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Sample records for nuclear fusion driven

  1. Concept evaluation of nuclear fusion driven symbiotic energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renier, J.P.; Hoffman, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper analyzes systems based on D-T and semi-catalyzed D-D fusion-powered U233 breeders. Two different blanket types were used: metallic thorium pebble-bed blankets with a batch reprocessing mode and a molten salt blanket with on-line continuous or batch reprocessing. All fusion-driven blankets are assumed to have spherical geometries, with a 85% closure. Neutronics depletion calculations were performed with a revised version of the discrete ordinates code XSDRN-PM, using multigroup (100 neutron, 21 gamma-ray groups) coupled cross-section libraries. These neutronics calculations are coupled with a scenario optimization and cost analysis code. Also, the fusion burn was shaped so as to keep the blanket maximum power density below a preset value, and to improve the performance of the fusion-driven systems. The fusion-driven symbiotes are compared with LMFBR-driven energy systems. The nuclear fission breeders that were used as drivers have parameters characteristic of heterogeneous, oxide LMFBRs. They are net plutonium users - the plutonium is obtained from the discharges of LWRs - and U233 is bred in the fission breeder thorium blankets. The analyses of the symbiotic energy systems were performed at equilibrium, at maximum rate of grid expansion, and for a given nuclear power demand

  2. The Fusion Driven Rocket: Nuclear Propulsion through Direct Conversion of Fusion Energy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Fusion Driven rocket (FDR) represents a revolutionary approach to fusion propulsion where the power source releases its energy directly into the propellant, not...

  3. Review of accelerator driven heavy ion nuclear fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Hofmann

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Using high energy accelerators for energy production by nuclear fission goes back to the 1950's with plans for “breeder accelerators” as well as with early ideas on subcritical reactors, which are currently pursued in China and other countries. Also, fusion came in, when the idea emerged in the mid 1970's to use accelerators and their highly time and space compressed beams in order to generate the extremely high density and temperatures required for inertial fusion energy production. Due to the higher repetition rates and efficiencies of accelerators, this was seen as a promising alternative to using high power lasers. After an introduction to nuclear fission applications of accelerators, this review summarizes some of the scientific developments directed towards this challenging application – with focus on the European HIDIF-study- and outlines parameters of future high energy density experiments after construction of the FAIR/Germany and HIAF/China heavy ion accelerator projects.

  4. Nuclear Propulsion through Direct Conversion of Fusion Energy: The Fusion Driven Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slough, John; Pancotti, Anthony; Kirtley, David; Pihl, Christopher; Pfaff, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The future of manned space exploration and development of space depends critically on the creation of a dramatically more proficient propulsion architecture for in-space transportation. A very persuasive reason for investigating the applicability of nuclear power in rockets is the vast energy density gain of nuclear fuel when compared to chemical combustion energy. Current nuclear fusion efforts have focused on the generation of electric grid power and are wholly inappropriate for space transportation as the application of a reactor based fusion-electric system creates a colossal mass and heat rejection problem for space application.

  5. On fusion driven systems (FDS) for transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aagren, O; Moiseenko, V.E.; Noack, K.

    2008-10-01

    This report gives a brief description of ongoing activities on fusion driven systems (FDS) for transmutation of the long-lived radioactive isotopes in the spent nuclear waste from fission reactors. Driven subcritical systems appears to be the only option for efficient minor actinide burning. Driven systems offer a possibility to increase reactor safety margins. A comparatively simple fusion device could be sufficient for a fusion-fission machine, and transmutation may become the first industrial application of fusion. Some alternative schemes to create strong fusion neutron fluxes are presented

  6. On fusion driven systems (FDS) for transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagren, O (Uppsala Univ., Aangstroem laboratory, div. of electricity, Uppsala (Sweden)); Moiseenko, V.E. (Inst. of Plasma Physics, National Science Center, Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine)); Noack, K. (Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany))

    2008-10-15

    This report gives a brief description of ongoing activities on fusion driven systems (FDS) for transmutation of the long-lived radioactive isotopes in the spent nuclear waste from fission reactors. Driven subcritical systems appears to be the only option for efficient minor actinide burning. Driven systems offer a possibility to increase reactor safety margins. A comparatively simple fusion device could be sufficient for a fusion-fission machine, and transmutation may become the first industrial application of fusion. Some alternative schemes to create strong fusion neutron fluxes are presented

  7. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The results of nuclear fusion researches in JAERI are summarized. In this report, following themes are collected: the concept of fusion reactor (including ITER), fusion reactor safety, plasma confinement, fusion reactor equipment, and so on. Includes glossary. (J.P.N.)

  8. On the energy gain enhancement of DT+D3He fuel configuration in nuclear fusion reactor driven by heavy ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khoshbinfar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that advanced fuels be employed in the second generation of nuclear fusion reactors. Theoretical calculations show that in such a fuel, a high plasma temperature about 100 keV is a requisite for reaction rate improvement of nuclear fusion. However, creating such a temporal condition requires a more powerful driver than we have today. Here, introducing an optimal fuel configuration consisting of DT and D-3He layers, suitable for inertial fusion reactors and driven by heavy ion beams, the optimal energy gain conditions have been simulated and derived for 1.3 MJ system. It was found that, in this new fuel configuration, the ideal energy gain, is 22 percent more comparing with energy gain in corresponding single DT fuel layer. Moreover, the inner DT fuel layer contributed as an ignition trigger, while the outer D3He fuel acts as particle and radiation shielding as well as fuel layer.

  9. Controlled Nuclear Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasstone, Samuel

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Importance of Fusion Energy; Conditions for Nuclear Fusion; Thermonuclear Reactions in Plasmas; Plasma Confinement by Magnetic Fields; Experiments With Plasmas; High-Temperature…

  10. Cold nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Shinji.

    1991-01-01

    Selection of cathode material is a key to the attainment of cold nuclear fusion. However, there are only few reports on the cathode material at present and an effective development has been demanded. The device comprises an anode and a cathode and an electrolytic bath having metal salts dissolved therein and containing heavy water in a glass container. The anode is made of gold or platinum and the cathode is made of metals of V, Sr, Y, Nb, Hf or Ta, and a voltage of 3-25V is applied by way of a DC power source between them. The metal comprising V, Sr, Y, Nb, Hf or Ta absorbs deuterium formed by electrolysis of heavy water effectively to cause nuclear fusion reaction at substantially the same frequency and energy efficiency as palladium and titanium. Accordingly, a cold nuclear fusion device having high nuclear fusion generation frequency can be obtained. (N.H.)

  11. Fabrication of advanced targets for laser driven nuclear fusion reactions through standard microelectronics technology approaches.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Picciotto, A.; Crivellari, M.; Bellutti, P.; Barozzi, M.; Kucharik, M.; Krása, Josef; Swidlovsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Velyhan, Andriy; Ullschmied, Jiří; Margarone, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, October (2017), č. článku P10001. ISSN 1748-0221 Grant - others:OP VK 2 LaserGen(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0087; LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : Nuclear instruments and methods for hot plasma diagnostics * Plasma generation (laserproduced, RF, x ray-produced) * Plasma diagnostics - charged-particle spectroscopy Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: 2.11 Other engineering and technologies; 2.11 Other engineering and technologies (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-0221/12/10/P10001/meta

  12. Energy from nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkau, K.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear fusion research is conducted for the long-term objective of developing a power plant generating energy from the fusion of atomic nuclei. In order for the fusion fire to be ignited the fuel, a hydrogen plasma, must be confined in magnetic fields and heated to high temperatures - a design principle resulting in good safety characteristics and environmental compatibility. As the source materials required for the fusion process are available in almost unlimited quantities and are distributed all over the world, nuclear fusion could make a sizeable contribution towards future energy supplies. Since its beginnings in the early fifties, fusion research has approached its ambitious goal in painstaking, detailed work. Sometimes unnoticed by the public, these activities have made considerable progress especially in the past few years. Such formerly critical problems as plasma heating, thermal insulation, prevention of plasma impurities, and energy extraction can now be considered nearly solved. It has been possible in the meantime to generate fusion powers of several megawatt. The results obtained so far allow a test reactor to be planned which, for the first time, is to produce a self-sustaining plasma with powers in the gigawatt range. (orig.) [de

  13. Laser driven fusion fission hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.F.; Maniscalco, J.A.

    1977-11-01

    The role of the fusion-fission hybrid reactor (FFHR) as a fissile fuel and/or power producer is discussed. As long range options to supply the world energy needs, hybrid-fueled thermal-burner reactors are compared to liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR). A discussion of different fuel cycles (thorium, depleted uranium, and spent fuel) is presented in order to compare the energy multiplication, the production of fissile fuel, the laser efficiency and pellet gain requirements of the hybrid reactor. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) has collaborated with Bechtel Corporation and with Westinghouse in two engineering design studies of laser fusion driven hybrid power plants. The hybrid designs which have resulted from these two studies are briefly described and analyzed by considering operational parameters, such as energy multiplication, power density, burn-up and plutonium production as a function time

  14. Value Driven Information Processing and Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    including: optimal data reduction in a network setting for decentralized inference with quantization constraint; interactive fusion that allows queries and...Sep-2012 22-Oct-2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Value Driven Information Processing and Fusion The views...2015 ABSTRACT Final Report: Value Driven Information Processing and Fusion Report Title The objective of the project is to develop a general framework

  15. Cell fusion and nuclear fusion in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Ohtsu, Mina; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2016-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells are surrounded by a plasma membrane and have a large nucleus containing the genomic DNA, which is enclosed by a nuclear envelope consisting of the outer and inner nuclear membranes. Although these membranes maintain the identity of cells, they sometimes fuse to each other, such as to produce a zygote during sexual reproduction or to give rise to other characteristically polyploid tissues. Recent studies have demonstrated that the mechanisms of plasma membrane or nuclear membrane fusion in plants are shared to some extent with those of yeasts and animals, despite the unique features of plant cells including thick cell walls and intercellular connections. Here, we summarize the key factors in the fusion of these membranes during plant reproduction, and also focus on "non-gametic cell fusion," which was thought to be rare in plant tissue, in which each cell is separated by a cell wall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Results of nuclear fusion development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kenzo

    1975-01-01

    Compared with the nuclear fission research which followed that in advanced countries, Japan has treaded on its own track in nuclear fusion development; in the former, she had been far behind other leading countries. Characteristic of the efforts in Japan is the collaboration with educational institutions. Works are now carried out mainly in Tokamak plasma confinement, though other means being studied simultaneously. The nation's fusion research program is the realization of a fusion reactor at the turn of the present century, based on the world-level results attained with Tokamak. Past developments in the nuclear fusion research, the current status, and aspects for the future are discribed. (Mori, K.)

  17. Cold nuclear fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsyganov, E.N., E-mail: edward.tsyganov@coldfusion-power.com [Cold Fusion Power, International (United States); Bavizhev, M.D. [LLC “Radium”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Buryakov, M.G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Dabagov, S.B. [RAS P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninsky pr. 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Golovatyuk, V.M.; Lobastov, S.P. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction’s theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300–700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of {sup 4}He{sup ∗}.

