WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear industry applications

  1. Industrial applications of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Celso

    2010-01-01

    Industrial applications of nuclear technology have been very diverse worldwide. This type of technology has begun to introduce in Costa Rica to evaluate and improve different industrial processes. These applications have been classified into two or three categories, according to the criteria used. Nucleonic control systems, the gamma logging and radiotracers are determined. (author) [es

  2. Microprocessors applications in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethridge, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    Microprocessors in the nuclear industry, particularly at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, have been and are being utilized in a wide variety of applications ranging from data acquisition and control for basic physics research to monitoring special nuclear material in long-term storage. Microprocessor systems have been developed to support weapons diagnostics measurements during underground weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site. Multiple single-component microcomputers are now controlling the measurement and recording of nuclear reactor operating power levels. The CMOS microprocessor data-acquisition instrumentation has operated on balloon flights to monitor power plant emissions. Target chamber mirror-positioning equipment for laser fusion facilities employs microprocessors

  3. Mobile robotics application in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.L.; White, J.R. [REMOTEC, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Mobile robots have been developed to perform hazardous operations in place of human workers. Applications include nuclear plant inspection/maintenance, decontamination and decommissioning police/military explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), hostage/terrorist negotiations and fire fighting. Nuclear facilities have proven that robotic applications can be cost-effective solutions to reducing personnel exposure and plant downtime. The first applications of mobile robots in the nuclear industry began in the early 1980`s, with the first vehicles being one of a kind machines or adaptations of commercial EOD robots. These activities included efforts by numerous commercial companies, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, EPRI, and several national laboratories. Some of these efforts were driven by the recovery and cleanup activities at TMI which demonstrated the potential and need for a remote means of performing surveillance and maintenance tasks in nuclear plants. The use of these machines is now becoming commonplace in nuclear facilities throughout the world. The hardware maturity and the confidence of the users has progressed to the point where the applications of mobile robots is not longer considered a novelty. These machines are being used in applications where the result is to help achieve more aggressive goals for personnel radiation exposure and plant availability, perform tasks more efficiently, and allow plant operators to retrieve information from areas previously considered inaccessible. Typical examples include surveillance in high radiation areas (during operation and outage activities), radiation surveys, waste handling, and decontamination evolutions. This paper will discuss this evolution including specific applications experiences, examples of currently available technology, and the benefits derived from the use of mobile robotic vehicles in commercial nuclear power facilities.

  4. Mobile robotics application in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.L.; White, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Mobile robots have been developed to perform hazardous operations in place of human workers. Applications include nuclear plant inspection/maintenance, decontamination and decommissioning police/military explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), hostage/terrorist negotiations and fire fighting. Nuclear facilities have proven that robotic applications can be cost-effective solutions to reducing personnel exposure and plant downtime. The first applications of mobile robots in the nuclear industry began in the early 1980's, with the first vehicles being one of a kind machines or adaptations of commercial EOD robots. These activities included efforts by numerous commercial companies, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, EPRI, and several national laboratories. Some of these efforts were driven by the recovery and cleanup activities at TMI which demonstrated the potential and need for a remote means of performing surveillance and maintenance tasks in nuclear plants. The use of these machines is now becoming commonplace in nuclear facilities throughout the world. The hardware maturity and the confidence of the users has progressed to the point where the applications of mobile robots is not longer considered a novelty. These machines are being used in applications where the result is to help achieve more aggressive goals for personnel radiation exposure and plant availability, perform tasks more efficiently, and allow plant operators to retrieve information from areas previously considered inaccessible. Typical examples include surveillance in high radiation areas (during operation and outage activities), radiation surveys, waste handling, and decontamination evolutions. This paper will discuss this evolution including specific applications experiences, examples of currently available technology, and the benefits derived from the use of mobile robotic vehicles in commercial nuclear power facilities

  5. Applications of industrial machine vision systems in the nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandergheynst, A.; Vanderborck, Y.

    1984-01-01

    In the paper, two multi-functional machine systems basically developed for the industrial robotics and representing the state of the art are presented. Their potential applications in the nuclear industry (nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities) are reviewed

  6. JAERI FEL applications in nuclear energy industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, Eisuke J.

    2005-01-01

    The JAERI FEL has first discovered the new FEL lasing of 255fs ultra fast pulse, 6-9% high efficiency, 1GW high peak power, a few kilowatts average power, and wide tunability of medium and far infrared wavelength regions at the same time. Using the new lasing and energy-recovery linac technology, we could extend a more powerful and more efficient free-electron laser (FEL) than 10kW and 25%, respectively, for nuclear energy industries, and others. In order to realize such a tunable, highly-efficient, high average power, high peak power and ultra-short pulse FEL, we need the efficient and powerful FEL driven by the JAERI compact, stand alone and zero boil-off super-conducting RF linac with an energy-recovery geometry. Our discussions on the FEL will cover the application of non-thermal peeling, cutting, and drilling to prevent cold-worked stress-corrosion cracking failures in nuclear energy and other heavy industries. (author)

  7. Biometrics and smart card based applications for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishanth Reddy, J.; Dheeraj Reddy, J.; Narender Reddy, J.

    2004-01-01

    Biometrics has emerged as a convenient, foolproof and well-accepted technology for identification around the globe. Nucleonix has developed innovative solutions based on finger scan biometrics for various industries. This paper closely looks into the application areas for the nuclear industry and how it will benefit this industry, in terms of identification, access control, security of PCs and applications, attendance, machinery usage control and other custom applications. (author)

  8. Application of nuclear instruments in China`s industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Yan-xiao [China Nuclear Information Center, Beijing (China); Cai Shan-yu; Wang Yi-shan; Lun Xiao [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

    1994-12-31

    The progress of nuclear instruments and their applications in China`s industries have been greatly dependent on the development of social economy. In recent years, the economy in China demands an increasing application of industrial nuclear instruments. The reliability of system performance and its adaptability are prerequisites to ensure widespread application in industry. Through the efforts over 40 years, a sound foundation for the development of nuclear instruments and their application has formed in China with the establishment of a comprehensive nuclear industrial system and skilled technical teams. The international cooperation and technical exchange between China and other countries has provided more opportunities to absorb new concepts, new ideas and new technology for upgrading current products and shorten the gap with the developed countries.

  9. Nuclear gauge application in road industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi Ismail, Mohd

    2017-11-01

    Soil compaction is essential in road construction. The evaluation of the degree of compaction relies on the knowledge of density and moisture of the compacted layers is very important to the performance of the pavement structure. Among the various tests used for making these determinations, the sand replacement density test and the moisture content determination by oven drying are perhaps the most widely used. However, these methods are not only time consuming and need wearisome procedures to obtain the results but also destructive and the number of measurements that can be taken at any time is limited. The test can on be fed back to the construction site the next day. To solve these problems, a nuclear technique has been introduced as a quicker and easier way of measuring the density and moisture of construction materials. Nuclear moisture density gauges have been used for many years in pavement construction as a method of non-destructive density testing The technique which can determine both wet density and moisture content offers an in situ method for construction control at the work site. The simplicity, the speed, and non-destructive nature offer a great advantage for quality control. This paper provides an overview of nuclear gauge application in road construction and presents a case study of monitoring compaction status of in Sedenak - Skudai, Johor rehabilitation projects.

  10. Applications of neutron radiography for the nuclear power industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craft, Aaron E.; Barton, John P.

    2016-11-01

    The World Conference on Neutron Radiography (WCNR) and International Topical Meeting on Neutron Radiography (ITMNR) series have been running over 35 years. The most recent event, ITMNR-8, focused on industrial applications and was the first time this series was hosted in China. In China, more than twenty new nuclear power plants are in construction and plans have been announced to increase the nuclear capacity further by a factor of three within fifteen years. There are additional prospects in many other nations. Neutron tests were vital during previous developments of materials and components for nuclear power applications, as reported in this conference series. For example a majority of the 140 papers in the Proceedings of the First WCNR are for the benefit of the nuclear power industry. Included are reviews of the diverse techniques being applied in Europe, Japan, the United States, and at many other centers. Many of those techniques are being utilized and advanced to the present time. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Applications include examination of nuclear waste, nuclear fuels, cladding, control elements, and other critical components. In this paper, the techniques developed and applied internationally for the nuclear power industry since the earliest years are reviewed, and the question is asked whether neutron test techniques can be of value in development of the present and future generations of nuclear power plants world-wide.

  11. EPRI expert system activities for nuclear utility industry application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naser, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on expert systems which have reached a level of maturity where they offer considerable benefits for the nuclear utility industry. The ability of expert systems to enhance expertise makes them an important tool for the nuclear utility industry in the areas of engineering, operations and maintenance. Benefits of expert system applications include comprehensive and consistent reasoning, reduction of time required for activities, retention of human expertise and ability to utilize multiple experts knowledge for an activity. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been performing four basic activities to help the nuclear industry take advantage of this expert system technology. The first is the development of expert system building tools which are tailored to nuclear utility industry applications. The second is the development of expert system applications. The third is work in developing a methodology for verification and validation of expert systems. The last is technology transfer activities to help the nuclear utility industry benefit from expert systems. The purpose of this paper is to describe the EPRI activities

  12. Applications of polyolefins in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erambert, M.; Goavec, P.

    1984-01-01

    The environment of a nuclear power plant often imposes impossible conditions on wires and cables. Cable manufacturers make great use of polymers, and the properties of the latter are limited in all the fields imposed: radiation, ageing, fire, corrosion. ACOME presents a cross-linked fireproof polyolefin, the properties of which have been verified in long-term tests: with very different ageing temperatures and times, very variable dose rates and very long simultaneous cycles. After all the tests proposed, the mechanical characteristics still made winding on cores possible. The electrical characteristics were very good, and fireproofing was unaffected [fr

  13. Applications of nuclear microprobes in the semiconductor industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, M.

    1996-01-01

    Possible nuclear microprobe applications in semiconductor industries are discussed. A unique technique using soft-error mapping and ion beam induced current measurements for reliability testing of dynamic random access memories such as soft-error immunity and noise carrier suppression has been developed for obtaining design parameters of future memory devices. Nano-probes and small installation areas are required for the use of microprobes in the semiconductor industry. Issues arising from microprobe applications such as damage induced by the probe beam are clarified. (orig.)

  14. Nuclear reactor application for high temperature power industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollezhal', N.A.; Zaicho, N.D.; Alexeev, A.M.; Baturov, B.B.; Karyakin, Yu.I.; Nazarov, E.K.; Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Protzenko, A.M.; Chernyaev, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    This report gives the results of considerations on industrial heat and technology processes (in chemistry, steelmaking, etc.) from the point of view of possible ways, technical conditions and nuclear safety requirements for the use of high temperature reactors in these processes. Possible variants of energy-technological diagrams of nuclear-steelmaking, methane steam-reforming reaction and other processes, taking into account the specific character of nuclear fuel are also given. Technical possibilities and economic conditions of the usage of different types of high temperature reactors (gas cooled reactors and reactors which have other means of transport of nuclear heat) in heat processes are examined. The report has an analysis of the problem, that arises with the application of nuclear reactors in energy-technological plants and an evaluation of solutions of this problem. There is a reason to suppose that we will benefit from the use of high temperature reactors in comparison with the production based on high quality fossil fuel [ru

  15. Present status of application of AI in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Masaharu

    1989-01-01

    Artificial intelligence (AL) techniques have been introduced actively in the nuclear industry in pursuit of increased safety and efficiency. The present report outlines some AI techniques currently used in nuclear facilities. This type of techniques have increasingly been introduced to such areas as design, construction, operation, maintenance, quality control and analysis. Most of them use knowledge engineering techniques including expert systems. Positive efforts at research and application of various more advance AI techniaues have started recently. For application of AI techniques, activities in nuclear power plants can be divided into two groups. One includes 'analytical' activities such as operation, maintenance and analysis, while the other includes 'synthetic' activities such as design, construction and fuel control. The most important AI technology for the analytical activities is diagnosis. Thus the report outlines major processes to which diagnostic techniques are applicable, and knowledge description and inference methods used for diagnosis. For AI techniques for synthetic activities, some problems and possible solutions are addressed. Development efforts in and outside Japan are also outlined. (Nogami, K.)

  16. The development of VR technology for nuclear industry applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Cho, Jai Wan; Lee, Nam Ho; Choi, Young Soo; Park, Soon Yong

    1998-01-01

    By searching the present condition of virtual reality technology of which researches were carried out not only abroad but also the country in nuclear power industry, we confirm the possibility of practical usage of VR in it. And as a fundamental research for applications of VR in nuclear power industry, gesture recognition for remote working and VR training system for severe working were performed. 1. A study on gesture recognition for remote working : The hand gesture recognition technology using visual signal and tactile magnetic sensor as a basic study for the introduction of task command and communication were performed. 2. A study on an construction of the virtual environment training system for the task in a severe condition: A construction of virtual reality training system for the tasks in a severe working condition was implemented. This system was intended to enhance the efficiency of actual tasks through advanced practicing the motion procedures those should be performed in a severe working condition where it is difficult to access for personnel. The motion information which is came from the sensors attached on trainers body was used for construction of the virtual environment through the computer graphic procedures. The VR training system has many merits relative to the conservative training method that was performed with mock-up which was made as the same size and shape as real component in nuclear power plant. (author). 27 refs., 21 tabs., 51 figs

  17. Expert system verification and validation for nuclear power industry applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naser, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The potential for the use of expert systems in the nuclear power industry is widely recognized. The benefits of such systems include consistency of reasoning during off-normal situations when humans are under great stress, the reduction of times required to perform certain functions, the prevention of equipment failures through predictive diagnostics, and the retention of human expertise in performing specialized functions. The increased use of expert systems brings with it concerns about their reliability. Difficulties arising from software problems can affect plant safety, reliability, and availability. A joint project between EPRI and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is being initiated to develop a methodology for verification and validation of expert systems for nuclear power applications. This methodology will be tested on existing and developing expert systems. This effort will explore the applicability of conventional verification and validation methodologies to expert systems. The major area of concern will be certification of the knowledge base. This is expected to require new types of verification and validation techniques. A methodology for developing validation scenarios will also be studied

  18. Applications of nuclear methods in the automotive industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, E.W.; Yusuf, S.O.

    1996-01-01

    Over the years nuclear methods have proved to be a valuable asset to industry in general and to the automotive industry in particular. This paper summarizes some of the most important recent contributions of nuclear technology to the development of vehicles having high quality and long-term durability. Radiotracer methods are used to measure engine oil consumption and the wear rates of inaccessible components. Radiographic and tomographic methods are used to image fluids and structures in engines and accessory components. Tracers are used to understand combustion chemistry and quantify fluid flow. Gauging methods are used for inspection and process control. Nuclear analytical methods are used routinely for materials characterization and problem solving. Although nuclear methods are usually considered as the means of last resort, they can often be applied more easily and quickly than conventional methods when those in industrial engineering and R and D are aware of their unique capabilities. (author). 51 refs., 5 figs

  19. Application and development of nuclear instrumentation in steel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Bo; Xiang Yaping

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Instrumentation (Nuclear Control System) can realize the non-contact measurement, and it has the characteristics of high precision, fast reaction, well stability and digital, intelligent, network by adopting the computer technology. Nuclear instrument is more and more widely applied to the online measurement with complex processes and high automation in adverse circumstances in steel manufacturing process. Nuclear instrument is also the indispensable basic instrument in the real time control system used to provide all kind of important measurement data. In this paper, the existing situation, development, technology and economic benefit of nuclear instrumentation application in domestic and overseas steel plant was introduced. (authors)

  20. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation, industrial applications, plasma physics and nuclear fusion 1986-1996. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques, and Instrumentation, Industrial Applications, Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1986-1996. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all of these papers have abstracts in English. Contents cover the three main areas of (i) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactor and Particle Accelerator Applications, and Nuclear Data), (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, and Tracers), and (iii) Plasma Physics and Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion

  1. Extending Nuclear Technology Applications to Heavy Industry-Sharing BTI Years of Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    In his speech, the presenter outlined several topics regarding the establishment of Industrial Technology Division since 1980 until 2012. The first topic was to relate the justification or reasonable of establishing this division with the national condition at 1980s. The need to explore nuclear technology on industrial application like nondestructive testing (NDT) and plant assessment were attract the Malaysian Nuclear Agency to do research in that fields. The establishment of division to do that research were responsible to Industrial Technology Division. Until now, this division succeed in doing research regarding industrial application and transferred it to industrial players along the nation and also international level. (author)

  2. Applications of nuclear technology in industry, environment and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera Ruiz, H.

    1998-01-01

    This article contains information on different applications of nuclear technology, such as: sterilization of single use medical products, radiation serialization of pharmaceutical products,radiation treatment of disposable products, in Europe, radiation treatment of micro-titer plates, several crosslinking processes, radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex, irradiation of polymers to obtain dressings for burns, ulcers bedsores and skin grafts, production of ground water with accelerated electrons in combination with accelerated electrons in combination with ozone, radiation treatment of hospital wastes. (S. Grainger)

  3. Applications of Nuclear Analytical Methods for High Tech Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, T.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon based semiconductor chip manufacturing is a worldwide high technology industry with numerous measurement issues. One of the major concerns in the semiconductor manufacturing is contamination such as the trace metal impurities. This concern is vividly illustrated by the fact that the manufacturing in this industry is done in ultra clean environment where the entire manufacturing facility or “Fab” is a clean room facility or each and every manufacturing tool is enclosed in a mini-environment Although semiconductor devices are fabricated on the surface of the Si wafers contamination in the bulk material is a major concern. Nuclear methods of analysis are uniquely suited for the contamination analysis in such a matrix. Many opportunities in the semiconductor manufacturing field exist for the nuclear methods to provide support services. Contamination analysis by NAA, depth profiles by NDP and prompt gamma analysis of H in thin films are a few examples. These needs are on-going and require commitment from the lab so that a manufacturing operation can rely on the delivery of these services when required

  4. Artificial intelligence and other innovative computer applications in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, M.C.; Majumdar, D.; Sackett, J.I.

    1987-01-01

    This book reviews the applications of artificial intelligence and computers in the nuclear industry and chemical plants. The topics discussed are: Robots applications and reliability in maintenance of nuclear power plants; Advanced information technology and expert systems; Knowledge base alarm systems; Emergency planning and response of accidents; and reactor safety assessment

  5. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation industrial applications plasma physics and nuclear fusion. 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation, with Industrial Applications (of Nuclear Physics and Engineering), and with Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1980-1994. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, and panels of experts may contain some papers in other languages (French, Russian, or Spanish), but all papers have abstracts in English. Price quotes are in Austrian Schillings, do not include local taxes, and are subject to change without notice. Contents cover the three main categories of (i) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Chemistry, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactors and Particle Accelerator Applications, Nuclear Data); (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, Tracers); and (iii) Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion

  6. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation industrial applications plasma physics and nuclear fusion, 1980-1993. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation, with Industrial Applications (of Nuclear Physics and Engineering), and with Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1980-1993. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, and panels of experts may contain some papers in other languages (French, Russian, or Spanish), but all papers have abstracts in English. Price quotes are in Austrian Schillings, do not include local taxes, and are subject to change without notice. Contents cover the three main categories of (I) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Chemistry, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactors and Particle Accelerator Applications, Nuclear Data); (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, Tracers); and (iii) Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion

  7. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for applications in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suri, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    There are several analytical techniques employing laser spectroscopy - each with its own distinctive potential. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such technique which is attractive in view of its relative compactness and simplicity (in configuration), remote and online analysis (with no sample handling requirement) and high spatial resolution allowing compositional map or homogeneity analysis. In this technique, a high power pulsed (mostly nanosecond) laser is employed to irradiate the sample causing spark emission, characteristics of the sample composition, which is collected using suitable optics and analysed spectroscopically. Remote and online capability is derived from long distance delivery of laser beams and collection of emitted light by fibres or conventional optics. Since laser can be focused sharply on the target, it can facilitate compositional mapping. Beam Technology Development Group at BARC had initiated work on LIBS of nuclear materials several years ago. Recently the challenge of online monitoring of radioactive waste vitrification plant in a hot cell has been taken up. The theoretical and experimental work done by the group related to instrument development, plasma characterization, quantitative compositional analysis of ternary alloys and uranium vitrified glass samples (comprising more than dozen elements) are described. The future plans for setting up online glass homogeneity monitoring facility are also described. This should fulfill an important demand for optimization of vitrification process. Various other demands of nuclear industry are also reviewed

  8. Experience in the application of nuclear energy for desalination and industrial use in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muralev, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    Key design features of the Aktau complex in Kazakhstan with a 1000 MWth fast breeder nuclear reactor are outlined. The experience gained over 20 years of operation and maintenance is briefed. The water costs, the impact on the environment and the water and steam quality have confirmed the efficiency and the reliability of nuclear energy application for seawater desalination and industrial use. (author)

  9. Applications of nuclear physics to interdisciplinary research and to industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Jeffrey

    2000-04-01

    Techniques that have been developed to understand nuclear structure can be used for interdisciplinary research and to determine useful properties. Both microscopic and macroscopic techniques can be used. The introduction discusses the diversity of fields that can benefit from applying nuclear physics techniques. Three current areas of research are used as illustrations. The use of gamma-ray spectroscopy following thermal neutron capture to better understand the formation and evolution of planetary bodies. Such measurements can be performed from orbit, on landers or on rovers, but each type of measurement puts different constraints on the instrument design. Nuclear resonant reaction analysis has recently been used to better understand the chemical kinetics in the curing of cement. Elemental concentrations of hydrogen have been measured with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers at the grain surface and about 20 nanometers at a depth of about two microns as a function of time during the reaction. Finally, x-ray techniques are being developed to provide an x-ray fluorescence instrument that can be used safely and reliably at a crime scene for investigative purposes. Unique problems of applying laboratory techniques to random, human-occupied locations and the requirements for providing a technically viable analysis that will be accepted by our legal system will be discussed.

  10. Human performance improvement in organizations: Potential application for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    This publication is primarily intended for managers and specialists in nuclear facility operating organizations working in the area of human performance improvement. It is intended to provide them with practical information they can use to improve human performance in their organizations. While some of the information provided in this publication is based upon the experience of nuclear facility operating organizations, most of it comes from human performance improvement initiatives in non-nuclear organizations and industries. The nuclear industry has a long tradition of sharing good management practices in order to foster continuous improvement. However, it is not always realized that many of the practices that are now well established initially came from non-nuclear industries and were subsequently adapted for application to nuclear power plant operating organizations. There is, therefore, good reason to periodically review non-nuclear industry practices for ideas that might have direct or indirect application to the nuclear industry in order to potentially gain benefits such as the following: new approaches to certain problem areas, insights into new or impending challenges, improvements in existing practices, benchmarking of opportunities, development of learning organizations and avoidance of collective blind spots. The preparation of this report was an activity of the project on Effective Training to Achieve Excellence in the Performance of NPP Personnel. The objective of this project is to enhance the capability of Member States to utilize proven practices developed and transferred by the IAEA for improving personnel performance. The expected outcome from this project is the increased use by organizations in Members States of proven engineering and management practices and methodologies developed and transferred by the IAEA to improve personnel performance

  11. Artificial intelligence and applications relevant to nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haridasan, G.; Das, Debashis

    1987-01-01

    Possible areas of application of artificial intelligence systems such as machine vision systems and expert systems are indicated. The work underway in this field at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay is briefly mentioned. (M.G.B.)

  12. Handbook of software quality assurance techniques applicable to the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.L.; Wilburn, N.P.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting a research project to recommend good engineering practices in the application of 10 CFR 50, Appendix B requirements to assure quality in the development and use of computer software for the design and operation of nuclear power plants for NRC and industry. This handbook defines the content of a software quality assurance program by enumerating the techniques applicable. Definitions, descriptions, and references where further information may be obtained are provided for each topic

  13. Handbook of software quality assurance techniques applicable to the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, J.L.; Wilburn, N.P.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting a research project to recommend good engineering practices in the application of 10 CFR 50, Appendix B requirements to assure quality in the development and use of computer software for the design and operation of nuclear power plants for NRC and industry. This handbook defines the content of a software quality assurance program by enumerating the techniques applicable. Definitions, descriptions, and references where further information may be obtained are provided for each topic.

  14. Industrial and environmental applications of nuclear analytical techniques. Report of a workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    The IAEA has programme the utilisation of nuclear analytical techniques (NATs), in particular for industrial and environmental applications. A major purpose is to help the developing Member States apply their analytical capabilities optimally for socio-economic progress and development. A large number of institutions in Europe, Africa, Latin America and Asia have established X ray fluorescence (XRF) and gamma ray measurement techniques and facilities for neutron activation analysis (NAA) have been initiated in institutions in these regions. Moreover, there is a growing interest among many institutes in applying more advanced analytical techniques, such as particle induced X ray emission (PIXE) and microanalytical techniques based on X ray emission induced by conventional sources or synchrotron radiation to the analysis of environmental and biological materials and industrial products. In order to define new areas of application of NATs and to extend the range of these techniques, a number of initiatives have recently been taken. It includes a workshop on industrial and environmental applications of nuclear analytical techniques, organized by the IAEA in Vienna, 7-11 September 1998. The main objectives of the workshop were as follows: (1) to review recent applications of NATs in industrial and environmental studies; (2) to identify emerging trends in methodologies and applications of NATs; (3) to demonstrate analytical capabilities of selected NATs. The following topics were reviewed during the workshop: (1) XRF and accelerator based analytical techniques; (2) portable XRF systems and their applications in industry, mineral prospecting and processing, (3) portable gamma ray spectrometers; and (4) NAA and its applications in industry and environmental studies. Micro-XRF and micro-PIXE methods and their applications in the above fields were also discussed, including aspects of synchrotron radiation induced X ray emission

  15. Proceedings of the workshop cum symposium on applications of neural networks in nuclear science and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Workshop cum Symposium on Application of Neural Networks in Nuclear Science and Industry was held at Bombay during November 24-26. 1993. The past decade has seen many important advances in the design and technology of artificial neural networks in research and industry. Neural networks is an interdisciplinary field covering a broad spectrum of applications in surveillance, diagnosis of nuclear power plants, nuclear spectroscopy, speech and written text recognition, robotic control, signal processing etc. The objective of the symposium was to promote awareness of advances in neural network research and applications. It was also aimed at conducting the review of the present status and giving direction for future technological developments. Contributed papers have been organized into the following groups: a) neural network architectures, learning algorithms and modelling, b) computer vision and image processing, c) signal processing, d) neural networks and fuzzy systems, e) nuclear applications and f) neural networks and allied applications. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately. (M.K.V.)

  16. Environmental influence on the usage of adhesive single lap joints in nuclear industry applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, Felipe do C.; Reis, João M.L. dos; Souza, João F.B. de; Costa, Gilberto T. de P.; Moura, Jorge C. de; Universidade Federal Fluminense; Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear

    2017-01-01

    Despite of some polymeric compounds vulnerability to different types of radiation, high polymer, as epoxy adhesives, had prospered in the nuclear industry because their mechanical properties to high doses of ionizing radiation is maintained. Because of this, epoxy adhesives are widely used in nuclear applications: nuclear power plants, aerospace components, radioactive sealed sources to medicine, radioactive waste immobilization. In the present work, the performance of a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol ether A (DGEBA) was analyzed. Tensile tests of adhesive single lap joints bonded with epoxy were performed. The environmental effect of ultraviolet (UV) exposure was observed in the mechanical reaction of PolyAnchor 4100 HT. In particular, maximum load decreases slightly in aggressive environment. It is possible to conclude the material is proper to use in internal and external areas, mainly due to the easy application when compared to welded joints with similar strength. The easy application reduces the workers exposure time to ionizing radiation. (author)

  17. Environmental influence on the usage of adhesive single lap joints in nuclear industry applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Felipe do C.; Reis, João M.L. dos; Souza, João F.B. de; Costa, Gilberto T. de P.; Moura, Jorge C. de, E-mail: felipe.amorim@cefet-rj.br, E-mail: jreis@id.uff.br, E-mail: joaofellipe@id.uff.br, E-mail: gilberto.costa@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: jcmoura@cnen.gov.br [Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica Celso Suckow da Fonseca (CEFET-RJ), Itaguai, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica; Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Mecania Teorica e Aplicada; Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Divisão de Controle de Rejeitos e Transporte de Materiais Radioativos

    2017-07-01

    Despite of some polymeric compounds vulnerability to different types of radiation, high polymer, as epoxy adhesives, had prospered in the nuclear industry because their mechanical properties to high doses of ionizing radiation is maintained. Because of this, epoxy adhesives are widely used in nuclear applications: nuclear power plants, aerospace components, radioactive sealed sources to medicine, radioactive waste immobilization. In the present work, the performance of a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol ether A (DGEBA) was analyzed. Tensile tests of adhesive single lap joints bonded with epoxy were performed. The environmental effect of ultraviolet (UV) exposure was observed in the mechanical reaction of PolyAnchor 4100 HT. In particular, maximum load decreases slightly in aggressive environment. It is possible to conclude the material is proper to use in internal and external areas, mainly due to the easy application when compared to welded joints with similar strength. The easy application reduces the workers exposure time to ionizing radiation. (author)

  18. Solid state nuclear track detectors and their application in industrial health, radiological and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, M.

    1993-09-01

    Passive Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors are electrically non conductive solids, mainly used for the registration of α-particles and neutron induced recoils. The stability of the particle tracks in the solid allow longer integration periods, what is essential for the measurement of small, time variant radiation exposures. This report gives an overview on non-photographic track detectors, their processing, dosimetric properties and examples for their application in industrial health, radiological and environmental protection. (orig.) [de

  19. Spain's nuclear components industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaibel, E.

    1985-01-01

    Spanish industrial participation in supply of components for nuclear power plants has grown steadily over the last fifteen years. The share of Spanish companies in work for the five second generation nuclear power plants increased to 50% of total capital investments. The necessity to maintain Spanish technology and production in the nuclear field is emphasized

  20. Spanish nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In this book published to commemorate the twentieth anniversary of the Spanish Nuclear Society, it is included a report on the Spanish Nuclear Industry. The Spanish Companies and Organizations in nuclear world are: CIEMAT, Empresarios Agrupados, ENRESA, ENUSA, ENDESA, Grupo Iberdrola, LAINSA, INITEC AND TECNATOM. Activities, history and research programs of each of them are included

  1. Responsability of nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadiz Deleito, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Since the beginning of nuclear industry, civil responsibility with damages to the public health and properties was a critical problem, because the special conditions of this industry (nuclear accident, damages could be very high but probability of these events is very low). Legal precepts, universally accepted, in the first 60 years for all countries interested in nuclear energy are being revised, then 20 years of experience. The civil responsibility limited is being questioned and indemnities updated. (author)

  2. Radiological surveillance employed at industrial application in a nuclear research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanches, M.P.; Sordi, G.M.; Sahyun, A.; Rodrigues, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    The monitoring and dosimetry systems used at Industrial Application and Engineering Service Department of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (GE-IPEN-CNEN/SP) are analyzed,in order to verify the compliance with the condition established by the dose system limitation and the basic radiation protection standards. The criteria about the use of individual dosimetry for persons that work in these facilities are established. In case of an external radiation dosimetry, by using film badge method, a level of 200μGy has been assigned, considering the detection significant threshold. For dose in air due to electromagnetic radiation, using TLD dosimetry of CaSO 4 :Dy a quarter year significant threshold is 101μGy. A symbiosis between the workplace monitoring and the individual monitoring became necessary for optimization purpose. (authors). 5 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  3. Nuclear Technology applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cibils Machado, W. E- mail: wrcibils@adinet.com.uy

    2002-01-01

    The present work tries on the applications of the nuclear technology in the life daily, such as agriculture and feeding, human health, industry, non destructive essays, isotopic hydrology, and the nuclear power stations for electricity production and radioisotopes production

  4. The application of neutron diffraction to materials science problems in the Canadian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, T.M.; Root, J.H.; Rogge, R.B.; Clarke, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    The main advantage of neutron diffraction over X-ray diffraction is that thermal neutrons easily pass through, for example, 25 mm of steel, so that measurements can be made at depth in engineering components. A program at Chalk River to investigate the industrial applications of neutron diffraction began with measurement on over-rolled Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes, a topic of major concern in the eighties. It was quickly realized that neutrons could provide measurements of residual stress accurate enough to be of real interest. Over the ensuing period, major contributions have been made in measuring stresses and crystallographic texture in components for the nuclear industry including end-fittings, steam generator tubing, pressure tubes and calandria tubes, and weldments. In addition to work for the nuclear industry, there have been many applications in the aerospace, automotive, defence and pipeline industries in Canada and throughout the world. Residual stresses arise because of inhomogeneous plastic deformation of the material. Inhomogeneous plastic deformation not only occurs on a macroscopic scale but also on the scale of the grain size. The stresses that occur on this scale are called intergranular of type=II stresses. These intergranular effects, taken with the strong crystallographic alignment in zirconium alloy tubing, determine the growth of components in the reactor environment. Systematic studies of the origin of intergranular residual stresses arising from thermal effects and plasticity effects were carried out on Zircaloy-2 and Zr-2.5Nb alloys which have led to a theoretical understanding of component growth. Finally, a very recent texture scanning technique was able to shed light on the microstructure of zirconium alloy components. (author) 17 refs., 14 figs

  5. Nuclear techniques in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammad, F.H.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear techniques are utilized in almost every industry. The discussion in this paper includes discussions on tracer methods and uses nucleonic control systems technology; non-destructive testing techniques and radiation technology. 1 fig., 2 tabs

  6. Nuclear industry chart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    As part of a survey on Switzerland a pull-out organisation chart is presented of the nuclear industry showing Swiss government bodies and industrial concerns. Their interests, connections with each other and their associations with international and other national organizations and firms are indicated. (U.K.)

  7. Applications of nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A. C.

    2017-02-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.

  8. Applications of nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Lastly, each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.

  9. Nuclear power industry, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    The intent of this publication is to provide a single volume of resource material that offers a timely, comprehensive view of the nuclear option. Chapter 1 discusses the development of commercial nuclear power from a historical perspective, reviewing the factors and events that have and will influence its progress. Chapters 2 through 5 discuss in detail the nuclear powerplant and its supporting fuel cycle, including various aspects of each element from fuel supply to waste management. Additional dimension is brought to the discussion by Chapters 6 and 7, which cover the Federal regulation of nuclear power and the nuclear export industry. This vast body of thoroughly documented information offers the reader a useful tool in evaluating the record and potential of nuclear energy in the United States

  10. The application of nuclear energy to the Canadian chemical process industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.F.S.

    1976-03-01

    A study has been made to determine what role nuclear energy, either electrical or thermal, could play in the Canadian chemical process industry. The study was restricted to current-scale CANDU type power reactors. It is concluded that the scale of operation of the chemical industry is rarely large enough to use blocks of electrical power (e) of 500 MW or thermal power (t) of 1500 MW. Thus, with a few predictable exceptions, the role of nuclear energy in the Canadian chemical industry will be as a general thermal/electrical utility supplier, serving a variety of customers in a particular geographic area. This picture would change if nuclear steam generators of 20 to 50 MW(t) become available and are economically competitive. (author)

  11. Nuclear weapons industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, K.A.; Shaw, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    This unique study was written specifically as a reference source for institutional investors concerned about the threat posed to their stock portfolios by the debate over nuclear arms production. The authors focus their analysis on the 26 leading companies in the field. The perspective is neutral and refreshing. Background information on strategic policy, arms control and disarmament, and the influence of the industry on defense policy and the economy is presented rationally. The study also discusses the economic significance of both the conversion from military to civilian production and nuclear freeze initiatives. An appendix contains a fact-filled guide to nuclear weapon systems

  12. Industrial nuclear gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennerstedt, T.

    1986-01-01

    A great number of industrial nuclear gauges are used in Sweden. The administrative routines for testing, approval and licensing are briefly described. Safety standards, including basic ICRP criteria, are summarized and a theoretical background to the various measuring techniques is given. Numerous practical examples are given. (author)

  13. The development of computer industry and applications of its relevant techniques in nuclear research laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Guiliang

    1988-01-01

    The increasing needs for computers in the area of nuclear science and technology are described. The current status of commerical availabe computer products of different scale in world market are briefly reviewed. A survey of some noticeable techniques is given from the view point of computer applications in nuclear science research laboratories

  14. Industry plots nuclear revival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogee, A.

    1984-01-01

    A successful revival of the nuclear power industry will require standardization and a reduction in the number of companies managing construction, according to Atomic Industrial Forum spokesmen. In describing the concept of a few superutilities to build nuclear plants, they emphasize the need for a nuclear culture among construction management. Future plant designs emphasize small scale, with design, engineering, licensing, financing, operator training, and paperwork completed before the sale. Utilities continue to pursue economy-of-scale despite the evidence that small-scale reactors can be economical and are more appropriate for fluctuating demand growth. Financiers want more say in construction plans in the future, while utilities want to establish generating subsidiaries for wholesale power sales

  15. Applications of high-resolution ICP-AES in the nuclear industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephen G.; Giglio, J. J.; Goodall, Phillip S.; Cummings, D. G.

    1998-05-01

    Application of high resolution ICP-AES to selected problems of importance in the nuclear industry is a growing field. The advantages in sample preparation time, waste minimization and equipment cost are considerable. Two examples of these advantages are presented in this paper, burnup analysis of spent fuel and analysis of major uranium isotopes. The determination of burnup, an indicator of fuel cycle efficiency, has been accomplished by the determination of 139La by high resolution inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (HR-ICP-AES). Solutions of digested samples of reactor fuel rods were introduced into a shielded glovebox housing an inductively coupled plasma and the resulting atomic emission transmitted to a high resolution spectrometer by a 31 meter fiber optic bundle. Total and isotopic U determination by thermal ionization mass spectrometry is presented to allow for the calculation of burnup for the samples. This method of burnup determination reduces the time, material, sample handling and waste generated associated with typical burnup determinations which require separation of lanthanum from the other fission products with high specific activities. Work concerning an alternative burnup indicator, 236U, is also presented for comparison. The determination of 235U:$_238)U isotope ratios in U-Zr fuel alloys is also presented to demonstrate the versatility of Hr-ICP-AES.

  16. Applications of high resolution ICP-AES in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.G.; Giglio, J.J.; Goodall, P.S.; Cummings, D.G.

    1998-01-01

    Application of high resolution ICP-AES to selected problems of importance in the nuclear industry is a growing field. The advantages in sample preparation time, waste minimization and equipment cost are considerable. Two examples of these advantages are presented in this paper, burnup analysis of spent fuel and analysis of major uranium isotopes. The determination of burnup, an indicator of fuel cycle efficiency, has been accomplished by the determination of 139 La by high resolution inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (HR-ICP-AES). Solutions of digested samples of reactor fuel rods were introduced into a shielded glovebox housing an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and the resulting atomic emission transmitted to a high resolution spectrometer by a 31 meter fiber optic bundle. Total and isotopic U determination by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is presented to allow for the calculation of burnup for the samples. This method of burnup determination reduces the time, material, sample handling and waste generated associated with typical burnup determinations which require separation of lanthanum from the other fission products with high specific activities. Work concerning an alternative burnup indicator, 236 U, is also presented for comparison. The determination of 235 U: 238 U isotope ratios in U-Zr fuel alloys is also presented to demonstrate the versatility of HR-ICP-AES

  17. Applications of artificial intelligence in the U.S. nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhring, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    In the United States, the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) into use in the nuclear power field is being carried out by a wide spectrum of organizations (i.e., nuclear equipment vendors, architect-engineer firms, universities, national laboratories, federal agencies, the electric utility industry, and small entrepreneurial groups). The most coherent of these efforts is an Electric Power Research Institute program to demonstrate the usefulness of AI in nuclear power plants (including augmenting plant automation) and an agreement with NASA to transfer the technology of their multi-year AI Core Technology in Systems Autonomy to the nuclear power industry. A few vendors are offering commercial AI products that reduce the burden on reactor operators during both normal and abnormal operation. Several AI programs at universities and national laboratories have automation as their primary focus, and individual AI projects have been initiated under the Small Business Innovative Research Program. The fundamental and synergistic relationship between training and expert systems supports the use of AI in the training of nuclear personnel

  18. Nuclear Industry Family Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This is a copy of the U.K.A.E.A. Question and Answer brief concerning an epidemiological study entitled the Nuclear Industry Family Study, to investigate the health of children of AEA, AWE, and BNFL Workers. The study is being carried out by an independent team of medical research workers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and the Imperial Cancer Research Fund. (UK)

  19. Nuclear industry almanac v.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, G.; Jeffs, E.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear Industry Almanac. National energy profiles of 17 Western European countries are given, concentrating on electricity supply and the role nuclear power plays in meeting the demand for electric power. The nuclear industries of Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom are described and addresses of establishments and industries are listed. (U.K.)

  20. Nuclear industry and radioecological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, V. G.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of XXI century is marked with increasing public concern over impact of man-made activity, including nuclear technologies, on the environment. Currently, the anthropocentric principle is applied in the course of the radioecological safety guaranteeing for the environment, which postulates that human protectability serves as guarantee of the environmental one. However, this principle correctness is called in question recently. The ecocentric principle is proposed as an alternative doctrine, defining balance between human importance and that of any other elements of biota. The system recommended isn't intended for the regulatory standards development yet, because of substantial gaps in scientific knowledge. Nevertheless, renunciation of the anthropocentric principle can result in unwarranted tightened regulatory basis, decreasing of nuclear industry evolution rates, and, consequently, breaching of societal and economical priorities. It is obvious that for the safety guaranteeing, nuclear industry shouldn't stand out against a background of other fields of human activity involved hazard factors. Therefore, new conceptions applying within the regulatory system is to be weighted and exclude formal using of discussion theses. More than semi-centennial experience of the anthropocentric approach applying serves as an evidence of safe protection of ecosystems against radiation exposure that ensures safe ecological development of nuclear power industry and other fields of nuclear technologies application. (author)

  1. Application of accelerators in industry, medicine and for environmental research in Almaty Institute of Nuclear Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyssukhin, S.N.; Arzumanov, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Institute of Nuclear Physics in Almaty is the only Kazakhstan institution with a significant activity at the national level in the field of physics of accelerators, their application and associated technology. Three accelerators of different type are being used in the Institute: high power electron beam accelerator, isochronous cyclotron and heavy ion electrostatic tandem. Electron beam accelerator ELV-4 - This high power machine is only electron beam irradiation facility of industrial scale in the Republic. It was produced by Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia and installed in Almaty in 1991 for development of radiation technology in Kazakhstan. The accelerator generates electron beams of following parameters: Energy range (MeV) 1.0-1.5; Max. beam power (kW) 40; Max. beam current (mA) 40. The machine is equipped with beam scanning system, extraction device with output window 980x75 mm 2 and chain conveyer for irradiated material supply. Tn the time being the accelerator is regularly used for radiation cross-linking technology and for sterilization. Cross-linking technology is the base of high quality roof material production for building industry. Raw ethylene-propylene rubber mixture is rolled as strip of 50 m length, 1 m width, 1 mm thickness and then irradiated by dose of about 120 kGy. The final product is waterproof flexible material, very stable in hard atmospheric conditions and non sensitive to sun UV radiation. Sterilization of medical materials and items is not traditional application of such low energy installations but due to uniqueness of this accelerator in Kazakhstan and high actuality of the task for the Republic this technology was developed in INP. Hermetically packed items (medical cotton , bandages, syringes, surgical gloves, small plastic bottles) with thickness less than penetration range of 1.5 MeV electrons are put at the conveyer as mono-layer and irradiated by sterilizing dose of 25 kGy. Isochronous

  2. Industrial applications at GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delagrange, H.

    1993-01-01

    After a first round of industrial applications using heavy ion beams, GANIL has refocused these activities along the lines defined by a strategy and market study. Heavy ion industrial applications take their roots in the physical effects of the interactions occurring between heavy ion projectiles and matter. Specific equipments operated by GANIL or CIRIL allow users to take benefit from these effects. By heavy ion irradiation, industrial companies qualify radiation hardened electronic components and sensitize plastic films to produce 'nuclear track' membranes. Research and development programs with laboratories of the public sector, focus on heavy ion lithography dedicated to large area luminescent flat screens with field emitter microtips and on tribology with radioactive implanted ions. Even sometimes facing difficulties to fill the gap between industry and research, GANIL is eager to promote heavy ion beam technologies. (author) 36 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Pumps for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, L.

    1978-01-01

    In order to meet the requirements of nuclear industry for the transfer of corrosive, toxic, humidity sensitive or very pure gases, different types of pumps were developped and commercialized. Their main characteristics are to prevent pollution of the transfered fluid by avoiding any contact between this fluid and the lubricated parts of the machine, and to prevent a contamination of the atmosphere or of the fluid by a total tightness. Patellar pumps have been particularly developped because the metallic bellows are quite reliable and resistant in this configuration. Two types are described: patellar pumps without friction and barrel pumps whose pistons are provided with rings sliding in the cylinders without lubrication [fr

  4. Radiation exposure control from the application of nuclear gauges in the mining industry in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faanu, A; Darko, E O; Awudu, A R; Schandorf, C; Emi-Reynolds, G; Yeboah, J; Glover, E T; Kattah, V K

    2010-05-01

    The use of nuclear gauges for process control and elemental analysis in the mining industry in Ghana, West Africa, is wide spread and on the increase in recent times. The Ghana Radiation Protection Board regulates nuclear gauges through a system of notification and authorization by registration or licensing, inspection, and enforcement. Safety assessments for authorization and enforcement have been established to ensure the safety and security of radiation sources as well as protection of workers and the general public. Appropriate training of mine staff is part of the efforts to develop the necessary awareness about the safety and security of radiation sources. The knowledge and skills acquired will ensure the required protection and safety at the workplaces. Doses received by workers monitored over a period between 1998 and 2007 are well below the annual dose limit of 20 mSv recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection.

  5. Nuclear energy and the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    These notes have been prepared by the Department of Energy to provide information and to answer questions often raised about nuclear energy and the nuclear industry and in the hope that they will contribute to the public debate about the future of nuclear energy in the UK. The subject is dealt with under the headings; contribution of nuclear power, energy forecasts, nuclear fuels and reactor types, cost, thermal reactor strategy, planning margin, safety, nuclear licensing, unlike an atomic bomb, radiation, waste disposal, transport of nuclear materials, emergency arrangements at nuclear sites, siting of nuclear stations, security of nuclear installations, world nuclear programmes, international regulation and non-proliferation, IAEA safeguards arrangements in the UK, INFCE, and uranium supplies. (U.K.)

  6. Atomic nanoscale technology in the nuclear industry

    CERN Document Server

    Woo, Taeho

    2011-01-01

    Developments at the nanoscale are leading to new possibilities and challenges for nuclear applications in areas ranging from medicine to international commerce to atomic power production/waste treatment. Progress in nanotech is helping the nuclear industry slash the cost of energy production. It also continues to improve application reliability and safety measures, which remain a critical concern, especially since the reactor disasters in Japan. Exploring the new wide-ranging landscape of nuclear function, Atomic Nanoscale Technology in the Nuclear Industry details the breakthroughs in nanosca

  7. JAERI 10kW High Power ERL-FEL and Its Applications in Nuclear Energy Industries

    CERN Document Server

    Minehara, E J; Iijima, H; Kikuzawa, N; Nagai, R; Nishimori, N; Nishitani, T; Sawamura, M; Yamauchi, T

    2005-01-01

    The JAERI high power ERL-FEL has been extended to the more powerful and efficient free-electron laser (FEL) than 10kW for nuclear energy industries, and other heavy industries like defense, shipbuilding, chemical industries, environmental sciences, space-debris, and power beaming and so on. In order to realize such a tunable, highly-efficient, high average power, high peak power and ultra-short pulse FEL, we need the efficient and powerful FEL driven by the JAERI compact, stand-alone and zero boil-off super-conducting RF linac with an energy-recovery geometry. Our discussions on the ERL-FEL will cover the current status of the 10kW upgrading and its applications of non-thermal peeling, cutting, and drilling to decommission the nuclear power plants, and to demonstrate successfully the proof of principle prevention of cold-worked stress-corrosion cracking failures in nuclear power reactors under routine operation using small cubic low-Carbon stainless steel samples.

  8. Preliminary cost estimating for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klumpar, I.V.; Soltz, K.M.

    1985-01-01

    The nuclear industry has higher costs for personnel, equipment, construction, and engineering than conventional industry, which means that cost estimation procedures may need adjustment. The authors account for the special technical and labor requirements of the nuclear industry in making adjustments to equipment and installation cost estimations. Using illustrative examples, they show that conventional methods of preliminary cost estimation are flexible enough for application to emerging industries if their cost structure is similar to that of the process industries. If not, modifications can provide enough engineering and cost data for a statistical analysis. 9 references, 14 figures, 4 tables

  9. Laser-induced time-resolved spectrofluorometry and thermal lensing: applications in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decambox, P.; Delorme, N.; Mauchien, P.; Moulin, C.

    1989-01-01

    Sensitive spectroscopic methods for the determination of actinides and lanthanides in various media are required in the nuclear industry. Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Spectrofluorometry (LITRS) for several actinides and lanthanides at very low levels and thermal lensing (TL) for oxidation state characterization allow these determinations. The set-up of LITRS is presented. Spectra, limit of detections and lifetimes obtained for U, Cm, Am, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ce, Sm, Tm are shown. Detection limit as low as 5.10 -12 M can be achieved. Examples of matrices encountered for the determination of uranium are given as well as comparison with mass spectrometry and alpha counting. The set-up of TL and performances obtained on plutonium as well as future developments are presented

  10. An industrial application virtual reality. An aid for designing maintenance in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fertey, G.; Thibault, G.; Delpy, T.; Lapierre, M.

