear worker cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillargeon, Jacques Guy

    Though well-documented among numerous cohorts of male workers, little is known about how the healthy worker effect (HWE) and the internal HWE is expressed among cohorts of female workers. This investigation examines characteristics of the HWE and the internal HWE in a cohort of 12,668 female nuclear workers. The HWE, which was estimated by assessing SMRs for all causes of death combined, was found to be modified by race, occupational class and length of follow-up. Smaller variations in the HWE were observed for age at hire, occupational class, length of employment, monitored status, and interruption of monitoring. Examination of SMRs for all cancers combined revealed that the HWE was modified by race, occupational class, monitored status, interruption of monitoring, and length of follow-up. Smaller variations were observed for age at hire and length of employment. Investigators often try to circumvent the HWE by employing internal comparisons; that is, by directly comparing the mortality of subgroups within a defined occupational cohort with one another. However, internal comparisons are not necessarily free from certain biases related to the HWE. If employees are selected on the basis of health into subgroups which serve as the basis for internal comparisons, then a form of internal comparison bias, called the internal healthy worker effect (Stewart et al, 1991; Wilkinson, 1992) may occur. In this investigation, the expression of the internal HWE was examined by estimating the extent to which survival time was modified by the variables under study. Using the Cox PH model, time to death from all causes was found to be modified by occupational class and length of employment but not by race, age at hire, monitored status, or interruption of monitoring. Time to death from all cancers was found to be modified by race and interruption of monitoring but not by age at hire, occupational class, length of employment, or monitored status. These results are important because

  15. Europairs project: creating an alliance of nuclear and non-nuclear industries for developing nuclear cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hittner, Dominique; Bogusch, Edgar; Viala, Celine; Angulo, Carmen; Chauvet, Vincent; Fuetterer, Michael A.; De Groot, Sander; Von Lensa, Werner; Ruer, Jacques; Griffay, Gerard; Baaten, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Developers of High Temperature Reactors (HTR) worldwide acknowledge that the main asset for market breakthrough is its unique ability to address growing needs for industrial cogeneration of heat and power (CHP) owing to its high operating temperature and flexibility, adapted power level, modularity and robust safety features. HTR are thus well suited to most of the non-electric applications of nuclear energy, which represent about 80% of total energy consumption. This opens opportunities for reducing CO 2 emissions and securing energy supply which are complementary to those provided by systems dedicated to electricity generation. A strong alliance between nuclear and process heat user industries is a necessity for developing a nuclear system for the conventional process heat market, much in the same way as the electronuclear development required a close partnership with utilities. Initiating such an alliance is one of the objectives of the EUROPAIRS project just started in the frame of the EURATOM 7. Framework Programme (FP7) under AREVA coordination. Within EUROPAIRS, process heat user industries express their requirements whereas nuclear industry will provide the performance window of HTR. Starting from this shared information, an alliance will be forged by assessing the feasibility and impact of nuclear CHP from technical, industrial, economical, licensing and sustainability perspectives. This assessment work will allow pointing out the main issues and challenges for coupling an HTR with industrial process heat applications. On this basis, a Road-map will be elaborated for achieving an industrially relevant demonstration of such a coupling. This Road-map will not only take into consideration the necessary nuclear developments, but also the required adaptations of industrial application processes and the possible development of heat transport technologies from the nuclear heat source to application processes. Although only a small and short project (21 months

  16. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie; Katsuta, Tadahiro; Ramana, M.V.; Fairlie, Ian; Maltini, Fulcieri; Thomas, Steve; Kaaberger, Tomas

    2016-07-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2015 provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. Nuclear power generation in the world increased by 1.3%, entirely due to a 31% increase in China. Ten reactors started up in 2015-more than in any other year since 1990-of which eight were in China. Construction on all of them started prior to the Fukushima disaster. Eight construction starts in the world in 2015-to which China contributed six-down from 15 in 2010 of which 10 were in China. No construction starts in the world in the first half of 2016. The number of units under construction is declining for the third year in a row, from 67 reactors at the end of 2013 to 58 by mid-2016, of which 21 are in China. China spent over US$100 billion on renewables in 2015, while investment decisions for six nuclear reactors amounted to US$18 billion. Eight early closure decisions taken in Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan and the U.S. Nuclear phase-out announcements in the U.S. (California) and Taiwan. In nine of the 14 building countries all projects are delayed, mostly by several years. Six projects have been listed for over a decade, of which three for over 30 years. China is no exception here, at least 10 of 21 units under construction are delayed. With the exception of United Arab Emirates and Belarus, all potential newcomer countries delayed construction decisions. Chile suspended and Indonesia abandoned nuclear plans. AREVA has accumulated US$11 billion in losses over the past five years. French government decides euro 5.6 billion bailout and breaks up the company. Share value 95 percent below 2007 peak value. State utility EDF struggles with US$ 41.5 billion debt, downgraded by S and P. Chinese utility CGN, EDF partner for Hinkley Point C, loses 60% of its share value

  17. Energy policy and nuclear power. Expectations of the power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harig, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    In the opinion of the power industry, using nuclear power in Germany is a responsible attitude, while opting out of nuclear power is not. Electricity utilities will build new nuclear power plants only if the structural economic and ecological advantages of nuclear power are preserved and can be exploited in Germany. The power industry will assume responsibility for new complex, capital-intensive nuclear plants only if a broad societal consensus about this policy can be reached in this country. The power industry expects that the present squandering of nuclear power resources in Germany will be stopped. The power industry is prepared to contribute to finding a speedy consensus in energy policy, which would leave open all decisions which must not be taken today, and which would not constrain the freedom of decision of coming generations. The electricity utilities remain committed proponents of nuclear power. However, what they sell to their customers is electricity, not nuclear power. (orig.) [de

  18. The development of Chinese power industry and its nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Dabin

    2002-01-01

    The achievements and disparity of Chinese power industry development is introduced. The position and function of nuclear power in Chinese power industry is described. Nuclear power will play a role in ensuring the reliable and safe supply of primary energy in a long-term and economic way. The development prospects of power source construction in Chinese power industry is presented. Challenge and opportunity in developing nuclear power in China are discussed

  19. Environmental impact of the nuclear industry in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang; Wang Zhibo; Chen Zhuzhou; Zhang Yongxing; Xie Jianlun

    1996-01-01

    Since its foundation in 1955, the nuclear industry has become a comprehensive industrial, scientific and technical system in China. The nuclear industry has obviously brought great profit to the country, but how much environmental effect it has caused is a question of common interest which we should answer. This report shows the environmental assessment of the nuclear fuel cycle in China. (author). 4 refs, 1 fig., 22 tabs

  20. Quantification practices in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In this chapter the quantification of risk practices adopted by the nuclear industries in Germany, Britain and France are examined as representative of the practices adopted throughout Europe. From this examination a number of conclusions are drawn about the common features of the practices adopted. In making this survey, the views expressed in the report of the Task Force on Safety Goals/Objectives appointed by the Commission of the European Communities, are taken into account. For each country considered, the legal requirements for presentation of quantified risk assessment as part of the licensing procedure are examined, and the way in which the requirements have been developed for practical application are then examined. (author)

  1. Nuclear analytical techniques in Cuban sugar industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz R, O.; Griffith M, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is a review concerning the application of Nuclear Analytical Techniques in the Cuban sugar industry. The most complete elemental composition of final molasses (34 elements) and natural zeolites (38) this last one employed as an auxiliary agent in sugar technological processe4s has been performed by means of instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis (XRFA). The trace elemental sugar cane soill-plant relationship and elemental composition of different types of Cuban sugar (raw, blanco-directo and refine) were also studied. As a result, valuable information referred to the possibilities of using these products in animal and human foodstuff so as in the other applications are given. (author). 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  2. Role definition among public officials and emergency workers in a nuclear evacuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    How public officials and emergency workers will resolve conflict between their official duties and assigned tasks and their family and conscience responsibilities is discussed in the context of the Indian Point nuclear station, and the Shoreham nuclear station

  3. Industrial development - consequences about the implantation of Brazilian Nuclear Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syllus, C.

    1987-07-01

    The strategy to promote the growing industry participation in the Brazilian Nuclear Program, the difficulties, the measurements adopted for overcoming and the results obtained in terms of industrial development, are presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  4. Germany, an industrialized country, and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wartenberg, L. v.

    2001-01-01

    The question of the future of nuclear power in Germany, and the agreement between the federal government and industry of June 14, 2000 about the future operation of plants, are important far beyond the confines of this sector of industry. In times of economic globalization and of competition among national economies, questions of location have become key issues in meeting future challenges. For this purpose, there must be more freedom for the economy; entrepreneurial action must be regarded as a positive duty to be fulfilled by society. Personal responsibility and competition, with room for self-responsibility, must not be hampered further by interventions and red tape. This applies to all sectors of the economy, in particular to the power supply sector, as is borne out by the current debate about the quota regulations for cogeneration systems (CHP). Social justice, one of the most important unifying forces in this modern society, must be interpreted as solidarity. This solidarity must be sought also in an international context. Supplying the basic necessities to all inhabitants of this earth requires all sources of energy, also in the interest of achieving sustainability. This term should be interpreted, above and beyond its meaning in environmental protection, as a concept in all areas of politics, implying that the future must be taken into account in all decisions made today. In the light of the problems associated with establishing a worldwide sustainable power supply system, inter alia meeting the objectives of climate protection, continuity of supply, and economic viability, there is no way around nuclear power. Free decisions are required in the sense of sustainable economic management, and the political boundary conditions must be created for this to be possible. (orig.) [de

  5. The nuclear power industry: financial considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leward, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    It is important not to allow the present liquidity crisis to escalate into economic and political dislocations that could result in a prolonged cessation of necessary capital investment. In assessing the future growth of nuclear power in other parts of the world, it may be instructive to consider the plight of the U.S. industry and the parallels that are apparent. In the United States, electric utility debt is growing too fast; a structural imbalance has developed even on the better corporate balance sheets; and cash flow or internal generation has diminished, particularly as the time needed to complete nuclear plants has extended, thereby precluding revenue production for as long as 10 to 15 years from the beginning of construction. Newcomers to the lending business may have little appetite to lend in unfavorable climates, and regulatory (political) bodies may irresponsibly allow unproductive use of resources and refuse to adopt difficult but essential economic policies to preserve the financial integrity of the borrower. These issues are relevant in the examination of any lender/borrower relationship, whether it be between sovereign nations, banker and borrower, or vendor and vendee. (author)

  6. Analysis of radiation overexposures for radiation workers in industrial institutions during 1991-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, J.M.; Raman, N.V.; Massand, O.P.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation Standards and Instrumentation Division (RS and ID) conducts country wide personnel monitoring service for external exposures of a total of about 41,000 radiation workers. Out of these, there are about 5300 radiation workers in industrial institutions alone. The analysis of overexposure cases (more than 10 mSv during a monitoring period) of these radiation workers has been presented for the period 1991-1995. The paper describes how the reporting, investigations and follow-up of these cases helps in obtaining effective control of doses to the radiation workers in the country keeping in view the dose limits stipulated by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board. (author)

  7. More evidence of unpublished industry studies of lead smelter/refinery workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Lead smelter/refinery workers in the US have had significant exposure to lead and are an important occupational group to study to understand the health effects of chronic lead exposure in adults. Recent research found evidence that studies of lead smelter/refinery workers have been conducted but not published. This paper presents further evidence for this contention. Objectives To present further evidence of industry conducted, unpublished epidemiologic studies of lead smelter/refinery workers and health outcomes. Methods Historical research relying on primary sources such as internal industry documents and published studies. Results ASARCO smelter/refinery workers were studied in the early 1980s and found to have increased risk of lung cancer and stroke in one study, but not in another. Conclusions Because occupational lead exposure is an on-going concern for US and overseas workers, all epidemiologic studies should be made available to evaluate and update occupational health and safety standards. PMID:26070220

  8. A survey of occupational health hazards among 7,610 female workers in China's electronics industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenlan; Lao, Xiang Qian; Pang, Shulan; Zhou, Jianjiao; Zhou, Anshou; Zou, Jianfang; Mei, Liangying; Yu, Ignatius Tak-sun

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the occupational hazards among Chinese female workers in the electronics industry, the authors systematically sampled a total of 8,300 female workers at random across 4 provinces in a variety of electronics factories. A detailed questionnaire was used to collect information on occupational hazards and the occurrence of occupation-related diseases. The results show that 4,283 female workers (51.9%) were exposed to 1 or more occupational hazards. The most common chemical hazard was organic solvent, and the second most common was heavy metals. The ergonomic hazards included repetitive movements, poor standing posture, and the lifting of heavy goods. More than 60% of the female workers self-reported occupation-related diseases. These results showed that occupational health hazards were common in the electronics industry in China and that they caused serious occupation-related health problems for the female workers therein.

  9. Knowledge, attitude and practices of Egyptian industrial and tourist workers towards HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayyed, N; Kabbash, I A; El-Gueniedy, M

    2008-01-01

    This study explored knowledge, attitudes and practices towards HIV/AIDS infection among 1256 Egyptian industrial and tourism workers aged 16-40 years. Compared with industrial workers, tourism workers had a significantly better perception of the magnitude of the HIV/AIDS problem worldwide as well as in Egypt and of the likelihood of the problem worsening. Knowledge of tourism workers was also significantly better about causative agent of AIDS and methods of transmission. Both groups had negative attitudes towards patients living with HIV/AIDS concerning their right to confidentiality and to work. Both groups had a positive attitude towards behaviour change for protection from HIV/AIDS, principally via avoidance of extramarital sexual relations and adherence to religious beliefs. Use of condoms as a way to avoid HIV/AIDS was reported by only 0.4% of workers.

  10. Prevalence of undiagnosed cardiovascular risk factors and 10-year CVD risk in male steel industry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Benjamin J; Bracken, Richard M; Turner, Daniel; Morgan, Kerry; Mellalieu, Stephen D; Thomas, Michael; Williams, Sally P; Williams, Meurig; Rice, Sam; Stephens, Jeffrey W

    2014-05-01

    To assess the prevalence of undiagnosed cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a cohort of male steelworkers in South Wales, UK. Male steel industry workers (n = 221) with no prior diagnosis of CVD or diabetes accepted a CVD risk assessment within the work environment. Demographic, anthropometric, family, and medical histories were all recorded and capillary blood samples obtained. The 10-year CVD risk was predicted using the QRISK2-2012 algorithm. Up to 81.5% of workers were either overweight or obese. More than 20% of workers were found to have diastolic hypertension, high total cholesterol, and/or a total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein ratio of six or more. Over one quarter of workers assessed had an increased 10-year CVD risk. Despite a physically demanding occupation, risk assessment in the workplace uncovered significant occult factors in CVD risk in a sample of male heavy industry workers.