  18. Nuclear Fusion Award 2010 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2010 speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, John

    2011-01-01

    Following the suggestion of Earl Marmar in 1995, I installed a compact von Hamos type x-ray spectrometer (originally built with Elisabeth Rachlew and Jan Kallne) on a tangentially viewing port on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The spectrometer views the plasma through a 2 cm diameter hole, and is tuned to H-like argon, suitable for passive measurement of the core toroidal rotation velocity from the Doppler shift. It soon became evident that the rotation in Ohmic L-mode discharges, while for the most part directed counter-current, depends in a very complicated fashion on plasma parameters, notably the electron density, current and magnetic configuration. The rotation can even flip sign for almost no apparent reason! In Ohmic and ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heated H-mode plasmas the rotation is in the co-current direction and has a relatively simple dependence on plasma parameters, proportional to the stored energy normalized to the current. Rotation velocities as high as 130 km s-1 have been observed without external momentum input. In dimensionless terms this intrinsic (or spontaneous rotation) depends on the normalized plasma pressure. The association of toroidal rotation with plasma pressure in ICRF H-modes was first observed by Lars-Goran Eriksson in JET discharges. Similar results were subsequently reported for Tore Supra enhanced confinement plasmas. In the early 2000s concerns began to surface about the lack of substantial neutral beam driven rotation in ITER, and intrinsic rotation became a topic of interest in the ITPA Transport Group. Through that connection, similar observations from DIII-D, TCV and JT-60U were added to the growing list. A database of intrinsic rotation observations was assembled with the goal of extrapolating to the expected values for ITER. Both dimensional and dimensionless scalings were developed and formed the backbone of the 2007 Nuclear Fusion paper. I gratefully acknowledge the important contributions to this paper from

  19. Jason: heavy-ion-driven inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callan, C.G. Jr.; Dashen, R.F.; Garwin, R.L.; Muller, R.A.; Richter, B.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1978-02-01

    A few of the problems in heavy-ion-driven inertial-fusion systems are reviewed. Nothing was found within the scope of this study that would in principle bar such systems from delivering the energy and peak power required to ignite the fuel pellet. Indeed, ion-fusion seems to show great promise, but the conceptual design of ion-fusion systems is still in a primitive state. A great deal of work, mostly theoretical, remains to be done before proceeding with massive hardware development. Conclusions are given about the state of the work

  20. Nuclear data needs for fusion programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.T.

    1991-02-01

    A review is given in areas relevant to nuclear data needs for fusion programs. These areas address the motivation and direction of fusion nuclear data development activities and include fusion fuel cycles, nuclear data needs, low activation fusion motivations, and progress on fusion nuclear data development activities. A list of important activation cross sections is presented whose measured data are needed to help assess some fusion reactor design issues. 11 refs

  1. Nuclear fusion apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Daizaburo; Yamada, Masao.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To provide a nuclear fusion apparatus in which a magnetic limiter is disposed within a vacuum vessel, said magnetic limiter being supported in such a manner so as to not to exert mechanical action upon said vacuum vessel, thereby minimizing a force applied to the vacuum vessel to easily manufacture the vacuum vessel. Structure: The magnetic limiter disposed within the vacuum vessel is connected to one end of a supporting post which extends through the wall of the vacuum vessel through a seal portion, the other end of the supporting post being secured to a structure such as a house outside the vacuum vessel. The seal portion comprises a bellows of high spring elasticity mounted on the vacuum vessel and a seal element comprised of an electric insulator such as ceramic for connecting the bellows to the supporting post, the supporting post extending through the wall of the vacuum vessel in vacuum-tight fashion, the force applied to the magnetic limiter exerting no influence upon the vacuum vessel. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. Nuclear fusion - a strategic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, U.

    1989-01-01

    Aspects of nuclear fusion research with particular reference to Europe are reviewed. The energy scenario with regard to nuclear fusion is considered including economic, political and scientific problems of energy policy in view of the long-term research effort required. Mention is also made of the need to phase out the use of fossil fuels for environmental reasons. Research into magnetic and inertial confinement fusion is considered. It is concluded that the development of thermonuclear reactors will eventually be brought to practical fruition. (UK)

  3. Chemistry in and from nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, M.

    1989-01-01

    The time, of the realization of nuclear fusion reactor is not clear even now. However, it is generally believed that the nuclear fusion is only one candidate of the big power source for humanbeing. We may be not able to, but our children or grandchildren would be able to see the nuclear fusion reactors. The nuclear fusion development may be the last and biggest technology program for us, so it will take so long leading time. Now, we are in the first stage of this leading time, I think. As being found in the history of every technology, chemistry is essential to develop the fusion nuclear technology. To assure the safety of the nuclear fusion system, chemistry should play the main role. There have been already not a few advanced chemistry initiated by the connected technologies with the nuclear fusion researches. The nuclear fusion needs chemistry and the nuclear fusion leads some of the new phases of chemistry. (author)

  4. Normal temperature nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hiroshige.

    1991-01-01

    In a normal temperature nuclear fusion device, electromagnetic waves such as laser beams are irradiated to nuclear fusion fuels made of specific material to which heavy water, etc. are impregnated or adsorbed. That is, nuclear fusion fuels in the form of high pressure gas are sealed in a high pressure vessel and the specific material such as of palladium is made into a small spherical shape. Further, a storage vessel capable of supplying the specific material is provided and cooled if required. Lasers at a wavelength longer than that of sub-millimeter waves are used for the irradiation of the electromagnetic waves. If lasers are irradiated to the deuterium-adsorbing specific material, deuterium is rapidly applied with a kinetic energy to increase the cross sectional area of the nuclear fusion reaction. The adsorbing efficiency of deuterism to the specific material is improved by placing the specific material in the atmosphere of the nuclear fusion fuels in the form of the high pressure gas and making it into the small spherical shape. Further, cooling also improves the adsorbing efficiency of deuterium. In view of the above, continuous combustion can be conducted. (I.S.)

  5. Controlled nuclear fusion apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussard, R.W.; Coppi, B.

    1982-01-01

    A fusion power generating device is disclosed having a relatively small and inexpensive core region which may be contained within an energy absorbing blanket region. The fusion power core region contains apparatus of the toroidal type for confining a high density plasma. The fusion power core is removable from the blanket region and may be disposed and/or recycled for subsequent use within the same blanket region. Thermonuclear ignition of the plasma is obtained by feeding neutral fusible gas into the plasma in a controlled manner such that charged particle heating produced by the fusion reaction is utilized to bootstrap the device to a region of high temperatures and high densities wherein charged particle heating is sufficient to overcome radiation and thermal conductivity losses. The high density plasma produces a large radiation and particle flux on the first wall of the plasma core region thereby necessitating replacement of the core from the blanket region from time to time. A series of potentially disposable and replaceable central core regions are disclosed for a large-scale economical electrical power generating plant

  6. Confinement inertial fusion. Power reactors of nuclear fusion by lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, G.; Ahnert, C.; Aragones, J.M.; Leira, G; Martinez-Val, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The energy crisis and the need of the nuclear fusion energy are analized. The nuclear processes in the laser interation with the ablator material are studied, as well as the thermohydrodinamic processes in the implossion, and the neutronics of the fusion. The fusion reactor components are described and the economic and social impact of its introduction in the future energetic strategies.(author)

  7. Nuclear Fusion prize laudation Nuclear Fusion prize laudation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, W.

    2011-01-01

    Clean energy in abundance will be of critical importance to the pursuit of world peace and development. As part of the IAEA's activities to facilitate the dissemination of fusion related science and technology, the journal Nuclear Fusion is intended to contribute to the realization of such energy from fusion. In 2010, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of the IAEA journal. The excellence of research published in the journal is attested to by its high citation index. The IAEA recognizes excellence by means of an annual prize awarded to the authors of papers judged to have made the greatest impact. On the occasion of the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon, Republic of Korea at the welcome dinner hosted by the city of Daejeon, we celebrated the achievements of the 2009 and 2010 Nuclear Fusion prize winners. Steve Sabbagh, from the Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York is the winner of the 2009 award for his paper: 'Resistive wall stabilized operation in rotating high beta NSTX plasmas' [1]. This is a landmark paper which reports record parameters of beta in a large spherical torus plasma and presents a thorough investigation of the physics of resistive wall mode (RWM) instability. The paper makes a significant contribution to the critical topic of RWM stabilization. John Rice, from the Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge is the winner of the 2010 award for his paper: 'Inter-machine comparison of intrinsic toroidal rotation in tokamaks' [2]. The 2010 award is for a seminal paper that analyzes results across a range of machines in order to develop a universal scaling that can be used to predict intrinsic rotation. This paper has already triggered a wealth of experimental and theoretical work. I congratulate both authors and their colleagues on these exceptional papers. W. Burkart Deputy Director General Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna

  8. Fusion energy and nuclear liability considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fork, William E.; Peterson, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    For over 60 years, fusion energy has been recognised as a promising technology for safe, secure and environmentally-sustainable commercial electrical power generation. Over the past decade, research and development programmes across the globe have shown progress in developing critical underlying technologies. Approaches ranging from high-temperature plasma magnetic confinement fusion to inertial confinement fusion are increasingly better understood. As scientific research progresses in its aim to achieve fusion 'ignition', where nuclear fusion becomes self-sustaining, the international legal community should consider how fusion power technologies fit within the current nuclear liability legal framework. An understanding of the history of the civil nuclear liability regimes, along with the different risks associated with fusion power, will enable nations to consider the proper legal conditions needed to deploy and commercialise fusion technologies for civil power generation. This note is divided into three substantive parts. It first provides background regarding fusion power and describes the relatively limited risks of fusion technologies when compared with traditional nuclear fission technologies. It then describes the international nuclear liability regime and analyses how fusion power fits within the text of the three leading conventions. Finally, it examines how fusion power may fall within the international nuclear liability framework in the future, a discussion that includes possible amendments to the relevant international liability conventions. It concludes that the unique nature of the current civil nuclear liability regime points towards the development of a more tailored liability solution because of the reduced risks associated with fusion power. (authors)

  9. Nuclear fusion and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Taijiro

    1987-01-01

    Work for design, research and development is expected to start in 1988 for a new nuclear fusion reactor called ITER (international thermonuclear experimental reactor), which is to be constructed and operated through cooperation among Japan, U.S., Soviet Union and EC. Many talks and discussions concerning the work have been made on various occasions, including the Reagan-Gorbachev talks at Geneva in November 1985, 5th Fusion Working Group meeting in Germany in January 1986, extraordinary FWG meeting at Tokyo in February-March 1986, 11th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Control held under IAEA at Kyoto in November 1986, and first formal four-party (Japan, U.S., Soviet Union, EC) meeting at the IAEA headquarters in March this year. The ITER Technical Working Group was established and its first meeting was held on May 21 - 23, 1987. It was concluded in the meeting that the operation of ITER will be performed in two phases intended for nuclear combustion plasma physics studies and stationary operation, respectively. Major research and development activities carried out in the U.S., Europe, the Soviet Union, Japan and IAEA in connection with the development of ITER are outlined. (Nogami, K.)

  10. Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Steven Anthony

    2011-01-01

    This is an exceptional moment in my career, and so I want to thank all of my teachers, colleagues and mentors who have made this possible. From my co-authors and myself, many thanks to the International Atomic Energy Agency, IOP Publishing, the Nuclear Fusion journal team, and the selection committee for the great honor of receiving this award. Also gratitude to Kikuchi-sensei, not only for the inventive and visionary creation of this award, but also for being a key mentor dating back to his efforts in producing high neutron output in JT-60U. It was also a great honor to receive the award directly from IAEA Deputy Director General Burkart during the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon. Receiving the award at this venue is particularly exciting as Daejeon is home to the new, next-generation KSTAR tokamak device that will lead key magnetic fusion research areas going forward. I would also like to thank the mayor of Daejeon, Dr Yum Hong-Chul, and all of the meeting organizers for giving us all a truly spectacular and singular welcoming event during which the award was presented. The research leading to the award would not have been possible without the support of the US Department of Energy, and I thank the Department for the continued funding of this research. Special mention must be made to a valuable co-author who is no longer with us, Professor A. Bondeson, who was a significant pioneer in resistive wall mode (RWM) research. I would like to thank my wife, Mary, for her infinite patience and encouragement. Finally, I would like to personally thank all of you that have approached and congratulated me directly. There are no units to measure how important your words have been in this regard. When notified that our paper had been shortlisted for the 2009 Nuclear Fusion Award, my co-authors responded echoing how I felt—honored to be included in such a fine collection of research by colleagues. It was unfathomable—would this paper follow the brilliant work

  11. Nuclear Fusion Fuel Cycle Research Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hongsuk; Koo, Daeseo; Park, Jongcheol; Kim, Yeanjin; Yun, Sei-Hun

    2015-01-01

    As a part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project, we at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and our National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) colleagues are investigating nuclear fusion fuel cycle hardware including a nuclear fusion fuel Storage and Delivery System (SDS). To have a better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we present our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). To have better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we presented our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). Our efforts to enhance the tritium confinement will be continued for the development of cleaner nuclear fusion power plants

  12. Fusion Nuclear Science Pathways Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.E. Kessel, et. al.

    2012-02-23

    With the strong commitment of the US to the success of the ITER burning plasma mission, and the project overall, it is prudent to consider how to take the most advantage of this investment. The production of energy from fusion has been a long sought goal, and the subject of several programmatic investigations and time line proposals [1]. The nuclear aspects of fusion research have largely been avoided experimentally for practical reasons, resulting in a strong emphasis on plasma science. Meanwhile, ITER has brought into focus how the interface between the plasma and engineering/technology, presents the most challenging problems for design. In fact, this situation is becoming the rule and no longer the exception. ITER will demonstrate the deposition of 0.5 GW of neutron heating to the blanket, deliver a heat load of 10-20 MW/m2 or more on the divertor, inject 50-100 MW of heating power to the plasma, all at the expected size scale of a power plant. However, in spite of this, and a number of other technologies relevant power plant, ITER will provide a low neutron exposure compared to the levels expected to a fusion power plant, and will purchase its tritium entirely from world reserves accumulated from decades of CANDU reactor operations. Such a decision for ITER is technically well founded, allowing the use of conventional materials and water coolant, avoiding the thick tritium breeding blankets required for tritium self-sufficiency, and allowing the concentration on burning plasma and plasma-engineering interface issues. The neutron fluence experienced in ITER over its entire lifetime will be ~ 0.3 MW-yr/m2, while a fusion power plant is expected to experience 120-180 MW-yr/m2 over its lifetime. ITER utilizes shielding blanket modules, with no tritium breeding, except in test blanket modules (TBM) located in 3 ports on the midplane [2], which will provide early tests of the fusion nuclear environment with very low tritium production (a few g per year).