    1995-09-01

    This paper shows a use of virtual reality in the industrial context of nuclear plant maintenance. The objective is to build a realistic simulation fool by means of virtual reality techniques. With such a tool, the designer of a maintenance operation can validate tools and sequencing of operations, reduce the time of intervention and minimize the radiation doses received by the operator on site. Several major functionalities have been studied: a navigation in 3D geometries faithfully reproducing terrain, geometries obtained by 3D digitization of installations; an optimized navigation to the intervention sites with both management of obstacles present along the way and room walls and guiding of navigator from one room to another by means of visual indicators (arrows) which he can capture and which virtually carry him; a programming of the environment in keeping with and translating faithfully the breakdown and sequencing of intervention operations; real time information on the surrounding radiation. (author)

  11. The nuclear industry in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.; Broughton, W.

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear industry in Canada comprises three identifiable groups: (1) Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), (2) electrical utilities that use nuclear power plants, (3) private engineering and manufacturing companies. At the end of World War II, AECL was charged with investigating and developing peaceful uses of atomic power. Included in the results is the Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, a peculiarly Canadian design. The AECL maintains research capability and operates as the prime nuclear steam supply system supplier. Utilities in three Canadian provinces operate nuclear power plants, New Brunswick, Quebec, and Ontario, with the majority in Ontario. From the beginning of the nuclear program in Canada, private industry has been an important partner to AECL and the utilities, filling roles as manufacturing subcontractors and as component designers. The prime objective of this paper is to illuminate the role of private industry in developing and maintaining a competitive world-class nuclear industry

  12. Promoting Implementation of Safety Culture in Nuclear Application for Industrial Facilities; an Important Role of Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setianingsih, Lilis Susanti

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of nuclear energy for industrial purposes has reached its highest peak. BAPETEN, as Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency of Indonesia has published regulations regarding nuclear energy utilization. As high risk associating such utilization requires direct and thoroughly supervision in order to assure its compliance to safety and security aspect, procedures related to operational activities must by fully applied. Radiation Protection Program as one type of procedures that must be available in nuclear energy utilization operation is intended to provide operators specifically technical guidance to avoid undesired negative effects of incidents or accidents. It is the responsibility of managerial level in a company to provide the procedures and to further supervise their application in the field. Radiation workers, those are all employees working in or within radiation area must understand how to execute the procedures properly. The radiation protection program is intended to protect workers, member of community and property as well as the environment from the negative impacts of nuclear utilization operational due to its radiation exposure. Safety culture, a compound of nature derived from behavior of organization and people within the organization to pay a full attention and give main priority in radiation safety matters, is expected to be achieved by implementing the radiation protection program as safety habits at the work place. It requires a management commitment to ensure that all aspect in safety and, whenever necessary, security are accomplished within the radiation protection program in order to build a safety culture in a radiation work place. Government Regulation No. 33 2007 about Safety for Ionizing Radiation and Security for Radioactive Source and Government Regulation No. 29 2008 regarding Licensing for Utilization of Ionizing Radiation and Nuclear Material present regulation and arrangement related to radiation protection program as a basic

  13. Chemical sensors for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnanasekaran, K.I.

    2012-01-01

    Development of chemical sensors for detection of gases at trace levels for applications in nuclear industry will be highlighted. The sensors have to be highly sensitive, reliable and rugged with long term stability to operate in harsh industrial environment. Semiconductor and solid electrolyte based electrochemical sensors satisfy the requirements. Physico-chemical aspects underlying the development of H 2 sensors in sodium and in cover gas circuit of the Fast breeder reactors for its smooth functioning, NH 3 and H 2 S sensors for use in Heavy water production industries and NO x sensors for spent fuel reprocessing plants will be presented. Development of oxygen sensors to monitor the oxygen level in the reactor containments and sodium sensors for detection of sodium leakages will also be discussed. The talk will focus the general aspects of identification of the sensing material for the respective analyte species, development of suitable chemical route for preparing them as fine powders, the need for configuring them in thick film or thin film geometries and their performance. Pulsed laser deposition method, an elegant technique to prepare the high quality thin films of multicomponent oxides is demonstrated for preparation of nanostructured thin films of complex oxides and its use in tailoring the morphology of the complex sensing material in the desired form by optimizing the in-situ growth conditions. (author)

  14. Nuclear industry takes off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Plessis, A.; Stevens, R.C.B.

    1982-01-01

    For more than a decade irradiation sterilisation of medical and pharmaceutical products proved a highly successful semi-commercial operation at Pelindaba, until it made way recently for the first full-scale radiation processing industry in SA - a classic case of science transferring technology to industry

  15. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation. Industrial applications. Plasma physics and nuclear fusion. 1990-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Power and Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management, and issued during the period 1 January 1990 and 31 July 2002. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English, though some are also available in other languages than English

  16. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation, industrial applications, plasma physics and nuclear fusion, 1986-1997. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle and waste management and issued during the period of 1986-1997. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain papers in languages other than English, but all of these papers have abstracts in English

  17. Radioactive wastes of Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This conference studies the radioactive waste of nuclear industry. Nine articles and presentations are exposed here; the action of the direction of nuclear installations safety, the improvement of industrial proceedings to reduce the waste volume, the packaging of radioactive waste, the safety of radioactive waste disposal and environmental impact studies, a presentation of waste coming from nuclear power plants, the new waste management policy, the international panorama of radioactive waste management, the international transport of radioactive waste, finally an economic analysis of the treatment and ultimate storage of radioactive waste. (N.C.)

  18. REVIEW OF INDUSTRIES AND GOVERNMENT AGENCIES FOR TECHNOLOGIES APPLICABLE TO DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilkoff, T. E.; Hetland, M. D.; O' Leary, E. M.

    2002-02-25

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area's (DDFA's) mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy improved deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) technologies. This mission requires that emphasis be continually placed on identifying technologies currently employed or under development in other nuclear as well as nonnuclear industries and government agencies. In support of DDFA efforts to clean up the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) radiologically contaminated surplus facilities using technologies that improve worker safety, reduce costs, and accelerate cleanup schedules, a study was conducted to identify innovative technologies developed for use in nonnuclear arenas that are appropriate for D&D applications.

  19. Russian nuclear industry exports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbatchev, A.

    2016-01-01

    Rosatom is the world leader for the export of nuclear technologies. 34 reactors of Russian technology are being built or planned worldwide. Most reactors proposed by Rosatom are third generation VVER-1200 units with an electric power output of 1200 MWe. Although the nuclear island is always built by Rosatom, the remain of the plant can be subcontracted to other enterprises and European companies are sought because they would bring a european quality touch to Russian works. One of the main assets of Rosatom is to propose an integrated offer from supplying nuclear fuel to managing nuclear waste via the turnkey building of nuclear power plants. Another important asset is the financial assistance of the Russian state through state credit or the support from Russian national banks that appears to be a decisive advantage in the international competition to win markets. We have to temper the Russian export perspectives by noting that most projects are set in countries that are prone to instabilities and that the economic crisis affecting Russia has a negative impact on its financial means. (A.C.)

  20. Special issue: the nuclear industry in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    This special issue contains papers on the following topics: French nuclear policy; nuclear energy development in Europe; nuclear diversification; Alsthom-Atlantique in the nuclear field; 1981 nuclear electricity generation; EDF siting policy; the N4 model of the 1300 MW series; Creys-Malville; the nuclear industry in Europe; pumps in the nuclear industry [fr

  1. Nuclear industry review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This review examines the consequences of projected excess electrical generating capacity for the maintenance of an independent nuclear power capability in Canada. Although consumption of electricity will continue to grow at rages well below historical averages, significant additions to capacity will be required in all parts of Canada in the 1990s. CANDU reactors are an attractive option for meeting load growth, particularly east of Manitoba. However, the absence of domestic orders in the 1980s may threaten the maintenance of this option. Even the most optimistic projections indicate that only one supplier of each component will remain in the nuclear business in the 1990s

  2. Human capital in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    On June 7, 2010, as part of the Atomexpo 2010 exhibition, a round-table discussion took place on the topic Human capital in the nuclear industry: challenges and solutions. The article summarizes reports made during the meeting. Tatiana Kozhevnikova, deputy director general of the Rosatom Corporation, made a report about the strategy and best human resource management practices in member companies of the Corporation. She briefly described the state of the human capital in the Russian nuclear industry and outlined the key provisions of the human resource management strategy. Attendees to the round-table discussion elaborated further on the key statements of the report. The discussion has given an evidence that the Russian nuclear industry is giving an enormous importance to human resource management and is firmly intended on successfully tacking the issues associated with the provision of sufficient staff for the industry's safe and efficient development [ru

  3. South Korea's nuclear fuel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    March 1990 marked a major milestone for South Korea's nuclear power program, as the country became self-sufficient in nuclear fuel fabrication. The reconversion line (UF 6 to UO 2 ) came into full operation at the Korea Nuclear Fuel Company's fabrication plant, as the last step in South Korea's program, initiated in the mid-1970s, to localize fuel fabrication. Thus, South Korea now has the capability to produce both CANDU and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. This article covers the nuclear fuel industry in South Korea-how it is structures, its current capabilities, and its outlook for the future

  4. Report of the project ARCAL XLIII: Paraguay: industrial application of tracer techniques and nuclear control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta Cabello, Rodolfo

    2000-12-01

    Paraguay needs to improve the productivity in several service industries. Main interest has been devoted to introducing new alternative techniques for the evaluation of the processes of water treatment plants for human consumption and waste waters [es

  5. Applications of nuclear energy in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitek, J.; Necas, V.

    2012-01-01

    Concepts and international frames of generation IV nuclear reactors. A review of use of nuclear energy for non electric applications especially in areas such as seawater desalination, hydrogen production, district heating and other industrial applications. (Author)

  6. A overview of industrial robots and their potential use in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larzelere, A.R.; Johnson, J.V.

    1992-01-01

    To understand the potential uses of industrial robots and the problems in adapting these robots to a nuclear application, the DOE and its design contractors conducted a survey of several manufacturers and users of robotics both in and out of the nuclear industry. This survey was not intended to be a comprehensive review of robotic applications of vendors. This paper provides a brief summary of lessons learned from the survey and the potential uses of commercial industrial robots in nuclear applications

  7. High performance structural ceramics for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujari, Vimal K.; Faker, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A family of Saint-Gobain structural ceramic materials and products produced by its High performance Refractory Division is described. Over the last fifty years or so, Saint-Gobain has been a leader in developing non oxide ceramic based novel materials, processes and products for application in Nuclear, Chemical, Automotive, Defense and Mining industries

  8. Applications of EPRI database on environmentally assisted cracking in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rungta, R.; Mindlin, H.; Gilman, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    A computerized database, EPRI Database on Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EDEAC), has been established to assemble stress-corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue crack growth data on materials of interest to nuclear power generation. The database is being used to review the basis for the existing ASME reference fatigue crack growth curves for low alloy ferritic steels used for reactor pressure vessels. Correlations between fatigue crack growth rate and stress intensity factor range with corrections for frequency, stress ratio, and temperature for austenitic stainless steels in air are also being developed

  9. Nuclear industry (Finance) Act 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the Act is to enable British Nuclear Fuels Limited to make borrowings backed by Government guarantees in order to finance its ten year investment programme. More specifically, the Act raises the financial limit applicable to British Nuclear Fuels Limited from pound 500 million to pound 1,000 million. (NEA) [fr

  10. Radiation resistant concrete for applications in nuclear power and radioactive waste industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Steven Robert

    Elemental components of ordinary concrete contain a variety of metals and rare earth elements that are susceptible to neutron activation. This activation occurs by means of radiative capture, a neutron interaction that results in formation of radioisotopes such as Co-60, Eu-152, and Eu-154. Studies have shown that these three radioisotopes are responsible for the residual radioactivity found in nuclear power plant concrete reactor dome and shielding walls. Such concrete is classified as Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) and Very Low Level Waste (VLLW) by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standards and requires disposal at appropriate disposal sites. There are only three such sites in the USA, and every nuclear power plant will produce at the time of decommissioning approximately 1,500 tonnes of activated concrete classified as LLRW and VLLW. NAVA ALIGA (ancient word for a new stone) is a new concrete mixture developed mainly by research as presented in this thesis. The purpose of NAVA ALIGA is to satisfy IAEA clearance levels if used as a material for reactor dome, spent fuel pool, or radioactive waste canisters. NAVA ALIGA will never be activated above the IAEA clearance level after long-term exposure to neutron radiation when used as a material for reactor dome, spent fuel pool, and radioactive waste canisters. Components of NAVA ALIGA were identified using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ISP-MS) to determine trace element composition. In addition, it was tested for compressive strength and permeability, important for nuclear infrastructure. The studied mixture had a high water to cement ratio of 0.56, which likely resulted in the high measured permeability, yet the mixture also showed a compressive strength greater than 6 000 psi after 28 days. In addition to this experimental analysis, which goal was to develop a standard approach to define the concrete mixtures in satisfying the IAEA

  11. Uranium oxide catalysts: environmental applications for treatment of chlorinated organic waste from nuclear industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazareva, Svetlana; Ismagilov, Zinfer; Kuznetsov, Vadim; Shikina, Nadezhda; Kerzhentsev, Mikhail

    2018-02-05

    Huge amounts of nuclear waste, including depleted uranium, significantly contribute to the adverse environmental situation throughout the world. An approach to the effective use of uranium oxides in catalysts for the deep oxidation of chlorine-containing hydrocarbons is suggested. Investigation of the catalytic activity of the synthesized supported uranium oxide catalysts doped with Cr, Mn and Co transition metals in the chlorobenzene oxidation showed that these catalysts are comparable with conventional commercial ones. Physicochemical properties of the catalysts were studied by X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed reduction with hydrogen (H 2 -TPR), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The higher activity of Mn- and Co-containing uranium oxide catalysts in the H 2 -TPR and oxidation of chlorobenzene in comparison with non-uranium catalysts may be related to the formation of a new disperse phase represented by uranates. The study of chlorobenzene adsorption revealed that the surface oxygen is involved in the catalytic process.

  12. Applications of Nuclear Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, Anna C.

    2017-01-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that und...

  13. Nuclear energy and the nuclear energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromova, E.; Vargoncik, D.; Sovadina, M.

    2013-01-01

    A popular interactive multimedia publication on nuclear energy in Slovak. 'Nuclear energy and energy' is a modern electronic publication that through engaging interpretation, combined with a number of interactive elements, explains the basic principles and facts of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Operation of nuclear power plants, an important part of the energy resources of developed countries, is frequently discussed topic in different social groups. Especially important is truthful knowledgeability of the general public about the benefits of technical solutions, but also on the risks and safety measures throughout the nuclear industry. According to an online survey 'Nuclear energy and energy' is the most comprehensive electronic multimedia publication worldwide, dedicated to the popularization of nuclear energy. With easy to understand texts, interactive and rich collection of accessories stock it belongs to modern educational and informational titles of the present time. The basic explanatory text of the publication is accompanied by history and the present time of all Slovak nuclear installations, including stock photos. For readers are presented the various attractions legible for the interpretation, which help them in a visual way to make a more complete picture of the concerned issue. Each chapter ends with a test pad where the readers can test their knowledge. Whole explanatory text (72 multimedia pages, 81,000 words) is accompanied by a lot of stock of graphic materials. The publication also includes 336 photos in 60 thematic photo galleries, 45 stock charts and drawings, diagrams and interactive 31 videos and 3D models.

  14. Computer aided design for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basson, Keith

    1986-01-01

    The paper concerns the new computer aided design (CAD) centre for the United Kingdom nuclear industry, and its applications. A description of the CAD system is given, including the current projects at the CAD centre. Typical applications of the 3D CAD plant based models, stress analysis studies, and the extraction of data from CAD drawings to produce associated documentation, are all described. Future developments using computer aided design systems are also considered. (U.K.)

  15. Radiation-tolerant cable management systems for remote handling applications in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, S.; Thom, M.

    1993-01-01

    Experience has shown that one of the most vulnerable areas within remote handling equipment is the umbilical cable and termination system. Repairs of a damaged system can be very long due to poorly designed termination techniques. Over the past five years W.L. Gore has gained considerable experience in the design and manufacture of cable systems, utilising unique radiation tolerant materials and manufacturing processes. The cable systems manufactured at the W.L. Gore, Dunfermline, Scotland facility have proven to give excellent performance in the most demanding of remote handling applications. (author)

  16. Applications of nuclear radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanagodimath, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear radiations are powerful and non destructive tools in industry, medicine, defence, agriculture and research. In the present lecture, the types of nuclear radiations, radiation sources, detection of radiation, uses of radiation, dangers of nuclear radiation and nuclear energy will be discussed. (author)

  17. Knowledge management for nuclear industry operating organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    research facilities to reduce operating costs and a decline in support to the universities to reduce overheads. The above factors have led to a reduction in technical innovation and a potential loss of technical competences that have drawn the attention of many concerned parties to the need for effective strategies and policies for nuclear knowledge management. The Director General of the IAEA, Mohamed ElBaradei, in his statement to the forty-seventh regular session of the IAEA General Conference 2003, said: 'Whether or not nuclear power witnesses an expansion in the coming decades, it is essential that we preserve nuclear scientific and technical competence for the safe operation of existing facilities and applications. Effective management of nuclear knowledge should include succession planning for the nuclear work force, the maintenance of the 'nuclear safety case' for operational reactors, and retention of the nuclear knowledge accumulated over the past six decades'. This report is intended for senior and middle level managers of nuclear industry operating organizations and provides practical information that can be used to improve knowledge management (KM) in such organizations. The information provided in this report is based upon actual experiences of Member State operating organizations as well as other related industries. The Nuclear Power Industry's Ageing Workforce: Transfer of Knowledge to the Next Generation, IAEA-TECDOC-1399, highlighted some of the knowledge management issues in Member States resulting from the large number of retiring NPP personnel who had been involved with the commissioning and initial operation of NPPs. This report complements that publication by broadening the scope of KM strategic issues, methods and techniques for nuclear industry operating organizations

  18. Nuclear process steam for industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddon, W.A.

    1981-11-01

    A joint industrial survey funded by the Bruce County Council, the Ontario Energy Corporation and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited was carried out with the cooperation of Ontario Hydro and the Ontario Ministry of Industry and Tourism. Its objective was to identify and assess the future needs and interest of energy-intensive industries in an Industrial Energy Park adjacent to the Bruce Nuclear Power Development. The Energy Park would capitalize on the infrastructure of the existing CANDU reactors and Ontario Hydro's proven and unique capability to produce steam, as well as electricity, at a cost currently about half that from a comparable coal-fired station. Four industries with an integrated steam demand of some 1 x 10 6 lb/h were found to be prepared to consider seriously the use of nuclear steam. Their combined plants would involve a capital investment of over $200 million and provide jobs for 350-400 people. The high costs of transportation and the lack of docking facilities were considered to be the major drawbacks of the Bruce location. An indication of steam prices would be required for an over-all economic assessment

  19. A REVIEW ON DEVELOPING INDUSTRIAL STANDARDS TO INTRODUCE DIGITAL COMPUTER APPLICATION FOR NUCLEAR I&C AND HMIT IN JAPAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HIDEKAZU YOSHIKAWA

    2013-04-01

    In Japan, the Fukushima Daiichi accident that occurred on March 11, 2011 has great impact on nuclear regulation and nuclear industries where concerns by the general public about safety have heightened significantly. However for the part of HF design and software reliability maintenance of digital I&C and HMIT for NPP, the author believes that the past practice of Japanese activities with the related technical standards can be successfully inherited in the future, by reinforcing the technical preparedness for the prevention and mitigation against any types of severe accident occurrence.

  20. The nuclear industry in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    The history of the development of the nuclear industry in Australia is essentially the history of uranium mining. Australia is a significant exporter of uranium concentrate yellowcake, but no other nuclear power or fuel cycle activity exists on a commercial scale. Industrial radiation processing and the production of radioisotopes and radio-pharmaceuticals are the only other endeavors. The uranium mining in early years and the second discovery period, the policy formulation in 1970s and the recent policy development are described. Australia's low cost reserve has risen to 474,000 t U, and in 1984, three mines produced around 4,400 t U as yellowcake. Once the Jervis Bay nuclear power plant with 500 MWe capacity was planned, but the project was postponed indefinitely. The Uranium Enrichment Group of Australia planned to build an enrichment plant as a joint venture with URENCO Ltd., but also this plan was interrupted. The lack of expansion into nuclear power and fuel cycle activities has been due to favorable fossil fuel resources and their distribution, population density and distribution, social factors and government policy in Australia. (Kako, I.)

  1. Application of robotics in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, J.S.; Fisher, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Industrial robots and other robotic systems have been successfully applied at the Savannah River nuclear site. These applications, new robotic systems presently under development, general techniques for the employment of robots in nuclear facilities, and future systems are discussed

  2. The political economy of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, J.

    1981-01-01

    The changing international context, in particular declining estimates of nuclear capacity and a depression in the nuclear reactor market will influence prospects for a nuclear industry in Australia. Effects of the opposition by trade unions and community groups to uranium mining are discussed. The relationship between political decisions and the economics of the nuclear power industry is stressed

  3. Preservation of knowledge: general principals, methodology and application in nuclear industry. Working material. Report prepared within the framework of the Programmes: C.3. Nuclear Knowledge Management and A.2. Improving Quality Assurance, Technical Infrastructure and Human Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    There is an immediate need to preserve existing knowledge in nuclear science and technology for peaceful applications for future generations, as it represents a valuable human capital asset. The development of an exciting vision for nuclear technology is prerequisite for attracting young scientists and professionals to seek careers in nuclear science and technology. Irrespective of current national energy policies, the need to maintain or even enhance the nuclear knowledge base and national capability will persist. In this way, the knowledge base will be available to meet requirements for evolving policy development. A number of IAEA advisory committees and technical meetings stressed the importance of preserving and further enhancing nuclear science and technology for socio-economic development. For nuclear science and technology to contribute to sustainable development requires knowledge and capacity on three levels: (a) basic nuclear science, (b) technology, (c) engineering and operation. There was unanimous consensus that IAEA has an obligation to lead activities towards preservation and enhancement of nuclear knowledge by complementing, and as appropriate supplementing, activities by governments, industry, academia and international organizations. International co-operation is of vital importance. Unless action is taken now, invaluable assets in critical nuclear knowledge and capacity will soon be lost. The IAEA is developing guidance documents on nuclear knowledge management including knowledge preservation and knowledge transfer in nuclear sector. This activity would assist nuclear organizations in MS to effectively apply this guidance, and to assist them in benchmarking their practices against those of other industry organizations. The present Working Material provides general principals for knowledge preservation in nuclear sector, which could be applied in different nuclear organization and in particular in Nuclear Power Plants

  4. Automation of radionuclide analysis in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gostilo, V.; Sokolov, A.; Kuzmenko, V.; Kondratjev, V.

    2009-01-01

    The development results for the automated precise HPGe spectrometers and systems for radionuclide analyses in nuclear industry and environmental monitoring are presented. Automated HPGe spectrometer for radionuclide monitoring of coolant in primary circuit of NPPs is intended for technological monitoring of the radionuclide specific activity in liquid and gaseous flows in the on-line mode. The automated spectrometer based on flowing HPGe detector with the through channel is intended for control of the uniformity of distribution of uranium and/or plutonium in fresh fuel elements, transferred through the detector, as well as for on-line control of the fluids and gases flows with low activity. Automated monitoring system for radionuclide volumetric activity in outlet channels of NPPs is intended for radionuclide monitoring of water reservoirs in the regions of nuclear weapons testing, near nuclear storage, nuclear power plants and other objects of nuclear energetic. Autonomous HPGe spectrometer for deep water radionuclide monitoring is applicable for registration of gamma radionuclides, distributed in water depth up to 3000 m (radioactive wastes storage, wreck of atomic ships, lost nuclear charges, atomic industry technological waste release etc.).(authors)

  5. Europairs project: creating an alliance of nuclear and non-nuclear industries for developing nuclear cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hittner, Dominique; Bogusch, Edgar; Viala, Celine; Angulo, Carmen; Chauvet, Vincent; Fuetterer, Michael A.; De Groot, Sander; Von Lensa, Werner; Ruer, Jacques; Griffay, Gerard; Baaten, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Developers of High Temperature Reactors (HTR) worldwide acknowledge that the main asset for market breakthrough is its unique ability to address growing needs for industrial cogeneration of heat and power (CHP) owing to its high operating temperature and flexibility, adapted power level, modularity and robust safety features. HTR are thus well suited to most of the non-electric applications of nuclear energy, which represent about 80% of total energy consumption. This opens opportunities for reducing CO 2 emissions and securing energy supply which are complementary to those provided by systems dedicated to electricity generation. A strong alliance between nuclear and process heat user industries is a necessity for developing a nuclear system for the conventional process heat market, much in the same way as the electronuclear development required a close partnership with utilities. Initiating such an alliance is one of the objectives of the EUROPAIRS project just started in the frame of the EURATOM 7. Framework Programme (FP7) under AREVA coordination. Within EUROPAIRS, process heat user industries express their requirements whereas nuclear industry will provide the performance window of HTR. Starting from this shared information, an alliance will be forged by assessing the feasibility and impact of nuclear CHP from technical, industrial, economical, licensing and sustainability perspectives. This assessment work will allow pointing out the main issues and challenges for coupling an HTR with industrial process heat applications. On this basis, a Road-map will be elaborated for achieving an industrially relevant demonstration of such a coupling. This Road-map will not only take into consideration the necessary nuclear developments, but also the required adaptations of industrial application processes and the possible development of heat transport technologies from the nuclear heat source to application processes. Although only a small and short project (21 months

  6. Capitalizing the contribution of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnadieu, G.

    1984-01-01

    The main contributions of the French nuclear industry to the country, and ways to make the most of them are presented. The advantages acquired include the nuclear power stations built; mastering of the combustion cycle; a powerful, well structured nuclear construction industry; and a nuclear-industrial complex giving France an important industrial potential. It is recommended that the industrial and research effort be maintained. The proposed strategy consists of defining an electronuclear program and associated economic development program and sticking to them; promoting exports; possibly merging certain industrial capacities; and strengthening the national position and independence concerning the fuel cycle [fr

  7. Chemical Analysis for Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sun Ho; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, Y. B.

    2008-12-01

    Main objective of this project is to maintain chemical hot cell facility and essential chemical analysis instruments of Nuclear Chemistry Research Division(NCRD) in KAERI and is to support other nuclear R and D groups and nuclear industries providing precise data from the samples and specimens with these facility and instruments. The main items of chemical analysis were the determination of burn-up and fission gas of PWR high burn up UO 2 fuels and hydrogen in cladding material. Other Chemical analyses (element analysis by using ICP-AES, AA and EPMA; radio nuclide analysis by αβγ-spectrometer; isotope analysis by TI-MS, ICP-MS and Quadrupole MS; surface analysis by XRD, SEM; H,C,O analysis etc.) were carried out through this project from January 1st to December 31th of 2007 for the 7,263 cases from the nuclear R and D projects, from the facilities of nuclear fuel cycle examination and from the domestic nuclear industries such as nuclear power plants(KEPCO), fuel producing company(KNFC). Experiments related to the development of chemical analysis methods, A gas chromatography analysis method was established for a slightly negative pressure fission gas sample and thus the results were compared to and reviewed with those obtained by quadrupole mass spectrometer which already had been developed for the routine gas analysis support of the same sample. With using a packed molecular column and optimum temperature condition of oven, the fission gas compositions, nitrogen, krypton and xenon, could be separated clearly within 7 minute. According to the analysis results for the same fission gas samples, gas chromatograph and quadrupole mass spectrometer, the krypton analysis results of fission gases by the former was 2.65 % higher than those by the later. However analysis results of xenon by both methods were agreed well within 1 decimal point.Simultaneous multi-sample treatment system was developed to promote efficiency of chemical analysis methods and the burnup

  8. Future jobs in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asquier, S.

    2017-01-01

    CEA leads research on fast reactors in the framework of Generation-4 reactors, it also brings technical support to industrial partners like EDF or AREVA for today operating reactors. Computerized simulation is strongly developed in order to get reliable computers codes able to simulate mechanical behavior of new materials or neutron transport in new reactor cores. CEA is also in charge of the dismantling and remediation of its own nuclear facilities, today about 1000 people work on the dismantling of 35 facilities. CEA is also participating in fusion research programs. This broad range of activities makes CEA an important recruiter of competencies in a lot of domains from nuclear engineering to biological impact of radiations via computer sciences. (A.C.)

  9. Industrial applications of radioisotope techniques in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, J.St.

    1985-01-01

    A general review of applications of radioisotope techniques in the Polish industry for about 25 years is given. The radiotracer methods used in metallurgy, hydrometallurgy, glass industry, oil and petroleum industries, in material testing and in other industries are described. Neutron activation analysis methods as well as nuclear gauges for industry (thickness meters, density meters, conveyer belt weigher, acid concentration meters and others) are also presented. The economic advantages of industrial applications of radioisotope techniques are described too. 42 refs., 43 figs., 11 tabs. (author)

  10. Fibre optic cable in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Berwyn

    1987-01-01

    The uses of optical fibre cables to transmit light signals include medical applications and telecommunications. In the nuclear industry the applications include process control and monitoring, conventional datacoms, security fencing and sensors. Time division multiplexing is described and currently available fibre optic multipexers are listed and explained. Single and multimode fibres are mentioned. Fibre optics are also used in cryogenics, to monitor the integrity of the storage vessels for cryogenic liquids. The uses of fibre optics at Hartlepool, Heysham I and Torness are mentioned in particular. (UK)

  11. Nuclear analytical techniques in Cuban Sugar Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Riso, O.; Griffith Martinez, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is a review concerning the applications of Nuclear Analytical Techniques in the Cuban sugar industry. The most complete elemental composition of final molasses (34 elements ) and natural zeolites (38) this last one employed as an auxiliary agent in sugar technological processes has been performed by means of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis (XRFA). The trace elements sugar cane soil plant relationship and elemental composition of different types of Cuban sugar (rawr, blanco directo and refine) were also studied. As a result, valuable information referred to the possibilities of using these products in animal and human foodstuff so as in other applications are given

  12. UK strategy for nuclear industry LLW - 16393

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Matthew; Fisher, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    In March 2007 the UK Government and devolved administrations (for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, from here on referred to as 'Government') published their policy for the management of solid low level waste ('the Policy'). The Policy sets out a number of core principles for the management of low level waste (LLW) and charges the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority with developing a UK-wide strategy in the case of LLW from nuclear sites. The UK Nuclear Industry LLW Strategy has been developed within the framework of the principles set out in the policy. A key factor in the development of this strategy has been the strategic partnership the NDA shares with the Low Level Waste Repository near Drigg (LLWR), who now have a role in developing strategy as well as delivering an optimised waste management service at the LLWR. The strategy aims to support continued hazard reduction and decommissioning by ensuring uninterrupted capability and capacity for the management and disposal of LLW in the UK. The continued availability of a disposal route for LLW is considered vital by both the nuclear industry and non-nuclear industry low level waste producers. Given that the UK will generate significantly more low level waste (∼ 3.1 million m 3 ) than there is capacity at the LLWR (∼0.75 million m 3 ), developing alternative effective ways to manage LLW is critical. The waste management hierarchy is central to the strategy, which includes strategic goals at all levels of the hierarchy to improve its application across the industry. (authors)

  13. Industrial applications of radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masatoshi

    1979-01-01

    The industrial application of radiochemistry is summarized, mainly in regard to the application of tracers and activation analysis. Changes in the utilization of radioisotopes in Japan are quoted according to the statistics of the Japan Information Center of Science and Technology (JICST) and reports of the Japan Isotope Conference since 1956. In order to clarify the application of industrial tracers, especially physical tracers in the manufacturing process, serial changes in the concentration of radioactive tracers retained in a bath and in Hg in a soda factory were determined. A radiorelease method used for analysis of exhaust fumes from automobiles is introduced and purification of Al by means by activation analysis, which is used to analyze extremely small amounts of impurities in highly pure materials, is described. Also, application of 252 Cf for activation analysis and its legal intricacies are discussed. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. Coating technologies in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaae, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Metallic, ceramic, and organic coatings are so commonly used in modern industry that virtually everyone can name several applications in which coatings are employed. Thus, it is no surprise that coating technologies are widely employed in the nuclear industry. Some of these technologies utilize processes that are mature and well developed, and others utilize processes that are new and state of the art. In this paper, five generic coating processes that include almost all vapor deposition processes are described, and then applications of each of these processes for deposition of specific materials in nuclear applications are described. These latter selections, of course, are very subjective, and others will be able to name other applications. Because of their wide range of application, coating technologies are considered to be national critical technologies. The generic coating processes that cover almost all vapor deposition technologies are as follows: (1) stationary substrate chemical vapor deposition; (2) fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition; (3) plasma-assisted chemical deposition; (4) sputtering; (5) evaporation

  15. Risk-informed decision making in the nuclear industry: Application and effectiveness comparison of different genetic algorithm techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjorgiev, Blaže; Kančev, Duško; Čepin, Marko

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Multi-objective optimization of STI based on risk-informed decision making. ► Four different genetic algorithms (GAs) techniques are used as optimization tool. ► Advantages/disadvantages among the four different GAs applied are emphasized. - Abstract: The risk-informed decision making (RIDM) process, where insights gained from the probabilistic safety assessment are contemplated together with other engineering insights, is gaining an ever-increasing attention in the process industries. Increasing safety systems availability by applying RIDM is one of the prime goals for the authorities operating with nuclear power plants. Additionally, equipment ageing is gradually becoming a major concern in the process industries and especially in the nuclear industry, since more and more safety-related components are approaching or are already in their wear-out phase. A significant difficulty regarding the consideration of ageing effects on equipment (un)availability is the immense uncertainty the available equipment ageing data are associated to. This paper presents an approach for safety system unavailability reduction by optimizing the related test and maintenance schedule suggested by the technical specifications in the nuclear industry. Given the RIDM philosophy, two additional insights, i.e. ageing data uncertainty and test and maintenance costs, are considered along with unavailability insights gained from the probabilistic safety assessment for a selected standard safety system. In that sense, an approach for multi-objective optimization of the equipment surveillance test interval is proposed herein. Three different objective functions related to each one of the three different insights discussed above comprise the multi-objective nature of the optimization process. Genetic algorithm technique is utilized as an optimization tool. Four different types of genetic algorithms are utilized and consequently comparative analysis is conducted given the

  16. Considerations about the licensing process of special nuclear industrial facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talarico, M.A., E-mail: talaricomarco@hotmail.com [Marinha do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao do Porgrama de Submarino com Propulsao Nuclear; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    This paper brings a discussion about the challenges involved in the development of a new kind of nuclear facility in Brazil, a naval base for nuclear submarines, with attention to the licensing process and considerations about the risk-informed decision making application to the licensing process. Initially, a model of such a naval base, called in this work, special industrial facility, is proposed, with its systems and respective sets of basic requirements, in order to make it possible the accomplishment of the special industrial facility support function to the nuclear submarine. A discussion about current challenges to overcome in this project is presented: the challenges due to the new characteristics of this type of nuclear facility; existence of several interfaces between the special industrial facilities systems and nuclear submarine systems in design activities; lack of specific regulation in Brazil to allow the licensing process of special industrial facilities by the nuclear safety authority; and comments about the lack of information from reference nuclear facilities, as is the case with nuclear power reactors (for example, the German Grafenrheinfeld nuclear plant is the reference plant for the Brazilian Angra 2 nuclear plant). Finally, in view of these challenges, an analysis method of special industrial facility operational scenarios to assist the licensing process is proposed. Also, considerations about the application of risk-informed decision making to the special industrial facility activity and licensing process in Brazil are presented. (author)

  17. Considerations about the licensing process of special nuclear industrial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talarico, M.A.; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e

    2015-01-01

    This paper brings a discussion about the challenges involved in the development of a new kind of nuclear facility in Brazil, a naval base for nuclear submarines, with attention to the licensing process and considerations about the risk-informed decision making application to the licensing process. Initially, a model of such a naval base, called in this work, special industrial facility, is proposed, with its systems and respective sets of basic requirements, in order to make it possible the accomplishment of the special industrial facility support function to the nuclear submarine. A discussion about current challenges to overcome in this project is presented: the challenges due to the new characteristics of this type of nuclear facility; existence of several interfaces between the special industrial facilities systems and nuclear submarine systems in design activities; lack of specific regulation in Brazil to allow the licensing process of special industrial facilities by the nuclear safety authority; and comments about the lack of information from reference nuclear facilities, as is the case with nuclear power reactors (for example, the German Grafenrheinfeld nuclear plant is the reference plant for the Brazilian Angra 2 nuclear plant). Finally, in view of these challenges, an analysis method of special industrial facility operational scenarios to assist the licensing process is proposed. Also, considerations about the application of risk-informed decision making to the special industrial facility activity and licensing process in Brazil are presented. (author)

  18. [Industrial application of lipases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancerz, Renata

    2017-01-01

    The ability of lipases to perform specific reactions of transformation (biotransformation) makes these enzymes a useful tool used in many syntheses, for example: in the production of detergents, cosmetics, biosurfactants, in the oil-chemical, paper, dairy, food or pharmaceutical industries. Lipases are ubiquitous enzymes but only lipases produced by microorganisms are important for industrial applications due to their wide variety of properties such as stability in organic solvents, action under mild conditions, high substrate specificity and region- and enantioselectivity, as well as the relatively simple methods of their production in fermentors and recovery from the culture medium. This paper reviews the latest achievements in the production of lipases in the submerged fermentation and solid state fermentation using waste products from the agricultural industry. In addition, new applications of lipases were described, including those for the synthesis of biopolymers and biodiesel and for the production of enantiomeric pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and flavoring compounds.

  19. Process intensification : Industrial applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, Anton A.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter presents process intensification technologies used in industrial applications, for increasing the eco-efficiency of the chemical equipment with the benefit of lower capital costs, substantial energy saving, reduced footprint, and safety by design. The key topics cover compact heat

  20. Development and issues of nuclear industry in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuangchi Liu

    1994-01-01

    Industrial and economic developments in Taiwan have achieved a so-called 'miracle' in the last decades. Endeavors by the private enterprise, prudent planning by the government, and the devoted efforts by the diligent and creative labor forces have been credited jointly with the result. To develop a sustainable nuclear industry in support of an efficient and safe power generation and other applications of nuclear energy in Taiwan, continuing efforts from the private industry, government and each individual of the nuclear industry will be required. In this paper, milestones of the past and major issues for future developments will be discussed

  1. Advances in instrumentation for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayya, Y.S.

    2012-01-01

    The key motivations for advances in instrumentation in Nuclear industry always are - improved plant availability and safety with reduced cost. The time tested design principles applicable to safety systems in Nuclear power plants guide these developments: simplicity, diversity, independence, defence-in-depth and fail-safety. Nuclear instruments are primarily made up of detectors/sensors and processing electronics. Today's instruments leverage the latest advancements in material science, sensors, architectures, processors, computation and development platforms, networks, software, diagnostics and HMl technologies to achieve the above objectives. Nuclear plants are heavily instrumented: a wide variety of instruments are deployed not only for the safe and reliable operation of the plant itself but also for the monitoring of health and safety of personnel. This applies to all nuclear installations including research and power reactors, fuel reprocessing plants, fuel fabrication facilities, heavy water plants etc. In addition to the above, it has now become necessary for these plants to have instruments for monitoring movement of Special nuclear materials. Historically, the nuclear industry has been slower in embracing new technologies due to the rigorous process of verification and validation involved for licensing. As newer technologies emerge, they also impinge on regulatory framework, principles and practices as has been happening over the previous decades as computers and software based systems made gradual inroads in to the safety island. Electronics Corporation of India came into being with the mandate of meeting all the instrumentation requirements of the Atomic Energy Program of the country. This not only includes the instrumentation for safe operation of nuclear power reactors and allied facilities but also for the related basic and nuclear science research and development activities. Since its inception, ECIL has been involved in the development, production

  2. Industrial applications of radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallien, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation processing refers to the use of ionizing radiation to initiate chemical or biological changes in various materials as a substitute for conventional thermal or chemical processes. The method was inroduced in the industrial field 30 years ago and is now being widely used for numerous applications, among which industrial radiography, polymer modification, sterilization or decontamination, and food preservation. Both electron beam accelerators and gamma sources can be used, depending mainly of the amount of radiation and the penetration required. Radiation processing presents an increasing economical importance; in 1986 the market volume of ionized products ranged 3 billion $ [fr

  3. Nuclear cratering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, M.M.

    1969-01-01

    The development of nuclear excavation technology is based on the promise that the relatively inexpensive energy available from thermonuclear explosives can be used to simultaneously break and move age quantities of rock and earth economically and safety. This paper discusses the economic and other advantages of using nuclear excavation for large engineering projects. A brief description of the phenomenology of nuclear excavation is given. Each of the several proposed general applications of nuclear excavation is discussed to include a few specific example of possible nuclear excavation projects. The discussion includes nuclear excavation for harbors, canals, terrain transits, aggregate production, mining and water resource development and conservation. (author)

  4. Inspection robots for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazawa, Tatsuo; Kimura, Motohiko; Sato, Michio

    1990-01-01

    In order to maintain the soundness in nuclear facilities including nuclear power stations, the inspection prior to operation and the inspection during operation as well as the quality control at the time of manufacture are carried out. The main methods of inspection are nondestructive inspection, and visual, ultrasonic flaw detection, eddy current flaw detection, X-ray and other inspections are carried out. In nuclear facilities, it is necessary to do inspection in the places where radiation and radioactivity exist, accordingly in view of reducing the dose in working as far as possible, remote and automatic inspection is desirable. Besides, the research and development of the upgrading of quality and the shortening of time of inspection have been done. The ultrasonic flaw detection of the nozzle parts of reactor pressure vessels, welded pipings and so on was automated, and the application of CT technology to make the three-dimensional images of piping defects has been studied. In this report, a remote, automatic ultrasonic flaw detection apparatus and an underwater visual inspection apparatus are described. The former is composed of an electromagnetic acoustic transducer and its running mechanism of trackless magnetic sticking type. The latter uses a television camera mounted on a vehicle. (K.I.)

  5. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hosokawa, Komei; Thomas, Steve; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Hazemann, Julie; Bradford, Peter A.

    2013-07-01

    Two years after the Fukushima disaster started unfolding on 11 March 2011, its impact on the global nuclear industry has become increasingly visible. Global electricity generation from nuclear plants dropped by a historic 7 percent in 2012, adding to the record drop of 4 percent in 2011. This World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2013 (WNISR) provides a global overview of the history, the current status and the trends of nuclear power programs worldwide. It looks at nuclear reactor units in operation and under construction. Annex 1 provides 40 pages of detailed country-by-country information. A specific chapter assesses the situation in potential newcomer countries. For the second time, the report looks at the credit-rating performance of some of the major nuclear companies and utilities. A more detailed chapter on the development patterns of renewable energies versus nuclear power is also included. Annex 6 provides an overview table with key data on the world nuclear industry by country. The 2013 edition of the World Nuclear Industry Status Report also includes an update on nuclear economics as well as an overview of the status, on-site and off-site, of the challenges triggered by the Fukushima disaster. However, this report's emphasis on recent post-Fukushima developments should not obscure an important fact: as previous editions (see www.WorldNuclearReport.org) detail, the world nuclear industry already faced daunting challenges long before Fukushima, just as the U.S. nuclear power industry had largely collapsed before the 1979 Three Mile Island accident. The nuclear promoters' invention that a global nuclear renaissance was flourishing until 3/11 is equally false: Fukushima only added to already grave problems, starting with poor economics. The performance of the nuclear industry over the year from July 2012 to July 2013 is summed up in this report

  6. Safety reassessment of nuclear installations: consequences for the 900 MWe-PWR type reactors. Safety reassessment of laboratories and nuclear industrial plant, application to a nuclear laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dousson, D.; Guillard, M.; Charles, Th.

    2002-10-01

    In 1987 EDF (Electricite de France) launched the first campaign of the reassessment of safety of 6 operating nuclear reactors (2 Fessenheim units and the 4 reactors of the Bugey plant). This reassessment was requested by the Safety Authority in order to: - check that the safety studies led by EDF are consistent with the real state of the reactors and - be sure that the feedback experience cumulated over years of operating life has been profitable. This work ended in 1995. In 1990 EDF launched the second campaign involving the remaining 28 units of the 900 MWe-PWR type reactors. The aim was the same as previously but this time the procedure has included the use of probabilistic studies of safety. This second campaign has now entered its final stage and has led to several measures concerning fire protection, seismic resistance, and protection against deep cold weather. The probabilistic studies have shown that the reliability of some systems important for safety might be improved, so some modifications have been proposed. These modifications concern the emergency feedwater supply of steam generators, the ventilation systems and the emergency turbine generator set. The second part of the document presents the reassessment of safety that has been performed on a CEA laboratory dedicated to the study of irradiated fuel rods. (A.C.)

  7. Nuclear instrumentation for the industrial measuring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normand, S.

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with nuclear instrumentation and its application to industry, power plant fuel reprocessing plant and finally with homeland security. The first part concerns the reactor instrumentation, in-core and ex-core measurement system. Ionization Uranium fission chamber will be introduced with their acquisition system especially Campbell mode system. Some progress have been done on regarding sensors failure foresee. The second part of this work deals with reprocessing plant and associated instrumentation for nuclear waste management. Proportional counters techniques will be discussed, especially Helium-3 counter, and new development on electronic concept for reprocessing nuclear waste plant (one electronic for multipurpose acquisition system). For nuclear safety and security for human and homeland will be introduce. First we will explain a new particular approach on operational dosimetric measurement and secondly, we will show new kind of organic scintillator material and associated electronics. Signal treatment with real time treatment is embedded, in order to make neutron gamma discrimination possible even in solid organic scintillator. Finally, the conclusion will point out future, with most trends in research and development on nuclear instrumentation for next years. (author) [fr

  8. Design of nuclear instruments for industrial use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggio, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    Following an introduction to the atomic structure and the radioactive desintegration, the applications of radioisotopic sealed sources are described. The laws that govern the interaction of radiation with matter and the statistics applied to the radioactive measurements are presented. Different measurement techniques, basic equations of design, the way to provide the activity calculation of a source and the detector's characteristics are given, according to the parameters to be measured and the conditions imposed. Finally, the principles of operation and the most important characteristics of different nuclear instruments to be used in industrial measurements are described. (Author) [es

  9. Economical scale of nuclear energy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The nuclear energy industry is supported by two wheels of radiation and energy applications. When comparing both, they have some different sides, such as numbers of employees and researchers, numbers and scales of works, effect on society, affecting effects and regions of industrial actions, problems on safety, viewpoint on nuclear proliferation protection and safety guarantee, energy security, relationship to environmental problem, efforts on wastes disposal, and so on. Here described on economical scale of radiation application in fields of industry, agriculture, and medicine and medical treatment, and on economical scale of energy application in nuclear power generation and its instruments and apparatus. (G.K.)

  10. Union innovation in Ontario's nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, D.

    2003-01-01

    Over the last decade the Power Worker's Union (PWU) has embarked on a number of innovative approaches that have provided significant benefit to the nuclear industry. These include advanced labour relations approaches, equity participation and groundbreaking skills training initiatives. This presentation outlines these and other initiatives in the context of the union's view of the nuclear generation industry's future. (author)

  11. German nuclear industry waits on the politicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuett, Claudia.

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear energy programme in Germany is facing serious social and political opposition from environmentalists and political parties. The nuclear industry must wait for national election results in October to find out about its future prospects. Energy policy will depend crucially on these results, with the current opposition party arguing for the end of nuclear power in Germany. (UK)

  12. Status of nuclear power industry in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadenko, I.M.; Vlasenko, M.I.

    2007-01-01

    There are five nuclear power plants and sites (NPPs) with 15 units in operation, 3 units under decommissioning and 1 drastically known as the 'Shelter' object in Ukraine. Ukraine has ambitions plans to develop nuclear industry based on own mineral, human financial resources as well as world wide international cooperation with nuclear countries

  13. China's nuclear industry comes of age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Ken.

    1986-01-01

    China's part in civil nuclear construction in its own country, and in exporting of nuclear plant and services to the rest of the world is described. A brief history of the nuclear industry in China is given, and future plans outlined. (UK)

  14. The Canadian nuclear industry - a national asset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    The economic importance of the Canadian nuclear industry in saving costs and creating jobs is expounded. The medical work of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is also extolled. The Canadian Nuclear Association urges the federal government to continue to support the industry at home, and to continue to promote nuclear exports. This report was prepared in response to the Federal Finance Minister's 'A New Direction for Canada'

  15. The Canadian nuclear power industry. Background paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, A.

    1993-12-01

    Nuclear power, the production of electricity from uranium through nuclear fission, is by far the most prominent segment of the nuclear industry. The value of the electricity produced, $3.7 billion in Canada in 1992, far exceeds the value of any other product of the civilian nuclear industry. Power production employs many more people than any other sector, the capital investment is much greater, and nuclear power plants are much larger and more visible than uranium mining and processing facilities. They are also often located close to large population centres. This paper provides an overview of some of the enormously complex issues surrounding nuclear power. It describes the Canadian nuclear power industry, addressing i particular its performance so far and future prospects. (author). 1 tab

  16. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony

    2004-12-01

    Fifty years ago, in September 1954, the head of the US Atomic Energy Commission stated that nuclear energy would become 'too cheap to meter': The cost to produce energy by nuclear power plants would be so low that the investment into electricity meters would not be justified. By coincidence the US prophecy came within three months of the announcement of the world's first nuclear power plant being connected to the grid in.. the then Soviet Union. In June 2004, the international nuclear industry celebrated the anniversary of the grid connection at the site of the world's first power reactor in Obninsk, Russia, under the original slogan '50 Years of Nuclear Power - The Next 50 Years'. This report aims to provide a solid basis for analysis into the prospects for the nuclear power industry. Twelve years ago, the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, WISE-Paris and Greenpeace International published the World Nuclear Industry Status Report 1992. In the current international atmosphere of revival of the nuclear revival debate - it has been a periodically recurring phenomenon for the past twenty years - two of the authors of the 1992 report, now independent consultants, have carried out an updated review of the status of the world nuclear industry. The performance of the nuclear industry over the past year is summed up in this report

  17. US nuclear policy and business trend of Japan's nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    As several countries in the east-Asia and middle-east area have been taking an increasing interest in the deployment of nuclear power generation, Japan's nuclear industries have promoted international business activities including the success in the bid of second nuclear power plants in Vietnam. While there are plans for more than thirty of new reactors in the US, the lifetime extension of existing aged reactors, development of non-existing natural gas and trend of greenhouse gases reduction measures have dampened these plans and probably most of new units will not start construction by 2030. This article reviewed the details of US's new nuclear power introduction, trend of recent government's policies, future perspective of nuclear power construction and business trend of Japan's nuclear industries. Japan's industries should be flexible regarding nuclear power as one option to realize low-carbon society. (T. Tanaka)

  18. The worldwide nuclear industry and its markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mons, L.

    2000-06-01

    The world nuclear industry has entered a phase of low activity since the beginning of the 90's. The opening of electricity markets to competition, the reserve of part of the public opinion with respect to nuclear energy and the competition of other power production sources explain the lack of dynamism of nuclear markets. In this context of uncertainties, the nuclear sector has started a re-structuration in depth with new strategic trends which will be decisive for the perenniality of the nuclear industry. The front-end of the fuel cycle is disturbed by production over-capacities which lead to strong tensions on prices. The veering of the German and Belgian policies has had strong impacts on the spent fuels reprocessing activity and the reactor construction activity is in decline in Europe and in the US. On the other hand, services are developing with the extension of the service life of nuclear plants and the waste management and dismantling markets are emerging. The main stakes that the occidental nuclear actors have to face today are: improving the competitiveness of nuclear industry, mastering the management of long-living radioactive wastes, proving the safeness of nuclear power, countering the arrival of Asian competitors. In front of these stakes, the nuclear actors have to take initiatives such as: concentration, vertical integration, technological innovation, communication, diversification etc.. This study examines the overall segments of the world nuclear industry. It comprises also a behaviour and strategy analysis of 13 major actors of this sector. (J.S.)