  11. Industrial radiography in the State of Bahia, Brazil: The health protection of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Ana Emilia Oliveira de

    1997-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the Regulatory and Inspection Authority for actions developed by industrial radiography enterprises in the State of Bahia, Brazil, concerning health protection of workers exposed to ionizing radiation in industry. Institutions which legislate about this matter at international, national and State level were identified. These legislations were analysed according to recommendations by the Basic Safety Standards from the Atomic Energy International Agency. Medical Supervision is proposed as a factor to warrant protection to worker's health. This is a service evaluation study, encompassing results, processes and structural components. Emphasis is given to the process component which investigated the adequacy of which is performed by employees and workers. Five enterprises which provide industrial radiography services in the State of Bahia were identified, employing forty workers on a temporary basis. This study also observed: intense workforce, a complete process of contracting out in the sector; inadequate conditions of work organization (long work journey, night work, lack of days-off schedule); inefficiency of medical services responsible by worker's protection concerning radiation specific risks as well as other occupational risks, unrelated to main activity. There is a legal basis for Authorities actions, although it has not been completely implemented. These findings embased the elaboration of a proposal of a Surveillance Program for the Worker Exposed to Industrial Radiation, which includes the setting of safety standards and monitoring of workers exposed to ionization radiation in the occupational environment, accident prevention in this activity and the specialized health care to those affected by radio accidents. (author)

  12. Mortality risk in a historical cohort of nuclear power plant workers in Germany: results from a second follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merzenich, Hiltrud; Troeltzsch, Katrin; Ruecker, Kai; Buncke, Johanna; Blettner, Maria; Hammer, Gael P.; Fehringer, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Possible health effects of low and protracted doses of ionizing radiation are relevant for persons who are exposed to an occupational context like nuclear industry workers. A historical cohort study was therefore conducted to examine mortality risks following occupational radiation exposure among 4,844 German nuclear power plant workers. This cohort included workers from ten nuclear power plants with an observational period from 1991 until 1997. The results of an enlarged cohort with 8,972 workers from all 17 nuclear power plants in West Germany are now available. During the extended follow-up period from 1991 to 2008, a total of 310 deaths among men were observed. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) from all causes of deaths was estimated at 0.50 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.45-0.56]. A total of 126 deaths due to cancer occurred (SMR = 0.65; 95 % CI 0.51-0.82) and seven deaths due to leukemia (SMR = 1.23; 95 % CI 0.42-2.84). Overall, a reduced mortality compared to the general population of West Germany was observed indicating a healthy worker effect. In the dose-response analysis, no statistically significant risk due to ionizing radiation was seen. The hazard ratio (HR/mSv) for leukemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia was estimated at 1.004 (95 % CI 0.997-1.011). In conclusion, the cohort is small and made up of young workers, most of whom were still employed at the end of the observational period in 2008. Results of the external analysis are difficult to interpret as influenced by a healthy worker effect. In the internal analysis, no excess of risk due to radiation was detected. (orig.)

  13. Mortality risk in a historical cohort of nuclear power plant workers in Germany: results from a second follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merzenich, Hiltrud; Troeltzsch, Katrin; Ruecker, Kai; Buncke, Johanna; Blettner, Maria [University Medical Center Mainz, Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, Mainz (Germany); Hammer, Gael P. [University Medical Center Mainz, Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, Mainz (Germany); Laboratoire National de Sante E.P., Registre Morphologique des Tumeurs, Dudelange (Luxembourg); Fehringer, Franz [Berufsgenossenschaft Energie Textil Elektro Medienerzeugnisse (BGETEM), Cologne (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Possible health effects of low and protracted doses of ionizing radiation are relevant for persons who are exposed to an occupational context like nuclear industry workers. A historical cohort study was therefore conducted to examine mortality risks following occupational radiation exposure among 4,844 German nuclear power plant workers. This cohort included workers from ten nuclear power plants with an observational period from 1991 until 1997. The results of an enlarged cohort with 8,972 workers from all 17 nuclear power plants in West Germany are now available. During the extended follow-up period from 1991 to 2008, a total of 310 deaths among men were observed. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) from all causes of deaths was estimated at 0.50 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.45-0.56]. A total of 126 deaths due to cancer occurred (SMR = 0.65; 95 % CI 0.51-0.82) and seven deaths due to leukemia (SMR = 1.23; 95 % CI 0.42-2.84). Overall, a reduced mortality compared to the general population of West Germany was observed indicating a healthy worker effect. In the dose-response analysis, no statistically significant risk due to ionizing radiation was seen. The hazard ratio (HR/mSv) for leukemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia was estimated at 1.004 (95 % CI 0.997-1.011). In conclusion, the cohort is small and made up of young workers, most of whom were still employed at the end of the observational period in 2008. Results of the external analysis are difficult to interpret as influenced by a healthy worker effect. In the internal analysis, no excess of risk due to radiation was detected. (orig.)

  14. The nuclear industry and the NPT: a perspective from Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Whilst exporting nuclear reactors, the nuclear industry in the United States and other nuclear exporting countries also supports the Non-Proliferation Treaty. The nuclear industry needs the IAEA safeguards and the NPT as these allow the nuclear trade to be conducted in an orderly fashion. Non-sensitive equipment, materials and technology can be made available to other nations which adhere to the NPT. Indeed article IV of the NPT encourages this. Many developing countries do not, however, have the money to pay for the imported technology. This article looks at the current situation in the world where nuclear technology has been, is being, or will be, transferred. (U.K.)

  15. Risk management of knowledge loss in nuclear industry organizations (Russian edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-08-01

    Maintaining nuclear competencies in the nuclear industry and nuclear regulatory authorities will be one of the most critical challenges in the near future. As many nuclear experts around the world are retiring, they are taking with them a substantial amount of knowledge and corporate memory. The loss of such employees who hold knowledge critical to either operations or safety poses a clear internal threat to the safe and reliable operation of nuclear facilities. This publication is intended for senior and middle level managers of nuclear industry operating organizations and provides practical information on knowledge loss risk management. The information provided in this it is based upon the actual experiences of Member State operating organizations and is intended to increase awareness of the need to: develop a strategic approach and action plans to address the potential loss of critical knowledge and skills; provide processes and in conducting risk assessments to determine the potential for loss of critical knowledge caused by the loss of experienced workers; and enable nuclear organizations to utilize this knowledge to improve the skill and competence of new and existing workers In 2004, the IAEA published a report entitled The Nuclear Power Industry's Ageing Workforce: Transfer of Knowledge to the Next Generation (IAEA-TECDOC-1399). That report highlighted some of the knowledge management issues in Member States resulting from the large number of retiring nuclear power plant personnel who had been involved with the commissioning and initial operation of nuclear power plants. This publication complements that report by providing a practical methodology on knowledge loss risk management as one element of an overall strategic approach to workforce management which includes work force planning, recruitment, training, leadership development and knowledge retention

  16. Exposure to Fluoride in Smelter Workers in a Primary Aluminum Industry in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AK Susheela

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fluoride is used increasingly in a variety of industries in India. Emission of fluoride dust and fumes from the smelters of primary aluminum producing industries is dissipated in the work environment and poses occupational health hazards. Objective: To study the prevalence of health complaints and its association with fluoride level in body fluids of smelter workers in a primary aluminum producing industry. Methods: In an aluminum industry, health status of 462 smelter workers, 60 supervisors working in the smelter unit, 62 non-smelter workers (control group 1 and 30 administration staff (control group 2 were assessed between 2007 and 2009. Their health complaints were recorded and categorized into 4 groups: 1 gastro-intestinal complaints; 2 non-skeletal manifestations; 3 skeletal symptoms; and (4 respiratory problems. Fluoride level in body fluids, nails, and drinking water was tested by an ion selective electrode; hemoglobin level was tested using HemoCue. Results: The total complaints reported by study groups were significantly higher than the control groups. Smelter workers had a significantly (p<0.001 higher urinary and serum fluoride level than non-smelter workers; the nail fluoride content was also higher in smelter workers than non-smelter workers (p<0.001. The smelter workers with higher hemoglobin level had a significantly (p<0.001 lower urinary fluoride concentration and complained less frequently of health problems. Only 1.4% of the smelter workers were consuming water with high fluoride concentrations. A high percentage of participants was using substances with high fluoride contents. Conclusions: Industrial emission of fluoride is not the only important sources of fluoride exposure—consumption of substance with high levels of fluoride is another important route of entry of fluoride into the body. Measurement of hemoglobin provides a reliable indicator for monitoring the health status of employees at risk of fluorosis.

  17. Low vision rehabilitation and ocular problems among industrial workers in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, R; Knight, V F; Aziz Mohammed, M A

    2014-01-01

    Work-related ocular injuries and illnesses were among the major causes of job absenteeism. This study was conducted to determine if low vision rehabilitation was provided following work-related ocular problems among industrial workers in a developing country. This was a retrospective analysis of case records. Randomly selected records of all employees from the Social Security Organization (SOCSO) Medical Board for 2004 who suffered from ocular injuries and illnesses were selected. Rates of ocular injuries and illnesses according to age, gender, races, types of injuries, types of industries, visual rehabilitation and types of medical interventions were tabulated and analysed. A total of 26 cases of ocular injuries and illnesses were identified where 46.2% suffered from ocular injuries. The remaining 53.8% had ocular and/or systemic diseases. The 40-49-yearold age group suffered the greatest number of injuries (26.92%). Ocular perforating injuries (66.67%) and ocular contusions (33.33%) were the most common types of ocular injury among industrial workers in Kuala Lumpur. Most injuries occurred among workers in the service industry (50%). Almost 60% of these injured workers did not receive any low vision rehabilitation after medical intervention while 25% were given contact lenses or spectacles as rehabilitation and remaining had surgery. The low vision rehabilitation is still unexplored in the management of ocular injuries and illnesses among industrial workers. Introducing low vision rehabilitation can benefit both workers and employers as it provides care beyond spectacles or contact lens prescriptions.

  18. Interpretation of bioassay data from nuclear fuel fabrication workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, D.; Xavier, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In nuclear fuel fabrication facilities, workers are exposed to different compounds of enriched uranium. Although in this kind of facility the main route of intake is inhalation, ingestion may occur in some situations. The interpretation of the bioassay data is very complex, since it is necessary taking into account all the different parameters, which is a big challenge. Due to the high cost of the individual monitoring programme for internal dose assessment in the routine monitoring programmes, usually only one type of measurement is assigned. In complex situations like the one described in this paper, where several parameters can compromise the accuracy of the bioassay interpretation it is need to have a combination of techniques to evaluate the internal dose. According to ICRP 78 (1997), the general order of preference in terms of accuracy of interpretation is: body activity measurement, excreta analysis and personal air sampling. Results of monitoring of working environment may provide information that assists in interpretation on particle size, chemical form and solubility, time of intake. A group of seventeen workers from controlled area of the fuel fabrication facility was selected to evaluate the internal dose using all different available techniques during a certain period. The workers were monitored for determination of uranium content in the daily urinary and faecal excretion (collected over a period of 3 consecutive days), chest counting and personal air sampling. The results have shown that at least two types of sensitivity techniques must be used, since there are some sources of uncertainties on the bioassay interpretation, like mixture of uranium compounds intake and different routes of intake. The combination of urine and faeces analysis has shown to be the more appropriate methodology for assessing internal dose in this situation. (author)

  19. Occupational dermatoses among cottage industry workers of Kashmir Valley in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saniya Akhtar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cottage industry is usually a small-scale industry operated from home by family members using their own equipment. Kashmir has a unique cottage industry of its own which deals with production of many handicrafts, which may lead to a peculiar pattern of skin diseases in these artisans. Aim: The aim of this study was to find out the pattern of skin disorders in the cottage industry workers of Kashmir valley, with primary focus on the occupation-related dermatoses and to identify the most common cutaneous manifestation in these workers. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in which 1062 cottage industry workers engaged in different crafts were screened. A detailed history taking and examination was carried out in each worker and the diagnosis was made on clinical grounds. Wherever deemed necessary, relevant investigations were done to establish the nature of the disease. Results: A total of 1062 workers were evaluated for the presence of skin disorders. The male-to-female ratio was 1:1.5. The mean age of the study group was 30.3 years ± 10.79 years, with maximum number of workers (164 belonging to the crewel embroidery industry. The mean duration of work was 6.4 ± 2.08 hours/day. A total of 953 workers (89.7% had cutaneous manifestations, with callosities being the most common finding seen in 371 workers (35%, followed by cumulative insult dermatitis seen in 201 workers (19%. Conclusion: Cottage industry of Kashmir valley is a unique occupational group where a high percentage of workers had cutaneous manifestations related to their occupation, with callosities being the most common finding. Information and better knowledge regarding these dermatoses are important in devising strategies to improve the health scenario of these workers. Simple measures such as proper use of instruments, use of protective gloves, guarded use of chemicals, and hand washing may be very beneficial in reducing the burden of

  20. Cytogenetic monitoring of nuclear workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griciene, B.; Slapsyte, G.; Mierauskiene, J.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome aberration (CA) analysis using Giemsa techniques was performed in blood lymphocytes of 84 nuclear workers with cumulative doses of 1-632 mSv during employment periods of 1-25 y. The control group comprised 82 healthy male donors. An estimated CA frequency in the total radiation-exposed group was significantly higher when compared with the controls (2.27 vs. 1.76 CA/100 cells, p 0.05). However, significant increase in the total CA frequency was determined in workers with additional internal exposure (2.54 CA/100 cells, p < 0.05) and those with registered neutron doses (2.95 CA/100 cells, p < 0.01). No correlation was found between CA frequency and occupational exposure dose. Borderline significant correlation was found between duration of employment and total CA (r = 0.218, p = 0.046, Fig. 2) and chromosome-type aberration (r = 0.265, p = 0.015) frequency. (authors)

  1. Fitness for duty in the nuclear power industry: A review of technical issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.; Barnes, V.; Hauth, J.

    1989-05-01

    This report presents information gathered and analyzed in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) efforts to develop a rule that will ensure that workers with unescorted access to protected areas of nuclear power plants are fit for duty. This report supplements information previously published in NUREG/CR-5227, Fitness for Duty in the Nuclear Power Industry: A Review of Technical Issues (Barnes et al., 1988). The primary potential fitness-for-duty concern addressed in both of these reports is impairment caused by substance abuse, although other fitness concerns are discussed. This report addresses issues pertaining to workers' use and misuse of alcohol, prescription drugs, and over-the-counter drugs as fitness-for-duty concerns; responds to several questions raised by NRC Commissioners; discusses subversion of the chemical testing process and methods of preventing such subversion; and examines concerns about the urinalysis cutoff levels used when testing for marijuana metabolites, amphetamines, and phencyclidine

  2. Organization, structure, and performance in the US nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lester, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    Several propositions are advanced concerning the effects of industry organization and structure on the economic performance of the American commercial nuclear power industry. Both the electric utility industry and the nuclear power plant supply industry are relatively high degree of horizontal disaggregation. The latter is also characterized by an absence of vertical integration. The impact of each of these factors on construction and operating performance is discussed. Evidence is presented suggesting that the combination of horizontal and vertical disaggregation in the industry has had a significant adverse effect on economic performance. The relationship between industrial structure and regulatory behavior is also discussed. 43 references, 4 figures, 9 tables

  3. [Influencing factors for reproductive health of female workers in petrochemical industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Z X; Wang, S L; Chen, Z L; He, Y H; Yu, W L; Mei, L Y; Zhang, H D

    2018-02-20

    Objective: To investigate the reproductive health status of female workers in petrochemical industry, and to provide a reference for improving reproductive health status and developing preventive and control measures for female workers in petrochemical industry. Methods: A face-to-face questionnaire survey was performed from January to October, 2016. The Questionnaire on Women's Reproductive Health was used to investigate the reproductive health of female workers in petrochemical industry. The multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify the influencing factors for reproductive health of female workers in petrochemical industry. Results: Among the 7485 female workers, 1 268 (40.9%) had abnormal menstrual period, 1 437 (46.4%) had abnormal menstrual volume, 177 (28.5%) had hyperplasia of mammary glands, and 1 807 (24.6%) had gynecological inflammation. The reproductive system diseases in female workers in petrochemical industry were associated with the factors including age, marital status, education level, unhealthy living habits, abortion, overtime work, work shift, workload, video operation, occupational exposure, positive events, and negative events, and among these factors, negative events (odds ratio[ OR ]= 1.856) , unhealthy living habits ( OR =1.542) , and positive events ( OR =1.516) had greater impact on reproductive system diseases. Conclusion: Many chemical substances in the occupational environment of petrochemical industry can cause damage to the reproductive system, which not only affects the health of the female workers, but also poses potential threats to the health of their offspring. Occupational exposure, unhealthy living habits, overtime work, and work shift have great influence on reproductive system diseases in female workers.

  4. Industry based performance indicators for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connelly, E.M.; Van Hemel, S.B.; Haas, P.M.