  13. Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor nucleonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, M.R.; Abdou, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor nucleonics are reviewed and the present status of data are assessed. The discussion is divided into broad categories dealing with data for Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT), D-T Fusion Reactors, Alternate Fuel Cycles and the Evaluated Data Files that are available or would be available in the near future

  14. Fusion-supported decentralized nuclear energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1979-04-01

    A decentralized nuclear energy system is proposed comprising mass-produced pressurized water reactors in the size range 10 to 300 MW (thermal), to be used for the production of process heat, space heat, and electricity in applications where petroleum and natural gas are presently used. Special attention is given to maximizing the refueling interval with no interim batch shuffling in order to minimize fuel transport, reactor downtime, and opportunity for fissile diversion. These objectives demand a substantial fissile enrichment (7 to 15%). The preferred fissile fuel is U-233, which offers an order of magnitude savings in ore requirements (compared with U-235 fuel), and whose higher conversion ratio in thermal reactors serves to extend the period of useful reactivity and relieve demand on the fissile breeding plants (compared with Pu-239 fuel). Application of the neutral-beam-driven tokamak fusion-neutron source to a U-233 breeding pilot plant is examined. This scheme can be extended in part to a decentralized fusion energy system, wherein remotely located large fusion reactors supply excess tritium to a distributed system of relatively small nonbreeding D-T reactors

  15. Catalogue of nuclear fusion codes - 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-10-01

    A catalogue is presented of the computer codes in nuclear fusion research developed by JAERI, Division of Thermonuclear Fusion Research and Division of Large Tokamak Development in particular. It contains a total of about 100 codes under the categories: Atomic Process, Data Handling, Experimental Data Processing, Engineering, Input and Output, Special Languages and Their Application, Mathematical Programming, Miscellaneous, Numerical Analysis, Nuclear Physics, Plasma Physics and Fusion Research, Plasma Simulation and Numerical Technique, Reactor Design, Solid State Physics, Statistics, and System Program. (auth.)

  16. The internal propagation of fusion flame with the strong shock of a laser driven plasma block for advanced nuclear fuel ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malekynia, B.; Razavipour, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    An accelerated skin layer may be used to ignite solid state fuels. Detailed analyses were clarified by solving the hydrodynamic equations for nonlinear force driven plasma block ignition. In this paper, the complementary mechanisms are included for the advanced fuel ignition: external factors such as lasers, compression, shock waves, and sparks. The other category is created within the plasma fusion as reheating of an alpha particle, the Bremsstrahlung absorption, expansion, conduction, and shock waves generated by explosions. With the new condition for the control of shock waves, the spherical deuterium-tritium fuel density should be increased to 75 times that of the solid state. The threshold ignition energy flux density for advanced fuel ignition may be obtained using temperature equations, including the ones for the density profile obtained through the continuity equation and the expansion velocity for the r ≠ 0 layers. These thresholds are significantly reduced in comparison with the ignition thresholds at x = 0 for solid advanced fuels. The quantum correction for the collision frequency is applied in the case of the delay in ion heating. Under the shock wave condition, the spherical proton-boron and proton-lithium fuel densities should be increased to densities 120 and 180 times that of the solid state. These plasma compressions are achieved through a longer duration laser pulse or X-ray. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  17. Outline of cold nuclear fusion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Enzo

    1991-01-01

    In 2010, as the total supply capacity of primary energy, 666 million liter is anticipated under the measures of thorough energy conservation. The development of energy sources along the energy policy based on environment preservation, safety, the quantity of resources and economy is strongly demanded. The nuclear power generation utilizing nuclear fission has been successfully carried out. As the third means of energy production, the basic research and technical development have been actively advanced on the energy production utilizing nuclear fusion reaction. The main object of the nuclear fusion research being advanced now is D-D reaction and D-T reaction. In order to realize low temperature nuclear fusion reaction, muon nuclear fusion has been studied so far. The cold nuclear fusion reaction by the electrolysis of heavy water has been reported in 1989, and its outline is ixplained in this report. The trend of the research on cold nuclear fusion is described. But the possibility of cold nuclear fusion as an energy source is almost denied. (K.I.)

  18. Theory of cold nuclear fusion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tatsuoki

    1991-01-01

    In order to cause nuclear fusion reaction, it is necessary to bring the nuclei having positive charges to the distance at which the reaction occurs, overcoming the Coulomb barrier. For the purpose, the thermo-nuclear fusion process is considered to be most promising, and the research and development have been advanced. Except the case of muon catalyst nuclear fusion, it has been considered that nuclear fusion does not occur near normal temperature. In order to clarify the existence of cold nuclear fusion reaction and its mechanism, several basic questions must be answered, but in spite of many theoretical attempts, the answer is not yet obtained. In this report, the research of seeking the factors which heighten the effect of shielding of Coulomb field and explaining the phenomena by two-body collision, the research of explaining the phenomena by collective nuclear reactions, and the research which considers that the phenomena observed while doubting the existence of cold nuclear fusion arose due to other causes than the cold nuclear fusion are described. (K.I.)

  19. Preliminary analysis of advanced equilibrium configuration for the fusion-driven subcritical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Delin; Wu Bin; Wu Yican

    2003-01-01

    The Fusion-Driven Subcritical System (FDS) is a subcritical nuclear energy system driven by fusion neutron source. In this paper, an advanced plasma configuration for FDS system has been proposed, which aims at high beta, high bootstrap current and good confinement. A fixed-boundary equilibrium code has been used to obtain ideal equilibrium configuration. In order to determine the feasibility of FDS operation, a two-dimensional time-dependent free boundary simulation code has been adopted to simulate time-scale evolution of plasma current profile and boundary position. By analyses, the Reversed Shear mode as the most attractive one has been recommended for the FDS equilibrium configuration design

  20. Controlled Nuclear Fusion: Status and Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, David J.

    1971-01-01

    Presents the history, current concerns and potential developments of nuclear fusion as a major energy source. Controlled fusion research is summarized, technological feasibility is discussed and environmental factors are examined. Relationships of alternative energy sources as well as energy utilization are considered. (JM)

  1. Mass Producing Targets for Nuclear Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Kendall, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Metal-encapsulating technique advances prospects of controlling nuclear fusion. Prefilled fusion targets form at nozzle as molten metal such as tin flows through outer channel and pressurized deuterium/tritium gas flows through inner channel. Molten metal completely encloses gas charge as it drops off nozzle.

  2. Overview on Fusion Nuclear Technology Experimental Testing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Entler, Slavomír; Kysela, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2016), č. článku 021018. ISSN 2332-8983 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : fusion * corrosion * thermohydraulic * LiPb * HHF * ITER Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  3. Nuclear data for fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The meeting was organized in four sessions and four working groups devoted to the following topics: Requirements of nuclear data for fusion reactor technology (6 papers); Status of experimental and theoretical investigations of microscopic nuclear data (10 papers); Status of existing libraries for fusion neutronic calculations (5 papers); and Status of integral experiments and benchmark tests (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  4. Fusion Nuclear Data activities at FNL, IPR

    OpenAIRE

    P. M. Prajapati; B. Pandey; S. Jakhar; C.V. S. Rao; T. K. Basu; B. K. Nayak; S. V. Suryanarayana; A. Saxena

    2015-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the current fusion nuclear data activities at Fusion Neutronics Laboratory, Institute for Plasma Research. It consist of infrastructure development for the cross-section measurements of structural materials with an accelerator based 14 MeV neutron generator and theoretical study of the cross-section using advanced nuclear reaction modular codes EMPIRE and TALYS. It will also cover the proposed surrogate experiment to measure 55Fe (n, p) 55Mn using BARC-TIFR Pel...

  5. Opimization of fusion-driven fissioning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapin, D.L.; Mills, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Potential advantages of hybrid or fusion/fission systems can be exploited in different ways. With selection of the 238 U-- 239 Pu fuel cycle, we show that the system has greatest value as a power producer. Numerical examples of relative revenue from power production vs. 239 Pu production are discussed, and possible plant characteristics described. The analysis tends to show that the hybrid may be more economically attractive than pure fusion systems

  6. Nuclear fusion: power for the next century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    The basis of fusion reactions is outlined, with special reference to deuterium and tritium (from lithium, by neutron reaction) as reactants, and the state of research worldwide is indicated. The problems inherent in fusion reactions are discussed, plasma is defined, and the steps to be taken to generate electricity from controlled nuclear fusion are stated. Methods of plasma heating and plasma confinement are considered, leading to a description of the tokamak plasma confinement system. Devices under construction include the JET (Joint European Torus) Undertaking in the UK. Plans and possibilities for fusion reactors are discussed. (U.K.)

  7. Prospect of realizing nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This Report describes the results of the research work on nuclear fusion, which CRIEPI has carried out for about ten years from the standpoint of electric power utilities, potential user of its energy. The principal points are; (a) economic analysis (calculation of costs) based on Japanese analysis procedures and database of commercial fusion reactors, including fusion-fission hybrid reactors, and (b) conceptual design of two types of hybrid reactors, that is, fission-fuel producing DMHR (Demonstration Molten-Salt Hybrid Reactor) and electric-power producing THPR (Tokamak Hybrid Power Reactor). The Report consists of the following chapters: 1. Introduction. 2. Conceptual Design of Hybrid Reactors. 3. Economic Analysis of Commercial Fusion Reactors. 4. Basic Studies Applicable Also to Nuclear Fusion Technology. 5. List of Published Reports and Papers; 6. Conclusion. Appendices. (author)

  8. Nuclear Fusion with Polarized Nucleons & PolFusion

    CERN Document Server

    Engels, Ralf; Büscher, Markus; Vasilyev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a detailed examination of the latest work on the potential of polarized fuel to realize the vision of energy production by nuclear fusion. It brings together contributions from nuclear physicists and fusion physicists with the aims of fostering exchange of information between the two communities, describing the current status in the field, and examining new ideas and projects under development. It is evident that polarized fuel can offer huge improvements for the first generation of fusion reactors and open new technological possibilities for future generations, including neutron lean reactors, which could be the most popular and sustainable energy production option to avoid environmental problems. Nevertheless, many questions must be resolved before polarized fuel can be used for energy production in the different reactor types. Readers will find this book to be a stimulating source of information on the key issues. It is based on contributions from leading scientists delivered at the meetin...

  9. History of Nuclear Fusion Research in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Harukazu; Matsuoka, Keisuke; Kimura, Kazue; Namba, Chusei; Matsuda, Shinzaburo

    In the late 1950s just after the atomic energy research was opened worldwide, there was a lively discussion among scientists on the strategy of nuclear fusion research in Japan. Finally, decision was made that fusion research should be started from the basic, namely, research on plasma physics and from cultivation of human resources at universities under the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture (MOE). However, an endorsement was given that construction of an experimental device for fusion research would be approved sooner or later. Studies on toroidal plasma confinement started at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) under the Science and Technology Agency (STA) in the mid-1960s. Dualistic fusion research framework in Japan was established. This structure has lasted until now. Fusion research activities over the last 50 years are described by the use of a flowchart, which is convenient to glance the historical development of fusion research in Japan.

  10. The European fusion nuclear technology effort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darvas, J.

    1989-01-01

    The role of fusion technology in the European fusion development strategy is outlined. The main thrust of the present fusion technology programme is responding to development needs of the Next European Torus. A smaller, but important and growing R and D effort is dealing with problems specific to the Demonstration, or Fusion Power, Reactor. The part of the programme falling under the somewhat arbitrarily defined category of 'fusion nuclear technology' is reviewed and an outlook to future activities is given. The review includes tritium technology, blanket technology and breeder materials development, technology and materials for the protection of the first wall and of other plasma facing components, remote handling technology, and safety and environmental impact studies. A few reflections are offered on the future long-term developments in fusion technology. (orig.)

  11. Present status of laser driven fusion--fission energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Hansen, L.F.