  19. Working in nuclear industry? why not?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechet, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Today 200 nuclear reactors are being built or scheduled in the world and despite this, nuclear energy in western countries seems to collapse under the weights of prejudices and false ideas. No matter what the opponents say, nuclear energy is safe and clean and is a bringer of jobs. In France nuclear industry is one of a few industrial sectors that have been spared by massive de-industrialization. Nuclear energy as a carbon-free energy, has an important role to play to mitigate climate warming by working with renewable energies to provide a reliable electric power. This future is a new future for nuclear energy as new challenges have to be overcome, for instance nuclear energy has to adapt itself to the intermittency of wind and solar energies, nuclear industry has to be innovative and has to fully appropriate numerical technologies. Nuclear industry is a promising sector that proposes interesting scientific and technical jobs and is also a vital interest for the country. (A.C.)

  20. Non-nuclear power application of nuclear technology in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funtua, I.I.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear Technology applications are found in Food and Agriculture, Human Health, Water Resources, Industry, Environment, Education and Research.There are more potentials for the deployment of nuclear technology in more aspects of our life with needed economic development in Nigeria.Nuclear Technology plays and would continue to play vital role in Agriculture, Human health, Water resources and industry in Nigeria.Nuclear technologies have been useful in developmental efforts worldwide and for these to take hold, capacity building programmes must be expanded and the general public must have informed opinions about the benefits and risk associated with the technologies.This presentation gives an overview of nuclear technology applications in Nigeria in the following areas: Food and Agriculture, Human Health, Water Resources, Industry, Education and Research

  1. Nuclear industry: a young sector of excellence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varin, P.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear industry is the 3. industrial sector in France and is the good reason why the French energy mix is largely carbon-free. The medium term challenges that faces nuclear industry in this country is first to succeed the extensive refit of nuclear power plants with a view on getting the extension of their operating life and secondly to recruit the skilled staff nuclear industry needs. About 8000 jobs dispatched in the 2500 enterprises that forms the nuclear sector will be available each year up to 2020. The age pyramid shows that numerous retirements are expected in the years to come so the issue of skill and knowledge transfer is looming. 25% of recruitment will be made on the basis of work-study contracts particularly for technical jobs. Concerning recruitment, the nuclear sector is competing with other high-tech sectors like aeronautics or the automobile sector, which make things harder. The image that nuclear industry wants to promote of itself is the image of a young, modern, high-tech industry that appeared less than 50 years ago and whose main purpose is to provide a carbon-free electricity to an avid world. (A.C.)

  2. The multiple applications of the nuclear techniques in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzini, Alberto C.

    2001-01-01

    A review is given of the use of nuclear technology in Argentina, especially in the field of the production of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals, nuclear medicine, and industrial applications. The applications of ionizing radiation are also reviewed

  3. Nuclear industry project audit and countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongxin; Zhang Jian

    2012-01-01

    With China's increasing use of nuclear energy, nuclear power related construction projects related to the deepening of the audit, some of the nuclear industry in construction field of the dominant issues have been more effective containment, such as inflated workload, high-set fixed standards, to improve billing unit price, which overestimate the risk calculation tools and behavior completed audit of the accounts have been able to escape his stuff. However, some nuclear industry construction field with a hidden problem because of its hidden nature, not easily found, and some even have intensified the trend. Construction funds to the country such problems caused by the loss of waste is enormous, to the breeding of corruption provided the soil is fertile, if not promptly and effectively to stop the breeding will spread. This paper on the current construction of the nuclear industry in several major areas of the hidden problems are discussed, and the angle from the audit of appropriate countermeasures. (authors)

  4. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie

    2012-07-01

    Twenty years after its first edition, World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2012 portrays an industry suffering from the cumulative impacts of the world economic crisis, the Fukushima disaster, ferocious competitors and its own planning and management difficulties. The report provides a global overview of the history, the current status and trends of nuclear power programs in the world. It looks at units in operation and under construction. Annex 1 also provides detailed country-by-country information. A specific chapter assesses the situation in potential newcomer countries. For the first time, the report looks at the credit-rating performance of some of the major nuclear companies and utilities. A more detailed chapter on the development patterns of renewable energies versus nuclear power is also included. The performance of the nuclear industry over the 18 months since the beginning of 2011 is summed up in this report

  5. Options contracts in the nuclear fuel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses options trading in the nuclear fuels industry. Although there now exists no formal options market in the nuclear industry, flexibilities, or embedded options, are actually quite common in the long-term supply contracts. The value of these flexibilities can be estimated by applying the methods used to evaluate options. The method used is the Black-Scholes Model, and it is applied to a number of examples

  6. Continuous improvement methods in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heising, Carolyn D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate management methods for improved safety in the nuclear power industry. Process improvement management, methods of business process reengineering, total quality management, and continued process improvement (KAIZEN) are explored. The anticipated advantages of extensive use of improved process oriented management methods in the nuclear industry are increased effectiveness and efficiency in virtually all tasks of plant operation and maintenance. Important spin off include increased plant safety and economy. (author). 6 refs., 1 fig

  7. Annual report 1999 - Brazil Nuclear Industry (INB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This document presents the 1999 annual report covering the following activities: nuclear fuel, resources and application, ISO 9001, environment social activities, personnel, financial indicators, and countability

  8. Dikkers Valves for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Most countries have adopted the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III, as the basis of their national requirements for licensing nuclear components. This Code gives clear directives for defining design requirements coupled with a controlled manufacturing system. It has always been and still is the policy of Dikkers to manufacture high-quality products. Dikkers manufacture nuclear products in accordance with this Code, Section III; indeed many features exceed these minimum requirements. At the Nuclex Exhibition in Basel, Dikkers Valves BV will exhibit its main products for use in nuclear power plants. (Auth.)

  9. Long-Term Nuclear Industry Outlook - 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichmuth, Barbara A.; Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.

    2004-09-30

    The nuclear industry has become increasingly efficient and global in nature, but may now be poised at a crossroads between graceful decline and profound growth as a viable provider of electrical energy. Predicted population and energy-demand growth, an increased interest in global climate change, the desire to reduce the international dependence on oil as an energy source, the potential for hydrogen co-generation using nuclear power reactors, and the improved performance in the nuclear power industry have raised the prospect of a “nuclear renaissance” in which nuclear power would play an increasingly more important role in both domestic and international energy market. This report provides an assessment of the role nuclear-generated power will plan in the global energy future and explores the impact of that role on export controls.

  10. Human resources in the Japanese nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, M.

    1995-01-01

    Japan is becoming rapidly a nation with an elderly population. Japanese students are turning away from the manufacturing industries, including the nuclear industry, and turning towards more service oriented industries that are considered to be cleaner and to pay better. Studies have been performed to devise ways to attract young workers to the nuclear industry, which is projected to continue to grown under the current long range energy plants. The paper summarizes the findings and recommendations of the recent studies conducted by the nuclear industry and academic circles. All studies point out that insufficient emphasis is placed on science in the present Japanese educational programme and that implementation of effective programmes to revitalize education in science is most urgently needed to keep Japan in the forefront of high technology. Utilization of advanced computer technology and automation is promoted to improve working conditions and efficiency in the nuclear industry. In addition, the establishment of a professional status of engineers and technicians will be vital for an effective utilization of qualified workers in the nuclear industry. (author). 3 refs, 1 tab

  11. Quantification practices in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In this chapter the quantification of risk practices adopted by the nuclear industries in Germany, Britain and France are examined as representative of the practices adopted throughout Europe. From this examination a number of conclusions are drawn about the common features of the practices adopted. In making this survey, the views expressed in the report of the Task Force on Safety Goals/Objectives appointed by the Commission of the European Communities, are taken into account. For each country considered, the legal requirements for presentation of quantified risk assessment as part of the licensing procedure are examined, and the way in which the requirements have been developed for practical application are then examined. (author)

  12. Westinghouse support for Spanish nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebollo, R.

    1999-01-01

    One of the major commitments Westinghouse has with the nuclear industry is to provide to the utilities the support necessary to have their nuclear units operating at optimum levels of availability and safety. This article outlines the organization the Energy Systems Business Unit of Westinghouse has in place to fulfill this commitment and describes the evolution of the support Westinghouse is providing to the operation o f the Spanish Nuclear Power plants. (Author)

  13. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report: 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavin, Christopher; Lenssen, Nicholas; Froggatt, Antony; Willis, John; Kondakji, Assad; Schneider, Mycle

    1992-05-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. This first WNISR Report was issued in 1992 in a joint publication with WISE-Paris, Greenpeace International and the World Watch Institute, Washington

  14. Proceedings of the first nuclear science and technology conference no. 1. Nuclear science and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This conference contains papers on non-power applications of nuclear technology in agriculture and industry. These applications include irradiation of food for disinfestation and radiopreservation, radiation monitoring, and radiation chemistry important to industrial processes

  15. Nuclear dual-purpose plants for industrial energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, O.H.

    1976-01-01

    One of the major obstacles to extensive application of nuclear power to industrial heat is the difference between the relatively small energy requirements of individual industrial plants and the large thermal capacity of current power reactors. A practical way of overcoming this obstacle would be to operate a centrally located dual-purpose power plant that would furnish process steam to a cluster of industrial plants, in addition to generating electrical power. The present study indicates that even relatively remote industrial plants could be served by the power plant, since it might be possible to convey steam economically as much as ten miles or more. A survey of five major industries indicates a major potential market for industrial steam from large nuclear power stations

  16. Nuclear industry is ready for digitalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc, B.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear industry is now embracing the digital revolution by adapting existing digital technologies concerning big data, additive manufacturing, connected objects or enhanced reality to the constraints of nuclear industry. The expected benefits will be manifold: to assure and improve the competitiveness of new reactors, to accelerate the implementation of innovations, to develop preventive maintenance, and to allow a better communication between teams working on the same project. In some big enterprises a chief digital officer has been commissioned to prioritize the introduction of digital technologies in industrial projects. (A.C.)

  17. The nuclear industry and the young generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanti, A.

    2000-01-01

    The European Nuclear Society was founded in 1975. It is a federation of 25 nuclear societies from 24 countries-stretching from the Atlantic to the Urals and on across Russia to the Pacific. Through Russia's membership in the Pacific Nuclear Council. ENS is directly linked to that area, too. ENS comprises more than 20 000 professionals from industry, power stations, research centers and authorities, working to advance nuclear energy. ENS has three Member Societies in Australia, Israel and Morocco. Also it has collaboration agreements with the American Nuclear Society, the Argentinean Nuclear Energy Association, the Canadian and the Chinese Nuclear Societies. ENS is doing pioneering work with its Young Generation Network, standing for positive measures to recruit and educate young people as engineers, technicians and skilled staff ion the nuclear field: from school to university and in industry. The goals of the YGN are: to promote the establishment of national Young Generation networks; to promote the exchange of knowledge between older and younger generation cross-linked all over Europe; to encourage young people in nuclear technology to provide a resource for the future; to communicate nuclear issues to the public (general public, media, politicians). (N.C.)

  18. Nuclear industry - challenges in chemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Sunder Rajan, N.S.; Balu, K.; Garg, R.K.; Murthy, L.G.K.; Ramani, M.P.S.; Rao, M.K.; Sadhukhan, H.K.; Venkat Raj, V.

    1978-01-01

    As chemical engineering processes and operations are closely involved in many areas of nuclear industry, the chemical engineer has a vital role to play in its growth and development. An account of the major achievements of the Indian chemical engineers in this field is given with view of impressing upon the faculty members of the Indian universities the need for taking appropriate steps to prepare chemical engineers suitable for nuclear industry. Some of the major achievements of the Indian chemical engineers in this field are : (1) separation of useful minerals from beach sand, (2) preparation of thorium nitrate of nuclear purity from monazite, (3) processing of zircon sand to obtain nuclear grade zirconium and its separation from hafnium to obtain zirconium metal sponge, (4) recovery of uranium from copper tailings, (5) economic recovery of nuclear grade uranium from low grade uranium ores found in India, (6) fuel reprocessing, (7) chemical processing of both low and high level radioactive wastes. (M.G.B.)

  19. Application of laboratory data from small-scale simulators to human performance issues in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spettell, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory analogs of nuclear power plant tasks were simulated on personal computers in two experimental studies. Human performance data were collected during each experimental study. The goal of the first experiment was to validate a quantitative model of dependence among human errors during testing, calibration, and maintenance activities. This model, the Multiple Sequential Failure (MSF) model (NUREG/CR-2211) has been used to quantify dependent human error failure probabilities for human reliability analyses in Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs). The goal of the second experiment was to examine the relationship among psychological and behavioral characteristics of individuals and their performance at controlling a simulated nuclear power plant. These studies demonstrated the usefulness of the experimental psychology approach for validating models of human performance at nuclear power plant tasks

  20. Guidelines for planning interventions against external exposure in industrial area after a nuclear accident. Pt. 1. A holistic approach of countermeasure application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eged, K.; Kis, Z.; Andersson, K.G.; Roed, J.; Varga, K.

    2003-01-01

    Following a large-scale release of radioactivity into the environment, different urban, industrial and rural environments may be contaminated for many years. Currently, there is limited systematic consideration of long-term management to ensure sustainability of areas contaminated by long-lived radionuclides. To sustain acceptable living and working conditions in such areas it is important to be able to construct robust, effective restoration strategies which address the many different types of environment, land use and ways of life. The overall objective of the STRATEGY project (directly addressing Key Action 2: Nuclear Fission - Off-site emergency management in the Fifth Framework Programme) is to establish a decision framework to enable the selection of robust and practicable remediation strategies for Member States, which enable the long-term sustainable management of contaminated areas. The special objectives of the work carried out by GSF - Radiation Protection Institute and presented in this report was to contribute to the different urban/industrial parts of the STRATEGY project. Countermeasures being different from the usual urban ones and largely applicable in industrial area are collected and evaluated. The industrial area is defined here as such an area where productive and/or commercial activity is carried out. A good example is a supermarket or a factory. In designing restoration strategies to ensure the long-term sustainability of large and varied contaminated areas, there is a requirement to adopt a more holistic approach rather than simply selecting cost-effective countermeasures. The potentially negative consequences of restoration must be fully considered. The implementation of a remediation strategy may lead to a reduced collective dose, but increased dose to those implementing the strategies. Countermeasures may themselves generate waste and the practical consideration of disposal options has to be addressed. There is also a requirement that the

  1. The application of laboratory data from small-scale simulators to human performance issues in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spettell, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory analogs of nuclear power plant tasks were simulated on personal computers in two experimental studies. Human performance data were collected during each experimental study. The goal of the first experiment was to validate a quantitative model of dependence among human errors during testing, calibration, and maintenance activities. This model, the Multiple Sequential Failure (MSF) model (NUREG/CR-2211) has been used to quantify dependent human error failure probabilities for human reliability analyses in Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs). The goal of the second experiment was to examine the relationship among psychological and behavioral characteristics of individuals and their performance at controlling a simulated nuclear power plant

  2. Activities of nuclear human resource development in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujikura, Yonezo

    2010-01-01

    Since 2007, the JAIF (Japan Atomic Industrial Forum) had established the nuclear energy human resource development council to make analysis of the issue on nuclear human resource development. The author mainly contributed to develop its road map as a chairman of working group. Questionnaire survey to relevant parties on issues of nuclear human resource development had been conducted and the council identified the six relevant issues and ten recommendations. Both aspects for career design and skill-up program are necessary to develop nuclear human resource at each developing step and four respective central coordinating hubs should be linked to each sector participating in human resource development. (T. Tanaka)

  3. What nuclear industry after Fukushima?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power experienced a fast growth during the 70's and 80's, but a quasi-stagnation during the 90's. Since the beginning of the 21. century, a so-called renaissance could be witnessed, fuelled by concerns about energy security of supply, volatility of oil and gas prices, fear of an incoming 'peak oil', and, last but not least, the threat of global climate change due to the anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse effect gases. Then, on March 11 2011, a monster earthquake followed by a violent tsunami triggered an accident which all but destroyed four nuclear reactors on the Fukushima-Daiichi site, on the east coast of Honshu, the main Japanese island. There was meltdown in three reactor cores, hydrogen explosions which blew off the upper structures of four reactor buildings, and massive radioactive contamination of a spread of land north-west of the site as well as radioactive releases to the ocean. This accident triggered reactions of various intensities throughout the world, awakening the fears, and questions raised 25 years before by the Chernobyl accident. But the tsunami did not make the fundamentals of the renaissance disappear. After a pause, to fully learn lessons from the accident, the renaissance is likely to start again, all the much since the 'third generation' nuclear plants would have survived unscathed the Fukushima earthquake and tsunami. (author)

  4. Corrosion issues in nuclear industry today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattant, F.; Crusset, D.; Feron, D.

    2008-01-01

    In the context of global warming, nuclear energy is a carbon-free source of power and so is a meaningful option for energy production without CO 2 emissions. Currently, there are more than 440 commercial nuclear reactors, accounting for about 15% of electric power generation in the world, and there has not been a major accident in over 20 years. The world's fleet of nuclear power plants is, on average, more than 20 years old. Even though the design life of a nuclear power plant is typically 30 or 40 years, it is quite feasible that many nuclear power plants will be able to operate for longer than this. The re-emergence of nuclear power today is founded on the present generation of nuclear reactors meeting the demands of extended service life, ensuring the cost competitiveness of nuclear power and matching enhanced safety requirements. Nuclear power plant engineers should be able to demonstrate such integrity and reliability of their system materials and components as to enable nuclear power plants to operate beyond their initial design life. Effective waste management is another challenge for sustainable nuclear energy today; more precisely, a solution is needed for the management of high-level and long-lived intermediate-level radioactive waste over the very long term. Most nuclear countries are currently gathering the data needed to assess the feasibility of a deep geological waste repository, including the prediction of the behaviour of materials over several thousands of years. The extended service life of nuclear power plants and the need for permanent disposal for nuclear waste are today's key issues in the nuclear industry. We focus here on the major role that corrosion plays in these two factors, and on the French approaches to these two issues. (authors)

  5. Nuclear heat for industrial purposes and district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    Studies on the various possibilities for the application of heat from nuclear reactors in the form of district heat or process steam for industrial purposes had been made long before the present energy crisis. Although these studies have indicated technical feasibility and economical justification of such utilization, the availability of relatively cheap oil and difficulties in locating a nuclear heat source inside industrial areas did not stimulate much further development. Since the increase of oil prices, the interest in nuclear heat application is reawakened, and a number of new potential areas have been identified. It now seems generally recognized that the heat from nuclear reactors should play an important role in primary energy supply, not only for electricity production but also as direct heat. At present three broad areas of nuclear heat application are identified: Direct heat utilization in industrial processing requiring a temperature above 800 deg. C; Process steam utilization in various industries, requiring a temperature mainly in the range of 200-300 deg. C; Low temperature and waste heat utilization from nuclear power plants for desalination of sea water and district heating. Such classification is mainly related to the type and characteristics of the heat source or nuclear reactor which could be used for a particular application. Modified high temperature reactor types (HTR) are the candidates for direct heat application, while the LWR reactors can satisfy most of the demands for process steam. Production of waste heat is a characteristic of all thermal power plants, and its utilization is a major challenge in the field of power production

  6. Nuclear industry must change or disappear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shellenberger, M.

    2017-01-01

    What makes nuclear plants safer and less costly during construction or operation, is the cumulated feedback experience rather than innovative concepts. The multiplicity of reactor designs hamper nuclear plant constructors to gain the necessary experience to become more efficient and it is all the more true since the number of reactors being built worldwide is low (about 50 units). Contrary to other industries, the nuclear industry has to face first, a very strong and disparate lobby that is ready to benefit from any of its weaknesses and secondly, the continuous implementation of new regulations on safety that jeopardises all the gains made elsewhere. A more important standardization of reactor design, a better cooperation between countries in order to elaborate a planning for the construction of nuclear power plants, or the merging of reactor constructors in order to get a western leader, are key elements to reduce costs and financing needs. (A.C.)

  7. Diffusion of information about the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvan, C.G.

    1983-01-01

    The diffusion of nuclear technology means a development of a large network of activities (e.g. capital goods, construction, metallurgical and chemical industries) than a path for solving energy problems. Its ties with the arms race cause specific non-proliferation problems. A close state-capital articulation emerges, which strengthens the subsumption of labour and introduces new processes of social control. Already fulfilled investments give impulse to this tendency. The Tlatelolco regime, banishing nuclear weapons from Latin America, seems to establish a pre-condition for a regional solution to the problems thus arising. But, besides the imperfect adhesion to the Treaty, technical and political reasons obstruct a regional integration of the nuclear fuel cycle. Among other things, a lack of regional integration in other industries makes nuclear expansion more dependent on extra-regional technological ties. (Author) [pt

  8. The rebirth of the US nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitron, G.

    2008-01-01

    Fought during a long time by ecologists but recently rehabilitated by politicians, the US civil nuclear industry has started its comeback in the first power-consuming country of the world. Utilities and industrialists are already in action, and the first cooperation agreements with foreign groups, like EdF or Areva, have been signed. After three decades of stagnation, the US nuclear industry has to re-launch its fuel cycle activities, from the fuel enrichment to the waste management, and the recruitment of a new competent manpower is one of the main concerns. (J.S.)

  9. C. The nuclear industry in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Most of the European states have made a large commitment to nuclear power. In some aspects, such as fast breeder technology and oxide fuel reprocessing, they clearly lead the rest of the world. The industry is highly competitive, and is able to win contracts over US firms, even though the products offered are basically of US designs. It is also characterised by a large degree of co-operation and dependency amongst member countries. Many developments and services are of a joint nature. To ensure growth in the industry, and reduce foreign involvement, many of the governments have bought large segments of domestic companies, often from US firms. Government agencies themselves have transformed their service departments (such as those involved in the fuel cycle business) so that they now operate under the guise of commercial enterprises. These steps have arisen principally because of the large financial commitments normally associated with nuclear power. As a result of this, and despite the recent economic depression, the nuclear industry in Europe generally appears healthy. It does not seem to be suffering to the same extent from the problems that the industry in the USA is currently facing. Even though some states are experiencing a decrease in the projected rate of growth of energy demand, expectations are that an increasing proportion of energy requirements in most European countries will be met from nuclear power. The industry, both for the construction of generating capacity and fuel cycle services, is anticipating growth and financial profit

  10. Application of radiation and isotopes in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrzej, G. Chmielewski

    2006-01-01

    Full text: A vast variety of nuclear techniques is available for industrial, environmental, medical and research applications. Sealed or open radioisotope sources are applied as radiotracer in the system, in nucleonic gauges, in non destructive testing and in nuclear analytical techniques. Beside of isotopes X-ray tubes and accelerators operated in e-/X mode as a source of radiation are applied as well. These methods are used for process and material control, non-destructive evaluation of wells, castings and assembled machinery help to make industrial processes safer and more cost effective. For natural resource exploration radiotracers (RTT), sealed sources and nucleonic gauges (NCS) are used in the oil industry, in mineral processing and waste water treatment plants. Radioisotopes make important contributions in several sectors of economic significance including medicine industry, agriculture, structural safety and research. They are generally produced in research reactors or cyclotrons. More than 150 different radioisotopes in different forms are in use for various applications. Non-destructive testing (NDT) is essential for quality assurance of various products in diverse industries and construction projects apart from well established NDT protocols for industrial components, machinery and chemical pipelines, new techniques and applications, such as digital radiography for ecological safety, online inspection of concrete structures and pipe corrosion, are being developed. The new applications concern cargo inspection where Co 60 or e-/X sources are used. Radioisotopes are applied as radiotracers in industry and environment. Oil fields and refineries, chemical and metallurgical industries and wastewater purification installations are the end users benefiting from radioisotope techniques. Radioisotope techniques (radiotracers, gamma scanning, tomography and single particle tracking) are extensively used to identify and quantify multiphase reactors (phase hold

  11. Nuclear applications for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Building capacity for the safe application of nuclear technologies produces tangible socioeconomic benefits to developing countries. Identifying killer infections such as extrapulmonary tuberculosis and drug resistant strains of HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa; Monitoring malaria drug resistance in Myanmar; - Teaching Jordanian farmers how to produce viable crops on salty soils; - Investigating water resources deep beneath the Nubian Desert; - Fighting acid rain in Poland; - Creating an energy strategy for Latin America; - Strengthening the security of nuclear sources in Kazakhstan. These are just some of examples of the practical ways in which the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) fulfils its mandate to 'accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health, and prosperity throughout the world'. And some of the reasons the IAEA's long history of global action was recognized through the Nobel Peace Prize in 2005. This list of activities reflects the diverse needs of Member States. It also demonstrates the enormous potential of nuclear technology and the breadth of expertise that lie within three IAEA technical programmes: Nuclear Sciences and Applications, Nuclear Energy, and Nuclear Safety and Security. More importantly, it speaks to the success of a determined effort to facilitate knowledge sharing and technology transfer through a cross-cutting mechanism known as the technical cooperation programme. Each year, the technical cooperation programme disburses approximately US $90 million, all of which is acquired through voluntary contributions from Member States. The programme concentrates on building capacity through training and education, expert advice, and equipment delivery. It is currently active in more than 110 countries across four geographic regions: Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Europe and Latin America

  12. Zirconium in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, D.G.; Adamson, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    This book examines the properties of Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and Zr-2.5Nb with regard to their use as structural materials in nuclear reactors. Topics considered include refinement and fabrication (extractive metallurgy, zirconium and hafnium separation, electron-beam remelting, pressure tube development, cold working and heat treatments), basic metallurgical studies (etching, strain anisotropy, fuel cladding, anneal hardening, recrystallization, hydrides in zirconium alloy tubes), texture and irradiation creep (microstructure, ultrasonic velocity, in-reactor creep, fuel rods, deformation), irradiation growth (proton and neutron bombardment, high-fluence irradiation growth), corrosion (ZrO 2 films, aqueous corrosion kinetics, corrosive effects of lithium hydroxide, oxidation films, hydridation), fracture studies (stress-corrosion cracking, hydrogen cracking), and high-temperature and transient effects (cladding deformation in LOCA, high-temperature behavior of fuel rods, steam oxidation kinetics, dissolution of solid UO 2 by molten Zircaloy-4)

  13. Competitiveness in Canada's nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirwald, R.

    1997-01-01

    Cameco, now a publicly traded company, mines and processes uranium. The mines are mostly in northern Saskatchewan. In 1996, Cameco increased its market share to about 15% of the western world's U 3 O 8 , and more than 20% of conversion to UF 6 . Cameco is the only commercial converter of uranium for Candu reactors. In 1996, sales were C$591 million. Net earnings last year were C$137.5 million - a fourfold increase over six years earlier - and long-term debt had been reduced to C$200 million. Cameco's position is secured by its substantial ownership position in Cigar Lake and McArthur River, the richest uranium deposits in the world. To answer questions by investors, Cameco has had to provide good public information about uranium and nuclear power

  14. Intelligent systems and soft computing for nuclear science and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, D.; D'hondt, P.; Govaerts, P.; Kerre, E.E.

    1996-01-01

    The second international workshop on Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science (FLINS) addresses topics related to intelligent systems and soft computing for nuclear science and industry. The proceedings contain 52 papers in different fields such as radiation protection, nuclear safety (human factors and reliability), safeguards, nuclear reactor control, production processes in the fuel cycle, dismantling, waste and disposal, decision making, and nuclear reactor control. A clear link is made between theory and applications of fuzzy logic such as neural networks, expert systems, robotics, man-machine interfaces, and decision-support techniques by using modern and advanced technologies and tools. The papers are grouped in three sections. The first section (Soft computing techniques) deals with basic tools to treat fuzzy logic, neural networks, genetic algorithms, decision-making, and software used for general soft-computing aspects. The second section (Intelligent engineering systems) includes contributions on engineering problems such as knowledge-based engineering, expert systems, process control integration, diagnosis, measurements, and interpretation by soft computing. The third section (Nuclear applications) focusses on the application of soft computing and intelligent systems in nuclear science and industry

  15. Industry of nuclear fuel cycle: Status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikipelov, B.V.

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear industry in Russia was started in the late forties and early fifties, it was aimed at solving certain defense problems. During 1948-1949, the first plant for enriching uranium 235 U and an industrial complex for obtaining and reprocessing plutonium for the defense applications were put into operation. By 1991, the country had 47 plants having a total rated power of 37 GW, i.e., 12.5% of the total power generated in the country. After the Chernobyl' accident, the plans for starting new NPPs were curtailed. Towards the end of this century, the total power generation of all the nuclear power plants of the country is estimated at ∼60 GW. In view of the decreased volume of the nuclear equipment, processing of the concentrated uranium for defense purposes was stopped and, consequently, at the present time, the nuclear industry has a capacity exceeding the requirements of the internal market. The author examines in detail the infrastructure of the nuclear industry that is based on the concept of a closed fuel cycle consisting of reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel using the unburnt uranium, plutonium, and other isotopes separated from it. It includes recovery and processing of the uranium ores, production of uranium hexafluoride, its enrichment to yield 235 U, production of the fuel assemblies (FA), radiochemical processing of the spent nuclear fuel, and reprocessing and open-quotes buryingclose quotes of the radioactive waste materials and the spent nuclear fuel that is not suitable for regeneration. This article includes section on (1) recovery and processing of uranium ores, (2) production of enriched uranium, (3) production of fuel assemblies, control elements, and rolled zirconium alloys, (4) radiochemical processing of spent fuel, and (5) prospects of the Russian nuclear industry through the year 2000

  16. Crisis in the French nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nectoux, F.

    1991-02-01

    This report discusses the economics of the French nuclear power industry. It considers the dominant position of nuclear power in the French energy system, stresses the scale and causes of the current (1990) economic crisis and dispels the popular misconceptions on the cost efficiency of the French programme. The evidence is based on widely available French documents and articles. The report begins by looking at the background of nuclear power in France then discusses the problem of overcapacity, the technical problems and fall in load factors, generating costs and electricity prices and finally, strategic issues are considered. (UK)

  17. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie; Katsuta, Tadahiro; Ramana, M.V.; Rodriguez, Juan C.; Ruedinger, Andreas; Stienne, Agnes

    2017-09-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2017 (WNISR2017) provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. The WNISR2017 edition includes a new assessment from an equity analyst view of the financial crisis of the nuclear sector and some of its biggest industrial players. The Fukushima Status Report provides not only an update on onsite and offsite issues six years after the beginning of the catastrophe, but also the latest official and new independent cost evaluations of the disaster. Focus chapters provide in-depth analysis of France, Japan, South Korea, the United Kingdom and the United States. The Nuclear Power vs. Renewable Energy chapter provides global comparative data on investment, capacity, and generation from nuclear, wind and solar energy. Finally, Annex 1 presents a country-by-country overview of all other countries operating nuclear power plants

  18. Application of neutron absorption method of the analysis on thermal neutrons for the control of substances and products containing boron in a nuclear power engineering and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuev, A.G.; Kiryanov, G.I.; Shagov, S.V.; Shtan, A.S.; Titov, V.V.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear physical methods of analysis using the absorption effect of ionising radiation should satisfy the following requirements for industrial practice. First, the ionising radiation should have a high penetrating ability in the environment examined to ensure a representative nature of the data and reliability of the analysis. Secondly, the absorption degree of radiation should be sufficient to maintain the sensitivity and accuracy of the measurements. In addition, to keep the necessary selectivity, the neutron absorption analysis on thermal neutrons is applied on chemical elements and their isotopes with an anomalously high absorption cross section about 10 2 - 10 4 barn. To such elements belong Gd, Sm, B, Cd, Hg and others. Based on the exponential law of absorption for thermal neutrons, an analytical expression was obtained for the concentration of the element analyzed in dependence on the flow of the elapsed neutrons. A number of interfering factors such as the matrix effect of the filling agent, scattering of neutrons, dispersion of the density and of the temperature of the environment, and background radiation have to be taken into account. Owing to the difference between the experimental calibration dependence and the exponential one, the methods of its mathematical approximation, for example, polynomial function and partially hyperbolic one are considered. The scheme realisation of the method is feasible in geometry 'on passage' and 'on reflection' of the neutron flow. Radionuclide Pu-Be sources are preferred as the neutron sources based on nuclear reactions of the (α,n) type. Detectors used for registration of slow neutrons are gas discharge corona 3 He-filled counters. Hydrogen-containing substances with good scattering properties are utilised as the fast neutron moderators. The neutron absorption method has found wide application in the nuclear power engineering and atomic industry. This method is intended for continuous automatic monitoring of

  19. Helium leak testing methods in nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Anis

    2004-01-01

    Helium mass-spectrometer leak test is the most sensitive leak test method. It gives very reliable and sensitive test results. In last few years application of helium leak testing has gained more importance due to increased public awareness of safety and environment pollution caused by number of growing chemical and other such industries. Helium leak testing is carried out and specified in most of the critical area applications like nuclear, space, chemical and petrochemical industries

  20. Nuclear relations with administrations of industry services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardez Garcia, A.

    2011-01-01

    The object of the article is to try to answer to the following question that can arise to the holder of a nuclear power station: What Administration of Industry must I myself direct to be able to support my complementary facilities of Industrial Security inside the in force legality?. The raised discussion arise between if the competent administration for the legal steps, is the Central Administration across his delegates and sub delegates of government, or is of the Territorial Services of Industry of Autonomous communities. (Author)

  1. Wireless Technology Application to Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Kweon; Jeong, See Chae; Jeong, Ki Hoon; Oh, Do Young; Kim, Jae Hack

    2009-01-01

    Wireless technologies are getting widely used in various industrial processes for equipment condition monitoring, process measurement and other applications. In case of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), it is required to review applicability of the wireless technologies for maintaining plant reliability, preventing equipment failure, and reducing operation and maintenance costs. Remote sensors, mobile technology and two-way radio communication may satisfy these needs. The application of the state of the art wireless technologies in NPPs has been restricted because of the vulnerability for the Electromagnetic Interference and Radio Frequency Interference (EMI/RFI) and cyber security. It is expected that the wireless technologies can be applied to the nuclear industry after resolving these issues which most of the developers and vendors are aware of. This paper presents an overview and information on general wireless deployment in nuclear facilities for future application. It also introduces typical wireless plant monitoring system application in the existing NPPs

  2. Knowledge preservation in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents examples of knowledge loss in different areas related to attrition, retirements or layoff as well as the consequences of the loss of knowledge. The nature of the so called tacit knowledge and its role as a barrier to knowledge preservation is discussed. Strategies for knowledge preservation in the nuclear industry are presented

  3. Reviewing industrial safety in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    This document contains guidance and reference materials for Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) experts, in addition to the OSART Guidelines (TECDOC-449), for use in the review of industrial safety activities at nuclear power plants. It sets out objectives for an excellent industrial safety programme, and suggests investigations which should be made in evaluating industrial safety programmes. The attributes of an excellent industrial safety programme are listed as examples for comparison. Practical hints for reviewing industrial safety are discussed, so that the necessary information can be obtained effectively through a review of documents and records, discussions with counterparts, and field observations. There are several annexes. These deal with major features of industrial safety programmes such as safety committees, reporting and investigation systems and first aid and medical facilities. They include some examples which are considered commendable. The document should be taken into account not only when reviewing management, organization and administration but also in the review of related areas, such as maintenance and operations, so that all aspects of industrial safety in an operating nuclear power plant are covered

  4. Industrial Application of Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    At CERN, we are very familiar with large, high energy particle accelerators. However, in the world outside CERN, there are more than 35000 accelerators which are used for applications ranging from treating cancer, through making better electronics to removing harmful micro-organisms from food and water. These are responsible for around $0.5T of commerce each year. Almost all are less than 20 MeV and most use accelerator types that are somewhat different from what is at CERN. These lectures will describe some of the most common applications, some of the newer applications in development and the accelerator technology used for them. It will also show examples of where technology developed for particle physics is now being studied for these applications. Rob Edgecock is a Professor of Accelerator Science, with a particular interest in the medical applications of accelerators. He works jointly for the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the International Institute for Accelerator Applications at the Univer...

  5. Industrial Application of Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    At CERN, we are very familiar with large, high energy particle accelerators. However, in the world outside CERN, there are more than 35000 accelerators which are used for applications ranging from treating cancer, through making better electronics to removing harmful micro-organisms from food and water. These are responsible for around $0.5T of commerce each year. Almost all are less than 20 MeV and most use accelerator types that are somewhat different from what is at CERN. These lectures will describe some of the most common applications, some of the newer applications in development and the accelerator technology used for them. It will also show examples of where technology developed for particle physics is now being studied for these applications. Rob Edgecock is a Professor of Accelerator Science, with a particular interest in the medical applications of accelerators. He works jointly for the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the International Institute for Accelerator Applications at the Uni...

  6. Thermal imaging for the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, F.T.

    1986-01-01

    While, on its face, thermal imaging for the nuclear power industry bears little difference from infra-red imaging for the industrial complex, as a whole (in so far as equipment, trained personnel, and technique, are concerned), there are vast differences with regard to access, training, and movement within a nuclear facility. For the un-initiated, working inside of a nuclear power plant can be a series of frustrations, fraught with time wasting periods of training, classes, and seminars,--interspersed with an unending line of meetings and project planning sessions. For those used to working within the system, the experience can be of tremendous satisfaction in undertaking, and successfully completing a project under some very difficult circumstances

  7. The human factor in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, Armand

    1998-01-01

    After having evoked the progressive reduction and stabilization of significant incidents occurring every year in French nuclear power plants, and the challenges faced by nuclear energy (loss of public confidence, loss of competitiveness), and then outlined the importance of safety to overcome these challenges, the author comments EDF's approach to the human factor. He first highlights the importance of information and communication towards the population. He briefly discusses the meaning of human factors for the nuclear industry, sometimes perceived as the contribution people to the company's safety and performance. He comments the evolution observed in the perception of human error in different industrial or technical environments and situations, and outlines what is at stake to reduce the production of faults and organize a 'hunt for latent defects'

  8. Applications of nuclear data science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jyrwa, B.

    2015-01-01

    The field of nuclear data has always been at the cutting edge technology since the beginning of nuclear era. Therefore it is a thrust area in the department of atomic energy in our country. It had been observed that even after 60 years of nuclear energy, nuclear data have not been well defined. The reason is not far to seek, it is mainly because nuclear energy has been introduced to mankind without adequate knowledge of nuclear data. Historically, reactor physics designer never used uncertainty information in basic data directly in algorithms in the calculations. Therefore nuclear data covariances is one of the challenges in Basic Nuclear Data Physics, reactor design and plant optimization for Indian Nuclear Industry. The importance of nuclear data for sustainable nuclear energy should be given the top priority

  9. Nuclear politics: the interplay of the industry, government and nuclear lobby in setting nuclear policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doub, W.O.

    1993-01-01

    Public acceptance of nuclear power in the United States is to a large extent dependent on the continued good performance of nuclear power in the rest of the world. A nuclear accident anywhere in the world will have adverse consequences for the nuclear industry in the United States. I continually encourage U.S nuclear executives and groups to continue to expand their contacts with the international nuclear community, in conferences such as this one

  10. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Ayukawa, Yurika; Burnie, Shaun; Piria, Raffaele; Thomas, Steve; Hazemann, Julie; Suzuki, Tatsujiro

    2014-07-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2014 provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. A 20-page chapter on nuclear economics looks at the rapidly changing market conditions for nuclear power plants, whether operating, under construction, or in the planning stage. Reactor vendor strategies and the 'Hinkley Point C Deal' are analyzed in particular. The performance on financial markets of major utilities is documented. The WNISR2013 featured for the first time a Fukushima Status Report that triggered widespread media and analyst attention. The 2014 edition entirely updates that Fukushima chapter. The Nuclear Power vs. Renewable Energy chapter that provides comparative data on investment, capacity, and generation has been greatly extended by a section on system issues. How does nuclear power perform in systems with high renewable energy share? Is this the end of traditional baseload/ peak-load concepts? Finally, the 45-page Annex 1 provides a country-by-country overview of all 31 countries operating nuclear power plants, with extended Focus sections on China, Japan, and the United States

  11. A telerobot for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Industrial robots are not widely used in the nuclear industry. More use is made of telemanipulators, in which tasks are performed under total human control via a master-slave actuation system. AEA Technology have developed a Nuclear Engineered Advanced TEle Robot (NEATER), a telerobot which combines industrial robot technology with the skills of a human operator. It has been designed for use in radioactive decommissioning work and has a number of radiation tolerant properties. NEATER can be operated in a pure robotic mode using a standard computer controller and software. Or it can operate as a telerobot in a remote control mode via a television input. In this mode the operator controls the robot's movement by using a joystick or a simple six degrees of freedom input device. (UK)

  12. Some applications of industrial neutrongraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joode, A.S.; Mury, A.G.O.S.

    1987-01-01

    The techniques used and main applications of neutrongraphy as non destructive inspection are presented. The advantages of this technique in relation to radiography and gamagraphy for using in industries are shown. (E.G.) [pt

  13. The nuclear industry's communication efforts viewed from outside the industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuck, Moira

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the attitude towards nuclear power of a company specialised in behavioural communication, not employed exclusively by the nuclear power industry. Only one of it's clients has a nuclear interest and that is Eskom, South Africa electricity utility which runs 21 active power stations of which 13 are fossil-fueled, 2 hydro, 2 pump storage stations, 3 gas turbine stations and 1 nuclear. This company is a firm believer in the nuclear energy option for some very practical reasons and one or two abstract reasons. The practical reasons are the ones well known, the world needs ever-increasing amounts of base load energy in order to increase the quality of life. The world also needs clean energy so that the planet can be preserved beyond the next generation. The abstract reasons are perhaps 'not so often' thought about by nuclear, communication practitioners: in harnessing nuclear energy for the service of mankind humans have captured a miracle. The harnessing of nuclear energy is a mark of man's ability to think conceptually, to walk in the realms of the unseen and bring back from those realms a tool of progress. In more prosaic terms, the loss of nuclear expertise would, very simply be a retrogression of the human race. As behavioural communication specialist it s our job to find ways for our clients to speak truthfully about their endeavours to the hearts of their audience. It is not our job to (nor will we) either lie or cover up for our clients. That which is wrong is wrong and cannot be painted rightly spoken words or clever videos or ingenious advertising. In all cases our advice to our clients has been to assume that people will not argue against the greater good of humanity. And there is much about nuclear power that contributes to the greater good: of humanity. 'That is the factor that, is common to all of us in this room today and all our colleagues in the industry. W have only to tell the truth with words that our target audiences can

  14. Industrial Robot Label Applicator

    OpenAIRE

    Kukasch, Kai

    2017-01-01

    The thesis deals with a project carried out for developing and setting up a robot label applicator system. The requirement was that RFID tracking labels can be applied on flexible positions, without manual effort and rearrangement, via programming. The purpose of the robot label applicator system is to increase the efficiency in production sites, where the RFID label position can change, depending on product or other reasons. New label positions should be programmed easily with a human-m...

  15. Exporting nuclear engineering and the industry's viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelt, K.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear energy offers all possibilities to reduce the energy problems in the world which arise with the world-wide increasing population and the energy demand connected with it. The Federal Republic of Germany lives on the exports of refined technical methods which also include nuclear engineering. The exports of nuclear engineering should lead to a technology transfer with guidance and training on an equal basis between the industrial and developing countries. The preconditions of exporting nuclear-technical systems are a well-functioning domestic market and a certain support by the government, especially with regard to giving guarantees for the special exports risks of these big projects. On the other hand, exports are also needed in order to be able to continue providing high-level technology for the domestic market. (UA) [de

  16. Industrial accelerators and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hamm, Marianne E

    2012-01-01

    This unique new book is a comprehensive review of the many current industrial applications of particle accelerators, written by experts in each of these fields. Readers will gain a broad understanding of the principles of these applications, the extent to which they are employed, and the accelerator technology utilized. The book also serves as a thorough introduction to these fields for non-experts and laymen. Due to the increased interest in industrial applications, there is a growing interest among accelerator physicists and many other scientists worldwide in understanding how accelerators are used in various applications. The government agencies that fund scientific research with accelerators are also seeking more information on the many commercial applications that have been or can be developed with the technology developments they are funding. Many industries are also doing more research on how they can improve their products or processes using particle beams.

  17. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie; Katsuta, Tadahiro; Ramana, M.V.; Thomas, Steve; Porritt, Jonathon

    2015-07-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2015 provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. Japan without nuclear power for a full calendar year for the first time since the first commercial nuclear power plant started up in the country 50 years ago. Nuclear plant construction starts plunge from fifteen in 2010 to three in 2014. 62 reactors under construction - five fewer than a year ago - of which at least three-quarters delayed. In 10 of the 14 building countries all projects are delayed, often by years. Five units have been listed as 'under construction' for over 30 years. Share of nuclear power in global electricity mix stable at less than 11% for a third year in a row. AREVA, technically bankrupt, downgraded to 'junk' by Standard and Poor's, sees its share value plunge to a new historic low on 9 July 2015-a value loss of 90 percent since 2007 China, Germany, Japan-three of the world's four largest economies-plus Brazil, India, Mexico, the Netherlands, and Spain, now all generate more electricity from non-hydro renewables than from nuclear power. These eight countries represent more than three billion people or 45 percent of the world's population. In the UK, electricity output from renewable sources, including hydropower, overtook the output from nuclear. Compared to 1997, when the Kyoto Protocol on climate change was signed, in 2014 there was an additional 694 TWh per year of wind power and 185 TWh of solar photovoltaics- each exceeding nuclear's additional 147 TWh

  18. Usage of industrial robots in nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Yoshio; Hamada, Kenjiro

    1982-01-01

    Japan is now at the top level in the world in robot technology.Its application to nuclear power field is one of the most expected. However, their usage spreads over various types of nuclear power plants, their manufacture and operation, and other areas such as fuel reprocessing plants and reactor plant decommissioning. The robots as used for the operation of BWR nuclear power plants, already developed and under development, are described: features in the nuclear-power usage of robots, the robots used currently for automatic fuel exchange, the replacement of control rod drives and in-service inspection; the robots under development for travelling inspection device and the inspection of main steam-relief safety valves, future development of robots. By robot usage, necessary personnel, work period and radiation exposure can be greatly reduced, and safety and reliability are also raised. (Mori, K.)

  19. Radioisotope applications in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frevert, E.

    1983-03-01

    The practical applications of the isotope technique are reported and illustrated by examples of works of the Department of Isotope Application of the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf. First the field of process controlling device and controll is described, including thickness, density and moisture gauging, the estimation of coatings and material compounds, the location of material defects and the level control. After this a detailed description of all kinds of tracer investigations is given like measurements of flow rate, intermixture, distribution and volume, investigations of corrosion, wear and lubrication and locations of all kind. A short description of gas ionisation, sources of light and isotope batteries is mentioned. Finally a general view of the applications in the fields of chemistry, biology, agriculture and medicine and the most important of the Austrian law of protective screen and its enactment are given. (Author) [de

  20. Nuclear industry after the Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branche, Thomas; Billes-Garabedian, Laurent; Salha, Bernard; Behar, Christophe; Dupuis, Marie-Claude; Labalette, Thibaud; Lagarde, Dominique; Planchais, Bernard; West, Jean-Pierre; Stubler, Jerome; Lancia, Bruno; Machenaud, Herve; Einaudi, Andre; Anglaret, Philippe; Brachet, Yves; Bonnave, Philippe; Knoche, Philippe; Gasquet, Denis

    2013-01-01

    This special dossier about the situation of nuclear industry two years after the Fukushima accident comprises 15 contributions dealing with: the nuclear industry two years after the Fukushima accident (Bernard Salha); a low-carbon electricity at a reasonable cost (Christophe Behar); nuclear engineering has to gain even more efficiency (Thomas Branche); how to dispose off the most radioactive wastes (Marie-Claude Dupuis, Thibaud Labalette); ensuring the continuation for more than 40 years onward (Denis Gasquet); developing and investing in the future (Philippe Knoche); more than just signing contracts (Dominique Lagarde); immersed power plants, an innovative concept (Bernard Planchais); R and D as a source of innovation for safety and performances (Jean-Pierre West); dismantlement, a very long term market (Jerome Stubler, Bruno Lancia); a reference industrial model (Herve Machenaud); recruiting and training (Andre Einaudi); a diversity of modern reactors and a world market in rebirth (Philippe Anglaret); an industrial revolution is necessary (Yves Brachet); contracts adapted to sensible works (Philippe Bonnave)

  1. CVD diamond for nuclear detection applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergonzo, P.; Brambilla, A.; Tromson, D.; Mer, C.; Guizard, B.; Marshall, R.D.; Foulon, F.