    1990-07-01

    This report presents the results of the first phase of a two-phase study, performed with the goal of developing indirect (leading) indicators of nuclear power plant safety, using other industries as a model. It was hypothesized that other industries with similar public safety concerns could serve as analogs to the nuclear power industry. Many process industries have many more years of operating experience, and many more plants than the nuclear power industry, and thus should have accumulated much useful safety data. In Phase 1, the investigators screened a variety of potential industry analogs and chose the chemical/petrochemical manufacturing industry as the primary analog for further study. Information was gathered on safety programs and indicators in the chemical industry, as well as in the nuclear power industry. Frameworks were selected for the development of indicators which could be transferred from the chemical to the nuclear power environment, and candidate sets of direct and indirect safety indicators were developed. Estimates were made of the availability and quality of data in the chemical industry, and plans were developed for further investigating and testing these candidate indicators against safety data in both the chemical and nuclear power industries in Phase 2. 38 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs

  5. Nuclear industry will be short of engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, M.

    1990-01-01

    This article discusses the potential shortage of nuclear engineers due to reduction of educational and training facilities and difficulty in attracting minorities into nuclear engineering. The article reports on recommendations from the National Research Council Nuclear Education Study Committee on attracting minorities to nuclear engineering, increasing DOE fellowships, funding for research and development, involvement of utilities and vendors, and support of the American Nuclear Society's advocacy of nuclear engineering education

  6. The biomedicalisation of war and military remains: US nuclear worker compensation in the 'post-Cold War'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupar, Shiloh

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the recent legislation and administration of United States nuclear worker compensation--the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Programme Act (EEOICPA)--in order to show the domestic impacts of war and the social order that has been established to respond to the Cold War legacy of occupational exposures, illness, and death. Examining the epistemological politics and material effects of compensation, an insufficiently analysed aspect of the Cold War, I argue that the system designed to redress the occupational exposures of nuclear workers accomplishes something else: obscuring the ethical problem of misinformation and missing data from the Cold War era; mobilising an industry of knowledge and market-economic opportunities in the arena of biomedical exposure assessment and dose reconstruction for parts of the former US nuclear complex; and, lastly, dematerialising and depoliticising geographies of the Cold War and its differential impacts through an individualistic epidemiological reprocessing of radiation exposures. The paper shows how the general claims procedure, combined with two methods mandated by EEOICPA--dose reconstruction and the probability of causation--effectively de-link workers from each other, and worksites from homes, pin compensation to a cost-benefit logic, implicate genuine scientific complexity and uncertainty in an ongoing denial of the toxic legacies of war, and ethically undermine the social justice aims of the legislation. The article ends by considering some of the ways that US nuclear workers have responded to living as the remains of both US bomb production and the compensation system.

  7. Vapor explosion studies for nuclear and non-nuclear industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P. [Arden L. Bement, Jr. Professor Nuclear Engineering, School of Nuclear Engineering, 1290 Nuclear Engineering Building, Room 108C, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47905 (United States)]. E-mail: rusi@purdue.edu

    2005-05-01

    Energetic melt-water explosions are a well-established contributor to risk for nuclear reactors, and even more so for the metal casting industry. In-depth studies were undertaken in an industry-national laboratory collaborative effort to understand the root causes of explosion triggering and to evaluate methods for prevention. The steam explosion triggering studies (SETS) facility was devised and implemented for deriving key insights into explosion prevention. Data obtained indicated that onset of base surface-entrapment induced explosive boiling-caused trigger shocks is a result of complex combination of surface wettability, type of coating (organic versus inorganic), degree of coating wearoff, existence of bypass pathways for pressure relief, charring and non-condensable gas (NCG) release potential. Of these parameters NCGs were found to play a preeminent role on explosion prevention by stabilizing the melt-water steam interface and acting as a shock absorber. The role of NCGs was experimentally confirmed using SETS for their effect on stable film boiling using a downward facing heated body through which gases were injected. The presence of NCGs in the steam film layer caused a significant delay in the transitioning of film-to-nucleate boiling. The role of NCGs on explosion prevention was thereafter demonstrated more directly by introducing molten metal drops into water pools with and without NCG bubbling. Whereas spontaneous and energetic explosions took place without NCG injection, only benign quenching occurred in the presence of NCGs. Gravimetric analyses of organic coatings which are known to prevent explosion onset were also found to release significant NCGs during thermal attack by melt in the presence of water. These findings offer a novel, simple, cost-effective technique for deriving fundamental insights into melt-water explosions as well as for explosion prevention under most conditions of interest to metal casting, and possibly for nuclear reactor

  8. A new context for the nuclear research and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Pascal Colombani, general administrator of the CEA, develops in this presentation the situation of the nuclear industry to introduce the new orientations of the CEA group. The energy context, the deregulation impacts, the energy dependence and the greenhouse effect project are discussed before the presentation of the research programs and the necessary reorganizing of the nuclear industry. (A.L.B.)

  9. Considerations about the licensing process of special nuclear industrial facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talarico, M.A., E-mail: talaricomarco@hotmail.com [Marinha do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao do Porgrama de Submarino com Propulsao Nuclear; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    This paper brings a discussion about the challenges involved in the development of a new kind of nuclear facility in Brazil, a naval base for nuclear submarines, with attention to the licensing process and considerations about the risk-informed decision making application to the licensing process. Initially, a model of such a naval base, called in this work, special industrial facility, is proposed, with its systems and respective sets of basic requirements, in order to make it possible the accomplishment of the special industrial facility support function to the nuclear submarine. A discussion about current challenges to overcome in this project is presented: the challenges due to the new characteristics of this type of nuclear facility; existence of several interfaces between the special industrial facilities systems and nuclear submarine systems in design activities; lack of specific regulation in Brazil to allow the licensing process of special industrial facilities by the nuclear safety authority; and comments about the lack of information from reference nuclear facilities, as is the case with nuclear power reactors (for example, the German Grafenrheinfeld nuclear plant is the reference plant for the Brazilian Angra 2 nuclear plant). Finally, in view of these challenges, an analysis method of special industrial facility operational scenarios to assist the licensing process is proposed. Also, considerations about the application of risk-informed decision making to the special industrial facility activity and licensing process in Brazil are presented. (author)

  10. Considerations about the licensing process of special nuclear industrial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talarico, M.A.; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e

    2015-01-01

    This paper brings a discussion about the challenges involved in the development of a new kind of nuclear facility in Brazil, a naval base for nuclear submarines, with attention to the licensing process and considerations about the risk-informed decision making application to the licensing process. Initially, a model of such a naval base, called in this work, special industrial facility, is proposed, with its systems and respective sets of basic requirements, in order to make it possible the accomplishment of the special industrial facility support function to the nuclear submarine. A discussion about current challenges to overcome in this project is presented: the challenges due to the new characteristics of this type of nuclear facility; existence of several interfaces between the special industrial facilities systems and nuclear submarine systems in design activities; lack of specific regulation in Brazil to allow the licensing process of special industrial facilities by the nuclear safety authority; and comments about the lack of information from reference nuclear facilities, as is the case with nuclear power reactors (for example, the German Grafenrheinfeld nuclear plant is the reference plant for the Brazilian Angra 2 nuclear plant). Finally, in view of these challenges, an analysis method of special industrial facility operational scenarios to assist the licensing process is proposed. Also, considerations about the application of risk-informed decision making to the special industrial facility activity and licensing process in Brazil are presented. (author)

  11. Evaluation of the nutritional status of workers of transformation industries adherent to the Brazilian Workers' Food Program. A comparative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid W Leal Bezerra

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess whether the Brazilian Workers' Food Program (WFP is associated with changes in the nutritional status of workers in the transformation industry. We conducted a cross-sectional, observational, comparative study, based on prospectively collected data from a combined stratified and two-stage probability sample of workers from 26 small and medium size companies, 13 adherent and 13 non-adherent to the WFP, in the food, mining and textile sectors. Study variables were body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, and dietary intake at lunch obtained by 24-hour dietary recall. Data were analyzed with nested mixed effects linear regression with adjustment by subject variables. Sampling weights were applied in computing population parameters. The final sample consisted of 1069 workers, 541 from WFP-adherent and 528 from WFP non-adherent companies. The groups were different only in education level, income and in-house training. Workers in WFP-adherent companies have greater BMI (27.0 kg/m2 vs. 26.0 kg/m2, p = 0.002 and WC (87.9 cm vs. 86.5, p = 0.04, higher prevalence of excessive weight (62.6% vs. 55.5%, p<0.001 and of increased WC (49.1% vs. 39.9%. Workers of WFP companies have lower intake of saturated fat (-1.34 g, p<0.01 and sodium (-0.3 g, p<0.01 at lunch. In conclusion, this study showed that workers of companies adherent to the Brazilian WFP have greater rates of excessive weight and increased cardiovascular risk-a negative finding-as well as lower intake of sodium and saturated fat-a positive finding. Therefore, the WFP needs to be revisited and its aims redefined according to the current epidemiological status of the target population of the program.

  12. Nuclear safety. ICFTU proposals for the international control of the nuclear energy industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-07-01

    In the wake of the Chernobyl accident in April 1986 and the nuclear near disaster at Three Mile Island in 1979, public concern about the safety of nuclear power has increased. Some of the opponents of nuclear power see it as a unique and ominous danger. Some critics see opposition to it as a moral crusade associated with the struggle for nuclear disarmament. Some describe nuclear power or almost any tampering with radioactivity as evil. Others see it as simply a potentially dangerous technology that is insufficiently understood but argue that it is being developed without adequate protection for public safety. Recently some supporters of nuclear power have argued that it is the answer to the ' greenhouse effect' as it does not produce the gases responsible for global warming. On the other side opponents have argued that the full social and economic costs are never properly considered when assessments are made of the viability or desirability of nuclear power. Meanwhile, many of the workers who have given their skills and working lives to develop nuclear power, or support its development, continue to see it as a great hope for the future, safer and environmentally cleaner than most other energy sources. Many of them find it puzzling and frustrating that others are so hostile, and are angry that the evidence about nuclear energy, as they see it, is woefully misrepresented. At times, this clash of perspectives has completely obscured the possibility of rational debate. At the extremes, some people have argued that there is no alternative to reliance on nuclear power while others have alleged that nuclear power only exists as a cover for nuclear bomb-making, that all radiation is deadly and evil and that people who support nuclear power are concealing this. Against this background, unions find themselves in a unique position and they have a special responsibility. Within the membership of the ICFTU, some affiliates have a policy against the use of nuclear power, some

  13. Nuclear safety. ICFTU proposals for the international control of the nuclear energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    In the wake of the Chernobyl accident in April 1986 and the nuclear near disaster at Three Mile Island in 1979, public concern about the safety of nuclear power has increased. Some of the opponents of nuclear power see it as a unique and ominous danger. Some critics see opposition to it as a moral crusade associated with the struggle for nuclear disarmament. Some describe nuclear power or almost any tampering with radioactivity as evil. Others see it as simply a potentially dangerous technology that is insufficiently understood but argue that it is being developed without adequate protection for public safety. Recently some supporters of nuclear power have argued that it is the answer to the ' greenhouse effect' as it does not produce the gases responsible for global warming. On the other side opponents have argued that the full social and economic costs are never properly considered when assessments are made of the viability or desirability of nuclear power. Meanwhile, many of the workers who have given their skills and working lives to develop nuclear power, or support its development, continue to see it as a great hope for the future, safer and environmentally cleaner than most other energy sources. Many of them find it puzzling and frustrating that others are so hostile, and are angry that the evidence about nuclear energy, as they see it, is woefully misrepresented. At times, this clash of perspectives has completely obscured the possibility of rational debate. At the extremes, some people have argued that there is no alternative to reliance on nuclear power while others have alleged that nuclear power only exists as a cover for nuclear bomb-making, that all radiation is deadly and evil and that people who support nuclear power are concealing this. Against this background, unions find themselves in a unique position and they have a special responsibility. Within the membership of the ICFTU, some affiliates have a policy against the use of nuclear power, some

  14. Prolonged menstrual cycles in female workers exposed to ethylene glycol ethers in the semiconductor manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, G-Y; Wang, J-D; Cheng, T-J; Chen, P-C

    2005-08-01

    It has been shown that female workers exposed to ethylene glycol ethers (EGEs) in the semiconductor industry have higher risks of spontaneous abortion, subfertility, and menstrual disturbances, and prolonged waiting time to pregnancy. To examine whether EGEs or other chemicals are associated with long menstrual cycles in female workers in the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey during the annual health examination at a wafer manufacturing company in Taiwan in 1997. A three tiered exposure-assessment strategy was used to analyse the risk. A short menstrual cycle was defined to be a cycle less than 24 days and a long cycle to be more than 35 days. There were 606 valid questionnaires from 473 workers in fabrication jobs and 133 in non-fabrication areas. Long menstrual cycles were associated with workers in fabrication areas compared to those in non-fabrication areas. Using workers in non-fabrication areas as referents, workers in photolithography and diffusion areas had higher risks for long menstrual cycles. Workers exposed to EGEs and isopropanol, and hydrofluoric acid, isopropanol, and phosphorous compounds also showed increased risks of a long menstrual cycle. Exposure to multiple chemicals, including EGEs in photolithography, might be associated with long menstrual cycles, and may play an important role in a prolonged time to pregnancy in the wafer manufacturing industry; however, the prevalence in the design, possible exposure misclassification, and chance should be considered.

  15. Business environment of nuclear power industry in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yoon Young

    2003-01-01

    In Korea, there are total of 18 Nuclear Power Plants in operation as of the end of 2002 and 6 more plants are under construction. The first project for the Advanced Power Reactor (APR) 1400 nuclear power plant is being launched to provide reliable electricity economical competitiveness in Korea. The competitive business environment both globally and in Korea, where the power industry is undergoing significant restructuring, is requiring the Korean nuclear industry to continually improve the economic associated with nuclear power. Introduction of the APR 1400 design and continued improvement of local capabilities are two of the ways that the industry is responding to the challenge. (author)

  16. Development and issues of nuclear industry in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuangchi Liu

    1994-01-01

    Industrial and economic developments in Taiwan have achieved a so-called 'miracle' in the last decades. Endeavors by the private enterprise, prudent planning by the government, and the devoted efforts by the diligent and creative labor forces have been credited jointly with the result. To develop a sustainable nuclear industry in support of an efficient and safe power generation and other applications of nuclear energy in Taiwan, continuing efforts from the private industry, government and each individual of the nuclear industry will be required. In this paper, milestones of the past and major issues for future developments will be discussed

  17. Radiation safety in nuclear industry in retrospect and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang

    1993-01-01

    More than 30 years have passed since the starting up of nuclear industry in China from the early 1950's. Over the past 30-odd years, nuclear industry has always kept a good record in China thanks to the policy of 'quality first, safety first' clearly put forward for nuclear industry from the outset and a lot of suitable effective measures taken over that period. Internationally, there is rapid progress in radiation protection and nuclear safety (hereafter refereed to as radiation safety) and a number of new concepts in the field of radiation protection have been advanced. Nuclear industry is developing based on the international standardization. To ensure the further development of nuclear utility, radiation safety needs to be further strengthened

  18. Human performance in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koncz, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Management of employees human performance in the Nuclear Industry is endemic to their safety when working. In the United Kingdom it has been a key focus since 2003. Employees were made aware through a detailed program of workshops, of the error prevention methods and how to apply them. The use of effective incident barriers became embedded in the safety culture. The methodology implemented was personal ownership, to enable self assessment of behaviors, attitudes and beliefs. When put in place, there are many specific barriers, which can reduce the chances of an error occurring. They come under the headings of organisational, procedural and physical barriers. All of these were used in some way and continue to be reinforced on a daily basis. Specific barriers are applied in specific situations. However, some general ones are also effective. In common use are the Take 2 or Take 5 Minutes, point of work risk assessments. Applying the human performance barrier Independent Verification (I.V.) would result in 'Take 3 and I.V.' This would independently double check the risk assessment. New ways of thinking are required to continuously improve and evolve. Results of the error reduction process included; reduced workload, increased plant reliability, efficiencies and productivity. (author)