    1978-01-01

    The potential of laser fusion driven hybrids to produce fissile fuel and/or electricity has been investigated in the laser program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) for several years. Our earlier studies used neutronic methods of analysis to estimate hybrid performance. The results were encouraging, but it was apparent that a more accurate assessment of the hybrid's potential would require studies which treat the engineering, environmental, and economic issues as well as the neutronic aspects. More recently, we have collaborated with Bechtel and Westinghouse Corporations in two engineering design studies of laser fusion driven hybrid power plants. With Bechtel, we have been engaged in a joint effort to design a laser fusion driven hybrid which emphasizes fissile fuel production while the primary objective of our joint effort with Westinghouse has been to design a hybrid which emphasizes power production. The hybrid designs which have resulted from these two studies are briefly described and analyzed by considering their most important operational parameters

  12. Nuclear fusion, an energy source of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppendoerfer, W.

    1994-01-01

    The paper discusses the possibility to obtain energy by nuclear fusion. It deals successively with: The physical bases of nuclear fusion, research and development with a view to harnessing nuclear fusion, properties of a fusion reactor, and programme and timetable to economic exploitation. (orig./UA) [de

  13. Fusion of Nuclear and Emerging Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahrul Khaer Alang Rashid

    2005-04-01

    The presentation discussed the following subjects: emerging technology; nuclear technology; fusion emerging and nuclear technology; progressive nature of knowledge; optically stimulated luminescence - application of luminescence technology to sediments; Biosystemics technology -convergence nanotechnology, ecological science, biotechnology, cognitive science and IT - prospective impact on materials science, the management of public system for bio-health, eco and food system integrity and disease mitigation

  14. Nuclear data needs for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear design of fusion components (e.g., first wall, blanket, shield, magnet, limiter, divertor, etc.) requires an accurate prediction of the radiation field, the radiation damage parameters, and the activation analysis. The fusion nucleonics for these tasks are reviewed with special attention to point out nuclear data needs and deficiencies which effect the design process. The main areas included in this review are tritium breeding analyses, nuclear heating calculations, radiation damage in reactor components, shield designs, and results of uncertainty analyses as applied to fusion reactor studies. Design choices and reactor parameters that impact the neutronics performance of the blanket are discussed with emphasis on the tritium breeding ratio. Nuclear data required for kerma factors, shielding analysis, and radiation damage are discussed. Improvements in the evaluated data libraries are described to overcome the existing problems. 84 refs., 11 figs., 9 tabs

  15. Z-pinch driven fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutz, Stephen A.; Olson, Craig L.; Rochau, Gary E.; Dezon, Mark S.; Peterson, P.F.; Degroot, J.S.; Jensen, N.; Miller, G.

    2000-01-01

    The Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is the most powerful multi-module synchronized pulsed-power accelerator in the world. Rapid development of z-pinch loads on Z has led to outstanding progress in the last few years, resulting in radiative powers of up to 280 TW in 4 ns and a total radiated x-ray energy of 1.8 MJ. The present goal is to demonstrate single-shot, high-yield fusion capsules. Pulsed power is a robust and inexpensive technology, which should be well suited for Inertial Fusion Energy, but a rep-rated capability is needed. Recent developments have led to a viable conceptual approach for a rep-rated z-pinch power plant for IFE. This concept exploits the advantages of going to high yield (a few GJ) at low rep-rate (approximately 0.1 Hz), and using a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to provide the necessary standoff between the fusion target and the power plant chamber. In this approach, a portion of the transmission line near the capsule is replaced after each shot. The RTL should be constructed of materials that can easily be separated from the liquid coolant stream and refabricated for a subsequent shots. One possibility is that most of the RTL is formed by casting FLiBe, a salt composed of fluorine, lithium, and beryllium, which is an attractive choice for the reactor coolant, with chemically compatible lead or tin on the surface to provide conductivity. The authors estimate that fusion yields greater than 1 GJ will be required for efficient generation of electricity. Calculations indicate that the first wall will have an acceptable lifetime with these high yields if blast mitigation techniques are used. Furthermore, yields above 5 GJ may allow the use of a compact blanket direct conversion scheme

  16. The European programme for controlled nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This illustrated document is intended for information only and should not be used as a technical reference. The nuclear fusion reactors are presented with the two approaches: magnetic confinement and inertial confinement; are described: the place of fusion in the world energy scene and its importance for Europe, how research is at present organized, and the European programme with this next stage: the JET (Joint European Torus), the largest tokamak machine in Europe

  17. Nuclear fusion research in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheetham, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the recently formed National Plasma Fusion Research Facility centred around the H-1NF Heliac, located at the Australian National University, the Institute of Advanced Studies is described in the context of the international Stellarator program and the national collaboration with the Australian Fusion Research Group. The objectives of the facility and the planned physics research program over the next five years are discussed and some recent results will be presented. The facility will support investigations in the following research areas: finite pressure equilibrium and stability, transport in high temperature plasmas, plasma heating and formation, instabilities and turbulence, edge plasma physics and advanced diagnostic development

  18. Progress of laser nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraga, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the principle and features of nuclear fusion using laser, as well as its basic concepts such as high-temperature / high-density implosion system and fast ignition of fuel. At present, researches aiming at nuclear fusion ignition have been developing. As the current state of researches, this paper reviews the situations of FIREX (Fast Ignition Realization Experiment) project of Japan focusing on direct irradiation implosion and fast ignition system, as well as NIF (National Ignition Facility) project of the U.S. aiming at ignition combustion based on indirect irradiation implosion and central ignition system. In collaboration with the National Institute for Fusion Science, Osaka University started FIREX-1 project in 2003. It built a heating laser LFEX of 10 kJ/1 to 10ps, and started an implosion/heating integration experiment in 2009. Currently, it is developing experiment to achieve heating to 5 keV. At NIF, the self-heating of central sparks via energy of α particles generated in the nuclear fusion reaction has been realized. This paper also overviews R and D issues surrounding the lasers for reactors for use in laser nuclear fusion power generators. (A.O.)

  19. Plasma physics and nuclear fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, Richard D

    1981-01-01

    Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research covers the theoretical and experimental aspects of plasma physics and nuclear fusion. The book starts by providing an overview and survey of plasma physics; the theory of the electrodynamics of deformable media and magnetohydrodynamics; and the particle orbit theory. The text also describes the plasma waves; the kinetic theory; the transport theory; and the MHD stability theory. Advanced theories such as microinstabilities, plasma turbulence, anomalous transport theory, and nonlinear laser plasma interaction theory are also considered. The book furthe

  20. Focus on nuclear fusion research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křenek, Petr; Mlynář, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 61, - (2011), s. 62-63 ISSN 0375-8842 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : ITER * COMPASS * fusion energy * tokamak * EURATOM Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.ipp.cas.cz/Tokamak/clanky/energetika_COMPASS.pdf

  1. A fusion-driven subcritical system concept based on viable technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Jiang, J.; Wang, M.; Jin, M.; FDS Team

    2011-10-01

    A fusion-driven hybrid subcritical system (FDS) concept has been designed and proposed as spent fuel burner based on viable technologies. The plasma fusion driver can be designed based on relatively easily achieved plasma parameters extrapolated from the successful operation of existing fusion experimental devices such as the EAST tokamak in China and other tokamaks in the world, and the subcritical fission blanket can be designed based on the well-developed technologies of fission power plants. The simulation calculations and performance analyses of plasma physics, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, thermomechanics and safety have shown that the proposed concept can meet the requirements of tritium self-sufficiency and sufficient energy gain as well as effective burning of nuclear waste from fission power plants and efficient breeding of nuclear fuel to feed fission power plants.

  2. Hybrid fission-fusion nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid could contribute to all components of nuclear power - fuel supply, electricity production, and waste management. The idea of the fusion-fission hybrid is many decades old. Several ideas, both new and revisited, have been investigated by hybrid proponents. These ideas appear to have attractive features, but they require various levels of advances in plasma science and fusion and nuclear technology. As a first step towards the development of hybrid reactors, fusion neutron sources can be considered as an option. Compact high-field tokamaks can be a candidate for being the neutron source in a fission-fusion hybrid, essentially due to their design characteristics, such as compact dimensions, high magnetic field, flexibility of operation. This study presents the development of a tokamak neutron source for a material testing facility using an Ignitor-based concept. The computed values show the potential of this neutron-rich device for fusion materials testing. Some full-power months of operation are sufficient to obtain relevant radiation damage values in terms of dpa. (Author)

  3. G8 decision on fusion would herald nuclear future

    CERN Multimedia

    Starck, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear fusion as a future abundant energy source would receive a boost if G8 leaders agree next month on the site for the world's first fusion test reactor, two nuclear scientists said on Wednesday (1 page)

  4. Technology of controlled nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    A review is presented of the following topics treated at the meeting (invited papers and sessions): international programs (Japanese, Joint European Tokamak, Euratom non-JET, ERDA magnetic, ERDA laser, and Electric Power Research Institute programmes); non-commercial reactor designs; commercial reactor designs; radiation damage; plasma engineering; tritium and neutronics; confinement system technology; environment and safety; blanket engineering and materials testing; fusion-fission hybrid reactors

  5. Current state of nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naraghi, M.

    1985-01-01

    During the past quarter century, plasma physics and nuclear fusion research have gone through impressive development. Tokamak, is realized to be the number one candidate for nuclear fusion reactor. Two large experiments, one called Joint European Torus (JET) at Culham, England, and the other JT-60 project in Japan have been completed and have reported preliminary results. In JET an average electron density of 4x10 13 pcls/ cm 3 , ion temperatures of 3Kev and energy confinement of 0.8 sec have been achieved. However, the Zeff has been even equal to 10 which unfortunately is a source of plasma energy loss. JT-60 has not offered any appreciable results yet, however, the objectives and initial tests promise long pulse duration, with very high ion and plasma densities. Both experiments have promised to achieve conditions approaching those needed in a fusion reactor. Other important experiments will be discussed and the role of third world countries will be emphasized. (Author)

  6. Confusion about nuclear fusion: a false report is laid bare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintsches, E.

    1983-01-01

    The author discusses the inaccurate and precipitate news of alleged successful controlled nuclear fusion in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor at Princeton University. The later modified published report indicated that in a first test, fractional second operation had produced plasma gas temperature of 100,000 0 C whereas 100 million degrees C is necessary for hydrogen nuclear fusion. Also power generation from nuclear fusion is still a long term goal. Problems of nuclear fusion are very briefly mentioned, and an impression of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor is illustrated. (H.V.H.)

  7. Chemical engineering side of nuclear fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.F.

    1976-10-01

    It is widely recognized that chemical engineering has important roles to play in the development of national and world wide energy resources through optimal utilization of fossil fuel reserves. It is much less appreciated that there are crucial chemical engineering problems in the development of energy production from other sources. In particular the successful development of nuclear fusion power generating systems will require the solution of many problems that are uniquely suited to chemical engineers. This article presents a brief overview of the fusion development program and an identification of the major technological problems remaining to be solved

  8. Cluster dynamics transcending chemical dynamics toward nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Andreas; Jortner, Joshua; Last, Isidore

    2006-07-11

    Ultrafast cluster dynamics encompasses femtosecond nuclear dynamics, attosecond electron dynamics, and electron-nuclear dynamics in ultraintense laser fields (peak intensities 10(15)-10(20) W.cm(-2)). Extreme cluster multielectron ionization produces highly charged cluster ions, e.g., (C(4+)(D(+))(4))(n) and (D(+)I(22+))(n) at I(M) = 10(18) W.cm(-2), that undergo Coulomb explosion (CE) with the production of high-energy (5 keV to 1 MeV) ions, which can trigger nuclear reactions in an assembly of exploding clusters. The laser intensity and the cluster size dependence of the dynamics and energetics of CE of (D(2))(n), (HT)(n), (CD(4))(n), (DI)(n), (CD(3)I)(n), and (CH(3)I)(n) clusters were explored by electrostatic models and molecular dynamics simulations, quantifying energetic driving effects, and kinematic run-over effects. The optimization of table-top dd nuclear fusion driven by CE of deuterium containing heteroclusters is realized for light-heavy heteroclusters of the largest size, which allows for the prevalence of cluster vertical ionization at the highest intensity of the laser field. We demonstrate a 7-orders-of-magnitude enhancement of the yield of dd nuclear fusion driven by CE of light-heavy heteroclusters as compared with (D(2))(n) clusters of the same size. Prospective applications for the attainment of table-top nucleosynthesis reactions, e.g., (12)C(P,gamma)(13)N driven by CE of (CH(3)I)(n) clusters, were explored.

