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Sample records for nuclear graphite properties

  1. IAEA international database on irradiated nuclear graphite properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; Clark, R.E.H.; Stephens, J.A.; Eto, M.; Haag, G.; Hacker, P.; Neighbour, G.B.; Janev, R.K.; Wickham, A.J.

    2000-02-01

    This report describes an IAEA database containing data on the properties of irradiated nuclear graphites. Development and implementation of the graphite database followed initial discussions at an IAEA Specialists' Meeting held in September 1995. The design of the database is based upon developments at the University of Bath (United Kingdom), work which the UK Health and Safety Executive initially supported. The database content and data management policies were determined during two IAEA Consultants' Meetings of nuclear reactor graphite specialists held in 1998 and 1999. The graphite data are relevant to the construction and safety case developments required for new and existing HTR nuclear power plants, and to the development of safety cases for continued operation of existing plants. The database design provides a flexible structure for data archiving and retrieval and employs Microsoft Access 97. An instruction manual is provided within this document for new users, including installation instructions for the database on personal computers running Windows 95/NT 4.0 or higher versions. The data management policies and associated responsibilities are contained in the database Working Arrangement which is included as an Appendix to this report. (author)

  2. Characterization of nuclear graphite elastic properties using laser ultrasonic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan W.; Han, Karen; Olasov, Lauren R.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Spicer, James B.

    2015-05-01

    Laser ultrasonic methods have been used to characterize the elastic behaviors of commercially-available and legacy nuclear graphites. Since ultrasonic techniques are sensitive to various aspects of graphite microstructure including preferred grain orientation, microcrack orientation and porosity, laser ultrasonics is a candidate technique for monitoring graphite degradation and structural integrity in environments expected in high-temperature, gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Aspects of materials texture can be assessed by studying ultrasonic wavespeeds as a function of propagation direction and polarization. Shear wave birefringence measurements, in particular, can be used to evaluate elastic anisotropy. In this work, laser ultrasonic measurements of graphite moduli have been made to provide insight into the relationship between the microstructures and the macroscopic stiffnesses of these materials. In particular, laser ultrasonic measurements have been made using laser line sources to produce shear waves with specific polarizations. By varying the line orientation relative to the sample, shear wave birefringence measurements have been recorded. Results from shear wave birefringence measurements show that an isostatically molded graphite, such as PCIB, behaves isotropically, while an extruded graphite, such as H-451, displays significant ultrasonic texture. Graphites have complicated microstructures that depend on the manufacturing processes used, and ultrasonic texture in these materials could originate from grain orientation and preferred microcrack alignment. Effects on material isotropy due to service related microstructural changes are possible and the ultimate aim of this work is to determine the degree to which these changes can be assessed nondestructively using laser ultrasonics measurements.

  3. Nuclear graphite wear properties and estimation of graphite dust production in HTR-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xiaowei, E-mail: xwluo@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, Xiaoxin; Shi, Li; Yu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Suyuan

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Graphite dust. • The wear properties of graphite. • Pebble bed. • High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor. • Fuel element. - Abstract: The issue of the graphite dust has been a research focus for the safety of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), especially for the pebble bed reactors. Most of the graphite dust is produced from the wear of fuel elements during cycling of fuel elements. However, due to the complexity of the motion of the fuel elements in the pebble bed, there is no systematic method developed to predict the amount the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor. In this paper, the study of the flow of the fuel elements in the pebble bed was carried out. Both theoretical calculation and numerical analysis by Discrete Element Method (DEM) software PFC3D were conducted to obtain the normal forces and sliding distances of the fuel elements in pebble bed. The wearing theory was then integrated with PFC3D to estimate the amount of the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor, 10 MW High Temperature gas-cooled test Reactor (HTR-10).

  4. Measurement and investigation of effects of coal tar pitch fractions in nuclear graphite properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatemi, K.; Fatoorehchian, S.; Ahari Hashemi, F.; Ahmadi, Sh.

    2003-01-01

    Coal tar pitch has a complex chemical structure. Determination of α, β, γ fractions, is one of the methods to get information about its properties. In graphite fabrication it plays a role as a binder for coke particles. During the thermal treatment it carbonizes and changes to a secondary coke. This has considerable affects on the graphite properties. In this paper, determination of α, β, γ-1 fraction in three different types of pitches have been carried out. Graphite specimens have been fabricated by using these pitches and anisotropy coke in laboratory scale. The graphite properties have been compared with the nuclear graphite prototype. The comparison of the results showed that the density and compression strength are appreciable while the anisotropy factor of properties is about one. The linear thermal expansion in graphite from Iranian pitch had a better, result, where it stands in the nuclear range of usage. As a result, our studies showed that the graphite properties are affected by properties of pitch fractions, where it can be used as a proper sample for the graphite fabrication

  5. Nuclear graphite ageing and turnaround

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Hall, G.N.; Smart, J.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite moderated reactors are being operated in many countries including, the UK, Russia, Lithuania, Ukraine and Japan. Many of these reactors will operate well into the next century. New designs of High Temperature Graphite Moderated Reactors (HTRS) are being built in China and Japan. The design life of these graphite-moderated reactors is governed by the ageing of the graphite core due to fast neutron damage, and also, in the case of carbon dioxide cooled reactors by the rate of oxidation of the graphite. Nuclear graphites are polycrystalline in nature and it is the irradiation-induced damage to the individual graphite crystals that determines the material property changes with age. The life of a graphite component in a nuclear reactor can be related to the graphite irradiation induced dimensional changes. Graphites typically shrink with age, until a point is reached where the shrinkage stops and the graphite starts to swell. This change from shrinkage to swelling is known as ''turnaround''. It is well known that pre-oxidising graphite specimens caused ''turnaround'' to be delayed, thus extending the life of the graphite, and hence the life of the reactor. However, there was no satisfactory explanation of this behaviour. This paper presents a numerical crystal based model of dimensional change in graphite, which explains the delay in ''turnaround'' in the pre-oxidised specimens irradiated in a fast neutron flux, in terms of crystal accommodation and orientation and change in compliance due to radiolytic oxidation. (author)

  6. Quality assurance for the IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, A.J.; Humbert, D.

    2006-06-01

    Consideration has been given to the process of Quality Assurance applied to data entered into current versions of the IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. Originally conceived simply as a means of collecting and preserving data on irradiation experiments and reactor operation, the data are increasingly being utilised for the preparation of safety arguments and in the design of new graphites for forthcoming generations of graphite-moderated plant. Under these circumstances, regulatory agencies require assurances that the data are of appropriate accuracy and correctly transcribed, that obvious errors in the original documentation are either highlighted or corrected, etc., before they are prepared to accept analyses built upon these data. The processes employed in the data transcription are described in this document, and proposals are made for the categorisation of data and for error reporting by Database users. (author)

  7. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  8. Graphites for nuclear applications; Les graphites pour les applications nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonal, J.P.; Gosmain, L. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DMN), Lab. de Microscopie et d' Etudes de l' Endommagement, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-03-15

    Being an excellent neutron moderator, graphite is used as a structural material in many nuclear reactor types. By the end of the 50's, the French gas-cooled reactor development needed manufacturing of a nuclear-grade graphite. Graphite irradiation can lead to in-lattice energy accumulation, dimensional changes and physical properties modification. Moreover, the radiolytic corrosion induced by the coolant (CO{sub 2}) may generate mechanical properties degradation. Today, French gas-cooled reactors are all in their decommissioning phase that requires the knowledge of the radiological inventory of the irradiated graphites. At present time, graphite is still foreseen as a future material for hydrogen production by high temperature gas cooled nuclear plants. In the future, graphite will be the necessary moderator material for high temperature reactors with thermal neutron spectrum dedicated to hydrogen and electricity production. (authors)

  9. IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. 6th meeting of the Technical Steering Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Wickham, A.J.

    2004-12-01

    This report summarizes the Consultant Meeting 6th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties' held on 16-17 September 2004 at Plas Tan-Y-Bwlch, Maentwrog, Gwynedd, UK. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database and to make recommendations for actions for the next year. The purposes of the meeting were fully met. This report contains the current status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  10. IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. 7th meeting of the Technical Steering Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Wickham, A.J.

    2005-06-01

    This report summarizes the Consultant Meeting '7th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties' held on 16-17 March 2005 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database and to make recommendations for actions for the next year. The purposes of the meeting were fully met. This report contains the current status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  11. Summary report of consultants' meeting on IAEA international database on irradiated nuclear graphite properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Wickham, A.J.

    2007-06-01

    The '9th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties' was held on 26-27 March 2007 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. All discussions, recommendations and actions of this Consultants' Meeting are recorded in this report. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database and make recommendations for actions for the next year. This report contains the current status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  12. Production of nuclear graphite in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legendre, P.; Mondet, L.; Arragon, Ph.; Cornuault, P.; Gueron, J.; Hering, H.

    1955-01-01

    The graphite intended for the construction of the reactors is obtained by the usual process: confection of a cake from coke of oil and tar, cooked (in a electric oven) then the product of cook is graphitized, also by electric heating. The use of the air transportation and the control of conditions cooking and graphitization have permitted to increase the nuclear graphite production as well as to better control their physical and mechanical properties and to reduce to the minimum the unwanted stains. (M.B.) [fr

  13. Non-destructive evaluation on mechanical properties of nuclear graphite with porous structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taiju; Hanawa, Satoshi; Sumita, Junya; Tada, Tatsuya; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Iyoku, Tatsuo

    2005-01-01

    As a research subjects of 'Research and development for advanced high temperature gas cooled reactor fuels and graphite components,' we started the study of development of non-destructive evaluation methods for mechanical properties of graphite components. The micro-indentation and ultrasonic wave methods are focused to evaluate the degradation of graphite components in VHTR core. For the micro-indentation method, the test apparatus was designed for the indentation test on graphite specimens with some stress levels. It is expected the stress condition is evaluated by the indentation load-depth characteristics and hardness. For the ultrasonic wave method, ultrasonic wave testing machine and probes were prepared for experiments. It is expected that the stress and inner porous conditions are evaluated by the wave propagation characteristics with wave-pore interaction model. R and D plan to develop the non-destructive evaluation method for graphite is presented in this paper. (This study is the result of contract research in the fiscal year of 2004, Research and development for advanced high temperature gas cooled reactor fuels and graphite components,' which is entrusted to the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.) (author)

  14. The influence of roughness on tribological properties of nuclear grade graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Xiaowei; Yu Suyuan; Sheng Xuanyu; He Shuyan

    2006-01-01

    The influence of surface roughness on tribological properties of graphite IG-11 was investigated on a standard SRV tester. The experimental condition was selected as: 30 N normal load, room temperature and a 10 Hz frequency with different strokes. The experiments environments included helium and air. Five types of roughness were studied in the experiments. The experiments revealed that the surface roughness greatly affected the graphite friction behavior. When the friction surface was smooth, the friction coefficient was high because of intensive adhesion accompanied by many pits at the friction surface. When the friction surface was rough, the adhesion was very poor, but the wear was excessive and generated many graphite particles at the friction surface. These particles can separate the friction surfaces, which reduced the friction action between them. For very rough specimens, the friction coefficient decreased with sliding velocity at about 0.004 m/s and then increases gradually

  15. Obtention of nuclear grade graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    The impurity level of natural graphite found in some of the most important mines of the State of Minas Gerais - Brasil is determined. It is also concerned with the development and use of natural graphite in nuclear reactors. Standard methods for chemical and instrumentsal analysis such as Spectrografic Determination by Emission, Spectrografic Determination by X-Rays, Spectrografic Determination by Atomic Asorption, Photometric Determination, and also chemical and physical methods for separation of impurities as well standard method for Estimating the Thermal Neutron Absorption Cross Section of graphite were employed. Some aditionals methods of purification to the ordinary treatment such as the use of metanol and halogens are also described. (Author) [pt

  16. IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. Summary report of consultants' meeting. 12. meeting of the Technical Steering Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.K.; Wickham, A.J.

    2010-02-01

    The 12th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties was held on 12-13 November 2009 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. All discussions, recommendations and actions of this Consultants' Meeting are recorded in this report. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database, and make recommendations for action over the next year. This report contains the status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  17. The wear properties of nuclear grade graphite IG-11 under different loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Xiaowei; Zhang Lihong; Yu Suyuan

    2004-01-01

    The influence of normal load on wear performance of graphite used in a 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled reactor was investigated. The experiments included the wear between graphite and graphite specimens, and the wear between graphite and stainless steel specimens. The worn surfaces and abrasive particles were analysed with SEM and the wear mechanism was discussed. The sizes of abrasive particles were counted. (author)

  18. Cementation of Nuclear Graphite Using Geopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girke, N.A.; Steinmetz, H-J.; Bukaemsky, A.; Bosbach, D.; Hermann, E.; Griebel, I.

    2016-01-01

    Geopolymers are solid aluminosilicate materials usually formed by alkali hydroxide or alkali silicate activation of solid precursors such as coal fly ash, calcined clay and/or metallurgical slag. Today the primary application of geopolymer technology is in the development of alternatives to Portland-based cements. Variations in the ratio of aluminium to silicon, and alkali to silicon or addition of structure support, produce geopolymers with different physical and mechanical properties. These materials have an amorphous three-dimensional structure that gives geopolymers certain properties, such as fire and acid resistance, low leach rate, which make them an ideal substitute for ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in a wide range of applications especially in conditioning and storage of radioactive waste. Therefore investigations have been initiated on how and to which amount graphite as a hydrophobic material can be mixed with cement or concrete to form stable waste products and which concretes fulfil the necessary specifications best. As a result, geopolymers have been identified as a promising matrix for graphite containing nuclear wastes. With geopolymers, both favourable properties in the cementation process and a high long time structural stability of the products can be achieved. Investigations include: • direct mixing of graphite with geopolymers with or without sand as a mechanically stabilizing medium; • production of cement-graphite granulates as intermediate products and embedding of these granulates in geopolymer; • coating of formed graphite pieces with geopolymer.The report shows that carbon in the form of graphite can both be integrated with different grain size spectra as well as shaped in the hydraulic binder geopolymer and meets the requirements for a stable long-term immobilisation. (author)

  19. Sealing nuclear graphite with pyrolytic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Shanglei; Xu, Li; Li, Li; Bai, Shuo; Yang, Xinmei; Zhou, Xingtai

    2013-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) coatings were deposited on IG-110 nuclear graphite by thermal decomposition of methane at ∼1830 °C. The PyC coatings are anisotropic and airtight enough to protect IG-110 nuclear graphite against the permeation of molten fluoride salts and the diffusion of gases. The investigations indicate that the sealing nuclear graphite with PyC coating is a promising method for its application in Molten Salt Reactor (MSR)

  20. Improving molten fluoride salt and Xe135 barrier property of nuclear graphite by phenolic resin impregnation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhao; Lian, Pengfei; Song, Yan; Liu, Zhanjun; Song, Jinliang; Zhang, Junpeng; Feng, Jing; Yan, Xi; Guo, Quangui

    2018-02-01

    A densification process has been conducted on isostatic graphite (IG-110, TOYO TANSO CO., Ltd., Japan) by impregnating phenolic resin to get the densified isostatic graphite (D-IG-110) with pore diameter of nearly 11 nm specifically for molten salt reactor application. The microstructure, mechanical, thermophysical and other properties of graphite were systematically investigated and compared before and after the densification process. The molten fluoride salt and Xe135 penetration in the graphite were evaluated in a high-pressure reactor and a vacuum device, respectively. Results indicated that D-IG-110 exhibited improved properties including infiltration resistance to molten fluoride salt and Xe135 as compared to IG-110 due to its low porosity of 2.8%, the average pore diameter of 11 nm and even smaller open pores on the surface of the graphite. The fluoride salt infiltration amount of IG-110 was 13.5 wt% under 1.5 atm and tended to be saturated under 3 atm with the fluoride salt occupation of 14.8 wt%. As to the D-IG-110, no salts could be detected even up to 10 atm attempted loading. The helium diffusion coefficient of D-IG-110 was 6.92 × 10-8 cm2/s, significantly less than 1.21 × 10-2 cm2/s of IG-110. If these as-produced properties for impregnated D-IG-110 could be retained during MSR operation, the material could prove effective at inhibiting molten fluoride salt and Xe135 inventories in the graphite.

  1. Modelling property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperature

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kok, S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method is proposed to predict the irradiation induced property changes in nuclear; graphite, including the effect of a change in irradiation temperature. The currently used method; to account for changes in irradiation temperature, the scaled...

  2. Microstructural Characterization of Next Generation Nuclear Graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthik Chinnathambi; Joshua Kane; Darryl P. Butt; William E. Windes; Rick Ubic

    2012-04-01

    This article reports the microstructural characteristics of various petroleum and pitch based nuclear graphites (IG-110, NBG-18, and PCEA) that are of interest to the next generation nuclear plant program. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging was used to identify and understand the different features constituting the microstructure of nuclear graphite such as the filler particles, microcracks, binder phase, rosette-shaped quinoline insoluble (QI) particles, chaotic structures, and turbostratic graphite phase. The dimensions of microcracks were found to vary from a few nanometers to tens of microns. Furthermore, the microcracks were found to be filled with amorphous carbon of unknown origin. The pitch coke based graphite (NBG-18) was found to contain higher concentration of binder phase constituting QI particles as well as chaotic structures. The turbostratic graphite, present in all of the grades, was identified through their elliptical diffraction patterns. The difference in the microstructure has been analyzed in view of their processing conditions.

  3. The Fracture Toughness of Nuclear Graphites Grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Erdman, III, Donald L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lowden, Rick R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunter, James A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hannel, Cara C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    New measurements of graphite mode I critical stress intensity factor, KIc (commonly referred to as the fracture toughness) and the mode II critical shear stress intensity, KIIc, are reported and compared with prior data for KIc and KIIc. The new data are for graphite grades PCEA, IG-110 and 2114. Variations of KIc and acoustic emission (AE) data with graphite texture are reported and discussed. The Codes and Standards applications of fracture toughness, KIc, data are also discussed. A specified minimum value for nuclear graphite KIc is recommended.

  4. Mechanical properties of graphites and carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouquet, Gilbert.

    1977-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of graphites and artificial carbons is related to the structure of these materials. The influence of structural modifications in a graphite monocrystal on the deformation and fracture properties is studied [fr

  5. On estimating the fracture probability of nuclear graphite components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Makuteswara

    2008-01-01

    The properties of nuclear grade graphites exhibit anisotropy and could vary considerably within a manufactured block. Graphite strength is affected by the direction of alignment of the constituent coke particles, which is dictated by the forming method, coke particle size, and the size, shape, and orientation distribution of pores in the structure. In this paper, a Weibull failure probability analysis for components is presented using the American Society of Testing Materials strength specification for nuclear grade graphites for core components in advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The risk of rupture (probability of fracture) and survival probability (reliability) of large graphite blocks are calculated for varying and discrete values of service tensile stresses. The limitations in these calculations are discussed from considerations of actual reactor environmental conditions that could potentially degrade the specification properties because of damage due to complex interactions between irradiation, temperature, stress, and variability in reactor operation

  6. Nuclear graphite for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    The cores and reflectors in modern High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTRs) are constructed from graphite components. There are two main designs; the Pebble Bed design and the Prism design. In both of these designs the graphite not only acts as a moderator, but is also a major structural component that may provide channels for the fuel and coolant gas, channels for control and safety shut off devices and provide thermal and neutron shielding. In addition, graphite components may act as a heat sink or conduction path during reactor trips and transients. During reactor operation, many of the graphite component physical properties are significantly changed by irradiation. These changes lead to the generation of significant internal shrinkage stresses and thermal shut down stresses that could lead to component failure. In addition, if the graphite is irradiated to a very high irradiation dose, irradiation swelling can lead to a rapid reduction in modulus and strength, making the component friable.The irradiation behaviour of graphite is strongly dependent on its virgin microstructure, which is determined by the manufacturing route. Nevertheless, there are available, irradiation data on many obsolete graphites of known microstructures. There is also a well-developed physical understanding of the process of irradiation damage in graphite. This paper proposes a specification for graphite suitable for modern HTRs. (author)

  7. Summary report of consultants meeting on IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. 11. meeting of the Technical Steering Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Wickham, A.J.

    2009-05-01

    The 11th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties was held on 25-26 March 2009 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. All discussions, recommendations and actions of this Consultants' Meeting are recorded in this report. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database, and make recommendations for action over the next year. This report contains the status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  8. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpeux S; Cacciaguerra T; Duclaux L

    2005-01-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF 2 , ThF 4 , and UF 4 ) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin or polyvinyl chloride precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm 3 and closed pores with nano-metric size (∼ 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons, in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry of the graphite substrate. The deposit regions where

  9. Topological investigation of nuclear graphite using small angle scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Durgesh K.; Khaykovich, Boris; Campbell, Anne A.; Ilvasky, Jan; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.

    Nuclear power reactors require high performance materials that withstand high temperatures and neutron damage over long period of times. Graphite is widely used for high temperature fission reactor applications. It has a complex multiphase microstructure, which is affected by neutron irradiation. The irradiation-induced microstructures result in significant thermophysical property changes, affecting service lifetimes. It is important to understand these life-limiting phenomena at many different length scales. We present the results from small angle scattering (SAS) studies on graphite samples, which vary in doses and irradiation temperatures. The neutron and synchrotron SAS measurement data indicates that the graphite morphology consists of surface fractal structures. The samples were found to be uniform across several decades of length scale, while exhibiting different surface fractal dimensions, for different irradiation doses and temperature conditions. The surface fractal dimension changes at HFIR at ORNL, DOE User Facility; APS at ANL, DOE User Facility; Office of Nuclear Energy NSUF.

  10. Properties of graphite composites based on natural and synthetic graphite powders and a phenolic novolac binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magampa, P. P.; Manyala, N.; Focke, W. W.

    2013-05-01

    Model graphite composites, similar to those used in nuclear applications as encasement material in fuel pebbles, were prepared by uniaxial cold compression moulding. They contained natural flake graphite, synthetic graphite and 20 wt.% phenolic novolac resin binder. The materials were carbonised at 900 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere and then annealed at 1800 °C in helium atmosphere. The X-ray diffraction studies showed that the graphite in these composites had hexagonal crystal structure after annealing. Raman spectroscopy revealed the presence of the structurally disordered phase derived from the carbonised resin. Optical microscopy revealed a flake-like microstructure for composites containing mainly natural graphite and needle-coke like particles for composites containing mainly synthetic graphite. The composites featured anisotropic property behaviour as the particles were partially aligned in a direction perpendicular to the compression direction. Thermogravimetric analysis studies showed that the annealed graphite composites were stable in air to 650 °C. The linear thermal expansion coefficients measured by thermomechanical analysis (20-600 °C) in the direction of pressing were in the range 5-9 × 10-6 K-1 and in the range 1.2-2 × 10-6 K-1 in the direction normal to pressing. The thermal conductivity of the composites were measured using Xenon flash method from 100 to 1000 °C and the values ranged from 19 to 30 W m-1 K-1.

  11. Direct reading spectrochemical analysis of nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca Adell, M.; Becerro Ruiz, E.; Alvarez Gonzalez, F.

    1964-01-01

    A description is given about the application of a direct-reading spectrometer the Quantometer, to the determination of boron. calcium, iron, titanium and vanadium in nuclear grade graphite. for boron the powdered sample is mixed with 1% cupric fluoride and excited in a 10-amperes direct current arc and graphite electrodes with a crater 7 mm wide and 10 mm deep. For the other elements a smaller crater has been used and dilution with a number of matrices has been investigated; the best results are achieved by employing 25% cupric fluoride. The sensitivity limit for boron is 0,15 ppm. (Author) 21 refs

  12. Mechanical properties of graphite and carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouquet, G.

    1976-01-01

    The elastic properties of the graphite monocrystal, the role of internal characteristics (texture, porosity) on the mechanical behavior of carbons, effects caused by the gaseous environment and neutron irradiation, and the resistance of graphites to cyclic mechanical stresses are discussed [fr

  13. Graphite matrix materials for nuclear waste isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1981-06-01

    At low temperatures, graphites are chemically inert to all but the strongest oxidizing agents. The raw materials from which artificial graphites are produced are plentiful and inexpensive. Morover, the physical properties of artificial graphites can be varied over a very wide range by the choice of raw materials and manufacturing processes. Manufacturing processes are reviewed herein, with primary emphasis on those processes which might be used to produce a graphite matrix for the waste forms. The approach, recommended herein, involves the low-temperature compaction of a finely ground powder produced from graphitized petroleum coke. The resultant compacts should have fairly good strength, low permeability to both liquids and gases, and anisotropic physical properties. In particular, the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients and the thermal conductivity should be advantageous for this application. With two possible exceptions, the graphite matrix appears to be superior to the metal alloy matrices which have been recommended in prior studies. The two possible exceptions are the requirements on strength and permeability; both requirements will be strongly influenced by the containment design, including the choice of materials and the waste form, of the multibarrier package. Various methods for increasing the strength, and for decreasing the permeability of the matrix, are reviewed and discussed in the sections in Incorporation of Other Materials and Elimination of Porosity. However, it would be premature to recommend a particular process until the overall multi-barrier design is better defined. It is recommended that increased emphasis be placed on further development of the low-temperature compacted graphite matrix concept.

  14. Graphite matrix materials for nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1981-06-01

    At low temperatures, graphites are chemically inert to all but the strongest oxidizing agents. The raw materials from which artificial graphites are produced are plentiful and inexpensive. Morover, the physical properties of artificial graphites can be varied over a very wide range by the choice of raw materials and manufacturing processes. Manufacturing processes are reviewed herein, with primary emphasis on those processes which might be used to produce a graphite matrix for the waste forms. The approach, recommended herein, involves the low-temperature compaction of a finely ground powder produced from graphitized petroleum coke. The resultant compacts should have fairly good strength, low permeability to both liquids and gases, and anisotropic physical properties. In particular, the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients and the thermal conductivity should be advantageous for this application. With two possible exceptions, the graphite matrix appears to be superior to the metal alloy matrices which have been recommended in prior studies. The two possible exceptions are the requirements on strength and permeability; both requirements will be strongly influenced by the containment design, including the choice of materials and the waste form, of the multibarrier package. Various methods for increasing the strength, and for decreasing the permeability of the matrix, are reviewed and discussed in the sections in Incorporation of Other Materials and Elimination of Porosity. However, it would be premature to recommend a particular process until the overall multi-barrier design is better defined. It is recommended that increased emphasis be placed on further development of the low-temperature compacted graphite matrix concept

  15. Elastic properties of graphite and interstitial defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayasse, J.-B.

    1977-01-01

    The graphite elastic constants C 33 and C 44 , reflecting the interaction of the graphitic planes, were experimentally measured as a function of irradiation and temperature. A model of non-central strength atomic interaction was established to explain the experimental results obtained. This model is valid at zero temperature. The temperature dependence of the elastic properties was analyzed. The influence of the elastic property variations on the specific heat of the lattice at very low temperature was investigated [fr

  16. Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gilpin R.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Olson, Donald W.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Graphite is a form of pure carbon that normally occurs as black crystal flakes and masses. It has important properties, such as chemical inertness, thermal stability, high electrical conductivity, and lubricity (slipperiness) that make it suitable for many industrial applications, including electronics, lubricants, metallurgy, and steelmaking. For some of these uses, no suitable substitutes are available. Steelmaking and refractory applications in metallurgy use the largest amount of produced graphite; however, emerging technology uses in large-scale fuel cell, battery, and lightweight high-strength composite applications could substantially increase world demand for graphite.Graphite ores are classified as “amorphous” (microcrystalline), and “crystalline” (“flake” or “lump or chip”) based on the ore’s crystallinity, grain-size, and morphology. All graphite deposits mined today formed from metamorphism of carbonaceous sedimentary rocks, and the ore type is determined by the geologic setting. Thermally metamorphosed coal is the usual source of amorphous graphite. Disseminated crystalline flake graphite is mined from carbonaceous metamorphic rocks, and lump or chip graphite is mined from veins in high-grade metamorphic regions. Because graphite is chemically inert and nontoxic, the main environmental concerns associated with graphite mining are inhalation of fine-grained dusts, including silicate and sulfide mineral particles, and hydrocarbon vapors produced during the mining and processing of ore. Synthetic graphite is manufactured from hydrocarbon sources using high-temperature heat treatment, and it is more expensive to produce than natural graphite.Production of natural graphite is dominated by China, India, and Brazil, which export graphite worldwide. China provides approximately 67 percent of worldwide output of natural graphite, and, as the dominant exporter, has the ability to set world prices. China has significant graphite reserves, and

  17. Special graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.

    1964-01-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [fr

  18. Role of nuclear grade graphite in controlling oxidation in modular HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windes, Willaim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kane, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The passively safe High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design is one of the primary concepts considered for Generation IV and Small Modular Reactor (SMR) programs. The helium cooled, nuclear grade graphite moderated core achieves extremely high operating temperatures allowing either industrial process heat or electricity generation at high efficiencies. In addition to their neutron moderating properties, nuclear grade graphite core components provide excellent high temperature stability, thermal conductivity, and chemical compatibility with the high temperature nuclear fuel form. Graphite has been continuously used in nuclear reactors since the 1940’s and has performed remarkably well over a wide range of core environments and operating conditions. Graphite moderated, gas-cooled reactor designs have been safely used for research and power production purposes in multiple countries since the inception of nuclear energy development. However, graphite is a carbonaceous material, and this has generated a persistent concern that the graphite components could actually burn during either normal or accident conditions [ , ]. The common assumption is that graphite, since it is ostensibly similar to charcoal and coal, will burn in a similar manner. While charcoal and coal may have the appearance of graphite, the internal microstructure and impurities within these carbonaceous materials are very different. Volatile species and trapped moisture provide a source of oxygen within coal and charcoal allowing them to burn. The fabrication process used to produce nuclear grade graphite eliminates these oxidation enhancing impurities, creating a dense, highly ordered form of carbon possessing high thermal diffusivity and strongly (covalently) bonded atoms.

  19. Spectroscopical determination of impurities in nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lordello, A.R.; Tognini, R.P.

    1975-01-01

    A spectrochemical method for the direct determination of B, Cd, Si, Hg, Fe, Mg, Mn, Cr, Ni, Al, Mo, Ti, Sr, Na, Zn, and As in nuclear grade graphite is described. A 9:1 ratio of graphite to copper difluoride is used in the preparation of samples and standards. The excitation is carried out in a d-c at 10 amperes. The copper fluoride used as spectrographic buffer serves to increase the volatilization rate of the impurities and to diminish the differences in the nature of the analytical and calibration samples. The relative standard deviations for the determination of the 16 trace elements, except Sr, Fe, Cd, Al and Si, are in the range of 8 - 20% in their appropriate calibration levels. For the latter five elements they are approximately 20-40%

  20. Comparison of Oxidation Characteristics of Selected Nuclear Graphite Grades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Kim, Gen Chan

    2010-02-01

    The oxidation behavior of some selected nuclear graphite grades (i.e., IG-110, IG-430, NBG-18, NBG-25) were compared in view of their filler coke type and the physical property of the grades. Oxidation rates were determined at six temperatures between 600 ∼ 960 .deg. C in air by using a three-zone vertical tube furnace at a 10 L/min air flow rate. The specimens were a cylinder with a 25.4 mm diameter and a 25.4 mm length. Results showed that, even though the four examined nuclear graphite grades showed a highly temperature-sensitive oxidation behavior through out the test temperature range of 600 ∼ 950 .deg. C, the differences between the grades were not significant. The oxidation rates determined for a 5∼10 % weight loss at the six temperatures were nearly the same except for 702 and 808 .deg. C, where the pitch coke graphites showed an apparent decrease in their oxidation rate, more so than the petroleum coke graphites. These effects of the coke type reduced or nearly disappeared with an increasing temperature. The average activation energy determined for 608 ∼ 808 .deg. C was 161.5 ± 7.3 kJ/mol, showing that the dominant oxidation reaction occurred by a chemical control

  1. On modes and kinetics of nuclear graphite oxidation in massive air or steam ingress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M. S.; Tournier, J. M. P.

    2010-01-01

    A massive air or steam ingress in High and Very-High Temperature Reactors (HTRs and VHTRs) nominally operating at 600-950 deg. C is a design-basis accident requiring the development and validation of models for predicting the graphite oxidation and erosion and examining the potential of a fission products release and a loss in integrity of the graphite core and reflector blocks. Isotropic and porous nuclear graphite is of many types with similarities but also differences in microstructure; volume porosity, impurities; type and size of filler coke particles; graphitization; heat treatment temperature and thermal and physical properties. These as well as temperature affect the prevailing mode and kinetics of the graphite oxidation and burn-off rate. This paper reviews the fabrication procedures, characteristics, chemical kinetics and modes of oxidation of nuclear graphite for future model developments. (authors)

  2. Thermal Properties of G-348 Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEligot, Donald M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swank, W. David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cottle, David L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Valentin, Francisco I. [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Fundamental measurements have been obtained in the INL Graphite Characterization Laboratory to deduce the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity for G-348 isotropic graphite, which has been used by City College of New York in thermal experiments related to gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Measurements of thermal diffusivity, mass, volume and thermal expansion were converted to thermal conductivity in accordance with ASTM Standard Practice C781-08 (R-2014). Data are tabulated and a preliminary correlation for the thermal conductivity is presented as a function of temperature from laboratory temperature to 1000C.

  3. Thermal Properties of G-348 Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEligot, Donald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swank, W. David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cottle, David L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Valentin, Francisco I. [City College of New York, NY (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Fundamental measurements have been obtained in the INL Graphite Characterization Laboratory to deduce the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity for G-348 isotropic graphite, which has been used by City College of New York in thermal experiments related to gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Measurements of thermal diffusivity, mass, volume and thermal expansion were converted to thermal conductivity in accordance with ASTM Standard Practice C781-08. Data are tabulated and a preliminary correlation for the thermal conductivity is presented as a function of temperature from laboratory temperature to 1000C.

  4. Thermogravimetric and Differential Scanning Calorimetric Behavior of Ball-Milled Nuclear Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eung Seon; Kim, Min Hwan; Kim, Yong Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yi Hyun; Cho, Seung Yon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    An examination was made to characterize the oxidation behavior of ball-milled nuclear graphite powder through a TG-DSC analysis. With the ball milling time, the BET surface area increased with the reduction of particle size, but decreased with the chemisorptions of O{sub 2} on the activated surface. The enhancement of the oxidation after the ball milling is attributed to both increases in the specific surface area and atomic scale defects in the graphite structure. In a high temperature gas-cooled reactor, nuclear graphite has been widely used as fuel elements, moderator or reflector blocks, and core support structures owing to its excellent moderating power, mechanical properties and machinability. For the same reason, it will be used in a helium cooled ceramic reflector test blanket module for the ITER. Each submodule has a seven-layer breeding zone, including three neutron multiplier layers packed with beryllium pebbles, three lithium ceramic pebbles packed tritium breeder layers, and a reflector layer packed with 1 mm diameter graphite pebbles to reduce the volume of beryllium. The abrasion of graphite structures owing to relative motion or thermal cycle during operation may produce graphite dust. It is expected that graphite dust will be more oxidative than bulk graphite, and thus the oxidation behavior of graphite dust must be examined to analyze the safety of the reactors during an air ingress accident. In this study, the thermal stability of ball-milled graphite powder was investigated using a simultaneous thermogravimeter-differential scanning calorimeter.

  5. Testing of Small Graphite Samples for Nuclear Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julie Chapman

    2010-11-01

    Accurately determining the mechanical properties of small irradiated samples is crucial to predicting the behavior of the overal irradiated graphite components within a Very High Temperature Reactor. The sample size allowed in a material test reactor, however, is limited, and this poses some difficulties with respect to mechanical testing. In the case of graphite with a larger grain size, a small sample may exhibit characteristics not representative of the bulk material, leading to inaccuracies in the data. A study to determine a potential size effect on the tensile strength was pursued under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant program. It focuses first on optimizing the tensile testing procedure identified in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard C 781-08. Once the testing procedure was verified, a size effect was assessed by gradually reducing the diameter of the specimens. By monitoring the material response, a size effect was successfully identified.

  6. Electrical properties of Egyptian natural graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shazly, O.; El-Wahidy, E.F.; Elanany, N.; Saad, N.A.

    1992-06-01

    The electrical properties of Egyptian natural graphite flakes, obtained from the graphite schists of Wadi Bent, Eastern Desert, were measured. The flakes were ground and compressed into pellets. The standard four probe dc method was used to measure the temperature dependence of the electric resistivity from room temperature down to 12 K. The transverse and longitudinal magnetoresistance were measured in the low magnetic field range at temperatures 300 K, 77 K and 12 K. The transverse magnetoresistance data was used to estimate the average mobility, assuming a simple two-band model. (author). 20 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  7. Rules for design of nuclear graphite core components - some considerations and approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svalbonas, V.; Stilwell, T.C.; Zudans, Z.

    1977-01-01

    In the High Temperature Gas reactor (HTGR) core a large number of elements are constructed of nuclear graphite. This paper discusses the attendant difficulties, and presents some approaches, for ASME code safety-consistent design and analysis. The statistical scatter of material properties, which complicates even the definitions of allowable stress, as well as the brittle, anisotropic, inhomogeneous nature of the graphite was considered. It was found that analytic statistical methods used to arrive at a definition of minimum ultimate strength were totally unrealistic It was concluded on the basis of presently available evidence that the distinctions between secondary and primary stresses are inappropriate to graphite structures. The proposed overall design criteria and stress limits for graphite structure were reviewed. The use of the homologous stress concept is graphite fatigue calculations was reviewed. The overall design philosophy for brittle materials is applied to HTGR core structure design including such areas as graphite oxidation, component proof tests, experimental seismic modeling and fracture analysis. (Auth.)

  8. Characterization, treatment and conditioning of radioactive graphite from decommissioning of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-09-01

    Graphite has been used as a moderator and reflector of neutrons in more than 100 nuclear power plants and in many research and plutonium-production reactors. It is used primarily as a neutron reflector or neutron moderator, although graphite is also used for other features of reactor cores, such as fuel sleeves. Many of the graphite-moderated reactors are now quite old, with some already shutdown. Therefore radioactive graphite dismantling and the management of radioactive graphite waste are becoming an increasingly important issue for a number of IAEA Member States. Worldwide, there are more than 230 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite which will eventually need to be managed as radioactive waste. Proper management of radioactive graphite waste requires complex planning and the implementation of several interrelated operations. There are two basic options for graphite waste management: (1) packaging of non-conditioned graphite waste with subsequent direct disposal of the waste packages, and (2) conditioning of graphite waste (principally either by incineration or calcination) with separate disposal of any waste products produced, such as incinerator ash. In both cases, the specific properties of graphite - such as Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility, and radioactive gases released from waste graphite - have a potential impact on the safety of radioactive graphite waste management and need to be carefully considered. Radioactive graphite waste management is not specifically addressed in IAEA publications. Only general and limited information is available in publications dealing with decommissioning of nuclear reactors. This report provides a comprehensive discussion of radioactive graphite waste characterization, handling, conditioning and disposal throughout the operating and decommissioning life cycle. The first draft report was prepared at a meeting on 23-27 February 1998. A technical meeting (TM) was held in October 1999 in coincidence with the Seminar on

  9. A systematic study of acoustic emission from nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; McEnaney, B.

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring has been identified as a possible method to determine internal stresses in nuclear graphites using the Kaiser effect, i.e., on stressing a graphite that has been subject to a prior stress, the onset of AE occurs at the previous peak stress. For three nuclear graphites (PGA, IM1-24 and VNEC), AE was monitored during both monotonic and cyclic loading to failure in tensile, compressive and flexural test modes. For unirradiated graphites, the Kaiser effect was not found in cyclic loading, but a Felicity effect was observed, i.e., the onset of AE occurred below the previously applied peak stress. The Felicity effect was attributed to time-dependent relaxation and recovery processes and was characterized using a new parameter, the Recovery ratio. It was shown that AE can be used to monitor creep strain and creep recovery in graphites at zero load. The AE-time responses from these experiments were fitted to equations similar to those used for creep strain-time at elevated temperatures. The number of AE counts from irradiated graphites were greater than those from unirradiated graphites, subject to similar stresses, due to increases in porosity caused by radiolytic oxidation. A Felicity effect was also observed on cyclic loading of irradiated graphites, but no evidence for a Kaiser effect was found for irradiated graphites loaded monotonically to failure. Thus internal stresses in irradiated graphites could not be measured using AE. This was attributed to relaxation and recovery processes that occur between removing the irradiated graphite from the reactor and AE testing. This work indicated that AE monitoring is not a suitable technique for measuring internal stresses in irradiated graphite. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs, 6 tabs

  10. The application of the pore population balance method to the calculation of the radiolytic weight loss and gas transport property changes of nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.A.V.

    1982-01-01

    A pore population balance equation, previously used to describe the physical property changes of porous carbons during thermal oxidation in carbon dioxide, has been modified to treat the radiolytic oxidation of graphite in CO 2 /CO/CH 4 gas mixtures. Good agreement has been obtained between theory and experiment for the variation in the gas transport coefficients B, K and lambda of gilsonite graphite with absorbed radiation dose. Calculations indicate that the addition of blind pores to the transport porosity, and an allowance for the opening of closed pores with burn-off, do not account for the experimental fractional weight loss curve. An excellent fit is obtained, however, if a small volume of cylindrical pores of a mean radius approximately equal to the diffusion length of oxidising species in the coolant are present in the pore size spectrum. Gilsonite graphite therefore behaves as if the pore size distribution function is trimodal, with mean radii at about 0.5μm, 2.48μm and greater than or equal to 10.57μm. (author)

  11. Effect of graphite target power density on tribological properties of graphite-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dan; Jiang, Bailing; Li, Hongtao; Du, Yuzhou; Yang, Chao

    2018-05-01

    In order to improve the tribological performance, a series of graphite-like carbon (GLC) films with different graphite target power densities were prepared by magnetron sputtering. The valence bond and microstructure of films were characterized by AFM, TEM, XPS and Raman spectra. The variation of mechanical and tribological properties with graphite target power density was analyzed. The results showed that with the increase of graphite target power density, the deposition rate and the ratio of sp2 bond increased obviously. The hardness firstly increased and then decreased with the increase of graphite target power density, whilst the friction coefficient and the specific wear rate increased slightly after a decrease with the increasing graphite target power density. The friction coefficient and the specific wear rate were the lowest when the graphite target power density was 23.3 W/cm2.

  12. Ion irradiation to simulate neutron irradiation in model graphites: Consequences for nuclear graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Ammar, M. R.; Simon, P.; Deldicque, D.; Sainsot, P.

    2017-10-01

    Due to its excellent moderator and reflector qualities, graphite was used in CO2-cooled nuclear reactors such as UNGG (Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz). Neutron irradiation of graphite resulted in the production of 14C which is a key issue radionuclide for the management of the irradiated graphite waste. In order to elucidate the impact of neutron irradiation on 14C behavior, we carried out a systematic investigation of irradiation and its synergistic effects with temperature in Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG) model graphite used to simulate the coke grains of nuclear graphite. We used 13C implantation in order to simulate 14C displaced from its original structural site through recoil. The collision of the impinging neutrons with the graphite matrix carbon atoms induces mainly ballistic damage. However, a part of the recoil carbon atom energy is also transferred to the graphite lattice through electronic excitation. The effects of the different irradiation regimes in synergy with temperature were simulated using ion irradiation by varying Sn(nuclear)/Se(electronic) stopping power. Thus, the samples were irradiated with different ions of different energies. The structure modifications were followed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman microspectrometry. The results show that temperature generally counteracts the disordering effects of irradiation but the achieved reordering level strongly depends on the initial structural state of the graphite matrix. Thus, extrapolating to reactor conditions, for an initially highly disordered structure, irradiation at reactor temperatures (200 - 500 °C) should induce almost no change of the initial structure. On the contrary, when the structure is initially less disordered, there should be a "zoning" of the reordering: In "cold" high flux irradiated zones where the ballistic damage is important, the structure should be poorly reordered; In "hot" low flux irradiated zones where the ballistic

  13. Initial Comparison of Baseline Physical and Mechanical Properties for the VHTR Candidate Graphite Grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Mark C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). VHTR Program

    2014-09-01

    High-purity graphite is the core structural material of choice in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design, a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled configuration capable of producing thermal energy for power generation as well as process heat for industrial applications that require temperatures higher than the outlet temperatures of present nuclear reactors. The Baseline Graphite Characterization Program is establishing accurate as-manufactured mechanical and physical property distributions in nuclear-grade graphites by providing comprehensive data that captures the level of variation in measured values. In addition to providing a thorough comparison between these values in different graphite grades, the program is also carefully tracking individual specimen source, position, and orientation information in order to provide comparisons both in specific properties and in the associated variability between different lots, different billets, and different positions from within a single billet. This report is a preliminary comparison between each of the grades of graphite that are considered “candidate” grades from four major international graphite producers. These particular grades (NBG-18, NBG-17, PCEA, IG-110, and 2114) are the major focus of the evaluations presently underway on irradiated graphite properties through the series of Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiments. NBG-18, a medium-grain pitch coke graphite from SGL from which billets are formed via vibration molding, was the favored structural material in the pebble-bed configuration. NBG-17 graphite from SGL is essentially NBG-18 with the grain size reduced by a factor of two. PCEA, petroleum coke graphite from GrafTech with a similar grain size to NBG-17, is formed via an extrusion process and was initially considered the favored grade for the prismatic layout. IG-110 and 2114, from Toyo Tanso and Mersen (formerly Carbone Lorraine), respectively, are fine-grain grades produced via an isomolding

  14. Understanding the reaction of nuclear graphite with molecular oxygen: Kinetics, transport, and structural evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Joshua J.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Smith, Rebecca E.; Strydom, Gerhard; Windes, William E.

    2017-09-01

    For the next generation of nuclear reactors, HTGRs specifically, an unlikely air ingress warrants inclusion in the license applications of many international regulators. Much research on oxidation rates of various graphite grades under a number of conditions has been undertaken to address such an event. However, consequences to the reactor result from the microstructural changes to the graphite rather than directly from oxidation. The microstructure is inherent to a graphite's properties and ultimately degradation to the graphite's performance must be determined to establish the safety of reactor design. To understand the oxidation induced microstructural change and its corresponding impact on performance, a thorough understanding of the reaction system is needed. This article provides a thorough review of the graphite-molecular oxygen reaction in terms of kinetics, mass and energy transport, and structural evolution: all three play a significant role in the observed rate of graphite oxidation. These provide the foundations of a microstructurally informed model for the graphite-molecular oxygen reaction system, a model kinetically independent of graphite grade, and capable of describing both the observed and local oxidation rates under a wide range of conditions applicable to air-ingress.

  15. An analytical study on porosity changes of nuclear graphites under high temperature irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, T.

    1996-01-01

    A quantitative description of the changing pore structure, based on some radiation damage mechanisms, may introduce a physically appropriate method for lifetime assessment of graphite fuel and moderator components. Recently Brocklehurst and Kelly have analyzed well-characterized data on dimensional changes of UK reactor graphites to quantify volumetric and linear pore generation terms. The analysis (B/K theory) has demonstrated that a crystal strain parameter X T , depending on irradiation temperature and fluence, is suitable for defining structure factors, which relate changes in microstructure with those in macroscopic properties of a family of nuclear graphites. Graphite components in high temperature reactors are subjected to higher temperatures well above 1000 deg. C, which accelerate pore generation. Their mechanical integrity will suffer from the deterioration, resulting in a reduced lifetime. Previous design considerations on the dimensional change behavior have been based on an empirical approach using measured data obtained in a number of irradiation experiments. A large variety of experimental data have been utilized to develop a general phenomenological model(Graphite Damage Model, GDM) for predicting engineering properties of nuclear graphites. The present study tries to combine the B/K theory with the GDM prediction with a view to characterizing porosity changes at high temperatures of some graphites from different manufacturing routes. The dimensional change data in the literature are analyzed by the GDM to obtain their analytical presentation as a function of temperature and fluence. The results are used to derive an X T function and pore volume change as a function of X T for each grade of graphite. The resulting porosity changes are compared between different kinds of graphites. 13 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  16. Rules for design of nuclear graphite core components - some considerations and approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svalbonas, V.; Stilwell, T.C.; Zudans, Z.

    1978-01-01

    The use of graphite as a structural element presents unusual problems both for the designer and stress analysist. When the structure happens to be a nuclear reactor core, these problems are significantly magnified both by the environment and the attendant safety requirements. In the high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) core a large number of elements are constructed of nuclear graphite. This paper discusses the attendant difficulties, and presents some approaches, for ASME code safety-consistent design and analysis. The statistical scatter of material properties, which complicates even the definitions of allowable stress, as well as the brittle, anisotropic, inhomogeneous nature of the graphite was considered. The study of this subject was undertaken under contract to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. (Auth.)

  17. Pyrolysis and its potential use in nuclear graphite disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, J.B.; Bradbury, D.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite is used as a moderator material in a number of nuclear reactor designs, such as MAGNOX and AGR gas cooled reactors in the United Kingdom and the RBMK design in Russia. During construction the moderator of the reactor is usually installed as an interlocking structure of graphite bricks. At the end of reactor life the graphite moderator, weighing typically 2,000 tonnes, is a radioactive waste which requires eventual management. Radioactive graphite disposal options conventionally include: In-situ SAFESTORE for extended periods to permit manual disassembly of the graphite moderator through decay of short-lived radionuclides. Robotic or manual disassembly of the reactor core followed by disposal of the graphite blocks. Robotic or manual disassembly of the reactor core followed by incineration of the graphite and release of the resulting carbon dioxide Studsvik, Inc. is a nuclear waste management and waste processing company organised to serve the US nuclear utility and government facilities. Studsvik's management and technical staff have a wealth of experience in processing liquid, slurry and solid low level radioactive waste using (amongst others) pyrolysis and steam reforming techniques. Bradtec is a UK company specialising in decontamination and waste management. This paper describes the use of pyrolysis and steam reforming techniques to gasify graphite leading to a low volume off-gas product. This allows the following options/advantages. Safe release of any stored Wigner energy in the graphite. The process can accept small pieces or a water-slurry of graphite, which enables the graphite to be removed from the reactor core by mechanical machining or water cutting techniques, applied remotely in the reactor fuel channels. In certain situations the process could be used to gasify the reactor moderator in-situ. The low volume of the off-gas product enables non-carbon radioactive impurities to be efficiently separated from the off-gas. The off-gas product can

  18. Comparison of the oxidation rate and degree of graphitization of selected IG and NBG nuclear graphite grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Kim, Gen-Chan

    2008-10-01

    The oxidation rate and degree of graphitization (DOG) were determined for some selected nuclear graphite grades (i.e., IG-110, IG-430, NBG-18, NBG-25) and compared in view of their filler coke type (i.e., pitch or petroleum coke) and the physical property of the grades. Oxidation rates were determined at six temperatures between 600 and 960 °C in air by using a three-zone vertical tube furnace at a 10 l/min air flow rate. The specimens were a cylinder with a 25.4 mm diameter and a 25.4 mm length. The DOG was determined based on the lattice parameter c determined from an X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that, even though the four examined nuclear graphite grades showed a highly temperature-sensitive oxidation behavior through out the test temperature range of 600-950 °C, the differences between the grades were not significant. The oxidation rates determined for a 5-10% weight loss at the six temperatures were nearly the same except for 702 and 808 °C, where the pitch coke graphites showed an apparent decrease in their oxidation rate, more so than the petroleum coke graphites. These effects of the coke type reduced or nearly disappeared with an increasing temperature. The average activation energy determined for 608-808 °C was 161.5 ± 7.3 kJ/mol, showing that the dominant oxidation reaction occurred by a chemical control. A relationship between the oxidation rate and DOG was not observed.

  19. Characterization of structural defects in nuclear graphite IG-110 and NBG-18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Guiqiu; Xu, Peng; Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear graphite IG-110 and NBG-18 were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) to understand the structure and microstructure of nuclear graphite. The lattice parameter (a), degree of graphitization (g ¯ ), crystallite size parallel and perpendicular to c-direction (L c and L ⊥ ), anisotropy (B), as well as in-plane crystallite size (L a ) were calculated and compared based on XRD patterns and Raman spectra. Results indicate that IG-110 has a larger crystallite size and higher degree of graphitization, but lower anisotropy than NBG-18. These differences are attributed to the properties of coke source and manufacturing processes. Additionally, the shape of the pores and crystallized filler particles, the interface between binders and fillers, Mrozowski cracks and nano-cracks, and the defects of disclination were observed and characterized from SEM and HR-TEM images. The similarities and differences in microstructure between IG-110 and NBG-18 are discussed. The results in this work provide useful information to guide selection of nuclear graphite for the design of next generation nuclear plants (NGNP)

  20. Change in properties of graphite on stake of Obninsk NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgul'ev, Yu.S.; Gundorov, V.V.; Kalyagina, I.P.; Belinskaya, N.T.; Dolgov, V.V.; Komissarov, O.V.; Stuzhnev, Yu.A.

    1997-01-01

    The results of testing the graphite from the AM-1 reactor masonry at the Obninsk NPP for its operation period are discussed. It is shown that the masonry graphite state after 42 years of the reactor operation remains satisfactory in the most cells inspected. Separate cells requiring a repair resulted from oxidation are characterized by strength decreased by several times. The laws of radiation changes in graphite properties are analyzed. The conclusion on possibility of the further masonry operation is drawn

  1. INCREASING OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CAST GRAPHITIZED STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Akimov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Due to the presence of many essential properties (low prime cost, high manufacturability and damping ability, heat conductivity, fluidity and others,the graphitized cast irons are widely applied for parts operating under the conditions of static and cyclic loads, wear at dry friction and aggressive media at elevated temperatures. At the same time because of significant content of the graphite phase in the structure, the cast irons possess relatively low mechanical properties. Thereby the attention is drawn to graphitized steels, the peculiarity of which consists in the presence of graphite inclusions in the structure, which appoints specific cast iron's properties to these materials. But unlike cast irons, the graphite content in them is in 2…3 times lower and it affects positively on mechanical and service properties indices. This work deals with the optimization of the composition of cast graphitized steel, which has high mechanical properties indices. Methodology. The experimental design technique was used in this work. Alloys prototypes were smelted and their mechanical properties were investigated on the basis of these techniques. Findings were exposed to regression processing, and the dependences of the alloys components influence on its properties were obtained. By means of graphical optimization the optimal composition of steel with high mechanical properties indices has been determined. Findings.Ithasbeenestablishedthat carbon and silicon have the most significant influence on the strength and cyclic endurance of graphitized steels. The chemical composition of the cast graphitized steel with high static and cyclic strength indices was suggested in this work. Originality. With the use of mathematical experimental design techniques the dependences describing the influence of carbon, silicon and copper on the static and cyclic strength indices were obtained. They allow optimizing compositions of graphitized steels. Practical

  2. Variation of the properties of siliconized graphite during neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgil'ev, Y.S.; Chugunova, T.K.; Pikulik, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    The authors evaluate the radiation-induced property changes in siliconized graphite of the industrial grades SG-P and SG-M. The authors simultaneously tested the reference (control) specimens of graphite that are used as the base for obtaining the SG-M siliconized graphite by impregnating with silicon. The suggested scheme (model) atributes the dimensional changes of the siliconized graphite specimens to the effect of the quantitative ratio of the carbide phase and carbon under different conditions of irradiation. If silicon is insufficient for the formation of a dense skeleton, graphite plays a devisive role, and it may be assumed that at an irradiation temperature greater than 600 K, the material shrinks. The presence of isolated carbide inclusions also affects the physicomechanical properties (including the anitfriction properties)

  3. Properties of unirradiated fuel element graphites H-451 and TS-1240

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.R.; Engle, G.B.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear graphite grades H-451 (Great Lakes Carbon Company) and TS-1240 (Union Carbide Corporation) are described and property data are presented for the unirradiated state. Properties measured included bulk density, ultimate tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, thermal expansivity, and thermal conductivity. The data presented represent the minimum and maximum property values of the prototype full-size production logs and are indicative of property values to be expected in commercial production

  4. Statistical Comparison of the Baseline Mechanical Properties of NBG-18 and PCEA Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark C. Carroll; David T. Rohrbaugh

    2013-08-01

    High-purity graphite is the core structural material of choice in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled design that is capable of producing process heat for power generation and for industrial process that require temperatures higher than the outlet temperatures of present nuclear reactors. The Baseline Graphite Characterization Program is endeavoring to minimize the conservative estimates of as-manufactured mechanical and physical properties by providing comprehensive data that captures the level of variation in measured values. In addition to providing a comprehensive comparison between these values in different nuclear grades, the program is also carefully tracking individual specimen source, position, and orientation information in order to provide comparisons and variations between different lots, different billets, and different positions from within a single billet. This report is a preliminary comparison between the two grades of graphite that were initially favored in the two main VHTR designs. NBG-18, a medium-grain pitch coke graphite from SGL formed via vibration molding, was the favored structural material in the pebble-bed configuration, while PCEA, a smaller grain, petroleum coke, extruded graphite from GrafTech was favored for the prismatic configuration. An analysis of the comparison between these two grades will include not only the differences in fundamental and statistically-significant individual strength levels, but also the differences in variability in properties within each of the grades that will ultimately provide the basis for the prediction of in-service performance. The comparative performance of the different types of nuclear grade graphites will continue to evolve as thousands more specimens are fully characterized from the numerous grades of graphite being evaluated.

  5. Triple templating of graphitic carbon nitride to enhance photocatalytic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphitic carbon nitride materials show some promising properties for applications such as photocatalytic water splitting. However, the conversion efficiency is still low due to factors such as a low surface area and limited light absorption. In this paper, we describe a “triple templating” approach to generating porous graphitic carbon nitride. The introduction of pores on several length-scales results in enhanced photocatalytic properties.

  6. Triple templating of graphitic carbon nitride to enhance photocatalytic properties

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Yang; A. E. Danks; J. Wang; Y. Zhang; Z. Schnepp

    2016-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride materials show some promising properties for applications such as photocatalytic water splitting. However, the conversion efficiency is still low due to factors such as a low surface area and limited light absorption. In this paper, we describe a “triple templating” approach to generating porous graphitic carbon nitride. The introduction of pores on several length-scales results in enhanced photocatalytic properties.

  7. Damage tolerance of nuclear graphite at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Gludovatz, Bernd; Barnard, Harold S.; Kuball, Martin; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear-grade graphite is a critically important high-temperature structural material for current and potentially next generation of fission reactors worldwide. It is imperative to understand its damage-tolerant behaviour and to discern the mechanisms of damage evolution under in-service conditions. Here we perform in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron X-ray computed micro-tomography at temperatures between ambient and 1,000 °C on a nuclear-grade Gilsocarbon graphite. We find that both the strength and fracture toughness of this graphite are improved at elevated temperature. Whereas this behaviour is consistent with observations of the closure of microcracks formed parallel to the covalent-sp2-bonded graphene layers at higher temperatures, which accommodate the more than tenfold larger thermal expansion perpendicular to these layers, we attribute the elevation in strength and toughness primarily to changes in the residual stress state at 800-1,000 °C, specifically to the reduction in significant levels of residual tensile stresses in the graphite that are `frozen-in' following processing.