    2002-01-01

    Chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond is a remarkable material for the fabrication of radiation detectors. In fact, there exist several applications where other standard semiconductor detectors do not fulfil the specific requirements imposed by corrosive, hot and/or high radiation dose environments. The improvement of the electronic properties of CVD diamond has been under intensive investigations and led to the development of a few applications that are addressing specific industrial needs. Here, we report on CVD diamond-based detector developments and we describe how this material, even though of a polycrystalline nature, is readily of great interest for applications in the nuclear industry as well as for physics experiments. Improvements in the material synthesis as well as on device fabrication especially concern the synthesis of films that do not exhibit space charge build up effects which are often encountered in CVD diamond materials and that are highly detrimental for detection devices. On a pre-industrial basis, CVD diamond detectors have been fabricated for nuclear industry applications in hostile environments. Such devices can operate in harsh environments and overcome limitations encountered with the standard semiconductor materials. Of these, this paper presents devices for the monitoring of the alpha activity in corrosive nuclear waste solutions, such as those encountered in nuclear fuel assembly reprocessing facilities, as well as diamond-based thermal neutron detectors exhibiting a high neutron to gamma selectivity. All these demonstrate the effectiveness of a demanding industrial need that relies on the remarkable resilience of CVD diamond

  2. Heat transfer challenges in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penot, F.; Petit, D.; El Ganaoui, M.; Fauchais, P.

    2006-01-01

    The 2006 issue of the annual French congress of thermal engineering has chosen as specific topic the nuclear industry. Nuclear fission represents today about 12% of the energy production and more than 80% of the power generation in France. Its use at the worldwide scale is less important but the economic growth of countries like India and China would deeply change this situation. Different aspects of nuclear industry have been approached during the congress: the worldwide development of nuclear energy in a market environment, the problems linked with the geologic disposal of high level and long lived radioactive wastes, the stakes and thermal challenges of present and future nuclear systems, the R and D challenges of future systems and the general problem of tomorrow's energy supplies. The domain of very high temperatures, largely present in future systems and the domain of thermonuclear fusion have been also approached. Twenty-two papers out of 192 presented at the congress have been selected which fit with the INIS scope. (J.S.)

  3. Quality management certification for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmer, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    Historically for safety critical items, the United Kingdom nuclear companies either conducted their own inspection and audit of suppliers or sub-contracted staff to do so on their behalf. However, it is becoming unrealistic for these services to be undertaken in-house for economic reasons. The power industry is looking outside its own immediate expertise to that of 3rd Party Certification Bodies. There is a danger of introducing an element of risk unless the Certification Body really does understand the industry and its requirements. The Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) makes it mandatory for nuclear installations to have in place Quality management systems that meet the requirements of BS 5882. This standard requires the use of quality assurance programmes and a greater degree of understanding of nuclear regulations and codes of practice than is required by BS 5750. This is a very significant factor, recognising as it does the need to harmonise the management interface between an operator of a nuclear installation and suppliers to that same installation. (author)

  4. Nuclear industry prospects: A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morden, Reid

    1995-01-01

    Canada, with its proven, safe and versatile CANDU reactor is well poised for the second half-century of nuclear fission. Canada's nuclear pedigree goes back to the turn-of-the-century work of Ernest Rutherford in Montreal. This year, Canada's nuclear industry celebrates the 50th anniversary of the start-up of its first research reactor at Chalk River. Last year, the pioneering work of Bert ram Blockhouse in Physics was honoured with a Nobel Prize. Future international success for the nuclear industry, such as has been achieved here in Korea, depends on continued cooperative and collaborative team work between the public and private sectors, continued strong research and development backing by the government, and new strategic partnerships. The biggest challenge is financing for the emerging markets. The brightness or dimness of future prospects are relative to the intensity of the lessons learned from history. In Canada we have a fairly long nuclear pedigree, It goes back almost a century to 1898, when Ernest Rutherford set up a world centre at McGill University in Montreal for research into the structure of the atom and into radioactivity

  5. China's nuclear industry at a turning point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    The China nuclear industry is coming at a turning point since the first Chinese nuclear power plant of Qinshan No.1 was started construction 24 years ago. At the end of year 2008, there are 11 nuclear power plants in operation in China. The total power capacity of the facilities has reached to 9068MW. It resulted in 11th position next to Sweden. Despite the nuclear power was reached to 68.4 billion KWh, it makes up only 2% of the total electric generation in China. The thermal power takes 81% of the total generation, in which the power by coal fuel takes for the most part and the total generation by both natural gas and oil fuel take only as small as a few percentage. In this situation, a nuclear power plant development is being accelerated. As of July 2009, China has 15 nuclear power plants currently under construction with a total capacity of 15260MW, that is more than 24000MW together with ones currently in operation. Furthermore, my research shows that China would have a plan to build 180 new nuclear power plants of 192770MW, though the progress varies widely. The construction speed of China nuclear power plant has become increasingly high since 2008. Starting with the construction of. Ningde unit 1 (PWR, 1110MW) in Fujian Province, February 2008, they continuously started constructions for five more nuclear power plants in year 2008 alone. China still holds momentum in a nuclear power plant construction even in 2009, and continues constructing new nuclear power plants. They include a Liaoning. Hongyanhe unit 3 in March, Sanmen Zhejiang April 19 which lead a construction first in the world for the third generation nuclear power plant of AP1000 (PWR, 1250MW) developed by Westinghouse, Fuqing unit 2 (PWR, 1000MW) June 17, and Fangjiashan unit 2 (PWR, 1000MW) on 17, July. Besides, Shidaowan, Rongcheng phase I (200MW), which is a demonstration reactor of HTGR in Shandong. They even said that China would start construction for approximately 7 to 9 nuclear power

  6. Domestic safeguards in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 brought about markedly increased security requirements at nuclear power plants. NRC established a threat level against which the security forces were expected to defend. It is asserted that an inadequate legal basis exists for the NRC requirement that nuclear plants be defended by the use of deadly force, if necessary, and that complex issues such as apprehension, retention, and pursuit of intruders are left vague. Security measures patterned after the airline industry, resolution of the deadly force issue, and definition of a creditable threat level are proposed

  7. Nuclear physics and optoelectronics presence in industry, medicine and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robu, Maria; Peteu, Gh.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reveals applications of Nuclear Physics and Optoelectronics in numerous fields of interest in industry, medicine, environment. In the first part of the work basic elements are analyzed, among which: - the large possibilities offered by the investigation, analysis and testing techniques based on nuclear physics and optoelectronics; - the superior qualitative and quantitative characteristics of these techniques, with varied applicability in fields from industry, medicine and environment. These applications refers to: - elemental analyses of content and impurities; - non-destructive testing with X and gamma radiations; - investigations with radioactive and activable tracers in trophic chains as for instance, ground-vegetation-products-consumers-environment, including also the systemic pollution factors; - complex investigations in the interface tritium-vegetation-environment-humans; - techniques and radiopharmaceutical products for medical investigations; - determinations and automatic control for levels, density, thickness, humidity, surfaces covering; - monitoring by means of remote sensing for the evaluation of the environment, vegetation and pollution factors; - applications and production of laser and UV installations; - connections through optical fibres resistant to radiations; - imaging and medical bioengineering; - advances in X ray, laser and ultrasonic radiology; - monitoring with radiations beams. In the final part, there are presented examples of optoelectronics and nuclear physics applications in fields in industry, medicine and environment, with special stress on their basic characteristics and efficiency. (authors)

  8. Evolution of nuclear chemical industry in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fould, M.H.

    1959-01-01

    The present characteristics can be summarized in one word: expansion. Impelled by the CEA, but also by such organisations as the Electricite de France and the Merchant Marine, the French nuclear effort for the years 1957-1961 reaches about 600 thousand millions francs; over half this sum will be spent by chemical industry on research, pilot installations, construction of plants and delivery. The aim is to work efficiently, quickly and profitably. This is achieved through close collaboration between the big state organisations and private industry. It is chiefly along the following lines that this large scale effort is carried on: - thorough chemical treatment of increasing tonnages of ores from the French Union, with the aim of producing pure, plentiful and cheap uranium. - careful preparation of nuclear fuels, economical and perfectly adapted to the various types of reactor in operation or under construction. - Further treatment of irradiated fuels to extract the plutonium completely, as well as the uranium and certain fission products. industrial manufacture of material of nuclear purity or corrosion resistant required by the technology of energy producing or research reactors. - Supply to the many foreign or French users of isotopes and radioactive tracers required by medicine, industry and agriculture in ever-increasing numbers. - Meticulous chemical treatment of gaseous or liquid effluent in strictly controlled stations in order that reactors and their annexes will be perfectly safe to use. This account shows the great extent of the effort laid out by a young, energetic chemical industry in full swing. Having made sure of its techniques and set up numerous installations it is fully in a position to confront the French atomic programme. In addition it is able and anxious to associate with the developments of foreign atomic industry, especially EURATOM and Eurochemic. (author) [fr

  9. Review of national and international demands on fire protection in nuclear power plants and their application in the Swedish nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredholm, Lotta

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this report has been to detect and describe differences between rules regarding fire safety and the interpretation of the rules and make suggestions on how all parties involved are able to develop a harmonized approach to the fire conditions and how fire requirements aspects can be optimized and modernized. International and national laws and requirements for fire protection are compared and analyzed with the content and structure of the USNRCs RG.1189, which is considered the document that has the most complete accounts of the fire requirements both in terms of structure and content. The national laws, rules and guidelines that have been studied are general fire protection rules as well as nuclear specific rules. The studied national rules also includes Safety Analysis Reports (SAR) and Technical Specifications (TS). This study shows that the Swedish SAR and TS are markedly different from each other in how the fire requirements are presented as well as the methodology and level of detail of how they are fulfilled. These differences make it difficult to compare the quality of the fire protection between different sites and it also makes it different to learn from each other. The main reason to the differences are the lack of national guidance of how to fulfil the general requirements. The main conclusion of the screening of national requirements, is that many of the references used in the SAR are not suited for operation at a nuclear plant. The differences are often the purpose, examples of purposes that are not necessarily met by complying with national laws, rules, advices are: - Prevent fire to influence redundant safety equipment in different fire cells. - Prevent fire to influence redundant safety equipment in the same fire cell. - Prevent extensive consequences of fire in cable rooms. - Prevent extensive consequences of fires in oil that are not included in the Swedish regulation for handling highly flammable liquids. The international regulations

  10. Fields of nuclear power application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper deals with nuclear power application in fields different from electricity generation, i.e. district heating, sea water desalination, coal gasification and nuclear splitting of water. (RW) [de

  11. Industrial applications of electron accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Cleland, M R

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the industrial applications of electron accelerators for modifying the physical, chemical or biological properties of materials and commercial products by treatment with ionizing radiation. Many beneficial effects can be obtained with these methods, which are known as radiation processing. The earliest practical applications occurred during the 1950s, and the business of radiation processing has been expanding since that time. The most prevalent applications are the modification of many different plastic and rubber products and the sterilization of single-use medical devices. Emerging applications are the pasteurization and preservation of foods and the treatment of toxic industrial wastes. Industrial accelerators can now provide electron energies greater than 10 MeV and average beam powers as high as 700 kW. The availability of high-energy, high-power electron beams is stimulating interest in the use of X-rays (bremsstrahlung) as an alternative to gamma rays from radioactive nuclides.

  12. The nuclear industry and public hearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansillon, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Major decisions about the French nuclear industry have been made, it is often said, without sufficiently informing and consulting the population. Laws in 1995 and 2002 provide for public hearings in order to inform the public and obtain its reactions to big projects of national interest. The responsibility for organizing a hearing is vested in an independent administrative authority, the National Commission of Public Debate (CNDP). Within 2 years, 5 issues related to the nuclear industry have been referred to it: 1) the ITER project at Cadarache in april 2003, 2) the George-Besse-II project to replace the present uranium enrichment plant at Tricastin in april 2004, 3) the research reactor Jules-Horowitz project at Cadarache in july 2004, 4) the EPR project at Flamanville in november 2004, and 5) the management of radioactive wastes in february 2005. The hearings already represent a fundamental innovation compared with earlier practices

  13. Evolution of stainless steels in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavassoli, Farhad

    2010-01-01

    Starting with the stainless steels used in the conventional industry, their adoption and successive evolutions in the nuclear industry, from one generation of nuclear reactors to another, is presented. Specific examples for several steels are given, covering fabrication procedures, qualification methods, property databases and design allowable stresses, to show how the ever-increasing demands for better performance and reliability, in particular under neutron irradiation, have been met. Particular attention is paid to the austenitic stainless steels types 304L, 316L, 316L(N), 316L(N)-IG, titanium stabilized grade 321, precipitation strengthened alloy 800, conventional and low activation ferritic/martensitic steels and their oxygen dispersion strengthening (ODS) derivatives. For each material, the evolution of the associated filler metal and welding techniques are also presented. (author)

  14. Industrial applications of cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditroi, F.

    1998-01-01

    Since the putting into operation of the Debrecen Cyclotron Laboratory with an MGC-20E (or U-103) machine, a lot of demands have been emerged on the practical exploitation of this facility. Since the cyclotron works at least in one half of its running time for medical purposes (isotope production), the rest can be devoted for fundamental research and practical applications. Special beam lines and laboratory facilities have been built for the purposes of materials investigation. These are mainly irradiation chambers, special irradiation facilities and sample holder/changers as well as special laboratory facilities for sample preparation and low background measurements

  15. Competency assessments for nuclear industry personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-04-01

    In 1996, the IAEA published Technical Reports Series No. 380, Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation: A Guidebook. This publication provides guidance for the development, implementation and evaluation of training programmes for all nuclear power plant personnel using the systematic approach to training (SAT) methodology. The SAT methodology has since been adopted and used for the development and implementation of training programmes for all types of nuclear facility and activities in the nuclear industry. The IAEA Technical Working Group on Training and Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel recommended that an additional publication be prepared to provide further guidance concerning competency assessments used for measuring the knowledge, skills and attitudes of personnel as the result of training. This publication has been prepared in response to that recommendation. A critical component of SAT (as part of the implementation phase) is the assessment of whether personnel have achieved the standards identified in the training objectives. The nuclear industry spends a significant amount of resources conducting competency assessments. Competency assessments are used for employee selection, trainee assessment, qualification, requalification and authorization (in some Member States the terminology may be 'certification' or 'licensing'), and job advancement and promotion. Ineffective testing methods and procedures, or inappropriate interpretation of test results, can have significant effects on both human performance and nuclear safety. Test development requires unique skills and, as with any skill, training and experience are needed to develop and improve them. Test item and examination development, use, interpretation of results and examination refinement, like all other aspects of SAT, should be part of an ongoing, systematic process. This publication is primarily intended for use by personnel responsible for developing and administering

  16. Subcontracting in nuclear industry - legal aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leger, M.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the legal framework of subcontracting in France. Subcontracting is considered as a normal mode of functioning for an enterprise: an enterprise contracts another enterprise to do what it can not do itself or does not want to do. According to the 1975 law, cascade subcontracting is allowed but subcontractors have to be accepted by the payer. In some cases the payer can share responsibility when the subcontracting enterprises do not comply to obligations like the payment of some taxes. The main subcontractor who is the one who contracted with the payer is the only one responsible for the right execution of the whole contract. In nuclear industry there are 2 exceptions to the freedom of subcontracting. The first one concerns radiation protection: in a nuclear facility the person in charge of radioprotection must be chosen among the staff. The second concerns the operations and activities that are considered important for radiation protection, it is forbidden to subcontract them. In some cases like maintenance in nuclear sector the law imposes some qualification certification for subcontracting enterprises. The end of the article challenges the common belief about subcontracting in nuclear industry. (A.C.)

  17. Situation of nuclear industry in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    This document presents the situation of nuclear industry in Japan: cooperation with France in the domain of the fuel cycle (in particular the back-end) and of for the industrial R and D about fast reactors and nuclear safety; present day situation characterized by a series of incidents in the domain of nuclear safety and by an administrative reorganization of the research and safety organizations; power of local representatives, results of April 2003 elections, liberalization of the electric power sector, impact of the TEPCO affair (falsification of safety reports) on the nuclear credibility, re-start up of the Monju reactor delayed by judicial procedures, stopping of the program of MOX fuel loading in Tepco's reactors, discovery of weld defects in the newly built Rokkasho-mura reprocessing plant, an ambitious program of reactors construction, the opportunity of Russian weapons dismantling for the re-launching of sodium-cooled fast reactors; the competition between France and Japan for the setting up of ITER reactor and its impact of the French/Japanese partnership. (J.S.)

  18. Women in the new era of nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junko Ogawa

    2009-01-01

    In modern society, it is important that men and women share and equally participate in every aspect of society. Nevertheless the field of nuclear energy and radiation technology is traditionally a man-centric?industry, so women make up very small minority. However, recently even in this nuclear industry, we can sometimes see the phenomena that women are playing an active part.The nuclear industry has a big impact on society. It is necessary that we are accountable for all information given out to the public and we listen and respond to the public's concern. We do this so that nuclear technology will be able to grow and develop smoothly. In such area as better understanding, women working as nuclear engineers, scientists or communicators will be able to act in a significant role because women in general have excellent ability in communication and networking. Women in Nuclear, WiN is a worldwide association for the professional women working in the nuclear energy and radiation applications. WiN was founded in 1993, by European women involved in nuclear industry among the mood of anti-nuclear movement after the Chernobyl accident. The goals of WIN are to improve proper understanding of nuclear energy among the general public by presenting the factual information and to empower members' ability by world-wide exchange of lessons and human relationship. According to the recent data, there are 74 countries with at least one WiN member. and 38 chapters (countries/regions/organizations) that have WiN formal chapter like WIN-Japan, WIN-Korea, WIN-US, for examples. The registered members of WiN Global is about 2500. My presentation will introduce recent activities and topics of WiN Global and WiN Japan. I hope this will be able to convey that women working in nuclear field are indeed gaining in their brilliance and carrying out their mission steadily in our industry now and in the future. (Author)

  19. Industrial applications of electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    The review of industrial applications with use of electron beams has been done. Especially the radiation technologies being developed in Poland have been shown. Industrial installations with electron accelerators as radiation source have been applied for: modification of polymers; modification of thyristors; sterilization of health care materials; radiopreservation of food and other consumer products; purification of combustion flue gases in heat and power plants. 14 refs, 6 tabs, 7 figs

  20. Neutron methods for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazkov, V.; Kvardakov, V.; Podurets, K.; Somenkov, V.; Shilstein, S.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The results of industrial applications of various neutron methods (coherent and incoherent neutron scattering, absorption and refraction radiography, topography) are discussed. The main directions of the applied neutron program of Kurchatov Institute are the hydrogen detection in industrial materials at trace levels, visualization of defects in single crystal turbine blades, study of composite materials and steels with inhomogeneous magnetic and atomic structure, neutron focusing radiography and tomography. (author)

  1. Trends in industrial application of radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetzel, K.; Beer, M.; Boes, J.; Flachowski, J.; Freyer, K.; Gorski, B.; Kupsch, H.; Leonhardt, J.; Schuetze, H.; Thuemmel, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    Isotope and radiation techniques are reviewed laying emphasis on tracer techniques and radiometric instruments. Important lines of utilization as well as volume, efficiency and limitations of the use of radioactive isotopes in industries are characterized. The survey focuses on new trends of the utilization of industrial radioisotope application, taking into account the experience of the Central Institute of Isotope and Radiation Research of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR. These trends involve the improvement of obtaining information through the application of radiotracer methods as prerequisite to the transition to complex analyses (improvement of labelling techniques, use of complex measuring systems, increased application of mathematical methods for data processing), as well as the use of radiometric instruments for the solution of complex problems in process control (new types of detectors, improvement of energy resolution, automatic signal processing by means of microprocessors, large radiation sources, mobile neutron sources). Trends in the development of utilizing radiation sources and accelerators for the modification of materials as well as perspectives industrial application of nuclear reactors are shown. Possible results of isotope and radiation research and their future applicability in industries are assessed. (author)

  2. Environmental effects from the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Since 1969 several meetings have been convened to study the possibility of using high-level radiation in waste treatment. It was agreed that ionizing radiation offered some compromise as a feasible technology for a certain unique purpose, but economic considerations mitigated any overwhelming enthusiasm for early industrial realization. Recently a significant change has taken place in the world energy supply picture, and the expanded projection of nuclear power generation affects the analysis of comparative economic feasibility of ionizing radiation treatment of wastes. In addition, increased consideration of environmental quality not only calls for the re-evaluation of conventional waste treatment technologies, but also the development of more effective means where conventional methods might be unsatisfactory. As a result of several allied considerations, it was thought necessary and timely to review the status of research and development in the application of ionizing radiation to waste treatment and to consider the environmental implication of the proposed technology. Accordingly, the Symposium on the Use of High-Level Radiation in Waste Treatment - Status and Prospects was convened by the IAEA, in co-operation with the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany and the Bayerische Landesanstalt fur Bodenkultur und Pflanzenbau. Forty-eight papers were presented in eight sessions covering the current technology of waste-water treatment and re-use, radiosensitivity of micro-organisms, disinfection and microbiological control, physical and chemical modification of aqueous pollutants, technological and economic considerations, pilot-plant design and operating experiences, and radiation treatment of gaseous and solid wastes

  3. Industrial Agents: Emerging Applications of Software Agents in Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Leitão P.; Leitão, Paulo; Karnouskos, Stamatis

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this book is to address both industry practitioners and academia, providing the vision, on-going efforts, example applications, assessments, and roadmaps associated with industrial agents used in multiple industries. Such a book provides an introduction to the “industrial agents” domain by discussing up-to-date examples of their applications in industry, and it offers a view of future challenges with an accompanying roadmap. Part I introduces industrial agents,...

  4. Industrial Applications of Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, Frank J.

    2002-01-01

    The historical development of the use of Moessbauer spectroscopy in industrial applications is briefly outlined. The power of the technique for the study of commercially important materials and its capacity to make contributions as a research tool, in quality control, and for in-service evaluation are reviewed. The disadvantages of the technique in the industrial setting are considered. The power of Moessbauer spectroscopy when used to approach specific industrial problems is illustrated by its use in monitoring the nature of corrosion resistant coated steel for automobile manufacture and the in situ characterization of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts.

  5. The industrial nuclear fuel cycle in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koll, J.H.; Kittl, J.E.; Parera, C.A.; Coppa, R.C.; Aguirre, E.J.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear power program of Argentina for the period 1976-85 is described, as a basis to indicate fuel requirements and the consequent implementation of a national fuel cycle industry. Fuel cycle activities in Argentina were initiated as soon as 1951-2 in the prospection and mining activities through the country. Following this step, yellow-cake production was initiated in plants of limited capacity. National production of uranium concentrate has met requirements up to the present time, and will continue to do so until the Sierra Pintada Industrial Complex starts operation in 1979. Presently, there is a gap in local production of uranium dioxide and fuel elements for the Atucha power station, which are produced abroad using Argentine uranium concentrate. With its background, the argentine program for the installation of nuclear fuel cycle industries is described, and the techno-economical implications considered. Individual projects are reviewed, as well as the present and planned infrastructure needed to support the industrial effort [es

  6. Neutron Scattering for the Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogge, Ronald B.

    1999-01-01

    The National Research Council's (NRC's) Neutron Program for Materials Research is in the fortunate circumstance of being located at the primary research facility for Canada's nuclear industry, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). The National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor located at the Chalk River Laboratories is the source of neutrons for NRC's neutron beam laboratory. The NRC provides access to neutrons in two ways: (a) as an international user facility, participating in collaborative research projects with university, industry, and government laboratories, and (b) on a fee-for-service basis, obtaining proprietary information for Canadian and foreign industries. Consequently, neutron-scattering techniques can be applied to problems that span the range from fundamental research on the properties and behavior of materials to manufacturing processes and failure analysis

  7. Transfer of industry-oriented nuclear technology at NUCOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jesus, A.S.M.

    1983-10-01

    The transfer of industry-oriented nuclear technology at the Nuclear Development Corporation of South Africa (Pty) Ltd (NUCOR) is centred in a few divisions only, as most of the NUCOR's program is internally oriented. The industry-oriented activities include radiation technology, production of radioisotopes and application of nuclear techniques in solving problems of industry. The study is concerned mainly with the last of these activities. The general problem of transferring innovative technology is reviewed and a systems approach is used to analyse the transfer process at NUCOR, in terms of the organisation itself and its environment. Organisational strengths and weaknesses are identified and used as a basis to determine opportunities and threats. Possible objectives are formulated and a strategy to meet them is suggested. 'Demand-pull' as opposed to 'technology-push' is advanced as the main triggering mechanism in the transfer of industry-oriented nuclear technology. The importance of marketing this technology, as well as its commercialization, are discussed

  8. Intelligent robotics and remote systems for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehe, D.K.; Lee, J.C.; Martin, W.R.; Tulenko, J.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear industry has a recognized need for intelligent, multitask robots to carry out tasks in harsh environments. From 1986 to the present, the number of robotic systems available or under development for use in the nuclear industry has more than doubled. Presently, artificial intelligence (AI) plays a relatively small role in existing robots used in the nuclear industry. Indeed, the lack of intelligence has been labeled the ''Achilles heel'' of all current robotic technology. However, larger-scale efforts are underway to make the multitask robot more sensitive to its environment, more capable to move and perform useful work, and more fully autonomous via the use of AI. In this paper, we review the terminology, the history, and the factors which are motivating the development of robotics and remove systems; discuss the applications related to the nuclear industry; and, finally, examine the state of the art of the technologies being applied to introduce more autonomous capabilities. Much of this latter work can be classified as within the artificial intelligence framework. (orig.)

  9. Peaceful applications of nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, L.B.

    1975-12-01

    The intension of this report is to give a survey of the field of peaceful applications of nuclear explosions. As an introduction some examples of possibilities of application are given together with a simple description of nuclear explosions under ground. After a summary of what has been done and will be done in this field nationally and internationally, a short discussion of advantages and problems with peaceful application of nuclear explosions follows. The risks of spreading nuclear weapons due to this applications are also touched before the report is finished with an attempt to judge the future development in this field. (M.S.)

  10. Probabilistic safety assessment in the chemical and nuclear industries

    CERN Document Server

    Fullwood, Ralph R

    2000-01-01

    Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) determines the probability and consequences of accidents, hence, the risk. This subject concerns policy makers, regulators, designers, educators and engineers working to achieve maximum safety with operational efficiency. Risk is analyzed using methods for achieving reliability in the space program. The first major application was to the nuclear power industry, followed by applications to the chemical industry. It has also been applied to space, aviation, defense, ground, and water transportation. This book is unique in its treatment of chemical and nuclear risk. Problems are included at the end of many chapters, and answers are in the back of the book. Computer files are provided (via the internet), containing reliability data, a calculator that determines failure rate and uncertainty based on field experience, pipe break calculator, event tree calculator, FTAP and associated programs for fault tree analysis, and a units conversion code. It contains 540 references and many...

  11. Non power applications of nuclear technology: The case of Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaumotte, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    The historical review and oversight of Belgium activities in applications of nuclear technologies has been presented. Especially attention have been paid on industrial applications as sterilization of surgical tools, medical supplies, drugs, food; radiation induced polymerization and composite materials production; nondestructive testing and application of sealed sources in industry. The detailed review has been done on nuclear medicine development in Belgium covering the range of therapeutic applications as well as diagnostic techniques

  12. The INSTN trains the future professionals of nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, P.

    2017-01-01

    The INSTN (Institute for Nuclear Sciences and Nuclear Technologies) is the applied school in nuclear technologies that has been present for 60 years for specialized training and vocational training. The integration of numerical technologies has allowed INSTN to adapt its way of teaching and to overcome difficulties like distances and to propose for instance practical exercises on the ISIS experimental reactor through the web for foreign graduate schools. The INSTN has realized its first SPOC (Small Private Online Course) and is preparing 2 MOOC (Massive Open Online Course). Since 2016, the INSTN has become 1 of the 2 training centers appointed as 'collaborating center' by the IAEA in the field of nuclear technologies and their industrial and radio-pharmaceutical applications. (A.C.)

  13. nuclea'10. Third industry meeting of the Swiss nuclear forum. Framework conditions for the renaissance of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    The Swiss government and the Swiss power industry agree: Switzerland will have to renew its nuclear power plant park in a foreseeable time frame so as to prevent a threatenting gap in electricity supply. At the same time, the present lowest-CO 2 electricity mix in any industrialized country ensured by hydroelectric power and nuclear power must be safeguarded. The power industry is meeting these challenges by actively planning the replacement of existing nuclear power plants and the construction of new ones. Three framework applications for permits have been filed, and the first tenders connected to the new construction projects have been invited. This raises the question not only whether Switzerland is willing to embark on this project of a century, but also whether the country is able to do so. What are the factors helping nuclear power to achieve a breakthrough in Switzerland and its neighboring countries, provided there is public acceptance? Besides providing the necessary technical and economic resources it is the need for political and economic acceptance of nuclear power which constitutes an ongoing task for nuclear industry. nuclea is considered the meeting point of the nuclear industry in Switzerland. nuclea'10, held on November 11, 2010, served for exchanges of information between the nuclear industry and other stakeholders in nuclear power. More than 200 participants from public authorities, politics, the power industry, research and development, and vendors and service providers attended the informative and always interesting event accompanied by an industrial exhibition. (orig.)

  14. Applications of radioisotopes in industry and healthcare in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dien, N.N.; Quang, N.H.

    1997-01-01

    Nowadays, in Vietnam radioisotopes have been used very widely in various socio-economic branches, especially in industry and healthcare. Applications of radioisotopes have significant meaning in economic development, people health protection, as well as in scientific research. In this paper, the present status and main applications of radiation and radioactive isotopes in industry and healthcare in Vietnam are reported. In order to control and monitor industrial processes, nucleonic control systems and radioactive tracer techniques have been utilized. Actually, sealed source applications are popular in Vietnam industry. A number of nuclear control devices and gauges have been used in the various industrial factories, such as liquid level gauges in steel industry, cement and beverage factories; density and moisture gauges in paper industry, etc. Tracer technique and sealed source applications have also been utilized in industrial production plants and in trouble-shooting in the petroleum industry. For medicine purposes, two departments of nuclear medicine were primarily established at the beginning of the 1970s. At the present time, a number of nuclear medicine departments have been set up and they have been equipped with advanced equipment. Main activities are focused on thyroid function studies, nuclear cardiology, brain scans, gastrointestinal studies, bone scans, etc. Since march 1984 Dalat nuclear research reactor of nominal power of 500 kW has been reconstructed and put into operation. This reactor is unique in Vietnam and has become an important scientific tool for development of nuclear techniques and radioisotope applications for socio-economic progress. Thanks to this important scientific tool, a variety of radioisotopes for medicine and industry applications as well as for scientific research has been produced. Utilization of the Dalat research reactor for radioisotope production is also summarized in this paper

  15. Enhancing Safety Culture in Complex Nuclear Industry Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotcheva, N.

    2016-01-01

    lifecycle phases has implications for the defence in depth. Recently, the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority in Finland (STUK) has issued new YVL guides, which specify requirements on project management and safety culture of suppliers and subcontractors (STUK, 2014). International nuclear institutions have also paid attention to safety culture in networks of organizations (e.g., INPO, 2010; Royal Academy of Engineering, 2011; IAEA 2012). Culture has been predominantly studied in safety research as an intra-organizational phenomenon. Thus, it remains unclear how to apply safety culture models in large-scale project networks, consisting of multiple heterogeneous actors with somewhat conflicting objectives. Cultural approaches traditionally emphasise that creating a culture takes time and continuity, which does not reflect well the short time frames, high diversity and temporal dynamics typical for such projects. Each project partner brings own national and work cultural features and practices, which create a complex amalgam of cultural and subcultural influences on the overall project culture. Recently, Gotcheva and Oedewald (2015) summarised safety culture challenges in different lifecycle phases of large nuclear industry projects, and many of them relate to inter-organizational setups. Project governance deals with this inter-organizational space as it aims at aligning multiple diverse stakeholders’ interests to work together towards shared goals (Turner and Simister, 2001). The current study utilises a mixed-methods approach for understanding and enhancing safety culture in complex projects, focusing on management principles, cultural phenomena and simulation modelling. The need to integrate knowledge on safety culture and project governance to support safe and effective execution of complex nuclear projects is highlighted. The study advances the concept of safety culture and its applicability in project contexts by directing the attention to inter

  16. Nuclear energy for technology and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    It is a sad commentary on the complete lack of informed realism of the Government and people of Australia that, after thirty years of vacillation and political chicanery, nuclear technology, one of this nation's potential ''sunrise industries'' is in its death throes. Whilst our third world neighbours, in particular Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, the People's Republic of China and even impoverished Bangladesh are making giant strides to develop an autonomous expertise Australia's potential has been dissipated and its opportunities for leadership and technology transfer lost. By chance this paper was written some weeks before the nuclear accident at Chernobyl (U.S.S.R.) and many years after accidents at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant (U.S.A.) and the plutonium production reactor at Windscale (U.K.). None of these incidents alter the basic arguments or conclusions contained in this manuscript. (See Appendix). The year 1986 might represent the final opportunity for concerned professionals to seek to improve the quality of public education and information to end ''the war against the atom''. It will be necessary to re-motivate the public and private sector of a demoralised technology and to launch it on a road of responsible and successful expansion unshackled by beaurocratic interference. It is the purpose of this paper to examine why the first three decades of nuclear technology in Australia have been so singularly unsuccessful and to discuss a coherent and rational implementation of plans and policies for the future. (author)

  17. Internet applications in nuclear power plant operation management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, M.

    2000-01-01

    The use of the Internet is quickly becoming widespread in practically all areas of business and industry. The nuclear industry should not remain indifferent to this new trend. This paper analyses some of the Internet applications that can be easily adapted to nuclear power plant operation management, including. (Author)

  18. Regulatory issues for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peckover, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    Five issues are identified as needing clarification within the health and safety regulatory framework of the nuclear industry in the United Kingdom. The question of how to ensure there are enough but not too many regulations aimed at accident avoidance is posed. A need is previewed to convince all concerned, including the public, that a well-focused compact safety case will deliver higher standards than a verbose one. To enable the safety advantages of contractorization to outweigh the disadvantages, appropriate forms of relationship need to be worked out between licenses, management agents, implementation contractors and subcontractors. The processes of delicensing nuclear sites should be arranged by regulatory bodies to be both publicly acceptable and efficient. Finally, a single agreed concept to supersede such terms as ALARP (as low as reasonably practicable) and BPM (best practicable means) is desirable. (UK)

  19. Industrial fans used in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Industrial fans are widely used in nuclear facilities, and their most common use is in building ventilation. To control the spread of contamination, airflows are maintained at high levels. Therefore, the selection of the fan and fan control are important to the safety of people, equipment and the environment. As a result, 80% of all energy used in nuclear facilities is fan energy. Safety evolves from the durability, control and redundancy in the system. In new or retrofit installations, testing and qualification of fans and systems are completed prior to start-up. Less important but necessary is the energy conservation aspect of fan selection and installations. Fan efficiency, type of control and system installation are evaluated for energy use

  20. Nuclear challenges in Asia, an industrial perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiffou, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The author first gives a brief overview of military programmes implemented by India, China, Pakistan and North Korea to develop and manufacture the various vectors of nuclear weapons (submarines, missiles, bombers), the objective being (not always reached) to possess a nuclear triad (intercontinental ground-based missiles, submarines, and bombers). In this respect, the author briefly comments the evolutions of defence budgets, discusses the evolutions of the Chinese defence industry since the end of World War II (strong relationship with USSR, emergence of other various trade relationships, a more independent production but with a search for new technological partnerships). The author then discusses whether China is a threatening military power, more particularly for some Asian countries like Japan and South Korea

  1. Imminent perspectives for industrial application of atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowarski, L.

    1955-01-01

    This conference raises an inventory of industrial applications and their perspectives for the year 1955. The speaker extrapolate for the forthcoming years the evolution of the role of the nuclear, the nuclear fuel, the different, types of atomic reactors and the state of advancement for different countries. (M.B.) [fr

  2. Government intervention in the Canadian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doern, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    Several facets of government intervention in the Canadian nuclear industry are examined by reviewing the general historical evolution of intervention since the Second World War and by a more detailed analysis of three case studies. The case studies are the public sector - private sector content of the initial CANDU reactor program in the 1950's, the regulation of the health and safety of uranium miners in the late 1960's and early 1970's, and the Ontario Hydro decision in 1978 to enter into longer-term (40 year) contracts for uranium for its power reactors. (auth)

  3. Industrial applications of radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabharwal, Sunil

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, radiation processing has emerged as an alternative to conventional technologies such as thermal and chemical processing for many industrial applications. The industry is expanding at a fast rate all over the world. The actual industrial benefits on commercial basis, however, depends on the need of the individual society and may vary from country to country. In India, the applications of radiation technology have been found in areas of health care, agriculture, food preservation, industry and environment. Both gamma radiation and electron beam accelerators are being utilized for this purpose. Presently, 6 commercial gamma irradiators housing about 1.5 million curie 60 Co and an annual turnover of over US$ 2 million and 3 commercial electron beam (EB) accelerators with installed capacity of 185 kW are commercially operating in India. The new areas being explored include use of electron beam irradiation for surface treatment, radiation processed membranes for a variety of applications and radiation processing of natural polymers. In the present paper, the current status of this program, especially the recent developments and future direction of radiation processing technology is reviewed. (author)

  4. Economical state of nuclear industries in 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc., has carried out the survey of the actual state of atomic energy industries in Japan every year, and the 22nd survey was performed on the state in 1980. In this survey, the atomic energy industries are classified into electric power business, mining and manufacture, and trading companies. The actual results of expenditures, sales, the investment in facilities, backlogs, the volume of business, the number of employees and so on were surveyed by questionnaire, respectively. The data show the history of the atomic energy industries for a quarter of a century, and are utilized to search for the problems. The period of survey was from April 1, 1980, to March 31, 1981. The number of enterprises surveyed was 1234, and 924 companies replied, accordingly, the ratio of reply was 75%. 546 enterprises among the 924 had some results related to atomic energy, therefore, the results of survey were classified, totalized, examined and analyzed, based on the survey papers of these 546 enterprises. As for the Japanese economy, the real growth of economy was 3.8%, the index of mining and manufacturing production increased by 4.6%, but total energy consumption decreased by 4.4%, as compared with the previous year. One nuclear power plant began the operation, and 4000 centrifuges are operated in the uranium enrichment pilot plant. The trends of expenditures, sales and employees are shown. (Kako, I.)

  5. Ozone Applications in Food Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Savaş

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Known as active oxygen Ozone (O3, are among the most effective antimicrobials. The sun's ultraviolet rays and ozone caused by electric arcs of lightning occurring instantly around the world, and is available as a protective shield protects the animals against the effects of the sun's radiation. In the food industry, directly or indirectly in contact with food during processing of foods and chemical treatment of water disinfection bacteriological emerges as an alternative protection method. In this study, the effects of the ozone applications will evaluated as an alternative to conventional disinfectants in food industry.

  6. Nuclear Data Needs and Capabilities for Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-27

    In July 2014, DOE NP carried out a review of the US Nuclear Data Program. This led to several recommendations, including that the USNDP should “devise effective and transparent mechanisms to solicit input and feedback from all stakeholders on nuclear data needs and priorities.” The review also recommended that USNDP pursue experimental activities of relevance to nuclear data; the revised 2014 Mission Statement accordingly states that the USNDP uses “targeted experimental studies” to address gaps in nuclear data. In support of these recommendations, DOE NP requested that USNDP personnel organize a Workshop on Nuclear Data Needs and Capabilities for Applications (NDNCA). This Workshop was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) on 27-29 May 2015. The goal of the NDNCA Workshop was to compile nuclear data needs across a wide spectrum of applied nuclear science, and to provide a summary of associated capabilities (accelerators, reactors, spectrometers, etc.) available for the required measurements. The first two days of the workshop consisted of 25 plenary talks by speakers from 16 different institutions, on nuclear energy (NE), national security (NS), isotope production (IP), and industrial applications (IA). There were also shorter “capabilities” talks that described the experimental facilities and instrumentation available for the measurement of nuclear data. This was followed by a third day of topic-specific “breakout” sessions and a final closeout session. The agenda and copies of these talks are available online at http://bang.berkeley.edu/events/NDNCA/agenda. The importance of nuclear data to both basic and applied nuclear science was reflected in the fact that while the impetus for the workshop arose from the 2014 USNDP review, joint sponsorship for the workshop was provided by the Nuclear Science and Security Consortium, a UC-Berkeley based organization funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

  7. The world nuclear industry status report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.; Froggatt, A

    2007-11-15

    The status and perspectives of the nuclear industry in the world have been subject to a large number of publications and considerable media attention over the last few years. The present report attempts to provide solid elements of key information for intelligent analysis and informed decision-making. As of 1 November 2007 there are 439 nuclear reactors operating in the world. That is five less than five years ago. There are 32 units listed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as 'under construction'. That is about 20 less than in the late 1990's. In 1989 a total of 177 nuclear reactors had been operated in what are now the 27 EU Member States. That number shrank to 146 units as of 1 November 2007. In 1992 the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, WISE-Paris and Greenpeace International published the first World Nuclear Industry Status Report. As a first updated review in 2004 showed the 1992 analyses proved correct. In reality, the combined installed nuclear capacity of the 436 units operating in the world in the year 2000 was less than 352,000 megawatts - to be compared with the forecast of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from the 1970's of up to 4,450,000 megawatts. Today the 439 worldwide operating reactors total 371,000 megawatts. Nuclear power plants provide 16% of the electricity, 6% of the commercial primary energy and 2-3% of the final energy in the world - the tendency is downwards - less than hydropower alone. Twenty-one of the 31 countries operating nuclear power plants decreased their share of nuclear power within the electricity mix if compared with 2003. The average age of the operating power plants is 23 years. Some nuclear utilities envisage reactor lifetimes of 40 years or more. Considering the fact that the average age of all 117 units that have already been closed is equally about 22 years, the doubling of the operational lifetime seems already rather optimistic. However, we have assumed an average

  8. The world nuclear industry status report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.; Froggatt, A.

    2007-11-01

    The status and perspectives of the nuclear industry in the world have been subject to a large number of publications and considerable media attention over the last few years. The present report attempts to provide solid elements of key information for intelligent analysis and informed decision-making. As of 1 November 2007 there are 439 nuclear reactors operating in the world. That is five less than five years ago. There are 32 units listed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as 'under construction'. That is about 20 less than in the late 1990's. In 1989 a total of 177 nuclear reactors had been operated in what are now the 27 EU Member States. That number shrank to 146 units as of 1 November 2007. In 1992 the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, WISE-Paris and Greenpeace International published the first World Nuclear Industry Status Report. As a first updated review in 2004 showed the 1992 analyses proved correct. In reality, the combined installed nuclear capacity of the 436 units operating in the world in the year 2000 was less than 352,000 megawatts - to be compared with the forecast of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from the 1970's of up to 4,450,000 megawatts. Today the 439 worldwide operating reactors total 371,000 megawatts. Nuclear power plants provide 16% of the electricity, 6% of the commercial primary energy and 2-3% of the final energy in the world - the tendency is downwards - less than hydropower alone. Twenty-one of the 31 countries operating nuclear power plants decreased their share of nuclear power within the electricity mix if compared with 2003. The average age of the operating power plants is 23 years. Some nuclear utilities envisage reactor lifetimes of 40 years or more. Considering the fact that the average age of all 117 units that have already been closed is equally about 22 years, the doubling of the operational lifetime seems already rather optimistic. However, we have assumed an average lifetime of 40 years

  9. Integrating virtual reality applications in nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, Michael; Crete, Jean-Maurice; Pickett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) tools have already been developed and deployed in the nuclear industry, including in nuclear power plant construction, project management, equipment and system design, and training. Recognized as powerful tools for, inter alia, integration of data, simulation of activities, design of facilities, validation of concepts and mission planning, their application in nuclear safeguards is still very limited. However, VR tools may eventually offer transformative potential for evolving the future safeguards system to be more fully information-driven. The paper focuses especially on applications in the area of training that have been underway in the Department of Safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency. It also outlines future applications envisioned for safeguards information and knowledge management, and information-analytic collaboration. The paper identifies some technical and programmatic pre-requisites for realizing the integrative potential of VR technologies. If developed with an orientation to integrating applications through compatible platforms, software, and models, virtual reality tools offer the long-term potential of becoming a real 'game changer,' enabling a qualitative leap in the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear safeguards. The IAEA invites Member States, industry, and academia to make proposals as to how such integrating potential in the use of virtual reality technology for nuclear safeguards could be realized. (author)

  10. Assesment of safe discharge limits in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van As, D.

    1984-01-01

    Routine releases from the nuclear industry to the environment are controlled by three principles, viz. that the practice creating the effluents should be kept as low as reasonably achievable, and radiation dose limits should not be exceeded. In the nuclear industry, the discharge of radioactive effluent is controlled by a system of dose limitation. The application of this system to conventional effluents require: i) a quantitative relationship between intake and effect so as to establish intake limits; ii) environmental models that will allow calculation of the relationship between discharge and intake; iii) a measure of the total detriment due to the discharge. For such a system discharge limits can be established for the desired level of risk (safety)

  11. Instructional skills evaluation in nuclear industry training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazour, T.J.; Ball, F.M.

    1985-11-01

    This report provides information to nuclear power plant training managers and their staffs concerning the job performance requirements of instructional personnel to implement prformance-based training programs (also referred to as the Systems Approach Training). The information presented in this report is a compilation of information and lessons learned in the nuclear power industry and in other industries using performance-based training programs. The job performance requirements in this report are presented as instructional skills objectives. The process used to develop the instructional skills objectives is described. Each objective includes an Instructional Skills Statement describing the behavior that is expected and an Instructional Skills Standard describing the skills/knowledge that the individual should possess in order to have achieved mastery. The instructional skills objectives are organized according to the essential elements of the Systems Approach to Training and are cross-referenced to three categories of instructional personnel: developers of instruction, instructors, and instructional managers/supervisors. Use of the instructional skills objectives is demonstrated for reviewing instructional staff training and qualification programs, developing criterion-tests, and reviewing the performance and work products of individual staff members. 22 refs

  12. Learning curve estimation techniques for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaurio, Jussi K.

    1983-01-01

    Statistical techniques are developed to estimate the progress made by the nuclear industry in learning to prevent accidents. Learning curves are derived for accident occurrence rates based on actuarial data, predictions are made for the future, and compact analytical equations are obtained for the statistical accuracies of the estimates. Both maximum likelihood estimation and the method of moments are applied to obtain parameters for the learning models, and results are compared to each other and to earlier graphical and analytical results. An effective statistical test is also derived to assess the significance of trends. The models used associate learning directly to accidents, to the number of plants and to the cumulative number of operating years. Using as a data base nine core damage accidents in electricity-producing plants, it is estimated that the probability of a plant to have a serious flaw has decreased from 0.1 to 0.01 during the developmental phase of the nuclear industry. At the same time the frequency of accidents has decreased from 0.04 per reactor year to 0.0004 per reactor year

  13. Problems of nuclear industry in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiyama, Hirokichi

    1976-01-01

    The past twenty years growth of Japanese reactor plant makers is historically reviewed in the first part of this report. The first ten years were devoted for the construction of research reactors and for the design studies of power plants. The next ten years were devoted for the construction of power stations. Total income and expenditures of Japanese makers for these two periods are presented. It is emphasized that expenditures always exceeded income. The second part previews the projected growth of nuclear power generation. Generating capacities of 49,000 MW at 1985 and 90,000 MW at 1990 is assumed. To meet this demand, Japanese makers must have the ability of supplying about 8000 MW per year and the number of personnel (at present, about 9,000) must be increased to 25,000 in next ten years. The third part discusses the roles of plant makers. Establishment of safe and reliable technology, promotion of standardization, improvement of economical bases, and the promotion of associated industries (such as nuclear fuel makers and operator training institutions) are the main subjects. The roles of government are also shortly discussed. The rest of this paper shortly discusses about the participation to the national project (ATR, FBR, and centrifuge enrichment) and about future problems in growing to an exporting industry. (Aoki, K.)