  19. Human performance in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koncz, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Management of employees human performance in the Nuclear Industry is endemic to their safety when working. In the United Kingdom it has been a key focus since 2003. Employees were made aware through a detailed program of workshops, of the error prevention methods and how to apply them. The use of effective incident barriers became embedded in the safety culture. The methodology implemented was personal ownership, to enable self assessment of behaviors, attitudes and beliefs. When put in place, there are many specific barriers, which can reduce the chances of an error occurring. They come under the headings of organisational, procedural and physical barriers. All of these were used in some way and continue to be reinforced on a daily basis. Specific barriers are applied in specific situations. However, some general ones are also effective. In common use are the Take 2 or Take 5 Minutes, point of work risk assessments. Applying the human performance barrier Independent Verification (I.V.) would result in 'Take 3 and I.V.' This would independently double check the risk assessment. New ways of thinking are required to continuously improve and evolve. Results of the error reduction process included; reduced workload, increased plant reliability, efficiencies and productivity. (author)

  20. Instilling professionalism in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widen, W.C.; Keeley, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    The American nuclear industry has implemented many technical changes in the past TMI decade. Equipment and facilities have been improved, procedures have been rewritten and refined, and operational personnel have bolstered their technical expertise. This paper reports that to place an increased focus upon professional -- the attitude, demeanor, and conscientiousness with which everyone conduct their jobs --- Westinghouse implemented the Conduct of Operations training program at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The program began by involving plant operations personnel in an intensive one-day training session using case studies to emphasize that it is people who determine the safety and effectiveness of our work environment. The case studies made it apparent that the human element is the factor common in all of these incidents. And, in these cases, when people became too removed from and/or complacent to automation, tragedy resulted. Finally, several organizations were explored in which a positive work culture and ethic is imbued so deeply and completely within the work force that it would be unthinkable to oppose the culture. Also, during the seminar session, work groups compiled their goals and values for good conduct of operations. In particular, each work group listed its standards for good conduct of operations as well as those factors necessary in the working environment to achieve their standard

  1. Cancer incidence among Minnesota taconite mining industry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Elizabeth M; Alexander, Bruce H; MacLehose, Richard F; Nelson, Heather H; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Mandel, Jeffrey H

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate cancer incidence among Minnesota taconite mining workers. We evaluated cancer incidence between 1988 and 2010 in a cohort of 40,720 Minnesota taconite mining workers used between 1937 and 1983. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by comparing numbers of incident cancers with frequencies in the Minnesota Cancer Surveillance System. SIRs for lung cancer by histologic subtypes were also estimated. We adjusted for out-of-state migration and conducted a probabilistic bias analysis for smoking-related cancers. A total of 5700 cancers were identified, including 51 mesotheliomas and 973 lung cancers. The SIRs for lung cancer and mesothelioma were 1.3 (95% CI = 1.2-1.4) and 2.4 (95% CI = 1.8-3.2), respectively. Stomach, laryngeal, and bladder cancers were also elevated. However, adjusting for potential confounding by smoking attenuated the estimates for lung (SIR = 1.1, 95% CI = 1.0-1.3), laryngeal (SIR = 1.2, 95% CI = 0.8-1.6), oral (SIR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.7-1.2), and bladder cancers (SIR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.8-1.1). Taconite workers may have an increased risk for certain cancers. Lifestyle and work-related factors may play a role in elevated morbidity. The extent to which mining-related exposures contribute to disease burden is being investigated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of changed bio-signal to radiation exposure of nuclear medicine worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hwun Jae; Lee, Sang Bock

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we are evaluated about bio-signal between general workers and nuclear medicine workers which is more radiation exposure relatively. In order to reciprocal evaluated two group, we experimented nuclear medicine workers in Chung-Buk National University Hospital at department of nuclear medicine and worker in Chon-Nam National University Hospital at CT room, general radiographic room, medical recording room, receipt room, general office room. Used of experimental equipments as follows, for a level of radiation measurement by pocket dosimeter which made by Arrow-Tech company, for heart rate and blood pressure measurement by TONOPORT V which made by GE medical systems company, for heat flux and skin temperature and energy expenditure measurement by Armband senseware 2000 which made by Bodymedia company. Result of experiment obtains as follows : 1) Individual radiation exposure is recorded 3.05 uSv at department of nuclear medicine and order as follows CT room, general radiograpic room, medical recording room, receipt room, general office room. Department of nuclear medicine more 1.5 times than other places. 2) Radiation accumulated dose is not related to Heat flux, Skin temperature, Energy expenditure. 3) Blood pressure is recorded equal to nuclear medical workers, general officer, general people about systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. Compared to blood pressure between nuclear medical works which is more radiation exposure and other workers was not changed. Consequently, more radiation exposed workers at nuclear medicine field doesn't have hazard

  3. Radioactive waste: the poisoned legacy of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousselet, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear industry produces a huge amount of radioactive waste from one end to the other of the nuclear cycle: i.e. from mining uranium to uranium enrichment through reactor operating, waste reprocessing and dismantling nuclear power plants. Nuclear power is now being 'sold' to political leaders and citizens as an effective way to deal with climate change and ensure security of energy supplies. Nonetheless, nuclear energy is not a viable solution and is thus a major obstacle to the development of clean energy for the future. In addition to safety and security issues, the nuclear industry is, above all, faced with the huge problem of how to deal with the waste it produces and for which it has no solution. This ought to put a brake on the nuclear industry, but instead, against all expectations, its development continues to gather pace. (author)

  4. Mental disorders among workers in the healthcare industry: 2014 national health insurance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Seok; Kim, Taeshik; Lee, Dongwook; Yook, Ji-Hoo; Hong, Yun-Chul; Lee, Seung-Yup; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Kang, Mo-Yeol

    2018-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that healthcare professionals are exposed to psychological distress. However, since most of these studies assessed psychological distress using self-reporting questionnaires, the magnitude of the problem is largely unknown. We evaluated the risks of mood disorders, anxiety disorders, sleep disorders, and any psychiatric disorders in workers in healthcare industry using Korea National Health Insurance (NHI) claims data from 2014, which are based on actual diagnoses instead of self-evaluation. We used Korea 2014 NHI claims data and classified employees as workers in the healthcare industry, based on companies in the NHI database that were registered with hospitals, clinics, public healthcare, and other medical services. To estimate the standardized prevalence of the selected mental health disorders, we calculated the prevalence of diseases in each age group and sex using the age distribution of the Korea population. To compare the risk of selected mental disorders among workers in the healthcare industry with those in other industries, we considered age, sex, and income quartile characteristics and conducted propensity scored matching. In the matching study, workers in healthcare industry had higher odds ratios for mood disorders (1.13, 95% CI: 1.11-1.15), anxiety disorders (1.15, 95% CI: 1.13-1.17), sleep disorders (2.21, 95% CI: 2.18-2.24), and any psychiatric disorders (1.44, 95% CI: 1.43-1.46) than the reference group did. Among workers in healthcare industry, females had higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders than males, but the odds ratios for psychiatric disorders, compared to the reference group, were higher in male workers in healthcare industry than in females. The prevalence of mood disorders, anxiety disorders, sleep disorders, and all psychiatric disorders for workers in the healthcare industry was higher than that of other Korean workers. The strikingly high prevalence of sleep disorders could be related to the frequent

  5. DNA adduct formation among workers in a Thai industrial estate and nearby residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peluso, Marco; Srivatanakul, Petcharin; Munnia, Armelle; Jedpiyawongse, Adisorn; Meunier, Aurelie; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Piro, Sara; Ceppi, Marcello; Boffetta, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    The genotoxic effects of air pollutant exposures have been studied in people living and working in Map Ta Phut, Rayong province, Thailand, a site where is located the Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate (MIE) one of the largest steel, refinery and petrochemical complex in the South-Eastern Asia. This was done by the conduction of a transversal study aimed to compare the prevalence of bulky DNA adducts in groups of subjects experiencing various degree of air pollution. DNA adduct analysis was performed in the leukocytes of 201 volunteers by the 32 P-postlabelling assay: 79 were workers in the MIE complex, including 24 refinery workers, 40 steel workers and 15 tinplate workers, 72 were people residing downwind in the MIE area and 50 were residents in a control district of the same Rayong province but without industrial exposures. The groups of workers were analyzed separately to evaluate if DNA adduct formation differs by the type of industry. The levels of bulky DNA adducts were 1.17 ± 0.17 (SE) adducts/10 8 nucleotides in refinery workers, 1.19 ± 0.19 (SE) in steel workers, 0.87 ± 0.17 (SE) in tinplate workers, 0.85 ± 0.07 (SE) in MIE residents and 0.53 ± 0.05 (SE) in district controls. No effects of smoking habits on DNA adducts was found. The multivariate regression analysis shows that the levels of DNA adducts were significantly increased among the individuals living near the MIE industrial complex in respect to those resident in a control district (p < 0.05). In the groups of occupationally exposed workers, the highest levels of DNA adducts were found among the workers experiencing an occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, e.g. the steel factory and refinery workers. When we have evaluated if the levels of DNA adducts of the PAH exposed workers were different from those of the MIE residents, a statistical significantly difference was found (p < 0.05). Our present study indicates that people living near point sources of industrial air

  6. Lung cancer risk among workers in the construction industry: results from two case–control studies in Montreal

    OpenAIRE

    Lacourt, Aude; Pintos, Javier; Lavoué, Jérôme; Richardson, Lesley; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Background Given the large number of workers in the construction industry, it is important to derive accurate and valid estimates of cancer risk, and in particular lung cancer risk. In most previous studies, risks among construction workers were compared with general populations including blue and white collar workers. The main objectives of this study were to assess whether construction workers experience excess lung cancer risk, and whether exposure to selected construction industry exposur...

  7. The information of the nuclear industry before and during the nuclear debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstroem, P.

    1978-10-01

    A review of the organization and resources for information and public relations, which the nuclear industry have at its disposal in Sweden as well as in other countries. Furthermore, pre-nuclear organizations in the Northern Countries, which are not financed by the nuclear industry are discussed. (E.R.)

  8. Cea-Expo: A facility exposure matrix to assess passed exposure to chemical carcinogens and radionuclides of nuclear workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telle-Lamberton, M.; Bouville, P.; Bergot, D.; Gagneau, M.; Marot, S.; Telle-Lamberton, M.; Giraud, J.M.; Gelas, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    A 'Facility-Exposure Matrix' (FEM) is proposed to assess exposure to chemical carcinogens and radionuclides in a cohort of nuclear workers. Exposures are to be attributed in the following way: a worker reports to an administrative unit and/or is monitored for exposure to ionising radiation in a specific workplace. These units are connected with a list of facilities for which exposure is assessed through a group of experts. The entire process of the FEM applied in one of the nuclear centres included in the study shows that the FEM is feasible: exposure durations as well as groups of correlated exposures are presented but have to be considered as possible rather than positive exposures. Considering the number of facilities to assess (330), ways to simplify the method are proposed: (i) the list of exposures will be restricted to 18 chemical products retained from an extensive bibliography study; (ii) for each of the following classes of facilities: nuclear reactors, fuel fabrication, high-activity laboratories and radiation chemistry, accelerators and irradiators, waste treatment, biology, reprocessing, fusion, occupational exposure will be deduced from the information already gathered by the initial method. Besides taking into account confusion factors in the low doses epidemiological study of nuclear workers, the matrix should help in the assessment of internal contamination and chemical exposures in the nuclear industry. (author)

  9. Decision making in the digital age: the nuclear industry response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, G. [Energy Group, Kepner-Tregoe, Inc. (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    Ten years ago, the consequences of a prolonged outage - or of choosing a costly alternative - could usually be recovered from the ratepayers without major difficulty. But today, as in the rest of industrial America, poorly crafted decisions have very real economic consequences. This paper discusses the decision making process within the nuclear industry in the age of industry deregulation.

  10. Decision making in the digital age: the nuclear industry response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelman, G.

    2002-01-01

    Ten years ago, the consequences of a prolonged outage - or of choosing a costly alternative - could usually be recovered from the ratepayers without major difficulty. But today, as in the rest of industrial America, poorly crafted decisions have very real economic consequences. This paper discusses the decision making process within the nuclear industry in the age of industry deregulation

  11. Ecknomic benefits arising from the Canadian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    This document is a collection of surveys of the Canadian nuclear industry, with forecasts covering a number of possible scenarios. Topics covered include uranium mining and processing; economic benefits arising from the design, manufacture and construction of CANDU generating stations; employment and economic activity in the Canadian nqclear industry; and an overview of the remainder of the industry

  12. Exposure to occupational air pollution and cardiac function in workers of the Esfahan Steel Industry, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshahi, Jafar; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Saqira, Mohammad; Zavar, Reihaneh; Sadeghifar, Mostafa; Roohafza, Hamidreza

    2016-06-01

    Air pollution is recognized as an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We investigated association of exposure to occupational air pollution and cardiac function in the workers of the steel industry. Fifty male workers of the agglomeration and coke-making parts of the Esfahan Steel Company were randomly selected (n = 50). Workers in the administrative parts were studied as controls (n = 50). Those with known history of hypertension, dyslipidemia, or diabetes, and active smokers were not included. Data of age, body mass index, employment duration, blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, and lipid profile were gathered. Echocardiography was performed to evaluate cardiac function. Left ventricular ejection fraction was lower in workers of the agglomeration/coke-making parts than in controls (mean difference = 5 to 5.5 %, P steel industry is associated with left heart systolic dysfunction. Possible right heart insults due to air pollution exposure warrant further investigations.

  13. 77 FR 31643 - AI-Shreveport, LLC A Subsidiary of Android Industries Including On-Site Leased Workers From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... Subsidiary of Android Industries Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Adventures, Inc. Shreveport..., 2011, applicable to workers of AI-Shreveport, LLC, a subsidiary of Android Industries, Shreveport...- Shreveport, LLC, a subsidiary of Android Industries. The amended notice applicable to TA-W-80,515 is hereby...

  14. 76 FR 79221 - Android Industries Belvidere, LLC, Including On-Site Leased Workers From QPS Employment Group...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-73,072] Android Industries..., 2010, applicable to workers of Android Industries Belvidere, LLC, including on-site leased workers from... Belvidere, Illinois location of Android Industries Belvidere, LLC. The Department has determined that these...

  15. Radiation effects on electronic equipment: a designers'/users' guide for the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, R.E.; Garlick, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    The Designers'/Users' Guide to the effects of radiation on electronics is published by the Radiation Testing Service of AEA Technology. The aim of the Guide is to document the available information that we have generated and collected over some ten years whilst operating as a radiation effects and design consultancy to the nuclear power industry. We hope that this will enable workers within the industry better to understand the likely effects of radiation on the system or plant being designed and so minimise the problems that can arise. (Author)

  16. Opinions of UK rescue shelter and rehoming center workers on the problems facing their industry

    OpenAIRE

    Stavisky, Jenny; Brennan, Marnie L.; Downes, Martin J.; Dean, Rachel S.

    2017-01-01

    Animal shelters exist worldwide to care for and rehome unwanted or straying pets. Previous studies have examined why owners breed unwanted animals, or relinquish their pets to shelters. However, the views of shelter workers, who receive and care for these animals, have previously been largely unexplored. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of animal shelter workers on the problems facing their industry. A sampling frame was constructed, consisting of every identified shel...

  17. DNA adduct formation among workers in a Thai industrial estate and nearby residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Marco; Srivatanakul, Petcharin; Munnia, Armelle; Jedpiyawongse, Adisorn; Meunier, Aurelie; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Piro, Sara; Ceppi, Marcello; Boffetta, Paolo

    2008-01-25

    The genotoxic effects of air pollutant exposures have been studied in people living and working in Map Ta Phut, Rayong province, Thailand, a site where is located the Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate (MIE) one of the largest steel, refinery and petrochemical complex in the South-Eastern Asia. This was done by the conduction of a transversal study aimed to compare the prevalence of bulky DNA adducts in groups of subjects experiencing various degree of air pollution. DNA adduct analysis was performed in the leukocytes of 201 volunteers by the (32)P-postlabelling assay: 79 were workers in the MIE complex, including 24 refinery workers, 40 steel workers and 15 tinplate workers, 72 were people residing downwind in the MIE area and 50 were residents in a control district of the same Rayong province but without industrial exposures. The groups of workers were analyzed separately to evaluate if DNA adduct formation differs by the type of industry. The levels of bulky DNA adducts were 1.17+/-0.17 (SE) adducts/10(8) nucleotides in refinery workers, 1.19+/-0.19 (SE) in steel workers, 0.87+/-0.17 (SE) in tinplate workers, 0.85+/-0.07 (SE) in MIE residents and 0.53+/-0.05 (SE) in district controls. No effects of smoking habits on DNA adducts was found. The multivariate regression analysis shows that the levels of DNA adducts were significantly increased among the individuals living near the MIE industrial complex in respect to those resident in a control district (pindustrial air pollution can experiment an excess of DNA adduct formation. The emissions from the MIE complex are the main source of air pollution in this area and can be the cause of such increment in the levels of DNA damage.