  8. Laser ultrasonic assessment of the effects of porosity and microcracking on the elastic moduli of nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spicer, James B.; Olasov, Lauren R.; Zeng, Fan W.; Han, Karen; Gallego, Nidia C.; Contescu, Cristian I.

    2016-01-01

    Laser ultrasonic methods have been used to measure the elastic moduli of various nuclear graphites. Measurements were made to assess wavespeeds for longitudinal and shear waves in different propagation directions and these were used along with density measurements to compute the longitudinal and shear moduli as well as Young's modulus. All moduli decreased with increasing graphite porosity and these variations could be interpreted using models describing the effect of porosity on material stiffness. Extrapolations for these models to zero porosity were used to infer the moduli for theoretically dense graphite; the results were far below predicted values reported in the literature for fully dense, polycrystalline, isotropic graphite. Differences can be attributed to microcracking in the graphite microstructure. Using models for the effects of microcracking on modulus, estimates for microcrack populations indicate that the number of cracks per unit volume must be much greater than the number of pores per unit volume. Experimental results reported in the literature for irradiated graphites as well as for the stress dependence of graphite modulus are consistent with the influence of microcracking on elastic behavior and could be interpreted using concepts developed here. Results in this work for graphite structure-property relationships should allow for more sophisticated characterization of nuclear graphites using ultrasonic methods. - Highlights: • Moduli of nuclear graphites measured using laser ultrasonic methods. • Estimates made for the moduli of fully dense, polycrystalline, isotropic graphite. • Models for modulus used to assess effects of microcracking on stiffness. • Microcrack densities estimated using models for effect of microcracks on modulus.

  9. Graphite-based detectors of alkali metals for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalandarishvili, A.G.; Kuchukhidze, V.A.; Sordiya, T.D.; Shartava, Sh.Sh.; Stepennov, B.S.

    1993-01-01

    The coolants most commonly used in today's fast reactors are alkali metals or their alloys. A major problem in nuclear plant design is leakproofing of the liquid-metal cooling system, and many leak detection methods and safety specifications have been developed as a result. Whatever the safety standards adopted for nuclear plants in different countries, they all rely on the basic fact that control of the contamination and radiation hazards involved requires reliable monitoring equipment. Results are presented of trials with some leak detectors for the alkali-metal circuits of nuclear reactors. The principal component affecting the detector performance is the sensing element. In the detectors graphite was employed, whose laminar structure enables it to absorb efficiently alkali-metal vapors at high temperatures (320--500 K). This produces a continuous series of alkali-metal-graphite solid solutions with distinct electrical, thermal, and other physical properties. The principle of operation of the detectors resides in the characteristic reactions of the metal-graphite system. One detector type uses the change of electrical conductivity of the graphite-film sensor when it is exposed to alkali-metal vapor. In order to minimize the effect of temperature on the resistance the authors prepared composite layers of graphite intercalated with a donor impurity (cesium or barium), and a graphite-nickel material. The addition of a small percentage of cesium, barium, or nickel produces a material whose temperature coefficient of resistance is nearly zero. Used as a sensing element, such a material can eliminate the need for thermostatic control of the detector

  10. Feasibility of Ultrasonic Inspection for Nuclear Grade Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Seok; Lee, Jong Po; Yoon, Byung Sik; Jang, Chang Heui

    2008-01-01

    Graphite material has been recognized as a very competitive candidate for reflector, moderator, and structural material for very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Since VHTR is operated up to 900-950 .deg. C , small amount of impurity may accelerate the oxidation and degradation of carbon graphite, which results in increased porosity and lowered fracture toughness. In this study, ultrasonic wave propagation properties were investigated for both as-received and degradated material, and the feasibility of ultrasonic testing (UT) was estimated based on the result of ultrasonic property measurements. The ultrasonic properties of carbon graphite were half, more than 5 times, and 1/3 for velocity, attenuation, and signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio respectively. Degradation reduces the ultrasonic velocity slightly by 100 m/s, however the attenuation is about 2 times of as-receive state. The results of probability of detection (POD) estimation based on S/N ratio for side-drilled-hole (SDHs) of which depths were less than 100 mm were merely affected by oxidation and degradation. This result suggests that UT would be reliable method for nondestructive testing of carbon graphite material of which thickness is not over 100 mm. In accordance with the result produced by commercial automated ultrasonic testing (AUT) system, human error of ultrasonic testing is barely expected for the material of which thickness is not over 80 mm

  11. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; M.Carroll

    2010-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. This development has resulted in graphite being established as a viable structural material for HTGRs. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical “nuclear” grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermomechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. This Technology Development Plan outlines the research and development (R&D) activities and associated rationale necessary to qualify nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor.

  12. Studies on mechanical properties of graphites for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, T.; Eto, M.; Fujisaki, K.; Yoda, S.; Ishiyama, S.; Sugihara, T.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research on the mechanical properties of HTGR graphites at JAERI is reviewed. The mechanical properties of graphites are required for predicting the stresses induced in the core graphite structures during reactor operation and for evaluating non-failure probabilities of the graphite structures. In this paper, effects of irradiation, stress and oxidation on the mechanical properties and fatigue properties of petroleum coke semi-isotropic and isotropic graphites for HTGRs are primarly described. Young's modulus and bend strength before and after neutron irradiation have been measured to examine irradiation effects on a fracture criterion of graphites. Two kinds of relationships are found between the bend strength and Young's modulus, depending upon the irradiation temperature. Changes in Young's modulus after irradiation are found to be different from those after irradiation creep deformation. Young's modulus under compressive stress is equivalent to that at the onset of unloading. Oxidation gives rise to the decreases in density and modulus, and also brings about a strength degradation. Tension-compression fatigue strengths are obtained and arranged successfully using statistical trivariant method with tension-tension fatigue strength data

  13. The electrochemical properties of graphite and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeager, E.; Gupta, S.; Molla, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon and graphite are often used as supports for electrocatalysts, but also have an electrocatalytic function in such electrode reactions as O 2 reduction in alkaline electrolytes, Cl 2 generation in brine and SOCl 2 reduction in lithium-thionyl chloride batteries. These catalytic functions involve specific chemical functional groups bound to the carbon and graphite surfaces. The factors controlling O 2 reduction with various types of carbon electrodes of both low and high surface area are reviewed. Of particular importance is the role of hydrogen peroxide. The role of the functionality of the carbon in the electrocatalysis will be discussed

  14. Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Bio-Polymer Graphite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddam Kamarudin, M.; Rus, Anika Zafiah M.; Munirah Abdullah, Nur; Abdullah, M. F. L.

    2017-08-01

    Waste cooking oil is used as the main substances in producing graphite biopolymer thin films. Biopolymer is produce from the reaction of bio-monomer and cross linker with the ratio of 2:1 and addition of graphite with an increment of 2% through a slip casting method. The morphological surface properties of the samples are observed by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). It is shown that the graphite particle is well mixed and homogenously dispersed in biopolymer matrix. Meanwhile, the mechanical response of materials by monitoring the change in the material properties in terms of frequency and temperature of the samples were determined using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). The calculated cross-linked density of biopolymer composites revealed the increment of graphite particle loading at 8% gives highest results with 260.012 x 103 M/m3.

  15. A microstructurally based fracture model for nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports the physical basis of, and assumptions behind, a fracture model for nuclear graphites. Microstructurally related inputs, such as filler particle size, filler particle fracture toughness (K Ic ), density, pore size distribution, number of pores and specimen geometry (size and volume), are utilized in the model. The model has been applied to two graphites, Great Lakes Carbon Corporation grade H-451 and Toyo Tanso grade IG-110. For each graphite, the predicted tensile failure probabilities are compared with experimental data generated using ASTM Standard C-749 tensile test specimens. The predicted failure probabilities are in close agreement with the experimental data, particularly in the case of the H-451. The model is also shown to qualitatively predict the influence on the failure probabilities of changes in filler particle size, density, pore size, pore size distribution, number of pores and specimen geometry (stressed volume). The good performance is attributed to the sound physical basis of the model, which recognizes the dominant role of porosity in controlling crack initiation and propagation during graphite fracture. 8 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  16. Correlation between some mechanical and physical properties of polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, Shinichi; Fujisaki, Katsuo

    1982-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of polycrystalline graphites, tensile strength, compressive strength, flexural strength, Young's modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, electrical resistivity, volume fraction of porosity, and graphitisation were measured for ten brand graphites. Correlation between the mechanical and physical properties of the graphites were studied. Young's modulus and thermal expansion coefficient of the graphites depend on volume fraction of porosity. The Young's modulus of the graphites tended to increase with increasing the thermal expansion coefficient. For an anisotropic graphite, an interesting relationship between the Young's modulus E and the thermal expansion coefficient al pha was found in any specimen orientations; alpha E=constant. The value of alphah E was dependent upon the volume fraction of porosity. It should be noted here that the electrical resistivity increased with decreasing grain size. The flexural and the compressive strength were related with the volume fraction of porosity while the tensile strength was not, The relationships between the tensile, the compressive and the flexural strength can be approximately expressed as linear functions over a wide range of the stresses. (author)

  17. Destruction of nuclear graphite using closed chamber incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senor, D.J.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Morgan, W.C.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1994-01-01

    Closed chamber incineration (CCI) is a novel technique by which irradiated nuclear graphite may be destroyed without the risk of radioactive cation release into the environment. The process utilizes an enclosed combustion chamber coupled with molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). The transport of cations is intrinsically suppressed by the MCFCs, such that only the combustion gases are conducted through for release to the environment. An example CCI design was developed which had as its goal the destruction of graphite fuel elements from the Fort St. Vrain reactor (FSVR). By employing CCI, the volume of high level waste from the FSVR will be reduced by approximately 87 percent. Additionally, the incineration process will convert the SiC coating on the FSVR fuel particles to SiO 2 , thus creating a form potentially suitable for direct incorporation in a vitrification process stream. The design is compact, efficient, and makes use of currently available technology

  18. Macroscopic Properties of Restacked, Redox-Liquid Exfoliated Graphite and Graphite Mimics Produced in Bulk Quantities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Vikram K [ORNL; Quinlan, Ronald [ORNL; Agapov, Alexander L [ORNL; Dunlap, John R [ORNL; Nelson, Kimberly M [ORNL; Duranty, Edward R [ORNL; Sokolov, Alexei P [ORNL; Bhat, Gajanan [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The excellent properties exhibited by monolayer graphene have spurred the development of exfoliation techniques using bulk graphite to produce large quantities of pristine monolayer sheets. Development of simple chemistry to exfoliate and intercalate graphite and graphite mimics in large quantities is required for numerous applications. To determine the macroscopic behavior of restacked, exfoliated bulk materials, a systematic approach is presented using a simple, redox-liquid sonication process along to obtain large quantities of 2D and 3D hexagonally layered graphite, molybdenum disulfi de, and boron nitride, which are subsequently characterized to observe chemical and structural changes. For MoS 2 sonicated with the antioxidant sodium bisulfi te, results from Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy indicate the presence of distorted phases from different polymorphs, and apparent nanotube structures in the bulk, restacked powder. Furthermore, using thermograviemtric analysis, the antioxidant enhances the resistance to oxidative degradation of MoS 2 , upon thermal treatment up to 900 C. The addition of the ionic antioxidant decreased dispersion stability in non-polar solvent, suggesting decreased compatibility with non-polar systems. Using simple chemical methods, the ability to generate tailored multidimensional layered materials with unique macroscopic properties is critical for numerous applications, including electrical devices, reinforced polymer composites, lithium ion capacitors, and chemical sensing.

  19. Radiation damage in graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Simmons, John Harry Walrond

    1965-01-01

    Nuclear Energy, Volume 102: Radiation Damage in Graphite provides a general account of the effects of irradiation on graphite. This book presents valuable work on the structure of the defects produced in graphite crystals by irradiation. Organized into eight chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the description of the methods of manufacturing graphite and of its physical properties. This text then presents details of the method of setting up a scale of irradiation dose. Other chapters consider the effect of irradiation at a given temperature on a physical property of graphite. This

  20. The effect of volume on the tensile strength of several nuclear-grade graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strizak, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    This report will present the results of a study on the effects of stress volume on the tensile strength of two nuclear-grade graphites. The materials selected were H-451, an extruded near-isotropic graphite manufactured by Great Lakes Carbon Corporation, and IG-110, a fine-grained isotropic molded graphite manufactured by Toyo Tanso Company, Ltd. The tensile properties of H-451 were examined extensively in the past in order to characterize the variability of strength within billets, between billets, and between lots. But, the variability within a billet was, for the most part, studied only casually. The problem was the strong influence of a limited sampling plan in describing the mean strength and the variability. Therefore, an extensive, statistically sound sampling plan has been devised to fully characterize the spatial variability within a single billet. The effects of stress volume are being reexamined by comparing the strengths of four specimen sizes covering a broad range in stress volume. Two models will be employed for analysis of the stress volume data for the selected graphites. The popular Weibull model has previously been found to grossly overestimate the volume dependence of the strength of H-451 graphite. The model will be reevaluated using the improved statistical distribution of strength expected from the current sampling plan. A new fracture model developed by Burchell and Tucker has potential for determining the effect of stress volume on the tensile strength of graphite. This probabilistic failure criterion combines a microstructural basis with a fracture-mechanics approach to failure. An initial evaluation of H-451 data showed that the model closely predicted the mean tensile strength for the two smaller specimen sizes. 9 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab

  1. Overview of strength, crack propagation and fracture of nuclear reactor moderator graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskovic, R.; Heard, P.J.; Flewitt, P.E.J.; Wootton, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Fracture behaviour. • Cracking initiation and growth. • Different loadings configurations. • Fracture mechanisms. -- Abstract: Nuclear reactor moderator graphite is an aggregate of needle coke filler particles within a matrix of fine coke flour particles mixed with pitch binder. Following extrusion in green condition, impregnation with liquid pitch binder and graphitisation, a polygranular aggregate with orthotropic properties is produced. Its mechanical properties under several different loading conditions and associated cracking behaviour were examined to establish crack initiation and propagation behaviour. Both virgin and radiolytically oxidised material were examined using optical and electron optical microscopy, focused ion beam microscope and digital image correlation. The appearance of force vs. displacement curves varied with type of loading. Mostly linear elastic traces occurred in uniaxial tensile and flexural tests. Large departures from linear elastic behaviour were observed in standard uniaxial and diametral compression testing. Digital image correlation has shown that the initiation of cracking involves formation of a process zone which grows to a critical size of approximately 3–5 mm before a macro-crack is initiated. Cracks straddle a torturous path which zigzags between the filler particles through the matrix consistent with crack propagation along the filler matrix interface. This paper provides an overview of strength, crack propagation and fracture of nuclear reactor moderator graphite. It reviews the physical processes and mathematical approaches that have been adopted to describe the behaviour of brittle materials and then considers if they apply to reactor core graphites

  2. Development of mercury porosimeter. Application to nuclear graphite studies (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocquet, M.; Genisson, J.; Sailleau, J.

    1961-01-01

    A mercury porosimeter, model IFP-CEA, has been developed for application to nuclear graphite studies. The apparatus is based on the capillary depression phenomenon. The relationship between the radius of a pore and the pressure at which mercury fills it is pr = -2 σ cos θ ( σ is the surface tension, θ the angle of contact of the mercury). After some theoretical consideration, the apparatus is described. The mercury pressure is increased step-wise from 0 to 1000 kg/cm 2 thus yielding the complete distribution of pores from 92 μ to 75 A. Results are, then presented concerning nuclear graphites which show the evolution of the porous structure under the effect of bitumen impregnation. In general, the volume of the large pores decreases while that of the small pores increases. The structure of impregnated products appears to depend to a certain extent on that of the starting materials. It has also been possible to study other products with this porosimeter; the range of measurements possible is such that it may be used for the study of the majority of porous materials. (authors) [fr

  3. Transient analysis of nuclear graphite oxidation for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wei, E-mail: wxu12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Shi, Lei; Zheng, Yanhua

    2016-09-15

    Graphite is widely used as moderator, reflector and structural materials in the high temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble-bed modular (HTR-PM). In normal operating conditions or water/air ingress accident, the nuclear graphite in the reactor may be oxidized by air or steam. Oxidation behavior of nuclear graphite IG-110 which is used as the structural materials and reflector of HTR-PM is mainly researched in this paper. To investigate the penetration depth of oxygen in IG-110, this paper developed the one dimensional spherical oxidation model. In the oxidation model, the equations considered graphite porosity variation with the graphite weight loss. The effect of weight loss on the effective diffusion coefficient and the oxidation rate was also considered in this model. Based on this theoretical model, this paper obtained the relative concentration and local weight loss ratio profile in graphite. In addition, the local effective diffusion coefficient and oxidation rate in the graphite were also investigated.

  4. Microstructure, elastic and electromagnetic properties of epoxy-graphite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, S.; Micciulla, F.; Levin, V. M.; Petronyuk, Yu. S.; Chernozatonskii, L. A.; Kuzhir, P. P.; Paddubskaya, A. G.; Macutkevic, J.; Pletnev, M. A.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.

    2015-06-01

    A set of epoxy resin-based composites filled with 0.25 - 2.0 wt.% of commercially available exfoliated graphite (EG) and thick graphene (TG), prepared by suspending EG particles in cyclohexane, and submitting the suspension to a series of grinding and ultrasonic dispersion steps, was produced. The microstructure of such epoxy-graphite composites has been studied by the impulse acoustic microscopy technique. According to acoustic microscopy data, exfoliated graphite microparticles have been well dispersed in the epoxy matrix. TG nanoflakes demonstrated persistent tendency to clustering and formation of agglomerates. The addition of graphite particles in small amount (0.25 - 2.0 wt.%) did not influence the bulk elastic properties of epoxy-graphite composite materials. Being extremely lightweight, 0.003 g cm-3, EG had a lower percolation threshold than TG, at the level of 1-1.5 wt.% against 2.1-3.2 wt.%, respectively. As a result, epoxy composites filled with 1.0-2.0 wt.% EG provided high electromagnetic (EM) interference shielding both at microwave and THz frequencies. In contrast, no significant influence of TG loading was observed at low weight fraction (up to 2 wt.%) on the EM performance of epoxy composites.

  5. Microstructure, elastic and electromagnetic properties of epoxy-graphite composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bellucci

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A set of epoxy resin-based composites filled with 0.25 – 2.0 wt.% of commercially available exfoliated graphite (EG and thick graphene (TG, prepared by suspending EG particles in cyclohexane, and submitting the suspension to a series of grinding and ultrasonic dispersion steps, was produced. The microstructure of such epoxy-graphite composites has been studied by the impulse acoustic microscopy technique. According to acoustic microscopy data, exfoliated graphite microparticles have been well dispersed in the epoxy matrix. TG nanoflakes demonstrated persistent tendency to clustering and formation of agglomerates. The addition of graphite particles in small amount (0.25 – 2.0 wt.% did not influence the bulk elastic properties of epoxy-graphite composite materials. Being extremely lightweight, 0.003 g cm−3, EG had a lower percolation threshold than TG, at the level of 1-1.5 wt.% against 2.1-3.2 wt.%, respectively. As a result, epoxy composites filled with 1.0-2.0 wt.% EG provided high electromagnetic (EM interference shielding both at microwave and THz frequencies. In contrast, no significant influence of TG loading was observed at low weight fraction (up to 2 wt.% on the EM performance of epoxy composites.

  6. Properties of screen-printed modified graphite layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Walter

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available During last years protection of the environment is one of the important problems that should be solved by modern technology. Theimportant problems are toxic gases emitted by conventional power plants. One of the methods that contribute to decreasing air pollution is manufacturing of cheap solar energy devices that could be applied in households. Among different type of fabrication technology of solar cells, DSSC technology looks like one of the interesting because it is relatively simple and low cost technology. Nowadays a lot of researcher groups making investigations to improve its setup, to get the cost reduction. The methods to achieve this goal were proposed in ISE (Germany as a concept of monolithic dye sensitised solar cell. One of the ideas of this solar cells setup is replacing expensive TCO electrode by much cheaper graphite electrode. Replacing TCO glass by graphite layer has to be done only in case of comparable properties of those both electrodes. There are some tested ideas of manufacturing that electrode and some of them are successfully applied. Presented work has been focused on preparation graphite conductive electrode for DSSC technology application, fabricated by screen–printing technique. Investigations concern new graphite past composition suitable for graphite layer preparation. It was been found that applying additive of titanium organic compound (Tyzor GBA to the past composition result in good properties, characterised by low resistance and good adhesion between graphite particles in the printed layer. Some tested layers prepared from proposed paste compositions characterised by better conductivity then applied in conventional DSSC cells counter electrode. The optimal addition of the modifier has not fixed yet.Among tested pastes the most promising results has been achieved for paste contained the biggest amount of Tyzor GBA.

  7. The uncertain future for nuclear graphite disposal: Crisis or opportunity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, A.J.; Neighbour, G.B.; Dubourg, M.

    2001-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, numerous proposals have been made for the long-term treatment of radioactive graphite waste. These plans have ranged from sea dumping through incineration to land-based disposal, sometimes preceded by a variable period of 'safe-storage' within the original reactor containment, to allow for the decay of shorter-lived isotopes ahead of dismantling. A number of novel chemical or physical pre-treatments of the graphite, with the objective of facilitating its subsequent disposal or improving the environmental consequences of the chosen disposal route, have also been suggested. There are patents issued on systems for transmutation of long-lived isotopes to reduce the radiological consequences of disposal of intact graphite, and for separation of certain isotopes such as carbon-14 from the matrix in an incineration process. Although these far-reaching proposals are not apparently cost-effective, scope for cost-recovery does exist, i.e., in terms of disposal of the separated carbon-14 in cements used for immobilisation of other radioactive solid waste materials. More recently, political and environmental factors have further complicated the issue. Nuclear regulators are challenging the proposed length of 'safe-storage' schemes on the basis that essential knowledge on the reactor materials may be lost in the interim. International agreements such as OSPAR have effectively eliminated the possibility for disposal at sea, whilst public opinion is strongly expressed against any expansion of existing land-based disposal sites or the creation of new ones. As a particular example, the United Kingdom authorities recently denied to the official body charged with the development of a deep repository the necessary planning consents to develop an exploratory rock-structure laboratory on the most favoured site. The current drive towards minimising or eliminating any radioactivity release to the environment has the unintended consequence of causing the waste

  8. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A. N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated 'D'peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of 'G' and 'D' in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure.

  9. Direct reading spectrochemical analysis of nuclear graphite; Analisis espectroquimico de lectura directa de grafito nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca Adell, M.; Becerro Ruiz, E.; Alvarez Gonzalez, F.

    1964-07-01

    A description is given about the application of a direct-reading spectrometer the Quantometer, to the determination of boron. calcium, iron, titanium and vanadium in nuclear grade graphite. for boron the powdered sample is mixed with 1% cupric fluoride and excited in a 10-amperes direct current arc and graphite electrodes with a crater 7 mm wide and 10 mm deep. For the other elements a smaller crater has been used and dilution with a number of matrices has been investigated; the best results are achieved by employing 25% cupric fluoride. The sensitivity limit for boron is 0,15 ppm. (Author) 21 refs.

  10. Thermophysical properties estimation of paraffin/graphite composite phase change material using an inverse method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachheb, Mohamed; Karkri, Mustapha; Albouchi, Fethi; Mzali, Foued; Nasrallah, Sassi Ben

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Preparation of paraffin/graphite composites by uni-axial compression technique. • Measurement of thermophysical properties of paraffin/graphite using the periodic method. • Measurement of the experimental densities of paraffin/graphite composites. • Prediction of the effective thermal conductivity using analytical models. - Abstract: In this paper, two types of graphite were combined with paraffin in an attempt to improve thermal conductivity of paraffin phase change material (PCM): Synthetic graphite (Timrex SFG75) and graphite waste obtained from damaged Tubular graphite Heat Exchangers. These paraffin/graphite phase change material (PCM) composites are prepared by the cold uniaxial compression technique and the thermophysical properties were estimated using a periodic temperature method and an inverse technique. Results showed that the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity are greatly influenced by the graphite addition

  11. Microscopic physical and chemical properties of graphite intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eklund, P.C.

    1992-08-24

    Optical spectroscopy (Raman, FTIR and Reflection ) was used to study a variety of acceptor- and donor-type compounds synthesized to determine the microscopic models consistent with the spectrocsopic results. General finding is that the electrical conduction properties of these compounds can be understood on the basis that the intercalation of atomic and/or molecular species between the host graphite layers either raises or lowers the Fermi level (E{sub F)} in a graphitic band structure. This movement of E{sub F} is accomplished via a charge transfer of electrons from the intercalate layers to the graphitic layers (donor compounds), or vice versa (acceptor compounds). Furthermore, the band structure must be modified to take into account the layers of charge that occur as a result of the charge transfer. This charge layering introduces additional bands of states near E{sub F}, which are discussed. Charge-transfer also induces a perturbation of the graphitic normal mode frequencies which can be understood as the result of a contraction (acceptor compounds) or expansion (donor compounds) of the intralayer C-C bonds. Ab-initio calculations support this view and are in reasonable agreement with experimental data.

  12. Fracture behavior of nuclear graphites under tensile impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugachi, Hirokazu; Ishiyama, Shintaro; Eto, Motokuni

    1994-01-01

    Impact tensile strength test was performed with two kinds of HTTR graphites, fine grained isotropic graphite, IG-11 and coarse grained near isotropic graphite, PGX and deformation and fracture behavior under the strain rate of over 100s -1 was measured and the following results were derived: (1) Tensile strength for IG-11 graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but over 1 s -1 , tensile strength for IG-11 graphite increase larger than that measured under 1 s -1 . At the strain rate more than 100 s -1 , remarkable decrease of tensile strength for IG-11 graphite was found. Tensile strength of PGX graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but beyond this value, the sharp tensile strength decrease occurs. (2) Under 100 s -1 , fracture strain for both graphites increase with increase of strain rate and over 100 s -1 , drastic increase of fracture strain for IG-11 graphite was found. (3) At the part of gage length, volume of specimen increase with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (4) Poisson's ratio for both graphites decrease with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (5) Remarkable change of stress-strain curve for both graphites under 100 s -1 was not found, but over 100 s -1 , the slope of these curve for IG-11 graphite decrease drastically. (author)

  13. Property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.J.; Haag, G.

    1979-07-01

    Design data for irradiated graphite are usually presented as families of isothermal curves showing the change in physical property as a function of fast neutron fluence. In this report, procedures for combining isothermal curves to predict behavior under changing irradiation temperatures are compared with experimental data on irradiation-induced changes in dimensions, Young's modulus, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansivity. The suggested procedure fits the data quite well and is physically realistic

  14. Kinetics of Chronic Oxidation of NBG-17 Nuclear Graphite by Water Vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burchell, Timothy D [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mee, Robert [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report presents the results of kinetic measurements during accelerated oxidation tests of NBG-17 nuclear graphite by low concentration of water vapor and hydrogen in ultra-high purity helium. The objective is to determine the parameters in the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) equation describing the oxidation kinetics of nuclear graphite in the helium coolant of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR). Although the helium coolant chemistry is strictly controlled during normal operating conditions, trace amounts of moisture (predictably < 0.2 ppm) cannot be avoided. Prolonged exposure of graphite components to water vapor at high temperature will cause very slow (chronic) oxidation over the lifetime of graphite components. This behavior must be understood and predicted for the design and safe operation of gas-cooled nuclear reactors. The results reported here show that, in general, oxidation by water of graphite NBG-17 obeys the L-H mechanism, previously documented for other graphite grades. However, the characteristic kinetic parameters that best describe oxidation rates measured for graphite NBG-17 are different than those reported previously for grades H-451 (General Atomics, 1978) and PCEA (ORNL, 2013). In some specific conditions, certain deviations from the generally accepted L-H model were observed for graphite NBG-17. This graphite is manufactured in Germany by SGL Carbon Group and is a possible candidate for the fuel elements and reflector blocks of HTGR.

  15. Change in electrical resistance of irradiated nuclear graphite during compressive tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, Motokuni

    1986-01-01

    In this paper the change in electrical resistance of neutron-irradiated nuclear graphite is measured and compared with that of the unirradiated; the deformation mechanism for irradiated graphite is discussed in relation to the resistance change and the defects which are believed to be produced during irradiation. (orig./RK)

  16. Influence of Particle Size on Properties of Expanded Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurajica, S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Expanded graphite has been applied widely in thermal insulation, adsorption, vibration damping, gasketing, electromagnetic interference shielding etc. It is made by intercalation of natural flake graphite followed by thermal expansion. Intercalation is a process whereby an intercalant material is inserted between the graphene layers of a graphite crystal. Exfoliation, a huge unidirectional expansion of the starting intercalated flakes, occurs when the graphene layers are forced apart by the sudden decomposition and vaporization of the intercalated species by thermal shock. Along with production methodologies, such as the intercalation process and heat treatment, the raw material characteristics, especially particle size, strongly influence the properties of the final product.This report evaluates the influence of the particle size of the raw material on the intercalation and expansion processes and consequently the properties of the exfoliated graphite. Natural crystalline flake graphite with wide particle diameter distribution (between dp = 80 and 425 µm was divided into four size-range portions by sieving. Graphite was intercalated via perchloric acid, glacial acetic acid and potassium dichromate oxidation and intercalation procedure. 5.0 g of graphite, 7.0 g of perchloric acid, 4.0 g of glacial acetic acid and 2.0 g of potassium dichromate were placed in glass reactor. The mixture was stirred with n = 200 min–1 at temperature of 45 °C during 60 min. Then it was filtered and washed with distilled water until pH~6 and dried at 60 °C during 24 h. Expansion was accomplished by thermal shock at 1000 °C for 1 min. The prepared samples were characterized by means of exfoliation volume measurements, simultaneous differential thermal analysis and thermo-gravimetry (DTA/TGA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, BET measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.X-ray diffraction indicated a change of distance

  17. Balanced improvement of high performance concrete material properties with modified graphite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyvandi, Amirpasha

    Graphite nanomaterials offer distinct features for effective reinforcement of cementitious matrices in the pre-crack and post-crack ranges of behavior. Thoroughly dispersed and well-bonded nanomaterials provide for effective control of the size and propagation of defects (microcracks) in matrix, and also act as closely spaced barriers against diffusion of moisture and aggressive solutions into concrete. Modified graphite nanomaterials can play multi-faceted roles towards enhancing the mechanical, physical and functional attributes of concrete materials. Graphite nanoplatelets (GP) and carbon nanofibers (CNF) were chosen for use in cementitious materials. Experimental results highlighted the balanced gains in diverse engineering properties of high-performance concrete realized by introduction of graphite nanomaterials. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used in order to gain further insight into the effects of nanomaterials on the hydration process and structure of cement hydrates. NMR exploits the magnetic properties of certain atomic nuclei, and the sensitivity of these properties to local environments to generate data which enables determination of the internal structure, reaction state, and chemical environment of molecules and bulk materials. 27 Al and 29Si NMR spectroscopy techniques were employed in order to evaluate the effects of graphite nanoplatelets on the structure of cement hydrates, and their resistance to alkali-silica reaction (ASR), chloride ion diffusion, and sulfate attack. Results of 29Si NMR spectroscopy indicated that the percent condensation of C-S-H in cementitious paste was lowered in the presence of nanoplatelets at the same age. The extent of chloride diffusion was assessed indirectly by detecting Friedel's salt as a reaction product of chloride ions with aluminum-bearing cement hydrates. Graphite nanoplatelets were found to significantly reduce the concentration of Friedel's salt at different depths after various periods

  18. Microwave absorption properties of graphite flakes-phenolic resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Jyoti P.; Gogoi, Pragyan J.; Bhattacharyya, Nidhi S.

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, microwave absorption properties of a conductor back single layer designed on graphite flakes (GF)-novolac phenolic resin (NPR) composites is studied. The complex permittivity of the developed composite enhance for higher GF percentages. The reflection loss(RL) measured using E8362C VNA shows a maximum RL values -25 dB at 9.8 GHz for 7 wt. % composition with -10 dB bandwidth of 0.3 GHz. The developed composites are being light weight and cost effective shows potential to be used as dielectric absorber.

  19. Microstructure and some properties of boron modified graphite USB-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernikov, V. N.; Alimov, V. Kh.; Gorodetsky, A. E.; Sharapov, V. M.; Zakharov, A. P.; Kurolenkin, E. I.

    1992-09-01

    Boronized graphites, in particular USB-15, have some unique properties which make them applicable in thermonuclear confinement experiments. The optimization of USB-15 manufacture technology demands more detailed knowledge of its properties and, first of all, its microstructure. In this connection microstructure of USB-15 was studied in detail by means of X-ray diffraction, microanalysis, analytical TEM, SEM and other methods, both in original state and after annealing at 2300, 2700 and 3100 K. The erosion resistance to low energy bombardment from deuterium plasma was investigated between 350 and 900 K. In the course of 3 keV D +-ion implantation up to a dose ~ 5 × 10 20 D + m -2 deuterium is mainly trapped in vacancy complexes, which were studied by means of TDS and deuterium profiling using SIMS and RGA. The ratio of CD 4 to D 2 molecules emitted from USB-15 during post-implantation thermal desorption is considerably less than that from other types of graphites, indicating that the recombination desorption of deuterium is greatly enhanced by B in solid solution. Summary is given on property evolution of USB-15 (before and after thermal treatment) as a result of irradiation up to a fast neutron fluence ( E > 0.18 MeV) of 2.5 × 10 25 n m -2 in a temperature range 360-1100 K. Thermal annealing of USB-15 in the range 2200-2400 K is recommended for improvement of its thermal strength and radiation stability.

  20. A discussion of possible mechanisms affecting fission product transport in irradiated and unirradiated nuclear grade graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firth, M.J.

    1977-09-01

    137 Cs, 85 Sr, and sup(110m)Ag adsorption experiments were conducted on three graphite powders with differing amounts of specific basal and edge surface areas. No direct proportionality was found between the specific amounts of the isotopes adsorbed and either of the surface characteristics. There appears to be some correlation with the specific basal surface area despite the fact that each isotope behaves differently. Factors that might influence the adsorption behaviour of Cs and Ag during reactor irradiation and heat treatment of nuclear grade graphites are discussed. These include the form of Cs with the graphite surface. A model based on Cs adsorption at vacancy clusters is used to analyse adsorption experiments. A possible explanation for the behaviour of Ag through the migration of graphite impurities from the bulk of the graphite to the pore surface is also discussed. (author)

  1. Some aspects of nuclear graphite production in France; Etude generale sur les graphites nucleaires produits en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueron, J.; Hering, H. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Legendre, A. [Pechiney, 75 - Paris (France)

    1958-07-01

    1) Manufacturing: A summary and results on the CEA-Pechiney purification process are given. Variations in the preparation of green pastes and their effects on graphitized material are described. 2) Physical and mechanical properties: Results are given on: - Statistics of dimensional variatior products having square cross-section. - Statistical variation of thermal expansion coefficients and of electrical conductivity. - Density of normals to carbon layer planes and their connexion with thermal expansion. - Stress-strain cycles and conclusions drawn therefrom. - Mechanical resistance and gas permeability of items for supporting fuel elements. 3) Behaviour under radiation: Alteration under radiation of French graphites irradiated either in G1 pile or in experimental piles, and thermal annealing of those alterations, are given. (author)Fren. [French] 1) Fabrication: On resume le procede d'epuration CEA-PECHINEY, ainsi que diverses modalites de preparation des pates et on expose les resultats obtenus. 2) Proprietes physiques et mecaniques: On indique le resultat d'etudes sur: - la statistique des dimensions de produits a section carree. - celle des variations des coefficients de dilatation thermique et de la conductibilite electrique. - la densite des normales aux plans graphitiques et leur connexion avec la dilatation thermique. - la compression mecanique du graphite. - la solidite mecanique et la permeabilite aux gaz de pieces destinees a supporter des cartouches de combustible. 3) Tenue sous rayonnement: Modification sous rayonnement des graphites fran is irradies soit dans la pile G1, soit dans des piles experimentales, et guerison thermique de ces modifications. (auteur)

  2. The reaction of unirradiated and irradiated nuclear graphites with water vapor in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hisashi; Nomura, Shinzo; Kurosawa, Takeshi; Fujii, Kimio; Sasaki, Yasuichi

    1980-10-01

    Nuclear graphites more than 10 brands were oxidized with water vapor in helium and then some selected graphites were irradiated with fast neutron in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor to clarify the effect of radiation damage of graphite on their reaction behaviors. The reaction was carried out under a well defined condition in the temperature range 800 -- 1000 0 C at concentrations of water vapor 0.38 -- 1.30 volume percent in helium flow of total pressure of 1 atm. The chemical reactivity of graphite irradiated at 1000 +- 50 0 C increased linearly with neutron fluence until irradiation of 3.2 x 10 21 n/cm 2 . The activation energy for the reaction was found to decrease with neutron fluence for almost all the graphites, except for a few ones. The order of reaction increased from 0.5 for the unirradiated graphite to 1.0 for the graphite irradiated up to 6.0 x 10 20 n/cm 2 . Experiment was also performed to study a superposed effect between the influence of radiation damage of graphite and the catalytic action of barium on the reaction rate, as well as the effect of catalyser of barium. It was shown that these effects were not superposed upon each other, although barium had a strong catalytic action on the reaction. (author)

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Bratton, Rob [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marsden, Barry [University of Manchester, UK; Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Penfield, Scott [Technology Insights; Mitchell, Mark [PBMR (Pty) Ltd.; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2008-03-01

    Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV

  4. Low temperature chemical processing of graphite-clad nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-10-17

    A reduced-temperature method for treatment of a fuel element is described. The method includes molten salt treatment of a fuel element with a nitrate salt. The nitrate salt can oxidize the outer graphite matrix of a fuel element. The method can also include reduced temperature degradation of the carbide layer of a fuel element and low temperature solubilization of the fuel in a kernel of a fuel element.

  5. Graphitic carbon nitride: synthesis, properties, and applications in catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junjiang; Xiao, Ping; Li, Hailong; Carabineiro, Sónia A C

    2014-10-08

    Graphitic carbon nitride, g-C3N4, is a polymeric material consisting of C, N, and some impurity H, connected via tris-triazine-based patterns. Compared with the majority of carbon materials, it has electron-rich properties, basic surface functionalities and H-bonding motifs due to the presence of N and H atoms. It is thus regarded as a potential candidate to complement carbon in material applications. In this review, a brief introduction to g-C3N4 is given, the methods used for synthesizing this material with different textural structures and surface morphologies are described, and its physicochemical properties are referred. In addition, four aspects of the applications of g-C3N4 in catalysis are discussed: (1) as a base metal-free catalyst for NO decomposition, (2) as a reference material in differentiating oxygen activation sites for oxidation reactions over supported catalysts, (3) as a functional material to synthesize nanosized metal particles, and (4) as a metal-free catalyst for photocatalysis. The reasons for the use of g-C3N4 for such applications are also given, and we expect that this paper will inspire readers to search for further new applications for this material in catalysis and in other fields.

  6. Synthesis and properties of zirconium carbide film on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu Minh Thanh; Dang Van Duong; Le Kim Long; Nguyen Duc Nghia

    2014-01-01

    In this study, synthesis and properties of zirconium carbide on graphite will be introduced. CVD temperature and H 2 flow affect properties of ZrC film. The increased temperature and increased size of crystal ZrC reduce flatness of the surface; contrarily, the increased flow of H 2 and decreased size of crystal flatten the surface of porous film. The obtained results showed that CVD condition is suitable for producing uniform, consistent and flat ZrC film: temperature 1200 o C; H 2 flow at 20 ml/min; flows of Ar, gas at 30, 80 ml/min, respectively; ZrCl 4 8 g/time, CVD time 1 hour. Phase components of ZrC film mainly consist of two principal phases ZrC and carbon. Film thickness ranges from 10.5-15.5μm; film coating is uniform, non-crack, and highly compact and the film's medium hardness is 1943 kG/mm 2 . (author)

  7. Compressive loading unloading behavior of nuclear graphite grades of different forming method and raw cokes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Sehwan; Hong, Seongdeok; Kim, Yongwan

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear graphite is used for core structural components and neutron moderators in high temperature gas-cooled reactors. As graphite is a brittle material fail at relatively low strains (e.g., ∼0.5% in tension and ∼2% in compression), cracking of these components can occur throughout the life of the reactor under the influence of thermal and mechanical stresses. While a lot of studies have been performed on the fracture of graphite, most studies have been concerned on crack initiation and propagation, with little concerns on the damage processes that lead to the very first stage of crack initiation. In this study, the graphite damage processes before the main crack formation were investigated based on the microstructure change during load relaxation. For this, 4-1/3 notched flexure strength test specimens made of nuclear graphite grades IG-110, NBG-18 and PCEA of different forming methods (isotropic molding, vibrational molding and extrusion, respectively) and ingredients (coke, binder) were subjected to 10 cyclic compressive loading-unloading, and the changes in the microstructure of notch-tip areas were examined by X-ray tomography

  8. Development and testing of nuclear graphite for the German pebble-bed high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haag, G.; Delle, W.; Nickel, H.; Theymann, W.; Wilhelmi, G.

    1987-01-01

    Several types of high temperature reactors have been developed in the Federal Republic of Germany. They are all based on spherical fuel elements being surrounded by graphite as reflector material. As an example, HTR-500 developed by the Hochtemperatur Reaktorbau GmbH is shown. The core consists of the top reflector, the side reflector with inner and outer parts, the bottom reflector and the core support columns. The most serious problem with respect to fast neutron radiation damage had to be solved for the materials of those parts near the pebble bed. Regarding the temperature profile in the core, the top reflector is at 300 deg C, and as cooling gas flows from the top downward, the temperature of the inner side reflector rises to about 700 deg C at the bottom. Fortunately, the highest fast neutron load accumulated during the life time of a reactor corresponds to the lowest temperature. This makes graphite components easier to survive neutron exposure without being mechanically damaged, although the maximum fast neutron fluence is as high as 4 x 10 22 /cm 2 at about 400 deg C. HTR graphite components are divided into four classes according to loading. The raw materials for nuclear graphite, the development of pitch coke nuclear graphite, the irradiation behavior of ATR-2E and ASR-IRS and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  9. Experience of on-site disposal of production uranium-graphite nuclear reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavliuk, Alexander O; Kotlyarevskiy, Sergey G; Bespala, Evgeny V; Zakharova, Elena V; Ermolaev, Vyacheslav M; Volkova, Anna G

    2018-04-01

    The paper reported the experience gained in the course of decommissioning EI-2 Production Uranium-Graphite Nuclear Reactor. EI-2 was a production Uranium-Graphite Nuclear Reactor located on the Production and Demonstration Center for Uranium-Graphite Reactors JSC (PDC UGR JSC) site of Seversk City, Tomsk Region, Russia. EI-2 commenced its operation in 1958, and was shut down on December 28, 1990, having operated for the period of 33 years all together. The extra pure grade graphite for the moderator, water for the coolant, and uranium metal for the fuel were used in the reactor. During the operation nitrogen gas was passed through the graphite stack of the reactor. In the process of decommissioning the PDC UGR JSC site the cavities in the reactor space were filled with clay-based materials. A specific composite barrier material based on clays and minerals of Siberian Region was developed for the purpose. Numerical modeling demonstrated the developed clay composite would make efficient geological barriers preventing release of radionuclides into the environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Physical Properties of 3D Interconnected Graphite Networks - Aerographite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    networks: Aerographite Grant Number: FA8655-13-1-3058 Principal investigator: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Karl Schulte Institute of Polymers & Composites Hamburg...step process: first, ZnO is manufactured, in a flame spray process forming a solid 3-D scaffold as template, followed by a CVD process in which the...tured graphitic scaffold , the so called Aerographite, in which the graphitic ligaments are directly interconnected by covalent bonds. This rare

  11. Research of oxidation properties of graphite used in HTR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Xiaowei; Jean-Charles, R.

    2006-01-01

    The oxidation of graphite influences the graphite performance. There are many factors to influence the graphite oxidation. In 10 MW High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor(HTR-10), the graphite IG-11 was used as moderator and structure material. The dependence of oxidation behaviour on temperature for the graphite IG-11, was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis in the temperature range of 400 to 1200 degree C. The oxidant was dry air (water content -6 ) with a flow rate of 20 ml/min. The oxidation time was 4 hours. The oxidation results exhibited three regimes: in the 400-600 degree C range, the activation energy was 158.56 kJ/mol and oxidation was controlled by chemical reaction; in the 600-800 degree C range, the activation energy was 72.01 kJ/mol and oxidation kinetics were controlled by in-pore diffusion; when the temperature was over 800 degree C, the activation energy was very small and oxidation was controlled by the boundary layer. Due to CO production, the oxidation rate increased at high temperatures. The effect of burn-off on activation energy was also investigated. In the 600-800 degree C range, the activation energy decreased with burn-off. Results in low temperature tests were very dispersible because the oxidation behaviour at low temperatures was sensitive to inhomogeneous distribution of impurities and some impurities can catalyse graphite oxidation. (authors)

  12. Effects of porosity and temperature on oxidation behavior in air of selected nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dongyue; Li Zhengcao; Miao Wei; Zhang Zhengjun

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear graphite endures gas oxidation in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR), which may threaten the safety of reactor. To study the oxidation behavior of nuclear graphite, weight loss curve is usually measured through Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) method. In this work, three brands of nuclear graphite for HTGR (i.e., HSM-SC, IG-11, and NBG-18) are oxidized under 873 and 1073 K in open air, and their weight loss curves are obtained. The acceleration of oxidizing rate is observed for both HSM-SC and IG-11, and is attributed to the large porosity increase during oxidation process. For HSM-SC, the porosity increase comes from preferential binder oxidation, and thus its binder quality shall be improved to obtain better oxidation resistance. Temperature effects on oxidation for HSM-SC are also studied, which shows that oxidizing gas tends to be exhausted at graphite surface at high temperature instead of penetrate into the interior of bulk. (author)

  13. Study of a nuclear graphite waste 14C decontamination process by CO2 gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pageot, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The decommissioning of French gas cooled nuclear reactors (UNGG), all arrested since 1994, will generate 23,000 tons of graphite waste classified Low Level and Long Lived and notably containing 14 C. The aim of this thesis is to study a new method for selective extraction of this radionuclide by CO 2 gasification.The multi-scale organization of virgin and irradiated graphite has been studied by a coupling between microspectrometry Raman and transmission electron microscopy. With the neutron fluence, the structure degrades and the nano-structure can be greatly changed. In extreme cases, the lamellar nano-structure nuclear graphite has become nano-porous. Furthermore, these damages are systematically heterogeneous. An orientation effect of 'crystallites', shown experimentally by ion implantation, could be a cause of these heterogeneities.This study also showed that from a specific fluence, there is an important development of nano-porous zones coinciding with a dramatic 14 C concentration increase. This radionuclide could be preferentially concentrated in the nano-porous areas which are potentially more reactive than the remaining laminar areas which could be less rich in 14 C. This process by CO 2 gasification was firstly tested on 'analogous' non-radioactive materials (mechanically milled graphite). These tests confirmed, for temperatures between 950 and 1000 C, the selective and complete elimination of nano-porous areas.Tests were then carried out on graphite waste from Saint-Laurent-des-Eaux A2 and G2 reactors. The results are promising with notably the quarter of 14 C inventory extracted for a weight loss of only few percent. Up to 68 % of 14 C inventory was extracted, but with an important gasification. Thus, this treatment could allow extracting selectively a share of 14 C inventory (mobile or linked to nano-porous areas) and allows imagining alternative scenarios for graphite waste managing. (author) [fr

  14. Effects of Specimen Size on The Flexural Strength and Weibull Modulus of Nuclear Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Kim, Dae In; Kim, Eung Seon; Hong, Sung Deok; Kim, Yong Wan

    2010-01-01

    Flexural strength and the Weibull modulus of porous graphite are key material data for the design, and safety and lifetime evaluation of VHTR graphite core components. For brittle materials like graphite, it follows from the experiments that the mean strength of a set of large specimens is smaller than the mean strength of a set of small specimens since it is more likely to find a major flaw in a large than in a small. This size effects of strength is the most prominent and relevant consequence of the statistical behavior of the strength of brittle materials. Weibull was the first to develop a statistical theory of brittle fracture based on the weakest link hypothesis. Using some empirical arguments necessary to make a simple and good fitting of his experimental data he derived the Weibull distribution of the probability of failure, where the Weibull parameter, m, is being used in the probabilistic methods in materials science and structure mechanics, for example, in the design and safety analysis of graphite core components in VHTR. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the specimen size effects on the flexural strength and Weibull modulus of nuclear graphite of different coke particle sizes and different forming methods

  15. Radiation cured epoxy acrylate composites based on graphene, graphite oxide and functionalized graphite oxide with enhanced properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuqiang; Bao, Chenlu; Song, Lei; Qian, Xiaodong; Yuan, Bihe; Hu, Yuan

    2012-03-01

    Epoxy acrylate (EA) composites containing graphite oxide (GO), graphene and nitrogen-double bond functionalized graphite oxide (FGO) were fabricated using UV-radiation and electron beam radiation via in-situ polymerization. Graphene and FGO were homogenously dispersed in EA matrix and enhanced properties, including thermal stability, flame retardancy, electrical conductivity and reduced deleterious gas releasing in thermo decomposition were obtained. Microscale combustion colorimeter results illustrated improved flame retardancy; EA/FGO composites achieved a 29.7% reduction in total heat release (THR) when containing only 0.1% FGO and a 38.6% reduction in peak-heat release rate (PHRR) when containing 3% FGO. The onset decomposition temperatures were delayed and the maximum decomposition values were reduced, according to thermogravimetric analysis which indicated enhanced thermal stabilities. The electrical conductivity was increased by 6 orders of magnitude (3% graphene) and the deleterious gas released during the thermo decomposition was reduced with the addition of all the graphite samples. This study represented a new approach to functionalize GO with flame retardant elements and active curable double bond to achieve better dispersion of GO into polymer matrix to obtain nanocomposites and paved a way for achieving graphene-based materials with high-performance of graphene in enhancement of flame retardancy of polymers for practical applications.

  16. Multi-scale characterization and modelling of damage evolution in nuclear Gilsocarbon graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, D.; Heard, P.; Savija, B.; Smith, G.; Schlangen, E.; Flewitt, P.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the microstructure and mechanical properties of Gilsocarbon graphite have been characterized over a range of length-scales. Optical imaging, combined with 3D X-ray computed tomography and 3D high-resolution tomography based on focus ion beam milling has been adopted for

  17. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2012-10-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  18. Influence of neutron irradiation on the microstructure of nuclear graphite: An X-ray diffraction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z.; Bouwman, W. G.; Schut, H.; van Staveren, T. O.; Heijna, M. C. R.; Pappas, C.

    2017-04-01

    Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructure of nuclear graphite have been investigated by X-ray diffraction on virgin and low doses (∼ 1.3 and ∼ 2.2 dpa), high temperature (750° C) irradiated samples. The diffraction patterns were interpreted using a model, which takes into account the turbostratic disorder. Besides the lattice constants, the model introduces two distinct coherent lengths in the c-axis and the basal plane, that characterise the volumes from which X-rays are scattered coherently. The methodology used in this work allows to quantify the effect of irradiation damage on the microstructure of nuclear graphite seen by X-ray diffraction. The results show that the changes of the deduced structural parameters are in agreement with previous observations from electron microscopy, but not directly related to macroscopic changes.

  19. Development of electrically heated rods with resistive element of graphite or carbon/carbon composites for simulating transients in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polidoro, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    Thermo-hydraulic problems, in nuclear plants are normally analysed by the use of electrically heated rods. The direct or indirect heater rods are limited in their use because, for high temperatures and high heat flux, the heating element temperature approach its melting point. The use of platinum or tantalum is not economically viable. Graphite and carbon/carbon composites are alternative materials because they are good electrical conductors and have good mechanical properties at high temperatures. Graphite and carbon/carbon composites were used to make heating elements for testing by indirect heating. The swaging process used to reduce the cladding diameter prevented the fabrication of graphite heater rods. Carbon/carbon composite used to make heating elements gave good results up to a heat flux of 100 W/cm 2 . It is easy to verify that this value can be exceeded if the choice of the complementary materials for insulator and cladding improved. (author) [pt

  20. Microwave absorbing property of a hybrid absorbent with carbonyl irons coating on the graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yonggang, E-mail: xuyonggang221@163.com [Science and Technology on Electromagnetic Scattering Laboratory, Shanghai, 200438 (China); Yan, Zhenqiang; Zhang, Deyuan [Bionic and Micro/Nano/Bio Manufacturing Technology Research Center, School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2015-11-30

    Graphical abstract: The absorbing property could be enhanced as the CIPs coated on the graphite. - Highlights: • Absorbers filled with CIPs coating on the graphite was fabricated. • The permittivity and permeability increased as CIPs coated. • The CIP materials enhanced the electromagnetic property. • The graphite coated CIPs were effective in 2–18 GHz. - Abstract: The hybrid absorbent filled with carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) coating on the graphite was prepared using a chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were done to analyze the particle crystal grain structure. The complex permittivity and permeability were measured using a vector network analyzer in the frequency range of 2–18 GHz. The results showed that α-Fe appeared in the super-lattice diffraction peaks in XRD graph. The composites added CIPs coating on the graphite had a higher permittivity and imaginary permeability due to the superior microwave dielectric loss and magnetic loss of the CIPs. The reflection loss (RL) result showed that composites filled with 5 vol% Fe-graphite had an excellent absorbing property in the 2–18 GHz, the minimum RL was −25.14 dB at 6 mm and −26.52 dB at 8 mm, respectively.

  1. The tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite posterior to hydrostatic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, S.; Eto, M.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of prehydrostatic loading on microstructural changes and tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite have been examined. Scanning electron micrographs show that formation of microcracks associated with delamination between basal planes occurs under hydrostatic loading. Hydrostatic loading on specimens results in the decrease in tensile strength and increase in residual strain generated by the applied tensile stress at various levels, indicating that the graphite material is weakened by hydrostatic loading. A relationship between residual strain and applied tensile stress for graphite hydrostatically-loaded at several pressure levels can be approximately expressed as element of= (AP + B) sigmasup(n) over a wide range hydrostatic pressure, where element of, P and sigma denote residual strain, hydrostatic pressure and applied tensile stress, respectively; A, B and n are constant. The effects of prehydrostatic loading on the tensile stress-strain behavior of the graphite were examined in more detail. The ratio of stress after hydrostatic loading to that before hydrostatic loading on the stress-strain relationship remains almost unchanged irrespective of strain. (orig.)

  2. Microstructure, elastic and inelastic properties of partially graphitized biomorphic carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, T. S.; Kardashev, B. K.; Smirnov, B. I.; Gutierrez-Pardo, A.; Ramirez-Rico, J.; Martinez-Fernandez, J.

    2015-03-01

    The microstructural characteristics and amplitude dependences of the Young's modulus E and internal friction (logarithmic decrement δ) of biocarbon matrices prepared by beech wood carbonization at temperatures T carb = 850-1600°C in the presence of a nickel-containing catalyst have been studied. Using X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, it has been shown that the use of a nickel catalyst during carbonization results in a partial graphitization of biocarbons at T carb ≥ 1000°C: the graphite phase is formed as 50- to 100-nm globules at T carb = 1000°C and as 0.5- to 3.0-μm globules at T carb = 1600°C. It has been found that the measured dependences E( T carb) and δ( T carb) contain three characteristic ranges of variations in the Young's modulus and logarithmic decrement with a change in the carbonization temperature: E increases and δ decreases in the ranges T carb 1300°C; in the range 1000 biocarbons carbonized in the presence of nickel correlates with the evolution of their microstructure. The largest values of E are obtained for samples with T carb = 1000 and 1600°C. However, the samples with T carb = 1600°C exhibit a higher susceptibility to microplasticity due to the presence of a globular graphite phase that is significantly larger in size and total volume.

  3. Improved mechanical and functional properties of elastomer/graphite nanocomposites prepared by latex compounding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jian; Tian Ming; Jia Qingxiu; Shi Junhong; Zhang Liqun; Lim Szuhui; Yu Zhongzhen; Mai Yiuwing

    2007-01-01

    The facile latex approach has been adopted to finely incorporate graphite nanosheets into elastomeric polymer matrix to obtain high-performance elastomeric nanocomposites with improved mechanical properties and functional properties. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction experiments show that the nanostructures of the final nanocomposites exhibit a high degree of exfoliation and intercalation of graphite in the nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) matrix. Mechanical and dynamic-mechanical tests demonstrate that the NBR/graphite nanocomposites possess greatly increased elastic modulus and tensile strength, and desirably strong interfaces. The unexpected self-crosslinking of elastomer/graphite nanocomposites was discovered and then verified by oscillating disc rheometry and equilibrium swelling experiments. After critically examining various polymer types by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron spin resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, a radical initiation mechanism was proposed to explain the self-crosslinking reaction. These NBR/graphite nanocomposites possess significantly improved wear resistance and gas barrier properties, and superior electrical/thermal conductivity. Such versatile functional properties make NBR nanocomposites a promising new class of advanced materials

  4. The effect of synthetic nanosilica on tribological properties of graphite/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandern, Christian; Khunova, Viera

    2016-05-01

    Development of new advanced friction materials with improved tribological and mechanical properties is of high priority for a number of industrial applications. This paper explores the effect of synthetic spherical nanosilica Nanopox® F400 on tribological and mechanical properties of graphite/epoxy composites. The composites have been prepared by mixing in four paddle-stirrer standard mixer at 500 rpm. During the mixing nanosilica particles did not create agglomerates and are well dispersed within the epoxy matrix. The impact of the nanosilica on abrasive wear, dynamic and static coefficient of friction as well as mechanical properties (strength) has been studied. It was found that by application of 5 wt% graphite as well as 5 wt% nanosilica in epoxy resin a reduction of wear properties did not exceed 16 % in comparison to neat epoxy matrix. However, by simultaneous application of hybrid graphite and nanosilica fillers in epoxy resin reduction of wear increased up to 42 %. The highest improvement (61 %) of wear has been achieved in composites containing 5 wt % of graphite and 10 wt% of nanosilica. Contrary to wear, it was not observed a synergic effect of hybrid graphite/nanosilica fillers on static and dynamic coefficient of friction, as well as on tensile strength of studied epoxy composites.