  14. Environmental issues and the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castle, P.

    1995-01-01

    Health safety and environmental liabilities of the 'nuclear industry' reflect those of industry in general and may broadly be divided into two areas: criminal liability for regulatory non-compliance; and civil liability for damage caused to persons and their property (for example, neighbours, employees etc). In addition, environmental liability may be incurred as a result of powers of the regulatory authorities to clean up contamination and to recoup the cost. These are in addition to the regime of strict liability imposed, where relevant, by the Nuclear Installations Act 1965. In the case of environmental liabilities, 'owners;, 'occupiers', 'persons responsible', 'persons in control' may all be held to be liable and for the most part these terms remain undefined both under English law and European Community (now European Union) law. This potentially has ramifications for current and former owners and operators, their boards and senior managers, other employees, parent companies, shareholders and their lenders and investors - of particular relevance in the context of privatization. (author)

  15. Nuclear physics principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lilley, J S

    2001-01-01

    This title provides the latest information on nuclear physics. Based on a course entitled Applications of Nuclear Physics. Written from an experimental point of view this text is broadly divided into two parts, firstly a general introduction to Nuclear Physics and secondly its applications.* Includes chapters on practical examples and problems* Contains hints to solving problems which are included in the appendix* Avoids complex and extensive mathematical treatments* A modern approach to nuclear physics, covering the basic theory, but emphasising the many and important applicat

  16. Industrial applications of electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of high-energy radiation with organic systems produces very reactive, short-lived, ionic and free-radical species. The chemical changes brought about by these species are very useful in several systems, and are the basis of the growth of the electron processing industry. Some typical areas of the industrial use of electron accelerators are crosslinking wire and cable insulation, manufacturing heat shrink plastic items, curing coatings, and partially curing rubber products. Electron accelerators are also being considered in other areas such as sewage treatment, sterilizing medical disposables, and food irradiation. An emerging application of industrial electron accelerators is the production of advanced composites for the aerospace and other industries. Traditionally, the carbon-, aramid- and glass-fibre-reinforced composites with epoxy matrices are produced by thermal curing. However, equivalent composites with acrylated-epoxy matrices can be made by electron curing. Cost estimates suggest that electron curing could be more economical than thermal curing. Food irradiation has traditionally been an application for 60 Co γ-radiation. With the increasing demand for food irradiation in various countries, it may become necessary to use electron accelerators for this purpose. Since the dose rate during gamma and electron irradiation are generally very different, a review of the relevant work on the effect of dose rates has been done. This paper presents an overview of the industrial applications of electron accelerator for radiation processing, emphasises the electron curing of advanced composites and, briefly reviews the dose-rate effects in radiation processing of advanced composites and food irradiation. (author). 84 refs., 8 tabs

  17. JAIF formulates policy for strengthening foundation of nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    With recognition that conditions surrounding the nuclear industry are becoming severe with the slowdown in the growth of the Japanese economy, the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum has been discussing ways and means of strengthening the foundations of the nuclear industry. A subcommittee of the Power Reactor Development Committee has been formed. It comprizes two divisions. The first division focused on economic and social prospects for the future and other basic questions. The second division dealt with specific problems viewed from the position of the nuclear quipment supply industry and measures to resolve them. The report was prepared based on the studies done by the two divisions, and focusing on the strengthening of the basis of the nuclear industry through the year 2010. The report estimates that construction of nuclear power plants will be less than 2 units a year in the coming five year period, and will continue at about 2 units a year until about the year 2000. From this outlook, it discusses the work facing the nuclear industry and the steps to be taken to reduce nuclear power generation costs, efficient research and development and the promotion of international cooperation. The report covers four sections: the position of nuclear power development in the national economy; the present state and tasks of the nuclear industry and the nuclear equipment supply industry; measures for maintaining and strengthening the foundations of the nuclear industry, and the tasks to be done. (Nogami, K.)

  18. Radiation technology in emerging industrial applications. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In many industrial applications radiation processing has proven to be a technology of choice either because of its economic competitiveness or its technical superiority. Although the chemical effects of ionizing radiation have been known for more than a century, its industrial applications became possible only after the availability of reliable gamma sources and powerful electron accelerators during the last couple of decades.The programmes of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in radiation processing are implemented through the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications and the Department of Technical Co-operation. The IAEA has been active in this field for many years, contributing to new developments, training, promotion and transfer of technology. In September 1997, the IAEA held an international symposium in Zakopane, Poland on the 'Use of radiation technology for the conservation of environment' where the status of current developments and of applications of radiation processing in the control of environmental pollution was reviewed (IAEA-TECDOC-1023, 1998). Recent developments and achievements in various aspects of radiation processing have been assessed continuously through the organization of consultants meetings, advisory group meetings and research co-ordination meetings. Worldwide growing interest in the use of radiation technology in various new industrial applications, as exemplified by the reports and presentations made at these meetings, has led the IAEA to organize a symposium to cover every aspect of radiation processing and, exclusively, the emerging industrial applications of radiation technology. The International Symposium on Radiation Technology in Emerging Industrial Applications was convened in November 2000 in Beijing, China. Its main purpose was to bring scientists,technologists, industrialists and regulatory authorities together with a view of exchanging information and reviewing the status of current developments and

  19. Cutinases: properties and industrial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pio, Tatiana Fontes; Macedo, Gabriela Alves

    2009-01-01

    Cutinases, also known as cutin hydrolases (EC 3.1.1.74) are enzymes first discovered from phytopathogenic fungi that grow on cutin as the sole carbon source. Cutin is a complex biopolymer composed of epoxy and hydroxy fatty acids, and forms the structural component of higher plants cuticle. These enzymes share catalytic properties of lipases and esterases, presenting a unique feature of being active regardless the presence of an oil-water interface, making them interesting as biocatalysts in several industrial processes involving hydrolysis, esterification, and trans-esterification reactions. Cutinases present high stability in organic solvents and ionic liquids, both free and microencapsulated in reverse micelles. These characteristics allow the enzyme application in different areas such as food industry, cosmetics, fine chemicals, pesticide and insecticide degradation, treatment and laundry of fiber textiles, and polymer chemistry. The present chapter describes the characteristics, potential applications, and new perspectives for these enzymes.

  20. Industrial applications of affective engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Shiizuka, Hisao; Lee, Kun-Pyo; Otani, Tsuyoshi; Lim, Chee-Peng

    2014-01-01

    This book examines the industrial applications of affective engineering. The contributors cover new analytical methods such as fluctuation, fuzzy logic, fractals, and complex systems. These chapters also include interdisciplinary research that traverses a wide range of fields, including information engineering, human engineering, cognitive science, psychology, and design studies. The text is split into two parts: theory and applications. This work is a collection of the best papers from ISAE2013 (International Symposium of Affective Engineering) held at Kitakyushu, Japan and Japan Kansei Engineering Meeting on March 6-8, 2013.

  1. Analysis on Japanese nuclear industrial technologies and their military implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. S.; Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2000-10-01

    This study covered the following scopes : analysis of Japan's policy trend on the development and utilization of nuclear energy, international and domestic viewpoint of Japan's nuclear weapon capability, Japan's foreign affairs and international cooperation, status of Japan's nuclear technology development and its level, status and level of nuclear core technologies such as nuclear reactor and related fuel cycle technologies. Japan secures the whole spectrum of nuclear technologies including core technologies through the active implementation of nuclear policy for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy during the past five decades. Futhermore, as the result of the active cultivation of nuclear industry, Japan has most nuclear-related facilities and highly advanced nuclear industrial technologies. Therefore, it is reasonable that Japan might be recognized as one of countries having capability to get nuclear capability in several months.

  2. Safety analysis in the high risk industry: Similarities and differences with the nuclear approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilaragut LLanes, Juan Jose; Castillo Alvarez, Jorge Patricio

    2001-01-01

    In this article shows a conceptual aspects to the risk safety analysis, comparing them with the focus to the nuclear industry that has been characterized to be the pioneers in their systematized application

  3. Industrial application of radioisotopes in South Africa: a bibliographic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jesus, A.S.M.; Smith, S.W.; Van As, D.; De Wet, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Since 1963 considerable strides have been made concerning the application of nuclear radiation, in most cases provided by radioisotopic sources, in the South African industry. South Africa has moved from a phase where the emphasis was on experimenting and learning to a phase where the technologies developed over the years are being put to work in a productive manner by exploiting them, largely complementary to other non-nuclear technologies. Classification in terms of application areas includes subjects such as process control, elemental analysis, industrial processes, mining exploration and prospecting, environmental applications and radiation processing

  4. Joint submission of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the Organization of CANDU Industries to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    The manufacturing company members of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the Organization of CANDU Industries are proud to have played their part in the development of the peaceful application of nuclear technology in Ontario, and the achievement of the very real benefits discussed in this paper, which greatly outweigh the hypothetical risks

  5. Components and renewal parts in the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.F. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This paper indicates that the nuclear parts industry has been forced to make major investments in time, personnel and financial resources in order to solve short term/emergency procurement problems. What is required, as was previously indicated, is a coordinated industry-wide effort toward long range planning and implementation of a program that addresses these issues. The industry is developing programs directed toward inventory optimization and ''innovative-creative'' financing of manufacturing inventory/work-in-process in an effort to significantly reduce delivery lead times. Product transition, utilization of cancelled plant equipment, equipment qualification programs, and dedication of commercially manufactured/procured parts and components for safety related application continue to be major elements of our program to support current utility requirements

  6. Nuclear industrial and power complex of Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shemanskiy, V.A.; Cherepnin, Yu.S.; Zelenski, D.I.; Papafanasopulo, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    While selecting the national power supply strategy of economic potential development four factors are laid in the basis of discussions and technical and economic decisions: effect either power complexes on people health, consequences environmental, economics and resources existence. Atomic power requires the balanced approach to power politics which, by that, avoids the dependence on any energy source. The existing electric power generation structure in Kazakhstan is Featured by the following numbers: -TEPP on coal - 79%; - TEPP on gas-black-oil fuel - 12-13%; - HEPP - 6-7%; - Atomic PP - about 0.7%. The ground for nuclear power development is considerable uranium deposits and rather developed atomic industry. Kazakhstan atomic industry includes: - uranium extractive enterprise - State Holding Company 'Tselinnyi Mining-Chemical Plant' (SHC 'TCMP'), Stepnoy Ore Division (SOD), Central ore Division 6 (COD 6), KASKOR (Aktau); - plant on fuel pellets production for APP (JSC 'UMP'); - plants on production of rare and rare-earth metals - Irtysh Chemical and Metallurgical (JSC 'CMP') and Ulba Metallurgical Plant (JSC 'UMP'); - Mangyshlak Power Plant (MAEK); - Scientific Complex of NNC RK of Ministry of Science-Academy of Science. About 25% of world deposits and uranium resources are concentrated in Kazakhstan bowels. The scientific potential of atomic production complex of the Republic of Kazakhstan is concentrated in NNC RK divisions (IAE and INP) and at JSC 'UMP' and MAEK enterprises. Ministry Energy and Nature Resources is a Board responsible for the development of atomic industry and power branches. Atomic Energy Agency of the Republic Kazakhstan performs the independent effective state supervision and control providing safety of atomic industry power installations operation

  7. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie; Katsuta, Tadahiro; Ramana, M.V.; Fairlie, Ian; Maltini, Fulcieri; Thomas, Steve; Kaaberger, Tomas

    2016-07-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2015 provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. Nuclear power generation in the world increased by 1.3%, entirely due to a 31% increase in China. Ten reactors started up in 2015-more than in any other year since 1990-of which eight were in China. Construction on all of them started prior to the Fukushima disaster. Eight construction starts in the world in 2015-to which China contributed six-down from 15 in 2010 of which 10 were in China. No construction starts in the world in the first half of 2016. The number of units under construction is declining for the third year in a row, from 67 reactors at the end of 2013 to 58 by mid-2016, of which 21 are in China. China spent over US$100 billion on renewables in 2015, while investment decisions for six nuclear reactors amounted to US$18 billion. Eight early closure decisions taken in Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan and the U.S. Nuclear phase-out announcements in the U.S. (California) and Taiwan. In nine of the 14 building countries all projects are delayed, mostly by several years. Six projects have been listed for over a decade, of which three for over 30 years. China is no exception here, at least 10 of 21 units under construction are delayed. With the exception of United Arab Emirates and Belarus, all potential newcomer countries delayed construction decisions. Chile suspended and Indonesia abandoned nuclear plans. AREVA has accumulated US$11 billion in losses over the past five years. French government decides euro 5.6 billion bailout and breaks up the company. Share value 95 percent below 2007 peak value. State utility EDF struggles with US$ 41.5 billion debt, downgraded by S and P. Chinese utility CGN, EDF partner for Hinkley Point C, loses 60% of its share value

  8. Energy policy and nuclear power. Expectations of the power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harig, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    In the opinion of the power industry, using nuclear power in Germany is a responsible attitude, while opting out of nuclear power is not. Electricity utilities will build new nuclear power plants only if the structural economic and ecological advantages of nuclear power are preserved and can be exploited in Germany. The power industry will assume responsibility for new complex, capital-intensive nuclear plants only if a broad societal consensus about this policy can be reached in this country. The power industry expects that the present squandering of nuclear power resources in Germany will be stopped. The power industry is prepared to contribute to finding a speedy consensus in energy policy, which would leave open all decisions which must not be taken today, and which would not constrain the freedom of decision of coming generations. The electricity utilities remain committed proponents of nuclear power. However, what they sell to their customers is electricity, not nuclear power. (orig.) [de

  9. Radiotracer Generators for Industrial Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Radiotracers have been widely used throughout industry to optimize processes, solve problems, improve product quality, save energy and reduce pollution. Their technical, economic and environmental benefits have been recognized by both the industrial and the environmental sectors. The most important radiotracer techniques have been transferred to many developing Member States through IAEA Technical Cooperation projects. However, in spite of their manifest benefits, radiotracer techniques continue to be underutilized, not only by developing countries but also by more industrialized nations. There are a number of factors that restrict the usage of the radioisotope techniques, but chief among them is the timely availability of suitable radiotracers. Ensuring timely availability of suitable radionuclides is a main hurdle to the use of radiotracer techniques in industry. For developing countries that do not possess radioisotope production facilities, the long time required for import of radionuclides not only completely rules out the use of short half-life nuclides, but also makes it impossible for the radioisotope applications teams to respond to problems of an urgent nature. Many possible radiotracer investigations are not being carried out in developing countries because of this problem. Even in industrialized countries, radionuclide supply is often a problem, as many of the former suppliers of industrial radionuclides have switched their production facilities to serve the more lucrative radiopharmaceuticals market. Obtaining continuity of supply of radionuclides with which to carry out extended studies in difficult-to-access locations, such as offshore oil platforms, is also a significant challenge. Making use of tracers from radionuclide generators can alleviate the difficulties associated with radioisotope supply. Two commercially available medical radionuclide generators, 99 Mo/ 99 mTc and 113 Sn/ 113 mIn, have been used for this purpose, but their use has been

  10. The development of Chinese power industry and its nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Dabin

    2002-01-01

    The achievements and disparity of Chinese power industry development is introduced. The position and function of nuclear power in Chinese power industry is described. Nuclear power will play a role in ensuring the reliable and safe supply of primary energy in a long-term and economic way. The development prospects of power source construction in Chinese power industry is presented. Challenge and opportunity in developing nuclear power in China are discussed

  11. Germany, an industrialized country, and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wartenberg, L. v.

    2001-01-01

    The question of the future of nuclear power in Germany, and the agreement between the federal government and industry of June 14, 2000 about the future operation of plants, are important far beyond the confines of this sector of industry. In times of economic globalization and of competition among national economies, questions of location have become key issues in meeting future challenges. For this purpose, there must be more freedom for the economy; entrepreneurial action must be regarded as a positive duty to be fulfilled by society. Personal responsibility and competition, with room for self-responsibility, must not be hampered further by interventions and red tape. This applies to all sectors of the economy, in particular to the power supply sector, as is borne out by the current debate about the quota regulations for cogeneration systems (CHP). Social justice, one of the most important unifying forces in this modern society, must be interpreted as solidarity. This solidarity must be sought also in an international context. Supplying the basic necessities to all inhabitants of this earth requires all sources of energy, also in the interest of achieving sustainability. This term should be interpreted, above and beyond its meaning in environmental protection, as a concept in all areas of politics, implying that the future must be taken into account in all decisions made today. In the light of the problems associated with establishing a worldwide sustainable power supply system, inter alia meeting the objectives of climate protection, continuity of supply, and economic viability, there is no way around nuclear power. Free decisions are required in the sense of sustainable economic management, and the political boundary conditions must be created for this to be possible. (orig.) [de

  12. Robots in the nuclear industry: conference report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochan, Anna.

    1992-01-01

    Current robotic technology is severely challenged by the conditions which nuclear environments present. In such applications, reliability demands are stringent; the environment is highly unstructured; and the ionizing radiation field is extremely hazardous to equipment. But an international conference, held recently in Marseille, indicated clearly that there is no shortage of robotic solutions adapted to these special needs. Organized by the Institut International de Robotique et d'Intelligence Artificelle in Marseille, the conference focused on telerobotics in hostile environments, including sessions on Perception of Environment; Man/machine Interface; and Technologies and Components. (Author)

  13. Radioisotope tracer applications in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    Radioisotope tracers have many advantages in industrial trouble-shooting and studies on process kinetics. The applications are mainly of two types: one leading to qualitative (Yes or No type) information and the other to quantitative characterisation of flow processes through mass balance considerations and flow models. ''Yes or No'' type methods are mainly used for leakage and blockage locations in pipelines and in other industrial systems and also for location of water seepage zones in oil wells. Flow measurements in pipelines and mercury inventory in electrolytic cells are good examples of tracer methods using the mass balance approach. Axial dispersion model and Tanks-in-Series model are the two basic flow models commonly used with tracer methods for the characterisation of kinetic processes. Examples include studies on flow processes in sugar crystallisers as well as in a precalcinator in a cement plant. (author). 18 figs

  14. Nuclear power struggles - industrial competition and proliferation control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, W.; Loennroth, M.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections entitled: the nuclear industry and trade relations, 1945-80 (political and commercial foundations of nuclear trade; rupture of nuclear relations); industries under strain (France; West Germany; Canada; USA; other nuclear reactor exporters - Japanese challenge; domestic demand - key to industrial viability); contest for reactor export markets (size and location of market; dynamics of competition); proliferation risks and trade policy, the non-proliferation regime - the robustness of the NPT and IAEA; future relations between supplier countries (nuclear trade policies; the roles of European suppliers in the non-proliferation regime); a new hope. (U.K.)

  15. Industrial development - consequences about the implantation of Brazilian Nuclear Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syllus, C.

    1987-07-01

    The strategy to promote the growing industry participation in the Brazilian Nuclear Program, the difficulties, the measurements adopted for overcoming and the results obtained in terms of industrial development, are presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  16. The nuclear power industry: financial considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leward, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    It is important not to allow the present liquidity crisis to escalate into economic and political dislocations that could result in a prolonged cessation of necessary capital investment. In assessing the future growth of nuclear power in other parts of the world, it may be instructive to consider the plight of the U.S. industry and the parallels that are apparent. In the United States, electric utility debt is growing too fast; a structural imbalance has developed even on the better corporate balance sheets; and cash flow or internal generation has diminished, particularly as the time needed to complete nuclear plants has extended, thereby precluding revenue production for as long as 10 to 15 years from the beginning of construction. Newcomers to the lending business may have little appetite to lend in unfavorable climates, and regulatory (political) bodies may irresponsibly allow unproductive use of resources and refuse to adopt difficult but essential economic policies to preserve the financial integrity of the borrower. These issues are relevant in the examination of any lender/borrower relationship, whether it be between sovereign nations, banker and borrower, or vendor and vendee. (author)

  17. Applications of nuclear physics: Future trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichler, R.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear physics and energy research depends on and advances science and technology outside of the nuclear field. Perhaps the most commonly perceived benefits to society from nuclear and particle physics are those derived from particle beam technology. Charged particle accelerators play an increasing role in applications in industry and medicine. Neutrons produced with a high power proton accelerator in a spallation process are used from basic research, radiography in automotive industry (example fuel cell development) to transmutation of highly radioactive fission products. Production and acceleration of ultra cold neutrons provide intense and almost mono-energetic neutrons to study soft matter. Heavier radioisotopes are used in a wide field ranging from medicine to semiconductor industry (ion implantation for doping or coating technologies). Concrete examples and future trends will be given. Detailed understanding of ion physics at low energy allows the design of compact accelerator mass spectroscopy (close to table top size). The ability to measure concentrations of specific radioactive isotopes even below the natural radioactivity widens the scope of applications from archaeology, climate research to food industry. Such a compact device is close to commercialisation. (author)

  18. Nuclear fuel industry in USSR, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurasaka, Makoto; Kinoshita, Michio.

    1987-01-01

    The development of uranium ore in USSR changes from the deposits of high grade or easy to excavate to those of low grade or hard to excavate. In the deposits like this, the various elements which are useful for industrial fields are contained in addition to uranium, but these components become the harmful foreign matters to the uranium and its compounds used for atomic energy industry. All the other elements must be removed to obtain the purity as nuclear fuel, but it is necessary to effectively use these elements though their quantity is very small. As the separation of these elements is expensive, the production of such related products as fertilizer, alum and saltpeter is carried out accompanying the extraction of uranium, in this way, the improvement of efficiency is planned. In USSR, ion exchange process was developed in a very short period, and at present, this is used to extract high purity uranium compounds and others. For the adsorption of uranium, anion exchange resin is used in addition to cation exchange resin. By pulp adsorption process, the consumption of water, energy and chemicals was largely saved. Because of the closed process without releasing wastes, pollution was prevented. The method of extracting uranium and accompanying elements and the rough refineries for uranium in USSR are described. (Kako, I.)

  19. The industrial application of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frevert, E.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the two main fields of the industrial application of radioisotopes are introduced. In the field of process controlling device and control first about the transmission and the backscattering methods is reported. Then the x-ray fluorescence method and the moisture gauging with neutrons are mentioned. Also the measuring of depth of charge. In the field of tracer investigations about all kinds of flow and intermixture measurements is reported. And investigations of corrosion, wear and lubrication and precise location of nonmetallic pipe lines are mentioned. (Author)

  20. The nuclear industry and the NPT: a perspective from Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Whilst exporting nuclear reactors, the nuclear industry in the United States and other nuclear exporting countries also supports the Non-Proliferation Treaty. The nuclear industry needs the IAEA safeguards and the NPT as these allow the nuclear trade to be conducted in an orderly fashion. Non-sensitive equipment, materials and technology can be made available to other nations which adhere to the NPT. Indeed article IV of the NPT encourages this. Many developing countries do not, however, have the money to pay for the imported technology. This article looks at the current situation in the world where nuclear technology has been, is being, or will be, transferred. (U.K.)

  1. An HTR cogeneration system for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haverkate, B.R.W.; Heek, A.I. van; Kikstra, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    Because of its favourable characteristics of safety and simplicity the high-temperature reactor (HTR) could become a competitive heat source for a cogeneration unit. The Netherlands is a world leading country in the field of cogeneration. As nuclear energy remains an option for the medium and long term in this country, systems for nuclear cogeneration should be explored and developed. Hence, ECN Nuclear Research is developing a conceptual design of an HTR for Combined generation of Heat and Power (CHP) for the industry in and outside the Netherlands. The design of this small CHP-unit for industrial applications is mainly based on a pre-feasibility study in 1996, performed by a joint working group of five Dutch organisations, in which technical feasibility was shown. The concept that was subject of this study, INCOGEN, used a 40 MW thermal pebble bed HTR and produced a maximum amount of electricity plus low temperature heat. The system has been improved to produce industrial quality heat, and has been renamed ACACIA. The output of this installation is 14 MW electricity and 17 tonnes of steam per hour, with a pressure of 10 bar and a temperature of 220 deg. C. The economic characteristics of this installation turned out to be much more favourable using modern data. The research work for this installation is embedded in a programme that has links to the major HTR projects in the world. Accordingly ECN participates in several IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programmes (CRPs). Besides this, ECN is involved in the South African PBMR-project. Finally, ECN participates in the European Concerted Action on Innovative HTR. (author)

  2. BR2 reactor: medical and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponsard, B.

    2005-01-01

    The radioisotopes are produced for various applications in the nuclear medicine (diagnostic, therapy, palliation of metastatic bone pain), industry (radiography of welds, ...), agriculture (radiotracers, ...) and basic research. Due to the availability of high neutron fluxes (thermal neutron flux up to 10 15 n/cm 2 .s), the BR2 reactor is considered as a major facility through its contribution for a continuous supply of products such 99 Mo ( 99 mTc), 131 I, 133 Xe, 192 Ir, 186 Re, 153 Sm, 90 Y, 32 P, 188 W ( 188 Re), 203 Hg, 82 Br, 41 Ar, 125 I, 177 Lu, 89 Sr, 60 Co, 169 Yb, 147 Nd, and others. Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) silicon is produced for the semiconductor industry in the SIDONIE (Silicon Doping by Neutron Irradiation Experiment) facility, which is designed to continuously rotate and traverse the silicon through the neutron flux. These combined movements produce exceptional dopant homogeneity in batches of silicon measuring 4 and 5-inches in diameter by up to 750 mm in length. The main objectives of work performed were to provide a reliable and qualitative supply of radioisotopes and NTD-silicon to the customers in accordance with a quality system that has been certified to the requirements of the EN ISO 9001: 2000. This new Quality System Certificate has been obtained in November 2003 for the Production of radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications and the Production of Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) Silicon in the BR2 reactor

  3. World atlas of nuclear industry: civil and military

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandre, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Todays, with the energy supplies and global warming concerns, nuclear energy in making a come-back, witness the numerous nuclear programs launched or re-launched in the US, in Europe, China and India. In parallel, on the military side, the deterrence strategy remains in the center of security politics of big powers. This atlas takes stock of the overall issues linked with the nuclear technology: production, civil applications (power generation, medicine etc..), military usages (naval propulsion, weapons). It answers the main questions of this complex world, often dominated by secrecy: who does what in the nuclear domain in France? Is an accident, like the Chernobyl's one, possible today in Europe? What solutions for radioactive wastes? Do we take risks when we export our reactor technologies to Middle-East countries? Are we at the dawn of a new arms rush? What do international agreements foresee in this domain? Taking into account the costs, the hazards and the advantages of nuclear industry, the atlas shows that it is possible to establish solid technical and legal barriers between its civil and military sides. (J.S.)

  4. Probabilistic risk assessment in the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullwood, R.R.; Hall, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book describes the more important improvements in risk assessment methodology developed over the last decade. The book covers the following areas - a general view of risk pertaining to nuclear power, mathematics necessary to understand the text, a concise overview of the light water reactors and their features for protecting the public, probabilities and consequences calculated to form risk assessment to the plant, and 34 applications of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in the power generation industry. There is a glossary of acronyms and unusual words and a list of references. (author)

  5. Nuclear data measurement and evaluation activities for nuclear power technology applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioux, P.; Mouney, H.; Rowlands, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    Activity in the field of nuclear data for the fission power technology applications is reviewed. The present situation is of concern to the French nuclear industry because of the few measurement facilities which are now funded for work in the field and the reductions in the number of scientists expert in measurement and evaluation of nuclear data. It is argued that there are requirements which justify work to improve many items of nuclear data. (authors)

  6. Application of thermal-hydraulic codes in the nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queral, C.; Coriso, M.; Garcia Sedano, P. J.; Ruiz, J. A.; Posada, J. M.; Jimenez Varas, G.; Sol, I.; Herranz, L. E.

    2011-01-01

    Use of thermal-hydraulic codes is extended all over many different aspects of nuclear engineering. This article groups and briefly describes the main features of some of the well known codes as an introduction to their recent applications in the Spain nuclear sector. the broad range and quality of applications highlight the maturity achieved both in industry and research organizations and universities within the Spanish nuclear sector. (Author)

  7. Nuclear industry will be short of engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, M.

    1990-01-01

    This article discusses the potential shortage of nuclear engineers due to reduction of educational and training facilities and difficulty in attracting minorities into nuclear engineering. The article reports on recommendations from the National Research Council Nuclear Education Study Committee on attracting minorities to nuclear engineering, increasing DOE fellowships, funding for research and development, involvement of utilities and vendors, and support of the American Nuclear Society's advocacy of nuclear engineering education

  8. Nuclear applications in life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenak, P.

    2009-01-01

    Radioactivity has revolutionized life sciences during the last century, and it is still an indispensable tool. Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy, Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics, Nutrition and Environmental Problems Relevant Health are significant application fields of Nuclear Sciences. Nuclear medicine today is a well established branch of medicine. Radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals play a key role both in diagnostic investigations and therapy-Both cyclotron and reactor produced radionuclides find application, the former more in diagnostic studies and the latter in therapy. New therapy applications such as bor neutron therapy are increasing by time together with the technological improvements in imaging systems such as PET and SPECT. Radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals play important role in both therapy and imaging. However cyclotron produced radionuclides have been using generally in imaging purposes while reactor produced radionuclides have also therapeutic applications. With the advent of emission tomography, new vistas for probing biochemistry in vivo have been opened. The radio chemist faces an ever-increasing challenge of designing new tracers for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Rapid, efficient and automated methods of radionuclide and precursor production, labeling of biomolecules, and quality control need to be developed. The purpose of this article is a short interface from Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy, Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics Applications of Nuclear Sciences.

  9. Workplace monitoring and related health hazard evaluation in South African mining and mineral processing industries by application of nuclear and related analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faanhof, Arnaud

    2000-01-01

    The South African Government notice R 849 (23 April 1994) requires application to the South African Council for Nuclear Safety (CNS) for a nuclear licence if materials are dealt with that contain more than 0,2 but less than 1 Becquerel per gram of any radionuclide of the natural uranium, thorium and actinium decay series. If the material is to be used in the construction of buildings the application should have been made before 1 April 1996, otherwise before 31 March 1999. The first phase of the monitoring programme assesses the observed radioactivity levels of waste products and the possible radiological impact on people working on site and living in the direct environment of the operational site. Information has been obtained on the radionuclide content and elemental composition of the various sources of the coal, waste ash, ash related products, crusher materials and effluent water. Except for the effluent and coal samples all other materials showed activity levels for one or more nuclides above the 0,2 Bq/g but not exceeding the 1 Bq/g level. Accordingly a first order assessment of the possible radiological impact on workers and the public has been performed for water consumption and dust inhalation. Actual dust concentrations recorded at various sites within the operational area are used to evaluate the yearly dose to workers. (author)

  10. Organization, structure, and performance in the US nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lester, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    Several propositions are advanced concerning the effects of industry organization and structure on the economic performance of the American commercial nuclear power industry. Both the electric utility industry and the nuclear power plant supply industry are relatively high degree of horizontal disaggregation. The latter is also characterized by an absence of vertical integration. The impact of each of these factors on construction and operating performance is discussed. Evidence is presented suggesting that the combination of horizontal and vertical disaggregation in the industry has had a significant adverse effect on economic performance. The relationship between industrial structure and regulatory behavior is also discussed. 43 references, 4 figures, 9 tables

  11. Implications of occupational exposure distributions in the Canadian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, G.S.; Ashmore, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) is the nuclear regulator agency in Canada. Its mandate includes controlling the development, application and use of atomic energy. A major consideration in meeting this mandate is radiological safety. Careful recording and analysis of dose data are important in the regulatory process. AECB objectives in analysing this data include: studying the degree of compliance with regulations and provisions outlined in the licences; identifying the most exposed occupational groups, comparing exposures and studying exposure trends and informing the public as well as provincial, federal and international organizations. The National Dose Registry is operated by the Bureau of Radiation and Medical Devices of the Department of National Health and Welfare (DNHW). It is a centralized dose record keeping system which maintains dose information on all monitored radiation workers in Canada, that is, those in both the AECB regulated nuclear industry as well as the provincially regulated X-ray facilities. The nuclear industry workers constitute about 20% of the total. The Department maintains the Registry to: undertake epidemiological studies and health surveillance; assist the AECB and provincial authorities in controlling occupational radiation exposure; undertake dose trend analysis; and provide information for compensatory and legal purposes. The AECB and DNHW have established an interdepartmental working group to determine how DNHW can best meet AECB requirements for dose data analysis. Typical analyses include: dose distributions and average doses by job category and by area in a facility; trends in dose distributions or averages for each job category; trends in collective dose and determination of factors causing these trends. Additional analyses include intercomparison of data for similar jobs but at different facilities and different sectors of the nuclear industry, and the determination of radiation dose per unit of production. 3 refs

  12. Cyber security in nuclear power plants and its portability to other industrial infrastructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champigny, Sebastien; Gupta, Deeksha; Watson, Venesa; Waedt, Karl [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Power generation increasingly relies on decentralised and interconnected computerised systems. Concepts like ''Industrial Internet of Things'' of the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC), and ''Industry 4.0'' find their way in this strategic industry. Risk of targeted exploits of errors and vulnerabilities increases with complexity, interconnectivity and decentralization. Inherently stringent security requirements and features make nuclear computerised applications and systems a benchmark for industrial counterparts seeking to hedge against those risks. Consequently, this contribution presents usual cyber security regulations and practices for nuclear power plants. It shows how nuclear cyber security can be ported and used in an industrial context to protect critical infrastructures against cyber-attacks and industrial espionage.

  13. Cyber security in nuclear power plants and its portability to other industrial infrastructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champigny, Sebastien; Gupta, Deeksha; Watson, Venesa; Waedt, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Power generation increasingly relies on decentralised and interconnected computerised systems. Concepts like ''Industrial Internet of Things'' of the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC), and ''Industry 4.0'' find their way in this strategic industry. Risk of targeted exploits of errors and vulnerabilities increases with complexity, interconnectivity and decentralization. Inherently stringent security requirements and features make nuclear computerised applications and systems a benchmark for industrial counterparts seeking to hedge against those risks. Consequently, this contribution presents usual cyber security regulations and practices for nuclear power plants. It shows how nuclear cyber security can be ported and used in an industrial context to protect critical infrastructures against cyber-attacks and industrial espionage.

  14. The role of quality assurance in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The paper reports on the proceedings of a one day conference on ''the role of quality assurance in the nuclear industry'', presented by the British Nuclear Forum Working Group on Quality Assurance, 1985. The conference reviews the application and effectiveness of the British Standards in the light of experience with the AGR programme, and considers the lessons learned that will benefit future projects. Seven papers are presented at the conference, of which five deal with the AGR experience with respect to quality assurance in design and manufacture. The remaining two papers examine quality assurance in computing software and building on the AGR experience. All seven papers are selected for INIS and indexed separately. (U.K.)

  15. A new context for the nuclear research and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Pascal Colombani, general administrator of the CEA, develops in this presentation the situation of the nuclear industry to introduce the new orientations of the CEA group. The energy context, the deregulation impacts, the energy dependence and the greenhouse effect project are discussed before the presentation of the research programs and the necessary reorganizing of the nuclear industry. (A.L.B.)

  16. Augmented reality. Fundamentals and nuclear related applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Hirotake

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, Augmented Reality (AR) has attracted considerable interest from both academia and industry. Virtual Reality enables users to interact only with virtual objects in a virtual environment, but AR enables users to interact with both virtual objects and real objects in the real world. This feature supports application of AR to various fields such as education, driving, entertainment, and navigation. Especially, by application of AR to support workers in nuclear power plants, it is expected that working time and human error can be decreased. However, many problems remain unsolved to apply AR to real fields. In this lecture note, fundamental knowledge of AR is presented first including the overview of elemental technologies to realize AR. Then various AR applications to nuclear fields are described. Finally, future prospects are given. (author)

  17. Business environment of nuclear power industry in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yoon Young

    2003-01-01

    In Korea, there are total of 18 Nuclear Power Plants in operation as of the end of 2002 and 6 more plants are under construction. The first project for the Advanced Power Reactor (APR) 1400 nuclear power plant is being launched to provide reliable electricity economical competitiveness in Korea. The competitive business environment both globally and in Korea, where the power industry is undergoing significant restructuring, is requiring the Korean nuclear industry to continually improve the economic associated with nuclear power. Introduction of the APR 1400 design and continued improvement of local capabilities are two of the ways that the industry is responding to the challenge. (author)

  18. Health and safety record of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, M.W.; Carruthers, E.; Button, J.C.E.

    1975-09-01

    This paper examines the claim of the nuclear industry to have an excellent safety record, in terms of health and accident records of workers in the industry. It does not consider accidents which have not resulted in harm to the workers' health. The nuclear industry is considered to include all work with ionising radiations and radioactive materials, in education, research, medicine and industry. Since 'safety' is not an absolute concept, comparisons are made with the published records of other industries, and a study is made of the performance of the nuclear industry in relation to its own safety criteria. Data are presented on the radiation exposure of nuclear workers in Europe, America, India and Australia, in relation to the internationally recommended limits, and there is some discussion of the risks involved in these limits. The death rate in parts of the nuclear industry in America, the United Kingdom, and Australia is presented and compared with the death rate for other industries in those countries, and a listing is made of deaths caused by radiation in the period 1945 to 1968. Injury rates for the US and Australian nuclear industries are also compared with the injury rates for other industries in these countries. Consideration is given to the safety record of individual components of the nuclear industry (using the wide definition of this industry given above), special attention being given to health records of uranium miners, plutonium workers and radiologists. Although there are difficulties in obtaining sufficiently detailed information of this kind it is considered that the data presented, relative to any reasonable standard, demonstrate that the nuclear industry has a safety record to be proud of. (author)

  19. CVD diamond for nuclear detection applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bergonzo, P; Tromson, D; Mer, C; Guizard, B; Marshall, R D; Foulon, F

    2002-01-01

    Chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond is a remarkable material for the fabrication of radiation detectors. In fact, there exist several applications where other standard semiconductor detectors do not fulfil the specific requirements imposed by corrosive, hot and/or high radiation dose environments. The improvement of the electronic properties of CVD diamond has been under intensive investigations and led to the development of a few applications that are addressing specific industrial needs. Here, we report on CVD diamond-based detector developments and we describe how this material, even though of a polycrystalline nature, is readily of great interest for applications in the nuclear industry as well as for physics experiments. Improvements in the material synthesis as well as on device fabrication especially concern the synthesis of films that do not exhibit space charge build up effects which are often encountered in CVD diamond materials and that are highly detrimental for detection devices. On a pre-i...

  20. Human performance in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koncz, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Management of employees human performance in the Nuclear Industry is endemic to their safety when working. In the United Kingdom it has been a key focus since 2003. Employees were made aware through a detailed program of workshops, of the error prevention methods and how to apply them. The use of effective incident barriers became embedded in the safety culture. The methodology implemented was personal ownership, to enable self assessment of behaviors, attitudes and beliefs. When put in place, there are many specific barriers, which can reduce the chances of an error occurring. They come under the headings of organisational, procedural and physical barriers. All of these were used in some way and continue to be reinforced on a daily basis. Specific barriers are applied in specific situations. However, some general ones are also effective. In common use are the Take 2 or Take 5 Minutes, point of work risk assessments. Applying the human performance barrier Independent Verification (I.V.) would result in 'Take 3 and I.V.' This would independently double check the risk assessment. New ways of thinking are required to continuously improve and evolve. Results of the error reduction process included; reduced workload, increased plant reliability, efficiencies and productivity. (author)

  1. Reliability estimation for multiunit nuclear and fossil-fired industrial energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, W.G.; Wilson, J.V.; Klepper, O.H.

    1977-01-01

    As petroleum-based fuels grow increasingly scarce and costly, nuclear energy may become an important alternative source of industrial energy. Initial applications would most likely include a mix of fossil-fired and nuclear sources of process energy. A means for determining the overall reliability of these mixed systems is a fundamental aspect of demonstrating their feasibility to potential industrial users. Reliability data from nuclear and fossil-fired plants are presented, and several methods of applying these data for calculating the reliability of reasonably complex industrial energy supply systems are given. Reliability estimates made under a number of simplifying assumptions indicate that multiple nuclear units or a combination of nuclear and fossil-fired plants could provide adequate reliability to meet industrial requirements for continuity of service

  2. Reliability estimation for multiunit nuclear and fossil-fired industrial energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, W. G.; Wilson, J. V.; Klepper, O. H.

    1977-06-29

    As petroleum-based fuels grow increasingly scarce and costly, nuclear energy may become an important alternative source of industrial energy. Initial applications would most likely include a mix of fossil-fired and nuclear sources of process energy. A means for determining the overall reliability of these mixed systems is a fundamental aspect of demonstrating their feasibility to potential industrial users. Reliability data from nuclear and fossil-fired plants are presented, and several methods of applying these data for calculating the reliability of reasonably complex industrial energy supply systems are given. Reliability estimates made under a number of simplifying assumptions indicate that multiple nuclear units or a combination of nuclear and fossil-fired plants could provide adequate reliability to meet industrial requirements for continuity of service.

  3. The information of the nuclear industry before and during the nuclear debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstroem, P.

    1978-10-01

    A review of the organization and resources for information and public relations, which the nuclear industry have at its disposal in Sweden as well as in other countries. Furthermore, pre-nuclear organizations in the Northern Countries, which are not financed by the nuclear industry are discussed. (E.R.)

  4. Design research and industrial applicability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mogens Myrup

    1997-01-01

    Imprinted paper (copies of overheads in English) on the nature of design research, the transformation process for industrial utilization and the challenges of ENDREA from industry.......Imprinted paper (copies of overheads in English) on the nature of design research, the transformation process for industrial utilization and the challenges of ENDREA from industry....

  5. Application of nuclear energy in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Thuan, V.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Radioactive isotopes were introduced to medical treatment in Vietnam very early by M. Curie in 1923. A research reactor has been in operation since 1963 serving up to now an effective base for radioisotope production and nuclear analysis. After reunification of the country, the nuclear technique applications are developing faster and getting widespread. The twenty-year period from 1976 to 1995 was relatively limited by activity of R and D institutions. Nowadays, their interaction with companies demonstrates a dynamic commercialization of nuclear techniques in Vietnam. Investment from government as well as from the private sector has been increased significantly for the last ten years to nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. The radiographic NDT is getting a familiar technique to industry, particularly, in construction of strategy-important industrial and civil projects. NCS are upgraded in different factories, such as mining, ore processing and cement industries. Tracer techniques have shown benefit in oil offshore exploring and in sedimentation management of rivers and harbours. Isotope techniques are playing a competitive role for environmental monitoring and underground water management in the country. Radiation processing is transferred to a commercial scale emphasizing on sterilization of medical products and food preservation. There are still some problems such as public acceptance of radioactive techniques or a lack of both infrastructure and manpower to meet the national demands. However, the government of Vietnam has recently approved the national strategy for peaceful uses of atomic energy, which not only highlights the development of isotope and radiation applications in near future, but also clearly emphasizes the need of nuclear electrical generation by 2017-2020 for the national energy security

  6. Application of knowledge based software to industrial automation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yoshihiro

    1985-01-01

    In Japan, large industrial undertakings such as electric utilities or steel works are making first steps towards knowledge engineering, testing the applicability of knowledge based software to industrial automation. The goal is to achieve more intelligent, computer-aided assistance for the personnel and thus to enhance safety, reliability, and maintenance efficiency in large industrial plants. The article presents various examples showing advantages and draw-backs of such systems, and potential applications among others in nuclear or fossil fueled power plants or in electricity supply control systems. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Novel uses of magnetic separation in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coe, B.T.

    1999-08-01

    High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS) has been investigated in the nuclear industry, for the application of advanced technology in present and future nuclear environments within BNFL. Previous applications of HGMS have been reviewed and future novel applications investigated. The two most promising applications were then chosen as the focus of the PhD. In the first project, HGMS has been used to selectively recover biologically precipitated iron sulphide (Fe 1-x S) particles containing heavy metal ions, from a BNFL soil remediation effluent stream. The uptake of the ions is believed to be a consequence of the bacterial metabolism and the adsorptive properties of the iron sulphide. Biologically precipitated iron sulphide is known to differ in structure to its chemically precipitated equivalent and as such has certain advantages, for example, increased adsorbent properties and magnetic properties. The HGMS system was optimised and its performance investigated as a function of the magnetic field, the flow rate and the concentration of the biological particles in solution, with time. Results have shown that an efficiency of over 95% can be obtained, proving that HGMS is a valuable method for the concentration of metal ions from contaminated soils, especially when the adsorbed heavy metals are toxic or even radioactive and difficult to handle by other means. In the second project, the removal out of solution of radioactive technetium, in the form of the pertechnate ion [TcO 4 - ] was investigated. This was achieved using ion exchange techniques, Liquid Scintillation Counting LSC and HGMS. (author)

  8. Review of neutron radiographic applications in industrial and biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, M.M.; Khan, A.R.

    1992-10-01

    Neutron radiography is a non-destructive testing technique and is being used worldwide for the design and the development of reactor fuels for research and power reactors. It is also being used for non-destructive examination of nuclear industrial products. In addition to its explosives and other industrial sectors. In addition to its applications in industrial sectors, the technique is widely used for research and development activities in biological systems. A review of technical applications of neutron radiography in different fields particularly in nuclear fuel management, aerospace industry, explosives and biology is presented. The methodology of neutron radiography is also discussed in detail along with the advantages of the technique. In addition, the potential of the neutron radiography facility at PINSTECH has been described. (author)

  9. Evaluation of communication structures for nuclear-specific applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahedi, P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper evaluates various implementations of communication structures associated with nuclear-specific applications. Establishing numerous network structures currently used in nuclear industry, this projects analyzes the functionality and reliability of different structures. The communication structures studied in this paper include Object Linking and Embedding process control (OPC), Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) and Modbus Communication Protocol. The experimental aspect of this project includes development and implementation of each network structure for NPP control and shutdown systems. The results of the experimentations are used to identify the potential problems of applying such structures to nuclear industry, in order to introduce nuclear-specific network structures. (author)

  10. Decision making in the digital age: the nuclear industry response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, G. [Energy Group, Kepner-Tregoe, Inc. (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    Ten years ago, the consequences of a prolonged outage - or of choosing a costly alternative - could usually be recovered from the ratepayers without major difficulty. But today, as in the rest of industrial America, poorly crafted decisions have very real economic consequences. This paper discusses the decision making process within the nuclear industry in the age of industry deregulation.

  11. Decision making in the digital age: the nuclear industry response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelman, G.

    2002-01-01

    Ten years ago, the consequences of a prolonged outage - or of choosing a costly alternative - could usually be recovered from the ratepayers without major difficulty. But today, as in the rest of industrial America, poorly crafted decisions have very real economic consequences. This paper discusses the decision making process within the nuclear industry in the age of industry deregulation

  12. Materials of All-Polish Symposium Nuclear Techniques in Industry, Medicine, Agriculture and Environment Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The All-Polish Symposium Nuclear Techniques in Industry, Medicine, Agriculture and Environment Protection is cyclic (in 3 year period) conference being a broad review of state of art and development of all nuclear branches cooperated with industry and other branches of national economy and public life in Poland. The conference has been divided in one plenary session and 6 problem sessions as follow: Environmental protection, earth sciences, protection of cultural objects; Industrial applications; applications in medicine, medical apparatus; measurement methods, simulations, experiment planning; radiation techniques; laboratories, metrology

  13. Industrial Applications of Pulsed Power Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Koichi; Katsuki, Sunao

    Recent progress of the industrial applications of pulsed power is reviewed in this paper. Repetitively operated pulsed power generators with a moderate peak power have been developed for industrial applications. These generators are reliable and low maintenance. Development of the pulsed power generators helps promote industrial applications of pulsed power for such things as food processing, medical treatment, water treatment, exhaust gas treatment, ozone generation, engine ignition, ion implantation and others. Here, industrial applications of pulsed power are classified by application for biological effects, for pulsed streamer discharges in gases, for pulsed discharges in liquid or liquid-mixture, and for bright radiation sources.

  14. Tokai Mura accident and future of nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, I.A.

    2001-01-01

    After Chernobyl, human error once again triggered the world's worst nuclear accident at the Tokai Mura nuclear plant. Although there was only one fatal casualty, the accident could be a big blow to the nuclear industry and would scarcely help the nuclear lobby to promote nuclear energy. It would rather lead to the usual calls from nuclear opponents and anti-nuclear organisations for the world t o give up nuclear power . The accident has forced Japanese authorities to cutback and to consider dropping the plants to build 16-20 nuclear power plants by March 2011. However, one should think that by year 2050, the world's energy demand will have doubled: when fossil fuels, particularly oil and gas reserves, run short, is there any other energy source that can meet this target beside replacing 442 nuclear power stations currently in operation. Environmental impacts related to the use of fossil fuels should also be not ignored. (author)

  15. The thin layer activation method and its applications in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The thin layer activation (TLA) method is one of the most effective and precise methods for the measurement and monitoring of corrosion (erosion) and wear in industry and is used for on-line remote measurement of wear and corrosion rate of central parts in machines or processing vessels under real operating conditions. This document is a comprehensive manual on TLA method in its applications for monitoring wear and corrosion in industry. It describes the theory and presents case studies on TLA method applications in industry. In addition, in annexes are given tables of nuclear data relating to TLA (decay characteristics, depth distribution of reaction products, activation data for charged-particle nuclear reactions), references from INIS database on TLA and a detailed production of the application of TLA for wear measurement of superhard turning tools

  16. Microbial Cellulases and Their Industrial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Chander Kuhad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial cellulases have shown their potential application in various industries including pulp and paper, textile, laundry, biofuel production, food and feed industry, brewing, and agriculture. Due to the complexity of enzyme system and immense industrial potential, cellulases have been a potential candidate for research by both the academic and industrial research groups. Nowadays, significant attentions have been devoted to the current knowledge of cellulase production and the challenges in cellulase research especially in the direction of improving the process economics of various industries. Scientific and technological developments and the future prospects for application of cellulases in different industries are discussed in this paper.

  17. Microbial cellulases and their industrial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhad, Ramesh Chander; Gupta, Rishi; Singh, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Microbial cellulases have shown their potential application in various industries including pulp and paper, textile, laundry, biofuel production, food and feed industry, brewing, and agriculture. Due to the complexity of enzyme system and immense industrial potential, cellulases have been a potential candidate for research by both the academic and industrial research groups. Nowadays, significant attentions have been devoted to the current knowledge of cellulase production and the challenges in cellulase research especially in the direction of improving the process economics of various industries. Scientific and technological developments and the future prospects for application of cellulases in different industries are discussed in this paper.