  18. Serum levels of T3 and T4 among workers of contraceptive pills industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, E.Z.; Emara, A.; Yassen, Y.Z.; Amr, M.M.; Jaras, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    Serum levels of thyroxine and triiodothyronine were determined in 24 workers engaged in contraceptive pills industry and 20 control subjects. Serum thyroxine in exposed subjects was significantly lower, compared to its level in controls. On the other hand, triiodothyronine was significantly higher in exposed workers. Thus, it is concluded that exposure to the dust of contraceptive drugs, namely estrogen and progesterone, produced disturbances in thyroid gland function and thyroid hormone metabolism. (author)

  19. Forced Flexibility and Exploitation: Experiences of Migrant Workers in the Cleaning Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Ollus

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Globalization has resulted in structural changes in the labor markets over the last decades. These changes have weakened some of the economic and social dimensions of work. At the same time, migration and especially labor migration have increased on the global level. This article looks at the situation of migrant workers in the cleaning industry in Finland. It is based on interviews with migrant workers who have experienced labor exploitation in the cleaning industry, representatives of cleaning industry employers, and representatives of labor unions. The primary aim is to give voice to the migrant workers themselves and to analyze how they experience their work and their position in working life. The findings suggest that there is a risk that migrant workers in the cleaning sector experience various forms of exploitation. This article argues that the demand and need for (employee flexibility may turn into forced flexibility that exploits the powerless and vulnerable migrant workers who have few other options than to agree to work on poor terms. The article suggests that the structural reasons that make the exploitation of migrant labor possible should be identified and addressed in order to prevent misuse of any workers, especially migrants.

  20. Implementation of 5S in Manufacturing Industry: A Case of Foreign Workers in Melaka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Houa San

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lean manufacturing system has been infiltrated in manufacturing sectors across the world. In fact, Lean manufacturing system is a practice which regards the use of the resources, creation of value for the end customers, and as the ways to eliminate the waste. There are several tools that can be used to eliminate the waste within the industry. This research is a study of the implementation of 5S in manufacturing industry. Despite this, the research study focused on manufacturing industry, which has been implemented 5S system in Melaka State. Although there are number of tools and technique available to help in improving the manufacturing process, however, there is only few industries could implement the tools successfully. In this research, foreign workers play a main role in implement the 5S systems as the manufacturing industry in Malaysia adopt large amount of foreign workers to work as employees. Therefore, it is important to ensure the foreign workers truly understand the concept of 5S system and adopt the best ways to implement it in order to have better performance. This research study has been proposed by the research model of the barriers to implementation of 5S in manufacturing industry among foreign workers. A several research method has been adopted to do the research, such as descriptive research design with quantitative methods, survey questionnaire and cross-sectional studies.

  1. Pesquisa auditiva en trabajadores expuestos al ruido industrial Hearing screening in workers exposed to industrial noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Esteban Moreno Rajadel

    2006-09-01

    information on the use of protection means and their way of obtention, as well as the causes not to use them. Of the 24 studied areas, 15 (62.5 % had noise levels equal to or higher than 85 dB-A. The previous information on the use of means of protection was scarce, since 96.3 % of the workers did not use them, 62.2 % had been exposed to noise for more than 10 years, and 24 workers showed hearing loss; 5 of them (20.8 % without response to intensities of 25 dB; 12 (50.0 % to intensities of 40 dB; and 7 (29.2 % did not respond to sound stimuli of 60 dB. To conclude, it was considered that the sound contamination inherent to the studied entity is elevated, that the measured levels did not fulfill either the recommendations existing at the world level, or the higienic industrial criteria, and that they act detrimentally on hearing. Therefore, we recommend the implementation of measures to protect the personnel and to attenuate the high indexes of contaminating acoustic emissions.

  2. [Efficiency of early diagnosis and prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in industrial workers (prospective observation results)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrov, S V; Shpagina, L A; Kuznetsova, G V; Burganova, M R

    2011-01-01

    Examination of workers engaged into major industrial enterprises of Novosibirsk demonstrated high prevalence of bronchial obstruction in individuals contacting industrial aerosol. The workers with long length of service proved high level of tobacco addiction and marked psychologic dependence on smoking. Based on the data obtained, the authors specified a program for early diagnosis and prevention of occupational bronchitis among the workers of major industrial enterprises.

  3. Usage of industrial robots in nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Yoshio; Hamada, Kenjiro

    1982-01-01

    Japan is now at the top level in the world in robot technology.Its application to nuclear power field is one of the most expected. However, their usage spreads over various types of nuclear power plants, their manufacture and operation, and other areas such as fuel reprocessing plants and reactor plant decommissioning. The robots as used for the operation of BWR nuclear power plants, already developed and under development, are described: features in the nuclear-power usage of robots, the robots used currently for automatic fuel exchange, the replacement of control rod drives and in-service inspection; the robots under development for travelling inspection device and the inspection of main steam-relief safety valves, future development of robots. By robot usage, necessary personnel, work period and radiation exposure can be greatly reduced, and safety and reliability are also raised. (Mori, K.)

  4. Environmental effects from the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Since 1969 several meetings have been convened to study the possibility of using high-level radiation in waste treatment. It was agreed that ionizing radiation offered some compromise as a feasible technology for a certain unique purpose, but economic considerations mitigated any overwhelming enthusiasm for early industrial realization. Recently a significant change has taken place in the world energy supply picture, and the expanded projection of nuclear power generation affects the analysis of comparative economic feasibility of ionizing radiation treatment of wastes. In addition, increased consideration of environmental quality not only calls for the re-evaluation of conventional waste treatment technologies, but also the development of more effective means where conventional methods might be unsatisfactory. As a result of several allied considerations, it was thought necessary and timely to review the status of research and development in the application of ionizing radiation to waste treatment and to consider the environmental implication of the proposed technology. Accordingly, the Symposium on the Use of High-Level Radiation in Waste Treatment - Status and Prospects was convened by the IAEA, in co-operation with the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany and the Bayerische Landesanstalt fur Bodenkultur und Pflanzenbau. Forty-eight papers were presented in eight sessions covering the current technology of waste-water treatment and re-use, radiosensitivity of micro-organisms, disinfection and microbiological control, physical and chemical modification of aqueous pollutants, technological and economic considerations, pilot-plant design and operating experiences, and radiation treatment of gaseous and solid wastes

  5. Status of the civilian nuclear industry in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heim, Alexandre; Laconde, Thibault

    2011-01-01

    The main nuclear actors in Asia are China, South Korea, India and Japan. The authors indicate the share of nuclear energy in their energy mix, the number of operating reactors, the total installed power, and the number of projects. Then, for each of these four countries, and for Pakistan and Taiwan, they propose a brief history of the nuclear program and briefly present its current status. They also evoke the official reactions after the Fukushima accident. Finally, they briefly discuss some issues for the development of civilian nuclear industry in Asia: uranium supplies, nuclear waste processing, development of a national nuclear sector

  6. Predictors of health-related quality of life among industrial workers: A descriptive correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malak, Malakeh Z

    2017-06-01

    Assessment and evaluation of the health-related quality of life of industrial workers is an important research focus. This descriptive correlational study identifies the predictors of health-related quality of life using a random sampling of industrial workers (n = 640) from construction factories in Amman Governorate in Jordan using demographic characteristics, a health and work-related factors questionnaire, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief scale. Results showed that industrial workers had good physical health but a poor working environment. There was a statistically significant relationship between educational level, conflict between work and individual life and work and social life, working hours, and workload, and all domains of health-related quality of life. Overall, educational level was the main predictor for all domains of health-related quality of life. Such results confirm the need to develop appropriate interventions and strategies to improve workers' health-related quality of life. Furthermore, developing an integrated approach among policymakers, employers, and work organizations to enhance industrial workers' occupational health programs could be effective. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Standards development for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domondon, D.B.

    The ushering of nuclear era in the Philippines with the construction of the PNPP-I (Philippine Nuclear Power Plant) necessitates the evolvement and use of nuclear standards as a tool for safety evaluation in the licensing process. The Department of Nuclear Regulation and Safeguards under the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission has as one of its responsibilities the establishment of regulatory standards to ensure safe operation of nuclear facilities. This article points out the needs for nuclear standards and the steps in standard development which involve an enormous amount of resources in terms of manpower, expertise and money. The staff of the Department of Nuclear Regulations and Safeguards (DNRS) does not intend to engage in the original development of standards; rather, it reviews standards in use elsewhere, specifically in the U.S. and adopts to local conditions. (author)

  8. Radiological impact of diagnostic nuclear medicine technology on the Quebec population (patients and workers) in 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, L.; Blanchette, J.

    1992-01-01

    Using the results of a six month survey on the doses received by non-monitored hospital workers from diagnostic nuclear medicine patients (DNMP) in three hospitals and published statistics on Quebec's workers and hospitals, an evaluation of the radiological impact of DNMP has been calculated on the Quebec's population. In 1989, diagnostic nuclear medicine gave an average of 6.4 mSv/act or a total of 2,800 sv-man. The diagnostic nuclear medicine technologists' community received 0.4 Sv-man and the non-monitored hospital workers 1.7 Sv-man from the DNMP in the same year. (author)

  9. Deeline and Fail: The ailing nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoler, P.

    1985-01-01

    Peter Stoler, a Time correspondent, believes that if the government had regulated the nuclear power industry more strictly instead of being so friendly to it, the industry would be better off today. But Stoler thinks the dying industry can and should be saved. Better management, learning from foreign experience plus more governmental concern with safety are the main prescriptions. Most of the book contains a detailed history of the industry

  10. Potential industrial market for process heat from nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, R.W.

    1976-07-01

    A specific segment of industrial process heat use has been examined in detail to identify individual plant locations throughout the United states where nuclear generated steam may be a viable alternative. Five major industries have been studied: paper, chemicals, petroleum, rubber, and primary metals. For these industries, representing 75 percent of the total industrial steam consumption, the individual plant locations within the U.S. using steam in large quantities have been located and characterized as to fuel requirements

  11. Integrated project management information systems: the French nuclear industry experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquin, J.-C.; Caupin, G.-M.

    1990-01-01

    The article discusses the desirability of integrated project management systems within the French nuclear power industry. Change in demand for nuclear generation facilities over the last two decades has necessitated a change of policy concerning organization, cost and planning within the industry. Large corporate systems can benefit from integrating equipment and bulk materials tracking. Project management for the nuclear industry will, in future, need to incorporate computer aided design tools and project management information systems data bases as well as equipment and planning data. (UK)

  12. Integrated project management information systems: the French nuclear industry experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquin, J.-C.; Caupin, G.-M.

    1990-03-01

    The article discusses the desirability of integrated project management systems within the French nuclear power industry. Change in demand for nuclear generation facilities over the last two decades has necessitated a change of policy concerning organization, cost and planning within the industry. Large corporate systems can benefit from integrating equipment and bulk materials tracking. Project management for the nuclear industry will, in future, need to incorporate computer aided design tools and project management information systems data bases as well as equipment and planning data. (UK).

  13. Musculoskeletal problems among workers in a garment industry, at Tirupur, Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreesupria Purushothaman Ravichandran

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Every occupation has its own ill effects on health. Garment workers are denied of their basic rights and less importance is given to their health. Their health status also depends on their access to treatment and availability of healthcare facilities. Aims & Objectives: To estimate the prevalence, health seeking pattern and associated factors for musculoskeletal problems among garment workers and to assess the level of exposure of individual workers to upper limb musculoskeletal loads. Materials and methods: A cross sectional study was conducted among 380 workers in a garment industry, at Tirupur over a period of two months. Interview was conducted using a structured pretested questionnaire including Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire and Numerical Pain Rating Scale. Level of exposure to musculoskeletal load was assessed using RULA tool. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 19 version. Results: 77.6% of the workers had musculoskeletal problems. The most common sites affected were neck (32.1%, knee (28.7% and low back (26.6%. More than half of the workers experienced moderate pain in all body parts. 54.2% sought health care and 40% among them preferred government hospital. Only 8.7% workers had acceptable posture. Conclusion: Health problems among garment workers are one of the areas of public health concern in our country. Reducing the work strain and providing a supportive workplace environment will have a favorable impact on work productivity

  14. Knowledge Management Impacts on Organizational Proficiency in a Changing Demographic Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heler, D.; Marco, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The US nuclear energy industry has focused on workforce development and planning efforts over the past decade in anticipation of a large number of retirements taking place. Efforts by the US nuclear industry to replace retiring workers with younger staff to close the knowledge gap and improve organizational proficiency have started. This is resulting in a bimodal workforce distribution, which means that the industry has two workforce peaks. The 2015 Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Workforce Pipeline Survey results illustrate a significant number of experienced and young professionals, with fewer employees in the mid-career age group. This workforce distribution can pose a challenge for US nuclear industry to ensure it has effectively implemented knowledge management elements (People, Process, and Technology) to improve organizational proficiency and maintain critical skill sets. This technical brief will examine how one US nuclear plant performance dropped, which in part was a result of a significant demographic shift in their organizations. In addition, the paper will explore the challenge organizations may have as they undergo demographic changes without proper knowledge management programmes in place. (author

  15. Fitness for duty in the nuclear power industry: A review of technical issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, V.; Fleming, I.; Grant, T.

    1988-09-01

    This report presents information gathered and analyzed in support of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) efforts to develop a rule that will ensure that workers with unescorted access to protected areas in nuclear power plants are fit for duty. The primary potential fitness-for-duty concern addressed in the report is impairment caused by substance abuse, although other sources of impairment on the job are discussed. The report examines the prevalence of fitness-for-duty problems and discusses the use and effects of illicit drugs, prescription drugs, over-the-counter preparations and alcohol. The ways in which fitness-for-duty concerns are being addressed in both public- and private-sector industries are reviewed, and a description is provided of fitness-for-duty practices in six organizations that, like the nuclear industry, are regulated and whose operations can affect public health and safety. Methods of ensuring fitness for duty in the nuclear industry are examined in detail. The report also addresses methods of evaluating the effectiveness of fitness-for-duty programs in the nuclear power industry

  16. Optimalisation of national industry participation in nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyana

    2008-01-01

    A study of national industry participation based on recent data has already been conducted. The current industry data is used to estimate the optimum level of national industry participation in nuclear power plant (NPP) construction based on the prior study. The purpose of the study is to give a figure of the optimum level of national industry participation in NPP construction. The scope of the study is the NPP construction project in related to the potency of national industry to participate in the project. The methodology used in the study are literature study, web surfing for industrial data, and on-the-spot industry survey that are potential to participate in NPP construction. In addition to that, discussion with expertise of industrial practitioner was also conducted. The study concludes that (1) based on the recent national industry capability provided and compared to prior similar study, it is estimated that the level of national industry participation in the first NPP construction with the capacity of 1000 MWe PWR is about 40%. (2) to accelerate NPP technology transfer, we need to build a small size NPP. The nuclear island will be developed by BATAN in cooperation with national industry and the non-nuclear island will be developed by national industry. Universities and other academicians should be involved to support and keep the sustainability of man power availability in developing the NPP technology. (author)

  17. French nuclear industry exportations: companies and organisations, achievements and projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudon, V.; Pailler, S.; Miniere, D.; Pouget-Abadie, X.; Journes, F.; Ouali, F.; Brochard, D.; Choho, T.; Lagarde, D.; Anglaret, P.; Kottman, G.; Mockly, D.; Ouzounian, G.; Cordier, P.Y.; Prenez, J.C.; Arpino, J.M.; Jaouen, C.; Jolly, B.