  5. Nuclear quadrupole interaction measurements of 19F* and 22Na* on Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djoko-Surono, Th; Martin, Peter W

    1996-01-01

    Time differential perturbed angular distribution (TDPAD) technique has been used to investigate nuclear quadrupole interactions of 19 F * and 22 Na * in graphite. We concentrated the measurements on pseudo single crystal graphite called Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite for it has an ordered structure in which the c-axes of the microcrystals aligned in a certain direction with the mosaic spread less than 1 o , while the a- and b-axes randomly oriented on a plane perpendicular to the c-axes. Interactions between quadrupole moment of 19 F * and 22 Na * with its surroundings electric field gradient were studied by detecting the γ-rays distribution, W(Θ,t). For 1 9F * we found one static interaction. The corresponding electric field gradient was V zz =3.24(19)x10 22 V/m 2 . In the case of 22 Na * we found no evidence of nuclear quadrupole interaction, however, we were able to conclude that |QV 22 | 19 bV/m 2 . Using theoretical calculation Q=0.06 barn, we find that |V zz | 20 V/m 2 . These results indicate that the value efg depend on two factors, the host crystal and the core electrons. The core electrons contribution to the total efg is considerably large

  6. Large-Scale Weibull Analysis of H-451 Nuclear- Grade Graphite Specimen Rupture Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Walker, Andrew; Baker, Eric H.; Murthy, Pappu L.; Bratton, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    A Weibull analysis was performed of the strength distribution and size effects for 2000 specimens of H-451 nuclear-grade graphite. The data, generated elsewhere, measured the tensile and four-point-flexure room-temperature rupture strength of specimens excised from a single extruded graphite log. Strength variation was compared with specimen location, size, and orientation relative to the parent body. In our study, data were progressively and extensively pooled into larger data sets to discriminate overall trends from local variations and to investigate the strength distribution. The CARES/Life and WeibPar codes were used to investigate issues regarding the size effect, Weibull parameter consistency, and nonlinear stress-strain response. Overall, the Weibull distribution described the behavior of the pooled data very well. However, the issue regarding the smaller-than-expected size effect remained. This exercise illustrated that a conservative approach using a two-parameter Weibull distribution is best for designing graphite components with low probability of failure for the in-core structures in the proposed Generation IV (Gen IV) high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. This exercise also demonstrated the continuing need to better understand the mechanisms driving stochastic strength response. Extensive appendixes are provided with this report to show all aspects of the rupture data and analytical results.

  7. Thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite: A large scale waste treatment option.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Theodosiou

    Full Text Available This study has investigated the laboratory scale thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite, as a proof-of-concept for the treatment and decommissioning of reactor cores on a larger industrial scale. If showed to be effective, this technology could have promising international significance with a considerable impact on the nuclear waste management problem currently facing many countries worldwide. The use of thermal treatment of such graphite waste is seen as advantageous since it will decouple the need for an operational Geological Disposal Facility (GDF. Particulate samples of Magnox Reactor Pile Grade-A (PGA graphite, were oxidised in both air and 60% O2, over the temperature range 400-1200°C. Oxidation rates were found to increase with temperature, with a particular rise between 700-800°C, suggesting a change in oxidation mechanism. A second increase in oxidation rate was observed between 1000-1200°C and was found to correspond to a large increase in the CO/CO2 ratio, as confirmed through gas analysis. Increasing the oxidant flow rate gave a linear increase in oxidation rate, up to a certain point, and maximum rates of 23.3 and 69.6 mg / min for air and 60% O2 respectively were achieved at a flow of 250 ml / min and temperature of 1000°C. These promising results show that large-scale thermal treatment could be a potential option for the decommissioning of graphite cores, although the design of the plant would need careful consideration in order to achieve optimum efficiency and throughput.

  8. Study of graphite strength properties under conditions of hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strokov, V.I.; Barabanov, V.N.

    1987-01-01

    Three graphite grades are studied under compression, tension and hydrostaic pressure. It is shown that an increase in the ultimate strength and higher arrangement of strain curves are observed beginning with a certain value of hydrostatic pressure under compression. Several different types of coatings have been tested under compression and none of them gave a reliable protection against of oil in pores and cracks of a specimen as a result of which the strength values in this case are lower that under atmospheric pressure

  9. Effect of Bi on graphite morphology and mechanical properties of heavy section ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Liang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To improve the mechanical properties of heavy section ductile cast iron, bismuth (Bi was introduced into the iron. Five castings with different Bi content from 0 to 0.014 wt.% were prepared; and four positions in the casting from the edge to the center, with different solidification cooling rates, were chosen for microstructure observation and mechanical properties test. The effect of the Bi content on the graphite morphology and mechanical properties of heavy section ductile cast iron were investigated. Results show that the tensile strength, elongation and impact toughness at different positions in the five castings decrease with a decrease in cooling rate. With an increase in Bi content, the graphite morphology and the mechanical properties at the same position are improved, and the improvement of mechanical properties is obvious when the Bi content is no higher than 0.011wt.%. But when the Bi content is further increased to 0.014wt.%, the improvement of mechanical properties is not obvious due to the increase of chunky graphite number and the aggregation of chunky graphite. With an increase in Bi content, the tensile fracture mechanism is changed from brittle to mixture ductile-brittle fracture.

  10. Dispersion stability and thermophysical properties of environmentally friendly graphite oil–based nanofluids used in machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Su

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As environmentally friendly cutting fluids, vegetable-based oil and ester oil are being more and more widely used in metal cutting industry. However, their cooling and lubricating properties are required to be further improved in order to meet more cooling and lubricating challenges in high-efficiency machining. Nanofluids with enhanced heat carrying and lubricating capabilities seem to give a promising solution. In this article, graphite oil–based nanofluids with LB2000 vegetable-based oil and PriEco6000 unsaturated polyol ester as base fluids were prepared by ultrasonically assisted two-step method, and their dispersion stability and thermophysical properties such as viscosity and thermal conductivity were experimentally and theoretically investigated at different ultrasonication times. The results indicate that graphite-PriEco6000 nanofluid showed better dispersion stability, higher viscosity, and thermal conductivity than graphite-LB2000 nanofluid, which made it more suitable for application in high-efficiency machining as coolant and lubricant. The theoretical classical models showed good agreement with the thermal conductivity values of graphite oil–based nanofluids measured experimentally. However, the deviation between the experimental values of viscosity and the theoretical models was relatively big. New empirical correlations were proposed for predicting the viscosity of graphite oil–based nanofluids at various ultrasonication times.

  11. Structural and electronic properties of lithium intercalated graphite LiC6

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kganyago, KR

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The lattice properties and electronic structure of graphite and LiC6 within the most widely used density-functional theory implementation, the local density approximation (LDA) are calculated. Improvements to the LDA in the form of a generalized...

  12. Metallic impurities in graphenes prepared from graphite can dramatically influence their properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Chee, Sze Yin; Khezri, Bahareh; Webster, Richard D; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2012-01-09

    All at C? Graphenes prepared by the top-down exfoliation of graphite are shown to contain metallic impurities (see scheme, metal impurities shown as black dots). These impurities may dominate their properties and can have a negative influence on their potential applications. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Thermal properties improvement of Lithium nitrate/Graphite composite phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachheb, Mohamed; Adili, Ali; Albouchi, Fethi; Mzali, Foued; Ben Nasrallah, Sassi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Preparation of new Lithium nitrate/Graphite PCM-composites. • Experimental investigation of the thermo-physical properties of PCM-composites. • Prediction of theoretical thermo-physical properties by using different analytical models. - Abstract: This paper addresses the development and the thermal investigation of new composite materials with improved thermo-physical properties destined for solar thermal energy storage at high temperature. The thermo-physical properties of composites are characterized by using several techniques based on the temperature measurement and the obtained results are compared to the theoretical values calculated by different analytical models. The results of these experiments revealed a clear improvement in the different thermal properties when integrating graphite particles in the composite. In the other hand, a good agreement between experimental and theoretical values was obtained.

  14. Decontamination of nuclear graphite by thermal processing; Dekontamination von Nukleargraphit durch thermische Behandlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florjan, Monika W.

    2010-04-15

    The main problem in view of the direct disposal of the nuclear graphite is its large volume. This waste contains long-lived and short-lived radionuclides which determine the waste strategy. The irradiated graphite possess high amount of the {sup 14}C isotope. The main object of the present work was the selective separation of {sup 14}C isotope from the isotope {sup 12}C by thermal treatment (pyrolysis, partial oxidation). A successful separation could reduce the radiotoxicity and offer a different disposal strategy. Three different graphite types were investigated. The samples originate from the reflector and from the flaking of spherical fuel elements of the high-temperature reactor (AVR) Juelich. The samples from the thermal column of the research reactor (Merlin, Juelich) were also investigated. The maximum tritium releases were obtained both in inert gas atmosphere (N{sub 2}) and under water vapour-oxidizing conditions at 1280 C and 900 C. Furthermore it could be shown that 28% of {sup 14}C could be released under inert gas conditions at a 1280 C. By additive of oxidizing agent such as water vapour and oxygen the {sup 14}C release could be increased. Under water vapour-oxidizing conditions at a temperature of 1280 C up to 93% of the {sup 14}C was separated from the graphite. The matrix corrosion of 5.4% was obtained. The selective separation of the {sup 14}C is possible, because a substantial part of the radiocarbon is bound near the grain boundary surfaces. (orig.)

  15. Enhanced microwave absorption properties of graphite nanoflakes by coating hexagonal boron nitride nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Zhong, Bo

    2017-05-31

    We report herein the synthesis of a novel hexagonal boron nitride nanocrystal/graphite nanoflake (h-BNNC/GNF) composite through a wet-chemistry coating of graphite nanoflakes and subsequent in-situ thermal treatment process. The characterization results of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectrum, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrate that h-BNNCs with diameter of tens of nanometers are highly crystallized and anchored on the surfaces of graphite nanoflakes without obvious aggregation. The minimum reflection loss (RL) value of the h-BNNC/GNF based absorbers could reach −32.38dB (>99.99% attenuation) with the absorber thickness of 2.0mm. This result is superior to the other graphite based and some dielectric loss microwave absorption materials recently reported. Moreover, the frequency range where the RL is less than −10dB is 3.49-17.28GHz with the corresponding thickness of 5.0 to 1.5mm. This reveals a better electromagnetic microwave absorption performance of h-BNNC/GNFs from the X-band to the Ku-band. The remarkable enhancement of the electromagnetic microwave absorption properties of h-BNNC/GNFs can be assigned to the increase of multiple scattering, interface polarization as well as the improvement of the electromagnetic impedance matching of graphite nanoflakes after being coated with h-BNNCs.

  16. Effect of Graphite powder on thermal conductivity, physical and mechanical properties of 3-layer particleboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Malekani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study, has investigated effect of using graphite powder on thermal conductivity during the time of production in three-layer boards made ​​of planer shaving particles (70% in the middle layer and the particles poplar (30% of the surface at 4 levels of 0, 5, 10 and 15% (oven dry adhesive. After that physical properties and mechanical strength measured. Overall, results have shown that use of graphite powder, increases amount of thermal conductivity significantly. Also found that modulus of rupture and modulus of elasticity had significantly increased and the thickness swelling and water absorption decreased, but they had no significant effect on shear strength parallel to surface. So the boards produced by 15% graphite powder had maximum amount of modulus of rupture (18.42 MPa and modulus of elasticity (2298MPa and also had minimum amount of water absorption and thickness swelling

  17. Characterization of Epoxy Functionalized Graphite Nanoparticles and the Physical Properties of Epoxy Matrix Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Bauer, Jonathan L.; Maryanski, Michael J.; Heimann, Paula J.; Barlow, Jeremy P.; Gosau, Jan-Michael; Allred, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a novel approach to the functionalization of graphite nanoparticles. The technique provides a mechanism for covalent bonding between the filler and matrix, with minimal disruption to the sp2 hybridization of the pristine graphene sheet. Functionalization proceeded by covalently bonding an epoxy monomer to the surface of expanded graphite, via a coupling agent, such that the epoxy concentration was measured as approximately 4 wt.%. The impact of dispersing this material into an epoxy resin was evaluated with respect to the mechanical properties and electrical conductivity of the graphite-epoxy nanocomposite. At a loading as low as 0.5 wt.%, the electrical conductivity was increased by five orders of magnitude relative to the base resin. The material yield strength was increased by 30% and Young s modulus by 50%. These results were realized without compromise to the resin toughness.

  18. Deuterium migration in nuclear graphite: Consequences for the behavior of tritium in CO{sub 2}-cooled reactors and for the decontamination of irradiated graphite waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guillou, M. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Agence nationale pour la gestion des déchets radioactifs, DRD/CM – 1-7, rue Jean Monnet, Parc de la Croix-Blanche, F-92298 Châtenay-Malabry cedex (France); Toulhoat, N., E-mail: nelly.toulhoat@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); CEA/DEN – Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Pipon, Y. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Institut Universitaire Technologique, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 43, boulevard du 11 novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Khodja, H. [Laboratoire d’Etude des Eléments Légers, CEA/DSM/IRAMIS/NIMBE, UMR 3299 SIS2M – Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we aim at understanding tritium behavior in the graphite moderator of French CO{sub 2}-cooled nuclear fission reactors (called UNGG for “Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz”) to get information on its distribution and inventory in the irradiated graphite waste after their dismantling. These findings should be useful both to improve waste treatment processes and to foresee tritium behavior during reactor decommissioning and waste disposal operations. The purpose of the present work is to elucidate the effects of temperature on the behavior of tritium during reactor operation. Furthermore, it aims at exploring options of thermal decontamination. For both purposes, annealing experiments were carried out in inert atmosphere as well as in thermal conditions as close as possible to those encountered in UNGG reactors and in view of a potential decontamination in humid gas. D{sup +} ions were implanted into virgin nuclear graphite in order to simulate tritium displaced from its original structural site through recoil during reactor operation. The effect of thermal treatments on the mobility of the implanted deuterium was then investigated at temperatures ranging from 200 to 1200 °C, in inert atmosphere (vacuum or argon), in a gas simulating the UNGG coolant gas (mainly CO{sub 2}) or in humid nitrogen. Deuterium was analyzed by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) both at millimetric and micrometric scales. We have identified three main stages for the deuterium release. The first one corresponds to deuterium permeation through graphite open pores. The second and third ones are controlled by the progressive detrapping of deuterium located at different trapping sites and its successive migration through the crystallites and along crystallites and coke grains edges. Extrapolating the thermal behavior of deuterium to tritium, the results show that the release becomes significant above the maximum UNGG reactor temperature of 500 °C and should be lower than 30% of the

  19. Deuterium migration in nuclear graphite: Consequences for the behavior of tritium in CO2-cooled reactors and for the decontamination of irradiated graphite waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guillou, M.; Toulhoat, N.; Pipon, Y.; Moncoffre, N.; Khodja, H.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we aim at understanding tritium behavior in the graphite moderator of French CO2-cooled nuclear fission reactors (called UNGG for "Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz") to get information on its distribution and inventory in the irradiated graphite waste after their dismantling. These findings should be useful both to improve waste treatment processes and to foresee tritium behavior during reactor decommissioning and waste disposal operations. The purpose of the present work is to elucidate the effects of temperature on the behavior of tritium during reactor operation. Furthermore, it aims at exploring options of thermal decontamination. For both purposes, annealing experiments were carried out in inert atmosphere as well as in thermal conditions as close as possible to those encountered in UNGG reactors and in view of a potential decontamination in humid gas. D+ ions were implanted into virgin nuclear graphite in order to simulate tritium displaced from its original structural site through recoil during reactor operation. The effect of thermal treatments on the mobility of the implanted deuterium was then investigated at temperatures ranging from 200 to 1200 °C, in inert atmosphere (vacuum or argon), in a gas simulating the UNGG coolant gas (mainly CO2) or in humid nitrogen. Deuterium was analyzed by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) both at millimetric and micrometric scales. We have identified three main stages for the deuterium release. The first one corresponds to deuterium permeation through graphite open pores. The second and third ones are controlled by the progressive detrapping of deuterium located at different trapping sites and its successive migration through the crystallites and along crystallites and coke grains edges. Extrapolating the thermal behavior of deuterium to tritium, the results show that the release becomes significant above the maximum UNGG reactor temperature of 500 °C and should be lower than 30% of the total amount produced

  20. Effects of air flow rate on the oxidation of NBG-18 and NBG-25 nuclear graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Chan Kim, Gen

    2017-08-01

    The effects of air flow rate (FR) (FR range: 1-10 L/min) on the oxidation of NBG-18 and NBG-25 nuclear graphite grades at temperatures between 600 and 1100 °C were studied, in reference to the standard test procedure for measuring oxidation rates of nuclear graphite in air (ASTM D 7542-09). The results showed that the FR effects on oxidation rate (OR) increase with increasing temperature with negligible FR effects at 600 °C for both materials. At high temperatures (>800 °C) there appears to be a two-stage relationship between FR and OR, which corresponds to the transition between reaction rates dominated by chemical kinetics and those dominated by diffusion. The material-specific microstructure appeared strongly influences this transition. The overall OR-FR behaviours of NBG-18 were higher than NBG-25 at 600-800 °C while negligible differences in the OR-FR behaviours between the two grades were observed at 900-1100 °C. The mercury porosimetry data showed that the higher OR-FR behaviours observed in NBG-18 may partly be attributed to the differences in the pore size distribution (open porosity and cumulative pore area) between the grades, especially for the large size pores (diameter ≫ 5 × 103 nm).

  1. Spectroscopic study of energetic helium-ion irradiation effects on nuclear graphite tiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Wan; Lee, K.W. [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, D.M.; Noh, S.J.; Kim, H.S. [Department of Applied Physics, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheol Eui, E-mail: rscel@korea.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-01

    Highlights: • Energetic helium-ion irradiation on nuclear graphite tiles studied for plasma facing components. • XPS reveals recrystallization at low dose irradiation and DLC sites at higher doses. • Raman spectroscopy reveals increasing diamond-like defects and structural deformation. • Average inter-defect distance obtained as a function of irradiation dose from Raman intensities. - Abstract: Helium ion-irradiation effects on the nuclear graphite tiles were studied in order to understand the structural modifications and damages that can be produced by fusion reaction in tokamaks. The surface morphological changes due to increasing dose of the irradiation were examined by the field-effect scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy elucidated the changes in the shallow surface bonding configurations caused by the energetic irradiation. Raman spectroscopy revealed the structural defects and diamond-like carbon sites that increased with increasing irradiation dose, and the average inter-defect distance was found from the Raman peak intensities as a function of the irradiation dose.

  2. Effect of graphite loading on the electrical and mechanical properties of Poly (Ethylene Oxide)/Poly (Vinyl Chloride) polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajar, M. D. S.; Supri, A. G.; Hanif, M. P. M.; Yazid, M. I. M.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, films consisting of a blend of poly (ethylene oxide)/poly (vinyl chloride) (PEO/PVC) and a conductive filler, graphite were prepared and characterized for their mechanical and electrical properties. Solid polymer blend films based on PEO/PVC (50/50 wt%/wt%) with different graphite loading were prepared by using solution casting technique. Electrical conductivity results discovered the conductivity increased with increasing of filler loading. However, increasing amount of graphite loading led to a decreased in tensile strength and young’s modulus of PEO/PVC/Graphite polymer films. The dispersion of graphite and mechanism of conductive path in the polymer films were also investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphology of the PEO/PVC/Graphite polymer films shows that agglomeration occurred to complete the connection of conductive path, thus improving the conductivity behavior of the polymer films.

  3. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    Radioactive graphite constitutes a major waste stream which arises during the decommissioning of certain types of nuclear installations. Worldwide, a total of around 250 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite, comprising graphite moderators and reflectors, will require management solutions in the coming years. 14 C is the radionuclide of greatest concern in nuclear graphite; it arises principally through the interaction of reactor neutrons with nitrogen, which is present in graphite as an impurity or in the reactor coolant or cover gas. 3 H is created by the reactions of neutrons with 6 Li impurities in graphite as well as in fission of the fuel. 36 Cl is generated in the neutron activation of chlorine impurities in graphite. Problems in the radioactive waste management of graphite arise mainly because of the large volumes requiring disposal, the long half-lives of the main radionuclides involved and the specific properties of graphite - such as stored Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility and the potential for radioactive gases to be released. Various options for the management of radioactive graphite have been studied but a generally accepted approach for its conditioning and disposal does not yet exist. Different solutions may be appropriate in different cases. In most of the countries with radioactive graphite to manage, little progress has been made to date in respect of the disposal of this material. Only in France has there been specific thinking about a dedicated graphite waste-disposal facility (within ANDRA): other major producers of graphite waste (UK and the countries of the former Soviet Union) are either thinking in terms of repository disposal or have no developed plans. A conference entitled 'Solutions for Graphite Waste: a Contribution to the Accelerated Decommissioning of Graphite Moderated Nuclear Reactors' was held at the University of Manchester 21-23 March 2007 in order to stimulate progress in radioactive graphite waste management

  4. AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersen’s 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to

  5. Mechanical and dielectric properties of SEBS modified by graphite inclusion and composite interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorescu, Ramona Marina; Ciuprina, Florin; Ghioca, Paul; Ghiurea, Marius; Iancu, Lorena; Spurcaciu, Bogdan; Panaitescu, Denis Mihaela

    2016-02-01

    Tough and flexible dielectrics were prepared using graphite (G), a natural and low-cost resource, as filler in polystyrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-polystyrene (SEBS) and maleinized SEBS (SEBS-MA) matrices. The disintegration of graphite in submicron particles was accomplished by the shear forces during the melt processing step and it was highlighted by atomic force microscopy. Simultaneous increase of tensile strain, strength and Young's modulus was noticed for SEBS/G and SEBS-MA/G composites compared to unfilled matrices, this remarkable feature being previously reported only for some nanocomposites. Moreover, an exponential variation of the dielectric permittivity with the volume fraction of G was obtained. Higher reinforcing efficiency and better dielectric properties were observed in SEBS-MA/G composites, compared to the corresponding SEBS/G composites, due to the stronger polymer-filler interface and better dispersion of graphite. This study brings new insights into nanolevel properties of SEBS composites and it opens new perspectives on high performance composites by using graphite instead of expensive graphene and efficient melt mixing process.

  6. Electrical properties of alkali-activated slag composite with combined graphite/CNT filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovnaník, P.; Míková, M.; Kusák, I.

    2017-10-01

    Alkali-activated industrial by-products such as blast furnace slag are known to possess properties which are comparable to or even better than those observed for ordinary Portland cement. The combination of alkali-activated slag matrix with conductive filler introduces new functionalities which are commonly known for self-sensing or self-heating concrete. The present paper discusses the effect of the mixture of two different conductive fillers, graphite powder and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), on the electrical properties of alkali-activated slag mortars. Prepared samples were also tested for their mechanical properties and microstructure was investigated by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. The percolation threshold for the resistance was reached for the mixture containing 0.1% CNTs and 8% graphite powder.

  7. On the development of standardization methods for measuring the degree of graphitization of industrial materials, correlation of scientific characterization with the industrially relevant secondary properties of graphitic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzer, E.; Koechling, K.H.

    1984-01-01

    The completed research roject comprised the development of standardization methods for measuring the degree of graphitization of industrial materials, the testing of characterization methods with regard to significance, the correlation of scientific characterization with industrially relevant material properties and the resultant modification of industrial processes for the manufacture of coke raw materials and graphitic materials. Also targeted within the scope of this project were the grouping of comparable characterization methods and the drawing up of unequivocal terminology for scientific and industrial-commercial usage, with both aims based on intensified national and international teamwork. (orig./WL) [de

  8. Testing of different data libraries in activation analysis of concrete and graphite from nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cometto, M.; Ancius, D.; Ridikas, D.

    2003-01-01

    With the aging of the nuclear park, decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear installations after their service life is becoming an important issue for the nuclear industry. The radiological characterisation of the equipment and structures present in the reactor and its environment is an essential stage in a decommissioning project since it permits to define and optimize the decommissioning strategy and the disassembling operations. In addition, correct activation estimates are essential for determining the quantity and the nature of the radiological waste generated during decommissioning. The adoption of efficient dismantling procedures and the optimization of the mass flow going to different waste repositories might reduce substantially the total cost of decommissioning. The present work has been done in the framework of the decommissioning and dismantling of the experimental reactor of the University of Strasbourg (RUS). A methodology that combines theoretical calculations and direct measurements has been developed for determining the long-term induced activity in the graphite, concrete and materials present in the reactor. After characterisation of the different elements present in the reactor, it is then possible to plan efficiently the disassembling and dismantling of the system and to optimise the mass flow going to different waste repositories. From a scientific perspective, the comparison of theoretical predictions with experimental values validates the approach and the methodology used in the present study and tests the consistency and the reliability of the nuclear data used for activation analysis. (orig.)

  9. Neutron irradiation induced microstructural changes in NBG-18 and IG-110 nuclear graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthik, Chinnathambi [Boise State Univ., ID (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Idaho Falls, ID (United States) Center for Advanced Energy Studies; Kane, Joshua [Boise State Univ., ID (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Idaho Falls, ID (United States) Center for Advanced Energy Studies; Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Butt, Darryl P. [Boise State Univ., ID (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Idaho Falls, ID (United States) Center for Advanced Energy Studies; Windes, William E. [Idaho Falls, ID (United States) Center for Advanced Energy Studies; Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ubic, Rick [Boise State Univ., ID (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Idaho Falls, ID (United States) Center for Advanced Energy Studies

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports the neutron-irradiation-induced effects on the microstructure of NBG-18 and IG-110 nuclear graphites. The high-temperature neutron irradiation at two different irradiation conditions was carried out at the Advanced Test Reactor National User Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. NBG-18 samples were irradiated to 1.54 dpa and 6.78 dpa at 430 °C and 678 °C respectively. IG-110 samples were irradiated to 1.91 dpa and 6.70 dpa at 451 °C and 674 °C respectively. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging was used to study the changes in different microstructural components such as filler particles, microcracks, binder and quinoline-insoluble (QI) particles. Significant changes have been observed in samples irradiated to about 6.7 dpa. The closing of pre-existing microcracks was observed in both the filler and the binder phases. The binder phase exhibited substantial densification with near complete elimination of the microcracks. The QI particles embedded in the binder phase exhibited a complete microstructural transformation from rosettes to highly crystalline solid spheres. The lattice images indicate the formation of edge dislocations as well as extended line defects bridging the adjacent basal planes. The positive climb of these dislocations has been identified as the main contributor to the irradiation-induced swelling of the graphite lattice.

  10. Micro to nanostructural observations in neutron irradiated nuclear graphites PCEA and PCIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, H. M.; Mironov, B. E.; Windes, W.; Alnairi, M. M.; Scott, A. J.; Westwood, A. V. K.; Brydson, R. M. D.

    2017-08-01

    The neutron irradiation-induced structural changes in nuclear grade graphites PCEA and PCIB were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The graphite samples were irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory. Received doses ranged from 1.5 to 6.8 displacements per atom and irradiation temperatures varied between 350 °C and 670 °C. XRD and Raman measurements provided evidence for irradiation induced crystallite fragmentation, with crystallite sizes reduced by 39-55%. Analysis of TEM images was used to quantify fringe length, tortuosity, and relative misorientation of planes, and indicated that neutron irradiation induced basal plane fragmentation and curvature. EELS was used to quantify the proportion of sp2 bonding and specimen density; a slight reduction in planar-sp2 content (due to the buckling basal planes and the introduction of non-six-membered rings) agreed with the observations from TEM.

  11. Titanium Powder Sintering in a Graphite Furnace and Mechanical Properties of Sintered Parts

    OpenAIRE

    Changzhou Yu; Peng Cao; Mark Ian Jones

    2017-01-01

    Recent accreditation of titanium powder products for commercial aircraft applications marks a milestone in titanium powder metallurgy. Currently, powder metallurgical titanium production primarily relies on vacuum sintering. This work reported on the feasibility of powder sintering in a non-vacuum furnace and the tensile properties of the as-sintered Ti. Specifically, we investigated atmospheric sintering of commercially pure (C.P.) titanium in a graphite furnace backfilled with argon and stu...

  12. Synthesis and photocatalytic properties of graphitic carbon nitride nanofibers using porous anodic alumina templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchitra, S. M.; Udayashankar, N. K.

    2017-12-01

    In the present study, we describe an effective method for the synthesis of Graphitic carbon nitride (GCN) nanostructures using porous anodic alumina (AAO) membrane as template by simple thermal condensation of cyanamide. Synthesized nanostructure was fully analysed by various techniques to detect its crystalline nature, morphology, luminescent properties followed by the evaluation of its photocatalytic activity in the degradation of Methylene blue dye. Structural analysis of synthesized GCNNF was systematically carried out using x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), and. The results confirmed the growth of GCN inside the nanochannels of anodic alumina templates. Luminescent properties of GCNNF were studied using photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. PL analysis showed the presence of a strong emission peak in the wavelength range of 350–600 nm in blue region. GCNNF displays higher photocatalytic performance in the photodegradation of methylene blue compare to the bulk GCN. Highlights 1. In the present paper, we report the synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride nanofibers (GCNNF) using porous anodic aluminium oxide membranes as templates through thermal condensation of cyanamide at 500 °C. 2. The synthesis of Graphitic carbon nitride nanofibers using porous andic alumina template is the efficient approach for increasing crystallinity and surface area. 3. The high surface area of graphitic carbon nitride nanofibers has a good impact on novel optical and photocatalytic properties of the bulkGCN. 4. AAO templating of GCN is one of the versatile method to produce tailorable GCN nanostructures with higher surface area and less number of structural defects. 5. Towards photocatalytic degradation of dyes, the tuning of physical properties is very essential thing hence we are succeeded in achieving better catalytic performance of GCN nanostructures by making use of AAO templates.

  13. Effect of bainite transformation and retained austenite on mechanical properties of austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Toshio; Abe, Toshihiko; Tada, Shuji [Tohoku National Industrial Research Inst., Sendai (Japan). Materials Engineering Div.

    1996-06-01

    Austempered ductile iron (ADI) has excellent mechanical properties, but its Young`s modulus is low. Austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel (AGS) has been developed in order to obtain a new material with superior mechanical properties to ADI. Its carbon content (approximately 1.0 pct) is almost one-third that of a standard ADI; thus, the volume of graphite is also less. Young`s modulus of AGS is 195 to 200 GPa and is comparable to that of steel. Austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel has an approximately 200 MPa higher tensile strength than ADI and twice the Charpy absorbed energy of ADI. The impact properties and the elongation are enhanced with increasing volume fraction of carbon-enriched retained austenite. At the austempering temperature of 650 K, the volume fraction of austenite is approximately 40 pct for 120 minutes in the 2.4 pct Si alloy, although it decreases rapidly in the 1.4 pct Si alloy. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that appropriate quantity of silicon retards the decomposition of the carbon-enriched retained austenite. For austempering at 570 K, the amount of the carbon-enriched austenite decreases and the ferrite is supersaturated with carbon, resulting in high tensile strength but low toughness.

  14. Nuclear graphite development, operational problems, and resolution of these problems at the Hanford production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper chronicles the history of the Hanford Production Reactor, from the initial design considerations for B, D, and F Reactors through the selection of the agreed method for safe disposal of the decommissioned reactors. The operational problems that challenged the operations and support staff of each new generation of production reactors, the engineering actions an operational changes that alleviated or resolved the immediate problems, the changes in reactor design and design-bases for the next generation of production reactors, and the changes in manufacturing variables that resulted in new ''improved'' grades of nuclear graphites for use in the moderators of the Hanford Production Reactors are reviewed in the context of the existing knowledge-base and the mission-driven priorities on the time. 14 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  15. Artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial graphites are obtained by agglomeration of carbon powders with an organic binder, then by carbonisation at 1000 0 C and graphitization at 2800 0 C. After description of the processes and products, we show how the properties of the various materials lead to the various uses. Using graphite enables us to solve some problems, but it is not sufficient to satisfy all the need of the application. New carbonaceous material open application range. Finally, if some products are becoming obsolete, other ones are being developed in new applications [fr

  16. Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S. Blaine

    2009-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy's lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain seven separate stacks of graphite specimens. Six of the specimen stacks will have half of their graphite specimens under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will be organized into pairs with a different compressive load being applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks. The seventh stack will not have a compressive load on the graphite specimens during irradiation. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or

  17. THERMAL INSULATION PROPERTIES RESEARCH OF THE COMPOSITE MATERIAL WATER GLASS–GRAPHITE MICROPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Gostev

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Research results for the composite material (CM water glass–graphite microparticles with high thermal stability and thermal insulation properties are given. A composition consisting of graphite (42 % by weight, water glass Na2O(SiO2n (50% by weight and the hardener - sodium silicofluoric Na2SiF6 (8% by weight. Technology of such composition receipt is suggested. Experimental samples of the CM with filler particles (graphite and a few microns in size were obtained. This is confirmed by a study of samples by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The qualitative and quantitative phase analysis of the CM structure is done. Load limit values leading to the destruction of CM are identified. The character of the rupture surface is detected. Numerical values of specific heat and thermal conductivity are defined. Dependence of the specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity on temperature at monotonic heating is obtained experimentally. Studies have confirmed the increased thermal insulation properties of the proposed composition. CM with such characteristics can be recommended as a coating designed to reduce heat losses and resistant to high temperatures. Due to accessibility and low cost of its components the proposed material can be produced on an industrial scale.

  18. Studies of physicochemical properties of graphite oxide and thermally exfoliated/reduced graphene oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drewniak Sabina Elżbieta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the experimental research studies was to determine some electrical properties of graphite oxide and thermally exfoliated/reduced graphene oxide. The authors tried to interpret the obtained physicochemical results. For that purpose, both resistance measurements and investigation studies were carried out in order to characterize the samples. The resistance was measured at various temperatures in the course of composition changes of gas atmospheres (which surround the samples. The studies were also supported by such methods as: scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Raman spectroscopy (RS, atomic force microscopy (AFM and thermogravimetry (TG. Moreover, during the experiments also the elemental analyses (EA of the tested samples (graphite oxide and thermally exfoliated/reduced graphene oxide were performed.

  19. New graphite/salt materials for high temperature energy storage. Phase change properties study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J.

    2007-07-01

    This work is a contribution to the study of new graphite/salt composites dedicated to high temperature energy storage (≥200 C). The aim is to analyse and to understand the influence of both graphite and composite microstructure on the phase change properties of salts. This PhD is carried out within the framework of two projects: DISTOR (European) and HTPSTOCK (French). The major contributions of this work are threefold: 1) An important database (solid-liquid phase change properties) is provided from the DSC analysis of six salts and the corresponding composites. 2) Rigorous modeling of salts melting in confined media in several geometries are proposed to understand why, during the first melting of the compression elaborated composites, problems of salt leakage are observed. These models show that the materials morphology is responsible for these phenomena: the graphite matrix restrains the volume expansion due to salt melting: salt melts under pressure, which leads to a melting on a large temperature range and to a loss of energy density. Sensitivity analysis of parameters (geometric and physic) shows that matrix rigidity modulus is the parameter on which it is necessary to act during the composites elaboration to blur this phenomenon. 3) Finally, this work proposes a thermodynamic formulation of both surface/interface phenomena and the presence of dissolved impurities being able to explain a melting point lowering. It seems that the melting point lowering observed (∼ 5 C) are mainly due to the presence of dissolved impurities (brought by graphite) in the liquid, along with an additional Gibbs-Thomson effect (∼ 1 C, related to the size of the clusters crystals). (author)

  20. NGNP Graphite Selection and Acquisition Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.; Bratton, R.; Windes, W.

    2007-09-30

    The nuclear graphite (H-451) previously used in the United States for High-Temperature Reactors (HTRs) is no longer available. New graphites have been developed and are considered suitable candidates for the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). A complete properties database for these new, available, candidate grades of graphite must be developed to support the design and licensing of NGNP core components. Data are required for the physical, mechanical (including radiation-induced creep), and oxidation properties of graphites. Moreover, the data must be statistically sound and take account of in-billet, between billets, and lot-to-lot variations of properties. These data are needed to support the ongoing development1 of the risk-derived American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) graphite design code (a consensus code being prepared under the jurisdiction of the ASME by gas-cooled reactor and NGNP stakeholders including the vendors). The earlier Fort St. Vrain design of High-Temperature Reactor (HTRs) used deterministic performance models for H-451, while the NGNP will use new graphite grades and risk-derived (probabilistic) performance models and design codes, such as that being developed by the ASME. A radiation effects database must be developed for the currently available graphite materials, and this requires a substantial graphite irradiation program. The graphite Technology Development Plan (TDP)2 describes the data needed and the experiments planned to acquire these data in a timely fashion to support NGNP design, construction, and licensing. The strategy for the selection of appropriate grades of graphite for the NGNP is discussed here. The final selection of graphite grades depends upon the chosen reactor type and vendor because the reactor type (pebble bed or prismatic block) has a major influence on the graphite chosen by the designer. However, the time required to obtain the needed irradiation data for the selected NGNP graphite is sufficiently

  1. Spectral properties of nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, P

    2006-01-01

    We review self-consistent spectral methods for nuclear matter calculations. The in-medium T-matrix approach is conserving and thermodynamically consistent. It gives both the global and the single-particle properties the system. The T-matrix approximation allows to address the pairing phenomenon in cold nuclear matter. A generalization of nuclear matter calculations to the super.uid phase is discussed and numerical results are presented for this case. The linear response of a correlated system going beyond the Hartree-Fock+ Random-Phase-Approximation (RPA) scheme is studied. The polarization is obtained by solving a consistent Bethe-Salpeter (BS) equation for the coupling of dressed nucleons to an external field. We find that multipair contributions are important for the spin(isospin) response when the interaction is spin(isospin) dependent

  2. Experiences in the emptying of waste silos containing solid nuclear waste from graphite- moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, S.; Schwarz, T.

    2003-01-01

    difference in the two streams lays in the chosen retrieval technology, reflecting the different problems involved. The most significant differences in the retrieval solutions are; - MAC recovery is achieved with a hydraulic Artisan manipulator arm deployed through a series of new access points in the vault roof; - FED recovery utilizes two retrieval units which deploy petal grabs through tubes originally connected to the waste discharge conveyors. The waste is then transported for further treatment including monitoring, packing, lid and grouting fitting, box filling and swabbing of the boxes to eliminate external contamination. This poster session discusses the experiences made with the retrieval and emptying of graphite containing nuclear waste silos

  3. Effect of Graphite Nanosheets on Properties of Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Stieven Montagna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different contents, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.00 wt%, of graphite nanosheets (GNS on the properties of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV nanocomposites obtained by solution casting method has been studied. GNS were prepared by three steps: intercalation (chemical exfoliation, expansion (thermal treatment, and the GNS obtainment (physical treatment by ultrasonic exfoliation. X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectroscopy, and field emission gun-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM showed that the physical, chemical, and thermal treatments preserved the graphite sheets structure. XRD and Raman results also showed that GNS were dispersed in the PHBV matrix. The degree of crystallinity (Xc of the nanocomposites did not change when the graphite nanosheets were added. However, the GNS acted as nucleation agent for crystallization; that is, in the second heating the samples containing GNS showed two melting peaks. The addition the GNS did not change the thermal stability of the PHBV.

  4. Adhesive properties and adhesive joints strength of graphite/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudawska, Anna; Stančeková, Dana; Cubonova, Nadezda; Vitenko, Tetiana; Müller, Miroslav; Valášek, Petr

    2017-05-01

    The article presents the results of experimental research of the adhesive joints strength of graphite/epoxy composites and the results of the surface free energy of the composite surfaces. Two types of graphite/epoxy composites with different thickness were tested which are used to aircraft structure. The single-lap adhesive joints of epoxy composites were considered. Adhesive properties were described by surface free energy. Owens-Wendt method was used to determine surface free energy. The epoxy two-component adhesive was used to preparing the adhesive joints. Zwick/Roell 100 strength device were used to determination the shear strength of adhesive joints of epoxy composites. The strength test results showed that the highest value was obtained for adhesive joints of graphite-epoxy composite of smaller material thickness (0.48 mm). Statistical analysis of the results obtained, the study showed statistically significant differences between the values of the strength of the confidence level of 0.95. The statistical analysis of the results also showed that there are no statistical significant differences in average values of surface free energy (0.95 confidence level). It was noted that in each of the results the dispersion component of surface free energy was much greater than polar component of surface free energy.

  5. Specific features of the electrical properties in partially graphitized porous biocarbons of beech wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, V. V.; Orlova, T. S.; Gutierrez-Pardo, A.; Ramirez-Rico, J.

    2015-09-01

    The electrical and galvanomagnetic properties of partially graphitized highly porous bioC(Ni) biocarbon matrices produced by pyrolysis (carbonization) of beech wood at temperatures T carb = 850-1600°C in the presence of a Ni-containing catalyst have been studied in comparison with their microstructural features. The temperature dependences of the resistivity, the magnetoresistance, and the Hall coefficient have been measured in the temperature range of 4.2-300 K in magnetic fields to 28 kOe. It has been shown that an additional graphite phase introduction into samples with T carb ≥ 1000°C results in an increase in the carrier mobility by a factor of 2-3, whereas the carrier (hole) concentration remains within ~1020 cm-3, as in biocarbons obtained without catalyst. An analysis of experimental data has demonstrated that the features of the conductivity and magnetoresistance of these samples are described by quantum corrections related to their structural features, i.e., the formation of a globular graphite phase of nano- and submicrometer sizes in the amorphous matrix. The quantum corrections to the conductivity decrease with increasing carbonization temperature, which indicates an increase in the degree of structure ordering and is in good agreement with microstructural data.

  6. Properties of graphite-composite bipolar plate prepared by compression molding technique for PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakate, S.R.; Mathur, R.B.; Dhami, T.L. [National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi (India). Engineering Material Division, Carbon Technology Unit; Kakati, B.K. [Tezpur University, Assam (India). Department of Energy

    2007-12-15

    Bipolar plate is an important key component of fuel cell on the basis of its manifold function. In this direction a lot of effort is going on worldwide to make light-weight and cost-effective bipolar plate for fuel cell application. In the present investigation effort was made to develop graphite-composites bipolar plate by compression molding technique to achieve the requisite goal. The composites plates were prepared by using different reinforcing fillers such as natural graphite, synthetic graphite, carbon black, carbon fibers with phenolic resin as polymer matrix precursor in its liquid and powder form. The composition of different filler constituent adjusted in between 5 and 40 vol%. The composite plates prepared with appropriate proportion of filler components were characterized for physical and mechanical properties. It is found that no single reinforcing filler constituent composites plate gives the requisite properties for being used as bipolar plate in the PEM fuel cell. The judicious combination of reinforcing constituents gives the properties which are required for bipolar plate to use in fuel cell. By controlling the ratio of reinforcing constituents, one can able to achieve properties such as bulk density {proportional_to}1.85gcm{sup -3}, electrical conductivity >150Scm{sup -1}, shore hardness >65, bending strength >60MPa, modulus >10GPa and compressive >70MPa by applying the pressure (100kgcm{sup -2}) during compression molding. I-V characteristic of the composite bipolar plate, with optimum combination of reinforcing constituent, is found to be adequate as per the US-DOE target for composite bipolar plate. (author)

  7. Mechanical property characterization and impact resistance of selected graphite/PEEK composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Donald J.

    1994-01-01

    To use graphite polyetheretherketone (PEEK) material on highly curved surfaces requires that the material be drapable and easily conformable to the surface. This paper presents the mechanical property characterization and impact resistance results for laminates made from two types of graphite/PEEK materials that will conform to a curved surface. These laminates were made from two different material forms. These forms are: (1) a fabric where each yarn is a co-mingled Celion G30-500 3K graphite fiber and PEEK thermoplastic fiber; and (2) an interleaved material of Celion G30-500 3K graphite fabric interleaved with PEEK thermoplastic film. The experimental results from the fabric laminates are compared with results for laminates made from AS4/PEEK unidirectional tape. The results indicate that the tension and compression moduli for quasi-isotropic and orthotropic laminates made from fabric materials are at least 79 percent of the modulus of equivalent laminates made from tape material. The strength of fabric material laminates is at least 80 percent of laminates made from tape material. The evaluation of fabric material for shear stiffness indicates that a tape material laminate could be replaced by a fabric material laminate and still maintain 89 percent of the shear stiffness of the tape material laminate. The notched quasi-isotropic compression panel failure strength is 42 to 46 percent of the unnotched quasi-isotropic laminate strength. Damage area after impact with 20 ft-lbs of impact energy is larger for the co-mingled panels than for the interleaved panels. The inerleaved panels have less damage than panels made from tape material. Residual compression strength of quasi-isotropic panels after impact of 20 ft-lbs of energy varies between 33 percent of the undamaged quasi-isotropic material strength for the tape material and 38 percent of the undamaged quasi-isotropic material strength for the co-mingled fabric material.

  8. Metal-functionalized single-walled graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study on magnetic property

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Hui; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Shenoy, Vivek B; Gao, Huajian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The magnetic properties of metal-functionalized graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes were investigated based on first-principles calculations. The graphitic carbon nitride nanotube can be either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic by functionalizing with different metal atoms. The W- and Ti-functionalized nanotubes are ferromagnetic, which are attributed to carrier-mediated interactions because of the coupling between the spin-polarized d and p electrons and the formation of the impurit...

  9. Transient analysis of nuclear graphite oxidation for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wei; Shi Lei; Zheng Yanhua

    2014-01-01

    Graphite is widely used in the high temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble-bed modular (HTR-PM). There are about 420,000 spherical fuel elements in the reactor core. The amount of graphite matrix in the reactor is dozens of tons. In normal operating conditions or water/air ingress accident, the matrix graphite of spherical fuel element may be oxidized by air or steam. This paper developed a new graphite oxidation model, considering the graphite porosity variation with the fractional burn-off. This model also considered the effects of microstructure development during oxidation and the resulting changing of diffusivity as well as the oxidation rate. Based on this theoretical model, this paper analyzed penetration depth and the graphite transient oxidation by oxygen. In addition, this paper obtained the weight loss ratio and oxidation rate trend over time and space. (author)

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF RECUPIRATION’S METHODS OF GRAPHITE TO PROPERTIES OF SYNTHESIZED DIAMONDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Bogatyreva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The graphite’s waste can be used for synthesis of diamonds. It is established, that activation of graphite’s waste essential influence on a degree of transition of graph-ite in diamond and their physico-chemical properties. The activation of th graphite’s waste changes essentially their absorption and structural characteristics and to a great extent affect the characteristics of synthesized diamond. Thermal activation of graphite’s waste leads to that are synthesized, basically, diamond micropowders, and electrochemical — diamond grinding powders.

  11. Failure prediction of full-size reactor components from tensile specimen data on NBG-18 nuclear graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindley, Michael P., E-mail: makke@mweb.co.za [Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (Pty) Ltd., P.O. Box 9396, Centurion 0046 (South Africa); Blaine, Deborah C.; Groenwold, Albert A.; Becker, Thorsten H. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • Predicts failure on a full scale reactor component and compare it to experiments. • Shows the effect of volume on NBG-18 nuclear graphite failure prediction. • Provide independent verification of a previously published methodology. • Describe the influence of multiple locations of high stress on failure prediction. - Abstract: This paper concerns itself with predicting the failure of a full-size NBG-18 nuclear graphite reactor component based only on test data obtained from standard tensile test specimens. A full-size specimen structural test was developed to simulate the same failure conditions expected during a normal operation of the reactor in order to validate the failure prediction. The full-size specimen designed for this test is almost a hundred times larger than the tensile test specimen, has a completely different geometry and experiences a different loading condition to the standard tensile test specimen. Failure of the full-size component is predicted realistically, but conservatively.

  12. Impact of radiolysis and radiolytic corrosion on the release of {sup 13}C and {sup 37}Cl implanted into nuclear graphite: Consequences for the behaviour of {sup 14}C and {sup 36}Cl in gas cooled graphite moderated reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moncoffre, N., E-mail: nathalie.moncoffre@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Toulhoat, N. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); CEA/DEN, Centre de Saclay (France); Bérerd, N.; Pipon, Y. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Université de Lyon, Université Lyon, IUT Lyon-1 département chimie (France); Silbermann, G. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); EDF – DPI - DIN – CIDEN, DIE - Division Environnement, Lyon (France); Blondel, A. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Andra, Châtenay-Malabry (France); Galy, N. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); EDF – DPI - DIN – CIDEN, DIE - Division Environnement, Lyon (France); and others

    2016-04-15

    Graphite finds widespread use in many areas of nuclear technology based on its excellent moderator and reflector qualities as well as its strength and high temperature stability. Thus, it has been used as moderator or reflector in CO{sub 2} cooled nuclear reactors such as UNGG, MAGNOX, and AGR. However, neutron irradiation of graphite results in the production of {sup 14}C (dose determining radionuclide) and {sup 36}Cl (long lived radionuclide), these radionuclides being a key issue regarding the management of the irradiated waste. Whatever the management option (purification, storage, and geological disposal), a previous assessment of the radioactive inventory and the radionuclide's location and speciation has to be made. During reactor operation, the effects of radiolysis are likely to promote the radionuclide release especially at the gas/graphite interface. Radiolysis of the coolant is mainly initiated through γ irradiation as well as through Compton electrons in the graphite pores. Radiolysis can be simulated in laboratory using γ irradiation or ion irradiation. In this paper, {sup 13}C, {sup 37}Cl and {sup 14}N are implanted into virgin nuclear graphite in order to simulate respectively the presence of {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl and nitrogen, a {sup 14}C precursor. Different irradiation experiments were carried out using different irradiation devices on implanted graphite brought into contact with a gas simulating the coolant. The aim was to assess the effects of gas radiolysis and radiolytic corrosion induced by γ or He{sup 2+} irradiation at the gas/graphite interface in order to evaluate their role on the radionuclide release. Our results allow inferring that radiolytic corrosion has clearly promoted the release of {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 14}N located at the graphite brick/gas interfaces and open pores.

  13. The characteristics of TiC and oxidation resistance and mechanical properties of TiC coated graphite under corrosive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, Shinichi; Oku, Tatsuo; Ioka, Ikuo; Umekawa, Shokichi.

    1982-07-01

    Core region of the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (VHTR) consists mainly of polycrystalline graphite whose mechanical properties degradated by corrosion resulting from such impurities as O 2 , H 2 O, and CO 2 in coolant He gas. Mechanical properties and oxidation resistance of TiC coated graphite under corrosive condition were examined in order to evaluate the effects of TiC coating on preventing the graphite from its degradation in service condition of the VHTR. Characteristics of TiC coating was also examined using EPMA. Holding the specimen at 1373 K for 6 hr produced strong interface between TiC coating and the graphite, however, microcracks on TiC coating was observed, the origin of which is ascribed to mismatch in thermal expansion between TiC coating and the graphite. Oxidation rate of TiC coated graphite was one-thirds of that of uncoated graphite, which demonstrated that TiC coating on the graphite improved the oxidation resistance of the graphite. However, debonding of TiC coating layer at the interface was observed after heating for 3 to 4 hr in the oxidation condition. Changes in Young's modulus of TiC coated graphite were a half of that of uncoated graphite. Flexural strength of TiC coated graphite remained at the original value up to about 4 hr oxidation, therafter it decreased abruptly as was the trend of uncoated graphite. It is concluded that TiC coating on graphite materials is very effective in improving oxidation resistance and suppressing degradation of mechanical properties of the graphite. (author)

  14. Dielectric properties and electrical conductivity of flat micronic graphite/polyurethane composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plyushch, Artyom; Macutkevic, Jan; Kuzhir, Polina P.; Banys, Juras; Fierro, Vanessa; Celzard, Alain

    2016-03-01

    Results of broadband dielectric spectroscopy of flat micronic graphite (FMG)/polyurethane (PU) resin composites are presented in a wide temperature range (25-450 K). The electrical percolation threshold was found to lie between 1 and 2 vol. % of FMG. Above the percolation threshold, the composites demonstrated a huge hysteresis of properties on heating and cooling from room temperature up to 450 K, along with extremely high values of dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity. Annealing proved to be a very simple but powerful tool for significantly improving the electrical properties of FMG-based composites. In order to explain this effect, the distributions of relaxation times were calculated by the complex impedance formalism. Below room temperature, both dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity exhibited a very low temperature dependence, mainly caused by the different thermal properties of FMG and pure PU matrix.

  15. New insights into pre-lithiation kinetics of graphite anodes via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtstiege, Florian; Schmuch, Richard; Winter, Martin; Brunklaus, Gunther; Placke, Tobias

    2018-02-01

    Pre-lithiation of anode materials can be an effective method to compensate active lithium loss which mainly occurs in the first few cycles of a lithium ion battery (LIB), due to electrolyte decomposition and solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation at the surface of the anode. There are many different pre-lithiation methods, whereas pre-lithiation using metallic lithium constitutes the most convenient and widely utilized lab procedure in literature. In this work, for the first time, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) is applied to monitor the reaction kinetics of the pre-lithiation process of graphite with lithium. Based on static 7Li NMR, we can directly observe both the dissolution of lithium metal and parallel formation of LiCx species in the obtained NMR spectra with time. It is also shown that the degree of pre-lithiation as well as distribution of lithium metal on the electrode surface have a strong impact on the reaction kinetics of the pre-lithiation process and on the remaining amount of lithium metal. Overall, our findings are highly important for further optimization of pre-lithiation methods for LIB anode materials, both in terms of optimized pre-lithiation time and appropriate amounts of lithium metal.

  16. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; W. David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-08-01

    This report described the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the second Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-2) irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule is the second in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. Similar to the AGC-1 specimen pre-irradiation examination report, material property tests were conducted on specimens from 18 nuclear graphite types but on an increased number of specimens (512) prior to loading into the AGC-2 irradiation assembly. All AGC-2 specimen testing was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) from October 2009 to August 2010. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-2 irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule design requires “matched pair” creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-2 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce “matched pairs” of graphite samples above and below the AGC-2 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  17. The Impact of Alkaliphilic Biofilm Formation on the Release and Retention of Carbon Isotopes from Nuclear Reactor Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, S P; Payne, L; Walker, S; Scott, T; Heard, P; Eccles, H; Bond, G; Shah, P; Bills, P; Jackson, B R; Boxall, S A; Laws, A P; Charles, C; Williams, S J; Humphreys, P N

    2018-03-13

    14 C is an important consideration within safety assessments for proposed geological disposal facilities for radioactive wastes, since it is capable of re-entering the biosphere through the generation of 14 C bearing gases. The irradiation of graphite moderators in the UK gas-cooled nuclear power stations has led to the generation of a significant volume of 14 C-containing intermediate level wastes. Some of this 14 C is present as a carbonaceous deposit on channel wall surfaces. Within this study, the potential of biofilm growth upon irradiated and 13 C doped graphite at alkaline pH was investigated. Complex biofilms were established on both active and simulant samples. High throughput sequencing showed the biofilms to be dominated by Alcaligenes sp at pH 9.5 and Dietzia sp at pH 11.0. Surface characterisation revealed that the biofilms were limited to growth upon the graphite surface with no penetration of the deeper porosity. Biofilm formation resulted in the generation of a low porosity surface layer without the removal or modification of the surface deposits or the release of the associated 14 C/ 13 C. Our results indicated that biofilm formation upon irradiated graphite is likely to occur at the pH values studied, without any additional release of the associated 14 C.

  18. Standard Test Methods for Properties of Continuous Filament Carbon and Graphite Fiber Tows

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the preparation and tensile testing of resin-impregnated and consolidated test specimens made from continuous filament carbon and graphite yarns, rovings, and tows to determine their tensile properties. 1.2 These test methods also cover the determination of the density and mass per unit length of the yarn, roving, or tow to provide supplementary data for tensile property calculation. 1.3 These test methods include a procedure for sizing removal to provide the preferred desized fiber samples for density measurement. This procedure may also be used to determine the weight percent sizing. 1.4 These test methods include a procedure for determining the weight percent moisture adsorption of carbon or graphite fiber. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of t...

  19. Properties of unirradiated HTGR core support and permanent side reflector graphites: PGX, HLM, 2020, and H-440N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engle, G.B.

    1977-05-01

    Candidate materials for HTGR core supports and permanent side reflectors--graphite grades 2020 (Stackpole Carbon Company), H-440N (Great Lakes Carbon Corporation), PGX (Union Carbide Corporation), and HLM (Great Lakes Carbon Corporation)--are described and property data are presented. Properties measured are bulk density; tensile properties including ultimate strength, modulus of elasticity, and strain at fracture; flexural strength; compressive properties including ultimate strength, modulus of elasticity, and strain at fracture; and chemical impurity content

  20. Mechanical properties of aluminium based metal matrix composites reinforced with graphite nanoplatelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Syed Nasimul, E-mail: syedn@nitrkl.ac.in; Kumar, Lailesh

    2016-06-14

    In this work Al-matrix composites reinforced by exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) is fabricated by powder metallurgy route and their microstructure, mechanical properties and sliding wear behaviour were investigated. Here, xGnP has been synthesized from the thermally exfoliated graphite produced from a graphite intercalation compound (GIC) through rapid evaporation of the intercalant at an elevated temperature. The xGnP synthesized was characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis (DSC/TGA), Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The Al and xGnP powder mixtures were consolidated under a load of 565 MPa followed by sintering at 550 °C for 2 h in an inert atmosphere. Al-1, 2, 3 and 5 wt% xGnP nanocomposites were developed. Results of the wear test show that there was a significant improvement in the wear resistance of the composites up to the addition of 3 wt% of xGnP in the Al matrix. The hardness of the various Al-xGnP composites also shows improvement upto the addition of 1 wt% xGnP beyond which there was a decrease in the hardness of the composites. The tensile strength of the Al-xGnP composites continuously reduced with the addition of xGnP due to the formation of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} particles at the interface of the Al and xGnP in the composite.

  1. The effect of graphite precipitates in Ni3Al/C composite on tribological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study shows the results of investigations of the tribological properties of cast Ni3Al/C composite and compares them with the properties of pure intermetallic phases of the Ni3Al type. An inspiration to these studies was a surprising similarity observed between the microstructure of iron-carbon alloys, and specifically of different cast iron grades, and the microstructure of, absolutely different in terms of the chemical composition, nickel-aluminium alloy. Because of carbon present in the alloy, an attempt was made to determine what effect the presence of graphite (acting as a lubricant might have on the abrasive wear behaviour of alloy during lubricated friction test. Tests were made on a Miller apparatus, used for active testing of the abrasive wear resistance. The specimen loss of mass was determined in function of time.

  2. Mechanical properties of low-density polyethylene filled by graphite nanoplatelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carotenuto, G.; De Nicola, S.; Palomba, M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical properties of GNP/LDPE nanocomposites (graphite nanoplatelets/low density polyethylene) have been investigated, in order to establish the effect of nanoscale reinforcement within the polymer matrix. Results show that the presence of the filler does not involve a change...... in the microscopic structure of the polymer. However, on a macroscopic scale, GNPs limit the mobility of the polymer chains, resulting in an increase in stiffness for the final composite. Orientation of GNPs within the LDPE matrix is also an important issue that affects mechanical properties and it has been...... evaluated by testing nanocomposites made by different manufacturing techniques (compression moulding and blown extrusion). The comparison between the experimental data and the Halpin–Tsai model shows that the orientation of GNPs due to the extrusion process leads to values of tensile modulus higher than...