  18. Standards development for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domondon, D.B.

    The ushering of nuclear era in the Philippines with the construction of the PNPP-I (Philippine Nuclear Power Plant) necessitates the evolvement and use of nuclear standards as a tool for safety evaluation in the licensing process. The Department of Nuclear Regulation and Safeguards under the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission has as one of its responsibilities the establishment of regulatory standards to ensure safe operation of nuclear facilities. This article points out the needs for nuclear standards and the steps in standard development which involve an enormous amount of resources in terms of manpower, expertise and money. The staff of the Department of Nuclear Regulations and Safeguards (DNRS) does not intend to engage in the original development of standards; rather, it reviews standards in use elsewhere, specifically in the U.S. and adopts to local conditions. (author)

  19. Canada's Nuclear Crossroads: Steps to a Viable Nuclear Energy Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce Doern; Robert Morrison

    2009-01-01

    Canada is at an energy and environmental crossroad. Fossil fuels cause environmental damage and the growth potential of large-scale hydroelectricity is limited. Policymakers are reconsidering the merits of nuclear power as both a low-carbon emitting and low-cost base load electricity source. While nuclear power may look like an attractive option, nuclear power must overcome problems such as the high and uncertain cost of construction, dealing with nuclear waste, reactor licensing and regulati...

  20. Ninth annual conference of Indian Nuclear Society on public perception on benefits of nuclear energy in health care, industry and agriculture: book of preprints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, T.S.; Prasad, G.E.

    1998-06-01

    This volume contains the contributed papers dealing with beneficial aspects of nuclear energy in health care, industry and agriculture. Nuclear techniques in crime detection, neutron activation analysis, dosimetry, personnel monitoring, radiation safety, environmental aspects, application radiation techniques in medicine, industry, agriculture etc. are some of the main topics covered in the conference. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  1. Nuclear safety. ICFTU proposals for the international control of the nuclear energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    are strong proponents of its use and others have said that they are only prepared to accept its application if safety controls are substantially improved. All affiliates of the ICFTU are convinced that energy policy options must be widened through increased research and development of new and renewable sources and through extensive energy conservation measures. The environmental impact of all methods of energy generation must be assessed on the basis of the public availability of all relevant information. It is in this context, that whatever their views about the desirability or otherwise of nuclear power, all ICFTU affiliates recognise the immediate need to assure the highest possible level of safety for all nuclear plants and activities everywhere - for example to deal with radioactive wastes created over the last 30 years. Even if some countries opt out of nuclear power it is likely that many others will be committed to it for many years. Given the widespread effects of a catastrophic failure anywhere in the world we must therefore all be concerned to strengthen the international safety regime. Because of their historic role in campaigning for health and safety at work, unions are well placed to exercise an independent watchdog role - making use of the knowledge and skills of their members in the nuclear industry - and are also able to speak on behalf of a large membership which is representative representative of the wide public concern about nuclear safety. Immediately following the Chernobyl disaster, the ICFTU Executive Board adopted a resolution (reproduced as Appendix 2 to this document) calling for immediate steps to tighten up nuclear safety. In the light of subsequent developments, the Confederation has now given further detailed consideration to the whole question of nuclear safety and has decided to publish this report which contains detailed proposals for tighter international control of nuclear energy via the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA

  2. French nuclear industry exportations: companies and organisations, achievements and projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudon, V.; Pailler, S.; Miniere, D.; Pouget-Abadie, X.; Journes, F.; Ouali, F.; Brochard, D.; Choho, T.; Lagarde, D.; Anglaret, P.; Kottman, G.; Mockly, D.; Ouzounian, G.; Cordier, P.Y.; Prenez, J.C.; Arpino, J.M.; Jaouen, C.; Jolly, B.

    2013-01-01

    This document gathers a series of short articles in which the following players: French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN), Electricity of France (EdF), French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), AREVA, ALSTOM, the Association of French Nuclear Industry Exporters (AIFEN), the National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) and the French Society of Nuclear Energy (SFEN) present their competencies in their respective fields and their strategies and commercial offers for exports. 2 articles are dedicated to the achievements of the French nuclear industry in China and another details the cooperation between SFEN and its foreign counterparts. Another article briefly presents the EPR and ATMEA reactors. (A.C.)

  3. Potential industrial market for process heat from nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, R.W.

    1976-07-01

    A specific segment of industrial process heat use has been examined in detail to identify individual plant locations throughout the United states where nuclear generated steam may be a viable alternative. Five major industries have been studied: paper, chemicals, petroleum, rubber, and primary metals. For these industries, representing 75 percent of the total industrial steam consumption, the individual plant locations within the U.S. using steam in large quantities have been located and characterized as to fuel requirements

  4. World nuclear power generation market and prospects of industry reorganization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Tomoko

    2007-01-01

    In late years there are many trends placing nuclear energy with important energy in various countries in the world due to a remarkable rise to an energy price, importance of energy security and a surge of recognition to a global environment problem. Overseas nuclear industry's acquisition by a Japanese nuclear power plant maker and its capital or business tie-up with an overseas company, were announced in succession in 2006. A nuclear power plant maker has played an extremely important role supporting wide technology in all stages of a design, construction, operation and maintenance in a nuclear power generation business. After having surveyed the recent trend of world nuclear power generation situation, a background and the summary of these acquisition/tie-ups made were investigated and analyzed to consider the influence that movement of such an industry gives a world nuclear power generation market. (T. Tanaka)

  5. Spanish Nuclear Industry in Lungmen Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alomar, F.

    1998-01-01

    Spain's Advanced Nuclear Reactors Programs, under DTN's leadership, has meant an active participation the American Design of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants, in both General Electric and Westinghouse Programs. This collaboration has given to the Companies, which directly involved, an in-depth knowledge of both Development Programs, as well as it has allowed to establish relationships with Nuclear Island DTN's coordination. These Companies included a broad sample of Spanish Companies most interest in the Nuclear Field: DTN representing Spanish Utilities with Nuclear Assets; Empresarios Agrupados and INITEC as a Joint Venture, representing Spanish A/E; Equipos Nucleares, S.A., representing Nuclear Components Manufacturers; Tecnatom, representing Nuclear Services and Engineering and CIEMAT as National Laboratory. Taiwan Electric Power has awarded its two 1300 MWe Lungmen Units to General Electric. Knowledge acquired by these Spanish Companies along FOAKE First of kind then Engineering has allowed them to bid for some authorities in Lungmen NPP and in some cases to get important awards. Furthermore, the good working relationship which has been established has made way for other Spanish Companies to bid for other Project Packages. On a case by case basis the response of Spanish manufacturer has been irregular . In some instances manufactures have stopped manufacturing nuclear components, and in other instances a distinct lack of interest has been detected. (Author)

  6. Report of nuclear utility industry responses to Kemeny Commission recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a report of nuclear utility industry progress in responding to the recommendations of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island (The Kemeny Commission). On April 11, 1979, in response to TMI, President Carter established a Commission to conduct '.... a comprehensive study and investigation of the recent accident involving the nuclear power facility on Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania'. The Commission was chaired by Dr. John G. Kemeny, then President of Dartmouth College. (A list of all members of The Kemeny Commission is provided in Attachment to the Appendix ). The report of the commission's findings and recommendations was transmitted to the President in October 1979. During this same period, the nuclear utility industry responded to TMI by creating the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) with a mission to promote the highest levels of safety and reliability - to promote excellence - in the operation of nuclear electric generating plants. In addition, the Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) was established at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI to evaluate the accident and assist in determining the best industry response. In a White House paper (and press release) of December 7 1979, the President announced that he agreed fully with the spirit and intent of al the Kemeny Commission recommendations and requested that the industry and The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) comply with the recommendations. The President also recognized the industry initiative in establishing INPO and called for several actions involving the Institute; the President directed the Department of Energy and other government agencies to provide assistance to INPO and the industry. An overall status of the nuclear utility industry responses to Kemeny Commission recommendations in the key areas directly related to nuclear plant operations is provided below. A more detailed status of industry responses to the

  7. Manpower development in the US nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todreas, N.E.; Foulke, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the history and current status of the university nuclear education sector and the utility training sector of the United States (US) nuclear power industry. Recently, the number of programs in the university nuclear education sector has declined, and the remaining programs are in need of both strong governmental and industrial assistance if they are to remain a stable source for educating nuclear engineers and health physicists to staff the resurgence of the nuclear power industry. The utility training sector has undergone remarkable development since the TMI-2 accident. Programs to recruit, train, and qualify the variety of personnel needed, as well as the steps to accredit these programs, are being developed on a systematic, industry-wide basis. A number of new technologies for educating and training personnel are emerging which may be used to create or improve learning environments. Manpower development for the US nuclear power industry is a shared responsibility among the universities, the nuclear utilities, and the nuclear suppliers. This shared responsibility can continue to be best discharged by enhancement of the interaction among all parties with respect to evaluating the proper level of cognitive development within the utility training program

  8. Applications of Radiation Processing in Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abad, Lucille V.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation processing has long been known as commercially viable technology that can be beneficially used to enhance the characteristics of many materials. Several gamma irradiators and electron beam accelerators are operating worldwide which are utilized for various established industrial applications. These could be used for the following processes: a) radiation crosslinking e.g. crosslinking of wires and cables, heat shrinkable film and tube productions, manufacture of plastic bags and tubings for medical products, pre-curing of automobile tire components, curing of polymeric coatings, etc. b) radiation degradation e.g. Scrap Teflon (Polytetraflouroethylene) to form powders, disinfestations and pasteurization of agricultural products, sterilization of medical products, etc.; and c) radiation grafting e.g. grafted non-woven fabrics for metal adsorbent. Emerging applications for radiation processing include grafted membranes for fuel cell, electrodes, cell sheet for tissue engineering, nanoparticle production, polymer composite synthesis, and fibrous catalyst for biodiesel production. Current researches at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute consist of crosslinking of natural and synthetic polymers for medical application e.g. wound dressing, hemostats, and bioimplants for vesicouretal reflux (VUR); grafting of natural and synthetic fabrics for metal adsorbents; and radiation degradation of carrageenan as plant growth promoter. (author)

  9. Materials of All-Polish Symposium Nuclear Techniques in Industry, Medicine, Agriculture and Environment Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The All-Polish Symposium Nuclear Techniques in Industry, Medicine, Agriculture and Environment Protection is cyclic (in 3 year period) conference being a broad review of state of art and development of all nuclear branches cooperated with industry and other branches of national economy and public life in Poland. The conference has been divided in one plenary session and 8 problem sessions as follow: Radiation technologies of flue gas purification; radiation technologies in food and cosmetic industry; application of nuclear techniques in environmental studies and earth science; radiometric methods in material engineering; isotope tracers in biological studies and medical diagnostics; radiometric industrial measuring systems; radiation detectors and device; nuclear methods in cultural objects examination. The poster section as well as small exhibition have been also organised

  10. Diverting indirect subsidies from the nuclear industry to the photovoltaic industry: Energy and financial returns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenika-Zovko, I.; Pearce, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power and solar photovoltaic energy conversion often compete for policy support that governs economic viability. This paper compares current subsidization of the nuclear industry with providing equivalent support to manufacturing photovoltaic modules. Current U.S. indirect nuclear insurance subsidies are reviewed and the power, energy and financial outcomes of this indirect subsidy are compared to equivalent amounts for indirect subsidies (loan guarantees) for photovoltaic manufacturing using a model that holds economic values constant for clarity. The preliminary analysis indicates that if only this one relatively ignored indirect subsidy for nuclear power was diverted to photovoltaic manufacturing, it would result in more installed power and more energy produced by mid-century. By 2110 cumulative electricity output of solar would provide an additional 48,600 TWh over nuclear worth $5.3 trillion. The results clearly show that not only does the indirect insurance liability subsidy play a significant factor for nuclear industry, but also how the transfer of such an indirect subsidy from the nuclear to photovoltaic industry would result in more energy over the life cycle of the technologies. - Highlights: → The indirect insurance liability subsidy has been quantified over the life cycle of the U.S. nuclear fleet. → It was found to play a significant factor in the economics of the nuclear industry. → A transfer of such an indirect subsidy from the nuclear to photovoltaic industry would result in significantly more energy over the life cycle of the technologies.

  11. Nuclear energy can compete, industry watchers say

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cash, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear power plants with outstanding operating records and cost-conscious management can continue to compete with other forms of generation as the electricity business becomes more competitive. Natural gas-fired units will set the pricing standard with which nuclear power plants must compete

  12. Perspectives of development in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelt, K.

    1987-01-01

    Modern economy cannot do without electricity, and safe and reliable electricity supply cannot do without nuclear power. This implies that the F.R.G. will continue to build nuclear power stations, and as the power stations of the future benefit from the experience gained with existing plant, there will be continuous improvement in terms of safety, pollution control, and economics. (orig.) [de

  13. Master on Nuclear Engineering and Applications (MINA): instrument of knowledge management in the nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herranz, L. E.; Garcia Cuesta, J. C.; Falcon, S.; Casas, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge Management in nuclear industry is indespensable to ensure excellence in performance and safety of nuclear installations. The Master on Nuclear Engineering and Applications (MINA) is a Spanish education venture which foundations and evolution have meant and adaptation to the European Education system and to the domestic and international changes occured in the nuclear environment. This paper summarizes the most relevant aspects of such transformation, its motivation and the final outcome. Finally, it discusses the potential benefit of a closer collaboration among the existing national education ventures in the frame of Nuclear Engineering. (Author)

  14. Supplier quality assurance systems: a study in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, A.J.; Churchill, G.F.; Dale, B.G.

    1988-01-01

    The results are reported of a study which investigated the impact of quality assurance on 13 suppliers to the nuclear industry. The purpose of the study was to determine the benefits and problems of applying quality assurance in the supply of high risk plant items and material for nuclear installations. The paper discusses the problems facing the industry including: multiple audits and inspections, the irritation with having to contend with two quality system standards (namely BS 5750 and BS 5882) and the cost effectiveness of the more stringent quality system and quality control surveillance requirements imposed by the nuclear industry. It is also pointed out that companies supplying non-nuclear industrial customers were dissatisfied with the qualifications, experience and professional competence of some auditors and many inspectors. (author)

  15. Skoda JS's proposal for Slovak nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovec, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation author deals with the structure and revenues of the Skoda JS, a.s., as well as productions of the company for nuclear power industry in the Czech Republic, Ukraine and the Slovak Republic

  16. Development of thermal scanning probe microscopy for the determination of thin films thermal conductivity: application to ceramic materials for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, L.

    2006-10-01

    -reflectance microscope. Our results permit to propose a first estimate of the degradation of the thermal conductivity, caused by an irradiation with energy heavy ions, of the considered ceramics. This estimate is carried out in the field of the electronic collisions and that of the nuclear collisions. This study, first in its kind, revealed that SiC has been degraded much more because of irradiation than other materials. With the exception of ZrC, semi-metal ceramics seem better adapted to the concerned application. (author)

  17. Cyber security best practices for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badr, I.

    2012-01-01

    When deploying software based systems, such as, digital instrumentation and controls for the nuclear industry, it is vital to include cyber security assessment as part of architecture and development process. When integrating and delivering software-intensive systems for the nuclear industry, engineering teams should make use of a secure, requirements driven, software development life cycle, ensuring security compliance and optimum return on investment. Reliability protections, data loss prevention, and privacy enforcement provide a strong case for installing strict cyber security policies. (authors)

  18. The right understanding of nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baetjer, K.; Begemann, K.; Bleck, J.; Boikat, U.; Carbonell, P.; Helmers, H.; Kirchner, J.; Muschol, E.; Scheer, J.; Schmitz-Feuerhake, I.

    1978-09-01

    As the abstractor found himself unable to point out all the errors of the book, the statement on the back cover is cited in full wording: A boom for nuclear power - in the next 10 years, 40 nuclear power plants will be built in West Germany alone. It is a wellprepared boom: For 20 years, the public has heard about 'cheap, safe, and clean, nuclear power. Yet in spite of this, there is an ever increasing resistance of the public which finds itself threatened, misinformed and lost - left alone also by natural scientists who do not speak in the controversy or against the nuclear propaganda. Here is where this book intends to help. It was written by a group of scientists, students and staff of Bremen university. For three years, they have followed the public discussion of the nuclear problem, often acting as experts on behalf of citizen's groups. In this book, they refer to the propaganda leaflet '66 questions - 66 answers - for a better understanding of nuclear power', which has been distributed in 200,000 copies. To each of the questions and answers they give a detailed reply from the point of view of nuclear power plant opponents. With a summarizing epilogue and a list of explanations of abbreviations and keywards. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Numerical and experimental investigations of water hammers in nuclear industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Messahel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear and petroleum industries, supply pipes are often exposed to high pressure loading which can cause to the structure high strains, plasticity and even, in the worst scenario, failure. Fast Hydraulic Transient phenomena such as Water Hammers (WHs are of this type. It generates a pressure wave that propagates in the pipe causing high stress. Such phenomena are of the order of few msecs and numerical simulation can offer a better understanding and an accurate evaluation of the dynamic complex phenomenon including fluid-structure interaction, multi-phase flow, cavitation … For the last decades, the modeling of phase change taking into account the cavitation effects has been at the centre of many industrial applications (chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, … and has a direct impact on the industry as it might cause damages to the installation (pumps, propellers, control valves, …. In this paper, numerical simulation using FSI algorithm and One-Fluid Cavitation models ("Cut-Off" and "HEM (Homogeneous Equilibrium Model Phase-Change" introduced by Saurel et al. [1] of WHs including cavitation effects is presented.

  20. Quality assurance - Lessons learned in the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerzosimo, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    The importance of quality assurance in the nuclear industry has risen dramatically and its impact has increased significantly since the NRC published its Quality Assurance Regulations 10CFR50, Appendix B in 1969. In the intervening years, numerous standards dealing with quality assurance have been published by industry and, in connection with these standards, Regulatory Guides have been published by the NRC incorporating these standards into their regulatory guidance requirements. As a result of the analysis of both the TMI-2 accident and recently found quality deficiencies at construction sites for new nuclear power plants, the NRC staff has identified several areas of programmatic requirements needing upgrading to provide greater confidence in the effectiveness of quality assurance (QA) programs for nuclear power plants. The areas of upgrading are intended to provide overall strengthening of the QA program by expanding its formal coverage to additional items and activities, by improving its organizational independence, by improving staffing levels and qualifications of personnel and last, but certainly not least, by emphasizing the need for licensee management to recognize the value of, create, and maintain an effective QA program. Self-initiated evaluations by prospective applicants for an operating license, plus independent design reviews and construction evaluations, are typical of the additional steps taken to raise the level of confidence in the quality of design and construction. This paper addresses and treats the many lessons learned about quality assurance since TMI-2, and relates the actions planned and taken to the ongoing efforts in fusion technology associated with reactor development and performance demonstration

  1. Contrast variation by dynamic nuclear polarization and time-of-flight small-angle neutron scattering. I. Application to industrial multi-component nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Yohei; Koizumi, Satoshi; Masui, Tomomi; Mashita, Ryo; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Kumada, Takayuki; Takata, Shin-Ichi; Ohishi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at low temperature (1.2 K) and high magnetic field (3.3 T) was applied to a contrast variation study in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) focusing on industrial rubber materials. By varying the scattering contrast by DNP, time-of-flight SANS profiles were obtained at the pulsed neutron source of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). The concentration of a small organic molecule, (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-yl)oxy (TEMPO), was carefully controlled by a doping method using vapour sorption into the rubber specimens. With the assistance of microwave irradiation (94 GHz), almost full polarization of the paramagnetic electronic spin of TEMPO was transferred to the spin state of hydrogen (protons) in the rubber materials to obtain a high proton spin polarization ( P H ). The following samples were prepared: (i) a binary mixture of styrene-butadiene random copolymer (SBR) with silica particles (SBR/SP); and (ii) a ternary mixture of SBR with silica and carbon black particles (SBR/SP/CP). For the binary mixture (SBR/SP), the intensity of SANS significantly increased or decreased while keeping its q dependence for P H = -35% or P H = 40%, respectively. The q behaviour of SANS for the SBR/SP mixture can be reproduced using the form factor of a spherical particle. The intensity at low q (∼0.01 Å -1 ) varied as a quadratic function of P H and indicated a minimum value at P H = 30%, which can be explained by the scattering contrast between SP and SBR. The scattering intensity at high q (∼0.3 Å -1 ) decreased with increasing P H , which is attributed to the incoherent scattering from hydrogen. For the ternary mixture (SBR/SP/CP), the q behaviour of SANS was varied by changing P H . At P H = -35%, the scattering maxima originating from the form factor of SP prevailed, whereas at P H = 29% and P H = 38%, the scattering maxima disappeared. After decomposition of the total SANS according to inverse matrix

  2. Contrast variation by dynamic nuclear polarization and time-of-flight small-angle neutron scattering. I. Application to industrial multi-component nanocomposites1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Yohei; Koizumi, Satoshi; Masui, Tomomi; Mashita, Ryo; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Kumada, Takayuki; Takata, Shin-ichi; Ohishi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at low temperature (1.2 K) and high magnetic field (3.3 T) was applied to a contrast variation study in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) focusing on industrial rubber materials. By varying the scattering contrast by DNP, time-of-flight SANS profiles were obtained at the pulsed neutron source of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). The concentration of a small organic molecule, (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-yl)oxy (TEMPO), was carefully controlled by a doping method using vapour sorption into the rubber specimens. With the assistance of microwave irradiation (94 GHz), almost full polarization of the paramagnetic electronic spin of TEMPO was transferred to the spin state of hydrogen (protons) in the rubber materials to obtain a high proton spin polarization (P H). The following samples were prepared: (i) a binary mixture of styrene–butadiene random copolymer (SBR) with silica particles (SBR/SP); and (ii) a ternary mixture of SBR with silica and carbon black particles (SBR/SP/CP). For the binary mixture (SBR/SP), the intensity of SANS significantly increased or decreased while keeping its q dependence for P H = −35% or P H = 40%, respectively. The q behaviour of SANS for the SBR/SP mixture can be reproduced using the form factor of a spherical particle. The intensity at low q (∼0.01 Å−1) varied as a quadratic function of P H and indicated a minimum value at P H = 30%, which can be explained by the scattering contrast between SP and SBR. The scattering intensity at high q (∼0.3 Å−1) decreased with increasing P H, which is attributed to the incoherent scattering from hydrogen. For the ternary mixture (SBR/SP/CP), the q behaviour of SANS was varied by changing P H. At P H = −35%, the scattering maxima originating from the form factor of SP prevailed, whereas at P H = 29% and P H = 38%, the scattering maxima disappeared. After decomposition of the total SANS according to inverse matrix

  3. Diversified types and functions and present state of the industry of nuclear power plant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanobetti, D.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear plant operators must add to their class-room theoretical education a long in-plant practical training, and since the latter should include all sorts of manipulations, including those leading to accidents, it became obvious since the start of the application of nuclear energy to power production that most of the practical training should be carried out on simulators. The previous experience in flight simulation has greatly influenced the industry of nuclear simulators so that the manufacturers of large nuclear simulators have all had previous experience in the manufacture of flight trainers and simulators. Nuclear simulations come from two distinct periods: one preceding the Three Mile Island incident and one following that event which, as it has turned out to be a landmark in the development of so many aspects of the nuclear industry, has greatly influenced that of simulators. The way in which simulators are classified is first examined, and their use worldwide is discussed. (author)

  4. Nuclear know-how strengthens the competiveness of German industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The plenary speakers from politics and industry appealed to the public not to jeopardize the competitiveness of German industry; Germany had to remain one of the leading indusrialized countries. If nuclear power were given up in Germany, this would have negative impacts on the standard of living, on social security, employment, and on environmental policy. Opting out of nuclear power was tantamount to a decline, stated the German Federal Minister of Economics. The papers presented at the plenary sessions covered the current situation of nuclear power in Germany; the possible acceptance of nuclear technology as a result of advanced technical developments; the status and perspectives of nuclear installations for the nuclear fuel cycle in Germany; the possibilities and limits of reactor safety research. Excerpts from these presentations are covered in a report. (orig./UA) [de

  5. Modelling human resource requirements for the nuclear industry in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofs, Ferry [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG) (Netherlands); Flore, Massimo; Estorff, Ulrik von [Joint Research Center (JRC) (Netherlands)

    2017-11-15

    The European Human Resource Observatory for Nuclear (EHRO-N) provides the European Commission with essential data related to supply and demand for nuclear experts in the EU-28 and the enlargement and integration countries based on bottom-up information from the nuclear industry. The objective is to assess how the supply of experts for the nuclear industry responds to the needs for the same experts for present and future nuclear projects in the region. Complementary to the bottom-up approach taken by the EHRO-N team at JRC, a top-down modelling approach has been taken in a collaboration with NRG in the Netherlands. This top-down modelling approach focuses on the human resource requirements for operation, construction, decommissioning, and efforts for long term operation of nuclear power plants. This paper describes the top-down methodology, the model input, the main assumptions, and the results of the analyses.

  6. The status of ISI in the UK nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bann, T.; Rogerson, A. [AEA Technology, Risley (United Kingdom). Nuclear NDE Services

    1999-08-01

    This paper reviews the status of in-service inspection (ISI) in UK nuclear power generation industry through the experience of its nuclear utilities. The paper is intended to be a summary of some of the most recent and relevant ISI issues facing the utilities and the solutions devised to address those issues. (orig.)

  7. Fallout: the defence, industrial and technological benefits of nuclear deterrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tertrais, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    In the current climate of budgetary restrictions, it is fair to question the weight of military nuclear defence spending. Upon examination, however, nuclear deterrence has numerous military, industrial, and technological benefits. It is, in fact, totally intertwined with the other elements of our defence system. (author)

  8. Industrial organization. The government draws a new french nuclear landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucher, N.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents and explains the new nuclear industry. In order to rationalize Cogema and Framatome are going to be grouped in an holding called Topco with a nuclear pole and an electronic and new technologies pole. Framatome will be split in two parts and its connector technology subsidiary will be introduced on Change. (A.L.B.)

  9. Nuclear power: which industrial approach will preserve a French asset?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machenaud, H.

    2012-01-01

    France's strategic decision in favor of nuclear energy in the 1970's has given rise to an organization of this industry with clearly defined roles and responsibilities for all parties. This has led to the mastering of industrial production of the whole chain from mining to fuel reprocessing and to waste disposal. Nuclear safety was at any stage of the chain the priority number one. The French nuclear industry is present on the international scene and thus maintain its know-how and capacities despite the ups and downs of the nuclear market. Today 240.000 people work in France in the nuclear sector. France has followed a consistent energy policy during the last 50 years and benefits from an important and homogeneous fleet of reactors which has generated a rich feedback experience on reactor operation. The tasks that face the French nuclear industry are: -) to comply with the requirements of the Complementary Safety Assessments that have been performed on all French nuclear facilities, -) to maintain and upgrade the power plants (most of them are facing their 3. decennial overhaul), -) to prepare the nuclear systems of tomorrow, and -) to export the French know-how

  10. Implementation of graphical user interfaces in nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barmsnes, K.A.; Johnsen, T.; Sundling, C.-V.

    1997-01-01

    During recent years a demand has formed for systems that support design and implementation of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) in the control rooms of nuclear power plants. Picasso-3 is a user interface management system supporting object oriented definition of GUIs in a distributed computing environment. The system is currently being used in a number of different application areas within the nuclear industry, such as retrofitting of display systems in simulators and control rooms, education and training applications, etc. Some examples are given of nuclear applications where the Picasso-3 system has been used

  11. Korean nuclear industry hit by corruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo Bin

    2013-12-01

    After a four-month investigation, a court in South Korea has indicted 100 officials and suppliers on corruption charges over bogus safety certifications for parts that were supplied to some of the country's 23 nuclear reactors.

  12. The big awakening of nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2007-01-01

    The Earth's increasing need for energy will lead to a rebirth of nuclear energy all over the world. From now to 2030 the generation of electric power of nuclear origin will double. Beyond, a new generation of reactors, more efficient, will have to take over. In the meantime, reactor manufacturers and power companies, Areva and EdF first, are taking position. The urgency is also to invest in training for the recruitment of young engineers. The next generation of reactors (generation 4) which will be able to better exploit and recycle the fuel with an improved safety, will need 20 more years of research. Two solutions among the sixth proposed are more particularly studied by France: the sodium-cooled FBR and the helium-cooled VHTR. However, the French public opinion asks for more transparency in the nuclear affairs even if no real will for a renunciation of nuclear energy has been expressed so far. (J.S.)

  13. The black book of the French nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, J.

    2011-01-01

    Pro-nuclear lobbies, industrialists and politicians have claim for years that nuclear energy is the safest and most ecological energy source. In this book the author reveals the real hazards and the darkest side of the French nuclear industry: cancers and malformations or mutations risks, hidden by government authorities, serious problems due to power plants aging, impact on the environment with the reprocessing of toxic wastes

  14. Korean Nuclear Society - KNS: to develop nuclear industry to develop Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2016-01-01

    The Korean Nuclear Society (KNS) was founded in 1969 with the purpose of developing nuclear sciences and civil nuclear engineering. KNS has played a fundamental role in the developing of nuclear power turning South Korea into the 6. atomic power in the world in only 40 years. KNS has more than 4300 members from nuclear industry, research centers, and university laboratories. Since 2014 KNS is a partner of the 'nuclear for climate' initiative. Korean nuclear industry has been intensifying its research and developpement capacities since it won the contract for supplying several reactors to the United Arab Emirates. Since 1996, KNS has also been the editor of the journal NUTOPIA (Nuclear Engineering and Technology Journal). Each year KNS organizes a number of conferences on nuclear-related topics. (A.C.)

  15. Internet applications in nuclear power plant operation management; Aplicaciones de internet en la gestion de la explotacion de centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, M. [Empresarios Agrupados, A. I. E. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The use of the Internet is quickly becoming widespread in practically all areas of business and industry. The nuclear industry should not remain indifferent to this new trend. This paper analyses some of the Internet applications that can be easily adapted to nuclear power plant operation management, including. (Author)

  16. Corrosion and alteration of materials from the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Feron, D.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Vernaz, E.; Richet, C.

    2010-01-01

    The control of the corrosion phenomenon is of prime importance for the nuclear industry. The efficiency and the safety of facilities can be affected by this phenomenon. The nuclear industry has to face corrosion for a large variety of materials submitted to various environments. Metallic corrosion operates in the hot and aqueous environment of water reactors which represent the most common reactor type in the world. Progresses made in the control of the corrosion of the different components of these reactors allow to improve their safety. Corrosion is present in the facilities of the back-end of the fuel cycle as well (corrosion in acid environment in fuel reprocessing plants, corrosion of waste containers in disposal and storage facilities, etc). The future nuclear systems will widen even more the range of materials to be studied and the situations in which they will be placed (corrosion by liquid metals or by helium impurities). Very often, corrosion looks like a patchwork of particular cases in its description. The encountered corrosion problems and their study are presented in this book according to chapters representing the main sectors of the nuclear industry and classified with respect to their phenomenology. This monograph illustrates the researches in progress and presents some results of particular importance obtained recently. Content: 1 - Introduction: context, stakes and goals; definition of corrosion; a complex science; corrosion in the nuclear industry; 2 - corrosion in water reactors - phenomenology, mechanisms, remedies: A - uniform corrosion: mechanisms, uniform corrosion of fuel cladding, in-situ measurement of generalized corrosion rate by electrochemical methods, uniform corrosion of nickel alloys, characterization of the passive layer and growth mechanisms, the PACTOLE code - an integrating tool, influence of water chemistry on corrosion and contamination, radiolysis impact on uniform corrosion; B - stress corrosion: stress corrosion cracking

  17. Environmental racism: the US nuclear industry and native Americans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtinen, Ulla

    1997-01-01

    The author argues that the United States nuclear industry has acted in a discriminatory fashion towards Native American peoples and the land they hold as reservations. Both uranium mining and nuclear weapons testing is commonplace and plans now exist to locate a low-level radioactive waste dump in the Mojave desert in California, a sacred site for many native people. Opposition to such plans is growing among the Native Americans, sharpened by their existing commitment to conservation of the environment, but on their own, they are not a lobby powerful enough to oppose the might of the nuclear industry. (UK)

  18. Environmental racism: the US nuclear industry and native Americans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtinen, Ulla [Organization of the Fourth World - First Peoples (Finland)

    1997-03-01

    The author argues that the United States nuclear industry has acted in a discriminatory fashion towards Native American peoples and the land they hold as reservations. Both uranium mining and nuclear weapons testing is commonplace and plans now exist to locate a low-level radioactive waste dump in the Mojave desert in California, a sacred site for many native people. Opposition to such plans is growing among the Native Americans, sharpened by their existing commitment to conservation of the environment, but on their own, they are not a lobby powerful enough to oppose the might of the nuclear industry. (UK).

  19. The Application of Nuclear Technology for a Better World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ita, E.B.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear Technology is widely used in different areas and sector of our economy to better man kind and his environment. Peaceful applications of nuclear technology have several benefits to the world today. It is widely believed that nuclear technology is mainly used mainly for the production of electricity (Nuclear Power Plants – NPPs). Many are not aware of the other numerous benefits of nuclear technology. Nuclear technology can be applied in different fields for numerous benefits. Different sectors Nuclear Technology application can improve the living standard of man and his environment: – Food and Agriculture; – Medicine; – Industrial; – Energy; – Education; — Research and Development; – Environment. The benefits of the application of nuclear technology cannot be over emphasised. These benefits range from the improved quality of purified water we drink, the textiles we wear, improved quality of stored grains for preservation of foods, water analyses, improved transportation system work, drugs production, medical tests and analysis, clean environment through radioisotope techniques etc. The application of nuclear technology also gives a safer, greener, healthier and pollution free environment and atmosphere for human habitation. In my poster, the numerous benefits of the various applications of Nuclear Technology will be clearly enumerated and heighted. (author)

  20. A systematic approach to the training in the nuclear power industry: The need for standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    The five elements of a open-quotes Systematic Approach to Trainingclose quotes (SAT) are analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation. These elements are also present in the effective application of basic process control. The fundamental negative feedback process control loop is therefore an excellent model for a successful, systematic approach to training in the nuclear power industry. Just as standards are required in today's manufacturing and service industries, eg ISO 9000, so too are control standards needed in the training industry and in particular in the training of nuclear power plant staff. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) produced its TECDOC 525 on open-quotes Training to Establish and Maintain the Qualification and Competence of Nuclear Power Plant Operations Personnelclose quotes in 1989 and the American Nuclear Society published its open-quotes Selection, Qualification, and Training of Personnel for Nuclear Power Plants, an American National Standardclose quotes in 1993. It is important that community colleges, training vendors and organizations such as the Instrument Society of America (ISA), who may be supplying basic or prerequisite training to the nuclear power industry, become aware of these and other standards relating to training in the nuclear power industry

  1. Long-range goal setting in the nuclear utility industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, P.M.

    1986-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Power Operation's (INPO's) programs support the industry's efforts to improve performance in nuclear plant safety and reliability. The success of these programs can best be measured by the progress of the industry. As utilities focused their attention on nuclear plant performance, the Institute's goal was to make sure its programs and activities provided the best possible support for these efforts. INPO continues to coordinate an industry-wide plant performance indicator program to assist member utilities in assessing station performance. Closely related to this effort is the nuclear industry's establishment of long-range plant performance goals. The US nuclear utility industry currently sends INPO quarterly data on 28 key performance indicators. INPO analyzes these data and provides periodic reports to its members and participants. Selected highlights of INPO's Performance Indicators for the US Nuclear Utility, dated June 1986, are discussed. Throughout 1985, INPO interacted with members, participants, and three external ad hoc review groups to refine the overall performance indicators and to develop background for each unit. By April 1986, each utility had developed long-term goals for each unit. By April 1986, each utility had developed long-term goals for most of the overall indicators. These goals represent a commitment to achievement of excellence when applied to the day-to-day conduct of plant operations, and provide a framework for action

  2. The future of the nuclear industry: a matter of communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Waal, H.S.

    1993-11-01

    Since the very first successes achieved by the early scientists the infant nuclear industry was plagued by an atmosphere of uncertainty, conflict, anxiety and expectations. After the initial euphoria the Chernobyl accident shocked public opinion and perspectives changed. Nuclear energy is experience by the public in three dimensions. Firstly there are the technical realities of the reactor and its fantastically reduced source of power. Secondly, there is a psychological and political meaning, including the association of modern technology with authority, government, and control. The third dimension is the product of old myths about 'divine secrets', mad scientists dreadful pollution and cosmic apocalypse. To a large extent the nuclear industry is at fault for these emotional connotations. An early lapse in the communication process can be blamed for many of the misconceptions. The nuclear industry lost an opportunity by sticking to 'vagueness'. Recent trends show that a pattern of conditional acceptance is present in public opinion with regard to the nuclear industry. Possible solutions, including better communication, aggressive marketing, and the training of scientists to become communicators, are discussed. A study was done of community attitudes around Koeberg, and it is concluded that the public must be convinced of the fact that nuclear power is clean, safe, cheap and accepted as such by the industrially developed word. 62 refs., 13 figs

  3. Nuclear fuel industry of the republic of Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parfenov, D.; Dara, S.

    2001-01-01

    National Atomic Company Kazatomprom has been established in 1997 by special presidential decree with the purpose to coordinate the former USSR Nuclear Industry enterprises located on the territory of Kazakhstan. The Government of Kazakhstan entrusts the republican nuclear sector's future to Kazatomprom. Although Kazatomprom is a state-owned company and operates on behalf of the government, it is private in terms of ownership, being organized in a form of a closed type joint stock company, and within its structure there are daughter companies with a certain share of private capital. Formally Kazatomprom has started only a few years ago, but it should not create confusion. Because Kazatomprom has only united the USSR traditional nuclear cycle units, which, I want to emphasize for, count as long history as that of the nuclear industry itself. This fact is the guarantee of high quality production culture inherent to the former USSR Defense Industry

  4. The nuclear industry - Subcontracting and servitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliographical note presents a study based on a qualitative survey performed among different involved actors and notably 'external' workers, and on a sociological approach of occupational health. This book analyses the choice of subcontracting for maintenance activities which are fundamental for the safety of nuclear installations. The author first addresses activities performed under irradiation by discussing three specific professions (mechanics in plumbing and piping, equipment controllers specialised in non-destructive testing, workers in nuclear servitudes), by discussing the social division of labour and doses, and by discussing the flexibility of jobs, working time and family life. She discusses and comments the legitimacy of subcontracting by considering issues of competitiveness, safety and radiation protection. The last part addresses the consequences in terms of health of external workers, and in terms of safety of nuclear installations

  5. Industrial applications of laser; Applications industrielles du laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This technical dossier is a result of a collaboration between the CFE and the Power Laser club with the sustain of the French Ministry of Industry. It presents a catalogue of the industrial applications of the laser technology in France with about 80 technical files about companies using this technology in various domains such as: weapons industry, civil engineering, confection, automotive equipments, electrical equipments, medical applications, instrumentation, tools, sheet iron and steel plate industry etc.. (J.S.)

  6. Assessment of industrial energy options based on coal and nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.D.; Bowers, H.I.; Bryan, R.H.; Delene, J.G.; Hise, E.C.; Jones, J.E. Jr.; Klepper, O.H.; Reed, S.A.; Spiewak, I.

    1975-07-01

    Industry consumes about 40 percent of the total primary energy used in the United States. Natural gas and oil, the major industrial fuels, are becoming scarce and expensive; therefore, there is a critical national need to develop alternative sources of industrial energy based on the more plentiful domestic fuels--coal and nuclear. This report gives the results of a comparative assessment of nuclear- and coal-based industrial energy systems which includes technical, environmental, economic, and resource aspects of industrial energy supply. The nuclear options examined were large commercial nuclear power plants (light-water reactors or high-temperature gas-cooled reactors) and a small [approximately 300-MW(t)] special-purpose pressurized-water reactor for industrial applications. Coal-based systems selected for study were those that appear capable of meeting environmental standards, especially with respect to sulfur dioxide; these are (1) conventional firing using either low- or high-sulfur coal with stack-gas scrubbing equipment, (2) fluidized-bed combustion using high-sulfur coal, (3) low- and intermediate-Btu gas, (4) high-Btu pipeline-quality gas, (5) solvent-refined coal, (6) liquid boiler fuels, and (7) methanol from coal. Results of the study indicated that both nuclear and coal fuel can alleviate the industrial energy deficit resulting from the decline in availability of natural gas and oil. However, because of its broader range of application and relative ease of implementation, coal is expected to be the more important substitute industrial fuel over the next 15 years. In the longer term, nuclear fuels could assume a major role for supplying industrial steam. (U.S.)

  7. Biocatalysts: application and engineering for industrial purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemli, Sonia; Ayadi-Zouari, Dorra; Hlima, Hajer Ben; Bejar, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are widely applied in various industrial applications and processes, including the food and beverage, animal feed, textile, detergent and medical industries. Enzymes screened from natural origins are often engineered before entering the market place because their native forms do not meet the requirements for industrial application. Protein engineering is concerned with the design and construction of novel enzymes with tailored functional properties, including stability, catalytic activity, reaction product inhibition and substrate specificity. Two broad approaches have been used for enzyme engineering, namely, rational design and directed evolution. The powerful and revolutionary techniques so far developed for protein engineering provide excellent opportunities for the design of industrial enzymes with specific properties and production of high-value products at lower production costs. The present review seeks to highlight the major fields of enzyme application and to provide an updated overview on previous protein engineering studies wherein natural enzymes were modified to meet the operational conditions required for industrial application.

  8. The EU nuclear industry and FORATOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taipale, T.

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Every human activity involves some risk (transport, medical treatment). No-one can guarantee that accidents will never occur. The industry’s duty and commitment is to ensure safety, to reduce the possibility of an accident and mitigate its consequences. Stringent, independent nuclear safety regulation is essential. We cannot afford to lose nuclear energy in Europe – it is a cost effective and low carbon energy source. Electricity production and distribution does not stop at EU’s borders - need to promote a common pan-European energy market

  9. Expert systems in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Recent developments in expert system technology have led to the question whether such systems could be used for the enhancement of nuclear safety, particularly as advisory system during abnormal plant conditions. This document was produced during the Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) to Demonstrate and Review Expert System Prototypes, which was organized jointly by the International Atomic Energy Agency and British Nuclear Fuels Ltd (BNFL) and held at the BNFL site in Springfields, United Kingdom, from 30 September to 4 October 1991. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 14 papers in this document. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Regulation of the Canadian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gummer, W.K.

    1982-02-01

    This paper reviews the nuclear regulatory process in Canada in the following context. First, the pertinent factors in the present political and economic environment are identified, including both domestic and international matters. Second, the basis for current Atomic Energy Control Board operations is considered, with reference to both the Atomic Energy Control Act (1946) and the proposed Nuclear Control and Administration Act (Bill C-14, 1977). Some specific areas of the regulatory process are discussed in detail to show where ambiguity or uncertainty may arise: these areas are uranium exploration and mining, occupational health and safety, environmental protection, waste management, heavy water plants and transportation

  11. SOVT analysis of the nuclear industry in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez R, E.; Hernandez B, M. C.

    2011-11-01

    In this work the analysis of strengths, opportunities, vulnerabilities and threats (SOVT) of the nuclear industry in Mexico is presented. This industry presents among its strengths that Mexico is a highly electrified country and has a good established normative mark of nuclear security. Although the Secretaria de Energia in Mexico, with base to the exposed in the Programa Sectorial de Energia 2007-2012, is analyzing the convenience of the generation starting from this source, considering the strong technological dependence of the exterior and the limited federal budget dedicated to this field. As a result of the analysis of the SOVT matrix, were found a great number of strengths that threats, although the vulnerabilities list is major to the strengths, the opportunities list is the bigger. Therefore, the nuclear industry can be a sustainable industry, taking the necessary decisions and taking advantage of the detected opportunities. (Author)

  12. Further activities of safety culture toward nuclear transportation industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Y.; Shimakura, D.

    2004-01-01

    On September 30, 1999, a criticality accident occurred at the uranium processing facility of the JCO Co. Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as ''JCO'') Tokai plant, located in Tokaimura, Ibaraki Prefecture. This was an unprecedented accident in Japan's history of peaceful use of nuclear power, resulting in three workers exposed to severe radiation, two of whom died, and the evacuation and enforced indoor confinement of local residents. Nuclear power suppliers must take personal responsibility for ensuring safety. In this connection, the electric power industry, heavy electric machinery manufacturers, fuel fabricators, and nuclear power research organizations gathered together to establish the Nuclear Safety Network (NSnet) in December 1999, based on the resolve to share and improve the level of the safety culture across the entire nuclear power industry and to assure that such an accident never occurs again. NSnet serves as a link between nuclear power enterprises, research organizations, and other bodies, based on the principles of equality and reciprocity. A variety of activities are pursued, such as diffusing a safety culture, implementing mutual evaluation among members, and exchanging safety-related information. Aiming to share and improve the safety culture throughout the entire nuclear power industry, NSnet thoroughly implements the principle of safety first, while at the same time making efforts to restore trust in nuclear power

  13. HRD System and Experience in the Korean Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Byoungkook

    2012-01-01

    Korea began to nurture its nuclear energy pioneers in the 1950s when the government dispatched personnel in research and policy-making areas to foreign institutions. Then in 1959, KAERI was established and now plays a leading role in nuclear technology R and D. In addition, Korea's first research reactor, TRIGA Mark-II, was built and put into operation in 1962. This paved the way for advancements in operation and technical development of nuclear reactors. In turn, these accomplishments led to the birth of Korea's first commercial reactor, Kori Unit 1, in the 1970s, and HRD in the nuclear industry was put on the right track. However, the Korean nuclear industry remained heavily dependent on nuclear exporting countries such as the US, Canada, and France. Already confident in construction, Korea took the lead in building Kori Units 3 and 4 and Ulchin Units 1 and 2 in the 1980s, but the country was still in need of technological self-reliance. In order to achieve this, Korea proactively launched systematic HRD programs and dispatched nuclear professionals to overseas nuclear facilities to secure individuals competent in the areas of NPP operations, plant design, and major equipment manufacturing. Thanks to its diligent endeavors, Korea's nuclear entities established independent nuclear training institutes in the 1990s and began producing a large number of competent personnel. This allowed the country to ensure not only the best operation and maintenance engineers but also the essential nuclear technology required for plant design and equipment manufacturing. Since the beginning of the 21 st century, Korea has been producing its nuclear personnel on its own and exchanging nuclear training instructors and trainees with other organizations in fields where specialized knowledge is needed. Furthermore, Korea is taking comprehensive nuclear HRD measures in response to the rising demand for human resources that result from ongoing construction of NPPs in Korea and the UAE

  14. Manpower requirements in the nuclear power industry, 1982-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.C.

    1982-09-01

    The objective of this study is to project occupational employment needs, created by growth and employee turnover, for the nuclear power industry over the next decade. Employment data for 1981 were collected in a survey conducted by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations of its 60 member utilities. The data were analyzed statistically to identify factors that account for variations in power plant staffing and the number of off-site nuclear support personnel employed by a utility. Total employment in the nuclear power industry is predicted to increase from 54,400 in 1981 to 73,600 in 1991. Nuclear generating capacity will increase from 58 to 124 gigawatts, based on the midline forecast of the Energy Information Administration. The projections assume that current regulations will remain in effect and no new plans for additional generating facilities will be initiated

  15. Nuclear radiation application to nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakarvarti, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    Out of the numerous uses and applications of nuclear radiation, in particular heavy ions, the interaction of radiation with materials have culminated into a gamut of fine tools and technologies for taming the synergetic potential of the interaction. One such field of the immense importance is nanotechnology through nuclear radiation via use of ion-crafted polymeric membranes- so called 'Template Synthesis'. This talk will be addressed to the users of membranes - organic (polymeric) in general, formed through irradiation of polymeric foils with heavy and energetic ions followed by chemical processing leading finally to what is known as 'Track Etch Membranes (TEMs)', and present the review of the innovative uses of these membranes from filtration to electro-kinetic based applications and nano-/micro fabrication of devices- the potent aspect of emerging technologies. The emphasis would be on the dependence of useful and novel usages including applications in nano devices' fabrication. A membrane, with its most comprehensive and clear definition, is an intervening phase separating two phases and/or acting as an active or passive barrier to the transport of matter between phases. The very existence of a membrane relies upon the functionality domain of the pores contained therein. The geometrical traits and morphology of the pore ensembles dictate the applications, which any membrane can serve to. There are variety of membranes being developed and used in myriad of applications in diverse fields of science and technology. The range of commercially available membrane materials is quiet diverse and varies widely in terms of composition, and physical structure. The creation of pores, whether through natural self-assembling phenomenon or man-made processes, might itself be an issue of interest but these are the pore-traits which are fundamentally more important, whether the membrane is being used for sieving-one of the ever most important applications the mankind has been

  16. A review of the evolution of human reliability analysis methods at nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Lécio N. de; Santos, Isaac José A. Luquetti dos; Carvalho, Paulo V.R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of researches on the application of human reliability analysis methods at nuclear industry and its evolution along the years. Human reliability analysis (HRA) is one of the elements used in Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) and is performed as part of PSAs to quantify the likelihood that people will fail to take action, such as errors of omission and errors of commission. Although HRA may be used at lots of areas, the focus of this paper is to review the applicability of HRA methods along the years at nuclear industry, especially in Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). An electronic search on CAPES Portal of Journals (A bibliographic database) was performed. This literature review covers original papers published since the first generation of HRA methods until the ones published on March 2017. A total of 94 papers were retrieved by the initial search and 13 were selected to be fully reviewed and for data extraction after the application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, quality and suitability evaluation according to applicability at nuclear industry. Results point out that the methods from first generation are more used in practice than methods from second generation. This occurs because it is more concentrated towards quantification, in terms of success or failure of human action what make them useful for quantitative risk assessment to PSA. Although the second generation considers context and error of commission in human error prediction, they are not wider used in practice at nuclear industry to PSA. (author)

  17. A review of the evolution of human reliability analysis methods at nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Lécio N. de; Santos, Isaac José A. Luquetti dos; Carvalho, Paulo V.R., E-mail: lecionoliveira@gmail.com, E-mail: luquetti@ien.gov.br, E-mail: paulov@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    This paper reviews the status of researches on the application of human reliability analysis methods at nuclear industry and its evolution along the years. Human reliability analysis (HRA) is one of the elements used in Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) and is performed as part of PSAs to quantify the likelihood that people will fail to take action, such as errors of omission and errors of commission. Although HRA may be used at lots of areas, the focus of this paper is to review the applicability of HRA methods along the years at nuclear industry, especially in Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). An electronic search on CAPES Portal of Journals (A bibliographic database) was performed. This literature review covers original papers published since the first generation of HRA methods until the ones published on March 2017. A total of 94 papers were retrieved by the initial search and 13 were selected to be fully reviewed and for data extraction after the application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, quality and suitability evaluation according to applicability at nuclear industry. Results point out that the methods from first generation are more used in practice than methods from second generation. This occurs because it is more concentrated towards quantification, in terms of success or failure of human action what make them useful for quantitative risk assessment to PSA. Although the second generation considers context and error of commission in human error prediction, they are not wider used in practice at nuclear industry to PSA. (author)

  18. Mechatronics ideas for industrial application

    CERN Document Server

    Szewczyk, Roman; Trojnacki, Maciej; Kaliczyńska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    This book presents recent advances and developments in control, automation, robotics, and measuring techniques. It presents contributions of top experts in the fields, focused on both theory and industrial practice. The particular chapters present a deep analysis of a specific technical problem which is in general followed by a numerical analysis and simulation, and results of an implementation for the solution of a real world problem. The presented theoretical results, practical solutions and guidelines will be useful for both researchers working in the area of engineering sciences and for practitioners solving industrial problems.  