  9. Electrochemically induced nuclear fusion of deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorne, J.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper cold fusion of deuterium by electrolysis of heavy water onto a palladium (or titanium) cathode is reported. Contrary to the assumption of Fleishmann and Pons that electrochemically compressed D + exists inside the palladium cathode, the observations of Jones et al. can be partially explained by the simultaneous presence of deuteride D - and the highly mobile positive deuterium ion D + . The opposite charges reduce the intranuclear distance and enhance the tunneling fusion rate. Furthermore, alloying of lithium with palladium can stabilize a negatively charged deuteride ion due to the salinelike character of lithium deuteride. The enormous pressure (or fugacity), achieved by the applied electrochemical potential (10 30 atm), is a virtual pressure that would have existed in equilibrium with palladium deuteride (PdD x ). It is speculated that nuclear fusion occurs at the surface, and the PdD x serves as a reservoir for the supply of deuteride ions

  10. Verification of cold nuclear fusion reaction, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Zenko; Aratono, Yasuyuki; Hirabayashi, Takakuni

    1991-01-01

    Can cold nuclear fusion reaction occur as is expected? If it occurs, what extent is its reaction probability? At present after 2 years elapsed since its beginning, the clear solution of these questions is not yet obtained. In many reaction systems employing different means, the experiments to confirm the cold nuclear fusion reaction have been attempted. In order to confirm that the nuclear fusion reaction of deuterium mutually has occurred, the neutrons, He-3, protons, tritium or generated heat, which were formed by the reaction and released from the system, are measured. Since it is considered that the frequency of the occurrence at normal temperature of the reaction is very low, it is necessary to select the most suitable method upon evaluating the limit of detection peculiar to the measuring methods. The methods of measuring neutrons, protons, gamma ray and generated heat, and the reaction systems by electrolytic process and dry process are explained. The detection of plural kinds of the reaction products and the confirmation of synchronism of signals are important. (K.I.)

  11. Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (FENDL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulo, V.

    1989-08-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section, in cooperation with national laboratories and other interested institutions, has begun to assemble, process, and test the Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (FENDL) for use in international (ITER) and national/regional fusion reactor designs. This report includes a summary report on the second IAEA Specialists' Meeting on FENDL convened by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section from 8 to 11 May 1989 in Vienna with the objectives: 1. to analyse a ''review kit'' of evaluated nuclear data intercomparisons with EXFOR data for the choice of files for FENDL; recommend the next actions with the ''review kit'', including double differential emission spectra of particles and gamma rays; recommend a verification procedure for processing codes and FENDL application libraries; 2. to review the status of special purpose libraries and plans for their development; 3. to analyse the results of a benchmark comparison for a lead sphere; 4. to discuss plans for future co-operation with national and regional nuclear data centres on the development of FENDL. A number of unpublished papers from the prior specialists' meeting on this subject, held from 14 to 16 November 1987, are included here for convenient reference. (author). Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Nuclear fusion: the energy source of the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massaut, V.; Jacquet, P.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear fusion reactors are safer and do not produce any long-lived radioactive waste, unlike nuclear fission reactors. Moreover, their energy source is endless. In the strive for a sustainable energy future, rather a lot of eyes are turned towards nuclear fusion technology that is also CO 2 -neutral. In 2009, Belgium decided to actively participate in the international 'Broader Approach' nuclear fusion programme, a partnership between the EU and Japan, with SCK-CEN playing the Belgian lead role.

  13. Explosive-driven hemispherical implosions for generating fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagie, D.; Glass, I.I.

    1982-03-01

    The UTIAS explosive-driven-implosion facility was used to produce stable, centered and focussed hemispherical implosions to generate neutrons from D-D reactions. A high resolution scintillator-detection system measured the neutrons and γ-rays resulting from the fusion of deuterium. Several approaches were used to initiate fusion in deuterium. The simplest and most direct proved to be in a predetonated stoichiometric mixture of deuterium-oxygen. The other successful method was a miniature Voitenko-type compressor where a plane diaphragm was driven by the implosion wave into a secondary small spherical cavity that contained pure deuterium gas at one atmosphere. A great deal of work still remains in order to measure accurately the neutron flux and its velocity distribution as well as the precise interactions of the neturons with the steel chamber which produced the γ-rays. Nevertheless, this is the only known work where fusion neutrons were produced by chemical energy only in a direct and indirect manner

  14. Laser-driven magnetized liner inertial fusion on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnak, D. H.; Davies, J. R.; Betti, R.; Bonino, M. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Knauer, J. P.; Regan, S. P.; Sefkow, A. B.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Peterson, K. J.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Weis, M. R.; Chang, P.-Y.

    2017-05-01

    Magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) combines the compression of fusion fuel, a hallmark of inertial confinement fusion (ICF), with strongly magnetized plasmas that suppress electron heat losses, a hallmark of magnetic fusion. It can reduce the traditional velocity, pressure, and convergence ratio requirements of ICF. The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept being studied at the Z Pulsed-Power Facility is a key target concept in the U.S. ICF Program. Laser-driven MagLIF is being developed on OMEGA to test the scaling of MagLIF over a range of absorbed energy of the order of 1 kJ on OMEGA to 500 kJ on Z. It is also valuable as a platform for studying the key physics of MIF. An energy-scaled point design has been developed for OMEGA that is roughly 10 × smaller in linear dimensions than Z MagLIF targets. A 0.6-mm-outer-diameter plastic cylinder filled with 2.4 mg/cm3 of D2 is placed in a ˜10-T axial magnetic field, generated by a Magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system, the cylinder is compressed by 40 OMEGA beams, and the gas fill is preheated by a single OMEGA beam propagating along the axis. Preheating to >100 eV and axially uniform compression over 0.7 mm have been demonstrated, separately, in a series of preparatory experiments that meet our initial expectations. The preliminary results from the first integrated experiments combining magnetization, compression, and preheat demonstrating a roughly 2 x increase in the neutron yield will be reported here for the first time.

  15. Economic analysis of the fusion-driven subcritical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Desuo; Wu Yican; Chu Delin; Hu Liqin

    2004-01-01

    The economic performance of the Fusion-Driven Subcritical system (FDS) is discussed. At first, as an example, the impacts of parameters, such as plasma aspect-ratio, elongation, normalized beta, on-axis toroidal field and the blanket energy-gain are analyzed on the costs of the typical case (moderate aspect-ratio) of FDS. Then, the economic characteristics of the 3 possible scenarios of FDS are estimated with respect to the neutronics parameters. The results calculated with the SYSCODE developed by the FDS team show that the cost of electricity of Scenario-1 (low aspect-ratio) and Scenario-2 (moderate aspect-ratio) of FDS is cheaper than that of pure fusion power plant at the same plane size (1 GW e ). The cost of electricity of the FDS power plant depends heavily on the functions of blanket and the blanket energy-gain. (authors)

  16. Nuclear fusion research at Tokamak Energy Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windridge, Melanie J.; Gryaznevich, Mikhail; Kingham, David

    2017-01-01

    Tokamak Energy's approach is close to the mainstream of nuclear fusion, and chooses a spherical tokamak, which is an economically developed form of Tokamak reactor design, as research subjects together with a high-temperature superconducting magnet. In the theoretical prediction, it is said that spherical tokamak can make tokamak reactor's scale compact compared with ITER or DEMO. The dependence of fusion energy multiplication factor on reactor size is small. According to model studies, it has been found that the center coil can be protected from heat and radiation damage even if the neutron shielding is optimized to 35 cm instead of 1 m. As a small tokamak with a high-temperature superconducting magnet, ST25 HTS, it demonstrated in 2015 continuous operation for more than 24 hours as a world record. Currently, this company is constructing a slightly larger ST40 type, and it is scheduled to start operation in 2017. ST40 is designed to demonstrate that it can realize a high magnetic field with a compact size and aims at attaining 8-10 keV (reaching the nuclear fusion reaction temperature at about 100 million degrees). This company will verify the startup and heating technology by the coalescence of spherical tokamak expected to have plasma current of 2 MA, and will also use 2 MW of neutral particle beam heating. In parallel with ST40, it is promoting a development program for high-temperature superconducting magnet. (A.O.)

  17. Indirectly driven, high convergence inertial confinement fusion implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cable, M.D.; Hatchett, S.P.; Caird, J.A.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Kornblum, H.N.; Lane, S.M.; Laumann, C.; Lerche, R.A.; Murphy, T.J.; Murray, J.; Nelson, M.B.; Phillion, D.W.; Powell, H.; Ress, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    A series of high convergence indirectly driven implosions has been done with the Nova Laser Fusion facility. These implosions were well characterized by a variety of measurements; computer models are in good agreement. The imploded fuel areal density was measured using a technique based on secondary neutron spectroscopy. At capsule convergences of 24:1, comparable to what is required for the hot spot of ignition scale capsules, these capsules achieved fuel densities of 19 g/cm 3 . Independent measurements of density, burn duration, and ion temperature gave nτθ=1.7±0.9x10 14 keV s/cm 3

  18. Who works with nuclear fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettiger, H.

    1977-01-01

    Humanity today, and especially the youth in industrial nations, undergoes a trend towards a 'post-industrial society'. This may be due to the resignation of those who think themselves unable to meet the increasing demands made on social production. The paper draws up a concept to give humanity a new interest in life. First, the paradox educational situation in the FRG today is outlined. Nuclear fusion technology and the industrial development necessary for its implementation are offered as a way out of the paradox situation of the present educational system. The demands to be made on an educational system for fusion technology are discussed. This strategy for world-wide economic growth integrates the intelligence potential of the industrial nations and the potential labour force of the Third World. (GG) [de

  19. Is nuclear fusion a sustainable energy form?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, A.M.; Hamacher, T.; Fischer, U.

    2011-01-01

    An acceptable criterion for strong sustainability in the consumption of natural resources is an effective, or virtual, limitlessness of supply, which can be defined, albeit arbitrarily, as corresponding to a few million years. The fuels for nuclear fusion-lithium and deuterium-satisfy this condition because of the abundance of lithium in seawater and of deuterium in all forms of water. The possible use of lithium-ion batteries on a large scale, particularly in the automobile industry, could, however, use up all the known terrestrial reserves and resources of lithium in the next few decades. Little attention has been paid so far to the financial, energetic, and above all, environmental aspects of lithium extraction from seawater. The neutron multipliers foreseen for fusion power plants, in particular beryllium, represent a major supply problem and require that other, sustainable solutions be urgently sought.

  20. Reprocessing free nuclear fuel production via fusion fission hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotschenreuther, Mike, E-mail: mtk@mail.utexas.edu [Intitute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin (United States); Valanju, Prashant; Mahajan, Swadesh [Intitute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Fusion fission hybrids, driven by a copious source of fusion neutrons can open qualitatively 'new' cycles for transmuting nuclear fertile material into fissile fuel. A totally reprocessing-free (ReFree) Th{sup 232}-U{sup 233} conversion fuel cycle is presented. Virgin fertile fuel rods are exposed to neutrons in the hybrid, and burned in a traditional light water reactor, without ever violating the integrity of the fuel rods. Throughout this cycle (during breeding in the hybrid, transport, as well as burning of the fissile fuel in a water reactor) the fissile fuel remains a part of a bulky, countable, ThO{sub 2} matrix in cladding, protected by the radiation field of all fission products. This highly proliferation-resistant mode of fuel production, as distinct from a reprocessing dominated path via fast breeder reactors (FBR), can bring great acceptability to the enterprise of nuclear fuel production, and insure that scarcity of naturally available U{sup 235} fuel does not throttle expansion of nuclear energy. It also provides a reprocessing free path to energy security for many countries. Ideas and innovations responsible for the creation of a high intensity neutron source are also presented.

  1. Reprocessing free nuclear fuel production via fusion fission hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotschenreuther, Mike; Valanju, Prashant; Mahajan, Swadesh

    2012-01-01

    Fusion fission hybrids, driven by a copious source of fusion neutrons can open qualitatively “new” cycles for transmuting nuclear fertile material into fissile fuel. A totally reprocessing-free (ReFree) Th 232 –U 233 conversion fuel cycle is presented. Virgin fertile fuel rods are exposed to neutrons in the hybrid, and burned in a traditional light water reactor, without ever violating the integrity of the fuel rods. Throughout this cycle (during breeding in the hybrid, transport, as well as burning of the fissile fuel in a water reactor) the fissile fuel remains a part of a bulky, countable, ThO 2 matrix in cladding, protected by the radiation field of all fission products. This highly proliferation-resistant mode of fuel production, as distinct from a reprocessing dominated path via fast breeder reactors (FBR), can bring great acceptability to the enterprise of nuclear fuel production, and insure that scarcity of naturally available U 235 fuel does not throttle expansion of nuclear energy. It also provides a reprocessing free path to energy security for many countries. Ideas and innovations responsible for the creation of a high intensity neutron source are also presented.