  3. Graphite oxidation and damage under irradiation at high temperatures in an impure helium environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Cameron S.

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a Generation IV reactor concept that uses a graphite-moderated nuclear reactor with a once-through uranium fuel cycle. In order to investigate the mechanism for corrosion of graphite in HTGRs, the graphite was placed in a similar environment in order to evaluate its resistance to corrosion and oxidation. While the effects of radiation on graphite have been studied in the past, the properties of graphite are largely dependent on the coke used in manufacturing the graphite. There are no longer any of the previously studied graphite types available for use in the HTGR. There are various types of graphite being considered for different uses in the HTGR and all of these graphite types need to be analyzed to determine how radiation will affect them. Extensive characterization of samples of five different types of graphite was conducted. The irradiated samples were analyzed with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and gas chromatography. The results prove a knowledge base for considering the graphite types best suited for use in HTGRs. In my dissertation work graphite samples were gamma irradiated and also irradiated in a mixed field, in order to study the effects of neutron as well as gamma irradiation. Thermal effects on the graphite were also investigated by irradiating the samples at room temperature and at 1000 °C. From the analysi of the samples in this study there is no evidence of substantial damage to the grades of graphite analyzed. This is significant in approving the use of these graphites in nuclear reactors. Should significant damage had occurred to the samples, the use of these grades of graphite would need to be reconsidered. This information can be used to further characterize other grades of nuclear graphite as they become available.

  4. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management. Additional information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-06-01

    Radioactive graphite constitutes a major waste stream which arises during the decommissioning of certain types of nuclear installations. Worldwide, a total of around 250 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite, comprising graphite moderators and reflectors, will require management solutions in the coming years. 14 C is the radionuclide of greatest concern in nuclear graphite; it arises principally through the interaction of reactor neutrons with nitrogen, which is present in graphite as an impurity or in the reactor coolant or cover gas. 3 H is created by the reactions of neutrons with 6 Li impurities in graphite as well as in fission of the fuel. 36 Cl is generated in the neutron activation of chlorine impurities in graphite. Problems in the radioactive waste management of graphite arise mainly because of the large volumes requiring disposal, the long half-lives of the main radionuclides involved and the specific properties of graphite - such as stored Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility and the potential for radioactive gases to be released. Various options for the management of radioactive graphite have been studied but a generally accepted approach for its conditioning and disposal does not yet exist. Different solutions may be appropriate in different cases. In most of the countries with radioactive graphite to manage, little progress has been made to date in respect of the disposal of this material. Only in France has there been specific thinking about a dedicated graphite waste-disposal facility (within ANDRA): other major producers of graphite waste (UK and the countries of the former Soviet Union) are either thinking in terms of repository disposal or have no developed plans. A conference entitled 'Solutions for Graphite Waste: a Contribution to the Accelerated Decommissioning of Graphite Moderated Nuclear Reactors' was held at the University of Manchester 21-23 March 2007 in order to stimulate progress in radioactive graphite waste management

  5. Graphite moderator lifecycle behaviour. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The meeting provided the forum for graphite specialists representing operating and research organizations worldwide to exchange information in the following areas: the status of graphite development; operation and safety procedures for existing and future graphite moderated reactors; graphite testing techniques; review of the experiences gained and data acquired on the influence of neutron irradiation and oxidizing conditions on key graphite properties; and to exchange information useful for decommissioning activities. The participants provided twenty-seven papers on behalf of their countries and respective technical organizations. An open discussion followed each of the presentations. A consistently reoccurring theme throughout the specialists meeting was the noticeable reduction in the number of graphite experts remaining the nuclear power industry. Graphite moderated power reactors have provided a significant contribution to the generation of electricity throughout the past forty years and will continue to be a prominent energy source for the future. Yet, many of the renowned experts in the field of nuclear graphites are nearing the end of their careers without apparent replacement. This, coupled with changes in the focus on nuclear power by some industrialized countries, has prompted the IAEA to initiate an evaluation on the feasibility and interest by Member States of establishing a central archive facility for the storage of data on irradiated graphites. Refs, figs, tabs

  6. Investigation on Mechanical Properties and Wear Behavior of Al-Si-SiC-Graphite Composite using SEM and EDAX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, A.; Nallusamy, S.

    2017-08-01

    In this research article mechanical properties and wear performance with regard to the tribological behavior of aluminum metal matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide particulates and added with graphite particulates as a second reinforcement has been analysed. The method of stir casting procedure was used for the preparation of composite samples for analysis and those samples were tested for the presence of reinforcement particles using scanning electron microscope and EDAX. Uniform distribution of reinforcements and their presence was well established using characterization. The different mechanical properties have been tested and found to be better than the base alloy. Wear tests were performed to study the influence of graphite particulates and SiC particles through pin on disc tester. The experimental results of wear test reveal that, the formation of lubricate film with 4 kg of load establish the influence of graphite in the composite materials.

  7. Optimisation of the link volume for weakest link failure prediction in NBG-18 nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindley, Michael P.; Groenwold, Albert A.; Blaine, Deborah C.; Becker, Thorsten H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the process for approximating the optimal size of a link volume required for weakest link failure calculation in nuclear graphite, with NBG-18 used as an example. As part of the failure methodology, the link volume is defined in terms of two grouping criteria. The first criterion is a factor of the maximum grain size and the second criterion is a function of an equivalent stress limit. A methodology for approximating these grouping criteria is presented. The failure methodology employs finite element analysis (FEA) in order to predict the failure load, at 50% probability of failure. The average experimental failure load, as determined for 26 test geometries, is used to evaluate the accuracy of the weakest link failure calculations. The influence of the two grouping criteria on the failure load prediction is evaluated by defining an error in prediction across all test cases. Mathematical optimisation is used to find the minimum error across a range of test case failure predictions. This minimum error is shown to deliver the most accurate failure prediction across a whole range of components, although some test cases in the range predict conservative failure load. The mathematical optimisation objective function is penalised to account for non-conservative prediction of the failure load for any test case. The optimisation is repeated and a link volume found for conservative failure prediction. The failure prediction for each test case is evaluated, in detail, for the proposed link volumes. Based on the analysis, link design volumes for NBG-18 are recommended for either accurate or conservative failure prediction

  8. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Clausing, R.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Kennedy, C.R.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-03-01

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source

  9. Study on the property of low friction complex graphite-like coating containing tantalum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuoping Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to enhance equipment lifetime under low oil or even dry conditions, tantalum was introduced into the graphite-like coating (GLC by sputtering mosaic targets. The results showed that the introduction of Ta obviously reduced the friction coefficient and hardness of the GLC, while improved the wearability. When the atomic percentage of Ta was larger than 3%, the steady friction coefficient was lower than 0.01, suggesting the coating exhibited super lubricity. When the content of Ta was about 5.0%, the average friction coefficient was 0.02 by a sliding friction test under load of 20 N in unlubricated condition. Its average friction coefficient reduced by 75%, compared with that of control GLC (0.0825. Keywords: Tantalum, Sputtering, Super-lubrication, Complex GLC coating, Tribological property

  10. The magneto-elastic coupling and its consequences on the magneto-transport properties of bismuth and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michenaud, J.-P.; Lenoir, B.

    2007-01-01

    Magneto-transport properties of bismuth and graphite are reconsidered taking into account the magneto-elastic coupling. This coupling effect is responsible for a change of carrier density as well as a change of crystallographic symmetry. The change of carrier density can lead to a negative component in the magnetoresistance, when the change is positive

  11. The Effect of Graphite on the Water Uptake, Mechanical Properties, Morphology, and EMI Shielding Effectiveness of HDPE/Bamboo flour composites

    OpenAIRE

    Jianbin Song; Wenbin Yang; Feng Fu; Yanhua Zhang

    2014-01-01

    This goal of this work was to study the effect of graphite on the water uptake, mechanical properties, morphology, and electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI SE) of HDPE/Bamboo flour composites using the material mechanical testing machine, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and EMI shielding apparatus. The water uptake of the composites was improved by graphite. Compared with the neat HDPE/bamboo composites, the flexural strength of the graphite-filled composites showed a...

  12. Rheological and electrical properties of hybrid nanocomposites of epoxy resins filled with graphite nanoplatelets and carbon black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Quang-Trung; Lee, Seon-Suk; Lee, Dai-Soo

    2011-02-01

    Graphite nanoplatelets (GNP) were prepared by microwave irradiation of natural graphites intercalated with ferric chloride in nitromethane (GIC). Intercalated structure of GIC was confirmed by X-ray diffraction patterns. SEM images of GIC after microwave irradiation showed the exfoliation of GIC, the formation of GNPs. Hybrid nanocomposites of bisphenol-A type epoxy resins filled with GNP and a conductive carbon black (CB) were prepared and rheological and electrical properties of the nanocomposites were investigated. Viscosity and electrical surface resistivity of the nanocomposites showed minima at certain mixtures of GNP and CB in the epoxy resins.

  13. Influence of cooling rate and antimony addition content on graphite morphology and mechanical properties of a ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhe

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cooling rate and inoculation practice can greatly affect the graphite morphology of ductile irons. In the present research, the effects of the cooling rate and antimony addition on the graphite morphology and mechanical properties of ductile irons have been studied. Three ductile iron castings were prepared through solidification under cooling conditions S (slow, M (medium and F (fast. The cooling rates around the equilibrium eutectic temperature (1,150 ℃ for these cooling conditions (S, M and F were set at 0.21 ℃·min-1, 0.32 ℃·min-1 and 0.37 ℃·min-1, respectively. In addition, four ductile iron castings were prepared by adding 0.01%, 0.02%, 0.03% and 0.04% (by weight antimony, respectively under the slow cooling condition. The results show that the nodularity index, tensile strength and hardness of the ductile iron castings without antimony addition are all improved with the increase of cooling rate, while the ductile iron casting solidified under the medium cooling rate possesses the largest number of graphite nodules. Furthermore, for the four antimony containing castings, the graphite morphology and tensile strength are also improved by the antimony additions, and the effect of antimony addition is intensified when the addition increases from 0.01% to 0.03%. Moreover, the rare earth elements (REE/antimony ratio of 2 appears to be the most effective for fine nodular graphite formation in ductile iron.

  14. Effect of carbon black on electrical and rheological properties of graphite nanoplatelets/poly(ethylene-butyl acrylate composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Oxfall

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of adding carbon black on the electrical and rheological properties of graphite nanoplatelets/poly(ethylene-butyl acrylate copolymer composites produced via melt or solution mixing was studied. By adding a small amount of low- or high-structured carbon black to the nanocomposite, the electrical percolation threshold decreased and the final conductivity (at higher filler contents increased. The effect on the percolation threshold was significantly stronger in case of the high-structured carbon black where replacing 10 wt% of the total filler content with carbon black instead of graphite nanoplatelets reduced the electrical percolation threshold from 6.9 to 4.6 vol%. Finally, the solution mixing process was found to be more efficient leading to a lower percolation threshold. For the composites containing high-structured carbon black, graphite nanoplatelets and their hybrids there was a quite reasonable correlation between the electrical and rheological percolation thresholds.

  15. Nuclear radiation and the properties of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, M.F.

    1983-08-01

    Concrete is used for structures in which the concrete is exposed to nuclear radiation. Exposure to nuclear radiation may affect the properties of concrete. The report mentions the types of nuclear radiation while radiation damage in concrete is discussed. Attention is also given to the effects of neutron and gamma radiation on compressive and tensile strength of concrete. Finally radiation shielding, the attenuation of nuclear radiation and the value of concrete as a shielding material is discussed

  16. Morphological and electrical properties of epoxy-based composites reinforced with exfoliated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamberti, Patrizia; Spinelli, Giovanni, E-mail: gspinelli@unisa.it; Tucci, Vincenzo [Department of Information and Electrical Engineering and Applied Mathematics University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, Fisciano (Italy); Guadagno, Liberata; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Vertuccio, Luigi [Department of Industrial Engineering University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, Fisciano (Italy)

    2016-05-18

    An experimental study has been carried out to prepare and characterize epoxy/amine-based composites filled with different percentages of partially exfoliated graphite (i.e. pEG) particles having an exfoliation degree of 56% in order to analyze the effect of the filler amounts on the electrical properties of the resulting nanocomposites. Moreover, in order to fully investigate the direct relationship between the physical properties of the employed filler and the results of the electrical characterization, a structural and morphological characterization of the pEG samples is carried out by means of various type of analysis such as X-ray diffraction patterns, micro-Raman and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images. The DC electrical characterization reveals a percolation thresholds (EPT) that falls in the range [2–3] wt% and an electrical conductivity of about 0.66 S/m at the highest filler loading (6.5 wt%). From the analysis of the percolative curve it is possible to derive the percolation law parameters and in particular the critical exponent t, whose value (i.e. 1.2) reflects an effective 2D organization of the percolating structure consistent with the type of filler used (2-dimensional). Finally, an extensive analysis concerning the electrical properties in the frequency domain has been carried out in order to evaluate the effectiveness of pEG-loaded composites in terms of electromagnetic interference compatibility (EMC) and their applicability as radar absorbers materials (RAMs).

  17. Effect of thermal cycling on flexural properties of carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerström, Susanna; Ruyter, I Eystein

    2009-07-01

    To determine flexural strength and modulus after water storage and thermal cycling of carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced (CGFR) polymers based on poly(methyl methacrylate) and a copolymer matrix, and to examine adhesion between fiber and matrix by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Solvent cleaned carbon-graphite (CG) braided tubes of fibers were treated with a sizing resin. The resin mixture of the matrix was reinforced with 24, 36, 47 and 58wt% (20, 29, 38 and 47vol.%) CG-fibers. After heat polymerization the specimens were kept for 90 days in water and thereafter hydrothermally cycled (12,000 cycles, 5/55 degrees C). Mechanical properties were evaluated by three-point bend testing. After thermal cycling, the adhesion between fibers and matrix was evaluated by SEM. Hydrothermal cycling did not decrease flexural strength of the CGFR polymers with 24 and 36wt% fiber loadings; flexural strength values after thermocycling were 244.8 (+/-32.33)MPa for 24wt% and 441.3 (+/-68.96)MPa for 36wt%. Flexural strength values after thermal cycling were not further increased after increasing the fiber load to 47 (459.2 (+/-45.32)MPa) and 58wt% (310.4 (+/-52.79)MPa). SEM revealed good adhesion between fibers and matrix for all fiber loadings examined. The combination of the fiber treatment and resin matrix described resulted in good adhesion between CG-fibers and matrix. The flexural values for fiber loadings up to 36wt% appear promising for prosthodontic applications such as implant-retained prostheses.

  18. The effect of compressive stress on the Young's modulus of unirradiated and irradiated nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, T.; Usui, T.; Ero, M.; Fukuda, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The Young's moduli of unirradiated and high temperature (800 to 1000 0 C) irradiated graphites for HTGR were measured by the ultrasonic method in the direction of applied compressive stress during and after stressing. The Young's moduli of all the tested graphites decreased with increasing compressive stress both during and after stressing. In order to investigate the reason for the decrease in Young's modulus by applying compressive stress, the mercury pore diameter distributions of a part of the unirradiated and irradiated specimens were measured. The change in pore distribution is believed to be associated with structural changes produced by irradiation and compressive stressing. The residual strain, after removing the compressive stress, showed a good correlation with the decrease in Young's modulus caused by the compressive stress. The decrease in Young's modulus by applying compressive stress was considered to be due to the increase in the mobile dislocation density and the growth or formation of cracks. The results suggest, however, that the mechanism giving the larger contribution depends on the brand of graphite, and in anisotropic graphite it depends on the direction of applied stress and the irradiation conditions. (author)

  19. Nuclear property insurance: status and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    The report addresses the problem of the unavailability of adequate levels of property insurance for commercial power reactors to pay for decontamination and cleanup costs arising from accidents. The report is designed to answer six questions, as follows: (1) What has been the development of each principal source of nuclear property insurance used as of early 1982 by nuclear utilities in the United States; (2) What are some of the distinguishing features of nuclear property insurance as offered by the principal sources; (3) How much nuclear property insurance was offered by each of these sources as of January 1, 1982; (4) Assuming that present plans came to fruition, how much nuclear property insurance is likely to be offered by each of these sources as of January 1, 1983; (5) What, if any, principal sources of nuclear property insurance are likely to emerge in the private sector by January 1, 1983; (6) What problems serious enough to warrant action of the NRC exist with respect to nuclear property insurance and what action should NRC take in response to each problem

  20. An Facile High-Density Polyethylene - Exfoliated Graphite - Aluminium Hydroxide Composite: Manufacture, Morphology, Structure, Antistatic and Fireproof Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihui LI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Graphite intercalation compounds (GIC and exfoliated graphite (EG as raw materials were prepared with flake graphite, concentrated sulphuric acid (H2SO4, potassium bichromate (K2Cr2O7 and peracetic acid (CH3CO3H and characterized. Then, high-density polyethylene-exfoliated graphite (HDPE-EG composites were fabricated with HDPE and EG via in situ synthesis technique in the different mass ratio, and their resistivity values (ohms/sq were measured. Based on the resistivity values, it was discovered that HDPE-EG composite with the antistatic property could be fabricated while the mass ratio was 5.00 : 0.30. Last, HDPE-EG-aluminium hydroxide (HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composites were manufactured with HDPE, GIC and Al(OH3 via the in situ synthesis-thermal expansion technique, and their resistivity values and limiting oxygen index (LOI values were measured. Based on the resistivity values and LOI values, it was discovered that HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composite with the antistatic and fireproof property could be manufactured while HDPE, GICs and Al(OH3 of mass ratio was 5.00 : 0.30 : 1.00. Otherwise, the petal-like morphology and structure of HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composite were characterized, which consisted of EG, HDPE and Al(OH3. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4275

  1. Plasmon mediated enhancement and tuning of optical emission properties of two dimensional graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayan, Sayan; Gogurla, Narendar; Midya, Anupam; Singha, Achintya; Ray, Samit K.

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate surface plasmon induced enhancement and tunablilty in optical emission properties of two dimensional graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanosheets through the attachment of gold (Au) nanoparticles. Raman spectroscopy has revealed surface enhanced Raman scattering that arises due to the combined effect of the charge transfer process and localized surface plasmon induced enhancement in electromagnetic field, both occurring at the nanoparticle–nanosheet interface. Photoluminescence studies suggest that at an optimal concentration of nanoparticles, the emission intensity can be enhanced, which is maximum within the 500–525 nm region. Further, the fabricated electroluminescent devices reveal that the emission feature can be tuned from bluish-green to red (∼160 nm shift) upon attaching Au nanoparticles. We propose that the π*→π transition in g-C3N4 can trigger surface plasmon oscillation in Au, which subsequently increases the excitation process in the nanosheets and results in enhanced emission in the green region of the photoluminescence spectrum. On the other hand, electroluminescence of g-C3N4 can induce plasmon oscillation more efficiently and thus can lead to red emission from Au nanoparticles through the radiative damping of particle plasmons. The influence of nanoparticle size and coverage on the emission properties of two dimensional g-C3N4, nanosheets has also been studied in detail.

  2. Microwave absorbing property of silicone rubber composites with added carbonyl iron particles and graphite platelet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yonggang; Zhang, Deyuan; Cai, Jun; Yuan, Liming; Zhang, Wenqiang

    2013-01-01

    Silicone rubber composites filled with carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) and graphite platelet (GP) were prepared using non-coating or coating processes. The complex permittivity and permeability of the composites were measured using a vector network analyzer in the frequency range of 1–18 GHz and dc electric conductivity was measured by the standard four-point contact method. The results showed that CIPs/GP composites fabricated in the coating process had the highest permittivity and permeability due to the particle orientation and interactions between the two absorbents. The coating process resulted in a decreased effective eccentricity of the absorbents, and the dc conductivity increased according to Neelakanta's equations. The reflection loss (RL) value showed that the composites had an excellent absorbing property in the L-band, minimum −11.85 dB at 1.5 mm and −15.02 dB at 2 mm. Thus, GP could be an effective additive in preparing thin absorbing composites in the L-band. - Highlights: ► The added GP increased the permittivity and permeability of composites filled with CIPs. ► The enhancement was owing to interactions of the two absorbents and the fabrication process. ► The coating process decreased the effective eccentricity of the particles, and increased the conductivity of the composites. ► The composites to which CIPs/GP were added in coating process had excellent absorbing properties in the L-band.

  3. Preparation process and properties of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets filled Bisphthalonitrile nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yajie; Hu, Guo-Hua; Zhao, Rui; Guo, Heng; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Xiaobo

    2012-11-01

    Exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) filled 4,4'-Bis (3,4-dicyanophenoxy) biphenyl (BPh) nanocomposites were prepared by a resin transfer molding process. The rheological behavior of the BPh pre-polymer, and the morphology and electrical, mechanical and thermal properties of the xGnP/BPh nanocomposites were systematically investigated. The results showed that the xGnP/BPh pre-polymer possessed a higher complex viscosity and storage modulus than the pure BPh and that the xGnP could significantly enhance the mechanical and electrical properties of the resulted nanocomposites. The electrical percolation threshold of the xGnP/BPh nanocomposites was between 5 and 10 wt% xGnP. The flexural strength and modulus of the xGnP/BPh nanocomposites with 10 wt% xGnP exhibited maximum values and their thermal stabilities were greatly improved. Those novel xGnP/BPh nanocomposites could have advanced applications in areas like aerospace and military industry.

  4. Role of surfactant molecular weight on morphology and properties of functionalized graphite oxide filled polypropylene nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Various surfactants of different molecular weights, including alkylamine, poly(oxypropylene diamine (POP, and maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene (PPgMA oligomers, were used for simultaneous funtionalization and reduction of graphite oxide (fGO. In this study, the effect of molecular weight and compatibility of the surfactants on the morphology and properties of the nanocomposites are reported. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD exhibited a definite interlayer thickness for GOA (alkylamine intercalated GO, however, the diffraction peaks were nearly suppressed for fGOs combining ODA with either POP (GOAP or PPgMA (GOAE. The uniform dispersion of the fGO flakes in the polypropylene matrix resulted in the significant increase in both the degradation temperature and the crystallization temperature. A single characteristic melting peak of monoclinic (α crystalline phase was observed from DSC traces, which was consistent with WAXD results. Dynamic mechanical analysis clearly indicated increase in both the storage modulus and the glass transition temperature of the nanocomposites due to the enhanced affinity between fGO and the polypropylene matrix. However, GOAP composite showed lower E' and Tg than GOAE because POP is less compatible with the matrix than PPgMA oligomer. Dielectric analysis also showed significant increase in both dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss at low frequency regimes with GOAE showing maximum dielectric properties. The finely dispersed GOAE and its compatibility with polymer matrix manifested the interfacial polarization, which gave rise to much greater ε' and ε" than other nanocomposites.

  5. Titanium Powder Sintering in a Graphite Furnace and Mechanical Properties of Sintered Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changzhou Yu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent accreditation of titanium powder products for commercial aircraft applications marks a milestone in titanium powder metallurgy. Currently, powder metallurgical titanium production primarily relies on vacuum sintering. This work reported on the feasibility of powder sintering in a non-vacuum furnace and the tensile properties of the as-sintered Ti. Specifically, we investigated atmospheric sintering of commercially pure (C.P. titanium in a graphite furnace backfilled with argon and studied the effects of common contaminants (C, O, N on sintering densification of titanium. It is found that on the surface of the as-sintered titanium, a severely contaminated porous scale was formed and identified as titanium oxycarbonitride. Despite the porous surface, the sintered density in the sample interiors increased with increasing sintering temperature and holding time. Tensile specimens cut from different positions within a large sintered cylinder reveal different tensile properties, strongly dependent on the impurity level mainly carbon and oxygen. Depending on where the specimen is taken from the sintered compact, ultimate tensile strength varied from 300 to 580 MPa. An average tensile elongation of 5% to 7% was observed. Largely depending on the interstitial contents, the fracture modes from typical brittle intergranular fracture to typical ductile fracture.

  6. Plasmon mediated enhancement and tuning of optical emission properties of two dimensional graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayan, Sayan; Gogurla, Narendar; Midya, Anupam; Singha, Achintya; Ray, Samit K

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate surface plasmon induced enhancement and tunablilty in optical emission properties of two dimensional graphitic carbon nitride (g-C 3 N 4 ) nanosheets through the attachment of gold (Au) nanoparticles. Raman spectroscopy has revealed surface enhanced Raman scattering that arises due to the combined effect of the charge transfer process and localized surface plasmon induced enhancement in electromagnetic field, both occurring at the nanoparticle-nanosheet interface. Photoluminescence studies suggest that at an optimal concentration of nanoparticles, the emission intensity can be enhanced, which is maximum within the 500-525 nm region. Further, the fabricated electroluminescent devices reveal that the emission feature can be tuned from bluish-green to red (∼160 nm shift) upon attaching Au nanoparticles. We propose that the π*→π transition in g-C 3 N 4 can trigger surface plasmon oscillation in Au, which subsequently increases the excitation process in the nanosheets and results in enhanced emission in the green region of the photoluminescence spectrum. On the other hand, electroluminescence of g-C 3 N 4 can induce plasmon oscillation more efficiently and thus can lead to red emission from Au nanoparticles through the radiative damping of particle plasmons. The influence of nanoparticle size and coverage on the emission properties of two dimensional g-C 3 N 4 , nanosheets has also been studied in detail.

  7. Change of properties after oxidation of IG-11 graphite by air and CO2 gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yun-Soo; Chi, Se-Hwan; Cho, Kwang-Yun

    2008-01-01

    Artificial graphite is typically manufactured by carbonization of a shaped body of a kneaded mixture using granular cokes as a filler and pitch as a binder. It undergoes a pitch impregnation process if necessary and finally applying graphitization heat treatment. The effect of thermal oxidation in air or a CO 2 atmosphere on IG-11 graphite samples is investigated in this study. The results show a localized oxidation process that progressively reveals the large coke particles with increasing level of overall weight loss in air. The surface of the graphite was peeled off and no change was found in the specific gravity after air oxidation. However, the specific gravity of graphite was continuously decreased by CO 2 oxidation. The decrease in the specific gravity by CO 2 oxidation was due to CO 2 gas that progressed from the surface to the interior. The pore shape after CO 2 oxidation differed from that under air oxidation

  8. Mechanical and physical properties of carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced polymers intended for implant suprastructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerström, Susanna; Ruyter, I Eystein

    2007-09-01

    Mechanical properties and quality of fiber/matrix adhesion of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based materials, reinforced with carbon-graphite (CG) fibers that are able to remain in a plastic state until polymerization, were examined. Tubes of cleaned braided CG fibers were treated with a sizing resin. Two resin mixtures, resin A and resin B, stable in the fluid state and containing different cross-linking agents, were reinforced with CG fiber loadings of 24, 36, and 47 wt% (20, 29, and 38 vol.%). In addition, resin B was reinforced with 58 wt% (47 vol.%). After heat-polymerization, flexural strength and modulus were evaluated, both dry and after water storage. Coefficient of thermal expansion, longitudinally and in the transverse direction of the specimens, was determined. Adhesion between fibers and matrix was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexural properties and linear coefficient of thermal expansion were similar for both fiber composites. With increased fiber loading, flexural properties increased. For 47 wt% fibers in polymer A the flexural strength was 547.7 (28.12) MPa and for polymer B 563.3 (89.24) MPa when water saturated. Linear coefficient of thermal expansion was for 47 wt% CG fiber-reinforced polymers; -2.5 x 10(-6) degrees C-1 longitudinally and 62.4 x 10(-6) degrees C-1 in the transverse direction of the specimens. SEM revealed good adhesion between fibers and matrix. More porosity was observed with fiber loading of 58 wt%. The fiber treatment and the developed resin matrices resulted in good adhesion between CG fibers and matrix. The properties observed indicate a potential for implant-retained prostheses.

  9. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  10. Isospin dependent properties of asymmetric nuclear matter

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, P. Roy; Basu, D. N.; Samanta, C.

    2009-01-01

    The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy is determined from a systematic study of the isospin dependent bulk properties of asymmetric nuclear matter using the isoscalar and the isovector components of density dependent M3Y interaction. The incompressibility $K_\\infty$ for the symmetric nuclear matter, the isospin dependent part $K_{asy}$ of the isobaric incompressibility and the slope $L$ are all in excellent agreement with the constraints recently extracted from measured isotopic de...

  11. Correlation between Mechanical Properties with Specific Wear Rate and the Coefficient of Friction of Graphite/Epoxy Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alajmi, Mahdi; Shalwan, Abdullah

    2015-07-08

    The correlation between the mechanical properties of Fillers/Epoxy composites and their tribological behavior was investigated. Tensile, hardness, wear, and friction tests were conducted for Neat Epoxy (NE), Graphite/Epoxy composites (GE), and Data Palm Fiber/Epoxy with or without Graphite composites (GFE and FE). The correlation was made between the tensile strength, the modulus of elasticity, elongation at the break, and the hardness, as an individual or a combined factor, with the specific wear rate (SWR) and coefficient of friction (COF) of composites. In general, graphite as an additive to polymeric composite has had an eclectic effect on mechanical properties, whereas it has led to a positive effect on tribological properties, whilst date palm fibers (DPFs), as reinforcement for polymeric composite, promoted a mechanical performance with a slight improvement to the tribological performance. Statistically, this study reveals that there is no strong confirmation of any marked correlation between the mechanical and the specific wear rate of filler/Epoxy composites. There is, however, a remarkable correlation between the mechanical properties and the friction coefficient of filler/Epoxy composites.

  12. Correlation between Mechanical Properties with Specific Wear Rate and the Coefficient of Friction of Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Alajmi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between the mechanical properties of Fillers/Epoxy composites and their tribological behavior was investigated. Tensile, hardness, wear, and friction tests were conducted for Neat Epoxy (NE, Graphite/Epoxy composites (GE, and Data Palm Fiber/Epoxy with or without Graphite composites (GFE and FE. The correlation was made between the tensile strength, the modulus of elasticity, elongation at the break, and the hardness, as an individual or a combined factor, with the specific wear rate (SWR and coefficient of friction (COF of composites. In general, graphite as an additive to polymeric composite has had an eclectic effect on mechanical properties, whereas it has led to a positive effect on tribological properties, whilst date palm fibers (DPFs, as reinforcement for polymeric composite, promoted a mechanical performance with a slight improvement to the tribological performance. Statistically, this study reveals that there is no strong confirmation of any marked correlation between the mechanical and the specific wear rate of filler/Epoxy composites. There is, however, a remarkable correlation between the mechanical properties and the friction coefficient of filler/Epoxy composites.

  13. The Effect of Hydrogen on the Mechanical Properties of Cast Irons and ADI with Various Carbon Equivalent and Graphite Morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Gi; Lee, Kyung Sub

    1989-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of cast irons, flake, CV graphite cast iron ductile iron and ADI have been investigated. The effects of various carbon equivalent, graphite morphology and matrix have been analyzed to determine the predominant factor which influences on the hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of various carbon equivalent on the embrittlement was little in the similar graphite morphology. The embrittlement of ferrite matrix changed by heat treatment was less than that of pearlite matrix. In the case of ADI, the tendency of hydrogen embrittlement of lower bainite matrix was less remarkable than that of upper banite matrix. As the result of hydrogen charging, the tendency of interface decohesion between matrix-graphite was increased in flake G.C.I., and the trend from ductile fracture mode to brittle fracture mode was observed in CV G.C.I and ductile iron. Lower bainite in ADI showed the ductile fracture mode. Hydrogen solubility of lower bainite was higher than that of upper bainite

  14. Microscopic physical and chemical properties of graphite intercalation compounds. Final report, August 1, 1984--July 31, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eklund, P.C.

    1992-08-24

    Optical spectroscopy (Raman, FTIR and Reflection ) was used to study a variety of acceptor- and donor-type compounds synthesized to determine the microscopic models consistent with the spectrocsopic results. General finding is that the electrical conduction properties of these compounds can be understood on the basis that the intercalation of atomic and/or molecular species between the host graphite layers either raises or lowers the Fermi level (E{sub F)} in a graphitic band structure. This movement of E{sub F} is accomplished via a charge transfer of electrons from the intercalate layers to the graphitic layers (donor compounds), or vice versa (acceptor compounds). Furthermore, the band structure must be modified to take into account the layers of charge that occur as a result of the charge transfer. This charge layering introduces additional bands of states near E{sub F}, which are discussed. Charge-transfer also induces a perturbation of the graphitic normal mode frequencies which can be understood as the result of a contraction (acceptor compounds) or expansion (donor compounds) of the intralayer C-C bonds. Ab-initio calculations support this view and are in reasonable agreement with experimental data.

  15. Reference materials for nondestructive assay of special nuclear material. Volume 1. Uranium oxide plus graphite powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprinkle, J.K.; Likes, R.N.; Parker, J.L.; Smith, H.A.

    1983-10-01

    This manual describes the fabrication of reference materials for use in gamma-ray-based nondestructive assay of low-density uranium-bearing samples. The sample containers are 2-l bottles. The reference materials consist of small amounts of UO 2 spread throughout a graphite matrix. The 235 U content ranges from 0 to 100 g. The manual also describes the far-field assay procedure used with low-resolution detectors

  16. Property Analysis of Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelets Modified Asphalt Model Using Molecular Dynamics (MD Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This Molecular Dynamics (MD simulation paper presents a physical property comparison study between exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGNP modified and control asphalt models, including density, glass transition temperature, viscosity and thermal conductivity. The three-component control asphalt model consists of asphaltenes, aromatics, and saturates based on previous references. The xGNP asphalt model was built by incorporating an xGNP and control asphalt model and controlling mass ratios to represent the laboratory prepared samples. The Amber Cornell Extension Force Field (ACEFF was used with assigned molecular electro-static potential (ESP charge from NWChem analysis. After optimization and ensemble relaxation, the properties of the control and xGNP modified asphalt models were computed and analyzed using the MD method. The MD simulated results have a similar trend as the test results. The property analysis showed that: (1 the density of the xGNP modified model is higher than that of the control model; (2 the glass transition temperature of the xGNP modified model is closer to the laboratory data of the Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP asphalt binders than that of the control model; (3 the viscosities of the xGNP modified model at different temperatures are higher than those of the control model, and it coincides with the trend in the laboratory data; (4 the thermal conductivities of the xGNP modified asphalt model are higher than those of the control asphalt model at different temperatures, and it is consistent with the trend in the laboratory data.

  17. Further investigation on boric acid catalytic graphitization of polyacrylonitrile carbon fibers: Mechanism and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Ya; Lu, Yonggen; Xiao, Hao; Qin, Xianying

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The modulus of carbon fiber was improved by boric acid at the temperature range of 1500–2900 °C. ► 2300 °C is a key temperature degree from which the boron began to benefit fiber strength. ► The fiber strength was affected by the boron reaction and related to the boron states. -- Abstract: Catalytic graphitization of polyacrylonitrile based carbon fibers by boric acid doping was studied and the dependence of fiber tensile strength on the boron content and temperature was discussed. It was found that there existed a key temperature point for the boron to take effect. When the fibers were modified with 7.0 wt.% boric acid solution, with increasing temperature, the tensile strength was lower than that of the unmodified ones below 2300 °C, but a reverse thing happened above 2300 °C. Moreover, when being heated at 2500 °C, the modified fibers showed an increasing tensile modulus and strength with increasing boron content till maximums of 404 GPa and 2.46 GPa, 26% and 16% higher than those of unmodified ones. The mechanical properties of the fibers were affected by the interaction of carbon and boron, and also related with boron states. The decomposition of boron acid and its interaction with carbon brought defects on fiber surface, degrading the mechanical properties below 1300 °C. With further heat treatment, the boron diffused into the fibers and divided into two states: substitutional and interstitial. At a temperature over 2300 °C with an appreciate boron content, the substitutional would be formed predominantly, which removed the structural defects and relaxed the distortions, so as to benefit the mechanical properties.

  18. A New Method to Measure Crack Extension in Nuclear Graphite Based on Digital Image Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigang Lai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphite components, used as moderators, reflectors, and core-support structures in a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor, play an important role in the safety of the reactor. Specifically, they provide channels for the fuel elements, control rods, and coolant flow. Fracture is the main failure mode for graphite, and breaching of the above channels by crack extension will seriously threaten the safety of a reactor. In this paper, a new method based on digital image correlation (DIC is introduced for measuring crack extension in brittle materials. Cross-correlation of the displacements measured by DIC with a step function was employed to identify the advancing crack tip in a graphite beam specimen under three-point bending. The load-crack extension curve, which is required for analyzing the R-curve and tension softening behaviors, was obtained for this material. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis of the threshold value employed for the cross-correlation parameter in the crack identification process was conducted. Finally, the results were verified using the finite element method.

  19. Graphite-nanoplatelet-decorated polymer nanofiber with improved thermal, electrical, and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiefeng; Hu, Mingjun; Dong, Yucheng; Li, Robert K Y

    2013-08-28

    Graphite-nanoplatelet (GNP)-decorated polymer nanofiber composites with hierarchical structures were fabricated by the combination of electrospinning and ultrasonication. It was found that GNPs could be well attached or embedded onto the nanofibers when their size was comparable to the nanofiber diameter. X-ray diffraction results indicated that ultrasonic treatment exerted no influence on the carbon crystal layer spacing. Fourier transform infrared spectra and Raman spectroscopy revealed the existence of interfacial interaction between GNPs and polyurethane nanofibers. The prepared nanofiber composite showed enhanced thermal stability and hardness, which originated from uniform dispersion of GNPs as well as strong interaction between GNPs and the nanofibers. The electrical conductivity was significantly improved, derived from the formation of a conductive percolation network in the nanofiber composite. During ultrasonication, cavitation bubbles may be formed in liquid, and microjets and shock waves were created near the GNP surface after collapse of the bubbles. These jets, causing sintering of GNPs, pushed GNPs toward the nanofiber surface at very high speeds. When the fast-moving GNPs hit the nanofiber surface, interfacial collision between GNPs and the nanofibers occurs, the nanofiber may experience partial softening or even melting at the impact sites, and then GNPs could be uniformly anchored onto the nanofibers. This method opens a new door for harvesting GNP-based nanofiber composites with improved material properties.

  20. Electrical transport properties of graphene nanoribbons produced from sonicating graphite in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Cheng; Setzler, Gabriel; Lin, Ming-Wei; Dhindsa, Kulwinder Singh; Jin, Jin; Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Kim, Seung Soo; Ming-Cheng Cheng, Mark; Widjaja, Noppi; Zhou, Zhixian

    2011-08-12

    A simple one-stage solution-based method was developed to produce graphene nanoribbons by sonicating graphite powder in organic solutions with polymer surfactant. The graphene nanoribbons were deposited on a silicon substrate, and characterized by Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Single-layer and few-layer graphene nanoribbons with a width ranging from sub-10 nm to tens of nanometers and lengths ranging from hundreds of nanometers to 1 µm were routinely observed. The electrical transport properties of individual graphene nanoribbons were measured in both the back-gate and polymer-electrolyte top-gate configurations. The mobility of the graphene nanoribbons was found to be over an order of magnitude higher when measured in the latter than in the former configuration (without the polymer-electrolyte), which can be attributed to the screening of the charged impurities by the counter ions in the polymer-electrolyte. This finding suggests that the charge transport in these solution produced graphene nanoribbons is largely limited by charge impurity scattering.

  1. The determination of the elastic properties of an anisotropic polycrystalline graphite using neutron diffraction and ultrasonic measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lokajíček, Tomáš; Lukáš, Petr; Nikitin, A. N.; Papushkin, I.V.; Sumin, V. V.; Vasin, R.N.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 4 (2010), s. 1374-1384 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/0676 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516; CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : extruded graphite * elastic properties * neutron diffraction * ultrasonic sounding * thermal-expansion * self-consistent * young moduls * porosity * stress * rocks Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 4.893, year: 2010

  2. The correlation of low-velocity impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with matrix properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Summarized are basic studies that were conducted to correlate the impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with polymer matrix properties. Three crosslinked epoxy resins and a linear polysulfone were selected as composite matrices. As a group, these resins possess a significantly large range of mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the resins and their respective composites were measured. Neat resin specimens and unidirectional and crossply composite specimens were impact tested with an instrumented dropweight tester. Impact resistances of the specimens were assesseed on the basis of loading capability, energy absorption, and extent of damage.

  3. Management of graphite material: a key issue for High Temperature Gas Reactor system (HTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdeloie, C.; Marimbeau, P.; Robin, J.C.; Cellier, F.

    2005-01-01

    Graphite material is used in nuclear High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR, Fig.1) as moderator, thermal absorber and also as structural components of the core (Fig.2). This type of reactor was selected by the Generation IV forum as a potential high temperature provider for supplying hydrogen production plants and is under development in France in the frame of the AREVA ANTARES program. In order to select graphite grades to be used in these future reactors, the requirements for mechanical, thermal, physical-chemical properties must match the internal environment of the nuclear core, especially with regard to irradiation effect. Another important aspect that must be addressed early in design is the waste issue. Indeed, it is necessary to reduce the amount of nuclear waste produced by operation of the reactor during its lifetime. Preliminary assessment of the nuclear waste output for an ANTARES type 280 MWe HTGR over 60 year-lifetime gives an estimated 6000 m 3 of activated graphite waste. Thus, reducing the graphite waste production is an important issue for any HTGR system. First, this paper presents a preliminary inventory of graphite waste fluxes coming from a HTGR, in mass and volume, with magnitudes of radiological activities based on activation calculations of graphite during its stay in the core of the reactor. Normalized data corresponding to an output of 1 GWe.year electricity allows comparison of the waste production with other nuclear reactor systems. Second, possible routes to manage irradiated graphite waste are addressed in both the context of French nuclear waste management rules and by comparison to other national regulations. Routes for graphite waste disposal studied in different countries (concerning existing irradiated graphite waste) will be discussed with regard to new issues of large graphite waste from HTGR. Alternative or complementary solutions aiming at lowering volume of graphite waste to be managed will be presented. For example

  4. Average Nuclear properties based on statistical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Jaick, L.J.

    1974-01-01

    The rough properties of nuclei were investigated by statistical model, in systems with the same and different number of protons and neutrons, separately, considering the Coulomb energy in the last system. Some average nuclear properties were calculated based on the energy density of nuclear matter, from Weizsscker-Beth mass semiempiric formulae, generalized for compressible nuclei. In the study of a s surface energy coefficient, the great influence exercised by Coulomb energy and nuclear compressibility was verified. For a good adjust of beta stability lines and mass excess, the surface symmetry energy were established. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. Electromagnetic properties and performance of exfoliated graphite (EG) - thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanocomposites at microwaves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valentini, M.; Piana, Francesco; Pionteck, J.; Lamastra, F. R.; Nanni, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 114, 19 June (2015), s. 26-33 ISSN 0266-3538 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : exfoliated graphite * functional composites * nano composites Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.897, year: 2015

  6. A Nanotube Surface Reinforced Graphite Fiber Exhibiting Significantly Enhanced Properties, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The completed Phase I work was directed at the application of nanotechnology to graphite/epoxy composites. A novel approach to the application of the nanotubes onto...

  7. Comparison of 3 MeV C + ion-irradiation effects between the nuclear graphites made of pitch and petroleum cokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Kim, Gen-Chan

    2008-10-01

    Three million electron volt C + irradiation effects on the microstructure (crystallinity, crystal size), mechanical properties (hardness, Young's modulus) and oxidation of IG-110 (petroleum coke) and IG-430 (pitch coke) nuclear graphites were compared based on the materials characteristics (degree of graphitization (DOG), density, porosity, type of coke, Mrozowski cracks) of the grades and the ion-irradiation conditions. The specimens were irradiated up to ˜19 dpa at room temperature. Differences in the as-received microstructure were examined by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscope (OM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The ion-induced changes in the microstructure, mechanical properties and oxidation characteristics were examined by the Raman spectroscopy, microhardness and Young's modulus measurements, and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results of the as-received microstructure condition show that the DOG of the grades appeared the same at 0.837. The size of Mrozowski cracks appeared larger in the IG-110 of the higher open and total porosity than the IG-430. After an irradiation, the changes in the crystallinity and the crystallite size, both estimated by the Raman spectrum parameters, appeared large for the IG-430 and the IG-110, respectively. The hardness had increased after an irradiation, but, the hardness increasing behaviors were reversed at around 14 dpa. Thus, the IG-430 showed a higher increase before 14 dpa, but the IG-110 showed a higher increase after 14 dpa. No-clear differences in the increase of the Young's modulus were observed between the grades mainly due to a scattering in the measurements results. The IG-110 showed a higher oxidation rate than the IG-430 both before and after an irradiation. Besides the density and porosity, a possible contribution of the well-developed Mrozowski cracks in the IG-110 was noted for the observation. All the comparisons show that, even when the differences between the

  8. Comparison of 3 MeV C+ ion-irradiation effects between the nuclear graphites made of pitch and petroleum cokes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Kim, Gen-Chan

    2008-01-01

    Three million electron volt C + irradiation effects on the microstructure (crystallinity, crystal size), mechanical properties (hardness, Young's modulus) and oxidation of IG-110 (petroleum coke) and IG-430 (pitch coke) nuclear graphites were compared based on the materials characteristics (degree of graphitization (DOG), density, porosity, type of coke, Mrozowski cracks) of the grades and the ion-irradiation conditions. The specimens were irradiated up to ∼19 dpa at room temperature. Differences in the as-received microstructure were examined by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscope (OM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The ion-induced changes in the microstructure, mechanical properties and oxidation characteristics were examined by the Raman spectroscopy, microhardness and Young's modulus measurements, and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results of the as-received microstructure condition show that the DOG of the grades appeared the same at 0.837. The size of Mrozowski cracks appeared larger in the IG-110 of the higher open and total porosity than the IG-430. After an irradiation, the changes in the crystallinity and the crystallite size, both estimated by the Raman spectrum parameters, appeared large for the IG-430 and the IG-110, respectively. The hardness had increased after an irradiation, but, the hardness increasing behaviors were reversed at around 14 dpa. Thus, the IG-430 showed a higher increase before 14 dpa, but the IG-110 showed a higher increase after 14 dpa. No-clear differences in the increase of the Young's modulus were observed between the grades mainly due to a scattering in the measurements results. The IG-110 showed a higher oxidation rate than the IG-430 both before and after an irradiation. Besides the density and porosity, a possible contribution of the well-developed Mrozowski cracks in the IG-110 was noted for the observation. All the comparisons show that, even when the differences between the

  9. Graphite intercalated polyaniline composite with superior anticorrosive and hydrophobic properties, as protective coating material on steel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathnayake, R.M.N.M.; Mantilaka, M.M.M.G.P.G.; Hara, Masanori; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Wijayasinghe, H.W.M.A.C.; Yoshimura, Masamichi; Pitawala, H.M.T.G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • In this paper, it has been utilized a novel method to prepare a new composite material of PANI/NPG graphite composite, using NPG vein graphite variety. • It is found that the composite works as an anti-corrosive coating on steel surfaces. Further, the prepared composite shows good hydrophobic ability, which is very useful in preventing corrosion on metal surfaces. • The prepared PANI/NPG composite material shows a significantly high corrosion resistance compared to alkyd resin/PANI coatings or alkyd resin coatings, on steel surfaces. - Abstract: Solid polymer composite systems are widely being used for potential technological applications in secondary energy sources and electrochromic devices. In this study, we synthesized and characterized a composite material composed of polyaniline (PANI) and natural needle platy (NPG) vein graphite. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), micro-Raman analysis, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to study the structural and electrochemical properties of the prepared PANI/NPG graphite composite. XPS, FTIR, and micro-Raman analysis confirmed the existence of relevant functional groups and bonding in the prepared PANI/NPG composite material. The composite shows a very low corrosion rate, approximately 29 μm per year, and high hydrophobicity on steel surfaces, which helps to prevent the corrosion due to O 2 penetration towards the metal surface. It indicates that the composite can be used as a high potential surface coating material to anticorrosion. The specific capacitance of PANI/NPG composite is 833.3 F g −1 , which is higher than that of PANI. This synergistic electrical performance result proves the prepared PANI/NPG graphite composite as a suitable protective coating material for steel surfaces.

  10. Graphite intercalated polyaniline composite with superior anticorrosive and hydrophobic properties, as protective coating material on steel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathnayake, R.M.N.M. [National Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy (Sri Lanka); Graduate School of Engineering, Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan); Mantilaka, M.M.M.G.P.G. [Sri Lanka Institute of Nanotechnology, Nanotechnology and Science Park, Mahenwatte, Pitipana, Homagama (Sri Lanka); Hara, Masanori; Huang, Hsin-Hui [Graduate School of Engineering, Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan); Wijayasinghe, H.W.M.A.C., E-mail: athula@ifs.ac.lk [National Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy (Sri Lanka); Yoshimura, Masamichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan); Pitawala, H.M.T.G.A. [Department of Geology, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya (Sri Lanka)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • In this paper, it has been utilized a novel method to prepare a new composite material of PANI/NPG graphite composite, using NPG vein graphite variety. • It is found that the composite works as an anti-corrosive coating on steel surfaces. Further, the prepared composite shows good hydrophobic ability, which is very useful in preventing corrosion on metal surfaces. • The prepared PANI/NPG composite material shows a significantly high corrosion resistance compared to alkyd resin/PANI coatings or alkyd resin coatings, on steel surfaces. - Abstract: Solid polymer composite systems are widely being used for potential technological applications in secondary energy sources and electrochromic devices. In this study, we synthesized and characterized a composite material composed of polyaniline (PANI) and natural needle platy (NPG) vein graphite. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), micro-Raman analysis, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to study the structural and electrochemical properties of the prepared PANI/NPG graphite composite. XPS, FTIR, and micro-Raman analysis confirmed the existence of relevant functional groups and bonding in the prepared PANI/NPG composite material. The composite shows a very low corrosion rate, approximately 29 μm per year, and high hydrophobicity on steel surfaces, which helps to prevent the corrosion due to O{sub 2} penetration towards the metal surface. It indicates that the composite can be used as a high potential surface coating material to anticorrosion. The specific capacitance of PANI/NPG composite is 833.3 F g{sup −1}, which is higher than that of PANI. This synergistic electrical performance result proves the prepared PANI/NPG graphite composite as a suitable protective coating material for steel

  11. Effect of Microwave Treatment of Graphite on the Electrical Conductivity and Electrochemical Properties of Polyaniline/Graphene Oxide Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Tang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Polyaniline (PANI/graphene oxide (GO composites were synthesized via in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of GO. The effect of microwave treatment of graphite on the electrical conductivity and electrochemical properties of PANI/GO composites was highlighted, and the morphology and microstructure were subsequently characterized using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis. The results demonstrated that microwave treatment of graphite imparted a well-dispersed, highly ordered layered structure to the as-prepared GO, and in turn facilitated strong bonding between the GO and PANI nanosheets, which may be responsible for the improved electrical conductivity and electrochemical properties of the resulting PANI/GO composites. The desired PANI/GO composites possessed an electrical conductivity of 508 S/m, an areal capacitance of 172.8 mF/cm2, and a retained capacitance of 87.4% after cycling, representing percentage increases of 102, 232, and 112, respectively, as a result of the microwave treatment of graphite. The resulting composites are promising electrode materials for high-performance and ecofriendly electrical energy storage devices.

  12. Microwave absorption properties of NiCoFe2O4-graphite embedded poly(o-phenetidine nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Ohlan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Poly(o-phenetidine nanocomposites (PNG with NiCoFe2O4 and exfoliated graphite have been synthesized via in-situ emulsion polymerization. Systematic investigations reveal that the NiCoFe2O4 nanoparticles (30-40 nm in the poly(o-phenetidine matrix have phenomenal effect in determining the electrical, magnetic, and the microwave absorption properties of the nanocomposites. Shielding effectiveness due to absorption (SEA value of 32 dB (>99.9% has been achieved for PNG composite for its use as broadband microwave absorbing material. The microwave absorption of these composites can be attributed to dielectric loss from graphite and poly(o-phenetidine matrix, and magnetic loss from NiCoFe2O4 nanoparticles.

  13. Preparation and magnetic properties of polymer magnetic composites based on acrylate resin filled with nickel plating graphite nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yi, E-mail: zhangyi520love@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Qi Shuhua; Zhang Fan; Yang Yongqing; Duan Guochen [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2011-11-01

    Nickel plating graphite nanosheets (Ni/GNs) were prepared by electroless plating method using graphite nanosheets (GNs). Then a novel polymer magnetic composites based on acrylate pressure-sensitive adhesive (acrylate PSA) filled with Ni/GNs were fabricated by solution blend method. The Ni/GNs and acrylate PSA/Ni/GNs composites were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). All results showed that relatively uniform and compact Ni layer is successfully coated onto GNs under the given conditions, furthermore, Ni/GNs are homogeneously dispersed in acrylate PSA. The VSM results showed that the saturation magnetization of acrylate PSA/Ni/GNs composites increases with an increasing content of Ni/GNs while the coercivity decreases with an increasing content of Ni/GNs. When the content of GNs is 20 wt%, acrylate PSA/Ni/GNs composites exhibites good mechanical properties.

  14. Preparation and magnetic properties of polymer magnetic composites based on acrylate resin filled with nickel plating graphite nanosheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yi; Qi Shuhua; Zhang Fan; Yang Yongqing; Duan Guochen

    2011-01-01

    Nickel plating graphite nanosheets (Ni/GNs) were prepared by electroless plating method using graphite nanosheets (GNs). Then a novel polymer magnetic composites based on acrylate pressure-sensitive adhesive (acrylate PSA) filled with Ni/GNs were fabricated by solution blend method. The Ni/GNs and acrylate PSA/Ni/GNs composites were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). All results showed that relatively uniform and compact Ni layer is successfully coated onto GNs under the given conditions, furthermore, Ni/GNs are homogeneously dispersed in acrylate PSA. The VSM results showed that the saturation magnetization of acrylate PSA/Ni/GNs composites increases with an increasing content of Ni/GNs while the coercivity decreases with an increasing content of Ni/GNs. When the content of GNs is 20 wt%, acrylate PSA/Ni/GNs composites exhibites good mechanical properties.

  15. Metal-functionalized single-walled graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study on magnetic property

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic properties of metal-functionalized graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes were investigated based on first-principles calculations. The graphitic carbon nitride nanotube can be either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic by functionalizing with different metal atoms. The W- and Ti-functionalized nanotubes are ferromagnetic, which are attributed to carrier-mediated interactions because of the coupling between the spin-polarized d and p electrons and the formation of the impurity bands close to the band edges. However, Cr-, Mn-, Co-, and Ni-functionalized nanotubes are antiferromagnetic because of the anti-alignment of the magnetic moments between neighboring metal atoms. The functionalized nanotubes may be used in spintronics and hydrogen storage. PMID:21711614

  16. Metal-functionalized single-walled graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study on magnetic property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy Vivek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The magnetic properties of metal-functionalized graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes were investigated based on first-principles calculations. The graphitic carbon nitride nanotube can be either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic by functionalizing with different metal atoms. The W- and Ti-functionalized nanotubes are ferromagnetic, which are attributed to carrier-mediated interactions because of the coupling between the spin-polarized d and p electrons and the formation of the impurity bands close to the band edges. However, Cr-, Mn-, Co-, and Ni-functionalized nanotubes are antiferromagnetic because of the anti-alignment of the magnetic moments between neighboring metal atoms. The functionalized nanotubes may be used in spintronics and hydrogen storage.

  17. Synthesis, physical and chemical properties, and potential applications of graphite fluoride fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Long, Martin; Stahl, Mark

    1987-01-01

    Graphite fluoride fibers can be produced by fluorinating pristine or intercalated graphite fibers. The higher the degree of graphitization of the fibers, the higher the temperature needed to reach the same degree of fluorination. Pitched based fibers were fluorinated to flourine-to-carbon atom rations between 0 and 1. The graphite fluoride fibers with a fluorine-to-carbon atom ration near 1 have extensive visible structural damage. On the other hand, fluorination of fibers pretreated with bromine or fluorine and bromine result in fibers with a fluorine-to-carbon atom ratio nearly equal to 0.5 with no visible structural damage. The electrical resistivity of the fibers is dependent upon the fluorine to carbon atom ratio and ranged from .01 to 10 to the 11th ohm/cm. The thermal conductivity of these fibers ranged from 5 to 73 W/m-k, which is much larger than the thermal conductivity of glass, which is the regular filler in epoxy composites. If graphite fluoride fibers are used as a filler in epoxy or PTFE, the resulting composite may be a high thermal conductivity material with an electrical resistivity in either the insulator or semiconductor range. The electrically insulating product may provide heat transfer with lower temperature gradients than many current electrical insulators. Potential applications are presented.

  18. Study of the nuclear graphite contact with the eutectic liquid (ZrF{sub 4} - NaF-LiF) and its protection by the vitreous carbon; Etude du contact du graphite nucleaire avec le liquide eutectique (ZrF{sub 4} -NaF-LiF) et sa protection par le carbone vitreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardet, V.; Duclaux, L. [Universite de Savoie, LCME, Polytech Savoie, 73 - Le Bourget du Lac (France); Renaudin, G.; Dubois, M.; Guerin, K.; Avignant, D. [LMI, CNRS, 63 - Aubiere (France); Renaudin, S.; Delpeux, S. [CRMD, CNRS, 45 - Orleans (France)

    2008-07-01

    In the reactors of fourth generation called molten slats reactors, the graphite core is on contact with liquid fluoride salts used as fuel and coolant. The aim of the study is to better understand the interaction between the graphite and the molten salt and to determine methods to protect the graphite to limit its corrosion by the fuel. The molten salts of this study is composed of NaF and LiF and ZrF{sub 4}. The fluoride salts reactivity and diffusion have been characterized for the nuclear graphite. Microscopy and spectroscopy Raman have been used to characterize the adhesion. (A.L.B.)

  19. KNO3/NaNO3 - Graphite materials for thermal energy storage at high temperature: Part I. - Elaboration methods and thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acem, Zoubir; Lopez, Jerome; Palomo Del Barrio, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Composites graphite/salt for thermal energy storage at high temperature (∼200 deg. C) have been developed and tested. As at low temperature in the past, graphite has been used to enhance the thermal conductivity of the eutectic system KNO 3 /NaNO 3 . A new elaboration method has been proposed as an alternative to graphite foams infiltration. It consists of cold-compression of a physical mixing of expanded natural graphite particles and salt powder. Two different compression routes have been investigated: uni-axial compression and isostatic compression. The first part of the paper has been devoted to the analysis of the thermal properties of these new graphite/salt composites. It is proven that cold-compression is a simple and efficient technique for improving the salt thermal conductivity. For instance, graphite amounts between 15 and 20%wt lead to apparent thermal conductivities close to 20 W/m/K (20 times greater than the thermal conductivity of the salt). Furthermore, some advantages in terms of cost and safety are expected because materials elaboration is carried out at room temperature. The second part of the paper is focused on the analyses of the phase transition properties of these graphite/salt composites materials.