  19. Lessons and future prospects for the nuclear industry in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, John

    1995-01-01

    The most visible portion of the nuclear industry in the United States is its ongoing electrical generation program, in which 109 nuclear plants provide 21% of the nations electrical needs. However, the nuclear industry also includes nuclear medicine, agricultural uses of radiation sources, food irradiation, research, industrial applications of radiation sources, and even nuclear waste clean-up from old facilities and sites. Nuclear proponents need to be far more active in demonstrating to the public the wealth, and breadth, of all of the benefits that accrue from nuclear radiation even beyond the generation of electricity. We should also make known the damage that would be done to everyday lives if we were to lose the nuclear industry. There are certain issues which cut across all nuclear industries: the regulation of nuclear facilities, the disposal of wastes, the provision of isotopes, and the attitude and policy of the U. S. Government. It is necessary to understand these issues in order to formulate a proactive policy and a manner in which to conduct our advocacy of the beneficial uses of nuclear science and technology. The economic benefits, in terms of dollars and jobs, of the nuclear industry in sectors other than the power program are much larger than in the power program, and are not subject to the same hysterical opposition that has affected the power sector for the past twenty years. Moreover, industrial applications of nuclear radiation are so pervasive throughout the U. S. economy that they affect everyone. These applications have much less visibility than the power program, but they have some of the same problems. The non-power nuclear industry dose have its detractors, and, for example, the issue of low-level waste disposal, in particular, cuts across all sectors of the industry -- potentially damaging to a wide-ranging set of economic factors. Headlines seem to indicate that the end of the nuclear industry is at hand. Yet, public opinion polls

  20. Tackling the nuclear manpower shortage: industry, educators must work together

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witzig, W.

    1981-01-01

    A 50% decline in graduate enrollment and an increase to 50% of foreign nationals among the nuclear engineering students since 1973 at Pennsylvania State University is typical of national trends, which have led to the closing of 13 undergraduate programs across the country. Penn State's proximity to Three Mile Island had less effect than its interactions with high schools and utilities in keeping the nuclear program as strong as it is. Penn State operates three separate career programs to interest high school students in a nuclear career. Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) educational assistance reflects industry interest, but more scholarships are needed to broaden student awareness

  1. Tower of Babel: A special report on the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overton, J.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of the report was to reveal the scope of the nuclear industry in the south and the importance of the region to the nuclear dream/nightmare. The report was divided into three sections: the first detailed the south's involvement in each phase of the fuel cycle, from uranium mining to waste disposal. The second section focused on the region's private electric utility companies, which use their entrenched political and financial connections to buttress the crumbling support for nuclear power. The third section explored public power agencies purchasing a share of privately built nuclear reactors

  2. NIC (Nuclear Industry in China) exhibition. Press file; Exposition NIC (Nuclear Industry in China). Dossier de presse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-27

    Framatome participated to the NIC exhibition which took place in Beijing (China) on March 1998. This press dossier was distributed to visitors. It presents in a first part the activities of the Framatome group in people`s republic of China (new constructions (Daya Bay, Ling Ao project), technological cooperation and contracts in the nuclear domain, technology transfers in the domain of nuclear fuels, activities and daughter companies in the domain of industrial equipments, Framatome Connectors International (FCI) daughter company in the domain of connectors engineering). Then, the general activities of Framatome in the nuclear, industrial equipment, and connectors engineering domains are summarized in the next 3 parts. (J.S.)

  3. Industrial applications of thermal sprayed coatings in Venezuelan steelmaking industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liscano, S; Gil, L; Nuñez, E; Zerpa, R

    2013-01-01

    The metal components subjected to high temperature conditions, abrasive wear, corrosion, impact, etc.; tend to present degradation of manufacturing material, causing the failure imminent of the component. One of the alternatives to minimize or eliminate such effect is the application of ceramic coatings, which are thermal insulators and exhibit high mechanical strength. Its extreme hardness, coupled with the low friction properties and chemical stability, allowing its use in a wide variety of applications. Therefore, the following paper describes the application of thermal sprayed coatings obtained by HVOF and Plasma technologies like alternative to protect the metallic equipment in different venezuelan industrial sectors, such as to operate under aggressive conditions of service, such as the steelmaking nationals industries. This study presents applications cases of ceramic-based coatings, in order to minimize the sticking of metallic material in components of reduction reactor of FINMET® and MIDREXTM process

  4. Industrial Personal Computer based Display for Nuclear Safety System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Aram; Jo, Jung Hee; Kim, Ki Beom; Cheon, Sung Hyun; Cho, Joo Hyun; Sohn, Se Do; Baek, Seung Min

    2014-01-01

    The safety display of nuclear system has been classified as important to safety (SIL:Safety Integrity Level 3). These days the regulatory agencies are imposing more strict safety requirements for digital safety display system. To satisfy these requirements, it is necessary to develop a safety-critical (SIL 4) grade safety display system. This paper proposes industrial personal computer based safety display system with safety grade operating system and safety grade display methods. The description consists of three parts, the background, the safety requirements and the proposed safety display system design. The hardware platform is designed using commercially available off-the-shelf processor board with back plane bus. The operating system is customized for nuclear safety display application. The display unit is designed adopting two improvement features, i.e., one is to provide two separate processors for main computer and display device using serial communication, and the other is to use Digital Visual Interface between main computer and display device. In this case the main computer uses minimized graphic functions for safety display. The display design is at the conceptual phase, and there are several open areas to be concreted for a solid system. The main purpose of this paper is to describe and suggest a methodology to develop a safety-critical display system and the descriptions are focused on the safety requirement point of view

  5. Some applications of radioactivity and of nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This document presents various applications of radioactivity. It first addresses the medical field with applications in imagery (principles, used compounds, positron emission tomography, tumour detection, study of brain operation), applications in therapy (biological effects of radiations, principles of radiotherapy, struggle against cancer, notably by proton therapy), and applications in sterilisation and microbiological decontamination of instruments and medical products. It evokes applications in agriculture (irradiation of fruits and vegetables, vegetable conservation), in industry (production of new and stronger materials by irradiation, analysis by activation, thickness, density or homogeneity gauges), in arts (analysis of statues, use of gamma-graphy on dense objects, decontamination by irradiation), and in science (carbon 14 dating). It presents nuclear fission and ways to control it, recalls the main scientific discoveries and their consequences. It describes energy production based on nuclear fission (description of nuclear reactor core, of waste processing), and on nuclear fusion (principle, Tokamak examples with JET and ITER, brief presentation of laser fusion)

  6. The technical and industrial evolutions in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rougeau, J.P.; Guais, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The fuel cycle industry is a vital part of nuclear energy generation. Producers in every step of this industry, from uranium to reprocessing are working to adapt their products and services both to the more and more competitive conditions of the market and to the utilities evoluting specific needs. For the next decade, the main trend is uranium economy and reduction of industrial costs. For the longer term, the difficult prevision of nuclear energy developments, in particular with new types of reactors necessitates a true capacity of adaptation both from the utilities and from the fuel cycle industry. Cogema has already demonstrated the ability to adapt its industrial capabilities and therefore can prepare confidently for the future challenges [fr

  7. Examination of pump failure data in the nuclear power industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casada, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-01

    There are several elements that are critical to any program which is used to optimize the availability and reliability of process equipment. Perhaps the most important elements are routine monitoring and predictive maintenance elements. In order to optimize equipment monitoring and predictive maintenance, it is necessary to fundamentally and thoroughly understand the principal failure modes for the equipment and the effectiveness of alternative monitoring methods. While these observations are general in nature, they are certainly true for the {open_quotes}heart{close_quotes} of fluid systems - pumps. In recent years, particularly within the last decade, the capabilities and ease of use of previously existing pump diagnostic technologies, such as vibration monitoring and oil analysis, have improved dramatically. Newer technologies, such as thermal imaging, have been found effective at detecting certain undesirable or degraded conditions, such as misalignment and overheated bearings or packing. The ASME Code and NRC regulatory requirements have been, like essentially all similar code and regulatory bodies, conservative in their adoption or endorsement of newer technologies. The requirements prescribed by the Code and endorsed by the NRC have, in their essence, changed only minimally over more than a dozen years. As a follow-on to studies of check valve failure experience in the nuclear industry that have proven useful in identifying the effectiveness of alternative monitoring methods, a study of nuclear industry pump failure data has been conducted. The results of this study, conducted for the NRC by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, are presented. The historical effectiveness of both regulatory required and voluntarily implemented pump monitoring programs are shown. The distribution of pump failures by application, affected area, and level of significance are indicated. Apparent strengths and weaknesses of alternative monitoring methods are discussed.

  8. Industrial co-determination and nuclear law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, E.

    1987-01-01

    The author deals with the question which consequences atomic security conditions have on industrial co-determination. With regard to the security purpose in sec. 1 no. 2 Atomic Energy Act he comes to the conclusion that only the operator is competent to make decisions and that in this respect the co-determination of the works council is excluded. (WG) [de

  9. Technological and industrial applications of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitkamp, C.

    1976-07-01

    Technological and industrial applications of neutrons are reviewed except applications in power generation, biology and medicine, and solid-state research. Techniques are grouped in three main categories: isotope production, material testing, and material analysis. Following a brief description of the different methods, an attempt is made to assess their applicability and to point out current developments. (orig.) [de

  10. Technological and industrial applications of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitkamp, C.

    1977-01-01

    Technological and industrial applications of neutrons are reviewed except applications in power generation, biology and medicine, and solid-state research. Techniques are grouped in three main catagories: material production, material testing, and material analysis. Following a brief description of the different methods, an attempt is made to assess their applicability and to point out current developments. (author)

  11. Actual state of the nuclear industry in Japan and trends of nuclear development in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear industry in Japan established a fixed foundation as a large complex system industry by elapsing about forty years since beginning of its development at top of 1930s. For Japan with little energy resources, nuclear power generation is one of essential choices because not only of keeping energy security but also of response to global warming problem such as global warming protection. Then, in order to intend to promote sound development of the nuclear industry in Japan, further upgrading of technology aimed at maintenance and improvement of safety and formation of understanding and agreement of the peoples must be established. Here was introduced a report on actual state of the nuclear industry in Japan in 1997 fiscal year prepared on February, 1999 by the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum. (G.K.)

  12. Developing industrial infrastructures to support a programme of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This Guidebook is intended to offer assistance in the many considerations and decisions involved in preparing the national industry for participation in a nuclear power programme. The heavy financial investment, the setting up of certain infrastructures many years ahead of plant construction, plus the high level of technology involved require early and systematic planning. A further purpose of this Guidebook is to serve particularly those decision makers and planners in the various governmental authorities, the technological institutions and in the industries likely to be involved in a nuclear project. These industries include the services of the national engineering resources, the domestic design and manufacturing groups as well as the civil construction companies. These will be responsible for plant erection, testing and commissioning and most of all for the establishment of a framework for quality assurance. All of these are the components of an essential infrastructure necessary to raise the standards of the national industry and to displace increasingly foreign suppliers to the extent possible. In addition, this Guidebook should help to show some of the implications, consequences and options involved in a nuclear power programme. It does not consider the basic decisions for going nuclear, nor does it review the choice of the technology or nuclear process selected for the programme. Instead, it limits itself to a consideration of the nuclear power plant and its essential cycle activities. Figs and tabs

  13. On industrial application of structural reliability theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoft-Christensen, P

    1998-06-01

    In this paper it is shown that modern structural reliability theory is being successfully applied to a number of different industries. This review of papers is in no way complete. In the literature there is a large number of similar applications and also application not touched on in this presentation. There has been some concern among scientists from this area that structural reliability theory is not being used by industry. It is probably correct that structural reliability theory is not being used by industry as much as it should be used. However, the work by the ESReDA Working Group clearly shows the vary wide application of structural reliability theory by many different industries. One must also have in mind that industry often is reluctant to publish data related to safety and reliability. (au) 32 refs.

  14. On industrial application of structural reliability theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoft-Christensen, P.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper it is shown that modern structural reliability theory is being successfully applied to a number of different industries. This review of papers is in no way complete. In the literature there is a large number of similar applications and also application not touched on in this presentation. There has been some concern among scientists from this area that structural reliability theory is not being used by industry. It is probably correct that structural reliability theory is not being used by industry as much as it should be used. However, the work by the ESReDA Working Group clearly shows the vary wide application of structural reliability theory by many different industries. One must also have in mind that industry often is reluctant to publish data related to safety and reliability. (au)

  15. 20th survey on the state of nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc. has carried out a survey on the actual state of nuclear power industry in the fiscal year 1978, on expenditures, proceeds, personnel and future outlook in the enterprises of electric power, mining and manufacturing, and trading. The aggregate proceeds of yen 581,500 million in the mining and manufacturing industries exceeded the expenditures of yen 568,900 million by yen 12,600 million. This excess in proceeds followed that in the preceding year, for the first time in two consecutive years. In contrast, the backlog dropped to 3.2 years equivalent from 4.3 years in the preceding year. Together with the rough going in new installation of nuclear power plants, the nuclear power industry may thus be termed ''takeoff in mist.'' The results of the 20th survey are given; and also the summarized results of a survey on the business attitudes of nuclear supplier industries, and buyers' guide in nuclear field are published. (J.P.N.)

  16. Current Status of Non-Electric Applications of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Joon; Lee, Jun; Lee, Tae Hoon

    2009-05-01

    IAEA Technical Meeting(I3-TM-37394) on 'Non-Electric Applications of Nuclear Energy' has been successfully held from March 3 to 6 in 2009 at KAERI/INTEC. The 24 experts from 12 countries participated in this meeting and provided 17 presentations and their opinions and comments in desalination, hydrogen production, and heat application sessions. All of the participants from 12 countries agreed that nuclear power should be the potential carbon-free energy source to replace crude oil and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the fields of non-electric applications such as desalination, hydrogen production, district heating, and industrial processes applications

  17. Industrial applications of the Kalman filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auger, François; Hilairet, Mickael; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2013-01-01

    The Kalman filter has received a huge interest from the industrial electronics community and has played a key role in many engineering fields since the 70s, ranging, without being exhaustive, trajectory estimation, state and parameter estimation for control or diagnosis, data merging, signal...... processing and so on. This paper provides a brief overview of the industrial applications and implementation issues of the Kalman filter in six topics of the industrial electronics community, highlighting some relevant reference papers and giving future research trends....

  18. JAIF's 23rd nuclear industry survey: strengthening industrial foundations under low economic growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Each year since the beginning of nuclear development in Japan, Japan Atomic Industrial Forum has conducted the survey of the nuclear-related aspects in mining and manufacturing industries, electric utilities, trading firms, etc., regarding their expenditures, sales and personnel. The results of the 23rd survey for fiscal 1981 (April, 1981, to March, 1982,) are described. The salient points in the year, as compared with fiscal 1980, are as follows: (trend in expenditures) nuclear-related expenditures exceeded yen2 trillion, up 12 %; the operation and maintenance costs of electric utilities varied, but overall, up 25 %; the nuclear-related expenditures of mining and manufacturing industries were up 34 %; (trend in sales) the new record in mining and manufacturing industries - the sales topped yen1 trillion; the sales of reactor equipments rose by 59 %; the sales by mining and manufacturing industries to electric utilities up 42 %; the nuclear-related exports of mining and manufacturing industries grew by 13 %; the revenues and sales exceeded the expenditures in mining and manufacturing industries. (Mori, K.)

  19. Deregulation and internationalisation - impact on the Swedish nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, Sverre R.

    2010-01-01

    The deregulation of the Swedish electricity market in 1996 was well known in advance, and the nuclear power plants in Sweden, as well as their main suppliers, made early preparations for a this new situation. In a study - performed by the author at Malardalen University in Sweden - it is concluded that the electricity industry, including the nuclear power plants, was fundamentally transformed in conjunction with market liberalisation. Two large foreign companies, E-on and Fortum, entered the Swedish market and became part-owners of the nuclear plants. After deregulation, the electricity market in Sweden is dominated by these two companies and the large national company Vattenfall. Similarly, Vattenfall has recently grown into an international energy company, acquiring generation capacity in Northern Europe outside of Sweden, including nuclear power plants in Germany. Restructuring of the nuclear industry on the supplier side started in the 1980's, when the Swedish company ASEA and BBC of Switzerland merged to become ABB. Several years later the Swedish nuclear plant supplier ABB-Atom became part of Westinghouse Electric Company, today owned by Toshiba. The Swedish experience thus confirms an international trend of mergers and consolidation in the nuclear industry. (authors)

  20. The safety of a nuclear industry in South Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, D.J.

    2016-01-01

    On 19 March 2015, the South Australian Government established a Royal Commission to consider and analyse the potential of South Australia to further participate in the nuclear fuel cycle, whether through the expansion of the current level of exploration, extraction and milling of uranium (the only parts of the nuclear power industry that are currently allowed in Australia) or by undertaking the conversion and enrichment of materials for the nuclear fuel cycle, the generation of electricity from nuclear fuels and/or the management, storage and disposal of nuclear wastes. This provides a timely opportunity to review the performance of the nuclear industry throughout the world, particularly in the safety of electricity generation and waste management, showing that - despite misconceptions about radiological risks and the significance of the accidents that have occurred - the record of this industry is exceptionally good. The Federal and South Australian State governments both have the policy that uranium mining is acceptable providing it is properly regulated. The success of this policy suggests that it is exactly the policy that should be adopted for all other parts of the nuclear fuel cycle, including the generation of electricity.

  1. Deregulation and internationalisation - impact on the Swedish nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haukeland, Sverre R. [Swedish Nuclear Society, Vattenfall Research and Development, 162 89 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    The deregulation of the Swedish electricity market in 1996 was well known in advance, and the nuclear power plants in Sweden, as well as their main suppliers, made early preparations for a this new situation. In a study - performed by the author at Malardalen University in Sweden - it is concluded that the electricity industry, including the nuclear power plants, was fundamentally transformed in conjunction with market liberalisation. Two large foreign companies, E-on and Fortum, entered the Swedish market and became part-owners of the nuclear plants. After deregulation, the electricity market in Sweden is dominated by these two companies and the large national company Vattenfall. Similarly, Vattenfall has recently grown into an international energy company, acquiring generation capacity in Northern Europe outside of Sweden, including nuclear power plants in Germany. Restructuring of the nuclear industry on the supplier side started in the 1980's, when the Swedish company ASEA and BBC of Switzerland merged to become ABB. Several years later the Swedish nuclear plant supplier ABB-Atom became part of Westinghouse Electric Company, today owned by Toshiba. The Swedish experience thus confirms an international trend of mergers and consolidation in the nuclear industry. (authors)

  2. Evaluation of network structures and protocols for nuclear-specific applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahedi, P.

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of industrial implementations of network structures associated with nuclear-specific applications is the main focus of this paper. Establishing numerous network structures currently used in nuclear industry, this project analyzes the functionality and reliability of different structures. The communication structures studied in this paper include Fieldbus and Modbus Communication Protocols, Object Linking and Embedding process control (OPC), Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) and Net-DDE. This paper focuses on identifying the potential problems in applying various network structures to nuclear industry to enable a nuclear-specific network structure to be developed for the fast growing nuclear industry. (author)

  3. Industrial applications of neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felcher, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron diffraction (or, to be more general, neutron scattering) is a most versatile and universal tool, which has been widely employed to probe the structure, the dynamics and the magnetism of condensed matter. Traditionally used for fundamental research in solid state physics, this technique more recently has been applied to problems of immediate industrial interest, as illustrated in examples covering the main fields of endeavour. 14 refs., 14 figs

  4. Noise thermometry for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Legrand, A.; Villard, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiations on conventional thermocouples (type K, C and N) mainly used in irradiation experiments may create significant drifts of the signals. In order to solve these difficulties, the 'Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique' (CEA) has started to develop and qualify in laboratory conditions a miniature device, which combines a noise thermometer and thermocouples, for a future application in a research reactor. In this paper, a particular approach of a combined noise thermometer- thermocouples is described. Although the aim of the method is to cover temperatures over 1000 C, present measurements are realized in laboratory at 300 C which is the mean temperature in materials irradiation experiments. (authors)

  5. The industrial applications of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This report presents all industrial applications of ionizing radiations in France, for food preservation, radiosterilization of drugs, medical materials and cosmetic products, for radiation chemistry of polymers. This report also describes the industrial plants of irradiation (electron, cobalt 60). Finally, it explains the legal and safety aspects

  6. Nuclear analytical techniques for on-line elemental analysis in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    This report is the result of an advisory group meeting held in Espoo, Finland, 1-5 June, 1987. The purpose of the meeting was to assess the present status and development of nuclear analytical techniques used for industrial process control. The report gives an overview of the different nuclear techniques used for process control and the most important applications. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 7 papers presented at the meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Risk management of knowledge loss in nuclear industry organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-07-01

    Maintaining nuclear competencies in the nuclear industry and nuclear regulatory authorities will be one of the most critical challenges in the near future. As many nuclear experts around the world are retiring, they are taking with them a substantial amount of knowledge and corporate memory. The loss of such employees who hold knowledge critical to either operations or safety poses a clear internal threat to the safe and reliable operation of nuclear facilities. This publication is intended for senior and middle level managers of nuclear industry operating organizations and provides practical information on knowledge loss risk management. The information provided in this it is based upon the actual experiences of Member State operating organizations and is intended to increase awareness of the need to: develop a strategic approach and action plans to address the potential loss of critical knowledge and skills; provide processes and in conducting risk assessments to determine the potential for loss of critical knowledge caused by the loss of experienced workers; and enable nuclear organizations to utilize this knowledge to improve the skill and competence of new and existing workers In 2004, the IAEA published a report entitled The Nuclear Power Industry's Ageing Workforce: Transfer of Knowledge to the Next Generation (IAEA-TECDOC-1399). That report highlighted some of the knowledge management issues in Member States resulting from the large number of retiring nuclear power plant personnel who had been involved with the commissioning and initial operation of nuclear power plants. This publication complements that report by providing a practical methodology on knowledge loss risk management as one element of an overall strategic approach to workforce management which includes work force planning, recruitment, training, leadership development and knowledge retention

  8. Specific features of occupational medicine in nuclear research and industry; Specificites de la medecine du travail dans la recherche et l'industrie nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraud, J.M. [CEA, Dir. des Ressources Humaines et des Relations Sociales, 75 - Paris (France); Quesne, B. [Cogema, Coordination Medicale, 78 - Velizy Villacoublay (France)

    2003-07-01

    Measures to prevent the exposure of personnel to ionising radiation were taken as soon as the first nuclear laboratories were set up. This branch of occupational preventive medicine has since kept pace with advances in research and in the industrial applications of nuclear energy. (authors)

  9. Accident consequence analysis models applied to licensing process of nuclear installations, radioactive and conventional industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senne Junior, Murillo; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Jordao, Elizabete

    2002-01-01

    The industrial accidents happened in the last years, particularly in the eighty's decade, had contributed in a significant way to call the attention to government authorities, industry and society as a whole, demanding mechanisms for preventing episodes that could affect people's safety and environment quality. Techniques and methods already thoroughly used in the nuclear, aeronautic and war industries were then adapted for performing analysis and evaluation of the risks associated to other industrial activities, especially in the petroleum, chemistry and petrochemical areas. Some models for analyzing the consequences of accidents involving fire and explosion, used in the licensing processes of nuclear and radioactive facilities, are presented in this paper. These models have also application in the licensing of conventional industrial facilities. (author)

  10. Chapter 13. Industrial Application of Tap Water Hydraulic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn; Adelstorp, Anders

    1997-01-01

    Design and application of modern pure tap water components and systems in industries, in particular food processing industry.......Design and application of modern pure tap water components and systems in industries, in particular food processing industry....

  11. Technology transfer of nuclear techniques and nucleonic control systems in the mineral industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    Among the many beneficial applications of radiation and radioisotopes in industry which are now well established in advanced countries, the applications of nuclear techniques and nucleonic control systems in the mineral industry have great potential for developing Member States. The use of nucleonic on-stream analyzers in the coal industry has resulted in enormous technical and economic benefits in addition to minimization of environmental pollution. Large savings have also resulted from the use of such analyzers in the processing of other minerals. Nuclear borehole logging techniques have demonstrated great potential in oil and gas evaluation. Radiotracer investigations have led to process optimisation and trouble shooting in various stages in ore processing and metallurgy. Though the technical and economic benefits of applications of nuclear techniques in the mineral industry are well recognised, technology transfer in these areas has been hampered by a variety of factors. In order to review the status and trends in nuclear techniques and nucleonic control systems in the mineral industry and the problems and considerations in their technology transfer to developing Member States, the IAEA convened an Advisory Group Meeting in Bombay, India, 15-19 January 1990. The present publication is based on the 7 contributions presented at this meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Establishing a Nuclear Industrial Structure The Spanish Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, L.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear industry is nationalistic all over the world. This fact is at first glance rather surprising, since one would guess that the localization drive should start with segments of industry of a less sophisticated nature. The reason probably lies on the fact that nuclear disciplines are new and can be conceived as an easier task for planners than other techniques where industrial relationships are already established. The process of increasing domestic content has important implications and crucial decisions have to be made. A general process of technology transfer has to be assured, investments have to be made in new plant and a sizable number of engineers and technicians has to be trained. Technology transfer in the nuclear field seems to be the practical extent dictated by the availability of raw materials and the economy of scale for some components. Table V lists the content achieved in specific classes of equipment. The process has been successful and has enabled Spanish Industry to be present in the world market. Countries embarking in similar programs have expressed interest in the Spanish process as representative of medium development industry that, by determination and serious work, has achieved an advanced status, overcoming deficiencies that are not normally encountered in more developed societies. Spanish Industry is of course ready to share its experience with interested parties, thus contributing to orient local industries by advising them on the successes achieved as an example to follow, and the mistakes made, to prevent occurrence

  13. Gas processing in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovach, J.L.

    1995-02-01

    This article is a brief overview of code requirements in the nuclear air cleaning arena. NRC standards, which employ the various ASME codes, are noted. It is also noted that DOE facilities do not fall under the purview of the NRC and that DOE facilities (especially fuel cycle facilities) typically have broader gas processing activities than for power reactors. The typical differences between DOE facilities` and power reactor facilities` gas processing needs are listed, as are DOE facility components not covered by the ASME AG-1 code.

  14. Industrial application of radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashi Sasaki

    1993-01-01

    The contents are advantages of radiation processes - a solvent-free system, less energy consumative, higher production rate, processability at ambient temperature; electron beams vs. ultraviolet curing; applications -broad spectrum of markets use radiation curable materials

  15. HTGR technology and its industrial applications in INET, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yingzhong; Wang Dazhong; Zhong Daxin; Gao Zuying; Qing Zenya

    1988-01-01

    Several design HTGR studies have been performed in the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (China). In the first phase a 100 MWt HTGR thorium thermal breeder and a HTGR core with thorium pebble-bed was designed. In the second phase a project on application of HTGR's for nuclear process steam production for heavy oil recovery and chemical industry has been initiated. The selected HTGR design for this project is the modular type pebble-bed reactor with the power of 200-500 MWt. The experiment and developmental work carried out in China on HTGR's since 1973 are summarized in this report. 7 refs, 4 tabs

  16. A comparative analysis of managing radioactive waste in the Canadian nuclear and non-nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batters, S.; Benovich, I.; Gerchikov, M.

    2011-01-01

    Management of radioactive waste in nuclear industries in Canada is tightly regulated. The regulated nuclear industries include nuclear power generation, uranium mining and milling, nuclear medicine, radiation research and education and industrial users of nuclear material (e.g. radiography, thickness gauges, etc). In contrast, management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) waste is not regulated by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), with the exception of transport above specified concentrations. Although these are radioactive materials that have always been present in various concentrations in the environment and in the tissues of every living animal, including humans, the hazards of similar quantities of NORM radionuclides are identical to those of the same or other radionuclides from regulated industries. The concentration of NORM in most natural substances is so low that the associated risk is generally regarded as negligible, however higher concentrations may arise as the result of industrial operations such as: oil and gas production, mineral extraction and processing (e.g. phosphate fertilizer production), metal recycling, thermal electric power generation, water treatment facilities. Health Canada has published the Canadian Guidelines for the Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM). This paper presents a comparative analysis of the requirements for management of radioactive waste in the regulated nuclear industries and of the guidelines for management of NORM waste. (author)

  17. Fostering of Innovative Talents Based on Disciplinary Construction: HRD Strategy of Chinese Nuclear Power Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Yuanwei

    2014-01-01

    Workforce challenge to nuclear power industry: • We are facing the aging workforce and talent loss since the tough time of nuclear power industry. • Professional workforce fostering in nuclear power industry always needs a long period of time. • Professional workforce fostering in nuclear power industry is a systematic and interdisciplinary work. Talents fostering in nuclear power industry: Major measures → national overall planning; engineering practice; knowledge management; disciplinary construction; cooperation and communication

  18. Nuclear energy industry in Russia promoting global strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masaharu

    2001-01-01

    Since former USSR disintegrated to birth new Russia on December, 1991, it already passed ten years. As Russian economic hardship affected its nuclear energy development, No.1 reactor of the Rostov nuclear power station (VVER-1000) established its full power operation on September, 2001 after passing eight years of pausing period as a Russian nuclear power station, at dull development of nuclear energy in the world. When beginning of its commercial operation, scale of nuclear power generation under operation in Russia will reach to the fourth one in the world by getting over the one in Germany. Russia also begins international business on reprocessing of spent fuel and intermittent storage. And, Russia positively develops export business of concentrated uranium and nuclear fuel, too. Furthermore, Russia shows some positive initiatives on export of nuclear power station to China, Iran and India, and development on advanced nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel cycle forecast to future. Here was introduced on international developmental development of nuclear energy industry activated recently at delayed time for this ten years. (G.K.)

  19. Overview of the Russian nuclear industry; Le panorama nucleaire russe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-02-15

    In 2004, President Poutine decided to replace the atomic energy ministry (Minatom) by the federal atomic energy agency (Rosatom). Several projects were launched during the next two years which aimed at bringing back Russia to the fore front of the world leaders of nuclear energy use and nuclear technology export. In 2007, Rosatom agency was changed to a public holding company and a new company, named Atomenergoprom, was created which gathers all civil nuclear companies (AtomEnergoMash for the exploitation of power plants, Technabsexport (Tenex) specialized in enrichment or Atomstryexport in charge of export activities). Thus, Rosatom is at the head of all civilian and military nuclear companies, of all research centers, and of all nuclear and radiological safety facilities. In 2006, Russian nuclear power plants supplied 15.8% of the whole power consumption. Russia wishes to develop its nuclear program with the construction of new reactors in order to reach a nuclear electricity share of 25% from now to 2020. This paper presents first the 2007 institutional reform of the Russian atomic sector, and the three sectorial federal programmes: 1 - development of the nuclear energy industrial complex for the 2007-2010 era and up to 2015 (future power plants, nuclear fuel centers and reactor prototypes), 2 - nuclear safety and radioprotection for the 2008-2015 era (waste management, remedial actions, radiation protection), 3 - military program (confidential). Then, the paper presents: the international actions (export of Russian technology, cooperation agreements, non-proliferation), the situation of the existing nuclear park (reactors in operation, stopped, under construction and in project), the fuel cycle activities (production of natural uranium, enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste management), the nuclear R and D in Russia, and the nuclear safety authority. (J.S.)

  20. Human factors aspects of advanced instrumentation in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    An important consideration in regards to the use of advanced instrumentation in the nuclear industry is the interface between the instrumentation system and the human. A survey, oriented towards identifying the human factors aspects of digital instrumentation, was conducted at a number of United States (US) and Canadian nuclear vendors and utilities. Human factors issues, subsumed under the categories of computer-generated displays, controls, organizational support, training, and related topics were identified. 20 refs., 2 tabs

  1. Industrial inspection in a nuclear environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouy, Alain.

    1979-01-01

    The first inspection is carried out at the level of research and the manufacturre of prototypes. The mechanical performance of the main components, especially those in class one, are checked by methods based on combined knowledge of mechanical, numerical and data processing problems. Such methods are practiced by highly specialised teams. At the manufacturing levels, industrial inspection remains very conventional. Almost all the components are subjected to non-destructive testing (such as X-ray, ultrasounds, magnetic testing, sweating, eddy currents...); destructive testing is applied to samples from the test-bar (tensile, impact, fatigue, corrosion tests...) special attention is given to welding operations [fr

  2. A. The nuclear power industry in U.S.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The nuclear industry in the USA at present is on the defensive - opposition to nuclear power is growing, costs are escalating, new orders are outweighed by cancellations and spent fuel is accumulating as no commercial fuel reprocessing plants are operating. This latter is probably the greatest problem facing the industry and the lack of a decision on the use of mixed oxide fuel is a complicating factor. Other controversial subjects are the safety of power plants, the long term disposal of high level waste, the supply of uranium, enrichment facilities and safeguards. However nuclear power is already supplying 10% of the nations electricity and it may be that some of the current problems stem directly from the rapid growth of the industry. Thus, the current slowing of the growth rate could be advantageous. The industry has an enviable safety record and referenda held in a number of states on various nuclear issues have all suggested that in spite of the well-publicised problems, the public does not want nuclear power to be abandoned or too seriously constrained

  3. Managing nuclear knowledge and expertise - An industry perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garderet, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The industrial demand for expertise and qualified personnel in nuclear sciences and technologies will obviously continue to be strong during the next decades: in all cases, a high level of competence will necessarily continue to be required to maintain high performances in operating current nuclear facilities (up to decommissioning) ; moreover, additional skills are to be engaged to conceive new projects or to propose new services for new industrial customers. The industrial needs evidently show some quantitative or qualitative specificities according to the strategy each country has adopted in the past or is adopting now for the use of nuclear power or other nuclear technologies. But the general trends concerning the access to qualified knowledge in nuclear sciences and technologies are globally the same, so concrete actions have to be taken as soon as possible to anticipate difficult situations and overcome the problems. In the countries where nuclear industry has been strongly developed during the past decades (for example France) the problem chiefly concerns the relative ageing of the human workforce and the ability to maintain the accumulated knowledge and replace technical expertise at the very moment when all the technological companies show a significant decline in the number of entrants in all the domain of science and engineering. The problem is reinforced by the fact that (strictly for the same reasons) this phenomenon is observed concurrently within the research laboratories, among the staff of the safety authorities and, more generally, in all the offices engaged in the decision making process about nuclear affairs. Part of the solution to these serious problems stands in the human resources policy that the main nuclear industries have to achieve : internal training through enterprise universities, auto-formation, tutorage of young scientists by seniors, programs of knowledge preservation, international mobility when possible. But more

  4. Human-machine interactions: The human element of expert systems for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper will begin with a brief history of the development of expert systems in the nuclear industry. This discussion will serve to provide the reader with an understanding of how the field of artificial intelligence (AI) applications in the nuclear industry has developed. Next, this paper will discuss the general human factors issues relative to the development and implementation of expert systems for the nuclear industry. It will summarize the relevant research that addresses these issues and identify those areas that need the most effort for success. Since much of the prominent work for the application of expert systems has focused on computerized aids for decisionmaking in emergencies, this paper will draw from this area for its examples. This area tends to highlight the issues because of the safety-critical nature of the application. The same issues, however, are relevant to other applications of expert systems in the nuclear industry as well, even though the consequences of failure may not be as dramatic. (orig./GL)

  5. Nuclear fuel industry in USSR, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurasaka, Makoto; Kinoshita, Michio.

    1987-01-01

    The data on the atomic energy industries in East European countries have been published variously so far, but their summaries are very few. In order to know about the atomic energy industries in the world, it is necessary to know about those in East European countries, particularly in USSR. The exploration of uranium ore in USSR was begun in 1940s, and the various types of uranium ore have been found. Simultaneously with the extraction of uranium, molybdenum, iron and rare earth can be extracted, and also phosphatic fertilizer can be produced, therefore, even the uranium deposits of low grade are profitable. The accurate quantity of uranium reserves in USSR is unknown, but the confirmed resources seem to be 100,000 - 160,000 tons. The yearly production of uranium in USSR was about 4,500 tons in mid 1970s, and the cumulative production since 1908 was about 135,000 tons. The main uranium production facilities in USSR are in six districts, but there are many other places of medium and small production. For the exploration, the gamma ray measuring instruments carried by walkers, automobiles and aircrafts are used as a rule. As the mining methods, pit mining, open air mining and leaching in the site are carried out. In the uranium deposits in USSR, several hundreds km of mining is carried out on the yearly average. (Kako, I.)

  6. Civil engineering in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter-Smith, R.

    1991-01-01

    Civil Engineering has an important contribution to make at every stage of the nuclear fuel cycle, from the choice of site and conception of the design of a major power station or fuel plan, through modifications during modifications, during operation, to the final stages of designing and building waste management stores and repositories and the decommissioning of stations and plants. The conference papers published here -twenty four in total - cover many of these stages. All the papers are indexed separately. Two international papers are presented, one on French PWRs, the other on repository design. Four papers look at site investigations, four are concerned with earthquake engineering, four with structural analysis, three with quality assurance, three with design and four with in-service performance and decommissioning. (UK)

  7. Industrial application of radiation processing in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, S.

    1979-01-01

    A review is presented of the status of industrial application and advanced research projects of radiation processing in Japan. More than 20 industrial radiation facilities are now in operation. About 35 electron beam accelerators with the total capacity of ca. 1,200 kW are used for industrial applications, such as crosslinking of wire and cable insulation, heat shrinkable tubing and sheet, curing of surface coating and polyethylene foam. Three Co-60 facilities with 1,100 kCi in total are installed for the sterilization of medical supplies, plastics irradiation and the inhibition of sprouting in potatoes. The radiation research projects promising for industrial application are radiation treatment of exhaust gas, modification of emulsion-film, permselective membrane, immobilization of enzyme, fluoroelastomer, organic glass by cast polymerization, paint synthesis by electron beams and precoating of steel sheet. (author)

  8. Organizing the Canadian nuclear industry to meet the challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lortie, Pierre.

    1983-06-01

    The CANDU reactor is struggling for a share of the dwindling reactor market against formidable and well-established competition. The Canadian nuclear industry has historically depended upon two crown corporations, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. and Ontario Hydro, which have taken the lead in designing and engineering the reactor. Crown corporations are not notably successful in marketing, however, and the time has come for the industry to organize itself in preparation for an aggressive export drive

  9. Canada's nuclear industry - a leader in the global market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Pierre, G.

    1994-01-01

    The successes of the Canadian nuclear industry at home and abroad are recounted and extolled in this address. It is argued that the industry must become more global in order to compete more effectively in the export market. This means not only setting up operating bases (rather than mere marketing offices) abroad, but also employing nationals of prospective overseas purchasing countries in the headquarters of Canadian companies. Partnership with one or more Asian country may be the key to success

  10. Nuclear Medicine and Application of Nuclear Techniques in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiharto, Kunto

    1996-01-01

    The use of nuclear techniques medicine covers not only nuclear medicine and radiology in strict sense but also determination of body mineral content by neutron activation analysis and x-ray fluorescence technique either in vitro or in vivo, application of radioisotopes as tracers in pharmacology and biochemistry, etc. This paper describes the ideal tracer in nuclear medicine, functional and morphological imaging, clinical aspect and radiation protection in nuclear medicine. Nuclear technique offers facilities and chances related to research activities and services in medicine. The development of diagnostic as well as therapeutic methods using monoclonal antibodies labeled with radioisotope will undoubtedly play an important role in the disease control

  11. Nuclear battery materials and application of nuclear batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Shaochang; Lu Zhenming; Fu Xiaoming; Liang Tongxiang

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear battery has lots of advantages such as small volume, longevity, environal stability and so on, therefore, it was widely used in aerospace, deep-sea, polar region, heart pacemaker, micro-electromotor and other fields etc. The application of nuclear battery and the development of its materials promote each other. In this paper the development and the latest research progress of nuclear battery materials has been introduced from the view of radioisotope, electric energy conversion and encapsulation. And the current and potential applications of the nuclear battery are also summarized. (authors)

  12. Whistleblower litigation: A potential explosion in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowitt, A.J.; Panich, D.

    1990-01-01

    This article examines the protection offered nuclear employees and the limits of a nuclear employer's liability under section 210 of the Energy Reorganization Act. The author's warn that review by the US Supreme Court is not necessary but could only serve to expose the nuclear industry to an onslaught of litigation resulting from the assertion by an employee subjected to an adverse employment decision that the employee was engaged in a protected activity and as a result has a right to protection from retaliation by the employer

  13. Industry approach to BE applications - Past and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.P.

    2004-01-01

    With each passing year the nuclear industry, like all private industry, becomes more reliant on computer-based analysis tools. While this is primarily driven by competition and the natural advancement of computing power, computer analysis tools are also an excellent way to capture engineering know-how. As the average age of nuclear industry personnel approaches 50 years, this becomes increasingly important. The engineers that are retiring today have witnessed a remarkable evolution of computational tools during their tenure. For some, it is the difference between a pencil-and slide- rule and a desktop supercomputer. A curious aspect of this evolution is the question How has industry capitalized on all this advancement? Of course, the answer depends on who is being asked. Part of the answer must come from a historical review. This paper takes an engineer's approach to assessing history. In contrast, a mathematician's approach might be to look at where we have started and where we are today and fit a plausible story to the data. Engineers, on the other hand, have to consider other motivations. Webster Dictionary defines engineering as the application of scientific and mathematical principles to practical ends such as the design, manufacture, and operation of efficient and economical structures, machines, processes, and systems. Clearly, the engineers approach to any problem begins with science and math. The key difference to how an engineer approaches a problem is that 'practical', 'efficient', and 'economical' are on equal footing with 'scientific and mathematical principles'. Basically, engineers go through the same 'curve fitting' approach to every problem, but include more unknowns. Hence, the standard engineers' model is y = C 1 (science) + C 2 (math) + C 3 (practicality) + C 4 (efficiency) C 5 (economics). Computer codes used in the nuclear industry represent a broad spectrum of engineering applications including computer-aided design, structural and mechanical

  14. On Industrial Application of Structural Reliability Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    For the last two decades we have seen an increasing interest in applying structural reliability theory to many different industries. However, the number of real applications is much smaller than what one would expect. At the beginning most applications were in the design/analyses area especially ...

  15. Industrial Applications of Low Temperature Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardsley, J N

    2001-01-01

    The use of low temperature plasmas in industry is illustrated by the discussion of four applications, to lighting, displays, semiconductor manufacturing and pollution control. The type of plasma required for each application is described and typical materials are identified. The need to understand radical formation, ionization and metastable excitation within the discharge and the importance of surface reactions are stressed

  16. Industrial applications of Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasselli, J. G.; Walder, F.; Petty, C.; Kemeny, G.

    1993-03-01

    In the last two decades, Raman spectroscopy has matured as an important method for the study of molecules and complex molecular systems. This is evident from the number of fine texts and the many review articles which have been published describing theory and applications of Raman spectroscopy over a very broad range of subjects (1-10). Raman spectroscopy is the essential partner to infrared spectroscopy for a complete vibrational analysis of a molecule in structure determinations. From the understanding developed on small molecules, theory was extended to interpret the spectra of larger systems such as polymers, biological molecules, and ordered condensed phases. The contribution of Raman spectroscopy to these areas has been significant. It was the development of commercial lasers in the 1960s which spurred the renewed interest in the Raman technique. But applications were still limited for highly fluorescing or intensely colored systems. In 1986, a breakthrough paper by Hirschfeld and Chase (11) described the use of near-infrared laser excitation and a commercial interferometer-based FT-IR spectrometer to record FT-Raman spectra. Significant advantages included the inherent multiplex, throughput and data processing features of the FT interferometers and the use of a ND:YAG laser (1.064 μm) which dramatically decreased problems with sample fluorescence and decomposition. A deluge of papers describing applications of FT-Raman spectroscopy can be found in the Journal of Raman Spectroscopy, Spectrochimica Acta (special issues 40A ad 47A), and Applied Spectroscopy since then.

  17. The applications of nanotechnology in food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Ladan; Khosravi-Darani, Kianoush

    2011-09-01

    Nanotechnology has the potential of application in the food industry and processing as new tools for pathogen detection, disease treatment delivery systems, food packaging, and delivery of bioactive compounds to target sites. The application of nanotechnology in food systems will provide new methods to improve safety and the nutritional value of food products. This article will review the current advances of applications of nanotechnology in food science and technology. Also, it describes new current food laws for nanofood and novel articles in the field of risk assessment of using nanotechnology in the food industry.