    2013-01-01

    This document gathers a series of short articles in which the following players: French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN), Electricity of France (EdF), French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), AREVA, ALSTOM, the Association of French Nuclear Industry Exporters (AIFEN), the National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) and the French Society of Nuclear Energy (SFEN) present their competencies in their respective fields and their strategies and commercial offers for exports. 2 articles are dedicated to the achievements of the French nuclear industry in China and another details the cooperation between SFEN and its foreign counterparts. Another article briefly presents the EPR and ATMEA reactors. (A.C.)

  18. World nuclear power generation market and prospects of industry reorganization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Tomoko

    2007-01-01

    In late years there are many trends placing nuclear energy with important energy in various countries in the world due to a remarkable rise to an energy price, importance of energy security and a surge of recognition to a global environment problem. Overseas nuclear industry's acquisition by a Japanese nuclear power plant maker and its capital or business tie-up with an overseas company, were announced in succession in 2006. A nuclear power plant maker has played an extremely important role supporting wide technology in all stages of a design, construction, operation and maintenance in a nuclear power generation business. After having surveyed the recent trend of world nuclear power generation situation, a background and the summary of these acquisition/tie-ups made were investigated and analyzed to consider the influence that movement of such an industry gives a world nuclear power generation market. (T. Tanaka)

  19. TELEMAN - an European community research and development programme on robotics in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolley, B.; Robertson, B.

    1991-01-01

    The TELEMAN Programme is a five year cost-shared research programme covering remote handling in hazardous and disordered nuclear environments. It is supported within the current research and development of the European Communities. TELEMAN's strategic objective is to develop advanced teleoperators that respond to the needs of the nuclear industry. Its technical objective is to strengthen the scientific and engineering bases upon which the design of teleoperators for use throughout the nuclear industry rests. This will be done by providing new solutions to problems of manipulation, material transport and mobile surveillance in nuclear environments and by demonstrating their feasibility. Motivation for such a programme lies in the potential teleoperators have to improve the separation of workers from radioactive equipment. This technology will also enable plant operators and public authorities to deal more effectively with nuclear abnormal incidents and increase gains in productivity, mainly in the repair and maintenance area. Community support is justified by the cost of the reliability and autonomy required for the nuclear teleoperator, the need to rationalise R and D investment in an area of increasing industrial potential and a common interest in coherent responses to emergencies. (author)

  20. Report of nuclear utility industry responses to Kemeny Commission recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a report of nuclear utility industry progress in responding to the recommendations of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island (The Kemeny Commission). On April 11, 1979, in response to TMI, President Carter established a Commission to conduct '.... a comprehensive study and investigation of the recent accident involving the nuclear power facility on Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania'. The Commission was chaired by Dr. John G. Kemeny, then President of Dartmouth College. (A list of all members of The Kemeny Commission is provided in Attachment to the Appendix ). The report of the commission's findings and recommendations was transmitted to the President in October 1979. During this same period, the nuclear utility industry responded to TMI by creating the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) with a mission to promote the highest levels of safety and reliability - to promote excellence - in the operation of nuclear electric generating plants. In addition, the Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) was established at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI to evaluate the accident and assist in determining the best industry response. In a White House paper (and press release) of December 7 1979, the President announced that he agreed fully with the spirit and intent of al the Kemeny Commission recommendations and requested that the industry and The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) comply with the recommendations. The President also recognized the industry initiative in establishing INPO and called for several actions involving the Institute; the President directed the Department of Energy and other government agencies to provide assistance to INPO and the industry. An overall status of the nuclear utility industry responses to Kemeny Commission recommendations in the key areas directly related to nuclear plant operations is provided below. A more detailed status of industry responses to the

  1. Report of nuclear utility industry responses to Kemeny Commission recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-02-15

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a report of nuclear utility industry progress in responding to the recommendations of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island (The Kemeny Commission). On April 11, 1979, in response to TMI, President Carter established a Commission to conduct '.... a comprehensive study and investigation of the recent accident involving the nuclear power facility on Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania'. The Commission was chaired by Dr. John G. Kemeny, then President of Dartmouth College. (A list of all members of The Kemeny Commission is provided in Attachment to the Appendix ). The report of the commission's findings and recommendations was transmitted to the President in October 1979. During this same period, the nuclear utility industry responded to TMI by creating the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) with a mission to promote the highest levels of safety and reliability - to promote excellence - in the operation of nuclear electric generating plants. In addition, the Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) was established at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI to evaluate the accident and assist in determining the best industry response. In a White House paper (and press release) of December 7 1979, the President announced that he agreed fully with the spirit and intent of al the Kemeny Commission recommendations and requested that the industry and The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) comply with the recommendations. The President also recognized the industry initiative in establishing INPO and called for several actions involving the Institute; the President directed the Department of Energy and other government agencies to provide assistance to INPO and the industry. An overall status of the nuclear utility industry responses to Kemeny Commission recommendations in the key areas directly related to nuclear plant operations is provided below. A more detailed status of industry responses to the

  2. [Noise hazard and hearing loss in workers in automotive component manufacturing industry in Guangzhou, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Liang, Jiabin; Rong, Xing; Zhou, Hao; Duan, Chuanwei; Du, Weijia; Liu, Yimin

    2015-12-01

    To investigate noise hazard and its influence on hearing loss in workers in the automotive component manufacturing industry. Noise level in the workplace of automotive component manufacturing enterprises was measured and hearing examination was performed for workers to analyze the features and exposure levels of noise in each process, as well as the influence on hearing loss in workers. In the manufacturing processes for different products in this industry, the manufacturing processes of automobile hub and suspension and steering systems had the highest degrees of noise hazard, with over-standard rates of 79.8% and 57.1%, respectively. In the different technical processes for automotive component manufacturing, punching and casting had the highest degrees of noise hazard, with over-standard rates of 65.0% and 50%, respectively. The workers engaged in the automotive air conditioning system had the highest rate of abnormal hearing ability (up to 3.1%). In the automotive component manufacturing industry, noise hazard exceeds the standard seriously. Although the rate of abnormal hearing is lower than the average value of the automobile manufacturing industry in China, this rate tends to increase gradually. Enough emphasis should be placed on the noise hazard in this industry.

  3. Diverting indirect subsidies from the nuclear industry to the photovoltaic industry: Energy and financial returns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenika-Zovko, I.; Pearce, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power and solar photovoltaic energy conversion often compete for policy support that governs economic viability. This paper compares current subsidization of the nuclear industry with providing equivalent support to manufacturing photovoltaic modules. Current U.S. indirect nuclear insurance subsidies are reviewed and the power, energy and financial outcomes of this indirect subsidy are compared to equivalent amounts for indirect subsidies (loan guarantees) for photovoltaic manufacturing using a model that holds economic values constant for clarity. The preliminary analysis indicates that if only this one relatively ignored indirect subsidy for nuclear power was diverted to photovoltaic manufacturing, it would result in more installed power and more energy produced by mid-century. By 2110 cumulative electricity output of solar would provide an additional 48,600 TWh over nuclear worth $5.3 trillion. The results clearly show that not only does the indirect insurance liability subsidy play a significant factor for nuclear industry, but also how the transfer of such an indirect subsidy from the nuclear to photovoltaic industry would result in more energy over the life cycle of the technologies. - Highlights: → The indirect insurance liability subsidy has been quantified over the life cycle of the U.S. nuclear fleet. → It was found to play a significant factor in the economics of the nuclear industry. → A transfer of such an indirect subsidy from the nuclear to photovoltaic industry would result in significantly more energy over the life cycle of the technologies.

  4. Manpower development in the US nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todreas, N.E.; Foulke, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the history and current status of the university nuclear education sector and the utility training sector of the United States (US) nuclear power industry. Recently, the number of programs in the university nuclear education sector has declined, and the remaining programs are in need of both strong governmental and industrial assistance if they are to remain a stable source for educating nuclear engineers and health physicists to staff the resurgence of the nuclear power industry. The utility training sector has undergone remarkable development since the TMI-2 accident. Programs to recruit, train, and qualify the variety of personnel needed, as well as the steps to accredit these programs, are being developed on a systematic, industry-wide basis. A number of new technologies for educating and training personnel are emerging which may be used to create or improve learning environments. Manpower development for the US nuclear power industry is a shared responsibility among the universities, the nuclear utilities, and the nuclear suppliers. This shared responsibility can continue to be best discharged by enhancement of the interaction among all parties with respect to evaluating the proper level of cognitive development within the utility training program

  5. Spanish Nuclear Industry in Lungmen Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alomar, F.

    1998-01-01

    Spain's Advanced Nuclear Reactors Programs, under DTN's leadership, has meant an active participation the American Design of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants, in both General Electric and Westinghouse Programs. This collaboration has given to the Companies, which directly involved, an in-depth knowledge of both Development Programs, as well as it has allowed to establish relationships with Nuclear Island DTN's coordination. These Companies included a broad sample of Spanish Companies most interest in the Nuclear Field: DTN representing Spanish Utilities with Nuclear Assets; Empresarios Agrupados and INITEC as a Joint Venture, representing Spanish A/E; Equipos Nucleares, S.A., representing Nuclear Components Manufacturers; Tecnatom, representing Nuclear Services and Engineering and CIEMAT as National Laboratory. Taiwan Electric Power has awarded its two 1300 MWe Lungmen Units to General Electric. Knowledge acquired by these Spanish Companies along FOAKE First of kind then Engineering has allowed them to bid for some authorities in Lungmen NPP and in some cases to get important awards. Furthermore, the good working relationship which has been established has made way for other Spanish Companies to bid for other Project Packages. On a case by case basis the response of Spanish manufacturer has been irregular . In some instances manufactures have stopped manufacturing nuclear components, and in other instances a distinct lack of interest has been detected. (Author)

  6. Annual report 1999 - Brazil Nuclear Industry (INB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This document presents the 1999 annual report covering the following activities: nuclear fuel, resources and application, ISO 9001, environment social activities, personnel, financial indicators, and countability

  7. Radiation exposure and cause specific mortality among nuclear workers in Belgium (1969-1994)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, H.; Swaen, G. M. H.; Slangen, J.; Van Amersvoort, L.; Holmstock, L.; Van Mieghem, E.; Van Regenmortel, I.; Wambersie, A.

    2005-01-01

    Cause specific mortality was studied in nuclear workers from five nuclear facilities in Belgium and compared to the general population. For the 1969-1994 period, mortality in male nuclear workers is significantly lower for all causes of death and for all cancer deaths. The same conclusions are reached if one assumes a latency period of 20 y between the first irradiation and cancer induction. In female workers, mortality due to all causes and all cancer deaths is not different from that of the general population. Analysis of cause specific mortality was performed for male and female workers for three endpoints: specific cancer sites, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. No significant increase in mortality was observed. In male workers, the influence of cumulative dose was also investigated using four dose levels: No significant correlation was found. Smoking habits may be a confounding factor in smoking related health conditions. (authors)

  8. Assessment of the benefits and impacts in the U.S. Nuclear Power Industry of hypothesized lower occupational dose limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, R.L.; Schmitt, J.F. [Nuclear Energy Institute, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements have issued recommendations that would limit occupational exposure of individuals to doses lower than regulatory limits contained in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s 10 CFR Part 20, {open_quotes}Standards for Protection Against Radiation{close_quotes}. Because of this situation, there is interest in the potential benefits and impacts that would be associated with movement of the NRC regulatory limits toward the advisory bodies recommendations. The records of occupational worker doses in the U.S. commercial nuclear power industry show that the vast majority of these workers have doses that are significantly below the regulatory limit of 50 mSv (5 rem) per year. Some workers doses do approach the limits, however. This is most common in the case of specially skilled workers, especially those with skills utilized in support of plant outage work. Any consideration of the potential benefits and impacts of hypothesized lower dose limits must address these workers as an important input to the overall assessment. There are also, of course, many other areas in which the benefits and impacts must be evaluated. To prepare to provide valid, constructive input on this matter, the U.S. nuclear power industry is undertaking an assessment, facilitated by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), of the potential benefits and impacts at its facilities associated with hypothesized lower occupational dose limits. Some preliminary results available to date from this assessment are provided.

  9. Assessment of the benefits and impacts in the U.S. Nuclear Power Industry of hypothesized lower occupational dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, R.L.; Schmitt, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements have issued recommendations that would limit occupational exposure of individuals to doses lower than regulatory limits contained in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's 10 CFR Part 20, open-quotes Standards for Protection Against Radiationclose quotes. Because of this situation, there is interest in the potential benefits and impacts that would be associated with movement of the NRC regulatory limits toward the advisory bodies recommendations. The records of occupational worker doses in the U.S. commercial nuclear power industry show that the vast majority of these workers have doses that are significantly below the regulatory limit of 50 mSv (5 rem) per year. Some workers doses do approach the limits, however. This is most common in the case of specially skilled workers, especially those with skills utilized in support of plant outage work. Any consideration of the potential benefits and impacts of hypothesized lower dose limits must address these workers as an important input to the overall assessment. There are also, of course, many other areas in which the benefits and impacts must be evaluated. To prepare to provide valid, constructive input on this matter, the U.S. nuclear power industry is undertaking an assessment, facilitated by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), of the potential benefits and impacts at its facilities associated with hypothesized lower occupational dose limits. Some preliminary results available to date from this assessment are provided

  10. Japan's nuclear industry; taking off in the mist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This survey of the nuclear industry aimed at investigating the results and prospects of nuclear energy-related sales, expenditures and manpower in electric utilities, mining and manufacturing industries and trading companies in Japan, so that the study of the economic aspects of the nuclear industry and the analysis of problems may contribute to the sound development of the industry and provide with fundamental informations for interested persons in all sectors. It covers the fiscal year 1978, and is the 20th of a series of annual investigations. The fiscal year 1978 began with the court ruling on the Ikata case, and ended with the impact of the accident in the Three Mile Island plant, USA. As for the results of survey, the answers to questionnaire, the trend of expenditures, the trend of sales, the trend of manpower, the prospects for the future, and the flow of money in the nuclear industry are reported. The gross expenditures in private industries increased by 41% to 1,450 billion yen in comparison with the previous fiscal year. Sales exceeded expenditures by 12,600 million yen in mining and manufacturing industries. Manpower increased by 9% in electric utilities and 7% in mining and manufacturing industries. The construction of 3 nuclear power plants is due to start in fiscal 1978. (Kako, I.)

  11. Exposure to fluoride in smelter workers in a primary aluminum industry in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susheela, A K; Mondal, N K; Singh, A

    2013-04-01

    Fluoride is used increasingly in a variety of industries in India. Emission of fluoride dust and fumes from the smelters of primary aluminum producing industries is dissipated in the work environment and poses occupational health hazards. To study the prevalence of health complaints and its association with fluoride level in body fluids of smelter workers in a primary aluminum producing industry. In an aluminum industry, health status of 462 smelter workers, 60 supervisors working in the smelter unit, 62 non-smelter workers (control group 1) and 30 administration staff (control group 2) were assessed between 2007 and 2009. Their health complaints were recorded and categorized into 4 groups: 1) gastro-intestinal complaints; 2) non-skeletal manifestations; 3) skeletal symptoms; and (4) respiratory problems. Fluoride level in body fluids, nails, and drinking water was tested by an ion selective electrode; hemoglobin level was tested using HemoCue. The total complaints reported by study groups were significantly higher than the control groups. Smelter workers had a significantly (pworkers; the nail fluoride content was also higher in smelter workers than non-smelter workers (pworkers with higher hemoglobin level had a significantly (pworkers were consuming water with high fluoride concentrations. A high percentage of participants was using substances with high fluoride contents. Industrial emission of fluoride is not the only important sources of fluoride exposure--consumption of substance with high levels of fluoride is another important route of entry of fluoride into the body. Measurement of hemoglobin provides a reliable indicator for monitoring the health status of employees at risk of fluorosis.