  20. The Electrical Properties of Hybrid Composites Based on Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes with Graphite Nanoplatelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perets, Yulia; Aleksandrovych, Lyudmila; Melnychenko, Mykola; Lazarenko, Oleksandra; Vovchenko, Lyudmila; Matzui, Lyudmila

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, we have investigated the concentration dependences of electrical conductivity of monopolymer composites with graphite nanoplatelets or multiwall carbon nanotubes and hybrid composites with both multiwall carbon nanotubes and graphite nanoplatelets. The latter filler was added to given systems in content of 0.24 vol%. The content of multiwall carbon nanotubes is varied from 0.03 to 4 vol%. Before incorporation into the epoxy resin, the graphite nanoplatelets were subjected to ultraviolet ozone treatment for 20 min. It was found that the addition of nanocarbon to the low-viscosity suspension (polymer, acetone, hardener) results in formation of two percolation transitions. The percolation transition of the composites based on carbon nanotubes is the lowest (0.13 vol%).

  1. Porosity Effect on Thermal Properties of Al-12 wt % Si/Graphite Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Miguel Molina

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of porosity on the thermal conductivity and the coefficient of thermal expansion of composites obtained by infiltration of Al-12 wt % Si alloy into graphite particulate preforms has been determined. Highly irregular graphite particles were used to fabricate the preforms. The thermal conductivity of these composites gradually increases with the applied infiltration pressure given the inherent reduction in porosity. A simple application of the Hasselman-Johnson model in a two-step procedure (that accounts for the presence of both graphite particles and voids randomly dispersed in a metallic matrix offers a good estimation of the experimental results. As concerns the coefficient of thermal expansion, the results show a slight increase with saturation being approximately in the range 14.6–15.2 × 10−6 K−1 for a saturation varying from 86% up to 100%. Results lie within the standard Hashin-Strikman bounds.

  2. Porosity Effect on Thermal Properties of Al-12 wt % Si/Graphite Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, José-Miguel; Rodríguez-Guerrero, Alejandro; Louis, Enrique; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco; Narciso, Javier

    2017-02-14

    The effect of porosity on the thermal conductivity and the coefficient of thermal expansion of composites obtained by infiltration of Al-12 wt % Si alloy into graphite particulate preforms has been determined. Highly irregular graphite particles were used to fabricate the preforms. The thermal conductivity of these composites gradually increases with the applied infiltration pressure given the inherent reduction in porosity. A simple application of the Hasselman-Johnson model in a two-step procedure (that accounts for the presence of both graphite particles and voids randomly dispersed in a metallic matrix) offers a good estimation of the experimental results. As concerns the coefficient of thermal expansion, the results show a slight increase with saturation being approximately in the range 14.6-15.2 × 10 -6 K -1 for a saturation varying from 86% up to 100%. Results lie within the standard Hashin-Strikman bounds.

  3. Innovative approaches to the Management of Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Wastes: Addressing the Challenges through International Collaboration with Project 'GRAPA'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, A.J.; Ojovan, M.; O'Sullivan, P.; )

    2017-01-01

    There exists more than 250.000 tonnes of irradiated (and therefore radioactive) nuclear graphite (i-graphite) in the world, primarily as a result of the development of graphite-moderated power-reactor systems, initially for defence and subsequently for commercial purposes. Only a very small number of such plants have been dismantled and, for most cases, the final destiny of the irradiated graphite remains unresolved. Future high-temperature reactor programmes, such as the Chinese HTR-PM development, will produce more graphite and carbonaceous wastes from both structural components and the fuel pebbles (which are approximately 96% carbonaceous), the latter producing a continuous stream of so-called 'operational waste'. The problem of dismantling irradiated graphite reactor stacks, possibly distorted through neutron damage and in some cases degraded further by radiation-chemical attack by gaseous coolants, and then finding the appropriate treatments and final destiny of the material, has exercised both the European Union and the International Atomic Energy Agency for more than 25 years, seeking to address the different issues and available disposal solutions in different IAEA Member States. An IAEA collaborative research programme on treatment options has recently been completed, and an active group of international specialists in this area has now been established as part of the IAEA International Decommissioning Network under the envelope of Project 'GRAPA' (Irradiated Graphite Processing Approaches), which includes representatives from Belgium, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Lithuania, Rep. of Korea, Romania, Spain, Switzerland, Ukraine and the Russian Federation with direct responsibilities for various parts of the decommissioning and graphite-disposal process in a variety of reactor designs. Interest has also been expressed by colleagues from Sweden and Japan. Work is in progress on a number of topic areas where weaknesses in the

  4. Quantum mechanics based force field for carbon (QMFF-Cx) validated to reproduce the mechanical and thermodynamics properties of graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Tod A.; Karasawa, Naoki; Goddard, William A.

    2010-10-01

    As assemblies of graphene sheets, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes become components of new nanotechnologies, it is important to be able to predict the structures and properties of these systems. A problem has been that the level of quantum mechanics practical for such systems (density functional theory at the PBE level) cannot describe the London dispersion forces responsible for interaction of the graphene planes (thus graphite falls apart into graphene sheets). To provide a basis for describing these London interactions, we derive the quantum mechanics based force field for carbon (QMFF-Cx) by fitting to results from density functional theory calculations at the M06-2X level, which demonstrates accuracies for a broad class of molecules at short and medium range intermolecular distances. We carried out calculations on the dehydrogenated coronene (C24) dimer, emphasizing two geometries: parallel-displaced X (close to the observed structure in graphite crystal) and PD-Y (the lowest energy transition state for sliding graphene sheets with respect to each other). A third, eclipsed geometry is calculated to be much higher in energy. The QMFF-Cx force field leads to accurate predictions of available experimental mechanical and thermodynamics data of graphite (lattice vibrations, elastic constants, Poisson ratios, lattice modes, phonon dispersion curves, specific heat, and thermal expansion). This validates the use of M06-2X as a practical method for development of new first principles based generations of QMFF force fields.

  5. A Study of the Oxidation Behaviour of Pile Grade A (PGA) Nuclear Graphite Using Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Tomography (XRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Liam; Heard, Peter J.; Scott, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Pile grade A (PGA) graphite was used as a material for moderating and reflecting neutrons in the UK’s first generation Magnox nuclear power reactors. As all but one of these reactors are now shut down there is a need to understand the residual state of the material prior to decommissioning of the cores, in particular the location and concentration of key radio-contaminants such as 14C. The oxidation behaviour of unirradiated PGA graphite was studied, in the temperature range 600–1050°C, in air and nitrogen using thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray tomography to investigate the possibility of using thermal degradation techniques to examine 14C distribution within irradiated material. The thermal decomposition of PGA graphite was observed to follow the three oxidation regimes historically identified by previous workers with limited, uniform oxidation at temperatures below 600°C and substantial, external oxidation at higher temperatures. This work demonstrates that the different oxidation regimes of PGA graphite could be developed into a methodology to characterise the distribution and concentration of 14C in irradiated graphite by thermal treatment. PMID:26575374

  6. The effect of iron catalyzed graphitization on the textural properties of carbonized cellulose : Magnetically separable graphitic carbon bodies for catalysis and remediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Jacco; Beale, Andrew M.; Soulimani, Fouad; Versluijs-Helder, Marjan; Van De Kleut, Dirk; Koelewijn, Jacobus M.; Geus, John W.; Jenneskens, Leonardus W.

    2016-01-01

    Whereas pyrolysis of pristine microcrystalline cellulose spheres yields nonporous amorphous carbon bodies, pyrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose spheres loaded with iron salts leads to the formation of magnetically separable mesoporous graphitic carbon bodies. The microcrystalline cellulose

  7. Effect of extensional cyclic strain on the mechanical and physico-mechanical properties of PVC-NBR/graphite composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The variation of electrical resistivity as will as the mechanical properties of PVC (polyvinylchloride-NBR (acrylonitrile butadiene rubber based conductive composites filled with different concentrations of graphite were studied. These samples were studied as function of the constant deformation fatigue test. When the specimen was subjected to a large number of rapidly repeating strain cycles, and different strain amplitudes, the conductivity, σ(T, shows an initial rapid fall followed by dynamic equilibrium. Increasing the number of cycles and strain amplitudes, the conductivity remains almost constant over the temperature range 30–140°C. The equilibrium state between destruction and reconstruction of graphite particles has been detected for all strains of certain values of strain cycles (1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 cycles for 30% strain amplitude. A preliminary study was done to optimize the possibility to use Conductive Polymer Composites (CPC as a strain sensor and to evaluate its performance by an intrinsic physico-mechanical modification measurement. The electromechanical characterization was performed to demonstrate the adaptability and the correct functioning of the sensor as a strain gauge on the fabric. The coefficient of strain sensitivity (K was measured for 50 phr graphite/PVCNBR vulcanized at 3000 number of strain cycles and 30% strain amplitude. There was a broad maximum of K, with a peak value of 82, which was much higher, compared to conventional wire resistors. A slight hysteresis was observed at unloading due to plasticity of the matrix. A good correlation exists between mechanical and electrical response to the strain sensitivity. Mechanical reinforcement was in accordance with the Quemada equation [1] and Guth model [2] attested to good particle-matrix adhesion. It was found that the viscous component of deformation gradually disappeared and the hardening occurred with increasing strain cycles. The modulus, fracture

  8. Effect of graphite nanoplatelets on the structure and properties of PA6-elastomer nanocomposites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thanh, Tran Duy; Kaprálková, Ludmila; Hromádková, Jiřina; Kelnar, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 50, January (2014), s. 39-45 ISSN 0014-3057 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-15255S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : graphite nanoplatelets * polyamide 6 * elastomer Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 3.005, year: 2014

  9. Effect of oil and oil with graphite on tribological properties of glass ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    PMC's; coefficient friction; wear; glass fibre; specific wear rate; graphite additive. 1. Introduction. Polymers and polymer composites are steadily gaining ground over metals in the field of engineering applica- tions in tribology. Laboratory wear tests are carried out by various researchers under ambient temperatures with.

  10. Thorium dioxide: properties and nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belle, J.; Berman, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    This is the sixth book on reactor materials published under sponsorship of the Naval Reactors Office of the United States Department of Energy, formerly the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This book presents a comprehensive compilation of the most significant properties of thorium dioxide, much like the book Uranium Dioxide: Properties and Nuclear Applications presented information on the fuel material used in the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor core

  11. Thorium dioxide: properties and nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belle, J.; Berman, R.M. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    This is the sixth book on reactor materials published under sponsorship of the Naval Reactors Office of the United States Department of Energy, formerly the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This book presents a comprehensive compilation of the most significant properties of thorium dioxide, much like the book Uranium Dioxide: Properties and Nuclear Applications presented information on the fuel material used in the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor core.

  12. Effect of filler content on the properties of expanded- graphite-based composite bipolar plates for application in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masand, Aakash; Borah, Munu; Pathak, Abhishek K.; Dhakate, Sanjay R.

    2017-09-01

    Minimization of the weight and volume of a hydrogen-based PEM fuel cell stack is an essential area of research for the development and commercialization of PEMFCs for various applications. Graphite-based composite bipolar plates have significant advantages over conventional metallic bipolar plates due to their corrosion resistivity and low cost. On the other hand, expanded graphite is seen to be a potential candidate for facilitating the required electrical, thermal and mechanical properties of bipolar plates with a low density. Therefore, in the present study, the focus is on minimization of the high loading of graphite and optimizes its composition to meet the target properties of bipolar plates as per the USDOE target. Three types of expanded graphite (EG)-phenolic-resin-based composite bipolar plates were developed by partially replacing the expanded graphite content with natural graphite (NG) and carbon black as an additional filler. The three types of composite plate with the reinforcing constituent ratio EG:NG:R (25:25:50) give a bending strength of 49 MPa, a modulus of ~6 GPa, electrical conductivity  >100 S cm-1, a shore hardness of 55 and a bulk density of 1.55 g/cc. The 50 wt% loading of resin is sufficient to wet the 50 wt% filler content in the composite plate. This study gives an insight into using hybrid reinforcements in order to achieve the desired properties of bipolar plates.

  13. Liability for on-site nuclear property damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neems, H.J.

    2000-01-01

    Typically, liability for on-site property addressed in contracts between operator and its suppliers. Nuclear power plant operators ordinarily protect themselves against risk of nuclear damage to on-site property by insurance. Nuclear liability laws do not specifically address liability for nuclear damage to on-site property. Nuclear plant owners should address risk of damage to on-site property when developing risk management program

  14. Isospin dependent properties of asymmetric nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, P. Roy; Basu, D. N.; Samanta, C.

    2009-07-01

    The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy is determined from a systematic study of the isospin dependent bulk properties of asymmetric nuclear matter using the isoscalar and isovector components of the density dependent M3Y interaction. The incompressibility K∞ for the symmetric nuclear matter, the isospin dependent part Kasy of the isobaric incompressibility, and the slope L are all in excellent agreement with the constraints recently extracted from measured isotopic dependence of the giant monopole resonances in even-A Sn isotopes, from the neutron skin thickness of nuclei, and from analyses of experimental data on isospin diffusion and isotopic scaling in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions. This work provides a fundamental basis for the understanding of nuclear matter under extreme conditions and validates the important empirical constraints obtained from recent experimental data.

  15. Model for neutron total cross-section at low energies for nuclear grade graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galván Josa, V.M.; Dawidowski, J.; Santisteban, J.R.; Malamud, F.; Oliveira, R.G.

    2015-01-01

    At subthermal neutron energies, polycrystalline graphite shows a large total cross-section due to small angle scattering processes. In this work, a new methodology to determine pore size distributions through the neutron transmission technique at subthermal energies is proposed and its sensitivity is compared with standard techniques. A simple model based on the form factor for spherical particles, normally used in the Small Angle Neutron Scattering technique, is employed to calculate the contribution of small angle effect to the total scattering cross-section, with the width and center of the radii distributions as free parameters in the model. Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments were performed to compare results as a means to validate the method. The good agreement reached reveals that the neutron transmission technique is a useful tool to explore small angle scattering effects. This fact can be exploited in situations where large samples must be scanned and it is difficult to investigate them with conventional methods. It also opens the possibility to apply this method in energy-resolved neutron imaging. Also, since subthermal neutron transmission experiments are perfectly feasible in small neutron sources, the present findings open new possibilities to the work done in such kind of facilities

  16. Nitrogen-doped graphene: effect of graphite oxide precursors and nitrogen content on the electrochemical sensing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megawati, Monica; Chua, Chun Kiang; Sofer, Zdenek; Klímová, Kateřina; Pumera, Martin

    2017-06-21

    Graphene, produced via chemical methods, has been widely applied for electrochemical sensing due to its structural and electrochemical properties as well as its ease of production in large quantity. While nitrogen-doped graphenes are widely studied materials, the literature showing an effect of graphene oxide preparation methods on nitrogen quantity and chemical states as well as on defects and, in turn, on electrochemical sensing is non-existent. In this study, the properties of nitrogen-doped graphene materials, prepared via hydrothermal synthesis using graphite oxide produced by various classical methods using permanganate or chlorate oxidants Staudenmaier, Hummers, Hofmann and Brodie oxidation methods, were studied; the resulting nitrogen-doped graphene oxides were labeled as ST-GO, HU-GO, HO-GO and BR-GO, respectively. The electrochemical oxidation of biomolecules, such as ascorbic acid, uric acid, dopamine, nicotinamide adenine nucleotide and DNA free bases, was carried out using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry techniques. The nitrogen content in doped graphene oxides increased in the order ST-GO graphene followed this trend, as shown in the cyclic voltammograms. This is a very important finding that provides insight into the electrocatalytic effect of N-doped graphene. The nitrogen-doped graphene materials exhibited improved sensitivity over bare glassy carbon for ascorbic acid, uric acid and dopamine detection. These studies will enhance our understanding of the effects of graphite oxide precursors on the electrochemical sensing properties of nitrogen-doped graphene materials.

  17. Graphite/salt composites for high temperature energy storage: a study of the effects of the graphite and of the microstructure of the composites on the phase change properties of the salts; Composites graphite/sel pour le stockage d'energie a haute temperature: etude des effets du graphite et de la microstructure des composites sur les proprietes de changement de phase des sels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, J.; Palomo del Barrio, E. [TREFLE UMR 8508, 33 - Talence (France); Dumas, J.P. [Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, LaTEP, 64 - Pau (France)

    2008-07-15

    Thermal energy storage at high temperature is an efficient way for energy saving in the industrial sector, as well as a key component for power generation based on renewable energy resources. Thermal energy storage technology based on phase change materials (mainly salts) has been identified to meet the requirements of investment costs and compactness. However, the low thermal conductivity of salts (1 W/m/K) could be a limiting factor concerning power. To overcome such a drawback, new materials combining salts with graphite have been developed. Nevertheless, it is important to verify that no degradation of the salts storage properties is induced by their thermal conductivity enhancement. In this Note, the effects of the graphite and the composites graphite/salt microstructure on the phase change properties of salts are analysed. It appears that the thermo chemical stability of salts is not disturbed by graphite and that graphite does not modify the latent heat of salts. It is shown that graphite usually promotes heterogeneous nucleation and that it can reduce melting temperature.

  18. Oxidizability and explosibility of pure graphite powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L Rahmani; D Roubineau; S Cornet

    2005-01-01

    extremely powerful electric sparks. The sparks were triggered at one end of a 5 m long plexiglas tunnel, alter it had been filled with the right concentration of graphite powder. Preliminary tests carried out by CNPP allowed to calibrate opacimeters so as to measure the cloud density. The graphite powder was of the finest size compatible with quick dispersion, as larger particulates are known to act as heat sinks and smaller ones tend to agglomerate, and ground shortly before the tests since it has been noted that graphite powder looses some reactivity with time. The propagation of the explosion within the tunnel was filmed with a fast shooting camera, while temperature and pressure were recorded. The results show that, while the graphite is brought locally to incandescence by the spark, this dies out in about 100 milliseconds without having been propagated to other parts of the dust. It is expected that the EDF-CNPP experiments contribute together with results gathered in other countries to a shared understanding of the low oxidizability and explosibility properties of nuclear grade graphite

  19. Oxidizability and explosibility of pure graphite powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani, L.; Roubineau, D.; Cornet, S.

    2005-01-01

    extremely powerful electric sparks. The sparks were triggered at one end of a 5 m long plexiglas tunnel, after it had been filled with the right concentration of graphite powder. Preliminary tests carried out by CNPP allowed to calibrate opacimeters so as to measure the cloud density. The graphite powder was of the finest size compatible with quick dispersion, as larger particulates are known to act as heat sinks and smaller ones tend to agglomerate, and ground shortly before the tests since it bas been noted that graphite powder looses some reactivity with time. The propagation of the explosion within the tunnel was filmed with a fast shooting camera, while temperature and pressure were recorded. The results show that, while the graphite is brought locally to incandescence by the spark, this dies out in about 100 milliseconds without having been propagated to other parts of the dust. It is expected that the EDF-CNPP experiments contribute together with results gathered in other countries to a shared of the low oxidizability and explosibility properties of nuclear grade graphite. (authors)

  20. Study of Coating Geometries and Photoluminescence Properties of Metal Nanoparticles/Graphite Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Barone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present the results of a study of growth and characterization of metal nanoparticles (Ag, Au, and Co/carbon surfaces. The nanoparticles grew by laser ablation technique and their dimensions were controlled by light scattering study and AFM microscopy before their insertion on graphite surface. Nanoparticles appear randomly disposed on carbon surfaces aggregating to form big particles only in the case of silver. The different behavior of metal nanoparticles on carbon surface was explained in terms of different metal wetting of surface, in agreement with previous theoretical results of He et al. Chemical information, obtained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, indicated that the doping process is a simple physisorption while the interfacial interaction between particles and carbon layers causes local defects in graphite structure and the appearance of a strong photoluminescence signal for all composites. Moreover, the visible optical absorption decreases about 10% indicating the progressive metallization of carbon surface.

  1. Porosity effects in the neutron total cross section of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santisteban, J. R; Dawidowski, J; Petriw, S. N

    2009-01-01

    Graphite has been used in nuclear reactors since the birth of the nuclear industry due to its good performance as a neutron moderator material. Graphite is still an option as moderator for generation IV reactors due to its good mechanical and thermal properties at high operation temperatures. So, there has been renewed interest in a revision of the computer libraries used to describe the neutron cross section of graphite. For sub-thermal neutron energies, polycrystalline graphite shows a larger total cross section (between 4 and 8 barns) than predicted by existing theoretical models (0.2 barns). In order to investigate the origin of this discrepancy we measured the total cross section of graphite samples of three different origins, in the energy range from 0.001 eV to 10 eV. Different experimental arrangements and sample treatments were explored, to identify the effect of various experimental parameters on the total cross section measurement. The experiments showed that the increase in total cross section is due to neutrons scattered around the forward direction. We associate these small-angle scattered neutrons (SANS) to the porous structure of graphite, and formulate a very simple model to compute its contribution to the total cross section of the material. This results in an analytic expression that explicitly depends on the density and mean size of the pores, which can be easily incorporated in nuclear library codes. [es

  2. Studies of mechanical properties and irradiation damage nucleation of HTGR graphites. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrower, P.A.

    1981-05-01

    Since the submission of the last report (COO-2712-6) work has concentrated on the examination of the effects of oxidation on the compressive strengths of graphites doped with iron, vanadium and calcium. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the relative effects of the impurities on the rates of oxidation in air, CO 2 and H 2 O and the resultant reduction in compressive strength

  3. The Electrical Properties of Hybrid Composites Based on Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes with Graphite Nanoplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perets, Yulia; Aleksandrovych, Lyudmila; Melnychenko, Mykola; Lazarenko, Oleksandra; Vovchenko, Lyudmila; Matzui, Lyudmila

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, we have investigated the concentration dependences of electrical conductivity of monopolymer composites with graphite nanoplatelets or multiwall carbon nanotubes and hybrid composites with both multiwall carbon nanotubes and graphite nanoplatelets. The latter filler was added to given systems in content of 0.24 vol%. The content of multiwall carbon nanotubes is varied from 0.03 to 4 vol%. Before incorporation into the epoxy resin, the graphite nanoplatelets were subjected to ultraviolet ozone treatment for 20 min. It was found that the addition of nanocarbon to the low-viscosity suspension (polymer, acetone, hardener) results in formation of two percolation transitions. The percolation transition of the composites based on carbon nanotubes is the lowest (0.13 vol%).It was determined that the combination of two electroconductive fillers in the low-viscosity polymer results in a synergistic effect above the percolation threshold, which is revealed in increase of the conductivity up to 20 times. The calculation of the number of conductive chains in the composite and contact electric resistance in the framework of the model of effective electrical resistivity allowed us to explain the nature of synergistic effect. Reduction of the electric contact resistance in hybrid composites may be related to a thinner polymer layer between the filler particles and the growing number of the particles which take part in the electroconductive circuit.

  4. Mechanical properties of nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connelly, A.J.; Hand, R.J.; Bingham, P.A.; Hyatt, N.C.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of nuclear waste glasses are important as they will determine the degree of cracking that may occur either on cooling or following a handling accident. Recent interest in the vitrification of intermediate level radioactive waste (ILW) as well as high level radioactive waste (HLW) has led to the development of new waste glass compositions that have not previously been characterised. Therefore the mechanical properties, including Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, hardness, indentation fracture toughness and brittleness of a series of glasses designed to safely incorporate wet ILW have been investigated. The results are presented and compared with the equivalent properties of an inactive simulant of the current UK HLW glass and other nuclear waste glasses from the literature. The higher density glasses tend to have slightly lower hardness and indentation fracture toughness values and slightly higher brittleness values, however, it is shown that the variations in mechanical properties between these different glasses are limited, are well within the range of published values for nuclear waste glasses, and that the surveyed data for all radioactive waste glasses fall within relatively narrow range.

  5. AGC 2 Irradiated Material Properties Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrbaugh, David Thomas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Advanced Reactor Technologies Graphite Research and Development Program is conducting an extensive graphite irradiation experiment to provide data for licensing of a high temperature reactor (HTR) design. In past applications, graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high temperature gas cooled reactor designs. , Nuclear graphite H 451, used previously in the United States for nuclear reactor graphite components, is no longer available. New nuclear graphite grades have been developed and are considered suitable candidates for new HTR reactor designs. To support the design and licensing of HTR core components within a commercial reactor, a complete properties database must be developed for these current grades of graphite. Quantitative data on in service material performance are required for the physical, mechanical, and thermal properties of each graphite grade, with a specific emphasis on data accounting for the life limiting effects of irradiation creep on key physical properties of the HTR candidate graphite grades. Further details on the research and development activities and associated rationale required to qualify nuclear grade graphite for use within the HTR are documented in the graphite technology research and development plan.

  6. Simultaneously improving the mechanical and electrical properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) composites by high-quality graphitic nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Weng, Lin; Zhu, Hanxing; Zhang, Fan; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di

    2017-12-07

    Although carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great potential for enhancing the performance of polymer matrices, their reinforcement role still needs to be further improved. Here we implement a structural modification of multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) to fully utilize their fascinating mechanical and electrical properties via longitudinal splitting of MWCNTs into graphitic nanoribbons (GNRs). This nanofiller design strategy is advantageous for surface functionalization, strong interface adhesion as well as boosting the interfacial contact area without losing the intrinsic graphitic structure. The obtained GNRs have planar geometry, quasi-1D structure and high-quality crystallinity, which outperforms their tubular counterparts, delivering a superior load-bearing efficiency and conductive network for realizing a synchronous improvement of the mechanical and electrical properties of a PVA-based composite. Compared to PVA/CNTs, the tensile strength, Young's modulus and electrical conductivity of the PVA/GNR composite at a filling concentration of 3.6 vol.% approach 119.1 MPa, 5.3 GPa and 2.4 × 10 -4 S m -1 , with increases of 17%, 32.5% and 5.9 folds, respectively. The correlated mechanics is further rationalized by finite element analysis, the generalized shear-lag theory and the fracture mechanisms.

  7. Irradiation creep of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    Displacement damage of graphite by neutron irradiation causes graphite to change dimensions. This dimensional instability requires careful attention when graphite is used as as moderator and reflector material in nuclear devices. Natural gradients in flux and temperature result in time-varying differential growth generating stresses similar to thermal stresses with an ever increasing temperature gradient. Graphite, however, does have the ability to creep under irradiation, allowing the stress intensity to relax below the fracture strength of the material. Creep strain also serves to average the radiation-induced strains, thus contributing to the stability of the core. As the dimensional instability is a function of temperature, so are the creep characteristics of graphite, and it is of interest to generalize the available data for extension to more extreme conditions of fluence and temperature. Irradiation creep of graphite is characterized by two stages of creep; a primary stage that saturates with time and a secondary stage that is generally assumed to be linear and constant with time. Virtually all past studies have not considered primary creep in detail primarily because there is limited available data at the very low fluences required to saturate primary creep. It is the purpose of this study to carefully examine primary creep in detail over the irradiation temperature range of 150 to 1000 degree C. These studies also include the combined effects of creep, differential growth, and structural changes in graphite by irradiation. 3 refs., 5 figs

  8. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; R. Bratton

    2007-09-01

    This technology development plan is designed to provide a clear understanding of the research and development direction necessary for the qualification of nuclear grade graphite for use within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor. The NGNP will be a helium gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Considerable effort will be required to ensure that the graphite performance is not compromised during operation. Based upon the perceived requirements the major data needs are outlined and justified from the perspective of reactor design, reatcor performance, or the reactor safety case. The path forward for technology development can then be easily determined for each data need. How the data will be obtained and the inter-relationships between the experimental and modeling activities will define the technology development for graphite R&D. Finally, the variables affecting this R&D program are discussed from a general perspective. Factors that can significantly affect the R&D program such as funding, schedules, available resources, multiple reactor designs, and graphite acquisition are analyzed.

  9. Nondestructive evaluation method on mechanical property change of graphite components in the HTGR by ultrasonic wave propagation with grain/pore microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taiju; Ishihara, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Oxidation damage is one of the crucial factors to degrade mechanical properties of graphite components in the HTGRs. The oxidation increases the porosity of graphite and, hence, results in degradation. In order to evaluate the oxidation damage at neutron irradiated conditions, a new analytical method by ultrasonic wave propagation characteristics was developed. Irradiation effects, a dimensional change and a pinning of dislocations in crystals, on the propagation characteristics in graphite are taken into consideration in the method. It was shown that an equivalent velocity of the wave in graphite is increased by the irradiation, and that a signal height of a propagated waveform is increased by the irradiation, and it decreases with increasing porosity caused by the oxidation. The Young's modulus for an ideal graphite polycrystals without pore was evaluated by considering the wave velocity in them in order to evaluate the change of the apparent modulus at simultaneous irradiated and oxidized conditions as an application of the developed method. It was also shown that the oxidation-induced change of the modulus is appropriately evaluated by the method, suggesting that it is possible to evaluate the change for the irradiated conditions. It can be said from this study that the developed method is promising to evaluate the oxidation damage on graphite components in the HTGRs by nondestructive way. (author)

  10. Enhanced photovoltaic properties in graphitic carbon nanospheres networked TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite based dye sensitized solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Radhe [Department of Physics and Institute for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States); Sahoo, Satyaprakash, E-mail: satya504@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Institute for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States); Chitturi, Venkateswara Rao [Department of Physics and Institute for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States); Williams, Joseph D. [Department of Biomedical and Chemical Engineering, Syracuse University, L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science, Syracuse, NY (United States); Resto, Oscar [Department of Physics and Institute for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States); Katiyar, Ram S., E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.uprrp.edu [Department of Physics and Institute for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States)

    2015-08-25

    Highlights: • Nano size graphitic carbon nanospheres were prepared from MWCNTs. • TiO{sub 2}/GCNS composite was used as the photoanode in dye-sensitized solar cell. • An improved photovoltaic performance with GCNS–TiO{sub 2} composite was noticed. - Abstract: In this work, we report a novel carbon based TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite electron injection layer (photoanode) toward the improved performance of DSSCs. Graphitic carbon nanospheres (GCNSs) were synthesized by a unique acidic treatment of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. GCNS–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites with different concentrations of GCNSs (ranging from 5 to 20 μL) were prepared to use as photoanodes in DSSCs. Structural and morphological properties of GCNS–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and ultra-high resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques, respectively. A systematic increment in the short circuit current density (J{sub SC}) and open circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) of DSSC was observed by increasing GCNS concentration up to an optimal value, possibly due to the combined effect of slight rise in quasi-Fermi level and higher carrier transport rate in the resultant composite. Thus, a significant enhancement of ∼47% in the efficiency of DSSC containing GCNS–TiO{sub 2} photoanode was observed as compare to DSSC with pure TiO{sub 2} photoanode.

  11. Preparation, characterization and thermal properties of binary nitrate salts/expanded graphite as composite phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Junbing; Huang, Jin; Zhu, Panpan; Wang, Changhong; Li, Xinxi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The expanded graphite enhanced thermal conductivity coefficient greatly. • The aqueous solution method adopting ultrasonic was utilized to disperse EG. • The combination of composite was physical without chemical reaction. • The reduction on total latent heat was slight after the adding EG. - Abstract: The binary nitrate salts/expanded graphite (EG) composite phase change material (PCM) were prepared via adding different mass rate of EG to binary nitrate salts consisting of NaNO 3 and KNO 3 (6:4) by aqueous solution method adopting ultrasonic. The morphology and chemical composition of EG and the composite PCM were characterized and investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scan electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), respectively. Laser thermal conductivity instrument and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) were employed to measure thermo physical properties. Drawing the conclusion from investigation, that EG had enhanced thermal conductivity coefficient which largely increased to 4.884 W/(m K) and reduced total latent heat by mostly 11.0%. The morphology and phase structure results indicated that EG were well dispersed into and physically combined with molten salts. In general, the prepared composite PCM could be a suitable phase change material for thermal energy storage

  12. New insights into canted spiro carbon interstitial in graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Barbary, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    The self-interstitial carbon is the key to radiation damage in graphite moderator nuclear reactor, so an understanding of its behavior is essential for plant safety and maximized reactor lifetime. The density functional theory is applied on four different graphite unit cells, starting from of 64 carbon atoms up to 256 carbon atoms, using AIMPRO code to obtain the energetic, athermal and mechanical properties of carbon interstitial in graphite. This study presents first principles calculations of the energy of formation that prove its high barrier to athermal diffusion (1.1 eV) and the consequent large critical shear stress (39 eV-50 eV) necessary to shear graphite planes in its presence. Also, for the first time, the gamma surface of graphite in two dimensions is calculated and found to yield the critical shear stress for perfect graphite. Finally, in contrast to the extensive literature describing the interstitial of carbon in graphite as spiro interstitial, in this work the ground state of interstitial carbon is found to be canted spiro interstitial.

  13. The Nubase2012 evaluation of nuclear properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audi, G.; Sun, X.; Blachot, J.; Kondev, F.G.; Wang, M.; Pfeiffer, B.; MacCormick, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the NUBASE2012 evaluation that contains the recommended values for nuclear and decay properties of nuclides in their ground and excited isomeric (T 1/2 ≥100 ns) states. All nuclides for which some experimental information is known are considered. NUBASE2012 covers all up to date experimental data published in primary (journal articles) and secondary (mainly laboratory reports and conference proceedings) references, together with the corresponding bibliographical information. During the development of NUBASE2012, the data available in the 'Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File' (ENSDF) database were consulted, and critically assessed of their validity and completeness. Furthermore, a large amount of new and somewhat older experimental results that were missing in ENSDF were compiled, evaluated and included in NUBASE2012. The atomic mass values were taken from the 'Atomic Mass Evaluation' (AME2012, second and third parts of the present issue). In cases where no experimental data were available for a particular nuclide, trends in the behavior of specific properties in neighboring nuclei (TNN) were examined. This approach allowed to estimate, whenever possible, values for a range of properties, and are labeled in NUBASE2012 as 'non-experimental' (flagged '#'). Evaluation procedures and policies that were used during the development of this database are presented, together with a detailed table of recommended values and their uncertainties. (authors)

  14. Scalable Multifunctional Ultra-thin Graphite Sponge: Free-standing, Superporous, Superhydrophobic, Oleophilic Architecture with Ferromagnetic Properties for Environmental Cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Hamed Hosseini; Patino, Daisy; Mutlu, Zafer; Romero, Paige; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-02-24

    Water decontamination and oil/water separation are principal motives in the surge to develop novel means for sustainability. In this prospect, supplying clean water for the ecosystems is as important as the recovery of the oil spills since the supplies are scarce. Inspired to design an engineering material which not only serves this purpose, but can also be altered for other applications to preserve natural resources, a facile template-free process is suggested to fabricate a superporous, superhydrophobic ultra-thin graphite sponge. Moreover, the process is designed to be inexpensive and scalable. The fabricated sponge can be used to clean up different types of oil, organic solvents, toxic and corrosive contaminants. This versatile microstructure can retain its functionality even when pulverized. The sponge is applicable for targeted sorption and collection due to its ferromagnetic properties. We hope that such a cost-effective process can be embraced and implemented widely.

  15. First-principles investigations of the magnetic properties of graphite boron nitride sheet induced by Fe doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaohui; Wang, Wenwei; Zhang, Dengyu; Lu, Wei; Fan, Bingbing

    2010-05-26

    The first-principles spin polarization method is used to investigate the magnetic properties of graphite boron nitride (g-BN) sheet induced by Fe doping. We find that a nitrogen or boron atom substituted by Fe can induce a magnetic moment. From standard Mulliken population analysis, we also find that the magnetic moment is mainly dominated by Fe 3d states. Using Heisenberg exchange coupling theory, we study the exchange coupling mechanisms by constructing two-Fe centers in g-BN. The results show the presence of relatively strong exchange coupling for two-Fe substituted two-B atoms and the coupling is ferromagnetic. For the case of two-Fe substituted two-N atoms, the coupling is antiferromagnetic and the exchange coupling is very weak. The paper enriches recent molecular magnetic investigations.

  16. A study of the relationship between microstructure and oxidation effects in nuclear graphite at very high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, I.-Hsuan; Tzelepi, Athanasia; Patterson, Eann A.; Yeh, Tsung-Kuang

    2018-04-01

    Graphite is used in the cores of gas-cooled reactors as both the neutron moderator and a structural material, and traditional and novel graphite materials are being studied worldwide for applications in Generation IV reactors. In this study, the oxidation characteristics of petroleum-based IG-110 and pitch-based IG-430 graphite pellets in helium and air environments at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1600 °C were investigated. The oxidation rates and activation energies were determined based on mass loss measurements in a series of oxidation tests. The surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Although the thermal oxidation mechanism was previously considered to be the same for all temperatures higher than 1000 °C, the significant increases in oxidation rate observed at very high temperatures suggest that the oxidation behavior of the selected graphite materials at temperatures higher than 1200 °C is different. This work demonstrates that changes in surface morphology and in oxidation rate of the filler particles in the graphite materials are more prominent at temperatures above 1200 °C. Furthermore, possible intrinsic factors contributing to the oxidation of the two graphite materials at different temperature ranges are discussed taking account of the dominant role played by temperature.

  17. Study on the property of low friction complex graphite-like coating containing tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuoping; Feng, Lajun; Shen, Wenning

    2018-03-01

    In order to enhance equipment lifetime under low oil or even dry conditions, tantalum was introduced into the graphite-like coating (GLC) by sputtering mosaic targets. The results showed that the introduction of Ta obviously reduced the friction coefficient and hardness of the GLC, while improved the wearability. When the atomic percentage of Ta was larger than 3%, the steady friction coefficient was lower than 0.01, suggesting the coating exhibited super lubricity. When the content of Ta was about 5.0%, the average friction coefficient was 0.02 by a sliding friction test under load of 20 N in unlubricated condition. Its average friction coefficient reduced by 75%, compared with that of control GLC (0.0825).

  18. Graphite Microstructural Characterization Using Time-Domain and Correlation-Based Ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, James [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-12-06

    Among techniques that have been used to determine elastic modulus in nuclear graphites, ultrasonic methods have enjoyed wide use and standards using contacting piezoelectric tranducers have been developed to ensure repeatability of these types of measurements. However, the use of couplants and the pressures used to effectively couple transducers to samples can bias measurements and produce results that are not wholly related to the properties of the graphite itself. In this work, we have investigated the use of laser ultrasonic methods for making elastic modulus measurements in nuclear graphites. These methods use laser-based transmitters and receivers to gather data and do not require use of ultrasonic couplants or mechanical contact with the sample. As a result, information directly related to the elastic responses of graphite can be gathered even if the graphite is porous, brittle and compliant. In particular, we have demonstrated the use of laser ultrasonics for the determination of both Young’s modulus and shear modulus in a range of nuclear graphites including those that are being considered for use in future nuclear reactors. These results have been analyzed to assess the contributions of porosity and microcracking to the elastic responses of these graphites. Laser-based methods have also been used to assess the moduli of NBG-18 and IG-110 where samples of each grade were oxidized to produce specific changes in porosity. These data were used to develop new models for the elastic responses of nuclear graphites and these models have been used to infer specific changes in graphite microstructure that occur during oxidation that affect elastic modulus. Specifically, we show how ultrasonic measurements in oxidized graphites are consistent with nano/microscale oxidation processes where basal plane edges react more readily than basal plane surfaces. We have also shown the use of laser-based methods to perform shear-wave birefringence measurements and have shown

  19. New graphite/salt materials for high temperature energy storage. Phase change properties study; Nouveaux materiaux graphite/sel pour le stockage d'energie a haute temperature. Etude des proprietes de changement de phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, J

    2007-07-15

    This work is a contribution to the study of new graphite/salt composites dedicated to high temperature energy storage ({>=}200 C). The aim is to analyse and to understand the influence of both graphite and composite microstructure on the phase change properties of salts. This PhD is carried out within the framework of two projects: DISTOR (European) and HTPSTOCK (French). The major contributions of this work are threefold: 1) An important database (solid-liquid phase change properties) is provided from the DSC analysis of six salts and the corresponding composites. 2) Rigorous modeling of salts melting in confined media in several geometries are proposed to understand why, during the first melting of the compression elaborated composites, problems of salt leakage are observed. These models show that the materials morphology is responsible for these phenomena: the graphite matrix restrains the volume expansion due to salt melting: salt melts under pressure, which leads to a melting on a large temperature range and to a loss of energy density. Sensitivity analysis of parameters (geometric and physic) shows that matrix rigidity modulus is the parameter on which it is necessary to act during the composites elaboration to blur this phenomenon. 3) Finally, this work proposes a thermodynamic formulation of both surface/interface phenomena and the presence of dissolved impurities being able to explain a melting point lowering. It seems that the melting point lowering observed ({approx} 5 C) are mainly due to the presence of dissolved impurities (brought by graphite) in the liquid, along with an additional Gibbs-Thomson effect ({approx} 1 C, related to the size of the clusters crystals). (author)

  20. A micro-mechanical analysis of thermo-elastic properties and local residual stresses in ductile iron based on a new anisotropic model for the graphite nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andriollo, Tito; Thorborg, Jesper; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2016-01-01

    analysis to verify its consistency with the room-temperature elastic properties of ductile iron measured at the macro scale. Subsequently, it is used to investigate the formation of local residual stresses around the graphite particles by simulating the manufacturing process of a typical ferritic ductile......In this paper, the thermo-elastic behavior of the graphite nodules contained in ductile iron is derived on the basis of recent transmission electron microscopy investigations of their real internal structure. The proposed model is initially validated by performing a finite element homogenization...

  1. Improved Thermal Property of a Multilayered Graphite Nanoplatelets Filled Silicone Resin Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin; Zhang, Haiyan; Tang, Muyao; Tu, Wenying; Zhang, Xiubin

    2015-02-01

    We produced graphite nanoplatelets (GNP)/silicone resin composites at various loadings. The utilized GNPs were characterized by two-dimensional structure with high aspect ratio (~1810), and the GNP with approximately 10-30 nm thickness and 10-50 µm in length evenly dispersed throughout the resin matrix, which enables that GNPs effectively act as thermally conductive medium, thus contributed considerably to the formation of an efficient three-dimensional network for heat flow. The thermal conductivities of 5, 10, 15, and 20 wt.% GNP composite were 0.35, 1.02, 1.32, and 2.01 W/(m K), and were ca. 0.9, 4.7, 6.3, and 10.2 times higher than that of silicone resin at room temperature, respectively. The thermal conductivity decreased with elevated temperature in 25-200 °C, which was reminiscent at higher loading. Differential scanning calorimeter analysis showed that GNP addition increased the curing temperature of silicone resin from 90 to 119 °C, probably by hindering the free movement (mobility) of the silicone chains. The result showed that the GNP not only reduced the CTE but also improved the thermal stability of composite simultaneously.

  2. Preparation and thermal energy storage properties of paraffin/expanded graphite composite phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhengguo; Zhang, Ni; Peng, Jing; Fang, Xiaoming; Gao, Xuenong; Fang, Yutang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► EG was obtained by microwave irradiation to prepare the paraffin/EG composite PCM. ► Composite PCM was characterized by XRD to investigate the chemical compatibility. ► Temperature profiles of the composite PCM were obtained during thermal energy storage. -- Abstract: The paraffin/expanded graphite (EG) composite phase change material (PCM) was prepared by absorbing liquid paraffin into EG, in which paraffin was chosen as the PCM. EG was produced by microwave irradiation performed at room temperature. It was found that the EG prepared at 800 W irradiation power for 10 s exhibited the maximum sorption capacity of 92 wt% for paraffin. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that paraffin was uniformly dispersed in the pores of EG. Differential scanning calorimeter analysis indicated that the melting temperature of the composite PCM was close to that of paraffin, and its latent heat was equivalent to the calculated value based on the mass fraction of paraffin in the composite. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the composite PCM was just a combination of paraffin with EG, and no new substance was produced. Thermal energy storage performance of the composite PCM was tested in a latent thermal energy storage (LTES) system. Transients of axial and radial temperature profiles were obtained in the LTES for the composite PCM and paraffin. The thermal energy storage charging duration for the composite PCM was reduced obviously compared to paraffin.

  3. Mechanical and Electrical Properties of Styrene-Isoprene-Styrene Copolymer Doped with Expanded Graphite Nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenko Špitalský

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular dynamics of a triblock copolymer and of expanded graphite nanoplatelets were investigated. Composites were prepared using the solution technique. The effects of filler addition and of filler-matrix interactions were investigated using dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. Only one relaxation was observed by DRS, which was associated with the relaxation of the main polymer chain. Both DRS and DMA demonstrated that the addition of the filler does not cause a significant change in either the temperature of the relaxation or its activation energy, which suggests the presence of weak interactions between the filler and matrix. The storage modulus of the composites increased with increasing filler content. The composite containing 8% filler exhibited a storage modulus increase of approximately 394% in the rubber area. Using the DC electrical conductivity measurements, the electrical percolation threshold was determined to be approximately 5%. The dielectric permittivity and conductivity in the microwave region were determined, confirming that percolating behavior and the critical threshold concentration.

  4. FIRE-RESISTANCE PROPERTIES RESEARCH OF “WATER GLASS - GRAPHITE MICROPARTICLES” COMPOSITE MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Pitukhin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. Research results of the fire-resistance for “water glass - graphite microparticles” composite material (CM are given. The method for fire-resistance test of the micro composition is suggested in order to determine the limit state of the experimental samples under hightemperature action. Method. Test-benchequipment being used for research includes metering devices of temperature and time, as well as laboratory electric furnace PL20 with a maximum temperature in the chamber up to 1250ºC. Fire-resistance limit for the test samples of composite material is determined by the loss of insulating ability (I. For that purpose, the time is obtained from the test beginning with the standard temperature mode up to a limiting condition. Main Results. In accordance with the requirements of regulatory documents fire-resistance limit I15 has been obtained equal to 15 minutes. The qualitative and quantitative phase analysis of the CM structure has been done. By the study of samples by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy we have determined that the material retains the same chemical structure with a monotonic heating above 700° C. Practical Relevance. The composite material with obtained characteristics can be used as a protective coating for building constructions with the aim of fire-resistance enhancement and fuel hazard reduction.

  5. Blunt indentation of core graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, M.; McEnaney, B.

    1996-01-01

    Blunt indentation experiments were carried out on unoxidized and thermally oxidised IM1-24 graphite as a model to simulate local point stresses acting on graphite moderator bricks. Blunt indentation of unoxidized graphite initiates cracks close to the region of maximum tensile stress at the edge of the indentation. Cracks propagate and converge to form a cone of material. Failure is catastrophic, typically forming three pieces of graphite and ejecting the cone referred to above. The failure mode under indentation loading for highly oxidised graphite (weigh loss > 40%) is different from that for the unoxidized graphite. There is no longer a distinct crack path, the indentation is much deeper than in the case of the unoxidized graphite, and there is a region of crushed debris beneath the indentation, producing a crater-like structure. The reduction in the compressive fracture stress, σ cf , under indentation loading with increasing fractional weight loss on oxidation, x, can be fitted to σ cf /σ 0 = exp-[5.2x] where σ 0 is the compressive fracture stress of the unoxidized graphite. This indicates that the effect of thermal oxidation on indentation fracture stress is more severe than the effects of radiolytic oxidation on conventional strengths of nuclear graphites. (author). 8 refs, 12 figs

  6. Impedance of electrochemically modified graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdić, Katja; Kvastek, Krešimir; Horvat-Radošević, Višnja

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, EIS, has been applied for characterization of electrochemically modified graphite electrodes in the sulphuric acid solution. Graphite modifications were performed by potential cyclization between potentials of graphite oxide formation/reduction, different number of cycles, and prolonged reduction steps after cyclization. Impedance spectra measured at two potential points within double-layer region of graphite have been successfully modeled using the concept of porous electrodes involving two different electrolyte diffusion paths, indicating existence of two classes of pores. The evaluated impedance parameter values show continuous changes with stages of graphite modification, indicating continuous structural changes of pores by number of potential cycles applied. Differences of impedance parameter values at two potential values indicate the potential induced changes of solution properties within the pores of modified graphite.

  7. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  8. Staging properties of potassium-ammonia ternary graphite intercalation compounds at high ammonia pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, X. W.; Solin, S. A.

    1989-04-01

    The pressure dependence of the (00l) x-ray diffraction patterns of the ternary graphite intercalation compound K(NH3)xC24 has been studied in the range 0.5-11 kbar (for which x~4.5) using a diamond anvil cell. A special apparatus for loading the cell with liquid ammonia at room temperature has been constructed and is briefly described. In these experiments, the pressure-transmitting fluid was also an intercalant, namely ammonia. Therefore, the chemical potential of this species was linearly coupled to the applied pressure in contrast to the usual case where the pressure-transmitting fluid is chemically passive. The pressure dependences of the basal spacings and of the relative intensities of key reflections have been measured, as have the compressibilities of the stage-1 and stage-2 components of the two-phase system. Basal-spacing anomalies and anomalies in the relative intensities occur at pressures of ~3.5 and 8.0 kbar and are tentatively attributed to in-plane coordination changes in the potassium-ammonia ratio. Using thermodynamic arguments and Le Chatelier's principle we show quantitatively that a staging phase transition from pure stage-1 phase to an admixture of stage-1 and stage-2 is expected with increased pressure above 10 bar in agreement with experiment. The saturation ammonia compositions (x values) of the admixed stages are found to be 4.5 and 5.4 for the stage-1 and -2 components, respectively. This result is interpreted as evidence that the composition is not sterically limited but is determined by the binding energy of ammonia for potassium and by the perturbation to this energy from the guest-host interaction.

  9. Electrical, Thermal, and Morphological Properties of Poly(ethylene terephthalate-Graphite Nanoplatelets Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basheer A. Alshammari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphite nanoplatelets (GNP were incorporated with poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET matrix by melt-compounding technique using minilab compounder to produce PET-GNP nanocomposites, and then the extruded nanocomposites were compressed using compression molding to obtain films of 1 mm thickness. Percolation threshold value was determined using percolation theory. The electrical conductivity, morphology, and thermal behaviors of these nanocomposites were investigated at different contents of GNP, that is, below, around, and above its percolation threshold value. The results demonstrated that the addition of GNP at loading >5 wt.% made electrically conductive nanocomposites. An excellent electrical conductivity of ~1 S/m was obtained at 15 wt.% of GNP loading. The nanocomposites showed a typical insulator-conductor transition with a percolation threshold value of 5.7 wt.% of GNP. In addition, increasing screw speed enhanced the conductivity of the nanocomposites above its threshold value by ~2.5 orders of magnitude; this behavior is attributed to improved dispersion of these nanoparticles into the PET matrix. Microscopies results exhibited no indication of aggregations at 2 wt.% of GNP; however, some rolling up at 6 wt.% of GNP contents was observed, indicating that a conductive network has been formed, whereas more agglomeration and rolling up could be seen as the GNP content is increased in the PET matrix. These agglomerations reduced their aspect ratio and then reduced their reinforcement efficiency. NP loading (>2 wt.% increased degree of crystallinity and improved thermal stability of matrix slightly, suggesting that 2 wt.% of GNP is more than enough to nucleate the matrix.

  10. Polymer Nanocomposites Made with Unmodified Graphite or Carbon Nanotubes: Role of Dispersion in Optimizing Mechanical and Thermal Properties and Electrical Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Junichi; Wakabayashi, Katsuyuki; Brunner, Philip; Pierre, Cynthia; Torkelson, John

    2009-03-01

    Polymer nanocomposites made with carbon-based nanofiller have the potential to achieve unprecedented, multifunctional property enhancements in comparison with other nanocomposite systems. Here, we describe research in which we prepare nanocomposites with polymers that are not amenable to solution-based processing, such as polypropylene and poly(ethylene terephthalate). Solid-state shear pulverization is used singly or in conjunction with melt processing to obtain well-dispersed polymer/graphite and polymer/carbon nanotube nanocomposites. We report record improvements in properties of unoriented films of polypropylene nanocomposites, including Young's modulus, crystallization rate, and thermal degradation temperature. We also characterize electrical conductivity of such nanocomposites and note that the dispersion characteristics necessary to achieve maximum mechanical and thermal properties differ from those needed to maximize electrical conductivity. The potential of and challenges with using unmodified graphite as a filler in polymer nanocomposites will be discussed.

  11. A Nanotube Surface Reinforced Graphite Fiber Exhibiting Significantly Enhanced Properties, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nanotechnology which includes carbon nanotubes has the potential to produce materials that exhibit properties beyond those expected from conventional materials which...

  12. Frequency dependence of electrical properties of polyvinylidene fluoride/graphite electrode waste/natural carbon black composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insiyanda, D. R.; Indayaningsih, N.; Prihandoko, B.; Subhan, A.; Khaerudini, D. S.; Widodo, H.; Destyorini, F.; Chaer, A.

    2018-03-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVdF) is a semi-crystalline thermoplastic material with remarkably high piezoelectric coefficient and an attractive polymer matrix for micro-composite with superior mechanical and electrical properties. The conductive filler is obtained from Graphite Electrode Waste (GEW) and Natural Carbon Black (NCB). The variation of composite content (%) of PVdF/NCB/GEW were 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 95/0/5, 95/2.5/2.5. This experiment employed dry dispersion method for material mixing. The materials were then moulded using hot press machine with compression parameters of P = 5.5 MPa, T = 150 °C, t = 60 minutes, A = 5×5×(0.2 - 0.4) cm3. The electrical conductivity properties of pure PVdF, as well as PVdF/GEW, PVdF/NCB, and PVdF/NCB/GEW composites were investigated in a frequency range of 100 to 100000 Hz. The PVdF/GEW sample obtained the highest electrical conductivity. It is concluded that GEW and NCB can be incorporated into PVdF as a conductive filler to increase the conductivity of conductive material composite without solvent.

  13. Effects of resin content and preparing conditions on the properties of polyphenylene sulfide resin/graphite composite for bipolar plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Li-gang; Li, Ai-ju; Yin, Qiang [Key Laboratory for Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Shandong Key Laboratory of Engineering Ceramics, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Wang, Wei-qiang [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Lin, Heng; Zhao, Yi-bo [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2008-03-15

    In the paper, a kind of polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) resin/graphite (G) composite for bipolar plate was prepared by using the PPS resin as adhesive and simple hot pressing. The influences of the resin content, the molding temperature and holding time on the conductivity and the bending strength of the PPS/G composite bipolar plate were investigated firstly and then the optimum content and the preparing conditions of the composite were obtained. The experimental results show that the electrical conductivity decreases and the bending strength reveals a serrated variation with increase in PPS resin content; when the holding time is certain, the conductivity decreases and the bending strength increases with the molding temperature increasing. The experimental results further show that the effect of the holding time on the properties of the composite is different at different molding temperatures. The PPS/G composite with 20% PPS resin content has electrical conductivity of 118.9 S cm{sup -1} and bending strength of 52.4 MPa when it molded at 380 C for 30 min, and has electrical conductivity of 105 S cm{sup -1}, bending strength of 55.7 MPa when it molded at 390 C for 30 min. The properties of the composites can meet the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE). (author)

  14. Evaluation of co-cokes from bituminous coal with vacuum resid or decant oil, and evaluation of anthracites, as precursors to graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyathi, Mhlwazi S.

    2011-12-01

    Graphite is utilized as a neutron moderator and structural component in some nuclear reactor designs. During the reactor operaction the structure of graphite is damaged by collision with fast neutrons. Graphite's resistance to this damage determines its lifetime in the reactor. On neutron irradiation, isotropic or near-isotropic graphite experiences less structural damage than anisotropic graphite. The degree of anisotropy in a graphite artifact is dependent on the structure of its precursor coke. Currently, there exist concerns over a short supply of traditional precursor coke, primarily due to a steadily increasing price of petroleum. The main goal of this study was to study the anisotropic and isotropic properties of graphitized co-cokes and anthracites as a way of investigating the possibility of synthesizing isotropic or near-isotropic graphite from co-cokes and anthracites. Demonstrating the ability to form isotropic or near-isotropic graphite would mean that co-cokes and anthracites have a potential use as filler material in the synthesis of nuclear graphite. The approach used to control the co-coke structure was to vary the reaction conditions. Co-cokes were produced by coking 4:1 blends of vacuum resid/coal and decant oil/coal at temperatures of 465 and 500 °C for reaction times of 12 and 18 hours under autogenous pressure. Co-cokes obtained were calcined at 1420 °C and graphitized at 3000 °C for 24 hours. Optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed oxidation and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the products. It was found that higher reaction temperature (500 °C) or shorter reaction time (12 hours) leads to an increase in co-coke structural disorder and an increase in the amount of mosaic carbon at the expense of textural components that are necessary for the formation of anisotropic structure, namely, domains and flow domains. Characterization of graphitized co-cokes showed that the quality, as expressed by the degree of

  15. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  16. Development of a pencil-type single shield graphite quasi-adiabatic calorimeter and comparison of its performance with a double-shield graphite calorimeter for the measurement of nuclear heat deposition rate in a fusion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joneja, O.P.; Rosselet, M.; Ligou, J.; Gardel, P.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, heat deposition rate measurements were reported that used a quasi-adiabatic double-shield graphite calorimeter. It was found that for a better understanding of nuclear heating due to incident radiation, having a calorimeter that could be conveniently moved axially and radially inside large material blocks would be advisable. Here, a simpler design, based on three elements, i.e., core, jacket, and shield is conceived. The fabrication and testing details are presented, and the performance of the current calorimeter is compared with a double-shield calorimeter under similar conditions. Such a system is found to be extremely sensitive and can be employed successfully at the LOTUS facility for future nuclear heat deposition rate measurements in large blocks of materials. The current design paves the way for the convenient testing of a large amount of kerma factor data required for constructing future fusion machines. The same configuration with minor changes can be extended to most of the fusion materials of interest. The core of the new calorimeter measures 11 mm in diameter and height and has overall dimensions of 24 mm in diameter and 180 mm in height. The response of the calorimeter is measured by placing it in front of the Haefely neutron generator. 12 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs

  17. Path dependent models to predict property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperatures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kok, S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Property changes occur in materials subjected to irradiation. The bulk of experimental data and associated empirical models are for isothermal irradiation. The form that these isothermal models take is usually closed form expressions in terms...