  2. Sensor Fusion for Nuclear Proliferation Activity Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adel Ghanem, Ph D

    2007-03-30

    The objective of Phase 1 of this STTR project is to demonstrate a Proof-of-Concept (PoC) of the Geo-Rad system that integrates a location-aware SmartTag (made by ZonTrak) and a radiation detector (developed by LLNL). It also includes the ability to transmit the collected radiation data and location information to the ZonTrak server (ZonService). The collected data is further transmitted to a central server at LLNL (the Fusion Server) to be processed in conjunction with overhead imagery to generate location estimates of nuclear proliferation and radiation sources.

  3. State of controlled nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo, A.B.

    1978-04-01

    The development of a commercial fusion reactor requires an adequate solution to the problems of heating and confinement of the nuclear fuel, as well as a considerable effort in materials technology and reactor engineering. A general discussion is presented of the status of the research connected with the most advanced concepts, indicating in each case the present situation and the main problems that must be solved to meet the requeriments estimated for power reactors. In particular, the laser-inertial concept is reviewed in detail. (author) [es

  4. Nuclear fusion: Pursuing the Soft [Symposium on fusion technology] option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenward, M.

    1991-01-01

    Fusion research has come a long way since the fusion community held the first Symposium on fusion technology (Soft) in Britain 30 years ago. Some of the recent achievements of the Jet project are reported from this year's symposium, the 16th in the series, held in London at the beginning of September. (author)

  5. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research 1988. V.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Volume 3 of the proceedings of the twelfth international conference on plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion, held in Nice, France, 12-19 October, 1988, contains papers presented on inertial fusion. Direct and indirect laser implosion experiments, programs of laser construction, computer modelling of implosions and resulting plasmas, and light ion beam fusion experiments are discussed. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. Introduction to Nuclear Fusion Power and the Design of Fusion Reactors. An Issue-Oriented Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillo, J. A.

    This three-part module focuses on the principles of nuclear fusion and on the likely nature and components of a controlled-fusion power reactor. The physical conditions for a net energy release from fusion and two approaches (magnetic and inertial confinement) which are being developed to achieve this goal are described. Safety issues associated…

  7. ANNETTE Project: Contributing to The Nuclearization of Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, W.; Cizelj, L.; Dieguez Porras, P.; Jaspers, R.; Noterdaeme, J.; Scheffer, M.; Schoenfelder, C.

    2018-01-01

    The ANNETTE Project (Advanced Networking for Nuclear Education and Training and Transfer of Expertise) is well underway, and one of its work packages addresses the design, development and implementation of nuclear fusion training. A systematic approach is used that leads to the development of new training courses, based on identified nuclear competences needs of the work force of (future) fusion reactors and on the current availability of suitable training courses. From interaction with stakeholders involved in the ITER design and construction or the JET D-T campaign, it became clear that the lack of nuclear safety culture awareness already has an impact on current projects. Through the collaboration between the European education networks in fission (ENEN) and fusion (FuseNet) in the ANNETTE project, this project is well positioned to support the development of nuclear competences for ongoing and future fusion projects. Thereby it will make a clear contribution to the realization of fusion energy.

  8. ANNETTE Project: Contributing to The Nuclearization of Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrosini W.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The ANNETTE Project (Advanced Networking for Nuclear Education and Training and Transfer of Expertise is well underway, and one of its work packages addresses the design, development and implementation of nuclear fusion training. A systematic approach is used that leads to the development of new training courses, based on identified nuclear competences needs of the work force of (future fusion reactors and on the current availability of suitable training courses. From interaction with stakeholders involved in the ITER design and construction or the JET D-T campaign, it became clear that the lack of nuclear safety culture awareness already has an impact on current projects. Through the collaboration between the European education networks in fission (ENEN and fusion (FuseNet in the ANNETTE project, this project is well positioned to support the development of nuclear competences for ongoing and future fusion projects. Thereby it will make a clear contribution to the realization of fusion energy.

  9. Coiled coil driven membrane fusion between cyclodextrin vesicles and liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Frank; Voskuhl, Jens; Vos, Jan; Friedrich, Heiner; Ravoo, Bart Jan; Bomans, Paul H H; Stuart, Marc C A; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M; Kros, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Controlled fusion events between natural membranes composed of phospholipids with synthetic unnatural membranes will yield valuable fundamental information on the mechanism of membrane fusion. Here, fusion between vastly different phospholipid liposomes and cyclodextrin amphiphile based vesicles

  10. Nuclear group constant set FUSION-J3 for fusion reactor nuclear calculations based on JENDL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Koichi; Seki, Yasushi; Kosako, Kazuaki; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu.

    1991-03-01

    Based on evaluated nuclear data file JENDL-3, published in April 1990, we produced a nuclear group constant set 'FUSION-J3' for fusion reactor nuclear calculation by ANISN code instead of GICX40 produced in 1977. The set FUSION-J3 is the coupled group constant set with neutron 125 and gamma-ray 40 group structure, and has the maximum order of 5 as Legendre expansion in scattering cross section. Forty nuclides included in FUSION-J3 can be used in fusion reactor nuclear calculations. Considering mobility in two-dimensional calculations and fixed group structure in induced activity calculation code system as the GICX40 structure, we composed also FUSION-40 group constant set with neutron 42 group and gamma-ray 21 group structure. The set FUSION-40 includes the same maximum order of the Legendre expansion and the same nuclides as FUSION-J3. From the results in experimental analysis and benchmark calculations, it became proved that JENDL-3 is at higher level of accuracy than ENDF/B-IV and -V. The set FUSION-J3 can be clear applicable to fusion reactor nuclear calculations. (author)

  11. Vacuum vessel for a nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Takashi; Sato, Hiroshi; Owada, Koro.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a reinforcing member on a bellows portion to reduce a stress at the bellows portion thereby increasing the strength of a vessel. Structure: A vacuum vessel for a nuclear fusion device has a bellows portion and a wall thick portion. A support extended toward the bellows portion is secured inside of a toroidal section in order to reduce the stress at the bellows portion. An insulator is interposed between the support and the bellows portion and is retained on the support by a bolt. Since the stress may be reduced by the support, the wall thick of the bellows portion may be decreased to sufficiently secure the low electric resistance value. (Yoshihara, H.)

  12. Sono-luminescence and nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seife, Ch.; Hilgenfeldt, S.; Lohse, D.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents multi-bubble and single-bubble luminescence. Since long scientists have known that ultra-sound waves could trigger the formation of bubbles in water (phenomenon called cavitation) but in 1930, for the first time experiments showed that these bubbles could emit light in particular conditions. In 1989 F. Gaitan succeeded in trapping a single bubble by using stationary ultra-sound waves, this bubble was exploding 20.000 times per second according to the frequency of the wave while emitting a series of flashes of light. Some scientists thought that the gas inside the bubble could reach very high values of temperature and pressure, and proposed the possibility of nuclear fusion to explain the excess of neutrons that has been evidenced in a cavitation experiment with deuterated acetone. The last part of this article describes the controversy triggered by the article describing this experiment, that was published by 'Science' in march 2002. (A.C.)

  13. Distinct roles for key karyogamy proteins during yeast nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melloy, Patricia; Shen, Shu; White, Erin; Rose, Mark D

    2009-09-01

    During yeast mating, cell fusion is followed by the congression and fusion of the two nuclei. Proteins required for nuclear fusion are found at the surface (Prm3p) and within the lumen (Kar2p, Kar5p, and Kar8p) of the nuclear envelope (NE). Electron tomography (ET) of zygotes revealed that mutations in these proteins block nuclear fusion with different morphologies, suggesting that they act in different steps of fusion. Specifically, prm3 zygotes were blocked before formation of membrane bridges, whereas kar2, kar5, and kar8 zygotes frequently contained them. Membrane bridges were significantly larger and occurred more frequently in kar2 and kar8, than in kar5 mutant zygotes. The kinetics of NE fusion in prm3, kar5, and kar8 mutants, measured by live-cell fluorescence microscopy, were well correlated with the size and frequency of bridges observed by ET. However the kar2 mutant was defective for transfer of NE lumenal GFP, but not diffusion within the lumen, suggesting that transfer was blocked at the NE fusion junction. These observations suggest that Prm3p acts before initiation of outer NE fusion, Kar5p may help dilation of the initial fusion pore, and Kar2p and Kar8p act after outer NE fusion, during inner NE fusion.

  14. Material Development for Nuclear Fusion and Energy Development Using Actinoids

    OpenAIRE

    Kayano, Hideo

    1994-01-01

    In our Facilities. fundamental researches on nuclear fuels and reactor materials have been performed by making use of JMTR and JOYO. Authors outline original studies among them currently performed by having myself as the core. Research fields in progress are material developments for the nuclear fusion such as ferritic steel and V alloy and energy development using Actinoids. As the material development for practical nuclear fusion, we do those of low activation V alloys, ferritic steels and ...

  15. Nuclear engineering questions: power, reprocessing, waste, decontamination, fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, R.D. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the chemical engineering symposium on nuclear questions. Specific questions addressed by the speakers included: nuclear power - why and how; commercial reprocessing - permanent death or resurrection; long-term management of commercial high-level wastes; long-term management of defense high-level waste; decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, engineering aspects of laser fusion I; and engineering aspects of laser fusion II. Individual papers have been input to the Energy Data Base previously

  16. Self-sustaining nuclear pumped laser-fusion reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boody, F.P.; Choi, C.K.; Miley, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    The features of a neutron feedback nuclear pumped (NFNP) laser-fusion reactor equipment were studied with the intention of establishing the feasibility of the concept. The NFNP laser-fusion concept is compared schematically to electrically pumped laser fusion. The study showed that, once a method of energy storage has been demonstrated, a self-sustaining fusion-fission hybrid reactor with a ''blanket multiplication'' of two would be feasible using nuclear pumped Xe F* excimer lasers having efficiencies of 1 to 2 percent and D-D-T pellets with gains of 50 to 100

  17. Potential use of nuclear pumped lasers as fusion drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.; Greenspan, E.; Gilligan, J.

    1980-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of an energy-storage type nuclear pumped laser (NPL) suitable for laser fusion feedback applications is briefly noted. Then, the use of NPLs in fusion-fission-hybrid systems is presented and analyzed from an energetic point of view. Unique hybrid blanket concepts are proposed that enable approx. 3 fissions in the laser medium per fusion neutron while still providing approx. 2 fissile atoms per fusion neutron. Such designs would enable use of a very low gain fusion device as the driver. (orig.) [de

  18. Overview of fusion nuclear technology in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreani, R.; Gasparotto, M.

    2002-01-01

    The fusion nuclear technology programme in the EU is focussed on materials and breeding blankets development, tritium and high heat flux component technologies. A strong effort is also devoted to the validation of the design of an intense 14 MeV neutron source (IFMIF). The material programme includes the development of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel (EUROFER) to be used as structural material in a DEMO reactor, and potentially more attractive higher performance materials: ODS and SiC/SiC composites. The breeding blanket activities are focussed in the preparation of the two European Test Blanket Moduli to be installed in ITER. The Fuel Cycle activities for ITER include development of the torus exhaust cryopump, fuel storage system, performance characterisation of the torus exhaust processing and design of water detritiation system. High heat flux components have been developed in the framework of ITER R and D programme and based on copper alloy heat sink protected by an armour of beryllium, CFC or tungsten. Studies give an important contribution in defining the nuclear technology programme strategy

  19. Overview of fusion nuclear technology in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreani, R. E-mail: roberto.andreani@tech.efda.org; Gasparotto, M. E-mail: maurizio.gasparotto@tech.efda.org

    2002-11-01

    The fusion nuclear technology programme in the EU is focussed on materials and breeding blankets development, tritium and high heat flux component technologies. A strong effort is also devoted to the validation of the design of an intense 14 MeV neutron source (IFMIF). The material programme includes the development of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel (EUROFER) to be used as structural material in a DEMO reactor, and potentially more attractive higher performance materials: ODS and SiC/SiC composites. The breeding blanket activities are focussed in the preparation of the two European Test Blanket Moduli to be installed in ITER. The Fuel Cycle activities for ITER include development of the torus exhaust cryopump, fuel storage system, performance characterisation of the torus exhaust processing and design of water detritiation system. High heat flux components have been developed in the framework of ITER R and D programme and based on copper alloy heat sink protected by an armour of beryllium, CFC or tungsten. Studies give an important contribution in defining the nuclear technology programme strategy.