  12. Workers' compensation claims for musculoskeletal disorders among wholesale and retail trade industry workers--Ohio, 2005-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) resulting from ergonomic hazards are common in the United States. Recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) indicate that in 2011, one third of occupational injuries and illnesses resulting in lost time from work were WMSDs. Based on data from the 2010 BLS Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses, a higher rate of WMSDs resulting in lost time from work occurred in the Wholesale and Retail Trade (WRT) industry compared with most other industries. To assess trends and identify WRT subsectors and subgroups associated with high rates of WMSD workers' compensation claims, the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation (OBWC) and CDC analyzed OBWC claims data for single-location WRT employers in Ohio for the period 2005-2009. From 2005 to 2009, the rate of WMSD claims declined from 86.3 to 52.8 per 10,000 employees. The three WRT industry subsectors with the highest rates of WMSD claims were Merchant Wholesalers, Nondurable Goods; Furniture and Home Furnishings Stores; and Merchant Wholesalers, Durable Goods. Within those three WRT subsectors, the highest rates of WMSD claims were noted in five subgroups: furniture stores and wholesalers of alcoholic beverages, groceries and related products, metal and minerals, and motor vehicle parts. Providing recommendations for WMSD prevention is particularly important for these WRT subgroups.

  13. Skoda JS's proposal for Slovak nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovec, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation author deals with the structure and revenues of the Skoda JS, a.s., as well as productions of the company for nuclear power industry in the Czech Republic, Ukraine and the Slovak Republic

  14. Consideration of nuclear technology development on agricultural industrialization in Xinjiang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Fang; Xie Yinghua; Lei Bin

    2010-01-01

    This review describes the application of nuclear technology in Xinjiang agriculture along with industrialization and economic benefit since 1970s. Current problems in this field were analyzed and corresponding advices were presented. (authors)

  15. Supplier quality assurance systems: a study in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, A.J.; Churchill, G.F.; Dale, B.G.

    1988-01-01

    The results are reported of a study which investigated the impact of quality assurance on 13 suppliers to the nuclear industry. The purpose of the study was to determine the benefits and problems of applying quality assurance in the supply of high risk plant items and material for nuclear installations. The paper discusses the problems facing the industry including: multiple audits and inspections, the irritation with having to contend with two quality system standards (namely BS 5750 and BS 5882) and the cost effectiveness of the more stringent quality system and quality control surveillance requirements imposed by the nuclear industry. It is also pointed out that companies supplying non-nuclear industrial customers were dissatisfied with the qualifications, experience and professional competence of some auditors and many inspectors. (author)

  16. Cycle of radionuclides released into waters by the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovard, A.; Grauby, A.

    1975-01-01

    A review is made of the main radionuclides released by nuclear industry into the aquatic environment. The water-sediment interactions, the uptake of radionuclides by aquatic organisms and the problem of irrigation water are considered [fr

  17. Nuclear industry in a country with a substantial oil reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, R.; Castillo, H.; Costa, D.; Galan, I.; Martinez, M.

    1981-01-01

    The importance of the development of a nuclear industry in a country like Mexico, with a substantial oil reserve is analyzed, taking into account the technical, economical, political, ecological and social aspects of the problem. (author)

  18. Young workers in the construction industry and initial OSH-training when entering work life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holte, Kari Anne; Kjestveit, Kari

    2012-01-01

    Studies have found that young workers are at risk for injuries. The risk for accidents is high within construction, indicating that young workers may be especially vulnerable in this industry. In Norway, it is possible to enter the construction industry as a full time worker at the age of 18. The aim of this paper was to explore how young construction workers are received at their workplace with regards to OHS-training. The study was designed as a qualitative case study. Each case consisted of a young worker or apprentice (< 25 years), a colleague, the immediate superior, the OHS manager, and a safety representative in the company. The interviews were recorded and analyzed through content analysis. The results showed that there were differences between large and small companies, where large companies had more formalized routines and systems for receiving and training young workers. These routines were however more dependent on requirements set by legislators and contractors more than by company size, since the legislation has different requirements with impact on OHS.

  19. Evaluation of Dust Exposure among the Workers in Agricultural Industries in North-East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, Krishna N; Patil, Mahesh R

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to quantify dust exposure among the workers in four different industrial settings: rice mills, flour mills, oil mills, and tea factories and to compare the obtained data with the permissible exposure limit (PEL) of Indian Union Ministry of Labour as well as to compare the dust exposure across activities and seasons. RespiCon(TM) particle sampler was used for collecting dust concentration in the breathing zone of the workers. In total, 149 workers participated in the study and 204 samples were collected. Samples were collected in the vicinity of different processing operations. Samples in the rice mills were collected for two consecutive years in two seasons; however samples from other industries were collected for 1 year. The results indicate that geometric mean (GM) of dust exposure was significantly (P workers are exposed to higher level of respirable dust as compared to the PEL, while total dust exposure to all the workers were higher than the PEL; thus, immediate reduction of dust exposure among the workers is necessary for preventing respiratory system impairment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  20. Ion exchange in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibler, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Ion exchange is used in nearly every part of the nuclear fuel cycle -- from the purification of uranium from its ore to the final recovery of uranium and transmutation products. Ion exchange also plays a valuable role in the management of nuclear wastes generated in the fuel cycle

  1. Nuclear energy can compete, industry watchers say

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cash, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear power plants with outstanding operating records and cost-conscious management can continue to compete with other forms of generation as the electricity business becomes more competitive. Natural gas-fired units will set the pricing standard with which nuclear power plants must compete

  2. Perspectives of development in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelt, K.

    1987-01-01

    Modern economy cannot do without electricity, and safe and reliable electricity supply cannot do without nuclear power. This implies that the F.R.G. will continue to build nuclear power stations, and as the power stations of the future benefit from the experience gained with existing plant, there will be continuous improvement in terms of safety, pollution control, and economics. (orig.) [de

  3. Tooth loss, prosthetic status and treatment needs among industrial workers in Belgaum, Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Vishal V; Shigli, Kamal; Hebbal, Mamata; Agrawal, Neha

    2012-01-01

    The health of industrial workers often goes uncared for due to their stressful working conditions, busy schedules and poor economic conditions. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the prevalence of tooth loss, prosthetic status and treatment needs among industrial workers in Belgaum, Karnataka, India according to the criteria described in the World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Assessment form (1997). A total of 614 workers participated in the study. Information was obtained regarding their oral hygiene practice. The presence or absence of habits, and the frequency and duration since the last visit to a dentist were recorded followed by clinical examination. Chi-square test was used to determine the association between the variables and tooth loss. There was a statistically significant difference between the number of missing teeth in different age groups, methods of cleaning, smoking habits and visits to the dentist. Regarding prosthetic status, only one worker had a fixed prosthesis in the mandibular arch. The study revealed that tooth loss was associated with oral hygiene practices, habits and visits to the dentist. Poor prosthetic status and high treatment needs were observed. This study emphasized the need for improved dental health awareness and availability of dental facilities to industrial workers.

  4. Occupational noise-induced hearing loss in Indian steel industry workers: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lakhwinder Pal; Bhardwaj, Arvind; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2013-04-01

    The present study focused on exploring the current level of hearing protection and subsequently determined the prevalence of occupational noise-induced hearing loss among casting and forging industry workers. The casting and forging industry provides employment to a significant portion of the population. The level of hearing protection was assessed through questionnaire survey of 572 workers. Out of these workers, 165 and another control group of 57 participants were assessed by formal audiometry. Audiometric tests were conducted at frequencies of 1.0 KHz to 8.0 KHz.The occurrence of hearing loss was determined on the basis of a hearing threshold level with a low fence of 25 dB. Student's test and ANOVA were used to compare the various groups; a p value steel industry are highly exposed to occupational noise. The majority of workers are not protected from noise-induced hearing loss. There is a need to provide special ear protectors for workers engaged in forging. A complete hearing protection program, including training, audiometry, job rotation, and the use of hearing protection devices, needs to be introduced.

  5. Comprehensive survey of the Russian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    This document presents the organization of nuclear activities in the Russian federation: Minatom and its replacement by the federal agency of atomic energy, personnel, nuclear power plants (VVER, RBMK, fast neutron and mixed reactors), availability and power production, export of activities (construction of nuclear power plants in Slovakia, Iran, China, India, project in Viet Nam), expansion of the nuclear power plants park (improvement of plants safety, increase of service life), completion of uncompleted plants, the construction of which was stopped after the Chernobyl accident and the reorganization of the former-USSR, construction of new generation power plants (VVER-640, -1000 and -1500), fuel cycle facilities (geographical distribution, production of natural uranium, conversion and enrichment), fuel fabrication, reprocessing processes and spent fuel storage, management of radioactive wastes (leasing), R and D activities (organizations and institutes), research programs of the international scientific and technical center, nuclear safety authority (Gosatomnadzor - GAN). (J.S.)

  6. 20 CFR 404.1402 - When are railroad industry services by a non-vested worker covered under Social Security?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-vested worker covered under Social Security? 404.1402 Section 404.1402 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... When are railroad industry services by a non-vested worker covered under Social Security? If you are a non-vested worker, we (the Social Security Administration) will consider your services in the railroad...

  7. List of publications of workers of the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Cracow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babecki, J.; Bednarz, W.; Kuszaj, K.; Ptak, K.; Zrodlewska, K.

    1985-01-01

    Bibliography contains 3500 publications of 294 workers of the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Cracow published during the first 25 years of its activity. The publications are presented in alphabetic order. Personal author index is enclosed. (A.S.)

  8. The impact of computers on the nuclear utility industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The applications of computer technology to the nuclear utility industry are discussed in light of recent phenomenal growth of computer hardware and software. Computer applications in existence in the power plants are presented, as well as potential future development for plant design, construction, operation, maintenance and retrofit. Utility concerns are addressed. The study concludes that the applications of computer technology to the nuclear utility industry are highly promising and evolutionary in nature

  9. Cyber security best practices for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badr, I.

    2012-01-01

    When deploying software based systems, such as, digital instrumentation and controls for the nuclear industry, it is vital to include cyber security assessment as part of architecture and development process. When integrating and delivering software-intensive systems for the nuclear industry, engineering teams should make use of a secure, requirements driven, software development life cycle, ensuring security compliance and optimum return on investment. Reliability protections, data loss prevention, and privacy enforcement provide a strong case for installing strict cyber security policies. (authors)

  10. Radioactive waste management in the VS military nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobal'chuk, O.V.; Kruglov, A.K.; Sokolova, I.D.; Smirnov, Yu.V.

    1989-01-01

    Organization and plans of radioactive waste management in the US military nuclear industry, determining transition from the policy of temporal waste storage to their final and safe disposal are presented. Programs of long-term management of high-level, transuranium and low-level wastes, the problems of the work financing and the structure of management activities related to the radioactive waste processing military nuclear industry enterprises are considered

  11. Cyber security best practices for the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badr, I. [Rational IBM Software Group, IBM Corporation, Evanston, IL 60201 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    When deploying software based systems, such as, digital instrumentation and controls for the nuclear industry, it is vital to include cyber security assessment as part of architecture and development process. When integrating and delivering software-intensive systems for the nuclear industry, engineering teams should make use of a secure, requirements driven, software development life cycle, ensuring security compliance and optimum return on investment. Reliability protections, data loss prevention, and privacy enforcement provide a strong case for installing strict cyber security policies. (authors)

  12. A review of cancer mortality data of radiation workers of Nuclear Power Plant, Paks, Hungary, in the light the international radiation epidemiology study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turai, I.; Kerekes, A.; Otos, M.; Veress, K.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: To give a review of cancer mortality data among Hungarian radiation workers in nuclear industry in comparison with the results of the international nuclear workers' study prevailing the size of the study group of all former studies. Methods: Retrospective cohort study including 598,068 workers of 154 nuclear establishments in 15 countries (AUS, BEL, CAN, FIN, FRA, GER, HUN, JAP, LIT, ROK, SLK, SPA, SWE, UK, USA) coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC, Lyon, France). The national study was extended for an additional 4-year period. Results: In the international study 407,391 persons in 13 years of average employment received 19.4 mSv mean cumulative dose, while in the national study 3322 radiation workers of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Paks, Hungary, in 14 years of follow-up period accumulated in average 5.13 mSv, only. There were 5233 cancer deaths registered in the international study, associated with an estimated ERR of 0.97 per Sv. Thus, 19.4 mSv recorded cumulative dose can explain 1 to 2% of cancer death cases. In radiation workers of NPP, Paks, during the period of 1985-1998 there were 40 cancer deaths observed against the expected 58.8 cases. In a further four year period (1999-2002) 29 cancer death cases were identified vs. the expected 65.5 cases. The SMR for the cancer death cases registered in recent and former radiation workers of NPP, Paks in the 18-year follow-up period is 56%. The SMR from all causes was even lower, 40% only. Conclusions: In the international study the mean accumulated radiation dose received by nuclear workers in 13 years is below of the recent annual dose limit (20 mSv/yr of the effective dose). The average value for the whole of radiation workers in 15 countries is almost 4-times higher of that registered in Hungary. The 'healthy worker effect' in the nuclear industry, and particularly in Hungary has been proven, once again. Nevertheless, the results

  13. Demands for improvement in working surroundings for older workers in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shizawa, Yasuhiro; Sakuda, Hiroshi; Ohashi, Tomoki

    2003-01-01

    Workers in three nuclear power plants belonging to Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. were asked to complete a questionnaire. According to the accident reports, workers aged 50 or older had more accidents than those in 30s or 40s. Moreover, it is predicted that the average age of workers in Japan will increase during the first half of the 21st century. Therefore, investigations into working surroundings in which older workers can better perform their work would be useful. To this end, a questionnaire addressing issues related to working surroundings was conducted among workers in nuclear power plants and the demands for improvement of working surroundings for older workers are summarized. The demands of 'better lighting', 'making things less heavy', and installation of an elevator' were correlated with age, indicating that younger people have a tendency not to notice these issues. Thus, if the authority deciding on improvements in working surroundings is not an older worker, it is especially important that lighting, the weights of objects to be moved, and methods of moving between floors is taken into account. Findings specific to nuclear power plants were also reported. For example, employees who worked in the non-radiation controlled area demanded the installation of air conditioning and those who worked in the radiation controlled area demanded the establishment of a rest area. Further, we have developed a guidebook entitled 'a guidebook supporting workers' cooperation among all generations' to promote cooperation between older and younger workers. (author)

  14. Women workers in male dominated industrial manufacturing organisations: Contrasting workplace case studies from Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, John; Henderson, Lindy; Strachan, Glenda

    2005-01-01

    This study compared women's roles, expectations and experiences in two comparable, male dominated industrial manufacturing companies in Australia. Both organisations are subject to legislated equal opportunity program and reporting requirements. The research was conducted to examinee the differences between what is submitted in their EEO reports and the experience of women workers in the organisations. Good jobs and poor jobs existed in the same legislative and industrial framework and in the...

  15. [The systemic and differential psychoprophylaxis of vascular brain diseases in the workers of an industrial enterprise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, A G

    1994-01-01

    Basing on epidemiological, prospective and clinicopsychological data obtained on 1900 industrial workers of Nizhni Novgorod city, the system of psychoprophylaxis and psychotherapy of cerebrovascular diseases has been developed. The system of psychoprophylaxis was used with consideration of the disease stage and phase, psychic and psychosomatic status in risk groups, in subjects with initial and apparent symptoms of cerebrovascular failure. The psychoprophylactic system proved effective in the conditions of a large industrial enterprise.

  16. Applications of neutron radiography for the nuclear power industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craft, Aaron E.; Barton, John P.

    2016-11-01

    The World Conference on Neutron Radiography (WCNR) and International Topical Meeting on Neutron Radiography (ITMNR) series have been running over 35 years. The most recent event, ITMNR-8, focused on industrial applications and was the first time this series was hosted in China. In China, more than twenty new nuclear power plants are in construction and plans have been announced to increase the nuclear capacity further by a factor of three within fifteen years. There are additional prospects in many other nations. Neutron tests were vital during previous developments of materials and components for nuclear power applications, as reported in this conference series. For example a majority of the 140 papers in the Proceedings of the First WCNR are for the benefit of the nuclear power industry. Included are reviews of the diverse techniques being applied in Europe, Japan, the United States, and at many other centers. Many of those techniques are being utilized and advanced to the present time. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Applications include examination of nuclear waste, nuclear fuels, cladding, control elements, and other critical components. In this paper, the techniques developed and applied internationally for the nuclear power industry since the earliest years are reviewed, and the question is asked whether neutron test techniques can be of value in development of the present and future generations of nuclear power plants world-wide.