  18. Temperature-dependent thermal properties of a paraffin phase change material embedded with herringbone style graphite nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warzoha, Ronald J.; Weigand, Rebecca M.; Fleischer, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The thermal properties of a PCM with nanofibers are determined. • The solid-phase thermal conductivity scales exponentially with volume fraction. • The liquid-phase thermal conductivity is only enhanced beyond a critical percolation threshold. • The nanoscale interface resistance depends on the nanoparticle’s dimensionality. • The thermal diffusivity and volumetric heat capacity of the nanoenhanced PCMs are found. - Abstract: In many studies, carbon nanoparticles with high values of thermal conductivity (10–3000 W/m K) have been embedded into phase change thermal energy storage materials (PCMs) in order to enhance their bulk thermal properties. While a great deal of work to date has focused on determining the effect of these nanoparticles on a PCM’s solid phase thermal properties, little is known about their effect on its liquid phase thermal properties. Thus, in this study, the effect of implanting randomly oriented herringbone style graphite nanofibers (HGNF, average diameter = 100 nm, average length = 20 μm) on the bulk thermal properties of an organic paraffin PCM (IGI 1230A, T melt = 329.15 K) in both the solid and liquid phase is quantified. The bulk thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity and thermal diffusivity of HGNF/PCM nanocomposites are obtained as a function of temperature and HGNF volume loading level. It is found that the property enhancement varies significantly depending on the material phase. In order to explain the difference between solid and liquid phase thermal properties, heat flow at the nanoparticle–PCM and nanoparticle–nanoparticle interfaces is examined as a function of HGNF loading level and temperature. To do this, the solid and liquid phase thermal boundary resistances (TBRs) between the nanoparticles and the surrounding PCM and/or between contacting nanoparticles are found. Results suggest that the TBR at the HGNF–PCM interface is nearly double the TBR across the HGNF–HGNF interface in

  19. Surface properties and graphitization of polyacrylonitrile based fiber electrodes affecting the negative half-cell reaction in vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, J.; Bruns, M.; Dixon, D.; Nefedov, A.; Wöll, Ch.; Scheiba, F.; Ehrenberg, H.; Roth, C.; Melke, J.

    2016-07-01

    Carbon felt electrodes for vanadium redox flow batteries are obtained by the graphitization of polyacrylonitrile based felts at different temperatures. Subsequently, the surface of the felts is modified via thermal oxidation at various temperatures. A single-cell experiment shows that the voltage efficiency is increased by this treatment. Electrode potentials measured with reference electrode setup show that this voltage efficiency increase is caused mainly by a reduction of the overpotential of the negative half-cell reaction. Consequently, this reaction is investigated further by cyclic voltammetry and the electrode activity is correlated with structural and surface chemical properties of the carbon fibers. By Raman, X-ray photoelectron and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy the role of edge sites and oxygen containing functional groups (OCFs) for the electrochemical activity are elucidated. A significant activity increase is observed in correlation with these two characteristics. The amount of OCFs is correlated with structural defects (e.g. edge sites) of the carbon fibers and therefore decreases with an increasing graphitization degree. Thus, for the same thermal oxidation temperature carbon fibers graphitized at a lower temperature show higher activities than those graphitized at a higher temperature.

  20. The optical properties and photocatalytic activity of CdS-ZnS-TiO{sub 2}/Graphite for isopropanol degradation under visible light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmawati, Fitria, E-mail: fitria@mipa.uns.ac.id; Wulandari, Rini, E-mail: riniwulandari55@yahoo.com; Murni, Irvinna M., E-mail: irvinna-mutiara@yahoo.com; Mudjijono, E-mail: mbahparto@yahoo.com [Research Group of Solid State Chemistry & Catalysis, Chemistry Department, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A Kentingan, Surakarta, 57126 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    This research prepared a photocatalyst tablet of CdS-ZnS-TiO{sub 2} on a graphite substrate. The synthesis was conducted through chemical bath deposition method. The graphite substrate used was a waste graphite rod from primary batteries. The aims of this research are studying the crystal structure, the optical properties and the photocatalytic activity of the prepared material. The photocatalytic activity was determined through isopropanol degradation. The result shows that the TiO{sub 2}/Graphite provide direct transition gap energy at 2.91 eV and an indirect transition gap energy at 3.21 eV. Deposition of CdS-ZnS changed the direct transition gap energy to 3.01 eV and the indirect transition gap energy to 3.22 eV. Isopropanol degradation with the prepared catalyst produced new peaks at 223-224 nm and 265-266 nm confirming the production of acetone. The degradation follows first order with rate constant of 2.4 × 10{sup −2} min{sup −1}.

  1. A pore structure model for the gas transport property changes, initial oxidation rates and cumulative weight loss of AGR moderator graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.A.V.

    1985-09-01

    A quantitative model has been developed for the gas transport property variation, cumulative weight loss and initial oxidation rates of AGR moderator graphite. The model utilises the theory of dynamic moments of the pore structure to calculate the changes in physical properties brought about by radiolytic corrosion taking place within the graphite porosity. In order to account for the behaviour of the initial rate curves, and the weight loss data obtained it is necessary to invoke the presence of a group of cylindrical pore and a group of small slab-shaped pores. The latter are methane depleted. This is in addition to the pore group involved in gas transport which is best represented by cylinders of mean radius 2.13 μm. The model satisfactorily predicts the experimental weight loss data obtained from experiments in the DIDO 6V3 and BFB loops. (author)

  2. Effect of graphite content on magnetic and mechanical properties of TiC-TiN-Mo-Ni cermets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Man; Yang, Qingqing; Xiong, Weihao; Huang, Bin; Ruan, Linji; Mao, Qiao; Li, Shengtao

    2018-04-01

    TiC-10TiN-6Mo-xGr-yNi (mol%, Gr represents graphite, x = 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and y = 15, 30) cermets were prepared by powder metallurgy method, in order to inverstigate the effect of Gr content on magnetic and mechanical properties of TiC-TiN-Mo-Ni cermets. Room-temperature (RT) saturation magnetization (Ms) and remanence (Mr) of cermets increased with increasing x. This was mainly attributed to that the total content of non-ferromagnetic carbonitride-forming elements Ti and Mo in Ni-based binder phase decreased with increasing x. At the same x, cermets for y = 15 had lower RT Ms and Mr than those for y = 30. Cermets containing more than 2 mol% Gr became ferromagnetic at RT. Bending strength of cermets first increased and then decreased with increasing x. It reached the maximum at x = 2, mainly due to high total content of solutes Ti and Mo in Ni-based binder phase, and moderate thickness of outer rim of Ti(C,N) ceramic grains. Hardness of cermets was not significantly affected by x, mainly due to the combined action of the decrease of the total content of Ti and Mo in binder phase and the increase of the volume fraction of ceramic grains. At the same x, cermets for y = 15 had lower bending strength and higher hardness than those for y = 30.

  3. Effect of medium on friction and wear properties of compacted graphite cast iron processed by biomimetic coupling laser remelting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Qingchun; Zhou Hong; Wang Chengtao; Zhang Wei; Lin Pengyu; Sun Na; Ren Luquan

    2009-01-01

    Stimulated by the cuticles of soil animals, an attempt to improve the wear resistance of compact graphite cast iron (CGI) with biomimetic units on the surface was made by using a biomimetic coupled laser remelting process in air and various thicknesses water film, respectively. The microstructures of biomimetic units were examined by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction was used to describe the microstructure and identify the phases in the melted zone. Microhardness was measured and the wear behaviors of biomimetic specimens as functions of different mediums as well as various water film thicknesses were investigated under dry sliding condition, respectively. The results indicated that the microstructure zones in the biomimetic specimens processed with water film are refined compared with that processed in air and had better wear resistance increased by 60%, the microhardness of biomimetic units has been improved significantly. The application of water film provided finer microstructures and much more regular grain shape in biomimetic units, which played a key role in improving the friction properties and wear resistance of CGI.

  4. Gross properties of nuclei and nuclear excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, H.

    1989-01-01

    These proceedings contain the articles presented at the named workshop. These concern new developments in nuclear structure studies, relativistic heavy ion reactions, and advanced techniques for nuclear spectroscopy. (HSI)

  5. Gross properties of nuclei and nuclear excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, H.

    1992-01-01

    Heavy ion reactions are the main topics of the workshop. The different aspects that are discussed are: nuclear matter at relativistic energies, the transformation to quark matter, particle production, spallation and theoretical models for nuclear reaction kinetics. (BBOE)

  6. Gross properties of nuclei and nuclear excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, H.

    1991-01-01

    These proceedings contain the articles presented at the named workshop. They deal with nuclear multifragmentation, heavy ion reaction kinetics, breakup and transfer processes in heavy ion reactions, the production of hypernuclei, nuclear structure in the framework of the quark model and QCD, and particle production in nuclear reactions. (HSI)

  7. Optical reflection and transmission properties of exfoliated graphite from a graphene monolayer to several hundred graphene layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skulason, H S; Gaskell, P E; Szkopek, T

    2010-07-23

    The optical reflection contrast and optical transmission contrast of graphitic films on glass ranging in thickness from a monolayer to the limit of bulk graphite have been experimentally measured. For samples with more than 10 graphene layers where optical contrast quantization becomes difficult to observe, atomic force microscopy was used to measure the sample thickness. The visible optical reflection and transmission of thin graphitic films is found to depend strongly on the real component of the optical conductance per graphene layer, and comparatively weakly on the imaginary component of optical conductance. This observation in part explains the significant variation in the refractive index of graphene and graphite reported in the literature to date. Spectroscopic measurements reveal a strong dispersion in the optical conductance of even a 10 layer film, consistent with an imaginary conductance arising from virtual transitions at the band edges of the pi and sigma bands at the M and Gamma points, respectively.

  8. Effects of Casting Size on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Spheroidal and Compacted Graphite Cast Irons: Experimental Results and Comparison with International Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceschini, L.; Morri, Alessandro; Morri, Andrea

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effects of casting size (10-210 mm) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of spheroidal (SGI) and compacted (CGI) graphite cast irons. A comparison of the experimental mechanical data with those specified by ISO standards is presented and discussed. The study highlighted that the microstructure and mechanical properties of SGI (also known as ductile or nodular cast iron) are more sensitive to casting size than CGI (also known as vermicular graphite cast irons). In particular, in both types of cast iron, hardness, yield strength and ultimate tensile strength decreased, with increasing casting size, by 27% in SGI and 17% in CGI. Elongation to failure showed, instead, an opposite trend, decreasing from 5 to 3% in CGI, while increasing from 5 to 11% in SGI. These results were related to different microstructures, the ferritic fraction being more sensitive to the casting size in SGI than CGI. Degeneration of spheroidal graphite was observed at casting size above 120 mm. The microstructural similarities between degenerated SGI and CGI suggested the proposal of a unified empirical constitutional law relating the most important microstructural parameters to the ultimate tensile strength. An outstanding result was also the finding that standard specifications underestimated the mechanical properties of both cast irons (in particular SGI) and, moreover, did not take into account their variation with casting size, at thicknesses over 60 mm.

  9. Deformation and fracture of irradiated polygranular pile grade A reactor core graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heard, P.J.; Wootton, M.R.; Moskovic, R.; Flewitt, P.E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Mechanical properties of PGA nuclear graphite specimens were tested. → Load-displacement characteristics were consistent with quasi-brittle behaviour. → Micro-cracks observed in non-linear part of load-displacement curve pre-peak load. → Micro-testing showed surface tilts consistent with twinning. → Irradiated specimens failed at 20% lower load for 15% weight loss material. - Abstract: Pile grade A (PGA) graphite is used as a moderator in UK gas cooled nuclear reactors. This is a polygranular, aggregate material with quasi-brittle behaviour. When exposed to the service environment the material is subject to radiolytic oxidation that results in mass loss and an attendant increase in porosity. In the present work both unirradiated and irradiated small specimens of PGA graphite have been subjected to diametral compression. A novel trench-probe loading method is also described that allows micro-scale specimens prepared by focused ion beam milling to be fractured in a focused ion beam work station. This allows the fracture characteristics of selected regions of the graphite microstructure to be interrogated. The load-displacement and fracture characteristics of both the unirradiated and irradiated PGA graphite are compared and shown to be consistent with quasi-brittle behaviour. In addition, surface features consistent with elastically induced twins are observed associated with filler particles of the graphite. The results are discussed with respect to the quasi-brittle behaviour of this polygranular graphite.

  10. Effect of oil and oil with graphite on tribological properties of glass ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Present work deals with the experimental investigation of tribological properties of GF-filled polymer composites considering three velocities, i.e. 0⋅5, 1 and 2⋅0 m/s and loads ranging from 15⋅7 N to. 45⋅13 N keeping rest of the parameters constant. The test has been carried out for three materials,. PTFE + 15% ...

  11. Properties of Graphite Intercalates and of Aircraft Structural Metals and Alloys. A Comprehensive Data Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-05-01

    aid Bittel, J.T., "Rea- ommended Property and Reaction Kinetics Da for Us. In Evaluating a Light-Water-Cooled Reactor Loss-of-Coolant Incidet Involving...Electric Co., Cilncinati, Ohio, GEMP-643, 14 pp., 1968. 13 6477 Fleluhouse, L B., "Thermal Conductivity of Aircraft Structural and Reactor Materials...For extrap olation of data to higher temperatures and for estimation of values for the molten aloy, * the same methods as those discussed in the

  12. Hot magnetized nuclear matter: Thermodynamic and saturation properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaei, Z. [Shiraz University, Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bordbar, G.H. [Shiraz University, Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center for Excellence in Astronomy and Astrophysics (CEAA-RIAAM)-Maragha, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    We have used a realistic nuclear potential, AV{sub 18}, and a many-body technique, the lowest-order constraint variational (LOCV) approach, to calculate the properties of hot magnetized nuclear matter. By investigating the free energy, spin polarization parameter, and symmetry energy, we have studied the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the saturation properties of magnetized nuclear matter. In addition, we have calculated the equation of state of magnetized nuclear matter at different temperatures and magnetic fields. It was found that the flashing temperature of nuclear matter decreases by increasing the magnetic field. In addition, we have studied the effect of the magnetic field on liquid gas phase transition of nuclear matter. The liquid gas coexistence curves, the order parameter of the liquid gas phase transition, and the properties of critical point at different magnetic fields have been calculated. (orig.)

  13. Gross properties of nuclei and nuclear excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, H.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain the invited and contributed papers presented at the named workshop. They deal with special topics in high- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics. Especially considered are the quark-gluon plasma, ultrarelativistic heavy ion reactions, and the application of QCD to nuclear structure calculations. (HSI)

  14. Gross properties of nuclei and nuclear excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, H.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings contain the articles presented at the named workshop. They are concerned with the application of the results from high-energy physics to nuclear structure calculations, thermodynamics of nuclear matter, and kinetics of heavy ion reactions with special regard to relativistic processes. (HSI)

  15. Seismic Study of TMSR Graphite Core Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Derek; Huang Chao Chao

    2014-01-01

    Graphite plays an important role in the thorium based molten salt reactor (TMSR) nuclear energy system. The graphite core acts as reflector, moderator and structural material in the TMSR core. The graphite core assembly has hundreds of graphite bricks interconnected with graphite keys and dowels. In other words, the graphite core is a kind of discrete stack structure with highly nonlinear dynamic behaviour, and it will show totally different dynamics responses comparing with welded structure or bolted structure when subjected to the seismic loading. Hence it is important to investigate the dynamics characteristics of the TMSR graphite core assembly and to meet the seismic design requirement. The most popular way to investigate the nonlinearity of graphite core is to do finite element analyses. Due to the large number of nonlinear behaviour caused by contacts, collisions and impacts between the graphite bricks and keys, the computational costs on seismic analysis of the whole core would be very high. Many methods have been developed in the past 20 years to conquer this difficulty. In this work substructure method and finite element method have been used to study the dynamic behaviour of a stack of graphite bricks under seismic loading. The numerical results of these two methods will be compared. The results show that the super element method is an efficient method for graphite core seismic analyses. (author)

  16. On the thermal properties of polarized nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.Y.M.; Montasser, S.S.; Ramadan, S.

    1979-08-01

    The thermal properties of polarized nuclear matter are calculated using Skyrme III interaction modified by Dabrowski for polarized nuclear matter. The temperature dependence of the volume, isospin, spin and spin isospin pressure and energies are determined. The temperature, isospin, spin and spin isospin dependence of the equilibrium Fermi momentum is also discussed. (author)

  17. Variability of mechanical properties of nuclear pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrequin, P.; Soulat, P.

    1980-01-01

    Causes of variability of mechanical properties nuclear pressure vessel steels are reviewed and discussed. The effects of product shape and size, processing history and heat treatment are investigated. Some quantitative informations are given on the scatter of mechanical properties of typical pressure vessel components. The necessity of using recommended or standardized properties for comparing mechanical properties before and after irradiation in pin pointed. (orig.) [de

  18. Investigation on wear behavior of graphite baII under different pneumatic conveying environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhipeng; Zheng Yanhua; Shi Lei; Yu Suyuan

    2014-01-01

    An experimental platform was built in the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) to investigate the wear behavior of the graphite ball under the operational condition of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel handling system. In this experimental platform, a series of experiments were carried out under different pneumatic conveying environments with the graphite balls, which were made of the material same as the fuel element matrix graphite (A3) of the 10 MW high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTR-10). The effect of the pneumatic conveying condition on the wear rate of graphite ball has been investigated, and the results include: (1) There is an obvious linear relationship between the wear rate and the feeding velocity of graphite ball elevated in the stainless steel elevating tube, and the wear rate will increase with the increase of the feeding velocity. (2) The wear rate of graphite ball under helium environment is significantly greater than that under air and nitrogen environments, which is caused by the different effects of various gas environments on mechanical properties of graphite. (author)

  19. Nuclear materials thermo-physical property database and property analysis using the database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yeong Seok

    2002-02-01

    It is necessary that thermo-physical properties and understand of nuclear materials for evaluation and analysis to steady and accident states of commercial and research reactor. In this study, development of nuclear materials thermo-properties database and home page. In application of this database, it is analyzed of thermal conductivity, heat capacity, enthalpy, and linear thermal expansion of fuel and cladding material and compared thermo-properties model in nuclear fuel performance evaluation codes with experimental data in database. Results of compare thermo-property model of UO 2 fuel and cladding major performance evaluation code, both are similar

  20. Irradiation damage in graphite. The works of Professor B.T. Kelly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    The irradiation damage produced in graphite by energetic neutrons (>100eV) has been extensively studied because of the use of graphite as a moderator in thermal nuclear reactors. In recent times, graphite has been adopted as the protective tiling of the inner wall of experimental fusion systems and property changes due to fusion neutrons have become important. The late Professor B.T. Kelly reviewed the work carried out on the irradiation behaviour of graphite since the 1940s. This work is particularly timely as the scale of research into the effects of fission neutrons has been greatly reduced and many of the active researchers have retired. In recent years, new programmes of work are being formulated for the use of graphite in both the field of high temperature reactor systems and fusion systems. It is therefore important that the knowledge gained by Professor Kelly and other workers is not lost but passed on to future generations of nuclear scientists and engineers. This paper reviews Professor Kelly's last work, it also draws on the experience gained during many long discussions with Brian during the years he worked closely with the present graphite team at AEA Technology. It is hoped to publish his work in full in the near future. (author). 13 refs, 14 figs, 3 tabs

  1. Determination of incompressibility and saturation properties of nuclear matter from nuclear masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satpathy, L.

    1996-01-01

    The binding energy, saturation density and compression modulus of infinite nuclear matter are fundamental constants of nature. We have determined these values from nuclear masses through our mass formula based on infinite nuclear matter (INM) model, developed over a number of years. Recently we have improved this model in which important terms Eke exchange coulomb, proton form factor, charge asymmetry and pairing cancel exactly, giving rise to a clean and reliable determination of saturation properties of INM from nuclear masses. Starting with two body effective interaction we first show at a microscopic level using the results of Hartree-Fock and energy density formalism study that INM and not Bethe-Weizsaecker model is the appropriate one for extraction of such properties. The saturation properties are obtained using 1371 masses of 1993 mass table in this improved INM model. The density thus obtained agrees with that of electron scattering data and the Hartree-Fock calculations, and for the first time, using nuclear mass formula, the radius constant r 0 = 1.138 fm and energy a ν = -16.11 MeV corresponding to infinite nuclear matter are consistently obtained from the same source. Thus the so-called longstanding r 0 -anomaly is satisfactorily resolved with. We are able to extract convincingly the nuclear matter incompressibility K ∞ to be 288 ± 28 MeV using the same source of nuclear masses as input. Thus all the three important properties are consistently obtained from a single source. (author). 17 refs., 5 tabs

  2. Effects of fast-neutron damage from 0 to 42 x 1021 neutrons/CM2 on the physical properties of near-isotropic grades of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, W.H.; Kennedy, C.R.; Eatherly, W.P.

    1975-01-01

    The characterization of property changes in various grades of near-isotropic, ''binderless'' grades of graphite as functions of fluence accumulated at 715 0 C from 0 to 42 x 10 21 neutrons/cm 2 (E greater than 50 keV) was made. Generally, the average coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) from 20 to 600 0 C and the room-temperature values for strengths, fracture strains, Young's moduli, shear moduli, and calculated figures of merit (FOM) for resistance to thermal shock all ultimately decreased with fluence. (U.S.)

  3. National strategy of nuclear power intellectual property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bo Huaitao

    2008-01-01

    The IP strategy includes four strategic levels: international level, national level, industry level and enterprise level. The national nuclear power IP strategy is an industry level strategy, which is also one part of national IP strategy, permeating with the IP strategy of the international level and enterprise level mutually. Commencing from the angles of the national level and the industry level, the author tries to provide a reference for IP strategy by an initial study about IP strategy in nuclear power industry.. The author holds that independent innovation is at the root of strategic establishment; enterprise is the main body for strategic implementation; and evaluating index must be consummated in the strategic evaluation. (authors)

  4. Magnetic properties of strongly asymmetric nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, M.; Wojcik, W.

    1988-01-01

    We investigate stability of neutron matter containing a small proton admixture with respect to spin fluctuations. We establish conditions under which strongly asymmetric nuclear matter could acquire a permanent magnetization. It is shown that if the protons are localized, the system becomes unstable to spin fluctuations for arbitrarily weak proton-neutron spin interactions. For non-localized protons there exists a threshold value of the spin interaction above which the system can develop a spontaneous polarization. 12 refs., 2 figs. (author)

  5. Graphite oxidation in HTGR atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growcock, F.B.; Barry, J.J.; Finfrock, C.C.; Rivera, E.; Heiser, J.H. III

    1982-01-01

    On-going and recently completed studies of the effect of thermal oxidation on the structural integrity of HTGR candidate graphites are described, and some results are presented and discussed. This work includes the study of graphite properties which may play decisive roles in the graphites' resistance to oxidation and fracture: pore size distribution, specific surface area and impurity distribution. Studies of strength loss mechanisms in addition to normal oxidation are described. Emphasis is placed on investigations of the gas permeability of HTGR graphites and the surface burnoff phenomenon observed during recent density profile measurements. The recently completed studies of catalytic pitting and the effects of prestress and stress on reactivity and ultimate strength are also discussed

  6. Studies of mechanical properties and irradiation damage nucleation of HTGR graphites. Progress report, February 1, 1978--March 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrower, P.A.

    1979-04-01

    Irradiation damage effects to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite by 1.5, 5.5 and 15 MeV neutrons are briefly described. Studies of the effects of oxidation on the structure and strength of Stackpole 2020, Great Lakes H440 and POCO AXF-5Q graphites have been continued using H 2 O vapor as the oxidant. The effect of burn-off on compressive strength is similar to that of CO 2 , but structural effects are quite different. The kinetics of the C--CO 2 reaction are being studied using low CO 2 partial pressures in a total pressure of one atmosphere. The necessary modifications to existing apparatus have been made and experimental work is commencing

  7. Development of spheroidized graphite cast iron material for spent fuel transport and storage cask and investigation of its mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsumura, O.; Shimizu, S.; Murata, M.; Tanaka, Y.; Maruoka, M.; Sato, I.; Suzuki, K.

    1993-01-01

    We manufactured a 500mm thick ferrite base, spheroidized graphite cast iron cylindrical casting with a circular bottom (2000mm outside diameter and 2000mm height) for trial purpose. We then investigated the basic quality and performance by sampling specimens from various locations of the product. The results of the study can be summarized as follows. (1) Although there were some casting wrinkles, the overall surface of the casting was found to be good, without blowholes and other defects. (2) The nodularity tended to decline at the center of the interior where solidification occurred slowly. However, the nodularity was more than 75%, and no abnormal graphite was observed. Similarly, the ferrite area ratio had a tendency to decrease at the center, but it remained at more than 95%. (J.P.N.)

  8. Graphite nanoplatelets-modified PLA/PCL: effect of blend ratio and nanofiller localization on structure and properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kelnar, Ivan; Kratochvíl, Jaroslav; Kaprálková, Ludmila; Zhigunov, Alexander; Nevoralová, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 71, July (2017), s. 271-278 ISSN 1751-6161 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03194S Institutional support : RVO:61389013 Keywords : poly (epsilon-caprolactone) * poly (lactic acid) * graphite nanoplatelets Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 3.110, year: 2016

  9. Structure and tribological properties of steel after non-vacuum electron beam cladding of Ti, Mo and graphite powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataev, I.A.; Mul, D.O.; Bataev, A.A. [Novosibirsk State Technical University, K. Marks 20, 630073 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Lenivtseva, O.G., E-mail: lenivtseva_olga@mail.ru [Novosibirsk State Technical University, K. Marks 20, 630073 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Golkovski, M.G. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrentyev pr., 11, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Lizunkova, Ya.S. [Leibniz Universität Hannover, An der Universität, 2, 30823 Garbsen (Germany); Dostovalov, R.A. [Novosibirsk State Technical University, K. Marks 20, 630073 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    The non-vacuum electron beam cladding technique was used to fabricate layers alloyed with Ti, Mo and C on the surface of low-alloyed steel. Two types of experiments were carried out. In the first experiment, a mixture of Ti and graphite powders was used for cladding; in the second, a mixture of Ti, Mo and graphite powders was used for cladding. CaF{sub 2} powder or a mixture of CaF{sub 2} and LiF powders was used as flux. The thickness of the cladded layers was in the range of 2–2.2 mm. The structure of the layers was studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The microhardness after cladding of the layers fabricated by cladding of Ti and graphite powders was 8–9 GPa, while the microhardness of layers with Mo additions reached 11–12 GPa. The highest wear resistance at sliding friction and friction in abrasive environment was reached in the samples fabricated using Ti, Mo and graphite mixture due to the higher hardness and the martensite–austenite structure of the matrix. The wear resistance against fixed abrasive particles was 2.4 times higher compared to that of carburized and quenched steel. - Highlights: • Ti, C and Mo mixture of powders was cladded using non-vacuum electron beam treatment. • The depth of the cladded layers was 2.0 … 2.2 mm. • The microhardness of layer with Mo, Ti and C additions reached ~ 11 … 12 GPa. • The hardening of the layers caused by the formation of TiC particles and martensitic matrix • Wear resistance of cladded coatings was 2.4 higher than carburized steel.

  10. Investigation of mono/competitive adsorption of environmentally relevant ionized weak acids on graphite: impact of molecular properties and thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Ahmed M A; McPhedran, Kerry N; Moreira, Jesús; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2014-12-16

    The thermodynamics of adsorption and competitive interactions of five weak acids on a graphite surface was assessed in alkaline solutions. Adsorption of the acids in mono- and multicompound solutions followed their Freundlich isotherms which suggest a diversity of graphite adsorption sites as confirmed by the presence of carboxylic and phenolic groups observed on graphite surfaces. Thermodynamic calculations assigned the formation of the negatively charged assisted hydrogen bond (-CAHB) between ionized solutes and adsorbent surface groups as the possible adsorption mechanism. However, the similar pKa values of current acids resulted in comparable free energies for -CAHB formation (ΔG(-CAHB)) being less than solvation free energies (ΔGSolv). Thus, additional ΔG is supplemented by increased hydrophobicity due to proton exchange of ionized acids with water (ΔΔG Hydrophobicity). Adsorption capacities and competition coefficients indicated that ΔΔG Hydrophobicity values depend on the neutral and ionized acid Kow. Competitive adsorption implies that multilayer adsorption may occur via hydrophobic bonding with the CH3 ends of the self-assembled layer which affects the acid adsorption capacities in mixtures as compared to monocompound solutions. The determination of adsorption mechanisms will assist in understanding of the fate and bioavailability of emerging and classical weak acids released into natural waters.

  11. Updating irradiated graphite disposal: Project 'GRAPA' and the international decommissioning network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Anthony; Steinmetz, Hans-Jürgen; O'Sullivan, Patrick; Ojovan, Michael I

    2017-05-01

    Demonstrating competence in planning and executing the disposal of radioactive wastes is a key factor in the public perception of the nuclear power industry and must be demonstrated when making the case for new nuclear build. This work addresses the particular waste stream of irradiated graphite, mostly derived from reactor moderators and amounting to more than 250,000 tonnes world-wide. Use may be made of its unique chemical and physical properties to consider possible processing and disposal options outside the normal simple classifications and repository options for mixed low or intermediate-level wastes. The IAEA has an obvious involvement in radioactive waste disposal and has established a new project 'GRAPA' - Irradiated Graphite Processing Approaches - to encourage an international debate and collaborative work aimed at optimising and facilitating the treatment of irradiated graphite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of the graphite type in the mechanical properties of graphene nanosheets and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (GN/UHMWPE) nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, M.E. de A.; Coutinho, S.V.; Fim, F. de C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the mechanical properties of graphene nanosheets and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (GN/UHMWPE) nanocomposites. The graphene nanosheets were obtained by two methods: the first, from Graphite Micrograf HC11 after 8 hours in a ultrasound bath in 70% alcoholic solution; the second, from Graflake 9950 prepared by oxidizing with H 2 SO 4 /HNO 3 (4:1), followed by thermal expansion at 1050°C for 30 seconds and ultrasound bath for 20 hours. Both were oven dried for 24 hours at 110°C and subsequently added to the polymer in percentages of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% (w/w). The powders of the nanocomposites were mixed in a ball mill for 1 hour and molded by hot compression. XRD and SEM images was possible to verify that the Graflake's GN had higher delamination that the Micrograph's GN. The mechanical properties were affected in different percentages for each graphite type. (author)

  13. Temperature and radiolytic corrosion effects on the chlorine behaviour in nuclear graphite: consequences for the disposable of irradiated graphite from UNGG reactors; Effets de la temperature et de la corrosion radiolytique sur le comportement du chlore dans le graphite nucleaire: consequences pour le stockage des graphites irradies des reacteurs UNGG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaudey, C.E.

    2010-10-15

    This work concerns the dismantling of the UNGG reactor which have produced around 23 000 t of graphite wastes that ave to be disposed of according to the French law of June 206. These wastes contain two long-lived radionuclides ({sup 14}C and {sup 36}Cl) which are the main long term dose contributors. In order to get information about their inventory and their long term behaviour in case of water ingress into the repository, it is necessary to determine their location and speciation in the irradiated graphite after the reactor shutdown. This work concerns the study of {sup 36}Cl. The main objective is to reproduce its behaviour during reactor operation. For that purpose, we have studied the effects of temperature and radiolytic corrosion independently. Our results show a rapid release of around 20% {sup 36}Cl during the first hours of reactor operation whereas a much slower release occurs afterwards. We have put in evidence two types of chlorine corresponding to two different chemical forms (of different thermal stabilities) or to two locations (of different accessibilities). We have also shown that the radiolytic corrosion seems to enhance chlorine release, whatever the irradiation dose. Moreover, the major chemical form of chlorine is inorganic. (author)

  14. Rapid analysis of 14C and 3H in graphite and concrete for decommissioning of nuclear reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin

    2005-01-01

    /g graphite and 0.11 and 0.06Bq/g concrete, respectively. The cross contamination of C-14 and tritium in the preparation of samples is less than 0.2%. The interference of other radionuclides in the determination of C-14 and tritium in graphite is insignificant. The analytical accuracy, investigated...

  15. Effects of high temperature neutron irradiation on the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of fine-grained isotropic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, H.; Nomura, S.; Imai, H.; Oku, T.; Eto, M.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on the dimensional change, coefficient of thermal expansion(CTE), thermal conductivity, corrosion rate, Young's modulus and strengths were studied for the candidate graphite material IG-110 of the experimental very high temperature gas-cooled reactor(VHTR) after irradiation at 585 - 1273 deg C to neutron fluences of up to about 3 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ) in the JMTR and JRR-2, and to about 7 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ) in the HFR. The results were compared with the irradiation behaviors of other graphites. Dimensional shrinkage was observed in the whole irradiation temperature range, showing lower value than 2 %. The shrinkage rate showed the minimum in the irradiation temperature of around 850 deg C, followed by the increase for the samples irradiated at higher temperatures. The dimensional stability of the material was clarified to be almost the same with that of H451 graphite. The CTE, thermal resistivity and Young's modulus increased in the early stage of irradiation and then only the CTE decreased while the thermal resistivity and Young's modulus levelled off with further irradiation. The neutron fluence showing the maximum CTE shifted to the lower fluence with increasing irradiation temperature. The increases of both thermal resistivity and Young's modulus were remarkable for the samples irradiated at lower temperatures. Compressive and bending strengths measured at room temperature increased after irradiation as well. The corrosion rate with water-vapor of 0.65 % in helium at high temperatures decreased owing to irradiation and the reduction was independent of irradiation temperature and neutron fluence. The activation energy for the reaction was estimated to be the same before and after irradiation. (author)

  16. The effect of mineral fillers on the rheological, mechanical and thermal properties of halogen-free flame-retardant polypropylene/expandable graphite compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattausch, Hannelore; Laske, Stephan; Hohenwarter, Dieter; Holzer, Clemens

    2015-05-01

    In many polyolefin applications, such as electrical cables or automotive applications, the fire protection is a very important task. Unfortunately flame-retardant polymeric materials are often halogenated and form toxic substances in case of fire, which explains the general requirement to reduce the halogen content to zero. Non-halogenated, state-of-the-art flame retardants must be incorporated into the polymer in very high grades (> 40 wt%) leading to massive decrease in mechanical properties and/or processability. In this research work halogen-free flame-retardant polypropylene (PP) /expandable graphite (EG) were filled with minerals fillers such as layered silicates (MMT), magnesium hydroxide (MgOH), zeolite (Z) and expanded perlite (EP) in order to enhance the flame-retardant effect. The rheological, mechanical and thermal properties of these materials were investigated to gain more fundamental knowledge about synergistic combinations of flame-retardants and other additives. The rheological properties were characterized with a rotational rheometer with plate-plate setup. The EG/EP/PP compound exhibited the highest increase in viscosity (˜ 37 %). As representative value for the mechanical properties the Young's modulus was chosen. The final Young's modulus values of the twofold systems gained higher values than the single ones. Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) was utilized to investigate the material with respect to volatile substances and combustion behavior. All materials decomposed in one-step degradation. The EG filled compounds showed a significant increase in sample weight due to the expansion of EG. The combustion behavior of these materials was characterized by cone calorimeter tests. Especially combinations of expandable graphite with mineral fillers exhibit a reduction of the peak heat release rate during cone calorimeter measurements of up to 87% compared to pure PP.

  17. Nuclear properties with realistic Hamiltonians through spectral distribution theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vary, J.P.; Belehrad, R.; Dalton, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    Motivated by the need of non-perturbative methods for utilizing realistic nuclear Hamiltonians H, the authors use spectral distribution theory, based on calculated moments of H, to obtain specific bulk and valence properties of finite nuclei. The primary emphasis here is to present results for the binding energies of nuclei obtained with and without an assumed core. (Auth.)

  18. Statistical properties of the nuclear shell-model Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Hussein, M.S.; Oliveira, N.A. de

    1986-01-01

    The statistical properties of realistic nuclear shell-model Hamiltonian are investigated in sd-shell nuclei. The probability distribution of the basic-vector amplitude is calculated and compared with the Porter-Thomas distribution. Relevance of the results to the calculation of the giant resonance mixing parameter is pointed out. (Author) [pt

  19. Modelling fracture of aged graphite bricks under radiation and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atheer Hashim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The graphite bricks of the UK carbon dioxide gas cooled nuclear reactors are subjected to neutron irradiation and radiolytic oxidation during operation which will affect thermal and mechanical material properties and may lead to structural failure. In this paper, an empirical equation is obtained and used to represent the reduction in the thermal conductivity as a result of temperature and neutron dose. A 2D finite element thermal analysis was carried out using Abaqus to obtain temperature distribution across the graphite brick. Although thermal conductivity could be reduced by up to 75% under certain conditions of dose and temperature, analysis has shown that it has no significant effect on the temperature distribution. It was found that the temperature distribution within the graphite brick is non-radial, different from the steady state temperature distribution used in the previous studies [1,2]. To investigate the significance of this non-radial temperature distribution on the failure of graphite bricks, a subsequent mechanical analysis was also carried out with the nodal temperature information obtained from the thermal analysis. To predict the formation of cracks within the brick and the subsequent propagation, a linear traction–separation cohesive model in conjunction with the extended finite element method (XFEM is used. Compared to the analysis with steady state radial temperature distribution, the crack initiation time for the model with non-radial temperature distribution is delayed by almost one year in service, and the maximum crack length is also shorter by around 20%.

  20. Graphitic g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}-WO{sub 3} Composite: Synthesis and Photocatalytic Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doan, An Tran; Thi, Xuan Dieu Nguyen; Nguyen, Phi Hung; Thi, Viet Nga Nguyen; Vo, Vien [Quy Nhon Univ., Quy Nhon (Viet Nam); Kim, Sung Jin [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Graphitic g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}-WO{sub 3} composite was synthesized simply by decomposing melamine in the presence of WO{sub 3} at 500 .deg. C. The obtained material was characterized by XRD, SEM, IR and XPS. The results showed that the as-prepared composite exhibits orthorhombic WO{sub 3} phase coated by g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} and the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} decomposed completely with N-doped WO{sub 3} remaining at elevated calcination temperatures. The photocatalytic activity of the composite was evaluated by the photodegradation of methylene blue under visible light. An enhancement in photocatalytic activity for the graphitic g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}-WO{sub 3} composite compared to the conventional nitrogen-doped WO{sub 3} was observed, which can be attributed to the presence of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} in the material.

  1. Variability within a single type of polyacrylonitrile-based graphite felt after thermal treatment. Part II: chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabbow, Thomas J.; Trampert, Markus; Pokorny, Peter; Binder, Paul; Whitehead, Adam H.

    2015-01-01

    Graphite felts are often activated thermally before use in electrochemical reactors. This has the effect of improving wetting and decreasing charge-transfer resistance. In part I of this study, considerable variations were observed between two polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based felts from different production charges after thermal activation, despite both charges being of the same type of felt from one supplier. A difference due to bulk crystallinity or due to pronounced core-rim structures of the fibres has been excluded. In this second part a limitation from tarry coatings, which are a possible side products of graphitization, could not be corroborated. However, differences were ascribed to variations in the surface chemistry, which was characterised by Boehm method titration and cyclic voltammetry. The composition of the oxides is discussed together with the possible role they play in the activation and wetting of the felts. The rather high amount of oxides suggests that the Boehm method measures subsurface groups in addition to surface groups. The wetting quality of activated felts can be correlated well with the concentration of neutral quinone groups, characterised by cyclic voltammetry

  2. Effects of Holding Time on Thermomechanical Fatigue Properties of Compacted Graphite Iron Through Tests with Notched Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodrat, Sepideh; Riemslag, Ton A. C.; Kestens, Leo A. I.; Petrov, Roumen H.; Janssen, Michael; Sietsma, Jilt

    2013-05-01

    In cylinder heads of compacted graphite iron (CGI), the heating and cooling cycles can lead to localized cracking due to thermomechanical fatigue (TMF). Traditionally, TMF behavior is studied by thermal cycling of smooth specimens. The resulting number of cycles to failure ( N f) constitutes a single parameter that can be used to predict actual service failures. Nevertheless, there are also some drawbacks of the conventional testing procedures, most noticeably the prolonged testing times and a considerable scatter in test results. To address these drawbacks, TMF tests were performed using notched specimens, resulting in shorter testing times with less scatter. In the case of cast iron, artificial notches do not necessarily change the TMF behavior since the inherent graphite particles behave as internal notches. Using a notch depth of 0.2 mm, the effect of prolonged holding times (HT) on TMF lifetime was studied and a clear effect was found. Extended holding times were also found to be accompanied by relaxation of compressive stresses, causing higher tensile stresses to develop in the subsequent low temperature stages of the TMF cycles. The lifetimes in notched CGI specimens can be predicted by the Paris' fatigue crack growth model. This model was used to differentiate between the individual effects of stress level and holding times on TMF lifetime. Microstructural changes were evaluated by analyzing quantitative data sets obtained by orientation contrast microscopy based on electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD).

  3. Porous graphite electrodes for rechargeable ion-transfer batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, P.; Scheifele, W.; Haas, O. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The influence of preparation pressure and pore-forming additives on the properties of graphite-based, Li{sup +}-intercalating electrodes for ion-transfer batteries have been investigated. The electrochemical performance of graphite electrodes could be improved by adjusting the porosity. Specific charge of >300 Ah/kg (with respect to the graphite mass) could be achieved. (author) 4 figs., 2 refs.

  4. Nonlinear mean field theory for nuclear matter and surface properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boguta, J.; Moszkowski, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear matter properties are studied in a nonlinear relativistic mean field theory. We determine the parameters of the model from bulk properties of symmetric nuclear matter and a reasonable value of the effective mass. In this work, we stress the nonrelativistic limit of the theory which is essentially equivalent to a Skyrme hamiltonian, and we show that most of the results can be obtained, to a good approximation, analytically. The strength of the required parameters is determined from the binding energy and density of nuclear matter and the effective nucleon mass. For realistic values of the parameters, the nonrelativistic approximation turns out to be quite satisfactory. Using reasonable values of the parameters, we can account for other key properties of nuclei, such as the spin-orbit coupling, surface energy, and diffuseness of the nuclear surface. Also the energy dependence of the nucleon-nucleus optical model is accounted for reasonably well except near the Fermi surface. It is found, in agreement with empirical results, that the Landau parameter F 0 is quite small in normal nuclear matter. Both density dependence and momentum dependence of the NN interaction, but especially the former, are important for nuclear saturation. The required scalar and vector coupling constants agree fairly well with those obtained from analyses of NN scattering phase shifts with one-boson-exchange models. The mean field theory provides a semiquantitative justification for the weak Skyrme interaction in odd states. The strength of the required nonlinear term is roughly consistent with that derived using a new version of the chiral mean field theory in which the vector mass as well as the nucleon mass is generated by the sigma-field. (orig.)

  5. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products

  6. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, Todd [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-04-08

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission

  7. Thermal properties of nuclear matter under the periodic boundary condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otuka, Naohiko; Ohnishi, Akira

    1999-01-01

    We present the thermal properties of nuclear matter under the periodic boundary condition by the use of our hadronic nucleus-nucleus cascade model (HANDEL) which is developed to treat relativistic heavy-ion collisions from BNL-AGS to CERN-SPS. We first show some results of p-p scattering calculation in our new version which is improved in order to treat isospin ratio and multiplicity more accurately. We then display the results of calculation of nuclear matter with baryon density ρ b = 0.77 fm 3 at some energy densities. Time evolution of particle abundance and temperature are shown. (author)

  8. Statistical nuclear properties and synthesis of 138La

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheswa B. V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of the neutron deficient 138La nucleus has been a puzzle for a long time. It has not been clear whether it is produced through photodisintegration processes or neutrino induced reactions due to unavailability of experimental data for nuclear level densities and γ strength functions of 138,139La nuclei. In the present work these nuclear properties have been measured and are used to investigate the synthesis of 138La. The results support the neutrino interactions as a dominant production process for 138La.

  9. The Effect of Thermal Annealing on the Optical Properties of a-SiC:H Films Produced by DC Sputtering Methods: I. Graphite Target Case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusitra Munisa

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A study of the annealing effect on optical properties and disorder of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon (a-SiC:H films was undertaken. The films were prepared by sputtering technique using graphite target and silicon wafer in argon and hydrogen gas mixture, and then characterized by uv-vis (ultra violet-visible spectroscopy before and after annealing. Index of refraction n and absorption coefficient α of films have been determined from measurements of transmittance. The optical gap show small variation with annealing temperature, increasing with increasing annealing temperature up to 500 °C. An increase of annealing temperature leads to reduced film density and the amorphous network disorder. The experimental results are discussed in terms of deposition condition and compared to other experimental results.

  10. Boron coatings on graphite for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierson, H.O.; Mullendore, A.W.

    1979-01-01

    This study is an experimental investigation of boron coatings on graphite and the preliminary determination of some of their physical and nuclear related properties. The boron was obtained by the decomposition of diborane in argon at 500 0 C and one atm. Adhesion to the graphite (POCO AXF-5Q) was good if a slightly abraded surface was provided. The boron was pseudo-amorphous, had high purity with no visually observable porosity and the fractured surface showed no growth features. It was very hard (VHN 25 = 2400 kg/mm 2 ) and had good resistance to hydrogen ion erosion and arcing. It may, therefore, be a suitable candidate for first wall and limiter coatings in tokamak fusion reactors

  11. Characterization of radiation damage induced by swift heavy ions in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Christian

    2016-05-15

    Graphite is a classical material in neutron radiation environments, being widely used in nuclear reactors and power plants as a moderator. For high energy particle accelerators, graphite provides ideal material properties because of the low Z of carbon and its corresponding low stopping power, thus when ion projectiles interact with graphite is the energy deposition rather low. This work aims to improve the understanding of how the irradiation with swift heavy ions (SHI) of kinetic energies in the range of MeV to GeV affects the structure of graphite and other carbon-based materials. Special focus of this project is given to beam induced changes of thermo-mechanical properties. For this purpose the Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and glassy carbon (GC) (both serving as model materials), isotropic high density polycrystalline graphite (PG) and other carbon based materials like carbon fiber carbon composites (CFC), chemically expanded graphite (FG) and molybdenum carbide enhanced graphite composites (MoC) were exposed to different ions ranging from {sup 131}Xe to {sup 238}U provided by the UNILAC accelerator at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. To investigate structural changes, various in-situ and off-line measurements were performed including Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. Thermo-mechanical properties were investigated using the laser-flash-analysis method, differential scanning calorimetry, micro/nano-indentation and 4-point electrical resistivity measurements. Beam induced stresses were investigated using profilometry. Obtained results provided clear evidence that ion beam-induced radiation damage leads to structural changes and degradation of thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of graphite. PG transforms towards a disordered sp2 structure, comparable to GC at high fluences. Irradiation-induced embrittlement is strongly reducing the lifetime of most high-dose exposed accelerator components. For

  12. Preparation and properties of palmitic-stearic acid eutectic mixture/expanded graphite composite as phase change material for energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Nan; Yuan, Yanping; Du, Yanxia; Cao, Xiaoling; Yuan, Yaguang

    2014-01-01

    A novel composite PCM (phase change material) with PA-SA (palmitic-stearic acid) eutectic mixture as PCM and EG (expanded graphite) as supporting material was prepared. The optimum absorption ratio of PA-SA/EG (Palmitic-stearic acid/expanded graphite) composite PCM was determined as PA-SA:EG = 13:1 (by mass). Scanning electron microscope and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy results show that PA-SA was uniformly distributed in the porous network structure of EG due to the physical action. Thermal property and thermal stability of the PA-SA/EG composite PCM were characterized by DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) and TGA (thermogravimetric analysis). DSC results indicated that the melting and freezing temperatures and latent heats of PA-SA/EG were measured as 53.89 °C and 54.37 °C, and 166.27 J/g and 166.13 J/g. TGA test results revealed that PA-SA/EG had a good thermal stability in working temperature range. Thermal cycling test results showed PA-SA/EG had a good thermal reliability after 720 thermal cycles. Thermal conductivity of the composite PCM was measured as 2.51 W/m K, much higher than that of PA-SA. The thermal energy storage and release rates of PA-SA/EG were also increased due to the high thermal conductivity of EG. In conclusion, the prepared PA-SA/EG composite PCM can be acted as a potential material for thermal energy storage due to the acceptable thermal properties, good thermal reliability and stability, high thermal conductivity. - Highlights: • PA-SA/EG (Palmitic-stearic acid/expanded graphite) composite PCM was prepared. • Optimum absorption ratio of PA-SA in EG was obtained as 13:1 (by mass). • Thermal conductivity and performance of PA-SA/EG have been significate improved. • PA-SA/EG has a good thermal reliability and thermal stability

  13. Radiation behaviour of graphite for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shtrombakh, Ya.I.; Platonov, P.A.; Gurovich, B.A.; Alekseev, V.M.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations of different graphite materials, among with the standard reactor graphite manufacturing by electrode technology and a number of advanced graphites of new generation. During the investigation of radiation stability of standard reactor graphite the basic mechanisms of radiation damage of its structure were studied. With the help of transmission electron microscopy deformations and cracking of filler and binder were detected in the vicinity of the boundaries, separating these two components. Cracking begins with crystallite splitting and ends in full fracture of boundary layers. Such process of degradation can be explained by disjoint deformations resulting from difference in growth rate of filler and binder crystallites, in its turn caused by considerable difference between their sizes. It has been concluded that radiation stability of graphite may be improved by creating such graphite materials, in which the difference in sizes of crystallites of different structure components would be the minimal possible. When developing production technology of isotropic graphite for high temperature reactors, some progress was made towards the solution of this problem. Despite considerable swelling at high temperature this type of graphite appeared to be substantially less susceptible to the degradation of the structure and to deterioration of physico-mechanical properties. In addition to graphites manufactured by tradition technology, the graphite was investigated, in which pyrocarbon precipitated from gas phase under 1000 deg. C was used as binder. Carbon precipitated in such a way was non-graphitized at high temperatures and therefore it demonstrated sharp shrinkage under irradiation at high temperature, and shrinkage rate correlated with pyrocarbon quota in graphite structure. (author). 5 refs, 18 figs, 1 tab

  14. Electrochemically induced chemical sensor properties in graphite screen-printed electrodes: The case of a chemical sensor for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostaki, Vasiliki T.; Florou, Ageliki B.; Prodromidis, Mamas I.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Electrochemical treatment endows analytical characteristics to SPEs. → A sensitive chemical sensor for uranium is described. → Performance is due to a synergy between electrochemical treatment and ink's solvents. → The amount of the solvent controls the achievable sensitivity. - Abstract: We report for the first time on the possibility to develop chemical sensors based on electrochemically treated, non-modified, graphite screen-printed electrodes (SPEs). The applied galvanostatic treatment (5 μA for 6 min in 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 ) is demonstrated to be effective for the development of chemical sensors for the determination of uranium in aqueous solutions. A detailed study of the effect of various parameters related to the fabrication of SPEs on the performance of the resulting sensors along with some diagnostic experiments on conventional graphite electrodes showed that the inducible analytical characteristics are due to a synergy between electrochemical treatment and ink's solvents. Indeed, the amount of the latter onto the printed working layer controls the achievable sensitivity. The preconcentration of the analyte was performed in an electroless mode in an aqueous solutions of U(VI), pH 4.6, and then, the accumulated species was reduced by means of a differential pulse voltammetry scan in 0.1 M H 3 BO 3 , pH 3. Under selected experimental conditions, a linear calibration curve over the range 5 x 10 -9 to 10 -7 M U(VI) was constructed. The 3σ limit of detection at a preconcentration time of 30 min, and the relative standard deviation of the method were 4.5 x 10 -9 M U(VI) and >12% (n = 5, 5 x 10 -8 M U(VI)), respectively. The effect of potential interferences was also examined.

  15. Irradiation damage in graphite due to fast neutrons in fission and fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-09-01

    Gas cooled reactors have been in operation for the production of electricity for over forty years, encompassing a total of 56 units operated in seven countries. The predominant experience has been with carbon dioxide cooled reactors (52 units), with the majority operated in the United Kingdom. In addition, four prototype helium cooled power plants were operated in the United States and Germany. The United Kingdom has no plans for further construction of carbon dioxide units, and the last helium cooled unit was shutdown in 1990. However, there has been an increasing interest in modular helium cooled reactors during the 1990s as a possible future nuclear option. Graphite is a primary material for the construction of gas cooled reactor cores, serving as a low absorption neutron moderator and providing a high temperature, high strength structure. Commercial gas cooled reactor cores (both carbon dioxide cooled and helium cooled) utilise large quantities of graphite. The structural behaviour of graphite (strength, dimensional stability, susceptibility to cracking, etc.) is a complex function of the source material, manufacturing process, chemical environment, and temperature and irradiation history. A large body of data on graphite structural performance has accumulated from operation of commercial gas cooled reactors, beginning in the 1950s and continuing to the present. The IAEA is supporting a project to collect graphite data and archive it in a retrievable form as an International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties, with limited general access and more detailed access by participating Member States. Because of the large size of the database, the complexity of the phenomena and the number of variables involved, a general understanding of graphite behaviour is essential to the understanding and use of the data

  16. Graphite core stability during 'care and maintenance' and 'safe storage'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, A.J.; Marsden, B.J.; Sellers, R.M.; Pilkington, N.J.

    1998-01-01

    The current decommissioning strategy for the graphite-moderated reactors operated by Magnox Electric plc, Nuclear Electric Ltd and Scottish Nuclear Ltd is to delay dismantling and to initiate a monitored period of care and maintenance followed by a period of safe storage totaling up to 135 years. This philosophy has the considerable advantage of permitting the majority of radionuclides to decay, thereby minimising personnel dose during dismantling which itself will require far less complex remote-handling equipment. It also defers the disposal of the graphite and other components so that the provision of a deep land-based repository can be achieved. A comprehensive review of all relevant data on the chemical, physical and mechanical properties of the graphite and its potential reactions, including radioactivity transport, has been undertaken in order to demonstrate that there are no potential mechanisms which might lead to degradation of the core during the storage period. It is concluded that no significant experimental work is necessary to support the safe storage philosophy although, since the ingress of rainwater over long periods of time cannot be assumed incredible, a number of anomalies in chemical leaching rates may be worthy of re-examination. No other potential chemical reactions, such as the radiolytic formation of nitric acid leading to corrosion problems, are considered significant. (author)

  17. Thermophysical properties of graphite HOPG and HAPG in the solid state and under melting (from 2000 K up to 5000 K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvatimskiy, A. I.; Onufriev, S. V.; Konyukhov, S. A.

    2017-11-01

    Experiments with HOPG graphite grade showed that the melting temperature of graphite equals 4800-4900 K and that the melting of graphite is possible only at elevated pressures. The data were obtained for resistivity, specific heat and input (Joule) energy up to 5000 K. HAPG (Highly Annealing Pyrolytic Graphite) is a form of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. HAPG specimens in the form of strips (thickness 30 microns) were placed in a cell (between two plates of glass-sapphire). The specimen temperature was measured by a high speed pyrometer. The heat of fusion for both graphite grades (heated in a confined volume) was less (and specific heat – higher) than for the case with nearly free expansion. A possible reason for the observed effects is discussed in the report.

  18. Sulphur and nitrogen dual-doped mesoporous carbon hybrid coupling with graphite coated cobalt and cobalt sulfide nanoparticles: Rational synthesis and advanced multifunctional electrochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Anquan; Tan, Pengfei; Qiao, Lulu; Liu, Yi; Ma, Yongjin; Pan, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Doping-type carbon matrixes not only play a vital role on their electrochemical properties, but also are capable of suppressing the crush and aggregation phenomenon in the electrode reaction process for pristine metallic compound. Herein, graphite coated cobalt and cobalt sulfide nanoparticles decorating on sulphur and nitrogen dual-doped mesoporous carbon (Co@Co 9 S 8 /S-N-C) was fabricated by a combined hydrothermal reaction with pyrolysis method. Benefited from g-C 3 N 4 template and original synthetic route, as-obtained Co@Co 9 S 8 /S-N-C possessed high specific surface area (751.7m 2 g -1 ), large pore volume (1.304cm 3 g -1 ), S and N dual-doped component and relative integrated graphite skeleton, as results it was developed as decent oxygen reduction electro-catalyst and ultra-long-life Li-ion battery anode. Surprisingly, compared with commercial Pt/C, it displayed a higher half-wave potential (0.015V positive) and lower Tafel slop (66mVs -1 ), indicating its superior ORR activities. Moreover, the ultra-long-life cyclic performances were revealed for lithium ion battery, exhibiting the retention capacities of 652.1mAhg -1 after 610 cycles at 0.2Ag -1 , 432.1 and 405.7mAhg -1 at 5 and 10Ag -1 after 1000 cycles, respectively. We propose that the synergistic effect of structure and chemical component superiorities should be responsible for the remarkable electrochemical behaviors of the Co@Co 9 S 8 /S-N-C. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Properties of form-stable paraffin/silicon dioxide/expanded graphite phase change composites prepared by sol–gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Min; Wu, Zhishen; Tan, Jinmiao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite PCM was prepared with sol–gel method. ► The thermal conductivity of SiO 2 /paraffin/EG is 94.7% higher than paraffin. ► The latent heat of paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite is 104.4 J/g. -- Abstract: A form-stable paraffin/silicon dioxide (SiO 2 )/expanded graphite (EG) composite phase change material (PCM) was prepared by sol–gel method. Silica gel acts as the supporting material and EG is used to increase the thermal conductivity. The mass fractions of silicon oxide and graphite are 20.8% and 7.2%, respectively. The composite PCM was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method. Thermal properties and thermal stability of the composite PCM were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The result shows that paraffin was well dispersed in the network of silica gel and there is no chemical reaction between them. The phase change temperature of the paraffin/SiO 2 composite and the paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite are 27.53 °C and 27.72 °C, respectively. The latent heat of the paraffin/SiO 2 composite and the paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite are 112.8 J/g and 104.4 J/g, respectively. The thermal conductivity of the SiO 2 /paraffin composite and the SiO 2 /paraffin/EG composite are 28.2% and 94.7% higher than that of paraffin.

  20. Titania with Alkaline Treated Graphitic Carbon Nitride (g-C3N4) to Improve Photocatalysis Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei Han; Hak, Chen Hong; Saravanan, Pichiah; Leong, Kah Hon; Sim, Lan Ching

    2017-06-01

    The graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) was treated via alkaline hydrothermal treatment to change the porous structure of g-C3N4 to “tube-like” structure. The developed alkaline treated g-C3N4 (A-g-C3N4) was combined with P25 Degussa TiO2 for the competent removal of methylene blue (MB). The morphological changes increased the crystallite size and pore size of g-C3N4, causing a decrease in the specific surface area of A-g-C3N4. The pure g-C3N4 demonstrated the best degradation efficiency among the all samples due to its high specific surface area, low band gap energy and small pore size. The combination of both A-g-C3N4 and g-C3N4 with TiO2 did not exert significant effect on the degradation efficiency of MB owing to the low specific surface area, high band gap and large pore size. Thus concluding the degradation efficiency of organic dye is attributed predominantly to the factors of energy band gap, specific surface area and pore sizes.

  1. Study on the Comprehensive Properties and Microstructures of A3-3 Matrix Graphite Related to the High Temperature Purification Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwen Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning, a comparative analysis was made on the oxidation corrosion rate and ash content of A3-3 matrix graphite (MG pebbles lathed before and after high temperature purification (HTP treatment. Their oxidation corrosion rate and ash contents were almost identical, which indicated that the HTP process was to purify the entire MG pebbles and not limited on the surfaces. Furthermore, the multiple mechanical and thermal properties of MG treated without and with the treatment of HTP at ~1900°C were compared and their microstructure features were characterized as well. As the crush strength, oxidation corrosion rate, and erosion rate of MG without HTP treatment did not satisfy the specifications, the comprehensive properties and purity of MG with HTP were improved in various degrees through the HTP process so that all performances met the requirements of the A3-3 MG. The improvement of crush strength and erosion rate of MG in the HTP process could be mainly attributed to the upgradation of ordered microstructure and corresponding increase of density. However, the enhancement of oxidation corrosion rate was due to the synergistic effects of microstructural optimization and reduction of impurity elements, especially the transition metal elements of MG in the HTP process.