  20. The Physics Design for a Fusion Driven Sub-critical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Wu

    2002-11-01

    The Fusion Driven Sub-critical System (FDS) is a sub-critical nuclear energy system drive by fusion neutron source, which provides a feasible, safe, economic and highly efficient potential of disposing High Level Waste (HLW) and produce fission nuclear fuel as a early application of fusion technology. This paper reviews the past physics reactor design of fusion-fission hybrid reactor in China, and a low aspect ratio tokamak energy system that has been proposed, which aims at high β, good confinement, and steady-state operation in a compact configuration at modest field. The system includes a low aspect ratio tokamak as fusion neutron driver, a radioactivity clean nuclear power system as blanket and novel concept of liquid metal conductor as centre conductor post. Parameters of such kind reactor are the following. Major radius 1.4m, Minor radius 1m, plasma current 9.2MA, Toroidal field 2.5T, Plasma edge q=5, Average density 1.6 10^20m^3, Average temperature 10keV, Plasma volume 50m^3, Bootstrap current fraction 0.72, Fusion power 100MW, Drive power 28MW, Neutron wall loading 1.0MW/m-2. The plasma configuration is an important part in the low-A tokamak. The Eq code has been used to get a equilibrium. From this calculation, we have found a simple set of PF coils that satisfies the requirements of the large elongation plasma configuration and a vertical field with less curve field lines in the low-A tokamak. The natural elongation can be attributed mostly to differences in the current density profile. In order to determine the feasibility of the low-A tokamak operation, a transient simulation has been made which includes the equilibrium, transport and plasma position shape control in the low-A tokamak. A 1-1/2 equilibrium evolution code has been used to make this simulation. The code is two-dimensional time dependent free boundary simulation code that advances the MHD equations describing the transport time-scale evolution of a axisymmetric tokamak plasma.

  1. Will nuclear fusion be able to power the next century?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grad, P.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is widely regarded as potentially the ultimate energy-generation concept. Although an enormous amount of work and resources has already been committed throughout the world on nuclear fusion research, controlled nuclear fusion has so far proved largely elusive and the difficulties to be overcome before the first commercial fusion reactor is put into operation remain daunting and formidable. In Australia there are three main nuclear fusion research efforts. Sydney University's School of Physics operates a tokamak and a team there has been studying plasma properties in general and in particular radio frequency wave heating of the plasma. At the Australian National University a group has pioneered the construction and operation of an advanced stellarator model called a heliac while at Flinders University in Adelaide a team has developed a rotamak model. The US, Europe, Japan and the USSR each has a frontline fusion research tokamak with Princeton University's TFTR and Culham's JET closest to reactor operation conditions. Although several questions remain to be answered about the safety of a fusion reactor, all experts agree that these problems would be easier to solve than those of conventional fission reactors and there would be no major radioactive waste disposal problem. Some argue that fusion would contribute to the greenhouse effect but most authorities have expressed optimism that fusion, once the technical hurdles are overcome, could economically provide virtually unlimited energy with minimal environmental hazards and at a high safety level

  2. High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Induced Nuclear Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, Giorgio; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is a process in which nuclei, having a total initial mass, combine to produce a single nucleus, having a final mass less than the total initial mass. Below a given atomic number the process is exothermic; that is, since the final mass is less than the combined initial mass and the mass deficit is converted into energy by the nuclear fusion. On Earth nuclear fusion does not happen spontaneously because electrostatic barriers prevent the phenomenon. To induce controlled, industrial scale, nuclear fusion, only a few methods have been discovered that look promising, but net positive energy production is not yet possible because of low overall efficiency of the systems. In this paper we propose that an intense burst of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) could be focused or beamed to a target mass composed of appropriate fuel or target material to efficiently rearrange the atomic or nuclear structure of the target material with consequent nuclear fusion. Provided that efficient generation of HFGW can be technically achieved, the proposed fusion reactor could become a viable solution for the energy needs of mankind and alternatively a process for beaming energy to produce a source of fusion energy remotely - even inside solid materials

  3. Measurement of nuclear potentials from fusion excitation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, J.R.; Birkelund, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The basis for measuring nuclear potentials from fusion excitation functions at energies above barrier is reviewed. It is argued that because of experimental and conceptual problems fusion excitation functions at high energies cannot lead to model independent measurements of internuclear potential at small separations. The Al 27 + Ne 20 reaction previously analyzed by others is used as an example of problems arising from the inability to distinguish complete and incomplete fusion in experimental data

  4. Achieving competitive excellence in nuclear energy: The threat of proliferation; the challenge of inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1994-06-01

    Nuclear energy will have an expanding role in meeting the twenty-first-century challenges of population and economic growth, energy demand, and global warming. These great challenges are non-linearly coupled and incompletely understood. In the complex global system, achieving competitive excellence for nuclear energy is a multi-dimensional challenge. The growth of nuclear energy will be driven by its margin of economic advantage, as well as by threats to energy security and by growing evidence of global warming. At the same time, the deployment of nuclear energy will be inhibited by concerns about nuclear weapons proliferation, nuclear waste and nuclear reactor safety. These drivers and inhibitors are coupled: for example, in the foreseeable future, proliferation in the Middle East may undermine energy security and increase demand for nuclear energy. The Department of Energy's nuclear weapons laboratories are addressing many of these challenges, including nuclear weapons builddown and nonproliferation, nuclear waste storage and burnup, reactor safety and fuel enrichment, global warming, and the long-range development of fusion energy. Today I will focus on two major program areas at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): the proliferation of nuclear weapons and the development of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) energy

  5. The Fight for Fusion: A Modern Nuclear War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Adam; Sereda, David

    1992-01-01

    Describes the work of Bogdan Maglich with helium-based fusion and barriers to its development resulting from lack of government support, competition for funding, and political pet projects. Compares tritium-based to helium-based fusion and the potential for nonradioactive nuclear power to supply the world's energy requirements with no negative…

  6. Canonical form of an elastoplastic model of nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlova, T.I.; Mikhajlov, I.N.; Do Dang, G.

    1997-01-01

    Starting from equations of motion describing the fusion process in symmetrical nuclear systems of low angular momenta we reconstruct the collective Lagrangian and dissipation Rayleigh functions. This opens new perspectives in studying the dynamical effects in the heavy nuclei collisions. In particular, it provides a basis for a quantal description of the fusion process and accompanying its effects

  7. The U.S. program for fusion nuclear technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.F.; Haas, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The Fusion Nuclear Technology (FNT) research and development program in the United States is shaped by a hierarchy of documents and by the environment for nuclear energy existing in the United States. The fission nuclear industry in the United States has suffered problems with public perception of safety, waste disposal issues, and economics as influenced by safety and environmental issues. For fusion to be a viable energy alternative, it must offer significant improvements in these areas. The hierarchy of documents defining objectives, plans, and strategy of the U.S. FNT program consists of the Magnetic Fusion Program Plan (MFPP) (February 1985), the Technical Planning Activity Final Report (January 1987), the Finesse Program Report (January 1987), and the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study Final Report (September 1984). In addition, two other documents are also significant in shaping FNT policy. These are the IEA report on Material for Fusion (December 1986) and the Summary of the Report of the Senior Committee on Environmental, Safety, and Economic Aspects of Magnetic Fusion Energy (September 1987). The U.S. Magnetic Fusion Program Plan defines four key technical issues (magnetic confinement systems, properties of burning plasmas, fusion nuclear technology, and fusion materials). (orig./KP)

  8. Nuclear fusion experimental study on 16 O + 60 Ni system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.P. da.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear fusion cross section measurements were performed in the energy range near The Coulomb Barrier (E Lab -> 40-72 MeV), for the system 16 O + 60 Ni, aiming the study of Fusion Process involving heavy ions. (L.C.J.A.)

  9. Nuclear fusion: a dream in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaut, Cecile

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the construction of ITER, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, in which will be produced nuclear fusion reactions of the same type as those occurring in the sun. As only foundations have been built, physicists are working on component design, on material improvement, on monitoring and maintenance robots, on the simulation of plasma behaviour, a critical aspect of the operation. Experiments are performed in an older and smaller experimental reactor, Tore Supra. It is used to test plasma heating modes, the injection mode of deuterium and tritium which will fuse in ITER. Some parts of this installation are used to extract heat from plasma and must sustain huge heat fluxes (10 millions of Watt per square meter). In order to maintain ITER without stopping it, robots will be used to control and repair the installation. A virtual reality room has been designed to check in advance the construction process as well as the operation. ITER must be completed in 2018 and the first plasmas be produced in 2019. Tritium is to be introduced in 2026. Then, scientists hope to produce a power which will be ten times the input power

  10. Nuclear Fusion Research Understanding Plasma-Surface Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Robert E.H

    2005-01-01

    It became clear in the early days of fusion research that the effects of the containment vessel (erosion of "impurities") degrade the overall fusion plasma performance. Progress in controlled nuclear fusion research over the last decade has led to magnetically confined plasmas that, in turn, are sufficiently powerful to damage the vessel structures over its lifetime. This book reviews current understanding and concepts to deal with this remaining critical design issue for fusion reactors. It reviews both progress and open questions, largely in terms of available and sought-after plasma-surface interaction data and atomic/molecular data related to these "plasma edge" issues.

  11. Preliminary analysis of typical transients in fusion driven subcritical system (FDS-I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yunqing; Ke Yan; Wu Yican

    2007-01-01

    The potential safety characteristic is expected as one of the advantages of fusion-driven subcritical system (FDS-I) for the transmutation and incineration of nuclear waste compared with the critical reactor. Transients of the FDS-I may occur due to the perturbation of external neutron source, the failure of functional device, and the occurrence of the uncontrolled event. As typical transient scenarios, the following cases were analyzed: unprotected plasma overpower (UPOP), unprotected loss of flow (ULOF), unprotected transient overpower (UTOP). The transient analyses for the FDS-I were performed with a coupled two-dimensional thermal-hydraulics and neutronics transient analysis code NTC2D. The negative feedback of reactivity is the interesting safety feature of FDS-I as temperature increase, due to the fuel form of the circulating particle. The present simulation results showed that the current FDS-I design has a resistance against severe transient scenarios. (author)

  12. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  13. Burnup studies of the subcritical fusion-driven in-zinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, C. M.; Gudowski, W.; Venneri, F.

    2007-01-01

    A fusion-driven subcritical core, 'In-Zinerator', has been proposed for nuclear waste transmutation [1]. In this concept, a powerful Z-pinch neutron source will produce pulses of 14 MeV neutrons that multiply in a surrounding subcritical core consisting of spent fuel from the LWR fuel cycle or from deep burn high temperature reactors. The proposed design has pulse frequency 0.1 Hz and a thermal power of 3 GWth. The Z-pinch fusion experiment is located at Sandia Laboratories, USA, and can today fire once a day. However, investigations have been made how to increase the frequency to several fires per minute. Each fire yields 300 MJ corresponding to 1020 neutrons per pulse. The source chamber will in the In-Zinerator concept be surrounded by spent fuel to reach an effective multiplication factor, k e ff, of 0.97. The core will be cooled by liquid lead. In this paper, the burnup of different fuel compositions in the In-Zinerator will be studied as function of initial k e ff. The Monte Carlo based continuous energy burnup code MCB [2][3]will be used. References: [1] B.B. Cipiti, Fusion Transmutation of Waste and the Role of the In-Zinerator in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Sandia Report SAND2006-3522, Sandia National Laboratories, USA, 2006. [2] J. Cetnar, J Wallenius and W Gudowski, MCB: A continuous energy Monte-Carlo burnup simulation code, Actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation, Proc. of the Fifth Int. Information Exchange Meeting, Mol, Belgium, 25-27 November 1998, 523, OECD/NEA, 1998. [3] http://www.nea.fr/abs/html/nea-1643.html

  14. [Two-nuclear neurons: sincitial fusion or amitotic division].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, O S; Frumkina, L E; Lactionova, A A; Paramonova, N M; Novakovskaia, S A

    2011-01-01

    In the review the history of research two-nuclear neurons is stated and two hypotheses about mechanisms of their formation are analysed: by sincitial fusion or amytotic divisions. The facts of discrepancy of the former orthodox cellular theory categorically denying possibility sincitial of communications in nervous system and of sincitial fusion neurons are mentioned. As an example results of ultrastructural researches of occurrence sincitium in a cortex of the big brain of rats, in autonomic ganglions, in hypocampus and a cerebellum of adult animals are presented. The video data of the sincitial fusion of live neurons and the mechanism of formation multinuclear neurons in tissue culture are analyzed. Existing data about amytotic a way of formation two-nuclear neurons are critically considered. The conclusion becomes, that the mechanism of formation two-nuclear neurons is cellular fusion. Simultaneously the review confirms our representations about existence in nervous system sincitial interneural communications.