  17. A survey into process and worker's characteristics in the wood furniture industry in Songkhla Province, southern region of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuntiseranee, P; Chongsuvivatwong, V

    1998-12-01

    A cross-sectional survey of the wood furniture industry was conducted in southern Thailand in February 1993. The aim was to examine the manufacturing process, occupational hazards at the workplace, workers' demographic characteristics, period of employment, incidence rate of work related injury and some reproductive history of workers. Altogether 69 managers and 1,000 workers participated in the study. There are 2 main types of wood industry, rubberwood and hardwood. The rubberwood industry is semi-automated with advanced technology, has a female-dominated workforce of 200-300 workers per factory and overseas-market orientation. The hardwood industry is based in small-scale workplaces ranging from 20 to 60 workers, domestic-market orientation and has a male-dominated workforce. Most of the workers were young, single, of low education and were high turnover rate laborforce, with arduous work and long working hours per week. Solvent was the most frequent chemical exposure. The person-year incidence of chemical exposure in female workers was higher than in male workers for every group of chemicals. The incidence of accidents was twice as high as the official rate. The standardized fertility ratio of female wood workers was only 51.6% of that of the Thai female population. There was a high abortion rate among women who became pregnant inside the wood industry compared to that among pregnancies outside the wood factory. Wood industry workers were exposed to occupational hazards and accident-prone work conditions.

  18. Migration and Health in the Construction Industry: Culturally Centering Voices of Bangladeshi Workers in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Mohan J

    2017-01-29

    Construction workers globally face disproportionate threats to health and wellbeing, constituted by the nature of the work they perform. The workplace fatalities and lost-time injuries experienced by construction workers are significantly greater than in other forms of work. This paper draws on the culture-centered approach (CCA) to dialogically articulate meanings of workplace risks and injuries, voiced by Bangladeshi migrant construction workers in Singapore. The narratives voiced by the participants suggest an ecological approach to workplace injuries in the construction industries, attending to food insecurity, lack of sleep, transportation, etc. as contextual features of work that shape the risks experienced at work. Moreover, participant voices point to the barriers in communication, lack of understanding, and experiences of incivility as features of work that constitute the ways in which they experience injury risks. The overarching discourses of productivity and efficiency constitute a broader climate of threats to worker safety and health.

  19. Migration and Health in the Construction Industry: Culturally Centering Voices of Bangladeshi Workers in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Mohan J.

    2017-01-01

    Construction workers globally face disproportionate threats to health and wellbeing, constituted by the nature of the work they perform. The workplace fatalities and lost-time injuries experienced by construction workers are significantly greater than in other forms of work. This paper draws on the culture-centered approach (CCA) to dialogically articulate meanings of workplace risks and injuries, voiced by Bangladeshi migrant construction workers in Singapore. The narratives voiced by the participants suggest an ecological approach to workplace injuries in the construction industries, attending to food insecurity, lack of sleep, transportation, etc. as contextual features of work that shape the risks experienced at work. Moreover, participant voices point to the barriers in communication, lack of understanding, and experiences of incivility as features of work that constitute the ways in which they experience injury risks. The overarching discourses of productivity and efficiency constitute a broader climate of threats to worker safety and health. PMID:28146056

  20. Organizing Immigrant Workers in the Los Angeles Apparel Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Bonacich

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The apparel industry in the United States is declining. Every month new reports are put out enumerating the loss of jobs. Meanwhile, parallel numbers report the monthly rise of imports. However, even though apparel jobs are moving offshore, U.S.-based manufacturers and retailers still play a critical role in the production of apparel for the U.S. market. They have become multinational corporations. They now arrange for the production of their clothing in other countries, but they still remain in charge of ordering and marketing.

  1. [Investigation about prevention behavior for dust workers in machinery, ceramic, and metallurgy industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fu-hai; Ma, Qing-kun; Xiao, Shu-yu; Cui, Feng-tao; Meng, Qing-di; Yang, Xiu-qing; Qi, Hui-sheng; Fan, Xue-yun; Yao, San-qiao

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this thesis were to study the behavior about workers exposed to dust and provide scientific basis for health promotion. We designed a questionnaire and carry it on the 746 dust workers in the 3 representative corporations of Machinery, Ceramic, and Metallurgy Industry. All data were input into computer. And a database was established with Excel. SPSS11.5 statistical analysis software was used to analyze the influence on protecting behavioral between the application of qualifications, different jobs, training or protection, and other aspects etc. The rates were 94.4% and 75.3% about the regular physical examination and requirements for protective equipment. The rate of choosing an effective way of protection was generally low (15.4%). There was significant difference for among different educational background workers (P Metallurgy Industry. Those who were not educated had a lower using rate about the protection behavior, regular physical examination, and requirements for protective equipment than those educated.

  2. Estimating the whole-body exposure annual dose of radiation workers of petroleum nuclear well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yizong; Gao Jianzheng; Liu Wenhong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: By imitating experiment of radioactive sources being installed, to estimate the annual whole-body exposure dose of radiation workers of petroleum nuclear determining wells; Methods: To compre the values of the theory, imitating experiment and γ individual dose monitor calculations. Results: The three values measured above tally with one anather. Conclusion: The annual whole-body exposure doses of radiation workers of petroleum nuclear determining wells are no more than 5 mSv. (authors)

  3. The right understanding of nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baetjer, K.; Begemann, K.; Bleck, J.; Boikat, U.; Carbonell, P.; Helmers, H.; Kirchner, J.; Muschol, E.; Scheer, J.; Schmitz-Feuerhake, I.

    1978-09-01

    As the abstractor found himself unable to point out all the errors of the book, the statement on the back cover is cited in full wording: A boom for nuclear power - in the next 10 years, 40 nuclear power plants will be built in West Germany alone. It is a wellprepared boom: For 20 years, the public has heard about 'cheap, safe, and clean, nuclear power. Yet in spite of this, there is an ever increasing resistance of the public which finds itself threatened, misinformed and lost - left alone also by natural scientists who do not speak in the controversy or against the nuclear propaganda. Here is where this book intends to help. It was written by a group of scientists, students and staff of Bremen university. For three years, they have followed the public discussion of the nuclear problem, often acting as experts on behalf of citizen's groups. In this book, they refer to the propaganda leaflet '66 questions - 66 answers - for a better understanding of nuclear power', which has been distributed in 200,000 copies. To each of the questions and answers they give a detailed reply from the point of view of nuclear power plant opponents. With a summarizing epilogue and a list of explanations of abbreviations and keywards. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Estimation of hand index for male industrial workers of Haryana State

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hand index derived from measured hand dimensions can be used to estimate differences related to sex, age and race in forensic and legal sciences. It has been calculated as percentage of hand breadth over the hand length; which suggests that the male industrial workers population of state belong to mesocheir group of ...

  5. Math/Measurement Literacy for Upgrading Skills of Industrial Hourly Workers. Math Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Joan L.

    This manual contains materials for a numeracy course for adult industrial workers. In addition to assessment tests, seven units are provided. Unit topics are whole numbers; fractions; decimals; percents, median, and range; measurement and signed numbers; ratio/proportion and introduction to algebra; and computer literacy using algebra software.…

  6. Older Workers in the Hospitality Industry: Valuing Experience and Informal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Roy

    2011-01-01

    The research sets out to identify the learning processes adopted by older workers in the hospitality and visitor attraction industry in Scotland, with a view to determining how employers may better support their education and training within enterprises. The study was undertaken as part of the ESRC project on "Sustaining the employability of…

  7. Far from Home, But at Home: Indian Migrant Workers in the Iranian Oil Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atabaki, T.

    2015-01-01

    This article revisits the life and times of Indian migrant workers in Persia/Iran during the first half of the twentieth century, and discusses their contributions to the founding, development and eventual consolidation of the Persian/Iranian oil industry. A number of factors that shaped this

  8. Modelling human resource requirements for the nuclear industry in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofs, Ferry [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG) (Netherlands); Flore, Massimo; Estorff, Ulrik von [Joint Research Center (JRC) (Netherlands)

    2017-11-15

    The European Human Resource Observatory for Nuclear (EHRO-N) provides the European Commission with essential data related to supply and demand for nuclear experts in the EU-28 and the enlargement and integration countries based on bottom-up information from the nuclear industry. The objective is to assess how the supply of experts for the nuclear industry responds to the needs for the same experts for present and future nuclear projects in the region. Complementary to the bottom-up approach taken by the EHRO-N team at JRC, a top-down modelling approach has been taken in a collaboration with NRG in the Netherlands. This top-down modelling approach focuses on the human resource requirements for operation, construction, decommissioning, and efforts for long term operation of nuclear power plants. This paper describes the top-down methodology, the model input, the main assumptions, and the results of the analyses.

  9. Modelling human resource requirements for the nuclear industry in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelofs, Ferry; Flore, Massimo; Estorff, Ulrik von

    2017-01-01

    The European Human Resource Observatory for Nuclear (EHRO-N) provides the European Commission with essential data related to supply and demand for nuclear experts in the EU-28 and the enlargement and integration countries based on bottom-up information from the nuclear industry. The objective is to assess how the supply of experts for the nuclear industry responds to the needs for the same experts for present and future nuclear projects in the region. Complementary to the bottom-up approach taken by the EHRO-N team at JRC, a top-down modelling approach has been taken in a collaboration with NRG in the Netherlands. This top-down modelling approach focuses on the human resource requirements for operation, construction, decommissioning, and efforts for long term operation of nuclear power plants. This paper describes the top-down methodology, the model input, the main assumptions, and the results of the analyses.

  10. The status of ISI in the UK nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bann, T.; Rogerson, A. [AEA Technology, Risley (United Kingdom). Nuclear NDE Services

    1999-08-01

    This paper reviews the status of in-service inspection (ISI) in UK nuclear power generation industry through the experience of its nuclear utilities. The paper is intended to be a summary of some of the most recent and relevant ISI issues facing the utilities and the solutions devised to address those issues. (orig.)

  11. Fallout: the defence, industrial and technological benefits of nuclear deterrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tertrais, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    In the current climate of budgetary restrictions, it is fair to question the weight of military nuclear defence spending. Upon examination, however, nuclear deterrence has numerous military, industrial, and technological benefits. It is, in fact, totally intertwined with the other elements of our defence system. (author)

  12. Activities of Japan Nuclear Technology Institute Japanese TSO of Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, T.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy is a superior form of energy in that it delivers stable power supplies and counters global warming, and it is important to promote nuclear power generation as the core power sources for a nation. However, the Japanese environment surrounding nuclear energy is changing drastically, following the liberalization of market and recent series of troubles or falsifications shaking public confidence in nuclear energy. In the above mentioned situation, nuclear industries and organizations must fulfill their individual roles, and amass its strength to work toward enhancing industry initiatives for safety activities, securing safe / stable plant operations, restoring public confidence and initiate revitalization of nuclear energy operations. The Japan Nuclear Technology Institute (JANTI) has been established as a new entity for supporting and leading the industry's further progress in March 2005. Members of JANTI are not only utilities but also component manufacturers and constructors. JANTI enhance the technological foundation of nuclear energy based on scientific and rational data, coordinates its use among a wide range of relevant organizations, and helps members enhance their voluntary safety activities. At the same time, it is independent of utilities, and exercises a function of checking industry at the objective, third-party standpoint. As for the activities of JANTI itself, information disclosure and the establishment of a council comprising external members will enhance administration transparency. (author)

  13. The french nuclear industry is looking for an american partner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    In the same time of the nuclear industry revival in USA by the President Bush, TOPCO the holding society which is going to group the main french nuclear society, is looking for an american partner. This report deals with the economic and political aspects of the situation. (A.L.B.)

  14. Activity report 2006 - INB - Brazilian Nuclear Industries Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This document reports the activities of Brazilian Nuclear Industry company during 2006 as follows: uranium isotope enrichment; production of nuclear fuel; mineral resources; finance and administration; planning and sales; quality, safety and environment, communication and social action; economic and financial management

  15. Specific features of occupational medicine in nuclear research and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, J.M.; Quesne, B.

    2003-01-01

    Measures to prevent the exposure of personnel to ionising radiation were taken as soon as the first nuclear laboratories were set up. This branch of occupational preventive medicine has since kept pace with advances in research and in the industrial applications of nuclear energy. (authors)

  16. Industrial organization. The government draws a new french nuclear landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucher, N.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents and explains the new nuclear industry. In order to rationalize Cogema and Framatome are going to be grouped in an holding called Topco with a nuclear pole and an electronic and new technologies pole. Framatome will be split in two parts and its connector technology subsidiary will be introduced on Change. (A.L.B.)

  17. Nuclear power: which industrial approach will preserve a French asset?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machenaud, H.

    2012-01-01

    France's strategic decision in favor of nuclear energy in the 1970's has given rise to an organization of this industry with clearly defined roles and responsibilities for all parties. This has led to the mastering of industrial production of the whole chain from mining to fuel reprocessing and to waste disposal. Nuclear safety was at any stage of the chain the priority number one. The French nuclear industry is present on the international scene and thus maintain its know-how and capacities despite the ups and downs of the nuclear market. Today 240.000 people work in France in the nuclear sector. France has followed a consistent energy policy during the last 50 years and benefits from an important and homogeneous fleet of reactors which has generated a rich feedback experience on reactor operation. The tasks that face the French nuclear industry are: -) to comply with the requirements of the Complementary Safety Assessments that have been performed on all French nuclear facilities, -) to maintain and upgrade the power plants (most of them are facing their 3. decennial overhaul), -) to prepare the nuclear systems of tomorrow, and -) to export the French know-how

  18. Estimates and Predictions of Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis Cases among Redeployed Coal Workers of the Fuxin Mining Industry Group in China: A Historical Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Liu, Hongbo; Zhai, Guojiang; Wang, Qun; Liang, Jie; Zhang, Mengcang; Cui, Kai; Shen, Fuhai; Yi, Hongbo; Li, Yuting; Zhai, Yuhan; Sheng, Yang; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    This research was aimed at estimating possible Coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) cases as of 2012, and predicting future CWP cases among redeployed coal workers from the Fuxin Mining Industry Group. This study provided the scientific basis for regulations on CWP screening and diagnosis and labor insurance policies for redeployed coal workers of resource-exhausted mines. The study cohort included 19,116 coal workers. The cumulative incidence of CWP was calculated by the life-table method. Possible CWP cases by occupational category were estimated through the average annual incidence rate of CWP and males' life expectancy. It was estimated that 141 redeployed coal workers might have suffered from CWP as of 2012, and 221 redeployed coal workers could suffer from CWP in the future. It is crucial to establish a set of feasible and affordable regulations on CWP screening and diagnosis as well as labor insurance policies for redeployed coal workers of resource-exhausted coal mines in China.

  19. Korean nuclear industry hit by corruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo Bin

    2013-12-01

    After a four-month investigation, a court in South Korea has indicted 100 officials and suppliers on corruption charges over bogus safety certifications for parts that were supplied to some of the country's 23 nuclear reactors.

  20. The big awakening of nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2007-01-01

    The Earth's increasing need for energy will lead to a rebirth of nuclear energy all over the world. From now to 2030 the generation of electric power of nuclear origin will double. Beyond, a new generation of reactors, more efficient, will have to take over. In the meantime, reactor manufacturers and power companies, Areva and EdF first, are taking position. The urgency is also to invest in training for the recruitment of young engineers. The next generation of reactors (generation 4) which will be able to better exploit and recycle the fuel with an improved safety, will need 20 more years of research. Two solutions among the sixth proposed are more particularly studied by France: the sodium-cooled FBR and the helium-cooled VHTR. However, the French public opinion asks for more transparency in the nuclear affairs even if no real will for a renunciation of nuclear energy has been expressed so far. (J.S.)