  2. Assisted heterogeneous multinucleation and bubble growth in semicrystalline ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer/expanded graphite nanocomposite foams: Control of morphology and viscoelastic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yousefzade

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite foams of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA reinforced by expanded graphite (EG were prepared using supercritical nitrogen in batch foaming process. Effects of EG particle size, crosslinking of EVA chains and foaming temperature on the cell morphology and foam viscoelastic properties were investigated. EG sheet surface interestingly provide multiple heterogeneous nucleation sites for bubbles. This role is considerably intensified by incorporating lower loadings of EG with higher aspect ratio. The amorphous and non-crosslinked domains of EVA matrix constitute denser bubble areas. Higher void fraction and more uniform cell structure is achieved for non-crosslinked EVA/EG nanocomposites foamed at higher temperatures. With regard to the structural variation, the void fraction of foam samples decreases with increasing the EG content. Storage and loss moduli were analyzed to study the viscoelastic properties of nanocomposite foams. Surprisingly, the foaming process of EVA results in a drastic reduction in loss and storage moduli regardless of whether the thermoplastic matrix contains EG nanofiller or not. For the EVA/EG foams with the same composition, the nanocomposite having higher void fraction shows relatively lower loss modulus and more restricted molecular movements. The study findings have verified that the dynamics of polymer chains varies after foaming EVA matrix in the presence of EG.

  3. Quantitative properties of clustering within modern microscopic nuclear models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volya, A.; Tchuvil’sky, Yu. M.

    2016-01-01

    A method for studying cluster spectroscopic properties of nuclear fragmentation, such as spectroscopic amplitudes, cluster form factors, and spectroscopic factors, is developed on the basis of modern precision nuclear models that take into account the mixing of large-scale shell-model configurations. Alpha-cluster channels are considered as an example. A mathematical proof of the need for taking into account the channel-wave-function renormalization generated by exchange terms of the antisymmetrization operator (Fliessbach effect) is given. Examples where this effect is confirmed by a high quality of the description of experimental data are presented. By and large, the method in question extends substantially the possibilities for studying clustering phenomena in nuclei and for improving the quality of their description.

  4. Property-process relationships in nuclear fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikare, V.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear fuels are fabricated using many different techniques as they come in a large variety of shapes and compositions. The design and composition of nuclear fuels are predominantly dictated by the engineering requirements necessary for their function in reactors of various designs. Other engineering properties requirements originate from safety and security concerns, and the easy of handling, storing, transporting and disposing of the radioactive materials. In this chapter, the more common of these fuels will be briefly reviewed and the methods used to fabricate them will be presented. The fuels considered in this paper are oxide fuels used in LWRs and FRs, metal fuels in FRs and particulate fuels used in HTGRs. Fabrication of alternative fuel forms and use of standard fuels in alternative reactors will be discussed briefly. The primary motivation to advance fuel fabrication is to improve performance, reduce cost, reduce waste or enhance safety and security of the fuels. To achieve optimal performance, developing models to advance fuel fabrication has to be done in concert with developing fuel performance models. The specific properties and microstructures necessary for improved fuel performance must be identified using fuel performance models, while fuel fabrication models that can determine processing variables to give the desired microstructure and materials properties must be developed. (author)

  5. Effect of binder properties on electrochemical performance for silicon-graphite anode: Method and application of binder screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Taeeun; Choi, Soo Jung; Jo, Yong Nam; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ki Jae; Jeong, Goojin; Kim, Young-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Binder properties are systematically characterized to estimate their suitability. • Interpretation of binder properties in connection with binding affinity, electrode properties, and degree of phase separation in slurry. • According to the screening results, hybridization of poly(acrylic acid) and poly(amide imide) is recommended. • The modified binder showed improved cycle performance based on enhanced binder properties. - Abstract: With increasing demand for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) with high energy density, silicon-based negative electrode material has attracted much interest because of its high specific capacity. Practical utilization of Si remains unattainable, however, owing to severe volume expansion in the electrode, resulting in a loss of the electrical Si network, which is directly connected to drastic capacity fading of the cell. Therefore, there have been systematic studies on the characterization of fundamental binder properties to estimate the suitability of various binder materials. The binder properties are subdivided into mechanical and adhesion characteristics, electrode properties (rigidity and recovery), and phase separation behavior of slurry to correlate with the electrochemical performance and practical acceptance of candidate materials. Systematic screening showed that hybridization of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(amide imide) (PAI) could complement each other's properties and the hybridized PAA–PAI was synthesized by a one-step, acid-catalyzed reaction. The PAA–PAI hybrid showed enhancement in overall properties as a result of co-polymerization and exhibited remarkable cycling performance after 300 cycles. Based on these results, it can be concluded that an understanding of binder characteristics provides useful insight into the search for a more efficient binder material, and fine tuning of fundamental binder properties through screening will be advantageous to the construction of more efficient LIB

  6. Effect of gamma radiation on graphite - PTFE dry lubrication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sachin; Tyagi, Mukti; Seshadri, Geetha; Tyagi, Ajay Kumar; Varshney, Lalit

    2017-12-01

    An effect of gamma radiation on lubrication behavior of graphite -PTFE dry lubrication system has been studied using (TR-TW-30L) tribometer with thrust washer attachment in plane contact. Different compositions of graphite and PTFE were prepared and irradiated by gamma rays. Gamma radiation exposure significantly improves the tribological properties indicated by decrease in coefficient of friction and wear properties of graphite -PTFE dry lubrication system. SEM and XRD analysis confirm the physico-chemical modification of graphite-PTFE on gamma radiation exposure leading to a novel dry lubrication system with good slip and anti friction properties.

  7. Temperature and irradiation effects on the behaviour of 14C and its precursor 14N in nuclear graphite. Study of a decontamination process using steam reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silbermann, Gwennaelle

    2013-01-01

    The dismantling of UNGG reactors in France will generate about 23 000 tons of radioactive graphite wastes. To manage these wastes, the radiological inventory and data on radionuclides (RN) location and speciation should be determined. 14 C was identified as an important RN for disposal due to its high initial activity and the risk of release of a mobile organic fraction in environment, after water ingress into the disposal. Hence, the objective of this thesis, carried out in partnership with EDF is to implement experimental studies to simulate and evaluate the impact of temperature, irradiation and graphite radiolytic corrosion on the in reactor behavior of 14 C and its precursor, 14 N. The obtained data are then used to study the thermal decontamination of graphite in presence of water vapor. The experimental approach aims at simulating the presence of 14 C and 14 N by the respective ion implantation of 13 C and 14 N or 15 N in virgin graphite. This study shows that, in the temperature range reached during reactor operation, (100-500 C) and without radiolytic corrosion, 13 C is thermally stable whatever the initial graphite structure. Moreover, irradiation experiments were performed on heated graphite (500 C) put in contact with a gas representative of the radiolized coolant gas. They show the synergistic role played by the oxidative species and the graphite structure disorder on the enhancement of 13 C mobility resulting in the gasification of the graphite surface and/or the selective oxidation of 13 C more weakly bound than 12 C. Concerning the pristine nitrogen, we showed first that the surface concentration reaches several hundred ppm (≤500 ppm at) and decreases at deeper depths to about 160 ppm at.. Unlike implanted 13 C, implanted nitrogen migrates at 500 C when the graphite is highly disordered (about 8 dpa) while remaining stable for a lower disorder rate (0.14 dpa). Experiments also show the synergistic role by electronic excitations and temperature

  8. Vermicular graphite cast iron current state of the art

    OpenAIRE

    Murthy, VSR; Seshan, S; Seshan, K

    1985-01-01

    Vermicular graphite cast iron is a new addition to the family of cast irons. Various methods for producing vermicular graphite cast iron are briefly discussed in this paper. The mechanical and physical properties of cast irons with vermicular graphite have been found to be intermediate between those of gray and ductile irons. Other properties such as casting characteristics, scaling resistance, damping capacity and machinability have been compared with those of gray and ductile irons. Probabl...

  9. Graphite nanoreinforcements in polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Hiroyuki

    Nanocomposites composed of polymer matrices with clay reinforcements of less than 100 nm in size, are being considered for applications such as interior and exterior accessories for automobiles, structural components for portable electronic devices, and films for food packaging. While most nanocomposite research has focused on exfoliated clay platelets, the same nanoreinforcement concept can be applied to another layered material, graphite, to produce nanoplatelets and nanocomposites. Graphite is the stiffest material found in nature (Young's Modulus = 1060 GPa), having a modulus several times that of clay, but also with excellent electrical and thermal conductivity. The key to utilizing graphite as a platelet nanoreinforcement is in the ability to exfoliate this material. Also, if the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with not only excellent mechanical properties but electrical properties as well, opening up many new structural applications as well as non-structural ones where electromagnetic shielding and high thermal conductivity are requirements. In this research, a new process to fabricate exfoliated nano-scale graphite platelets was established (Patent pending). The size of the resulted graphite platelets was less than 1 um in diameter and 10 nm in thickness, and the surface area of the material was around 100 m2/g. The reduction of size showed positive effect on mechanical properties of composites because of the increased edge area and more functional groups attached with it. Also various surface treatment techniques were applied to the graphite nanoplatelets to improve the surface condition. As a result, acrylamide grafting treatment was found to enhance the dispersion and adhesion of graphite flakes in epoxy matrices. The resulted composites showed better mechanical properties than those with commercially available carbon fibers, vapor grown carbon fibers

  10. Graphite moderated 252Cf source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo B, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D.; Vega C, H. R.

    2014-08-01

    The thorium molten salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a 252 Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the 252 Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. (Author)

  11. Classical properties and semiclassical quantization of a spherical nuclear potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, J.; Brut, F.; Arvieu, R.; Touchard, J.

    1984-03-01

    The geometrical properties of the classical energy-action surface are studied for a nuclear Woods-Saxon-like spherical potential, in connection with the E.B.K. semiclassical method of quantization. Comparisons are made with other well known cases: the spherical harmonic oscillator and the spherical billiard. The shift of single particle energies from A = 208 to A = 16 is calculated by a simple method inspired by the Erhenfest adiabatic invariants. Semiclassical results are then compared with exact Schroedinger energies. It is seen that the most significant features of the single particle spectrum are explained by local properties of the energy action surface (curvature, slope) and by their evolution with the particle number

  12. Classical properties and semiclassical quantisation of a spherical nuclear potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, J.; Brut, F.; Arvieu, R.; Touchard, J.

    1985-01-01

    The geometrical properties of the classical energy-action surface are studied for a nuclear Woods-Saxon-like spherical potential in connection with the EBK semiclassical method of quantisation. Comparisons are made with other well known cases: the spherical harmonic oscillator and the spherical billiard. The shift of single-particle energies from A=208 to A=16 is calculated by a simple method inspired by the Erhenfest adiabatic invariants. Semiclassical results are then compared with exact Schroedinger energies. It is seen that the most significant features of the single-particle spectrum are explained by local properties of the energy-action surface (curvature, slope) and by their evolution with particle number. (author)

  13. Graphite reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.; Cogne, F.

    1964-01-01

    The study of graphite-natural uranium power reactor physics, undertaken ten years ago when the Marcoule piles were built, has continued to keep in step with the development of this type of pile. From 1960 onwards the critical facility Marius has been available for a systematic study of the properties of lattices as a function of their pitch, of fuel geometry and of the diameter of cooling channels. This study has covered a very wide field: lattice pitch varying from 19 to 38 cm. uranium rods and tubes of cross-sections from 6 to 35 cm 2 , channels with diameters between 70 and 140 mm. The lattice calculation methods could thus be checked and where necessary adapted. The running of the Marcoule piles and the experiments carried out on them during the last few years have supplied valuable information on the overall evolution of the neutronic properties of the fuel as a function of irradiation. More detailed experiments have also been performed in Marius with plutonium-containing fuels (irradiated or synthetic fuels), and will be undertaken at the beginning of 1965 at high temperature in the critical facility Cesar, which is just being completed at Cadarache. Spent fuel analyses complement these results and help in their interpretation. The thermalization and spectra theories developed in France can thus be verified over the whole valid temperature range. The efficiency of control rods as a function of their dimensions, the materials of which they are made and the lattices surrounding them has been measured in Marius, and the results compared with calculation on the one hand and with the measurements carried out in EDF 1 on the other. Studies on the control proper of graphite piles were concerned essentially with the risks of spatial instability and the means of detecting and controlling them, and with flux distortions caused by the control rods. (authors) [fr

  14. Properties of nuclear matter from macroscopic–microscopic mass formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the standard Skyrme energy density functionals together with the extended Thomas–Fermi approach, the properties of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter represented in two macroscopic–microscopic mass formulas: Lublin–Strasbourg nuclear drop energy (LSD formula and Weizsäcker–Skyrme (WS* formula, are extracted through matching the energy per particle of finite nuclei. For LSD and WS*, the obtained incompressibility coefficients of symmetric nuclear matter are K∞=230±11 MeV and 235±11 MeV, respectively. The slope parameter of symmetry energy at saturation density is L=41.6±7.6 MeV for LSD and 51.5±9.6 MeV for WS*, respectively, which is compatible with the liquid-drop analysis of Lattimer and Lim [4]. The density dependence of the mean-field isoscalar and isovector effective mass, and the neutron–proton effective masses splitting for neutron matter are simultaneously investigated. The results are generally consistent with those from the Skyrme Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov calculations and nucleon optical potentials, and the standard deviations are large and increase rapidly with density. A better constraint for the effective mass is helpful to reduce uncertainties of the depth of the mean-field potential.

  15. Computational prediction of dust production in graphite moderated pebble bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamian, Maziar

    The scope of the work reported here, which is the computational study of graphite wear behavior, supports the Nuclear Engineering University Programs project "Experimental Study and Computational Simulations of Key Pebble Bed Thermomechanics Issues for Design and Safety" funded by the US Department of Energy. In this work, modeling and simulating the contact mechanics, as anticipated in a PBR configuration, is carried out for the purpose of assessing the amount of dust generated during a full power operation year of a PBR. A methodology that encompasses finite element analysis (FEA) and micromechanics of wear is developed to address the issue of dust production and its quantification. Particularly, the phenomenon of wear and change of its rate with sliding length is the main focus of this dissertation. This work studies the wear properties of graphite by simulating pebble motion and interactions of a specific type of nuclear grade graphite, IG-11. This study consists of two perspectives: macroscale stress analysis and microscale analysis of wear mechanisms. The first is a set of FEA simulations considering pebble-pebble frictional contact. In these simulations, the mass of generated graphite particulates due to frictional contact is calculated by incorporating FEA results into Archard's equation, which is a linear correlation between wear mass and wear length. However, the experimental data by Johnson, University of Idaho, revealed that the wear rate of graphite decreases with sliding length. This is because the surfaces of the graphite pebbles become smoother over time, which results in a gradual decrease in wear rate. In order to address the change in wear rate, a more detailed analysis of wear mechanisms at room temperature is presented. In this microscale study, the wear behavior of graphite at the asperity level is studied by simulating the contact between asperities of facing surfaces. By introducing the effect of asperity removal on wear rate, a nonlinear

  16. Graphite target for the spiral project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putaux, J.C.; Ducourtieux, M.; Ferro, A.; Foury, P.; Kotfila, L.; Mueller, A.C.; Obert, J.; Pauwels, N.; Potier, J.C.; Proust, J. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Bertrand, P. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Loiselet, M. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    A study of the thermal and physical properties of graphite targets for the SPIRAL project is presented. The main objective is to develop an optimized set-up both mechanically and thermally resistant, presenting good release properties (hot targets with thin slices). The results of irradiation tests concerning the mechanical and thermal resistance of the first prototype of SPIRAL target with conical geometry are presented. The micro-structural properties of the graphite target is also studied, in order to check that the release properties are not deteriorated by the irradiation. Finally, the results concerning the latest pilot target internally heated by an electrical current are shown. (author). 5 refs.

  17. Critical experiments on enriched uranium graphite moderated cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko; Akino, Fujiyoshi; Kitadate, Kenji; Kurokawa, Ryosuke

    1978-07-01

    A variety of 20 % enriched uranium loaded and graphite-moderated cores consisting of the different lattice cells in a wide range of the carbon to uranium atomic ratio have been built at Semi-Homogeneous Critical Experimental Assembly (SHE) to perform the critical experiments systematically. In the present report, the experimental results for homogeneously or heterogeneously fuel loaded cores and for simulation core of the experimental reactor for a multi-purpose high temperature reactor are filed so as to be utilized for evaluating the accuracy of core design calculation for the experimental reactor. The filed experimental data are composed of critical masses of uranium, kinetic parameters, reactivity worths of the experimental control rods and power distributions in the cores with those rods. Theoretical analyses are made for the experimental data by adopting a simple ''homogenized cylindrical core model'' using the nuclear data of ENDF/B-III, which treats the neutron behaviour after smearing the lattice cell structure. It is made clear from a comparison between the measurement and the calculation that the group constants and fundamental methods of calculations, based on this theoretical model, are valid for the homogeneously fuel loaded cores, but not for both of the heterogeneously fuel loaded cores and the core for simulation of the experimental reactor. Then, it is pointed out that consideration to semi-homogeneous property of the lattice cells for reactor neutrons is essential for high temperature graphite-moderated reactors using dispersion fuel elements of graphite and uranium. (author)

  18. The influence of expanded graphite on thermal properties for paraffin/high density polyethylene/chlorinated paraffin/antimony trioxide as a flame retardant phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ping; Song Lei; Lu Hongdian; Wang Jian; Hu Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The influences of expanded graphite (EG) on the thermal properties of chlorinated paraffin (CP) and antimony trioxide (AT) on phase change material which bases on paraffin/high density polyethylene (HDPE) are studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), thermogravimetric analysis-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (TGA-FTIR), microscale combustion calorimeter (MCC) and cone calorimeter (CONE) were used to evaluate the influence of EG on paraffin/HDPE/CP/AT system. The DSC results indicated that the latent heat value of PCM could be increased when the mass fraction of HDPE was decreased in the PCM, and EG could confine the molecular heat movement of paraffin. EG could improve the thermal stability and increase the char residue at high temperature for paraffin/HDPE/CP/AT hybrid. The volatilized products formed on thermal degradation of paraffin/HDPE/CP/AT with EG showed the release of CO 2 gas was hastened and increased, and the amount of combustible gases were decreased by TGA-FTIR analysis. The MCC and CONE results presented that the flame retardant efficiency of CP/AT could be improved by adding EG in paraffin/HDPE/CP/AT system.

  19. Properties of the ρ meson in dense nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, M.

    1992-05-01

    In order to reach a description of the ρ meson, which is in accordance with the principles of the gauge invariance of the electromagnetic interaction, the vector-dominance hypothesis, and the unitarity a model for the ρ meson in the vacuum is developed. Thereafter follows the calculation of the properties of the ρ meson in nuclear matter. First the connection between the spectral function of the ρ meson and the dilepton production rate for an equilibrium state is derived. Then the model for the pion in nuclear matter is described. Following approximations are applied: The description of the pion-baryon interaction pursues non-relativistically and both the width of the delta resonance and the short-range repulsive delta-nucleon interaction is neglected. The self-energy of the ρ meson in nuclear matter following from this description is formally derived from the requirement to couple the ρ meson to a conserved current. The corrections for the 3-point and 4-point vertex resulting from this are calculated and discussed. Thereafter the physical consequences of the changed self-energy of the ρ meson in nuclear matter are considered. By means of the spectral function it is shown that up to the two-fold of the ground-state density the position of the resonance is nearly not changed. At still higher densities the resonances is a little shifted to higher energies. In the range of an invariant mass of about 400 meV a strong increasement concentrated on a small range results. This is caused by coupling to a naked delta-hole state and a pion. Finally the possibilities are discussed to apply the results of this thesis to the prediction of experimental data. Thereby it is proved to be necessary to base on a simulation of the heavy ion reaction. (orig./HSI) [de

  20. Heat Transfer During Evaporation of Cesium From Graphite Surface in an Argon Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bespala Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on discussion of problem of graphite radioactive waste formation and accumulation. It is shown that irradiated nuclear graphite being inalienable part of uranium-graphite reactor may contain fission and activation products. Much attention is given to the process of formation of radioactive cesium on the graphite element surface. It is described a process of plasma decontamination of irradiated graphite in inert argon atmosphere. Quasi-one mathematical model is offered, it describes heat transfer process in graphite-cesium-argon system. Article shows results of calculation of temperature field inside the unit cell. Authors determined the factors which influence on temperature change.

  1. Study on practical of eddy current testing of core and core support graphite components in HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Ooka, Norikazu; Shindo, Yoshihisa; Kawae, Hidetoshi; Hayashi, Motomitsu; Kambe, Mamoru; Takahashi, Masaaki; Ide, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    Core and core support graphite components in the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) are mainly made of nuclear-grade IG-110 and PGX graphites. Nondestructive inspection with Eddy Current Testing (ECT) is planned to be applied to these components. The method of ECT has been already established for metallic components, however, cannot be applied directly to the graphite ones, because the characteristics of graphite are quite different in micro-structure from those of metals. Therefore, ECT method and condition were studied for the application of the ECT to the graphite components. This paper describes the study on practical method and conditions of ECT for above mentioned graphite structures. (author)

  2. Terrorism cover in France for property damage including nuclear risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanislas, A.

    2004-01-01

    The obligation to include terrorism cover in all Property Damage policies issued on the French Market is ruled by an Act of 1986 and introduced under Section R 126-2 of the French Code of Insurance. This section stipulates that Property Damage policies must provide cover for damage resulting from acts of terrorism, with the same deductible and the same limit than that of the other damage covered in the policy. Soon after the dramatic events of September 11, 2001 in the United States and although reinsurers worldwide restricted their offer of capacities, French insurers recognized that they had to maintain this global cover for the benefit of their insurers. After difficult discussions between insurers, reinsurers, brokers, risk managers and representatives of the State, the creation of a new Pool, backed with a State guarantee, was decided in less than three months. Effective January 1, 2002 and called Gestion d'Assurance et de Reassurance des Risques Attentats et Actes de Terrorisme (GAREAT), the Pool offers a multiple layers stop-loss cover for Property Damage only, i.e. excluding TPL policies. Considering that nuclear risks should be treated in the same way as other industrial risks, it was decided that they would be covered by GAREAT as well. In the meantime, by a Decree of December 28, 2001 modifying Section R 126-2, a special provision, aiming at reducing the limit and thus the price of this cover, was introduced in the Code. The purpose of this paper is to expose the present situation applying through GAREAT and, after two years of operation to discuss future developments, including other sources of capacity for the coverage of acts of terrorism in nuclear risks insurance.(author)

  3. Preparation of in-house graphite reference material for boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjukta A.; Venkatesh, K.; Swain, Kallola K.; Manisha, V.; Kamble, Granthali S.; Pandey, Shailaja P.; Remya Devi, P.S.; Ghosh, M.; Verma, R.

    2016-05-01

    Graphite is extensively used in nuclear technology. Boron concentration in graphite is one of the important parameters that decide its acceptability for nuclear applications. Reliable analytical methods are essential for the determination of boron in graphite at concentration about 5 mg kg -1 . Reference materials are used for validation of existing analytical methods and developing new methodologies. In view of the importance of determination of boron in graphite and unavailability of graphite reference material, an In-house graphite reference material was prepared in Analytical Chemistry Division. Graphite source material was procured, processed to obtain powder of ≤ 75 μm (200 mesh) and bottled. Procedures were developed for the determination of boron in graphite using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICPOES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) techniques. Homogeneity testing was carried out on the bottled units and boron content along with the combined and expanded uncertainties were established. The assigned boron concentration in the In-house graphite reference material is (7.3±0.46) mg kg -1 . (author)

  4. Development of integrated waste management options for irradiated graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Wareing

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project sought to develop best practices in the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of irradiated graphite including other irradiated carbonaceous waste such as structural material made of graphite, nongraphitized carbon bricks, and fuel coatings. Emphasis was given on legacy irradiated graphite, as this represents a significant inventory in respective national waste management programs. This paper provides an overview of the characteristics of graphite irradiated during its use, primarily as a moderator material, within nuclear reactors. It describes the potential techniques applicable to the retrieval, treatment, recycling/reuse, and disposal of these graphite wastes. Considering the lifecycle of nuclear graphite, from manufacture to final disposal, a number of waste management options have been developed. These options consider the techniques and technologies required to address each stage of the lifecycle, such as segregation, treatment, recycle, and ultimate disposal in a radioactive waste repository, providing a toolbox to aid operators and regulators to determine the most appropriate management strategy. It is noted that national waste management programs currently have, or are in the process of developing, respective approaches to irradiated graphite management. The output of the Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project is intended to aid these considerations, rather than dictate them.

  5. Development of integrated waste management options for irradiated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wareing, Alan; Abrahamsen-Mills, Liam; Fowler, Linda; Jarvis, Richard; Banford, Anthony William [National Nuclear Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom); Grave, Michael [Doosan Babcock, Gateshead (United Kingdom); Metcalfe, Martin [National Nuclear Laboratory, Gloucestershire (United Kingdom); Norris, Simon [Radioactive Waste Management Limited, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-15

    The European Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project sought to develop best practices in the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of irradiated graphite including other irradiated carbonaceous waste such as structural material made of graphite, nongraphitized carbon bricks, and fuel coatings. Emphasis was given on legacy irradiated graphite, as this represents a significant inventory in respective national waste management programs. This paper provides an overview of the characteristics of graphite irradiated during its use, primarily as a moderator material, within nuclear reactors. It describes the potential techniques applicable to the retrieval, treatment, recycling/reuse, and disposal of these graphite wastes. Considering the lifecycle of nuclear graphite, from manufacture to final disposal, a number of waste management options have been developed. These options consider the techniques and technologies required to address each stage of the lifecycle, such as segregation, treatment, recycle, and ultimate disposal in a radioactive waste repository, providing a toolbox to aid operators and regulators to determine the most appropriate management strategy. It is noted that national waste management programs currently have, or are in the process of developing, respective approaches to irradiated graphite management. The output of the Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project is intended to aid these considerations, rather than dictate them.

  6. Synthesis of soluble graphite and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K F; Billups, W E

    2013-01-15

    Because of graphene's anticipated applications in electronics and its thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, many scientists and engineers are interested in this material. Graphene is an isolated layer of the π-stacked hexagonal allotrope of carbon known as graphite. The interlayer cohesive energy of graphite, or exfoliation energy, that results from van der Waals attractions over the interlayer spacing distance of 3.34 Å (61 meV/C atom) is many times weaker than the intralayer covalent bonding. Since graphene itself does not occur naturally, scientists and engineers are still learning how to isolate and manipulate individual layers of graphene. Some researchers have relied on the physical separation of the sheets, a process that can sometimes be as simple as peeling of sheets from crystalline graphite using Scotch tape. Other researchers have taken an ensemble approach, where they exploit the chemical conversion of graphite to the individual layers. The typical intermediary state is graphite oxide, which is often produced using strong oxidants under acidic conditions. Structurally, researchers hypothesize that acidic functional groups functionalize the oxidized material at the edges and a network of epoxy groups cover the sp(2)-bonded carbon network. The exfoliated material formed under these conditions can be used to form dispersions that are usually unstable. However, more importantly, irreversible defects form in the basal plane during oxidation and remain even after reduction of graphite oxide back to graphene-like material. As part of our interest in the dissolution of carbon nanomaterials, we have explored the derivatization of graphite following the same procedures that preserve the sp(2) bonding and the associated unique physical and electronic properties in the chemical processing of single-walled carbon nanotubes. In this Account, we describe efficient routes to exfoliate graphite either into graphitic nanoparticles or into graphene without

  7. Nuclear Well Log Properties of Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchwell, A.; Cook, A.

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing gas hydrate in a reservoir typically involves a full suite of geophysical well logs. The most common method involves using resistivity measurements to quantify the decrease in electrically conductive water when replaced with gas hydrate. Compressional velocity measurements are also used because the gas hydrate significantly strengthens the moduli of the sediment. At many gas hydrate sites, nuclear well logs, which include the photoelectric effect, formation sigma, carbon/oxygen ratio and neutron porosity, are also collected but often not used. In fact, the nuclear response of a gas hydrate reservoir is not known. In this research we will focus on the nuclear log response in gas hydrate reservoirs at the Mallik Field at the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada, and the Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg 2 sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Nuclear logs may add increased robustness to the investigation into the properties of gas hydrates and some types of logs may offer an opportunity to distinguish between gas hydrate and permafrost. For example, a true formation sigma log measures the thermal neutron capture cross section of a formation and pore constituents; it is especially sensitive to hydrogen and chlorine in the pore space. Chlorine has a high absorption potential, and is used to determine the amount of saline water within pore spaces. Gas hydrate offers a difference in elemental composition compared to water-saturated intervals. Thus, in permafrost areas, the carbon/oxygen ratio may vary between gas hydrate and permafrost, due to the increase of carbon in gas hydrate accumulations. At the Mallik site, we observe a hydrate-bearing sand (1085-1107 m) above a water-bearing sand (1107-1140 m), which was confirmed through core samples and mud gas analysis. We observe a decrease in the photoelectric absorption of ~0.5 barnes/e-, as well as an increase in the formation sigma readings of ~5 capture units in the water-bearing sand as

  8. PNGS-A unit 4 composite graphite valve packing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meaney, F.

    1992-01-01

    During the outage of Pickering 4 for retubing and rehabilitation, a composite graphite packing program was completed on 100 conventional valves and 50 nuclear valves. This paper describes component refurbishment, related maintenance, and manpower requirements. 2 figs

  9. Investigation on Electrochemical Properties of Polythiophene Nanocomposite with Graphite Derivatives as Supercapacitor Material on Breath Figure-Decorated PMMA Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Mona; Abbaspour, Mohsen; Fazli, Ali; Setoodeh, Hamideh; Pourabbas, Behzad

    2018-03-01

    Breath figures have been formed by the direct breath figure method on polymethyl methacrylate electrode sand hexagonal oriented holes with 0.5- to 10- μm2 surface area have been created. Deposition of materials on the electrodes has been performed by the spray-coating method. polythiophene (PTh) nanoparticles, polythiophene-graphene oxide (PTh-GO) and polythiophene-reduced graphene oxide (PTh-G) nanocomposites were synthesized by emulsion polymerization, while characterization of synthetic materials have been carried out by Fourier transform infrared, Χ-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy techniques. Also, the electrochemical properties of the designed electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. Specific capacitance of porous electrodes coated by PTh nanoparticles, PTh-GO and PTh-G nanocomposites were calculated from cyclic voltammetry curves at 5 mV/s scan rate, andthe values are 3.5 F/g, 16.39 F/g, and 28.68 F/g, respectively. Also, the energy density of each electrode at 5 mV/s scan rate has been calculated and the results show that incorporation of GO and G nanolayers with PTh nanoparticles enhances the electrochemical properties of electrodes.

  10. The roles of buckled geometry and water environment in the excitonic properties of graphitic C3N4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiuyu; Li, Xingxing; Yang, Jinlong

    2018-02-22

    The exciton plays a crucial role in two-dimensional materials involved in photocatalytic water splitting, where its properties are determined not only by the material itself, but also by the surrounding water environment. By the framework of many-body perturbation theory, we investigated the excitonic effects in pure and water-adsorbed g-C 3 N 4 . It is shown that the excitonic properties are very sensitive to the geometry of g-C 3 N 4 and the adsorption of water molecules. Firstly, the optical band gap, i.e. the first bright excitonic energy of pure g-C 3 N 4 decreases remarkably from a high symmetry planar structure (3.8 eV) to a P1 buckled configuration (2.7 eV). Secondly, the hydrogen bonds between water and g-C 3 N 4 induce the generation of interface excitons. With a reduced binding energy (at least 0.2 eV), interface excitons can contribute to a more efficient separation of electrons and holes. Our work provides an insight into the excitation mechanism of 2D photocatalysts in a real environment.

  11. Fabrication of conducting composite sheets using cost-effective graphite flakes and amorphous styrene acrylonitrile for enhanced thermistor, dielectric, and electromagnetic interference shielding properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, Varij, E-mail: varijpanwarcertain@gmail.com [Electronics and Communication Engineering, Graphic Era University, Dehradun, Uttarakhand (India); Gill, Fateh Singh; Rathi, Vikas; Tewari, V.K. [Electronics and Communication Engineering, Graphic Era University, Dehradun, Uttarakhand (India); Mehra, R.M. [Sharda University, Greater Noida (India); Park, Jong-Oh, E-mail: jop@jnu.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sukho, E-mail: shpark12@dgist.ac.kr [Department of Robotics Engineering, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-01

    The fabrication of strong conducting composite sheets (CCSs) using a simple technique with cost-effective materials is desirable for capacitor, decoupling capacitor, and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding applications. Here, we used cost-effective graphite flakes (GFs) as a conducting filler and amorphous poly (styrene-co-acrylonitrile) (PSAN) as an insulating polymer to fabricate a CCS via a simple mechanical mixing and hot compression molding process in 2.5 h, with the aim to save time and avoid the use of toxic reagents, which are generally used in chemical methods. In the present method, the GFs are connected in diffusively adhere polymer matrix, controlled by temperature and pressure that generate the conduction in the CCSs. The resulting PSAN/GF CCSs were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and hardness tests. The GFs penetrated the interfacial region of PSAN, thus improving the thermistor and dielectric properties (dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor) of the PSAN/GF CCSs. Furthermore, the PSAN/GF CCSs showed enhanced hardness and EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) properties in the X-band frequency range (8.5–12.5 GHz). The percolation theory was implemented to DC and AC conductivity. To detect the transition of the dielectric properties, the dielectric constant of the CCSs was analyzed with increasing volume fraction of GFs in the radio frequency region. The improved dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor of the PSAN/GF CCS, indicated a significant improvement in their EMI shielding properties in the X-band frequency range, which were measured using the waveguide method. The ac conductivity of PSAN/GF CCS shows stable behavior in the higher frequency ranges. The EMISE of PSAN/GF CCS were found to increase with increasing GF content due to the absorbance mechanism. - Highlights: • Enhanced hardness and

  12. Optical motion control of maglev graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masayuki; Abe, Jiro

    2012-12-26

    Graphite has been known as a typical diamagnetic material and can be levitated in the strong magnetic field. Here we show that the magnetically levitating pyrolytic graphite can be moved in the arbitrary place by simple photoirradiation. It is notable that the optical motion control system described in this paper requires only NdFeB permanent magnets and light source. The optical movement is driven by photothermally induced changes in the magnetic susceptibility of the graphite. Moreover, we demonstrate that light energy can be converted into rotational kinetic energy by means of the photothermal property. We find that the levitating graphite disk rotates at over 200 rpm under the sunlight, making it possible to develop a new class of light energy conversion system.

  13. Startup of a Joule-heated glass melter with a graphite slurry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T.L.; Routt, K.R.; Porter, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses the theoretical equations and physical and electrical property data of various graphite slurries for starting up a glass melter. An application test is also included to demonstrate the graphite slurry startup technique

  14. US graphite reactor D&D experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, S.M.K.; Williams, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the results of the U.S. Graphite Reactor Experience Task for the Decommissioning Strategy Plan for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 1 Study. The work described in this report was performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE).

  15. Probing Nuclear Symmetry Energy and its Imprints on Properties of Nuclei, Nuclear Reactions, Neutron Stars and Gravitational Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Fattoyev, Farrukh J; Newton, William G; Xu Chang

    2013-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in constraining nuclear symmetry energy at and below the saturation density of nuclear matter using data from both terrestrial nuclear experiments and astrophysical observations. However, many interesting questions remain to be studied especially at supra-saturation densities. In this lecture note, after a brief summary of the currently available constraints on nuclear symmetry energy near the saturation density we first discuss the relationship between the symmetry energy and the isopin and momentum dependence of the single-nucleon potential in isospin-asymmetric nuclear medium. We then discuss several open issues regarding effects of the tensor force induced neutron-proton short-range correlation (SRC) on nuclear symmetry energy. Finally, as an example of the impacts of nuclear symmetry energy on properties of neutron stars and gravitational waves, we illustrate effects of the high-density symmetry energy on the tidal polarizability of neutron stars in coalescing binaries.

  16. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Mansor, N.; Jorge, A. B.; Corà, F.; Gibbs, C.; Jervis, R.; McMillan, P. F.; Wang, X.; Brett, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li(+)Cl(-)), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion...

  17. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  18. Status of Chronic Oxidation Studies of Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mee, Robert W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Graphite will undergo extremely slow, but continuous oxidation by traces of moisture that will be present, albeit at very low levels, in the helium coolant of HTGR. This chronic oxidation may cause degradation of mechanical strength and thermal properties of graphite components if a porous oxidation layer penetrates deep enough in the bulk of graphite components during the lifetime of the reactor. The current research on graphite chronic oxidation is motivated by the acute need to understand the behavior of each graphite grade during prolonged exposure to high temperature chemical attack by moisture. The goal is to provide the elements needed to develop predictive models for long-time oxidation behavior of graphite components in the cooling helium of HTGR. The tasks derived from this goal are: (1) Oxidation rate measurements in order to determine and validate a comprehensive kinetic model suitable for prediction of intrinsic oxidation rates as a function of temperature and oxidant gas composition; (2) Characterization of effective diffusivity of water vapor in the graphite pore system in order to account for the in-pore transport of moisture; and (3) Development and validation of a predictive model for the penetration depth of the oxidized layer, in order to assess the risk of oxidation caused damage of particular graphite grades after prolonged exposure to the environment of helium coolant in HTGR. The most important and most time consuming of these tasks is the measurement of oxidation rates in accelerated oxidation tests (but still under kinetic control) and the development of a reliable kinetic model. This report summarizes the status of chronic oxidation studies on graphite, and then focuses on model development activities, progress of kinetic measurements, validation of results, and improvement of the kinetic models. Analysis of current and past results obtained with three grades of showed that the classical Langmuir-Hinshelwood model cannot reproduce all

  19. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 15: Metallurgy and Metals Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  20. Structures and Performance of Graphene/Polyimide Composite Graphite Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Na

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry-wet spinning process was used to gain graphene oxide/polyimide composite fibers, then graphene/polyimide composite carbon and graphite fibers were obtained through carbonized and graphitized. Different graphene oxide contents of the composite carbon and graphite fibers were measured by thermal gravimetric analysis, Raman, mechanical properties, electrical properties,SEM and so on. The results show that when the GO content is 0.3%(mass fraction,the same below, the thermal property of the graphene oxide/polyimide composite fibers is the best. The mechanical and electrical properties are obriously improved by the addition of GO, graphitization degree also increases. When the composite carbon fibers are treated at 2800℃, GO content increases to 2.0%, the thermal conductivity of the composite graphite fibers reaches 435.57W·m-1·K-1 and cross-section structures of carbon fibers are more compact.

  1. A graphite nanoeraser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ze; Bøggild, Peter; Yang, Jia-rui

    2011-01-01

    We present here a method for cleaning intermediate-size (up to 50 nm) contamination from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and graphene. Electron-beam-induced deposition of carbonaceous material on graphene and graphite surfaces inside a scanning electron microscope, which is difficult to remove...

  2. Graphite targets at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Rotating polycrystalline and stationary pyrolytic graphite target designs for the LAMPF experimental area are described. Examples of finite element calculations of temperatures and stresses are presented. Some results of a metallographic investigation of irradiated pyrolytic graphite target plates are included, together with a brief description of high temperature bearings for the rotating targets

  3. The electrochemical oxidation of organic waste and activated graphite by Ag{sup 2+} in nitric acid: a literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Alsenoy, V.; Rahier, A.

    1996-08-01

    Organic wastes and activated moderator graphite can be processed by means of combustion, but the incineration of organic waste poses emission problems. The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN has experience with the treatment of organic wastes. Moreover, the treatment of radioactive graphite will be required since the BR-1 reactor is moderated with 492 tons of graphite. The strong oxidising properties of Ag{sup 2+} are already used in the chemical and nuclear industry to destroy organic waste. We aim to apply the process on radioactive graphite, organic resins and effluents. The reaction mechanisms will be studied, taking into account the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the different reactions involved. As a first step, this document gives a literature study of the electrochemical oxidation using Ag{sup 2+}. This document presents a thorough literature study, and shows that the oxidative properties of the Ag{sup 2+} ion, which can easily be formed in nitric acid by means of electrolysis, make it an ideal candidate to oxidize organic molecules into carbon dioxide and water on a perfectly well controlled manner. The process has already been used to destroy explosives and toxic organic waste in the nuclear and chemical industry. Chemical, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of some of the reactions involved are already known and described, other reaction mechanisms are still unknown. On the basis of the information collected so far, the Research and Development group of the Radioactive Waste and Cleanup unit has proposed to start a research programme to define, test, demonstrate and finally apply a safe process for the treatment of radioactive organic material and graphite by electrochemical oxidation using Ag{sup 2+}. Available data confirm that the oxidation of organic material can be carried out safely, leading to the formation of water and carbon dioxide.

  4. The electrochemical oxidation of organic waste and activated graphite by Ag2+ in nitric acid: a literature study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Alsenoy, V.; Rahier, A.

    1996-08-01

    Organic wastes and activated moderator graphite can be processed by means of combustion, but the incineration of organic waste poses emission problems. The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN has experience with the treatment of organic wastes. Moreover, the treatment of radioactive graphite will be required since the BR-1 reactor is moderated with 492 tons of graphite. The strong oxidising properties of Ag 2+ are already used in the chemical and nuclear industry to destroy organic waste. We aim to apply the process on radioactive graphite, organic resins and effluents. The reaction mechanisms will be studied, taking into account the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the different reactions involved. As a first step, this document gives a literature study of the electrochemical oxidation using Ag 2+ . This document presents a thorough literature study, and shows that the oxidative properties of the Ag 2+ ion, which can easily be formed in nitric acid by means of electrolysis, make it an ideal candidate to oxidize organic molecules into carbon dioxide and water on a perfectly well controlled manner. The process has already been used to destroy explosives and toxic organic waste in the nuclear and chemical industry. Chemical, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of some of the reactions involved are already known and described, other reaction mechanisms are still unknown. On the basis of the information collected so far, the Research and Development group of the Radioactive Waste and Cleanup unit has proposed to start a research programme to define, test, demonstrate and finally apply a safe process for the treatment of radioactive organic material and graphite by electrochemical oxidation using Ag 2+ . Available data confirm that the oxidation of organic material can be carried out safely, leading to the formation of water and carbon dioxide

  5. Influence of Moisture Absorption and Content of Graphite Filler on Electrical Property of Sensors and Transducers Enclosures and Phenomena of Electrostriction in Glass- Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Shivamurthy

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation E-glass epoxy composite filled with different amount of graphite particles were prepared by compression. Plain waived E-glass cloth with density 200g / meter square was used as reinforcement. Epoxy resin LY556 mixed with Hardener HT907 and accelerator DY063 in the ratio 100:80:2 were used as matrix. The graphite of 50 particle size was used as fillers. Four types of composites were prepared with different amount of graphite fillers viz 0 %, 3 %, 6 % and 9 % with unchanged reinforcement. After subjecting the samples to water absorption up to 96 hours in steps of 24 hrs, dielectric dissipation factor (tan δ, dielectric constant and a. c. conductivity have been measured by using a LCR meter at two different frequencies (100 Hz and 1 kHz. Results show that tan δ direct constant, a.c. conductivity increases with increase in % of graphite in the composites at both high and low frequency for dry samples. Samples with 24 hrs moisture absorption showed approximately same result. After 48 hrs, tan δ values showed variations. However, the fluctuations were less at 6 % of graphite in all samples after 48 and 72 hrs of moisture absorption. Dielectric constant increases with increase in graphite % in composites at higher frequency and there was not much variation at low frequency. In all samples after 24 and 48 hrs of moisture absorption, dielectric constant decreases with increase in graphite loading. It is observed that dielectric constant increases in all samples after 72 hrs of moisture absorption as compared to dry samples. A c. conductivity increases with increase in % of graphite content in dry sample. Up to 6% a. c. conductivity increases after 24 and 48 hrs of immersion, after 72 hrs the trend is reversed. Since Fermi level is initially shifted towards the conduction band and then after 72 hrs of moisture absorption shifted towards the valence band. a. c. conductivity increases with increase in moisture content. The

  6. Tunable electronic and optical properties of gas molecules adsorbed monolayer graphitic ZnO: Implications for gas sensor and environment monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Du, Qikui; Zhang, Lifa

    2017-12-01

    Due to the large surface area and the peculiar electronic characters, great attention has been paid to 2D materials for the gas sensing applications. Here, using the hybrid density functional calculations, we systematically study the adsorptions of gas molecules on the monolayer graphitic ZnO (g-ZnO), including CO, H2, H2O, H2S, NH3, NO, NO2, O2, and SO2. For most of the molecules, g-ZnO shows superior sensing performance to the well-known MoS2, black phosphorus, blue phosphorus, antimonene, and germanene. H2S, NO, NO2, and SO2 act as charge acceptors, and CO, H2, H2O, and NH3 serve as charge donors. These molecules also induce distinct modifications to the electronic structures, work functions, and optical adsorptions. NO, NO2, and O2 form flat bands in the bandgaps of the spin-up or spin-down states, whereas other molecules mainly tune the bandgaps and the orbital couplings. In particular, g-ZnO is most likely to adsorb the atmospheric pollutant SO2, which has the strongest interaction through hybridizing its widely broadened 2p orbitals with the 3d orbitals of g-ZnO. Moreover, the improved visible light absorption is demonstrated in the NO2 adsorbed g-ZnO. Our results not only confirm that the electronic and optical properties of g-ZnO can be effectively tuned by the selective adsorption of gas molecules but also provide insightful guidance for the potential application of g-ZnO in the field of gas sensors.

  7. Surface areas of turbostratic graphitic carbons prepared from a resin using nickel particles, 20 nm, as graphitization catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oya, A.; Inoue, E.; Otani, S.; Marsh, H.

    1981-11-01

    Nickel particles were used to graphitize catalytically a non-graphitizing carbon to create a turbostratic graphitic material called the T/SUB/s-component. This method was examined by X-ray diffraction. Coals on heat treatment to temperatures >1270 K form T/SUB/s-component carbons. Therefore, considerations of the properties of the T/SUB/s-component carbon may have relevance to considerations of the operational performances of blast furnace coke. (22 refs.)

  8. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electroche-- mical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment ECT graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones this is treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A sMall quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes

  9. Plastic strain caused by contraction of pores in polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, Ikuo; Yoda, Shinichi; Konishi, Takashi.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of porosity on mechanical properties and deformation behavior of four isotropic polycrystalline graphites were studied. The pore size distributions of the graphites were measured using a conventional mercury penetration technique. The average pore radius of ISO-88 graphite was about one-tenth of that of ISEM-1, IG-11 or IG-15 graphites. Young's modulus of the graphites decreased with increasing porosity. The stress-strain curve of each graphite was measured in its lateral and axial directions. Young's modulus of graphite decreased with increasing load. The plastic strain at a given compressive load was calculated from the stress-strain curve and the initial gradient of the unloading curve at the load. The ratio of lateral plastic strain to axial plastic strain for the graphites was less than 0.5, indicating that the volume of the graphites decreased during compressive loading. By assuming that the volume change was caused by contraction of pores, plastic strain associated with contraction of pores was calculated from the axial plastic strain and lateral plastic strain by slips along the basal planes. The plastic strain increased with increasing axial plastic strain and porosity of graphite. (author)

  10. Theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanodiamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S Joon; Park, Jae-Gwan [Nano Science and Technology Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), PO Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul, 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-26

    We report on a theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanosize diamond (nanodiamond) in the metastable state. A nanodiamond annealed at a relatively lower temperature suffers morphological transition into a nanodiamond-graphite core-shell structure. Thermodynamic stability analysis of the nanodiamond showed that the phase diagram (relationship between the annealing temperature and radius) of the nanodiamond-graphite has three regimes: smaller nanodiamond, nanodiamond-graphite, and larger nanodiamond. These regimes of nanodiamond-graphite are due to an additional phase boundary from finding the maximum size of the nanodiamond which can be graphitized. In the theoretical analysis, the most probable and the maximum volume fractions of graphite in the nanodiamond were 0.76 and 0.84 respectively, which were independent of the annealing temperature and the initial radius of the nanodiamond. Therefore, the nanodiamond is not completely transformed into graphite by simple annealing at relatively lower process temperature and pressure. The highest graphitization probability decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Raman spectra for the F{sub 2g} vibration mode of nanodiamond were also calculated, and we found that the variation in properties of the spectral line was strongly dependent on the graphitization temperature and the initial size of the nanodiamond.

  11. Theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanodiamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S Joon; Park, Jae-Gwan

    2007-01-01

    We report on a theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanosize diamond (nanodiamond) in the metastable state. A nanodiamond annealed at a relatively lower temperature suffers morphological transition into a nanodiamond-graphite core-shell structure. Thermodynamic stability analysis of the nanodiamond showed that the phase diagram (relationship between the annealing temperature and radius) of the nanodiamond-graphite has three regimes: smaller nanodiamond, nanodiamond-graphite, and larger nanodiamond. These regimes of nanodiamond-graphite are due to an additional phase boundary from finding the maximum size of the nanodiamond which can be graphitized. In the theoretical analysis, the most probable and the maximum volume fractions of graphite in the nanodiamond were 0.76 and 0.84 respectively, which were independent of the annealing temperature and the initial radius of the nanodiamond. Therefore, the nanodiamond is not completely transformed into graphite by simple annealing at relatively lower process temperature and pressure. The highest graphitization probability decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Raman spectra for the F 2g vibration mode of nanodiamond were also calculated, and we found that the variation in properties of the spectral line was strongly dependent on the graphitization temperature and the initial size of the nanodiamond

  12. Measurement of the cleavage energy of graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Dai, Shuyang; Li, Xide; Yang, Jiarui; Srolovitz, David J; Zheng, Quanshui

    2015-08-28

    The basal plane cleavage energy (CE) of graphite is a key material parameter for understanding many of the unusual properties of graphite, graphene and carbon nanotubes. Nonetheless, a wide range of values for the CE has been reported and no consensus has yet emerged. Here we report the first direct, accurate experimental measurement of the CE of graphite using a novel method based on the self-retraction phenomenon in graphite. The measured value, 0.37±0.01 J m(-2) for the incommensurate state of bicrystal graphite, is nearly invariant with respect to temperature (22 °C≤T≤198 °C) and bicrystal twist angle, and insensitive to impurities from the atmosphere. The CE for the ideal ABAB graphite stacking, 0.39±0.02 J m(-2), is calculated based on a combination of the measured CE and a theoretical calculation. These experimental measurements are also ideal for use in evaluating the efficacy of competing theoretical approaches.

  13. Graphite structure and its relation to mechanical engineering design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocklehurst, J.E.; Kelly, B.T.

    1980-01-01

    The inhomogeneous nature of polycrystalline graphite requires property measurements to be made over dimensions large enough to average the local variations in the structure. This is particularly true for mechanical integrity, and experimental data are presented which illustrate the importance of the real aggregate structure of graphite and the difficulties of interpreting strength data from different tests. The classical statistical treatments do not hold generally, and the problem of defining a failure criterion for graphite is discussed. It is suggested that the stress conditions in graphite components might be classified in terms of the dimensions and stress gradients related to the characteristic flaw size of the material as determined experimentally. (author)

  14. Dependence of strength on particle size in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.P.; Kennedy, C.R.

    The strength to particle size relationship for specially fabricated graphites has been demonstrated and rationalized using fracture mechanics. In the past, similar studies have yielded empirical data using only commercially available material. Thus, experimental verification of these relationships has been difficult. However, the graphites of this study were fabricated by controlling the particle size ranges for a series of isotropic graphites. All graphites that were evaluated had a constant 1.85 g/cm 3 density. Thus, particle size was the only variable. This study also considered the particle size effect on other physical properties; coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), electrical resistivity, fracture strain, and Young's modulus

  15. Monte Carlo calculations on transmutation of trans-uranic nuclear waste isotopes using spallation neutrons difference of lead and graphite moderators

    CERN Document Server

    Hashemi-Nezhad, S R; Brandt, R; Krivopustov, M I; Kulakov, B A; Odoj, R; Sosnin, A N; Wan, J S; Westmeier, W

    2002-01-01

    Transmutation rates of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu and some minor actinides ( sup 2 sup 3 sup 7 Np, sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am, sup 2 sup 4 sup 5 Cm and sup 2 sup 4 sup 6 Cm), in two accelerator-driven systems (ADS) with lead or graphite moderating environments, were calculated using the LAHET code system. The ADS that were used had a large volume (approx 32 m sup 3) and contained no fissile material, except for a small amount of fissionable waste nuclei that existed in some cases. Calculations were performed at an incident proton energy of 1.5 GeV and the spallation target was lead. Also breeding rates of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu and sup 2 sup 3 sup 3 U as well as the transmutation rates of two long-lived fission products sup 9 sup 9 Tc and sup 1 sup 2 sup 9 I were calculated at different locations in the moderator. It is shown that an ADS with graphite moderator is a much more effective transmuter than that with lead moderator.

  16. Properties of the cloudy bag in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunatyan, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    Because of the pion mode softening, the pion field of the clody bag in the nuclear matter increases if the nuclear density increases. This causes in its turn the decreasing of the bag size and at a sufficiently large density of the nuclear matter lead to absolute instability of the cloudy bag-nucleon, which means the transition of the nuclear matter in another nonnucleon phase

  17. Graphite Oxidation Thermodynamics/Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propp, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The vulnerability of graphite-matrix spent nuclear fuel to oxidation by the ambient atmosphere if the fuel canister is breached was evaluated. Thermochemical and kinetic data over the anticipated range of storage temperatures (200 to 400 C) were used to calculate the times required for a total carbon mass loss of 1 mgcm-2 from a fuel specimen. At 200 C, the time required to produce even this small loss is large, 900,000 yr. However, at 400 C the time required is only 1.9 yr. The rate of oxidation at 200 C is negligible, and the rate even at 400 C is so small as to be of no practical consequence. Therefore, oxidation of the spent nuclear fuel upon a loss of canister integrity is not anticipated to be a concern based upon the results of this study

  18. Graphite moderated reactor for thermoelectric generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akazawa, Issei; Yamada, Akira; Mizogami, Yorikata

    1998-01-01

    Fuel rods filled with cladded fuel particles distributed and filled are buried each at a predetermined distance in graphite blocks situated in a reactor core. Perforation channels for helium gas as coolants are formed to the periphery thereof passing through vertically. An alkali metal thermoelectric power generation module is disposed to the upper lid of a reactor container while being supported by a securing receptacle. Helium gas in the coolant channels in the graphite blocks in the reactor core absorbs nuclear reaction heat, to be heated to a high temperature, rises upwardly by the reduction of the specific gravity, and then flows into an upper space above the laminated graphite block layer. Then the gas collides against a ceiling and turns, and flows down in a circular gap around the circumference of the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. In this case, it transfers heat to the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. (I.N.)

  19. Recent developments in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications

  20. Hirschegg '95: Dynamical properties of hadrons in nuclear matter. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, H.; Noerenberg, W.

    1995-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Chiral symmetry, chiral condensates, in-medium effective chiral Lagrangians, Δ's in nuclei, nonperturbative QCD, electron scattering from nuclear matter, nuclear shadowing, QCD sum rules, deconfinement, ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions, nuclear dimuon and electron pair production, photoproduction from nuclei, subthreshold K + production, kaon polarization in nuclear matter, charged pion production in relativistic heavy ion collisions, the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, the SU(3) L xSU(3) R sigma model, nonequilibrium dense nuclear matter, pion pair production at finite temperature. (HSI)

  1. Physicochemical characterization, and relaxometry studies of micro-graphite oxide, graphene nanoplatelets, and nanoribbons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavna S Paratala

    Full Text Available The chemistry of high-performance magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents remains an active area of research. In this work, we demonstrate that the potassium permanganate-based oxidative chemical procedures used to synthesize graphite oxide or graphene nanoparticles leads to the confinement (intercalation of trace amounts of Mn(2+ ions between the graphene sheets, and that these manganese intercalated graphitic and graphene structures show disparate structural, chemical and magnetic properties, and high relaxivity (up to 2 order and distinctly different nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion profiles compared to paramagnetic chelate compounds. The results taken together with other published reports on confinement of paramagnetic metal ions within single-walled carbon nanotubes (a rolled up graphene sheet show that confinement (encapsulation or intercalation of paramagnetic metal ions within graphene sheets, and not the size, shape or architecture of the graphitic carbon particles is the key determinant for increasing relaxivity, and thus, identifies nano confinement of paramagnetic ions as novel general strategy to develop paramagnetic metal-ion graphitic-carbon complexes as high relaxivity MRI contrast agents.

  2. Quantification of the clustering properties of nuclear states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.; Dickmann, F.

    1985-05-01

    The amount of particular type of clustering in a nuclear state is defined in this paper as the norm square of the projection of the wave function onto the particular cluster model subspace. It is pointed out that, although the clusters can not be localized in space by measurement, the amount of clustering characterizes the cluster formation in close analogy with a quantum mechanical probability. The cluster model component of the wave function is proved to have a variational property. This facilitates the computation of the amount of clustering. The model dependence of the amounts of various clusterings and their relationship to the corresponding spectroscopic factors are studied via numerical examples for two models of sup(6)Li. It is concluded that, in a relative sense, the spectroscopic factor, which is more directly related to experiment, is also characteristic of the clustering contents of different states of the same nucleus, but it can not be used for comparisons between different nuclei or clusterings. (author)

  3. Application of INAA for chemical quality control analysis of C-C composite and high purity graphite by determining trace elemental concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinde, Amol D.; Reddy, A.V.R.; Acharya, R.; Venugopalan, Ramani

    2015-01-01

    Carbon based materials like graphite and C-C composites are used for various scientific and technological applications. Owing to its low neutron capture cross section and good moderating properties, graphite is used as a moderator or reflector in nuclear reactors. For high temperature reactors like CHTR, graphite and C-C composites are proposed as structural materials. Studies are in progress to use C-C composites as prospective candidate instead of graphite due to their excellent mechanical and thermal properties. The advantage of carbon-carbon composite is that the microstructure and the properties can be tailor made. Impurities like rare earth elements and neutron poisons which have high neutron absorption cross section and elements whose activation products of have longer half-lives like 60 Co (5.27 y), 65 Zn (244.3 d) and 59 Fe (44.5 d) are not desired in structural materials. For chemical quality control (CQC) it is necessary to evaluate accurately the impurity concentrations using a suitable non-destructive analytical technique. In the present work, two carbon/carbon composite samples and two high purity graphite samples were analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) using high-flux reactor neutrons. Samples, sealed in Al foil, were irradiated in tray-rod position of Dhruva reactor, BARC at a neutron flux of ∼ 5 x 10 13 cm -2 s -1 . Radioactive assay was carried out using high resolution gamma ray spectrometry using 40% HPGe detector

  4. Fort St. Vrain graphite site mechanical separation concept selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, S.M.