  18. Current status and future prospects on nuclear industry in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joongjae

    2006-01-01

    It is ny great pleasure to have this chance of speaking at twenty-first KAIF/KNS Annual Conference, with the subject of the current status and future prospects of nuclear industry in Korea. As you all know, since the start of operation in Obninsk, the former Soviet Union, on June 26th, 1954, nuclear generation in the world has expanded continuously for the past 50 years. In 1973, when the first oil crisis hit the world, there were 147 nuclear power plants in operation, supplying only 0.8% of the world energy demand. About 30 years later, by the end of last year, 443 plants were in operation in 32 countries, supplying about 16% of the world power demand. Nuclear power generation is greatly contributing to the energy security of many countries and preservation of global environments. Recently, countries all over the world are becoming aware of the values and importance of nuclear energy which can help respond to energy crises caused by a sharp rise in oil prices and protect the earth from global warming. Due to its high energy density and ability to secure fuel supply at a lower cost, in addition to its cleanliness resulting from almost no emission of greenhouse gases, nuclear power generation is the practical alternative for energy security and the prevention of global warming. However, in the rapidly changing 21st century, the nuclear industries of the world, as well as Korea, are facing more challenges than ever before. The political and social disputes on nuclear generation are continuing while we all are facing urgent challenges, including the concerns about the safety of nuclear generation, procuring site to build nuclear power plants, and the improvement of competitiveness. Please allow me to remind you that it is very important for the world's nuclear societies to cooperate together in order to overcome diverse difficulties along our path and to contribute to the development of mankind and preservation of natural environments with nuclear power as a

  19. Linacs for medical and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Linear accelerators for medical and industrial applications have become an important commercial business. Microwave electron linacs for cancer radiation therapy and high-energy industrial radiography form the bulk of this market, but these, as well as induction linacs, are now being offered for radiation processing applications such as sterilization of disposable medical products, food preservation and material modifications. The radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac has now made the ion linac also practical for commercial applications in medicine and industry, including radiation therapy, isotope production, neutron production, materials modification, and energy transfer processes. Ion linacs for several of these applications will soon be commercially available. The market for both ion and electron linacs is expected to significantly grow in several exciting and important areas

  20. B. The nuclear industry in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Canada can claim to have one of the most successful nuclear power programmes in the world. The reactor type they have developed known as CANDU (CANadian Deuterium Uranium) uses natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as moderator. The production of sufficient heavy water has been a problem, but on the other hand, many advantages have been claimed for CANDUs over LWRs. The most important of these are: 1. natural rather than enriched uranium is used as fuel; 2. more electricity is generated for a given amount of mined uranium; 3. fuel costs are about half those of an LWR; 4. for a given amount of electricity generated about twice as much plutonium is produced; 5. without major changes CANDU reactor design can be optimised for more complex fuel cycles such as those employing thorium. Operation in breeding or near breeding modes appears feasible; 6. the pressure tube design appears inherently safer than one involving large pressure vessels; full scale testing of safety features such as ECCS is possible; 7. on-line refuelling enables high capacity factors to be achieved and also enables only a small excess of reactivity to be maintained in the core; this is a definite contribution to safety; 8. reprocessing of spent fuel is not required by economics, although it may become advantageous in the future; 9. defective fuel elements can be identified and removed from the system without shutdown - this minimises the dispersal of radioactive products from failed fuel into the primary circuit

  1. Some aspects of automation in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padegaonkar, Varsha; Modi, R.K.; Venkatesh, D.; Ramkumar, M.S.; Ramanujam, A.; Dhumwad, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Operations with radioactive materials (radioactive solutions, irradiated nuclear fuels, waste, etc.) need very specialised remote handling equipment. There is an increasing tendency to automate jobs that can clearly be planned. These include a surprisingly large number of tasks - especially if one considers using flexible robotic systems that can be performed automatically, remotely safely. One such system, namely, a computer controlled robotic radioactive sample solution handling system is described. It basically consists of a cylindrical co-ordinate type robot (LABOT), a computer controlled storage vault of chemical samples, decapping-capping device for bottles and software. An attempt is being made to give the technician a menu of possible operations and help him for coherent chain of operations. The computer, in addition to operating the robot, the storage vault and other accessories, will also log the operations performed and maintain records. The operations carried out by the robot are that of a chemical laboratory technician like sampling, aliquoting, weighing, storage and recovery of samples, maintenance of records, etc.. The electronic control system and system software are described. (author)

  2. Management of radioactive waste from nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Radioactive waste arises from the generation of nuclear energy and from the production of radioactive materials and their applications in industry, agriculture, research and medicine. The importance of safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized and considerable experience has been gained in this field. Technical expertise is a prerequisite for safe and cost-effective management of radioactive waste. A training course is considered an effective tool for providing technical expertise in various aspects of waste management. The IAEA, in co-operation with national authorities concerned with radioactive waste management, has organized and conducted a number of radioactive waste management training courses. The results of the courses conducted by the IAEA in 1991-1995 have been evaluated at consultants meetings held in December 1995 and May 1996. This guidance document for use by Member States in arranging national training courses on the management of low and intermediate level radioactive waste from nuclear applications has been prepared as the result of that effort. The report outlines the various requirements for the organization, conduct and evaluation of training courses in radioactive waste management and proposes an annotated outline of a reference training course

  3. Preservation and re-use of nuclear knowledge in the UK nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workman, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the need for the UK nuclear industry to preserve knowledge generated during the 6 decades of its existence for re-use by future generations. It outlines the major government restructuring of the industry and its impact on knowledge preservation. Work within British Nuclear Fuels plc to meet the knowledge preservation requirements of its business is described. The focus is shown to be the alignment of tacit knowledge - gained through interviews with key specialists - with the explicit knowledge contained within the major knowledge base (Corporate Memory). The creation of knowledge packages to hold key knowledge on core technologies and nuclear plants is described. The paper also covers developments in securing the nuclear skill base through University Research Alliances and the Dalton Nuclear Institute. Returning to the major new challenges ahead it is shown how a knowledge portal could be implemented, linking the knowledge repositories present within the organisations that will feature in the restructured UK nuclear industry in 2005. The UK nuclear industry is facing its greatest challenge in terms of its organisation and commercial interests, at a time when the technical challenges presented by the decommissioning of old nuclear plants and the remediation of its nuclear sites are building up. In terms of knowledge preservation there has never been a greater need to ensure that knowledge associated with the key technologies that underpin the nuclear plants, and the plants themselves, is made available for use now and in the future. The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority [NDA] - a new government body that will come into being in April 2005 - will own the liabilities (the nuclear plants). Those organisations bidding to operate and decommission plants on the UK nuclear sites will utilise the assets to best effect as Site Licensing Companies [SLC] under contract to the NDA. The key asset is knowledge. Knowledge is present in explicit forms within

  4. Recent Movement, Issues and Some Counter plans in Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. K.; Lee, J. K.; Cho, C. S.; Lee, C. C.; Park, C. O.

    2007-01-01

    There is no doubt 'Nuclear Energy' is the only source that can ensure the world's steady development in the foreseeable future. Nowadays is definitely what is called 'renaissance of nuclear.' As energy demand and economy increase, and global climate warms, the trend of nuclear dependency will be accelerated further. With 30 reactors being built around the world today, another 35 or more planned to come online during the next 10 years, and over two hundred further back in the pipeline, the global nuclear industry is clearly going forward strongly. Countries are seeking to replace old reactors as well as expand capacity, and an additional 25 countries are either considering or have already decided to make nuclear energy part of their power generation capacity. On the other hand, as current movement of world nuclear field, Korea has faced to one of the most important times since introducing nuclear power. Twenty nuclear power plants are run in Korea i.e. sixteen PWRs and four PHWRs now, and the capability of nuclear power production has been ranked world number six. In spite of this grand appearance, however, the influencing power on world nuclear society is not well matched to its status since it does not have a special hidden card which can appeal and impact on international community. In the era of nuclear renaissance, paradoxically, Korea is not in the situations of optimistic or pessimistic view. Now let's As energy demand and economy increase, and global climate warms, the trend of nuclear dependency will be accelerated further. With 30 reactors being built around the world today, another 35 or more planned to come online during the next 10 years, and over two hundred further back in the pipeline, the global nuclear industry is clearly going forward strongly. Countries are seeking to replace old reactors as well as expand capacity, and an additional 25 countries are either considering or have already decided to make nuclear energy part of their power generation

  5. Roadmap for human resources for expanded Indian nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, R.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Indian Nuclear Society (India); Srinivasan, G.R.; Goyal, O.P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with detailed requirement of human resources for all phases of nuclear power plant, for the manufacturing sector and the probable roadmap for achieving India's target. The accident in Fukushima has brought out that only nuclear power that avoids being a threat to the health and safety of the population and the environmental will be acceptable to the society and for this to be achieved human resources could be a single major contributor. India has ambitious plan of achieving 20,000MW by 2020 and 63,000MW by 2050. It is felt out of the three resources men, material and money; the critical shortage would be human resources both in quality and quantity. As per IAEA report (Publication of 2008 edition of energy, electricity and nuclear power estimates for the period of 2030), nuclear capacity must grow to at least 1.8 times current capacity by 2030 if global temperature rises are to be kept at 2°C. Objective of recruiting and training human resources for Indian Industry can be as follows: a) For catering domestic market. b) For catering international market later on for nuclear industries outside India. As India will be an important future international player. The above would require a multiplication of human resources by nearly seven times. In addition it has to be wholesome covering all levels and all skills and all disciplines and stages covering the whole nuclear cycle including regulators. Human resources are required for design and engineering, construction, commissioning, operation, manufacturing and for support services. The manpower for these has to be trained to achieve high quality of nuclear standards. Presently Indian Department of Atomic Energy(DAE) runs several training schools giving one year Post Graduate, tailor made courses. This needs to be multiplied by Joint efforts. Training should be on 'SAT (Systematic Approach to Training)' methodology to ensure focussed, specific, needed to culminate in safe, reliable and

  6. Roadmap for human resources for expanded Indian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Srinivasan, G.R.; Goyal, O.P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with detailed requirement of human resources for all phases of nuclear power plant, for the manufacturing sector and the probable roadmap for achieving India's target. The accident in Fukushima has brought out that only nuclear power that avoids being a threat to the health and safety of the population and the environmental will be acceptable to the society and for this to be achieved human resources could be a single major contributor. India has ambitious plan of achieving 20,000MW by 2020 and 63,000MW by 2050. It is felt out of the three resources men, material and money; the critical shortage would be human resources both in quality and quantity. As per IAEA report (Publication of 2008 edition of energy, electricity and nuclear power estimates for the period of 2030), nuclear capacity must grow to at least 1.8 times current capacity by 2030 if global temperature rises are to be kept at 2°C. Objective of recruiting and training human resources for Indian Industry can be as follows: a) For catering domestic market. b) For catering international market later on for nuclear industries outside India. As India will be an important future international player. The above would require a multiplication of human resources by nearly seven times. In addition it has to be wholesome covering all levels and all skills and all disciplines and stages covering the whole nuclear cycle including regulators. Human resources are required for design and engineering, construction, commissioning, operation, manufacturing and for support services. The manpower for these has to be trained to achieve high quality of nuclear standards. Presently Indian Department of Atomic Energy(DAE) runs several training schools giving one year Post Graduate, tailor made courses. This needs to be multiplied by Joint efforts. Training should be on 'SAT (Systematic Approach to Training)' methodology to ensure focussed, specific, needed to culminate in safe, reliable and viable operation of

  7. Promoting nuclear power, achieving sustainable development of nuclear industry in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, R.

    2006-01-01

    The past 5 decades witnessed the rapid growth of China's nuclear industry. The sustained and rapid economic growth and continuous improvement of people's living standards have placed higher requirements for energy and power supplies. As a safe and clean energy source, nuclear energy has been gradually and widely accepted by the Chinese government and the public. The Chinese government has adopted the policy a ctively pushing forward the nuclear power development , set up the target to reach 40GWe of nuclear power installed capacity by 2020, accounting for about 4% of the total installed capacity in China. In this regard, this paper presents the China's nuclear program to illustrate how China is going to achieve the target. The paper is composed of 3 parts. The first part gives a review of the achievements in nuclear power in the last 20 years. The second part presents China's ''three approach'' strategy for furthering the nuclear power development: carrying out duplication projects at the existing plant sites; introducing GUI technology via international bidding; developing the brand C NP1000 , i.e. Chinese Nuclear Power lOOOMwe class, with China's own intellectual property. This part also explores the ways of securing the fuel supply for nuclear power development. The third part concludes with CNNC's ''3221'' strategy which aims at building a world class conglomerate, and expresses its sincere wish to work with the nuclear community to push the nuclear industry worldwide by strengthening international cooperation

  8. Nuclear techniques in the coal industry. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    With the aim of promoting advanced research and facilitating a more extensive application of nuclear techniques for environmental protection in the exploration and exploitation of coal, the IAEA established the present co-ordinated research programme (CRP) in 1989. This report includes an assessment of the current status and trends in nuclear techniques in the coal industry and the results obtained by the participants at the CRP. Proceedings of the final CRP on ''Nuclear Techniques in Exploration and Exploitation of Coal: On-line and Bulk Analysis and Evaluation of Potential Environmental Pollutants in Coal and Coke'', was held in Krakow, Poland, from 9 to 12 May 1994. Refs, figs, tabs

  9. Application of nuclear activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamonov, E.I.; Khlystova, A.F.

    1979-01-01

    Consideration is given to the applications of nuclear-activation analysis (NAA) as discussed at the International Conference of 1977. One of the new results in the present-day NAA practices is the growing number of elements detected in samples without using a destructive radiochemical separation. An essential feature in this context is the development of the system automation of control and information NAA operations through the use computers. In biological medicine a multicomponent NAA is employed to determine the concentration of elements in various human organs and objects, in metabolic studies and for diagnostic purposes. In agriculture NAA finds applications in the evaluation of grain protein, analysis of element feed composition, soil and fertilizers. The application of this method to the environmental monitoring is considered with particular reference to the element analysis of water (especially drinking water), air, plant residues. Data are presented for the use of NAA in metallurgy, geology, archaeology and criminal law. Tables are provided to illustrate the uses of NAA in various fields

  10. Can the nuclear industry meet the Clean Air Act challenge?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The recent amendments to the US Clean Air Act promise to make fossil fuels less competitive in the energy-production arena. But if the nuclear industry is to take full advantage of this opportunity to move forward into the next century it must get itself into gear now. (author)

  11. How the nuclear industry keeps it gases clean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The paper surveys briefly the papers presented at a conference on gas filtration in the nuclear industry. The theory, development, design, use (under various conditions of temperature, humidity, corrosion), performance, cleaning and testing of fibrous, HEPA, metal, packed bed and magnetic filters are included, and the problems, advantages and disadvantages of the various types of filter are discussed. (U.K.)

  12. The manufacturing of components for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogarty, John

    The experience of one company in the Canadian nuclear industry, a prime supplier of end fittings for CANDU type reactors, is described. Many factors such as work flow and continuity, financing, quality control, and export trade, are dealt with. (E.C.B.)

  13. Big 'Q' in the nuclear industry: A shift in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschall, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear industry's shift toward total quality management, renewed emphasis on stating requirements and achieving consistent performance, is the subject of this paper. The impact of total quality management centers on three outward-focused areas: refined skills, performance, and process management. Process management requires a total change in organizational philosophy, policies, and management practice

  14. Laser ablation of paint in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brygo, Francois; Semerok, Alexandre; Weulersse, Jean-Marc; Thro, Pierre-Yves; Oltra, Roland; Decobert, Guy

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear dismantling faces the challenge of paint removal on large surfaces of painted walls. The conventional methods for paint stripping on concrete walls are mainly based on mechanical grinder and lead to an important volume of aerosols and wastes. Laser ablation has been evaluated as a promising method for paint removal with a number of advantages. The method reduces considerably the waste volume as the removal of paint is selective. The ablated matter can be collected by aerosol aspiration/filtration. The automation of the process can provide a higher capacity of paint removal. Laser ablation of paint was under our extensive studies. Laser ablation with different nanosecond repetition rate lasers was comparatively studied to understand the ablation mechanisms, and to obtain the highest efficiency of paint removal. The investigations were made with three Q-Switched Nd:YAG lasers (λ = 532 nm and λ = 1.064 μm). The different pulse durations (5 ns and 100 ns) demonstrated the different ablation regimes. Ablation with long pulses (100 ns) provided the best removal efficiency while the short ones (5 ns) decreased the ablation threshold fluence. It was demonstrated that the pulse repetition rate increasing in the 20 Hz - 10 kHz range induced heat accumulation in the paint. It resulted in ablation efficiency increase with a large decrease in the ablation threshold fluence. Laser ablation in the 0 - 10 J / cm 2 fluence range was investigated. Various paints were under investigation to obtain the maximum efficiency of paint removal for each specific experimental case. The ejected matter recording with a high speed imaging system allows to analyse the laser-matter interaction. (authors)

  15. Nuclear Propulsion for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, M. G.; Bechtel, R. D.; Borowski, S. K.; George, J. A.; Kim, T.; Emrich, W. J.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.; Gerrish, H. P.; Adams, R. B.

    2013-01-01

    Basics of Nuclear Systems: Long history of use on Apollo and space science missions. 44 RTGs and hundreds of RHUs launched by U.S. during past 4 decades. Heat produced from natural alpha (a) particle decay of Plutonium (Pu-238). Used for both thermal management and electricity production. Used terrestrially for over 65 years. Fissioning 1 kg of uranium yields as much energy as burning 2,700,000 kg of coal. One US space reactor (SNAP-10A) flown (1965). Former U.S.S.R. flew 33 space reactors. Heat produced from neutron-induced splitting of a nucleus (e.g. U-235). At steady-state, 1 of the 2 to 3 neutrons released in the reaction causes a subsequent fission in a "chain reaction" process. Heat converted to electricity, or used directly to heat a propellant. Fission is highly versatile with many applications.

  16. Dynamic goniometer for industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivaschenko, Elena; Pavlov, Petr A.; Pukhova, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    At the present time, there is a need for effective metrological control of the functional parameters of the modern rotary encoders due to their increased production level. This metrological control has to be carried out with high accuracy and high speed of operation. One of the most effective ways of solving this task is the use of dynamic goniometer (DG) jointly with an optical angle encoder and/or ring laser. The article deals with the principles of DG construction and considers the methods and results of DG investigation for the rotary encoder calibration as well as the elimination procedure of various types of DG uncertainties. The article shows that application of the proposed procedure allows to reduce the level of DG uncertainty to 0.2 arcsec, which ensures the uncertainty value of the rotary encoder metrological control by the means of DG to within 0.05 arcsec in a wide range of angular velocities.

  17. Topics on Education Activities in Japanese Nuclear Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroiwa, Haruko [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, LTD - MHI, 2-16-5 Kona Minato-K 108-8215 Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    The progression of an aging society with fewer children or a foreseeable decrease in population has caused the nuclear power plants under planning canceled or delayed. As a result, the number of students graduating with a nuclear degree began to decrease, while the development of the next generation light water reactor or of the practical use of the fast breeder reactor requires many skilled engineers. Atomic Energy Commission of Japan realized this potential impact of human resources. The Commission submitted the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy including this issue to the government. The report says that without future talent development, Japan will lose its competitiveness against other industrialized countries, and that without replenishment after a large number of baby boomers retire, the shortage of specialists in the radiation field will occur. In conjunction with the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry carried out the Nuclear Power Human Resources Development Program in 2007 fiscal year. The program focused on i) Support of educational activities, such as basic nuclear education and research, internship, and preparation of core curriculums and texts for nuclear power, ii) Implementation of research in the basic and infrastructure technology fields supporting the nuclear power (ex. structural strength, material strength, welding, erosion/corrosion, heat transfer, radiation safety). This program will continue till the end of 2009 fiscal year. Besides in order to promote nuclear power acceptance and to secure diversity, effective measures should be taken to support young, women, and foreign researchers and to promote their utilization. Mitsubishi accepts overseas students and researchers as an internship every year, and accelerates the safety architecture in the world. (author)

  18. Topics on Education Activities in Japanese Nuclear Industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroiwa, Haruko

    2008-01-01

    The progression of an aging society with fewer children or a foreseeable decrease in population has caused the nuclear power plants under planning canceled or delayed. As a result, the number of students graduating with a nuclear degree began to decrease, while the development of the next generation light water reactor or of the practical use of the fast breeder reactor requires many skilled engineers. Atomic Energy Commission of Japan realized this potential impact of human resources. The Commission submitted the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy including this issue to the government. The report says that without future talent development, Japan will lose its competitiveness against other industrialized countries, and that without replenishment after a large number of baby boomers retire, the shortage of specialists in the radiation field will occur. In conjunction with the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry carried out the Nuclear Power Human Resources Development Program in 2007 fiscal year. The program focused on i) Support of educational activities, such as basic nuclear education and research, internship, and preparation of core curriculums and texts for nuclear power, ii) Implementation of research in the basic and infrastructure technology fields supporting the nuclear power (ex. structural strength, material strength, welding, erosion/corrosion, heat transfer, radiation safety). This program will continue till the end of 2009 fiscal year. Besides in order to promote nuclear power acceptance and to secure diversity, effective measures should be taken to support young, women, and foreign researchers and to promote their utilization. Mitsubishi accepts overseas students and researchers as an internship every year, and accelerates the safety architecture in the world. (author)

  19. Nuclear power industry buckles down to meet the competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, S.D.

    1996-01-01

    This article reports that owners of nuclear plants are beginning to realize that the bottom line dominates in the developing electricity marketplace. Embedded in recent successes is the emerging reorganization of the industry along more functional lines. From the standpoint of generating cost, nuclear power has had an up and down record. Reversing the upward trend that prevailed since the late 1970s, variable production costs at US nuclear stations have now fallen for seven consecutive years. The change has been spurred by the loss of its earlier economic edge and the reality that a deregulated energy market is fast approaching. Comparison with other electric-energy sources shows the need to continue the recent trend for nuclear to remain competitive. This point is underscored by Neil Carnz, CEO of Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corp. A leading force behind creation of a utility business alliance, Carnz notes that high capital costs place nuclear plants at a great disadvantage in the market, and labor is the prime area for offsetting it. Stating that some 130,000 people draw paychecks from nuclear-power production, including consultants, some non-utility people, and even regulators, the author contends that this number will have to be reduced by 40,000 to make nuclear power competitive with other forms of electric generation

  20. The evolution of nuclear energy Opportunities for the industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, M. T.

    2013-01-01

    At the turn of the XXI century, the world energy context underwent a significant change due mainly to the increases in the demand for energy in the developing countries, a rise in gas prices and increased government support of clean energies in response to environmental issues. these boundary conditions led rapidly to renewed interest in nuclear energy worldwide. The phrase a Renaissance in nuclear energy was included in almost all energy forecasts. Unexpectedly, however, just then years later the panorama changed once again: unconventional gas appeared as new energy source, the world financial crisis hampered investment, and the demand for energy fell. This panorama has lowered expectations with regard to the size of the nuclear energy renaissance to a less buoyant but more balance scenario of nuclear energy deployment that we could now dub as the evolution of nuclear energy. This article describes how fission nuclear energy has continuously been evolving to adjust itself to these changing scenarios, and, in particular, how it is being adapted itself to todays vision of the role of the nuclear energy in the long term. The analysis in this paper focuses on those programs that could bring opportunities for Spanish nuclear industry participation. Starting with the development programs affecting existing reactors already in operation, the analysis moves on the new builds of Light Water Reactors (LWR) Generation III+, to then address, in two sections, Research Reactors and finally, the opportunities presented by Generation IV technologies. The development of fusion technology is not covered in this paper. (Author)

  1. Nuclear English: Language skills for a globalizing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorlin, S.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear English is a new course designed for English language learners working in the nuclear industry and in other fields of nuclear science and technology. The textbook is composed of 12 units, each covering a different aspect of the nuclear fuel cycle or a relevant topic such as non-proliferation, safety and the use of radioisotopes in medicine. Nuclear English offers a flexible approach, allowing learners to: Study the units in any order according to professional need or interest; Focus on listening, grammar and pronunciation tasks, which are clearly signposted; Work independently or with other students in a classroom. The other main features of the course are: A audio CD containing authentic interviews with industry specialists. The course covers various accents, including British, American, Australian, South African and Indian; Transcripts of the listening materials; A language orientation test, which learners can take at the start of the course to identify their grammar weaknesses; Teacher-led exercises for working in pairs or groups; A glossary of key terms; An answer key; a downloadable teacher's guide to help teachers maximize the learning potential of the materials (available at: www.world-nuclear-university.org)

  2. The impact of deregulation on the US nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baratta, A.J.

    2001-01-01

    In the United States, the electric utility industry is undergoing a dramatic shift away from a tightly regulated monopoly to a free market system. The impact on the nuclear utility industry of deregulation coupled with recent changes in the nuclear regulatory environment has had a dramatic impact on the future of nuclear power in the United States. Utilities have been broken up into separate generation, transmission, and distribution companies and are now allowed to sell electricity outside of their former service areas. As economic deregulation has occurred, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has also adopted a new approach to regulation -- risk informed regulation. The implementation of risk-informed regulation has resulted in the adoption of a new regulatory format that attempts to highlight those areas having greatest risk significance. This paper explores these and other changes that have resulted because of the changing economic and regulatory environment for nuclear energy and examines their impact on the future of nuclear energy in the United States. (author)

  3. Online Monitoring of Plant Assets in the Nuclear Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nancy Lybeck; Vivek Agarwal; Binh Pham; Richard Rusaw; Randy Bickford

    2013-10-01

    Today’s online monitoring technologies provide opportunities to perform predictive and proactive health management of assets within many different industries, in particular the defense and aerospace industries. The nuclear industry can leverage these technologies to enhance safety, productivity, and reliability of the aging fleet of existing nuclear power plants. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is collaborating with the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) Long-Term Operations program to implement online monitoring in existing nuclear power plants. Proactive online monitoring in the nuclear industry is being explored using EPRI’s Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software, a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. This paper focuses on development of asset fault signatures used to assess the health status of generator step-up transformers and emergency diesel generators in nuclear power plants. Asset fault signatures describe the distinctive features based on technical examinations that can be used to detect a specific fault type. Fault signatures are developed based on the results of detailed technical research and on the knowledge and experience of technical experts. The Diagnostic Advisor of the FW-PHM Suite software matches developed fault signatures with operational data to provide early identification of critical faults and troubleshooting advice that could be used to distinguish between faults with similar symptoms. This research is important as it will support the automation of predictive online monitoring techniques in nuclear power plants to diagnose incipient faults, perform proactive maintenance, and estimate the remaining useful life of assets.

  4. Telerobots in the nuclear industry: a manufacturer's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, Reuben

    1992-01-01

    In the nuclear industry, a broad range of tasks requires the use of a sophisticated remotely operated manipulator, wherein the control system can integrate human and computer control (shared control). The ''man-in-loop'' can accomplish non-programmable tasks, while computer control can reduce operator fatigue during repetitive tasks, integrate sensor data to improve safety of operation, and increase productivity through the use of preprogrammed routines or trajectories generated in near real time by 3D modelling techniques. No system currently available combines the advantages of teleoperation with full robotic control. Existing teleoperated systems cannot perform precise, high-fidelity robotic motions, and industrial robots generally are large, heavy, and fragile and are not designed to be teleoperated in real time. As a strategic matter, this manufacturer views decommissioning requirements as a guideline for product development and enhanced capabilities. Some examples are given of the use of telerobots in the nuclear industry. (Author)

  5. The partnership with other nuclear industries is important for the French industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc, B.

    2016-01-01

    After the French bid for the construction of a nuclear power plant in the United Arab Emirates (AE) failed in 2011, Assystem, a French engineering company decided to develop in the Middle-East and now has become one of the most important partners of KEPCO, the company in charge of constructing the Barakah plant in AE. In Turkey, Assystem has bought a Turkish enterprise to back the Franco-Japanese SINOP project and to initiate a partnership with Rosatom building the Akkuyu plant. Today Assystem has become an important player in nuclear industry and has been able to bring back to French nuclear industry its experience of different practices and know-how in international nuclear markets. Assystem employs 12.200 staff worldwide and realized a 908 Meuros turnover in 2015. (A.C.)

  6. French ESPN order, codes and nuclear industry requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laugier, C.; Grandemange, J.M.; Cleurennec, M.

    2010-01-01

    Work on coding safety regulations applicable to large equipment was undertaken in France as of 1978 to accompany the construction of a French nuclear plant. The needs of manufacturers were threefold: translate the design rules from the American licensor, meet the safety objectives expressed in French regulations published at that time through coding of industrial practices (order of February 26, 1974) and stabilize the work reference system between the operator - consultant - and the manufacturer responsible for applying technical recommendations. Significant work was carried out by AFCEN (the French Association for the Design, Construction and Operating Supervision of the equipment for Electronuclear boilers), an association created for this purpose, leading to the publication of a collection of rules related to mechanical equipment for pressurised water reactors, RCC-M and RSE-M, which will be discussed later, and also in several other technical fields: particularly mechanical equipment in fast neutron reactors, RCC-MR, electricity (RCC-E), and fuel (RCC-C). (authors)

  7. Importance of Advanced Planning of Manufacturing for Nuclear Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shykinov Nick

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of energy demands by growing economies, climate changes, fossil fuel pricing volatility, and improved safety and performance of nuclear power plants, many countries express interest in expanding or acquiring nuclear power capacity. In the light of the increased interest in expanding nuclear power the supply chain for nuclear power projects has received more attention in recent years. The importance of the advanced planning of procurement and manufacturing of components of nuclear facilities is critical for these projects. Many of these components are often referred to as long-lead items. They may be equipment, products and systems that are identified to have a delivery time long enough to affect directly the overall timing of a project. In order to avoid negatively affecting the project schedule, these items may need to be sourced out or manufactured years before the beginning of the project. For nuclear facilities, long-lead items include physical components such as large pressure vessels, instrumentation and controls. They may also mean programs and management systems important to the safety of the facility. Authorized nuclear operator training, site evaluation programs, and procurement are some of the examples. The nuclear power industry must often meet very demanding construction and commissioning timelines, and proper advanced planning of the long-lead items helps manage risks to project completion time. For nuclear components there are regulatory and licensing considerations that need to be considered. A national nuclear regulator must be involved early to ensure the components will meet the national legal regulatory requirements. This paper will discuss timing considerations to address the regulatory compliance of nuclear long-lead items.

  8. Quantity and quality in nuclear engineering professional skills needed by the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slember, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the challenge of work force requirements in the context of the full range of issues facing the nuclear power industry. The supply of skilled managers and workers may be a more serious problem if nuclear power fades away than if it is reborn in a new generation. An even greater concern, however, is the quality of education that the industry needs in all its future professionals. Both government and industry should be helping universities adapt their curricula to the needs of the future. This means building a closer relationship with schools that educate nuclear professionals, that is, providing adequate scholarships and funding for research and development programs, offering in-kind services, and encouraging internships and other opportunities for hands-on experience. The goal should not be just state-of-the-art engineering practices, but the broad range of knowledge, issues, and skills that will be required of the nuclear leadership of the twenty-first century

  9. Industrial application of high power disk lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Rüdiger; Havrilla, David

    2008-02-01

    Laser welding has become one of the fastest growing areas for industrial laser applications. The increasing cost effectiveness of the laser process is enabled by the development of new highly efficient laser sources, such as the Disk laser, coupled with decreasing cost per Watt. TRUMPF introduced the Disk laser several years ago, and today it has become the most reliable laser tool on the market. The excellent beam quality and output powers of up to 10 kW enable its application in the automotive industry as well as in the range of thick plate welding, such as heavy construction and ship building. This serves as an overview of the most recent developments on the TRUMPF Disk laser and its industrial applications like cutting, welding, remote welding and hybrid welding, too. The future prospects regarding increased power and even further improved productivity and economics are presented.

  10. SOVT analysis of the nuclear industry in Mexico; Analisis FODA de la industria nuclear en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez R, E.; Hernandez B, M. C., E-mail: edelmiraf@yahoo.com [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Division de Estudios de Posgrado, Av. Instituto Tecnologico s/n, Ex-rancho La Virgen, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    In this work the analysis of strengths, opportunities, vulnerabilities and threats (SOVT) of the nuclear industry in Mexico is presented. This industry presents among its strengths that Mexico is a highly electrified country and has a good established normative mark of nuclear security. Although the Secretaria de Energia in Mexico, with base to the exposed in the Programa Sectorial de Energia 2007-2012, is analyzing the convenience of the generation starting from this source, considering the strong technological dependence of the exterior and the limited federal budget dedicated to this field. As a result of the analysis of the SOVT matrix, were found a great number of strengths that threats, although the vulnerabilities list is major to the strengths, the opportunities list is the bigger. Therefore, the nuclear industry can be a sustainable industry, taking the necessary decisions and taking advantage of the detected opportunities. (Author)

  11. Applications of computational intelligence in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayalal, M.L.; Jehadeesan, R.

    2016-01-01

    Computational intelligence techniques have been successfully employed in a wide range of applications which include the domains of medical, bioinformatics, electronics, communications and business. There has been progress in applying of computational intelligence in the nuclear reactor domain during the last two decades. The stringent nuclear safety regulations pertaining to reactor environment present challenges in the application of computational intelligence in various nuclear sub-systems. The applications of various methods of computational intelligence in the domain of nuclear reactors are discussed in this paper. (author)

  12. Industrial Applications of Electronic Nose Technology in the Textiles Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Tim; Chandler, Rob; Hallam, Viv; Simpson, Claire; Bentham, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Electronic nose technology has been available commercially for over 12 years but uptake in actual industrial applications has yet to be fully realised. We report 2 specific test protocols being used in the textiles industry that allow the direct measurement of anti-odour and anti-microbial capabilities of fabrics. Results will be shown for the standard anti-odour test which was specifically commissioned by Courtaulds PLC and which is being used by a number of manufacturers. The second test, which measures the anti-microbial and the anti-odour capabilities of fabrics simultaneously was developed in 2008. Results will be shown that clearly indicate both parameters are detected and proofs of anti-microbial capabilities will be given. These 2 tests will for the first time, enable the fulfillment of legislation that states for textile product claims, anti-odour and anti-microbial capabilities of fabrics must be scientifically substantiated.

  13. The trilogy nuclear technology-quality-reliability in nuclear energy: the interface technical regulation/industrial norm in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Jose Ribeiro da

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, it is tried to find out a compatibility among Regulations (mandatory) documents governing Quality Assurance Requirements for the Nuclear Industry (like IAEA/50-C-QA, IAEA/50-SG-QA1, IAEA/50-SG-QA7, and others), with similar documents prescribing same requirements for COnventional Industry (like ISO/900 Series), using the technical support of the prescriptions contained in the IAEA/TR-328 documents. Harmonization and compatibility of these documents is a great deal for Industries engaged -directly or indirectly - in the Nuclear Technology, taking into account that such compatibility can avoid troubles for already ISO/9000 Series Certified Industries in the fulfillment of its contract requirements in the nuclear field. Its also represents in that field a symbiosis between Technical Regulations (mandatory) and Voluntary Standards (Industrial, Consensual Standards). (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  14. Industrial tracer application in people's republic of china

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Maoyi

    1987-01-01

    A number of important applications of radioisotopes and their compounds used as tracers in petroleum industry, metallurgical industry, mechanical industry, chemical industry, electronic industry, hydrology and water conservancy in China are introduced in this paper. And the tracer technique applied to entomology is also mentioned. The industrial tracer applications are successful and beneficial in People's Republic of China from the examples given. (author)

  15. Renaissance of nuclear power challenge for policy makers and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaroslav, I.R.A.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear power industry being cost intensive, must be considered as a high-tech employer of highly qualified man power. Similar challenge is faced by manufacturers: the part of supply chain. Nuclear power plant is very complex equipment as far as technology and science is involved. Nuclear power can be the option for bigger share of balanced national or global energy mix, to meet growing demand for power, with stability of supply and reducing CO 2 emissions till the year 2050. Hence, there is need to treat nuclear power as a long-term program, with which all its positive features will be a stronger alternative to conventional fossil power plants as well as all renewables. (author)

  16. Perspective on radiation from the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    Methods for estimating the risk of radiation induced cancer mortality to members of the public are outlined for each element of the nuclear power industry - reactor accidents, routine releases from nuclear plants, transport, mining and milling of uranium, and escape of buried radioactive waste (high level and low level). The results are compared with mortality risks from the air pollution and chemical carcinogens released into the ground in generating the same amount of electricity by coal burning - the latter are thousands of times larger. Radiation from nuclear power is also 1,000 times smaller than that from radon in homes. The amount of money spent to avert a death from nuclear power radiation is in the billion dollar range, whereas lives could be saved from radon in homes for 0.00001 times that cost. Medical screening and highway safety programs can save lives for a similarly low cost

  17. Applications of Virtual Reality to Nuclear Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stansfield, S.

    1998-11-03

    This paper explores two potential applications of Virtual Reality (VR) to international nuclear safeguards: training and information organization and navigation. The applications are represented by two existing prototype systems, one for training nuclear weapons dismantlement and one utilizing a VR model to facilitate intuitive access to related sets of information.

  18. Artificial Intelligence Applications for Nuclear Survivability Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    AD-A259 394 IIIIIt~l111 11 11 11 1 1hIf L- E, Defense Nuclear Agency Alexandria, VA 22310-3398 DNA-TR-92-82 Artificial Intelligence Applications for...TYPE AND DATES COVERED 921101 Technical 920101 -920408 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5, FUNDING NUMBERS Artificial Intelligence Applications for Nuclear

  19. Nuclear Reactions for Astrophysics and Other Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Scielzo, N D; Ressler, J J

    2011-03-01

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions are required for many applications. The surrogate nuclear reactions method provides an indirect approach for determining cross sections for reactions on unstable isotopes, which are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise. Current implementations of the method provide useful cross sections for (n,f) reactions, but need to be improved upon for applications to capture reactions.

  20. Application of nuclear techniques in Poland; Perspektywy wykorzystania atomistyki w Polsce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Owczarczyk, A.; Urbanski, P. [Instytut Chemii i Techniki Jadrowej, Warsaw (Poland); Romanowski, M. [Biuro Studiow i Projektow Techniki Jadrowej `Proatom`, Warsaw (Poland); Stegowski, Z. [Akademia Gorniczo-Hutnicza, Cracow (Poland); Nowak, K. [Osrodek Badawczo-Rozwojowy Izotopow, Swierk-Otwock (Poland); Pachan, A. [Instytut Problemow Jadrowych, Swierk-Otwock (Poland); Tanczyk, R. [Centralne Laboratorium Ochrony Radiologicznej, Warsaw (Poland); Jablonski, R. [Zaklad Techniki Izotopowej `Polon-Izot`, Warsaw (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    The commercial applications of nuclear techniques in Poland have been presented. The special attention have been paid at: radiation technologies, application of radiometric gages in different branches of industry, tracer techniques, production and application of radiation sources in medicine, industry and material testing. 10 refs, 6 figs, 6 tabs.

  1. Managing human resources in the nuclear power industry: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    This report is intended for senior and middle level managers in nuclear operating organizations. Its objectives are to facilitate the recognition of priority issues with respect to managing human resources, and to provide pragmatic ideas regarding improvements. The human resource issues addressed in this report, if not managed effectively, can result in significant performance problems at nuclear power plants. About 10 years ago the IAEA initiated an effort to identify such management issues and to find effective practices to deal with them. This information was provided in IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 369, Management for Excellence in Nuclear Power Plant Performance - A Manual (1994). This report builds upon the information in the subject manual. In the past 10 years there have been significant changes in the nuclear power industry resulting primarily from more competitive energy markets and privatization of nuclear power plant operating organizations. In general, the industry has responded positively to these changes, as indicated by IAEA/WANO performance indicators that show both improved operational and safety performance. This report provides examples of approaches to managing human resources that have been effective in responding to these changes. This report was produced through a series of meetings, where meeting participants were asked to share information regarding effective practices in their organizations with respect to managing human resources. The information provided through these meetings was supplemented with good practices in this area identified through IAEA Operational Safety Review Teams (OSARTs) conducted during the past 10 years

  2. Virtual Reality Applications in the Hospitality / Tourism Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Horan, Patrick

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the possible applications of VR to the Tourism Industry are discussed. In order to develop an application for any industry one must first get a clear understanding of that industry. Once this is achieved the next step is to develop an application to suit the needs of the Industry. The Industry in question here is the Tourism Industry and this paper begins by discussing the Tourism Industry and more specifically the relationship between Tourism and technology. This is absolutely ...

  3. A new industrial application of magnetic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beharrell, P.A.

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the application of magnetic separation to the removal and recovery of carbon steel grinding swarf from machining fluids used in large-scale industrial manufacturing processes such as in the automotive industry. Magnetic separation is a technology which has found widespread application in the mineral processing industry and in particular the beneficiation of kaolin clay for use in the paper industry. The technical feasibility of the application was demonstrated in the early stages of the work by the successful treatment of industrial samples using a crude laboratory-scale separator. In addition, the fluid and swarf material underwent extensive analysis using electron microscope-based optical and spectroscopic techniques in order to ascertain the presence of other undesirable components of the fluid that would require removal also. It was demonstrated by these results that the overall objective of the project was the development and testing of a laboratory-scale system which would allow the optimum operational parameters to be ascertained for the design of a commercially viable, large-scale system. A series of detailed trials on large volumes of industrial samples was carried out in conjunction with the development of the modifications that were required to existing magnetic separation theory in order to accommodate the particulars of this application. The trial system was tested to low applied magnetic strengths and high fluid flow velocities in order to optimise the economics of the application, resulting in extraction efficiencies of the order of 99.998% being achieved. During the course of the project, a new type of matrix cleaning system was developed for which a patent was applied and this was successfully tested in the trial system. Economic appraisal of the application suggests that an industrial-scale system could provide reliable, high quality recovery of grinding swarf at a cost of around one cent per cubic metre of

  4. The British Nuclear Industry Forum's public affairs campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, Keith

    2000-01-01

    Full text: In March 1999, BNIF launched a public affairs Campaign with the objective of influencing the views of opinion formers - particularly in the political field - about the case for nuclear energy as a long-term, sustainable component of the UK's energy mix. The Campaign was launched to BNIF's 70 member companies under the slogan, Profiting through Partnership - By Changing the Climate of Opinion. That slogan was chosen to emphasise a key feature of the Campaign approach, which is the importance of an industry speaking collectively with one voice, but with each individual company actively playing its part by spreading the industry's messages to their own local and regional audiences - Members of Parliament, local politicians, local media - to build a groundswell of support for the eventual renewal of nuclear energy in the UK. Our aim was to place the prospect of a new nuclear power station firmly on the political agenda during the lifetime of the next Parliament - that is, in the period 2002-2007. The Campaign was launched at a time when a few encouraging signs were emerging of a growing recognition in Government, Parliament, and in academic and scientific circles that nuclear energy has an important role to play in meeting the energy and environmental challenges of the 21st century. The challenge, in particular, of climate change and the UK Government's commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions undertaken at Kyoto and in its election manifesto, gave the industry a strong, positive issue on which to campaign. However, we fully recognised that to make a convincing case for nuclear energy we would also have to address the issues of concern and doubt in the minds of the public and politicians - economic competitiveness, waste management, transport and decommissioning. During the year, BNIF produced a range of Campaign materials, made submissions to several Government and other inquiries and consultations, organised events, meetings and discussions, all with

  5. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in “extreme” conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches. PMID:26494981

  6. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Littlechild

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in “extreme” conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches.

  7. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlechild, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in "extreme" conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches.

  8. Nuclear- and radiochemistry. Vol. 2. Modern applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesch, Frank (ed.) [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernchemie

    2016-07-01

    This work is conceived to meet the demand of state-of-the-art literature to teach the fundamentals as well as the modern applications of nuclear chemistry. The work will consist of two volumes: the first one covering the basics of nuclear chemistry such as the relevant parameters of instable atomic nuclei, the various modi of radioactive transmutations, the corresponding types of radiation including their detection and dosimetry, and finally the mechanisms of nuclear reactions. The second volume addresses relevant fields of nuclear chemistry, such as the chemistry of radioactive elements, application of radioactive nuclei in life sciences, nuclear energy, waste managements and environmental aspects, radiochemical separations, radioanalytical and spectroscopic methods, etc. Here, leading experts will contribute up-to-date knowledge on the most important application of nuclear chemistry.

  9. Nuclear- and radiochemistry. Vol. 2. Modern applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesch, Frank

    2016-01-01

    This work is conceived to meet the demand of state-of-the-art literature to teach the fundamentals as well as the modern applications of nuclear chemistry. The work will consist of two volumes: the first one covering the basics of nuclear chemistry such as the relevant parameters of instable atomic nuclei, the various modi of radioactive transmutations, the corresponding types of radiation including their detection and dosimetry, and finally the mechanisms of nuclear reactions. The second volume addresses relevant fields of nuclear chemistry, such as the chemistry of radioactive elements, application of radioactive nuclei in life sciences, nuclear energy, waste managements and environmental aspects, radiochemical separations, radioanalytical and spectroscopic methods, etc. Here, leading experts will contribute up-to-date knowledge on the most important application of nuclear chemistry.

  10. The industrial application of radioisotopes in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easey, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, the Australian Atomic Energy Commission has conducted a wide-ranging program of radioisotope applications to solve industrial problems of local, regional or national importance. Most of the investigations have been concerned with the behaviour of large complex systems. Broadly, the work covers such economically important fields as flow studies, environmental studies and coastal engineering studies. (author)

  11. Application of Pressure Equipment Standard at nuclear power plants; Aplicacion del Reglamento de Equipos a Presion a las centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostaza, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    Regarding with the paper presented on 9{sup t}h June 2011 referred to the Industrial Security standard in Nuclear Plants, it was about the application of Pressure Equipment standard to mentioned Nuclear Plants, this article is an extract of the paper going to be exposed. (Author)

  12. What can industry do to improve acceptance of nuclear energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panossian, J.

    1990-01-01

    Even though nuclear energy covers approximately a third of the energy needs of Western Europe without having injured anyone or damaging the environment, its development is considerably hindered in many countries by the opposition of a significant part of the public. The majority of those responsible for the energy supply though, is of the opinion that nuclear energy should continue to play at least as great a role in coming years. In order to lead the public to a positive stand towards nuclear energy, the industry must perfect its product and improve the quality of its communication. One cannot afford to be afraid of admitting that the product, nuclear energy, can be even further improved, even if it is currently at a very high level. Experienced suppliers in the field of nuclear energy have great sums of money with which to work, and should continue to invest in development. It is especially important that the existing nuclear power plants demonstrate exemplary company behavior in respect to safety, availability and economy: this is the best proof of the advantages of nuclear energy and that it is harmless. In regards to communication, it is important to remember that resistance disappears if the public can be directly acquainted with the object of its fears. This explains the special interest in tours of nuclear power plants. The manner in which risk is understood also needs our attention. Risk is not easily understood. It is more easily grasped if it is identified with a highest unsurmountable limit value which corresponds with acceptable consequences. Finally, the public must be informed that nuclear energy is the most environmentally safe means of energy production. (author)

  13. The US nuclear utility industry today: progress since TMI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pate, Z.T.

    1988-01-01

    The paper concerns the progress of the industry since the Three Mile Island reactor accident, in terms of improved operational practices. The industry has shown broad progress in key areas of plant safety and reliability due to assistance by INPO, the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations. INPO's programmes fall into four principal areas -evaluations, event analysis and information exchange, training and accreditation, and assistance. Significant performance improvements in the US utilities, as measured by a set of carefully selected performance indicators, are briefly described. (U.K.)

  14. Towards a nuclear industry boosted by artificial intelligence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc, B.

    2017-01-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is deemed as the fourth industrial revolution after the steam engine, electric power and the computer. Auto manufacturers invest a lot in AI to develop autonomous vehicles. Nuclear industry that has to deal with a huge amount of data due to the complexity of its installations may benefit from AI in terms of quick handling of complex situations, of reducing the rate of errors, of drawing adequate conclusions through the right crossing of data and of improving decision making. (A.C.)

  15. Environmental aspects of nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penner, S.S.; Howe, J.P.; Icerman, L.

    1976-01-01

    The paper estimates the future dangers from the nuclear industry. Historically, the occurrence of nuclear reactor accidents has not been a hazard to the U.S. population, because of relatively limited reactor deployment and because of relatively safe operation. Some factual inputs were taken from the Rasmussen Report, ''An Assessment of Accident Risks in U.S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants.'' It is noted that data on nuclear power plant accidents follow a curve about four orders of magnitude below that for persons on the ground killed by air crashes. Data show that coal mining produced about ten times as many disabilities as uranium mining and milling per 10 6 MW(e)h of energy recovered, while the number of injuries per 10 6 man-hours of work was roughly comparable for these two types of occupations. Information on the following subjects is then presented: radiation protection standards, radiation exposures; radiation emitted from nuclear reactors under normal operating conditions; accidents involving nuclear fission reactors; fuel reprocessing; nuclear waste disposal; estimates of environmental and safety aspects of fusion power; licensing of nuclear reactors; nuclear safeguards: diversion of nuclear materials, sabotage, and subversion; and nuclear energy and trade deficits in which data are presented estimating a timetable expressing the economic power of OPEC, or the time required for OPEC wealth to purchase the world's major assets

  16. Application of industrial robots in tubesheet cladding and tube to tubesheet welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berbakov, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper deals with the implementation of industrial robots in two areas of fabrication of nuclear power generation components at The Babcock and Wilcox Company facility in Barberton, Ohio. The applications described are robotic cladding of tubesheets, and tube-to-tubesheet Welding in nuclear steam generators

  17. The modern trends in energy and nuclear industry of Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenzhemurat, D.; Sergey, K.; Timur, A.

    2000-01-01

    Kazakhstan has in perspective the potential to be self-sufficient in energy resources and also to export such resources to other countries. This article describes the energy sector of Kazakhstan, the perspectives of the development the energy and nuclear industry and shows the problems and methods of its solutions. The energy sector of Kazakhstan has diversified sources of energy resources. The open market of electricity will generate the investments and direct them to the development for more efficiency use of these resources. Rehabilitation of old power stations and their modernisation will allow to cover the future needs of Kazakhstan. The nuclear industry of Kazakhstan has the infrastructure, high-qualified staff, enterprises, reactors and investments for the development. The energy policy of the Republic of Kazakhstan is directed to find the balance between different sources of energy to decrease the emissions of greenhouse gas. (author)

  18. Screening for aberrant behavior in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borofsky, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper attempts to promote a fuller understanding of how psychological assessment procedures can be used to reduce the threat from aberrant behavior in the nuclear industry. It begins with a discussion of the scientifically based methods that are used by psychologists in constructing, scoring, and interpreting these procedures. This discussion includes an emphasis on the concepts of validity and reliability and their central importance when one is choosing specific psychological screening tools. Criteria for selecting and using psychological assessment procedures when screening for aberrant behavior are also provided. Some commonly used assessment procedures that satisfy these criteria are discussed. A number a psychological assessment procedures specifically recommended for use in screening for aberrant behavior in the nuclear industry are described

  19. Quality management in the nuclear industry: the human factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    In the nuclear industry it is vital to understand the 'human factor' with regard to plant performance and plant safety. A proper management system ensures that personnel perform their duties correctly. 'Quality Management in the Nuclear Industry: the Human Factor', was a conference organized by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers in October 1990. The conference covered a wide range of topics on an international level including: standards, licensing and regulatory procedures; selection assessment and training of personnel; feedback from experience of good practice and of deviations; management and support of personnel performance; modelling and evaluation of human factors. The papers presented at the conference are contained in this volume. All twenty papers are indexed separately. (author).

  20. Implementation of Industry Experience at Nuclear Power Plant Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heruc, Z.; Kavsek, D.

    2002-01-01

    Being a standalone comparatively small unit NPP Krsko has adopted a business philosophy to incorporate industry experience into its daily operations. The continuos and safe operation of the unit is supported through feedback from other utilities (lessons learned) and equipment vendors and manufacturers. A permanent proactive approach in monitoring the international nuclear technology practices, standards changes and improvements, and upon feasibility review, introducing them into processes and equipment upgrades, is applied. As a member of the most important international integrations, NPP Krsko has benefited from the opportunity of sharing its experience with others (World Association of Nuclear Operators -WANO, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations - INPO, International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, Nuclear Operations Maintenance Information Service - NOMIS, Nuclear Maintenance Experience Exchange - NUMEX, Electric Power Research Institute - EPRI, Westinghouse Owners Group - WOG, etc.). Voluntary activities and good practices related to safety are achieved by international missions (IAEA Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team - ASSET, IAEA Operational Safety Review Team - OSART, WANO Peer Review, International Commission for Independent Safety Analysis - ICISA) and operating experience exchange programs through international organizations. These missions are promoting the highest levels of excellence in nuclear power plant operation, maintenance and support. With time, the practices described in this paper presented themselves as most contributing to safe and reliable operation of our power plant and at the same time supporting cost optimization making it a viable and reliable source of electrical energy in the more and more deregulated market. (author)