    1993-09-01

    One of the alternatives to the disposal of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) reactor spent nuclear fuel involves the separation of the fuel rods composed of compacts from the graphite fuel block assembly. After the separation of these two components, the empty graphite fuel blocks would be disposed of as a low level waste (provided the appropriate requirements are met) and the fuel compacts would be treated as high level waste material. This report deals with the mechanical separation aspects concerning physical disassembly of the FSV graphite fuel element into the empty graphite fuel blocks and fuel compacts. This report recommends that a drilling technique is the preferred choice for accessing the, fuel channel holes and that each hole is drilled separately. This report does not cover any techniques or methods to separate the triso fuel particles from the graphite matrix of the fuel compacts

  5. Carbon-14 Graphitization Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James; Collon, Philippe; Laverne, Jay

    2014-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a process that allows for the analysis of mass of certain materials. It is a powerful process because it results in the ability to separate rare isotopes with very low abundances from a large background, which was previously impossible. Another advantage of AMS is that it only requires very small amounts of material for measurements. An important application of this process is radiocarbon dating because the rare 14C isotopes can be separated from the stable 14N background that is 10 to 13 orders of magnitude larger, and only small amounts of the old and fragile organic samples are necessary for measurement. Our group focuses on this radiocarbon dating through AMS. When performing AMS, the sample needs to be loaded into a cathode at the back of an ion source in order to produce a beam from the material to be analyzed. For carbon samples, the material must first be converted into graphite in order to be loaded into the cathode. My role in the group is to convert the organic substances into graphite. In order to graphitize the samples, a sample is first combusted to form carbon dioxide gas and then purified and reduced into the graphite form. After a couple weeks of research and with the help of various Physics professors, I developed a plan and began to construct the setup necessary to perform the graphitization. Once the apparatus is fully completed, the carbon samples will be graphitized and loaded into the AMS machine for analysis.

  6. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  7. Limitations to private properties in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    This study, based on Argentine legislation, analyses the limitations to private property in the surroundings of nuclear power plants, due to public interest. A nuclear power plant could demand different kinds of property limitation, that could vary from restrictions to the absolute nature of property, to expropriation. Limitation of property is a different concept from restriction of property, the concept of limitation is wider. The author analyses for both concepts: validy requirements, competent bodies, and jurisdiction in case of conflict. He also explains the conditions and process of expropriation. Article 14 of the Constitution constitutes the positive legal basis for limitations of property. In the hypotheses of limitations to property due to vicinity of nuclear power plants, national legislation takes precedence over provincial law, since it is a matter of public national interest. (author)

  8. Effects of Oxidation on Oxidation-Resistant Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windes, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Rebecca [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Carroll, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades that exhibit oxidation resistance through the formation of protective oxides on the surface of the graphite material. In the unlikely event of an oxygen ingress accident, graphite components within the VHTR core region are anticipated to oxidize so long as the oxygen continues to enter the hot core region and the core temperatures remain above 400°C. For the most serious air-ingress accident which persists over several hours or days the continued oxidation can result in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material during any air-ingress accident would mitigate the structural effects and keep the core intact. Previous air oxidation testing of nuclear-grade graphite doped with varying levels of boron-carbide (B4C) at a nominal 739°C was conducted for a limited number of doped specimens demonstrating a dramatic reduction in oxidation rate for the boronated graphite grade. This report summarizes the conclusions from this small scoping study by determining the effects of oxidation on the mechanical strength resulting from oxidation of boronated and unboronated graphite to a 10% mass loss level. While the B4C additive did reduce mechanical strength loss during oxidation, adding B4C dopants to a level of 3.5% or more reduced the as-fabricated compressive strength nearly 50%. This effectively minimized any benefits realized from the protective film formed on the boronated grades. Future work to infuse different graphite grades with silicon- and boron-doped material as a post-machining conditioning step for nuclear components is discussed as a potential solution for these challenges in this report.

  9. MD-portal Materials Database: Effective Materials Property Information Management in Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyeonggeun; Kil, Soyeon; Kwon, Junhyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The collective properties of the nuclear materials are defined as standard industrial codes such as ASME codes. While in service, the materials are aged and degraded, and the initial properties are changed according to the operating environments. These changes are a matter of substantial concern of the operators, regulators, and researchers in nuclear fields. Hence, the material property database considering the degradation is required, and the successful management and use of material property information must be responsive to the continuing changes and increasing complexity in nuclear engineering materials. Recently, the nuclear materials division in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) launched a comprehensive portal website for nuclear material information, which is known as the MD-portal. The MD-portal contains various technical documents on the degradation and development of nuclear materials. Additionally, the nuclear materials database (MatDB) is incorporated in it. The MatDB covers the mechanical properties of various nuclear structural materials used as the components: a reactor pressure vessel, steam generator, and primary and secondary piping. In this study, we introduced the MD-portal MatDB briefly, and showed an application of the MatDB to the real case of material degradations in NPPs.

  10. Classical properties and semiclassical calculations in a spherical nuclear average potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, J.; Brut, F.; Arvieu, R.; Touchard, J.

    1984-03-01

    We study the relation between the classical properties or an average nuclear potential and its spectral properties. We have drawn the energy-action surface of this potential and related its properties to the spectral ones in the framework of the EBK semiclassical method. We also describe a method allowing us to get the evolution of the spectrum with the mass number

  11. Nickel-induced transformation of diamond into graphite and carbon nanotubes and the electron field emission properties of resulting composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunlu; Deng, Zejun; Zhou, Bo; Wei, Qiuping; Long, Hangyu; Wang, Yijia; Li, Jiaxin; Hu, Naixiu; Ma, Li; Lin, Cheng-Te; Yu, Zhiming; Zhou, Kechao

    2018-01-01

    The metal-induced transformation of diamond into graphite and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was achieved by catalytic deposition with nickel as the catalyst. The quality of catalytic products was assessed by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Results showed that the catalytic process could be controlled by adjusting the carbonaceous concentration in the deposition atmosphere, and new information concerning the diamond/Ni/graphite multi-phase mixed interface between diamond and carbon nanotube has been analyzed. A model was put forward to elucidate the mechanism of catalytic etching and growth on the diamond surface. In addition, the resulting diamond/CNTs composite film (10% CH4) was found to exhibit the lowest turn-on field of 6.9 V/μm as well as good current emission stability compared to the other composite films.

  12. Chemical properties of various organic electrolytes for lithium rechargeable batteries. Pt. 1.. Characterization of passivating layer formed on graphite in alkyl carbonate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Shoichiro; Asahina, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Yonei, Ayako; Yokoto, Kiyomi [Tsukuba Research Center, Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    The characteristics and reaction mechanisms of the passivating film formed on the surface of graphite were investigated in ethylene carbonate-diethyl carbonate solutions containing LiClO{sub 4}, LiPF{sub 6} and LiN(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2}. The electron consumption resulting on the irreversible capacity of graphite was almost equivalent to that used in the one-electron reduction of Li{sup +} found in the film. The electrochemical reactions in the first discharge process may be divided into the following steps: (i) `initial film formation step` from 1.4 to 0.55 V; (ii) `main film formation step` from 0.55 to 0.2 V, and (iii) `lithium intercalation step from 0.2 to 0.0 V. Most of the passivating film is formed together with the lithium intercalation reaction at step (ii). The passivating film formed at this step contained a significant amount of organic film such as EtOCO{sub 2}Li, (CH{sub 2}OCO{sub 2}Li){sub 2}, etc. Through the consecutive formation of passivating film at steps (i) and (ii), lithium intercalation into graphite proceeds smoothly without further decomposition of organic electrolyte. (orig.)

  13. Modeling Stress Strain Relationships and Predicting Failure Probabilities For Graphite Core Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffy, Stephen [Cleveland State Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2013-09-09

    This project will implement inelastic constitutive models that will yield the requisite stress-strain information necessary for graphite component design. Accurate knowledge of stress states (both elastic and inelastic) is required to assess how close a nuclear core component is to failure. Strain states are needed to assess deformations in order to ascertain serviceability issues relating to failure, e.g., whether too much shrinkage has taken place for the core to function properly. Failure probabilities, as opposed to safety factors, are required in order to capture the bariability in failure strength in tensile regimes. The current stress state is used to predict the probability of failure. Stochastic failure models will be developed that can accommodate possible material anisotropy. This work will also model material damage (i.e., degradation of mechanical properties) due to radiation exposure. The team will design tools for components fabricated from nuclear graphite. These tools must readily interact with finite element software--in particular, COMSOL, the software algorithm currently being utilized by the Idaho National Laboratory. For the eleastic response of graphite, the team will adopt anisotropic stress-strain relationships available in COMSO. Data from the literature will be utilized to characterize the appropriate elastic material constants.

  14. Modeling Stress Strain Relationships and Predicting Failure Probabilities For Graphite Core Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This project will implement inelastic constitutive models that will yield the requisite stress-strain information necessary for graphite component design. Accurate knowledge of stress states (both elastic and inelastic) is required to assess how close a nuclear core component is to failure. Strain states are needed to assess deformations in order to ascertain serviceability issues relating to failure, e.g., whether too much shrinkage has taken place for the core to function properly. Failure probabilities, as opposed to safety factors, are required in order to capture the bariability in failure strength in tensile regimes. The current stress state is used to predict the probability of failure. Stochastic failure models will be developed that can accommodate possible material anisotropy. This work will also model material damage (i.e., degradation of mechanical properties) due to radiation exposure. The team will design tools for components fabricated from nuclear graphite. These tools must readily interact with finite element software--in particular, COMSOL, the software algorithm currently being utilized by the Idaho National Laboratory. For the eleastic response of graphite, the team will adopt anisotropic stress-strain relationships available in COMSO. Data from the literature will be utilized to characterize the appropriate elastic material constants.

  15. Basic requirements of mechanical properties for nuclear pressure vessel materials in ASME-BPV code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Dong; Yao Weida

    2011-01-01

    The four basic aspects of strengths, ductility, toughness and fatigue strengths can be summarized for overall mechanical properties requirements of materials for nuclear pressure-retaining vessels in ASME-BPV code. These mechanical property indexes involve in the factors of melting, manufacture, delivery conditions, check or recheck for mechanical properties and chemical compositions, etc. and relate to degradation and damage accumulation during the use of materials. This paper specifically accounts for the basic requirements and theoretic basis of mechanical properties for nuclear pressure vessel materials in ASME-BPV code and states the internal mutual relationships among the four aspects of mechanical properties. This paper focuses on putting forward at several problems on mechanical properties of materials that shall be concerned about during design and manufacture for nuclear pressure vessels according to ASME-BPV code. (author)

  16. Surface Modification of Exfoliated Graphite Nano-Reinforcements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nano forms of graphite and carbon, such as flakes, worms, and tubes, can significantly modify the properties of polymers when used as reinforcements. Challenges...

  17. Graphitic Carbon Foam Structural Cores and Multifunctional Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Graphitic carbon foams include a family of material forms and products with mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties that are tailor-able over a wide range....

  18. Surface Modification of Exfoliated Graphite Nano-Reinforcements, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nano forms of graphite and carbon, such as flakes, worms, and tubes, can significantly modify the properties of polymers when used as reinforcements. Challenges...

  19. Conductive Graphitic Networks : From Atoms to Fuel Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Negro, E.

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic materials have attracted a great interest in the field of sustainable energy production and storage because of their excellent electrical, mechanical and chemical properties. This thesis modestly contributes to this global research by investigating new interconnected carbon nanostructures,

  20. Industrial Applications of Graphite Fluoride Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Kucera, Donald

    1991-01-01

    Based on fluorination technology developed during 1934 to 1959, and the fiber technology developed during the 1970s, a new process was developed to produce graphite fluoride fibers. In the process, pitch based graphitized carbon fibers are at first intercalated and deintercalated several times by bromine and iodine, followed by several cycles of nitrogen heating and fluorination at 350 to 370 C. Electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of this fiber depend on the fluorination process and the fluorine content of the graphite fluoride product. However, these properties are between those of graphite and those of PTFE (Teflon). Therefore, it is considered to be a semiplastic. The physical properties suggest that this new material may have many new and unexplored applications. For example, it can be a thermally conductive electrical insulator. Its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) can be adjusted to match that of silicon, and therefore, it can be a heat sinking printed circuit board which is CTE compatible with silicon. Using these fibers in printed circuit boards may provide improved electrical performance and reliability of the electronics on the board over existing designs. Also, since it releases fluorine at 300 C or higher, it can be used as a material to store fluorine and to conduct fluorination. This application may simplify the fluorination process and reduce the risk of handling fluorine.

  1. Gross properties of nuclei and nuclear excitations XXI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, H.

    1993-01-01

    These proceedings contain the articles and contributed papers presented at the named workshop. They are concerned with highly excited nuclear matter and relativistic heavy ion reactions together with some related topics. See hints under the relevant topics. (HSI)

  2. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of 137 Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of 137 Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000 0 C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ΔE of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon) 0 exp [-ΔE/RT] are about 4 x 10 -2 cm 2 /s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively

  3. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li+Cl–), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li+Cl– catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA. PMID:24748912

  4. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Noramalina; Jorge, A Belen; Corà, Furio; Gibbs, Christopher; Jervis, Rhodri; McMillan, Paul F; Wang, Xiaochen; Brett, Daniel J L

    2014-04-03

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li + Cl - ), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li + Cl - catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA.

  5. A new approach for preparation of magnetite-graphite composite: Intercalation of polyhydroxy iron cation into graphite oxide in L-arginine medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuqiong; Chen, Zhen; Jin, Yongdong; Chen, Shuihua; Wang, Hang; Geng, Junxia; Song, Qiang; Yang, Xiaodan; Ma, Lijian; Li, Shoujian; Qin, Zhi; Zheng, Chong

    2011-05-01

    A new approach to prepare magnetite nanoparticle pillared graphite has been put forward. The magnetic composite was normally obtained by calcining iron-intercalated graphite oxide, but the latter was prepared via intercalation reaction using polyhydroxy iron cation as iron precursor and pillaring agent, and a strong organic guanidine base, L-arginine, as alkaline agent and also intercalating agent. L-arginine, used herein instead of inorganic alkali, which would lead to the deoxygenation and reduction of graphite oxide into graphite, not only provided the alkaline condition for the formation of polyhydroxy iron cations, but also increased the interlayer spacing of graphite oxide to facilitate the intercalation of polyhydroxy iron cations into graphite oxide. The characterization by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer and nitrogen absorption indicated that the composite was nanoscale Fe 3O 4 pillared graphite with superparamagnetic property.

  6. The influence of the graphite mechanical properties on the constitutive response of a ferritic ductile cast iron – A micromechanical FE analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andriollo, Tito; Thorborg, Jesper; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    is considered and elasto-plastic behavior of both constituents is assumed; damage evolution in the ductile matrix is taken into account via Lemaitre’s isotropic model. Full 3D and 2D plane-stress finite element analyses are performed to simulate the loading conditions experienced by nodules located in the bulk...... as well as on the material surface. The effects of residual stresses arising during the manufacturing process are also accounted for. It is shown that the constitutive response of the equivalent composite medium can match ductile cast iron only if the graphite Young’s modulus value lies within a certain...

  7. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  8. A 3-D inelastic analysis of HTR graphite structures and a comparison with A 2-D approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willaschek, J.

    1979-01-01

    In High Temperature Reactor Cores (HTR) a large number of elements are constructed of nuclear graphite. The dimensions of the graphite components are limited by stresses and strains resulting from thermal loads, irradiation induced dimensional changes and stress-dependent irradiation creep. Therefore it is necessary to examine the feasibility of design concepts with regard to the structural integrity of the material. This paper presents an analysis of a radial reflector concept for use in a 3000 MWth HTR for process heat production. This concept of a pebble bed reactor (OTTO cycle) requires reflector dimensions and shapes which have previously not been used and which may exceed acceptable stress limits. Graphite reflector elements in a HTR are subject to a high fluence of fast neutrons. The fluence varies spatially within an element. Irradiation-induced strains occur which in turn vary non-linearly with the fluence. At low fluences the graphite shrinks. With increasing fluence shrinkage is saturated and after a 'turn-around' point the graphite begins to swell. The net effect of fluence gradient and irradiation-induced strain is a 'necking' of the element which moves radially outwards with time. In this paper a three-dimensional inelastic analysis of a graphite block with the above deformation history is described. The influence of irradiation on dimensional stability and other material properties was taken into account. Numerical results were obtained with the finite-element computer code ADINA, modified at INTERATOM for the task in hand. The radial reflector block was modelled using 21-node three-dimensional continuum elements of elastic-creep material. The element stiffness matrices were calculated using the standard 2x2x2 Gauss integration; material nonlinearities with quadratic displacement functions and linearised initial strains were employed. (orig.)

  9. Graphite technology development plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-07-01

    This document presents the plan for the graphite technology development required to support the design of the 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR within the US National Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. Besides descriptions of the required technology development, cost estimates, and schedules, the plan also includes the associated design functions and design requirements.

  10. (Irradiation creep of graphite)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, C.R.

    1990-12-21

    The traveler attended the Conference, International Symposium on Carbon, to present an invited paper, Irradiation Creep of Graphite,'' and chair one of the technical sessions. There were many papers of particular interest to ORNL and HTGR technology presented by the Japanese since they do not have a particular technology embargo and are quite open in describing their work and results. In particular, a paper describing the failure of Minor's law to predict the fatigue life of graphite was presented. Although the conference had an international flavor, it was dominated by the Japanese. This was primarily a result of geography; however, the work presented by the Japanese illustrated an internal program that is very comprehensive. This conference, a result of this program, was better than all other carbon conferences attended by the traveler. This conference emphasizes the need for US participation in international conferences in order to stay abreast of the rapidly expanding HTGR and graphite technology throughout the world. The United States is no longer a leader in some emerging technologies. The traveler was surprised by the Japanese position in their HTGR development. Their reactor is licensed and the major problem in their graphite program is how to eliminate it with the least perturbation now that most of the work has been done.

  11. The non-nuclear legislation and the communal property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciallella R, Norberto; Grancelli Cha, Nestor

    1996-01-01

    Since 1984, year in which the Bolson Municipality, Rio Negro province, declared the town a 'Non Nuclear Area', began to appear an abundant legislation that generically, it is know as 'Non Nuclear'. The provinces of Buenos Aires, Chubut, Formosa, La Pampa, Santa Cruz and Tierra del Fuego, have in their respective Constitutions non nuclear articles, while the provinces of Catamarca, Cordoba, Corrientes, Chaco, Entre Rios, Formosa, Rio Negro, San Luis, Santa Cruz, Santa Fe, Tierra del Fuego and Tucuman have sanctioned in their respective jurisdictions non nuclear laws. New projects of these laws are in consideration and treatment in the provinces of Catamarca, La Pampa, Mendoza, Santiago del Estero and Rio Negro. The present work compiles and analyzes the available information on this subject. Although the topic is not regulatory, it could have involved in the regulatory area in an eventual situation that could be presented between regulatory laws of federal and provincials reaches. This work describes the current situation and the probabilities consequences of the mentioned legislation. (author)

  12. Measurement of two phase flow properties using the nuclear reactor instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, R.W.; Washington Univ., Seattle; Crowe, R.D.; Dailey, D.J.; Kosaly, G.; Damborg, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    A procedure is introduced for characterizing one dimensional, two phase flow in terms of three properties; propagation, structure, and dynamics. It is shown that all of these properties can be measured by analyzing the response of the reactor neutron field to a two phase flow perturbation. Therefore, a nuclear reactor can be regarded as a two phase flow instrument. (author)

  13. Understanding Creep Mechanisms in Graphite with Experiments, Multiscale Simulations, and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eapen, Jacob [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Murty, Korukonda [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Burchell, Timothy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-06-02

    Disordering mechanisms in graphite have a long history with conflicting viewpoints. Using Raman and x-ray photon spectroscopy, electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction experiments and atomistic modeling and simulations, the current project has developed a fundamental understanding of early-to-late state radiation damage mechanisms in nuclear reactor grade graphite (NBG-18 and PCEA). We show that the topological defects in graphite play an important role under neutron and ion irradiation.

  14. Modelling deformation and fracture of Gilsocarbon graphite subject to service environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šavija, Branko; Smith, Gillian E.; Heard, Peter J.; Sarakinou, Eleni; Darnbrough, James E.; Hallam, Keith R.; Schlangen, Erik; Flewitt, Peter E. J.

    2018-02-01

    Commercial graphites are used for a wide range of applications. For example, Gilsocarbon graphite is used within the reactor core of advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGRs, UK) as a moderator. In service, the mechanical properties of the graphite are changed as a result of neutron irradiation induced defects and porosity arising from radiolytic oxidation. In this paper, we discuss measurements undertaken of mechanical properties at the micro-length-scale for virgin and irradiated graphite. These data provide the necessary inputs to an experimentally-informed model that predicts the deformation and fracture properties of Gilsocarbon graphite at the centimetre length-scale, which is commensurate with laboratory test specimen data. The model predictions provide an improved understanding of how the mechanical properties and fracture characteristics of this type of graphite change as a result of exposure to the reactor service environment.

  15. Hadron properties in nuclear matter and the phase structure of a skyrmionic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakhshiev, Ulugbek; Kim, Hyun-Chul

    2010-01-01

    Hadron properties and their interactions in a nuclear environment are considered in the framework of the in-medium modified Skyrme model. Furthermore, the influence of the medium modifications of the single hadron properties and their interactions to the stability of the whole system is considered by using the variational method of the Hartree-Fock type. In addition to previous studies, we discuss the possible in-medium modifications of the stabilizing Skyrme term which can be related to the modifications of vector meson properties in a nuclear environment. (author)

  16. Conflict between constitutional norms: monopoly of nuclear ore and the social function of property in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa-de-Moura, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    This monograph broaches about the conflict existing between the social Constitution of 1988, in relation to what is disposed in the Article 5, XXIII and XXIV, entrenchment clause of immediate application that determines the social function of property in Brazil, and articles 21, XXIII, and 177, V, that stipulate the monopoly of ores containing nuclear elements, i.e., those containing the chemical elements uranium, thorium, and plutonium in economically exploitable amounts. Initially, the work deals with legal definitions for nuclear ore, nuclear policy of some countries, the economical concepts of the social function of property and the negative aspects related to the maintenance of the nuclear ore in the state monopole regime in confrontation with the economic and social interest also expressed in the Constitutional Valance of 1988. Finally, it is presented an actualized compilation of nuclear laws related to the Brazilian nuclear policy and a glossary of terms used in the nuclear policy conducted by the Brazilian Nuclear Regulatory Agency (CNEN). (author)

  17. Graphitization of oil palm trunk chip with controlled heating condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, N. A.; Ghazali, C. M. R.; Ramli, M. M.; Halin, D. S. C.; Nainggolan, I.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to synthesize the synthetic graphite from oil palm trunk at lower temperature (various heating temperatures, 500 °C, 800 °C and 1,000 °C) with controlled condition and study the physical properties and characterization of the graphite obtained. After heat treatment process, the samples were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and analyzed using X'Pert Highscore Plus software. The morphological study was carried out by using Field Emission Electro Scanning Microscope (FESEM). Based on the analysis, by heating of the sample at 800 °C, the amorphous carbon and nanocrystalline graphite were observed.

  18. Patenting the bomb: nuclear weapons, intellectual property, and technological control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellerstein, Alex

    2008-03-01

    During the course of the Manhattan Project, the U.S. government secretly attempted to acquire a monopoly on the patent rights for inventions used in the production of nuclear weapons and nuclear energy. The use of patents as a system of control, while common for more mundane technologies, would seem at first glance to conflict with the regimes of secrecy that have traditionally been associated with nuclear weapons. In explaining the origins and operations of the Manhattan Project patent system, though, this essay argues that the utilization of patents was an ad hoc attempt at legal control of the atomic bomb by Manhattan Project administrators, focused on the monopolistic aspects of the patent system and preexisting patent secrecy legislation. From the present perspective, using patents as a method of control for such weapons seems inadequate, if not unnecessary; but at the time, when the bomb was a new and essentially unregulated technology, patents played an important role in the thinking of project administrators concerned with meaningful postwar control of the bomb.

  19. Graphite moderated {sup 252}Cf source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajo B, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Apdo. 89000, 1080A Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    The thorium molten salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a {sup 252}Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the {sup 252}Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. (Author)

  20. Elevated temperature properties of ferritic/martensitic steels for application to future nuclear reators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sung Ho; Ryu, Woo Seog; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2005-12-15

    The future nuclear systems such as nuclear hydrogen production reactors and fusion reactor require low activation and radiation embrittlement resistance in addition to excellent high temperature properties because their operating temperature are even higher than those of the light water reactors. The R and D of ferritic-martensitic steels in nuclear leading centuries like USA, Japan and EU has been continued for decades of years nuclear and they commercialized several steels. Korea consider modified 9Cr-1Mo steel as a candidate materials for reactor pressure vessel of very high temperature reactor. This state-of-the art report aimed to provide informations about the applicabilities of high Cr steels and low Cr steels through the analyses of their microstructures, mechanical properties and radiation characteristics. The metallurgical understanding of background of alloy evolutions might be helpful for the establishment of research orientation.

  1. Ultrafast Multiphoton Thermionic Photoemission from Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijing Tan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic heating of cold crystal lattices in nonlinear multiphoton excitation can transiently alter their physical and chemical properties. In metals where free electron densities are high and the relative fraction of photoexcited hot electrons is low, the effects are small, but in semimetals, where the free electron densities are low and the photoexcited densities can overwhelm them, the intense femtosecond laser excitation can induce profound changes. In semimetal graphite and its derivatives, strong optical absorption, weak screening of the Coulomb potential, and high cohesive energy enable extreme hot electron generation and thermalization to be realized under femtosecond laser excitation. We investigate the nonlinear interactions within a hot electron gas in graphite through multiphoton-induced thermionic emission. Unlike the conventional photoelectric effect, within about 25 fs, the memory of the excitation process, where resonant dipole transitions absorb up to eight quanta of light, is erased to produce statistical Boltzmann electron distributions with temperatures exceeding 5000 K; this ultrafast electronic heating causes thermionic emission to occur from the interlayer band of graphite. The nearly instantaneous thermalization of the photoexcited carriers through Coulomb scattering to extreme electronic temperatures characterized by separate electron and hole chemical potentials can enhance hot electron surface femtochemistry, photovoltaic energy conversion, and incandescence, and drive graphite-to-diamond electronic phase transition.

  2. Isospin-dependent properties of asymmetric nuclear matter in relativistic mean-field models

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lie-Wen; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Bao-An

    2007-01-01

    Using various relativistic mean-field models, including the nonlinear ones with meson field self-interactions, those with density-dependent meson-nucleon couplings, and the point-coupling models without meson fields, we have studied the isospin-dependent bulk and single-particle properties of asymmetric nuclear matter. In particular, we have determined the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy from these different relativistic mean-field models and compare the results with the constra...

  3. Graphite fluoride fibers and their applications in the space industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Chen; Long, Martin; Dever, Therese

    1990-01-01

    Characterization and potential space applications of graphite fluoride fibers from commercially available graphitized carbon fibers are presented. Graphite fluoride fibers with fluorine to carbon ratios of 0.65 and 0.68 were found to have electrical resistivity values of 10(exp 4) and 10(exp 11) Ohms-cm, respectively, and thermal conductivity values of 24 and 5 W/m-K, respectively. At this fluorine content range, the fibers have tensile strength of 0.25 + or - 0.10 GPa (36 + or - 14 ksi), Young's modulus of 170 + or - 30 GPa (25 + or - 5 Msi). The coefficient of thermal expansion value of a sample with fluorine to carbon ratio of 0.61 was found to be 7 ppm/C. These properties change and approach the graphite value as the fluorine content approach 0. Electrically insulative graphite fluoride fiber is at least five times more thermally conductive than fiberglass. Therefore, it can be used as a heat sinking printed circuit board material for low temperature, long life power electronics in spacecraft. Also, partially fluorinated fiber with tailor-made physical properties to meet the requirements of certain engineering design can be produced. For example, a partially fluorinated fiber could have a predetermined CTE value in -1.5 to 7 ppm/C range and would be suitable for use in solar concentrators in solar dynamic power systems. It could also have a predetermined electrical resistivity value suitable for use as a low observable material. Experimental data indicate that slightly fluorinated graphite fibers are more durable in the atomic oxygen environment than pristine graphite. Therefore, fluorination of graphite used in the construction of spacecraft that would be exposed to the low Earth orbit atomic oxygen may protect defect sites in atomic oxygen protective coatings and therefore decrease the rate of degradation of graphite.

  4. Harwell Graphite Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linacre, J.K.

    1970-01-01

    The calorimeter is of the steady state temperature difference type. It contains a graphite sample supported axially in a graphite outer jacket, the assembly being contained in a thin stainless steel outer can. The temperature of the jacket and the temperature difference between sample and jacket are measured by chromel-alumel thermocouples. The instrument is calibrated by means of an electric heater of low mass positioned on the axis of the sample. The resistance of the heater is known and both current through the heater and the potential across it may be measured. The instrument is filled with nitrogen at a pressure of one half atmosphere at room temperature. The calorimeter has been designed for prolonged operation at temperatures up to 600°C, and dose rates up to 1 Wg -1 , and instruments have been in use for periods in excess of one year

  5. Covariant energy density functionals: Nuclear matter constraints and global ground state properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasjev, A. V.; Agbemava, S. E.

    2016-05-01

    The correlations between global description of the ground state properties (binding energies, charge radii) and nuclear matter properties of the state-of-the-art covariant energy density functionals have been studied. It was concluded that the strict enforcement of the constraints on the nuclear matter properties (NMP) defined in Dutra et al. [Phys. Rev. C 90, 055203 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevC.90.055203] will not necessarily lead to the functionals with good description of the binding energies and other ground and excited state properties. In addition, it will not substantially reduce the uncertainties in the predictions of the binding energies in neutron-rich systems. It turns out that the functionals, which come close to satisfying these NMP constraints, have some problems in the description of existing data. On the other hand, these problems are either absent or much smaller in the functionals which are carefully fitted to finite nuclei but which violate some NMP constraints. This is a consequence of the fact that the properties of finite nuclei are defined not only by nuclear matter properties but also by underlying shell effects. The mismatch of phenomenological content, existing in all modern functionals, related to nuclear matter physics and the physics of finite nuclei could also be responsible.

  6. Features of spherical uranium-graphite HTGR fuel elements control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreindlin, I.I.; Oleynikov, P.P.; Shtan, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    Control features of spherical HTGR uranium-graphite fuel elements with spherical coated fuel particles are mainly determined by their specific construction and fabrication technology. The technology is chiefly based on methods of ceramic fuel (fuel microspheres fabrication) and graphite production practice it is necessary to deal with a lot of problems from determination of raw materials properties to final fuel elements testing. These procedures are described

  7. Secondary phases formed during nuclear waste glass-water interactions: Thermodynamic and derived properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, W.F.

    1992-08-01

    The thermodynamic properties of secondary phases observed to form during nuclear waste glass-water interactions are of particular interest as it is with the application of these properties together with the thermodynamic properties of other solid phases, fluid phases, and aqueous species that one may predict the environmental consequences of introducing radionuclides contained in the glass into groundwater at a high-level nuclear waste repository. The validation of these predicted consequences can be obtained from laboratory experiments and field observations at natural analogue sites. The purpose of this report is to update and expand the previous compilation (McKenzie, 1991) of thermodynamic data retrieved from the literature and/or estimated for secondary phases observed to form (and candidate phases from observed chemical compositions) during nuclear waste glass-water interactions. In addition, this report includes provisionally recommended thermodynamic data of secondary phases

  8. The 132Sn giant dipole resonance as a constraint on nuclear matter properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Brandon; Bonasera, Giacomo; Shlomo, Shalom

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear giant resonances provide a sensitive method for constraining the properties of nuclear matter (NM) - many of which have large uncertainties - and thereby improve the nuclear energy-density functional. In this work, self-consistent Hartree-Fock random-phase approximation (HF-RPA) theory was employed to calculate the strength function and energy of the isovector giant dipole resonance (IVGDR) in the doubly-magic 132Sn nucleus. Several (17) commonly-used Skyrme-type interactions were employed. The correlations between the IVGDR centroid energy and each nuclear matter property were explored, as were correlations between the nuclear matter properties and the 132Sn neutron skin thickness rn -rp . Experimental data for the IVGDR centroid energy was used to constrain the symmetry energy density, the symmetry energy, and its first and second derivatives, respectively, of NM. Further investigation, particularly of nuclides far from stability, will be needed to extend the nuclear energy-density functional to the extremes of density and neutron abundance found in neutron stars and astrophysical nucleosynthesis environments.

  9. Processing of Irradiated Graphite to Meet Acceptance Criteria for Waste Disposal. Results of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-05-01

    Graphite is widely used in the nuclear industry and in research facilities and this has led to increasing amounts of irradiated graphite residing in temporary storage facilities pending disposal. This publication arises from a coordinated research project (CRP) on the processing of irradiated graphite to meet acceptance criteria for waste disposal. It presents the findings of the CRP, the general conclusions and recommendations. The topics covered include, graphite management issues, characterization of irradiated graphite, processing and treatment, immobilization and disposal. Included on the attached CD-ROM are formal reports from the participants

  10. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kirilova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25  megapascal (MPa and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s−1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  11. Thermodynamic Simulation of Equilibrium Composition of Reaction Products at Dehydration of a Technological Channel in a Uranium-Graphite Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavliuk, A. O.; Zagumennov, V. S.; Kotlyarevskiy, S. G.; Bespala, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    The problems of accumulation of nuclear fuel spills in the graphite stack in the course of operation of uranium-graphite nuclear reactors are considered. The results of thermodynamic analysis of the processes in the graphite stack at dehydration of a technological channel, fuel element shell unsealing and migration of fission products, and activation of stable nuclides in structural elements of the reactor and actinides inside the graphite moderator are given. The main chemical reactions and compounds that are produced in these modes in the reactor channel during its operation and that may be hazardous after its shutdown and decommissioning are presented. Thermodynamic simulation of the equilibrium composition is performed using the specialized code TERRA. The results of thermodynamic simulation of the equilibrium composition in different cases of technological channel dehydration in the course of the reactor operation show that, if the temperature inside the active core of the nuclear reactor increases to the melting temperature of the fuel element, oxides and carbides of nuclear fuel are produced. The mathematical model of the nonstationary heat transfer in a graphite stack of a uranium-graphite reactor in the case of the technological channel dehydration is presented. The results of calculated temperature evolution at the center of the fuel element, the replaceable graphite element, the air gap, and in the surface layer of the block graphite are given. The numerical results show that, in the case of dehydration of the technological channel in the uranium-graphite reactor with metallic uranium, the main reaction product is uranium dioxide UO2 in the condensed phase. Low probability of production of pyrophoric uranium compounds (UH3) in the graphite stack is proven, which allows one to disassemble the graphite stack without the risk of spontaneous graphite ignition in the course of decommissioning of the uranium-graphite nuclear reactor.

  12. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram

    2017-07-20

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a mechanical pressing operation to generate a bromine-graphite/metal composite material.

  13. Properties of SA 533 type B class 1 steel plate for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Magoya; Ozawa, Hiroyasu; Nakano, Naokazu; Kato, Yutaka; Watanabe, Seiichi; Toyama, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of SA533 Type B Class 1 125 mm thick plate for nuclear power plant are introduced. The steel is required to have the highest quality such as excellent internal soundness, fracture toughness, fatigue properties and low neutron irradiation embrittlement therefore the steel making was performed by STB-LF-RH process to obtain sound metal and the ingot making was performed by LH-unidirectionally solidified ingot method-process to eliminate micro segregation. The results show that the steel plate has excellent properties to meet the requirement of material for nuclear power plant. (author)

  14. Chemical stabilization of graphite surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bistrika, Alexander A.; Lerner, Michael M.

    2018-04-03

    Embodiments of a device, or a component of a device, including a stabilized graphite surface, methods of stabilizing graphite surfaces, and uses for the devices or components are disclosed. The device or component includes a surface comprising graphite, and a plurality of haloaryl ions and/or haloalkyl ions bound to at least a portion of the graphite. The ions may be perhaloaryl ions and/or perhaloalkyl ions. In certain embodiments, the ions are perfluorobenzenesulfonate anions. Embodiments of the device or component including stabilized graphite surfaces may maintain a steady-state oxidation or reduction surface current density after being exposed to continuous oxidation conditions for a period of at least 1-100 hours. The device or component is prepared by exposing a graphite-containing surface to an acidic aqueous solution of the ions under oxidizing conditions. The device or component can be exposed in situ to the solution.

  15. Full aperture imaging with stereoscopic properties in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strocovsky, Sergio G.; Otero, D.

    2011-01-01

    The imaging techniques based on gamma camera (CG) and used in nuclear medicine have low spatial resolution and low sensitivity due to the use of the collimator. However, this element is essential for the formation of images in CG. The aim of this work is to show the principles of a new technique to overcome the limitations of existing techniques based on CG. Here, we present a Full Aperture Imaging (FAI) technique which is based on the edge-encoding of gamma radiation and differential detection. It takes advantage of the fact that gamma radiation is spatially incoherent. The mathematical principles and the method of images reconstruction with the new proposed technique are explained in detail. The FAI technique is tested by means of Monte Carlo simulations with filiform and spherical sources. The results show that FAI technique has greater sensitivity (>100 times) and greater spatial resolution (>2.6 times) than that of GC with LEHR collimator, in both cases, with and without attenuating material and long and short-distance configurations. The FAI decoding algorithm reconstructs simultaneously four different projections which are located in separate image fields on the detector plane, while GC produces only one projection per acquisition. Simulations have allowed comparison of both techniques under ideal identical conditions. Our results show it is possible to apply an extremely simple encoded imaging technique, and get three-dimensional radioactivity information for simplistic geometry sources. The results are promising enough to evaluate the possibility of future research with more complex sources typical of nuclear medicine imaging. (author)

  16. Isospin-dependent properties of asymmetric nuclear matter in relativistic mean field models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lie-Wen; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Bao-An

    2007-11-01

    Using various relativistic mean-field models, including nonlinear ones with meson field self-interactions, models with density-dependent meson-nucleon couplings, and point-coupling models without meson fields, we have studied the isospin-dependent bulk and single-particle properties of asymmetric nuclear matter. In particular, we have determined the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy from these different relativistic mean-field models and compared the results with the constraints recently extracted from analyses of experimental data on isospin diffusion and isotopic scaling in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions as well as from measured isotopic dependence of the giant monopole resonances in even-A Sn isotopes. Among the 23 parameter sets in the relativistic mean-field model that are commonly used for nuclear structure studies, only a few are found to give symmetry energies that are consistent with the empirical constraints. We have also studied the nuclear symmetry potential and the isospin splitting of the nucleon effective mass in isospin asymmetric nuclear matter. We find that both the momentum dependence of the nuclear symmetry potential at fixed baryon density and the isospin splitting of the nucleon effective mass in neutron-rich nuclear matter depend not only on the nuclear interactions but also on the definition of the nucleon optical potential.

  17. State-of-the-art review of materials properties of nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, J.E.; Nelson, R.D.; Turcotte, R.P.; Gray, W.J.; Merz, M.D.; Roberts, F.P.; Weber, W.J.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.; Clark, D.E.

    1981-04-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) was established at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to assemble a standardized nuclear waste materials data base for use in research, systems and facility design, safety analyses, and waste management decisions. This centralized data base will be provided through the means of a Nuclear Waste Materials Handbook. The first issue of the Handbook will be published in the fall of 1981 in looseleaf format so that it can be updated as additional information becomes available. To ensure utmost reliability, all materials data appearing in the Handbook will be obtained by standard procedures defined in the Handbook and approved by an independent Materials Review Board (MRB) comprised of materials experts from Department of Energy laboratories and from universities and industry. In the interim before publication of the Handbook there is need for a report summarizing the existing materials data on nuclear waste forms. This review summarizes materials property data for the nuclear waste forms that are being developed for immobilization of high-level radioactive waste. It is intended to be a good representation of the knowledge concerning the properties of HLW forms as of March 1981. The table of contents lists the following topics: introduction which covers waste-form categories, and important waste-form materials properties; physical properties; mechanical properties; chemical durability; vaporization; radiation effects; and thermal phase stability

  18. Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

  19. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) graphite pebble fuel: Review of technologies for reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcwilliams, A. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-08

    This report reviews literature on reprocessing high temperature gas-cooled reactor graphite fuel components. A basic review of the various fuel components used in the pebble bed type reactors is provided along with a survey of synthesis methods for the fabrication of the fuel components. Several disposal options are considered for the graphite pebble fuel elements including the storage of intact pebbles, volume reduction by separating the graphite from fuel kernels, and complete processing of the pebbles for waste storage. Existing methods for graphite removal are presented and generally consist of mechanical separation techniques such as crushing and grinding chemical techniques through the use of acid digestion and oxidation. Potential methods for reprocessing the graphite pebbles include improvements to existing methods and novel technologies that have not previously been investigated for nuclear graphite waste applications. The best overall method will be dependent on the desired final waste form and needs to factor in the technical efficiency, political concerns, cost, and implementation.

  20. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  1. Surface area-burnoff correlation for the steam--graphite reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, W.A. Jr.; Malinauskas, A.P.

    1977-01-01

    The oxidation of core graphite by steam of air represents a problem area of significant concern in safety analyses for the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). Core and core-support graphite integrity and strength deteriorate with oxidation of the graphite, and oxidation furthermore could affect the rate of fission product release under upset conditions. Consequently, modeling of core response during steam or air ingress conditions requires an expression for the rate of graphite interaction with those impurities. The steam--graphite reaction in particular is a complex interaction of mass transport within the graphite with chemi-sorption and reaction on accessible surfaces; experimental results from graphite to graphite are highly variable, and the description of the reaction is not yet completely consistent. A simple etch pit model relating surface area to burnoff has been proposed and shown to provide reasonable correlation with experimental data obtained from steam oxidation studies of nuclear grade H-327 graphite. Unaccounted differences between theory and experiment arise at burnoffs exceeding 3 to 5 percent. The model, while not complete nor comprehensive, is consistent with experimental observations of graphite oxidation by O 2 (air), CO 2 , or H 2 O, and could have some utility in safety analysis

  2. Recent studies of nuclear and chemical properties of elements 103, 104 and 105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1990-08-01

    Information obtained since 1983 on the nuclear and chemical properties of element 103, the last on the actinide series, and elements 104 and 105, at the beginning of the transactinide series, is reviewed. Their chemical properties are compared with their lanthanide and lighter group 4 and 5 homologs and evidence for possible relativistic effects is discussed. The current knowledge of the nuclear properties of these elements and how these affect of the study of chemical properties is discussed. Some of the challenges involved in the study of short-lived isotopes which can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' at an appropriate accelerator and the prognosis for future studies of these and still heavier elements are considered. 40 refs., 4 figs

  3. Constructing Sheet-On-Sheet Structured Graphitic Carbon Nitride/Reduced Graphene Oxide/Layered MnO2 Ternary Nanocomposite with Outstanding Catalytic Properties on Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianhua; Li, Dongnan; Chen, Yu; Tan, Linghua; Kou, Bo; Wan, Fushun; Jiang, Wei; Li, Fengsheng

    2017-01-01

    We unprecedentedly report that layered MnO2 nanosheets were in situ formed onto the surface of covalently bonded graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (g-C3N4/rGO), forming sheet-on-sheet structured two dimension (2D) graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide/layered MnO2 ternary nanocomposite (g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2) with outstanding catalytic properties on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). The covalently bonded g-C3N4/rGO was firstly prepared by the calcination of graphene oxide-guanidine hydrochloride precursor (GO-GndCl), following by its dispersion into the KMnO4 aqueous solution to construct the g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 ternary nanocomposite. FT-IR, XRD, Raman as well as the XPS results clearly demonstrated the chemical interaction between g-C3N4, rGO and MnO2. TEM and element mapping indicated that layered g-C3N4/rGO was covered with thin MnO2 nanosheets. Furthermore, the obtained g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 nanocomposite exhibited promising catalytic capacity on thermal decomposition of AP. Upon addition of 2 wt % g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 ternary nanocomposite as catalyst, the thermal decomposition temperature of AP was largely decreased up by 142.5 °C, which was higher than that of pure g-C3N4, g-C3N4/rGO and MnO2, respectively, demonstrating the synergistic catalysis of the as-prepared nanocomposite. PMID:29244721

  4. Constructing Sheet-On-Sheet Structured Graphitic Carbon Nitride/Reduced Graphene Oxide/Layered MnO2 Ternary Nanocomposite with Outstanding Catalytic Properties on Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Xu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We unprecedentedly report that layered MnO2 nanosheets were in situ formed onto the surface of covalently bonded graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (g-C3N4/rGO, forming sheet-on-sheet structured two dimension (2D graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide/layered MnO2 ternary nanocomposite (g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 with outstanding catalytic properties on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP. The covalently bonded g-C3N4/rGO was firstly prepared by the calcination of graphene oxide-guanidine hydrochloride precursor (GO-GndCl, following by its dispersion into the KMnO4 aqueous solution to construct the g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 ternary nanocomposite. FT-IR, XRD, Raman as well as the XPS results clearly demonstrated the chemical interaction between g-C3N4, rGO and MnO2. TEM and element mapping indicated that layered g-C3N4/rGO was covered with thin MnO2 nanosheets. Furthermore, the obtained g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 nanocomposite exhibited promising catalytic capacity on thermal decomposition of AP. Upon addition of 2 wt % g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 ternary nanocomposite as catalyst, the thermal decomposition temperature of AP was largely decreased up by 142.5 °C, which was higher than that of pure g-C3N4, g-C3N4/rGO and MnO2, respectively, demonstrating the synergistic catalysis of the as-prepared nanocomposite.

  5. Constructing Sheet-On-Sheet Structured Graphitic Carbon Nitride/Reduced Graphene Oxide/Layered MnO₂ Ternary Nanocomposite with Outstanding Catalytic Properties on Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianhua; Li, Dongnan; Chen, Yu; Tan, Linghua; Kou, Bo; Wan, Fushun; Jiang, Wei; Li, Fengsheng

    2017-12-15

    We unprecedentedly report that layered MnO₂ nanosheets were in situ formed onto the surface of covalently bonded graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (g-C₃N₄/rGO), forming sheet-on-sheet structured two dimension (2D) graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide/layered MnO₂ ternary nanocomposite (g-C₃N₄/rGO/MnO₂) with outstanding catalytic properties on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). The covalently bonded g-C₃N₄/rGO was firstly prepared by the calcination of graphene oxide-guanidine hydrochloride precursor (GO-GndCl), following by its dispersion into the KMnO₄ aqueous solution to construct the g-C₃N₄/rGO/MnO₂ ternary nanocomposite. FT-IR, XRD, Raman as well as the XPS results clearly demonstrated the chemical interaction between g-C₃N₄, rGO and MnO₂. TEM and element mapping indicated that layered g-C₃N₄/rGO was covered with thin MnO₂ nanosheets. Furthermore, the obtained g-C₃N₄/rGO/MnO₂ nanocomposite exhibited promising catalytic capacity on thermal decomposition of AP. Upon addition of 2 wt % g-C₃N₄/rGO/MnO₂ ternary nanocomposite as catalyst, the thermal decomposition temperature of AP was largely decreased up by 142.5 °C, which was higher than that of pure g-C₃N₄, g-C₃N₄/rGO and MnO₂, respectively, demonstrating the synergistic catalysis of the as-prepared nanocomposite.

  6. Experimental approach and modelling of the mechanical behaviour of graphite fuel elements subjected to compression pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forquin P.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the activities led by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF relative to the future nuclear systems, the improvement of recycling of fuel elements and their components is a major issue. One of the studied systems by the GIF is the graphite-moderated high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR. The fuel elements are composed of fuel roads half-inch in diameter named compacts. The compacts contain spherical particles made of actinide kernels about 500 m in diameter coated with three layers of carbon and silicon carbide, each about 50 m thick, dispersed in a graphite matrix. Recycling of compacts requires first a separation of triso-particles from the graphite matrix and secondly, the separation of the triso-coating from the kernels. This aim may be achieved by using pulsed currents: the compacts are placed within a cell filled by water and exposed to high voltage between 200 – 500 kV and discharge currents from 10 to 20 kA during short laps of time (about 2 µs [1-2]. This repeated treatment leads to a progressive fragmentation of the graphite matrix and a disassembly of the compacts. In order to improve understanding of the fragmentation properties of compacts a series of quasi-static and dynamic experiments have been conducted with similar cylindrical samples containing 10% (volume fraction of SiC particles coated in a graphite matrix. First, quasi-static compression tests have been performed to identify the mechanical behaviour of the material at low strain-rates (Fig.1. The experiments reveal a complex elasto-visco-plastic behaviour before a brittle failure. The mechanical response is characterised by a low yield stress (about 1 MPa, a strong strain-hardening in the loading phase and marked hysteresis-loops during unloading-reloading stages. Brittle failure is observed for axial stress about 13 MPa. In parallel, a series of flexural tests have been performed with the aim to characterise the quasi-static tensile strength of the

  7. Thermal migration of deuterium implanted in graphite: Influence of free surface proximity and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guillou, M. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Moncoffre, N., E-mail: n.moncoffre@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); CEA/DEN – Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Pipon, Y. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Institut Universitaire Technologique, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Ammar, M.R. [CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Université Orléans, CS90055, F-45071 Orléans cedex 2 (France); Rouzaud, J.N.; Deldicque, D. [Laboratoire de Géologie de l’Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, UMR CNRS ENS 8538, F-75231 Paris cedex 5 (France)

    2016-03-15

    This paper is a contribution to the study of the behavior of activation products produced in irradiated nuclear graphite, graphite being the moderator of the first French generation of CO{sub 2} cooled nuclear fission reactors. This paper is focused on the thermal release of Tritium, a major contributor to the initial activity, taking into account the role of the free surfaces (open pores and graphite surface). Two kinds of graphite were compared. On one hand, Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG), a model well graphitized graphite, and on the other hand, SLA2, a porous less graphitized nuclear graphite. Deuterium ion implantation at three different energies 70, 200 and 390 keV allows simulating the presence of Tritium at three different depths, corresponding respectively to projected ranges R{sub p} of 0.75, 1.7 and 3.2 μm. The D isotopic tracing is performed thanks to the D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction. The graphite structure is studied by Raman microspectrometry. Thermal annealing is performed in the temperature range 200–1200 °C up to 300 h annealing time. As observed in a previous study, the results show that the D release occurs according to three kinetic regimes: a rapid permeation through open pores, a transient regime corresponding to detrapping and diffusion of D located at low energy sites correlated to the edges of crystallites and finally a saturation regime attributed to detrapping of interstitial D located at high energy sites inside the crystallites. Below 600 °C, D release is negligible whatever the implantation depth and the graphite type. The present paper clearly puts forward that above 600 °C, the D release decreases at deeper implantation depths and strongly depends on the graphite structure. In HOPG where high energy sites are more abundant, the D release is less dependent on the surface proximity compared to SLA2. In SLA2, in which the low energy sites prevail, the D release curves are clearly shifted towards lower

  8. Thermal migration of deuterium implanted in graphite: Influence of free surface proximity and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guillou, M.; Moncoffre, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Pipon, Y.; Ammar, M. R.; Rouzaud, J. N.; Deldicque, D.

    2016-03-01

    This paper is a contribution to the study of the behavior of activation products produced in irradiated nuclear graphite, graphite being the moderator of the first French generation of CO2 cooled nuclear fission reactors. This paper is focused on the thermal release of Tritium, a major contributor to the initial activity, taking into account the role of the free surfaces (open pores and graphite surface). Two kinds of graphite were compared. On one hand, Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG), a model well graphitized graphite, and on the other hand, SLA2, a porous less graphitized nuclear graphite. Deuterium ion implantation at three different energies 70, 200 and 390 keV allows simulating the presence of Tritium at three different depths, corresponding respectively to projected ranges Rp of 0.75, 1.7 and 3.2 μm. The D isotopic tracing is performed thanks to the D(3He,p)4He nuclear reaction. The graphite structure is studied by Raman microspectrometry. Thermal annealing is performed in the temperature range 200-1200 °C up to 300 h annealing time. As observed in a previous study, the results show that the D release occurs according to three kinetic regimes: a rapid permeation through open pores, a transient regime corresponding to detrapping and diffusion of D located at low energy sites correlated to the edges of crystallites and finally a saturation regime attributed to detrapping of interstitial D located at high energy sites inside the crystallites. Below 600 °C, D release is negligible whatever the implantation depth and the graphite type. The present paper clearly puts forward that above 600 °C, the D release decreases at deeper implantation depths and strongly depends on the graphite structure. In HOPG where high energy sites are more abundant, the D release is less dependent on the surface proximity compared to SLA2. In SLA2, in which the low energy sites prevail, the D release curves are clearly shifted towards lower temperatures when D is located

  9. Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Spark Plasma Sintered Fe-Based Bulk Metallic Glass/Graphite Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiulin Ji

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bulk metallic glass (BMG and BMG-graphite composites were fabricated using spark plasma sintering at the sintering temperature of 575 °C and holding time of 15 min. The sintered composites exhibited partial crystallization and the presence of distributed porosity and graphite particles. The effect of graphite reinforcement on the tribological properties of the BMG/graphite composites was investigated using dry ball-on-disc sliding wear tests. The reinforcement of graphite resulted in a reduction in both the wear rate and the coefficient of friction as compared to monolithic BMG samples. The wear surfaces of BMG/graphite composites showed regions of localized wear loss due to microcracking and fracture, as was also the case with the regions covered with graphite-rich protective film due to smearing of pulled off graphite particles.

  10. Properties of neutron-rich nuclei studied by fission product nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.A.; Henry, E.A.; Griffin, H.C.; Lien, O.G. III; Lane, S.M.; Stevenson, P.C.; Yaffe, R.P.; Skarnemark, G.

    1979-09-01

    A review is given of the properties of neutron-rich nuclei studied by fission product nuclear chemistry and includes the techniques used in elemental isolation and current research on the structure of nuclei near 132 Sn, particle emission, and coexisting structure in both neutron-poor and neutron-rich nuclei. 35 references

  11. Properties of two Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus isolates obtained from the microbial pesticide Gypchek

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Slavicek; John Podgwaite; Carita. Lanner-Herrera

    1992-01-01

    Two Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus isolates, 5-6 and A2-1, differing in the phenotypic characteristic of the number of viral occlusions in infected cells, were obtained from a production lot of the microbial pesticide Gypchek and several of their replication properties were investigated and compared. Budded virus titer produced in cell...

  12. Transport properties of nuclear wastes in geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, M.G.; Rickert, P.; Fried, S.; Friedman, A.M.; Steindler, M.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed with Cs, Pu, Np, and Am to examine the migratory characteristics of long-lived radionuclides that could be mobilized by groundwaters infiltrating a nuclear waste repository and the surrounding geologic body. In column infiltration experiments, the positions of peak concentrations of Cs in chalk or shale columns, Pu and Am in limestone, sandstone, or tuff and neptunium in a limestone column did not move when the columns were infiltrated with water. However, fractions of all of the nuclides were seen downstream from the peaks, indicating a large dispersion in the relative migration rates of the trace elements in the lithic materials studied. Static absorption experiments showed that plutonium and americium are strongly absorbed from solution by common rocks and that their migration relative to groundwater flow is thereby retarded. Reaction rates of these dissolved elements with rocks were found to vary considerably in different rock-element systems. Following a sorption step in batch experiments with granulated basalt and Am bearing water, Pu and Am were desorbed from rock and repartitioned between rock and solution to an extent comparable to their distribution during absorption. In contrast, when tablets of various rocks were allowed to dry between absorption and desorption tests, Pu and Am were not generally desorbed from the tablets.In batch experiments with Pu and Am-bearing water and granulated basalt of several different particle sizes, the partitioning of Am and Pu did not correlate with the calculated area of the fracture surfaces nor did the partitioning remain constant (as did the measured surface area). Partitioning is concluded to be a bulk phenomenon with complete penetration of 30 to 40 mesh and smaller particles. 9 tables, 4 figs

  13. Graphitic packing removal tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Kurt Edward; Kolsun, George J.

    1997-01-01

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece. he packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  14. Neutron irradiation effects on graphite cloth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    A series of cloth and fiber samples has been irradiated to fluences of 3.5, 7.3, and 10 x 10 21 cm -2 EFF* at 470 0 C. Data from the first set of samples show large shrinkages relative to that found for typical nuclear graphites. Nevertheless, all but one of the 2-dimensional cloths were unchanged except for the shrinkage. The 3-dimensional cloths, on the other hand, have deteriorated apparently because these types of weaves are less able to accommodate the large axial fiber shrinkages

  15. Rubber property: compression set induced by nuclear radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The methods cover the testing of vulcanized rubber parts that are to be assembled in such a manner that the rubber will remain subjected to compressive stresses or shear during continuous exposure to high energy radiation. Three methods are covered: compression set under constant load with measurements performed at or near the site of irradiation; compression set under constant deflection with measurements performed at or near the site of irradiation; compression set under constant deflection with measurements performed at a site remote from irradiation facility. Each method includes a discussion of the compression device, test specimens, procedure, calculation, and report. The compression set tests are intended to measure the ability of vulcanized rubber compounds to retain elastic properties during prolonged periods of static loading in a field of high energy radiation

  16. Correlation of macroscopic material properties with microscopic nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Two primary irradiation-induced changes occur during neutron irradiation: the displacement of atoms forming crystal defects and the transmutation of atoms into either gaseous or solid products. The material scientist studying irradiation damage to material by fusion-produced neutrons is faced with several questions: Is the nature of high-energy (14-MeV) displacement damage the same as or different from that caused by fission neutrons (< 2 MeV). How do the high helium concentrations expected in a fusion environment affect the material properties. What effects do solid transmutation products have on the behavior of the irradiated materials. In the past few years, much work has been done to answer these questions. This paper reviews recent work in this area

  17. Research on technology of evaluating thermal property data of nuclear power materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hidetaka; Baba, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Tsuyoshi; Kishimoto, Isao; Taketoshi, Naoyuki; Arai, Teruo

    1997-01-01

    For the materials of first wall and diverter of nuclear fusion reactor, in order to withstand steady and unsteady high heat flux load, excellent thermal characteristics are required. It is strongly demanded to measure such thermal property values as heat conductivity, heat diffusivity, specific heat capacity, emissivity and so using small test pieces up to higher than 2000degC. As the materials of nuclear reactors are subjected to neutron irradiation, in order to secure the long term reliability of the materials, it is very important to establish the techniques for forecasting the change of the thermal property values due to irradiation effect. Also the establishment of the techniques for estimating the thermal property values of new materials like low radioactivation material is important. In National Research Laboratory of Me