  15. Nuclear hydrogen production: re-examining the fusion option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baindur, S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a scheme for nuclear hydrogen production by fusion. The basic idea is to use nuclear energy of the fuel (hydrogen plasma) to produce molecular hydrogen fro carbon-free hydrogen compounds. The hydrogen is then stored and utilized electrochemically in fuel cells or chemically as molecular hydrogen in internal combustion engines

  16. Establishment of a Program to Cultivate a Nuclear Fusion Workforce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. J.; Kim, J. U.; Yoo, J. G.; Oh, B. H.; Kwak, J. G.

    2009-02-01

    We carry out investigation on the establishment of a program to cultivate a nuclear fusion workforce effectively, which is the most important resource in the fusion energy development. Acquisition of fresh fusion technologies is essentially required to pursue R and D efficiently and to ensure fusion initiatives firmly in the international community. As the time has come to cultivate the fusion workforce and to enhance the workforce's expertise, the universities, research institutes and industries involved in fusion energy development are supposed to adjust fast technology shifts and to accommodate international trends toward collaboration. We establish systematic schemes to develop a professional workforce and to assign the right jobs to the right people timely through the research-academic-industry cooperation. After carrying out domestic and oversea surveys on the education and training programs of various institutes, we evaluate an over-all manpower supply system. Also, in this report, we establish research-academic-industry cooperation strategies to cultivate fusion energy professionals, such as researchers, professional fusion engineers in the industry, and experts in design, operations and maintenance. We propose education and training programs for newcomers to fusion, such as an interdisciplinary education program, an on-the-job training for fresh graduates with advanced degree. We suggest a working plan of education and training for fusion students through integration of basic sciences with fusion engineering. We arrange a scheme to designate education and training centers for human resource development by specifying organizations and functions. Finally, we establish international collaboration programs to encourage the fusion workforce to acquire the latest fusion technologies by participating in oversea R and D activities

  17. In vivo myomaker-mediated heterologous fusion and nuclear reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Yasuyuki; Vagnozzi, Ronald J; Millay, Douglas P

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge regarding cellular fusion and nuclear reprogramming may aid in cell therapy strategies for skeletal muscle diseases. An issue with cell therapy approaches to restore dystrophin expression in muscular dystrophy is obtaining a sufficient quantity of cells that normally fuse with muscle. Here we conferred fusogenic activity without transdifferentiation to multiple non-muscle cell types and tested dystrophin restoration in mouse models of muscular dystrophy. We previously demonstrated that myomaker, a skeletal muscle-specific transmembrane protein necessary for myoblast fusion, is sufficient to fuse 10T 1/2 fibroblasts to myoblasts in vitro. Whether myomaker-mediated heterologous fusion is functional in vivo and whether the newly introduced nonmuscle nuclei undergoes nuclear reprogramming has not been investigated. We showed that mesenchymal stromal cells, cortical bone stem cells, and tail-tip fibroblasts fuse to skeletal muscle when they express myomaker. These cells restored dystrophin expression in a fraction of dystrophin-deficient myotubes after fusion in vitro. However, dystrophin restoration was not detected in vivo although nuclear reprogramming of the muscle-specific myosin light chain promoter did occur. Despite the lack of detectable dystrophin reprogramming by immunostaining, this study indicated that myomaker could be used in nonmuscle cells to induce fusion with muscle in vivo, thereby providing a platform to deliver therapeutic material.-Mitani, Y., Vagnozzi, R. J., Millay, D. P. In vivo myomaker-mediated heterologous fusion and nuclear reprogramming. © FASEB.

  18. Twenty years of ''Nuclear Fusion''. Inertial confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, C.

    1980-01-01

    Inertial confinement (ICF) fusion research is directed towards demonstrating the feasibility of very rapidly heating and compressing small pellets of suitable fuel until conditions exist where thermonuclear fusion can occur and useful amounts of power can be produced. Major problems which have to be solved are the following: 1) pellet design based on driver-plasma coupling; 2) the technology of energy drivers; 3) feasibility of ICF reactor systems

  19. FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.

    1984-10-01

    The following chapters are included in this study: (1) fusion nuclear issues, (2) survey of experimental needs, (3) requirements of the experiments, (4) non-fusion facilities, (5) fusion facilities for nuclear experiments, and (6) fusion research and development scenarios

  20. Heat transfer and mechanical interactions in fusion nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    This general review of design issues in heat transfer and mechanical interactions of the first wall, blanket and shield systems of tokamak and mirror fusion reactors begins with a brief introduction to fusion nuclear systems. The design issues are summarized in tables and the following examples are described to illustrate these concerns: the surface heating of limiters, heat transfer from solid breeders, MHD effects in liquid metal blankets, mechanical loads from electromagnetic transients and remote maintenance

  1. Nuclear fusion and genome encounter during yeast zygote formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakoff, Alan Michael; Jaiswal, Purnima

    2009-06-01

    When haploid cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are crossed, parental nuclei congress and fuse with each other. To investigate underlying mechanisms, we have developed assays that evaluate the impact of drugs and mutations. Nuclear congression is inhibited by drugs that perturb the actin and tubulin cytoskeletons. Nuclear envelope (NE) fusion consists of at least five steps in which preliminary modifications are followed by controlled flux of first outer and then inner membrane proteins, all before visible dilation of the waist of the nucleus or coalescence of the parental spindle pole bodies. Flux of nuclear pore complexes occurs after dilation. Karyogamy requires both the Sec18p/NSF ATPase and ER/NE luminal homeostasis. After fusion, chromosome tethering keeps tagged parental genomes separate from each other. The process of NE fusion and evidence of genome independence in yeast provide a prototype for understanding related events in higher eukaryotes.

  2. Swedish perspective on the accelerator driven nuclear system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudowski, W.; Conde, H.

    1997-01-01

    Accelerator-driven nuclear systems can become an important complement for nuclear reactors, opening new options for the nuclear fuel cycle and furthermore, in countries like Sweden, where of conventional nuclear power has no future prospects, these systems can make nuclear energy an attractive source of environmentally friendly energy again. Also the idea of burning weapon grade Plutonium in accelerator driven systems has a lot of advantages. Intensive international cooperation and common efforts to build the first demonstration facility are the best ways to achieve these goals

  3. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tetsuya

    1993-05-01

    The report contains the proceedings of a conference on plasma physics. A fraction of topics included MHD instabilities, magnetic confinement and plasma heating in the field of fusion plasmas, in 8 papers falling in the INIS scope have been abstracted and indexed for the INIS database. (K.A.)

  4. Some theories of cold nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparata, G.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a review is presented of the main theoretical attempts to describe the phenomenology of cold fusion, whose general structure begins to clearly unravel. The main conclusion is that the approaches that are likely to be of relevance must invoke processes where the elementary components (nuclei and electrons) of condensed matter act in a coherent fashion

  5. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  6. The Nuclear Potential in Heavy-Ion Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D.; Newton, J. O.; Hagino, K.

    Fits to high precision fusion cross-sections even for ZPZT Woods-Saxon potential of ≃1~fm, which is much larger than the commonly accepted value of ≃~0.65 fm. However, use of large values of a necessarily makes the potential pocket very shallow for realistic values of the nuclear potential depth. For larger values of angular momenta the pocket disappears, and a fusion barrier energy or radius can no longer be defined. In the absence of a potential pocket, fusion does not occur in the commonly used realistic coupled channels code CCFULL where fusion is calculated by applying an incoming wave boundary condition at the position of the minimum of the attractive pocket. For this reason, realistic coupled channels calculations with large values of a have needed unrealistically deep nuclear potentials. Once the potential depth is constrained to reasonable values, the data cannot be explained by simply changing the diffuseness of the nuclear potential. This indicates the necessity to go beyond the potential model, and incorporate dynamical effects as the two nuclei move towards fusion, even for light systems with ZPZT < 1000.

  7. 2013 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech 2013 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, D.

    2015-01-01

    I would like to express gratitude to the IAEA, the journal Nuclear Fusion and its board for this acknowledgement of work carried out at the MIT Alcator C-Mod tokamak. I must begin by making it clear that this is in no way an award to an individual. The experiments, data analysis and paper were a true collaborative effort from the C-Mod team. It is a honor to work with them and to accept the award on their behalf. I would also like to thank the US Department of Energy for their support in funding this research. The paper describes the exploration of the 'improved' confinement regime dubbed 'I-mode'. The distinguishing feature of this operational mode is a robust boundary pedestal in temperature with the somewhat surprising lack of any form of density pedestal. Thus the regime exhibits an enhanced energy confinement similar to H-mode, roughly double of L-mode at fixed input power, yet has global fuel and impurity particle transport of L-mode. These features are intriguing from a scientific and practical point of view. On the science side it is extremely useful to obtain such a clear demarcation between the energy and particle transport. For example, soon after its discovery, the I-mode was used to extract the observation that the edge T pedestal is the strongest determinant for intrinsic rotation in work by John Rice, Pat Diamond and colleagues. Recent results regarding core transport by Anne White, Nate Howard and colleagues show that I-mode has intriguing properties with respect to core response of fluctuations and profile stiffness. Mike Churchill's recent Ph. D study on C-Mod shows that I-mode exhibits no strong poloidal impurity asymmetry, unlike H-mode. The I-mode posed an interesting test for the peeling-ballooning-KBM model of the pedestal, the subject of the 2014 Nuclear Fusion award of Phil Snyder, and was examined by John Walk and Jerry Hughes showing that in fact the lack of the density pedestal pushed the I-mode far away from the P-B limit, and thus the

  8. Nuclear characteristics of D-D fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hideki; Ohta, Masao

    1978-01-01

    Fusion reactors operating on deuterium (D-D) cycle are considered to be of long range interest for their freedom from tritium breeding in the blanket. The present paper discusses the various possibilities of D-D fusion reactor blanket designs mainly from the standpoint of the nuclear characteristics. Neutronic and photonic calculations are based on presently available data to provide a basis of the optimal blanket design in D-D fusion reactors. It is found that it appears desirable to design a blanket with blanket/shield (BS) concept in D-D fusion reactors. The BS concept is designed to obtain reasonable shielding characteristics for superconducting magnet (SCM) by using shielding materials in the compact blanket. This concept will open the possibility of compact radiation shield design based on assured technology, and offer the advantage from the system economics point of view. (auth.)

  9. Nuclear dynamics around the barrier: from fusion to evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simenel, Cedric

    2003-01-01

    This work is devoted to aspects of nuclear dynamics around the barrier. It is shown that for fusion reactions, the Coulomb field couples relative motion of nuclei to rotation of a deformed projectile independently of the energy and the charge of the nuclei. An experimental study of the reaction 6 He + 190 Os via gamma spectroscopy of product nuclei has shown that the break up of the 6 He is coupled to the relative motion too, a strong hindrance resulting in the fusion around and above the fusion barrier. The path to fusion after overcoming the barrier, especially the charge equilibration, have been studied in the framework of the TDHF theory via the preequilibrium GDR excited in N/Z asymmetric reactions. An application to formation of the super-heavy elements has been proposed. Finally, couplings between protons and neutrons have been shown up in mean field calculations. Their main expected effect is an emission of protons under the Coulomb barrier. (author)

  10. Muon catalyzed fusion - fission reactor driven by a recirculating beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliezer, S.; Tajima, T.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1986-01-01

    The recent experimentally inferred value of multiplicity of fusion of deuterium and tritium catalyzed by muons has rekindled interest in its application to reactors. Since the main energy expended is in pion (and consequent muon) productions, we try to minimize the pion loss by magnetically confining pions where they are created. Although it appears at this moment not possible to achieve energy gain by pure fusion, it is possible to gain energy by combining catalyzed fusion with fission blankets. We present two new ideas that improve the muon fusion reactor concept. The first idea is to combine the target, the converter of pions into muons, and the synthesizer into one (the synergetic concept). This is accomplished by injecting a tritium or deuterium beam of 1 GeV/nucleon into DT fuel contained in a magnetic mirror. The confined pions slow down and decay into muons, which are confined in the fuel causing little muon loss. The necessary quantity of tritium to keep the reactor viable has been derived. The second idea is that the beam passing through the target is collected for reuse and recirculated, while the strongly interacted portion of the beam is directed to electronuclear blankets. The present concepts are based on known technologies and on known physical processes and data. 29 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Nuclear data requirements for accelerator driven sub-critical systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The development of accelerator driven sub-critical systems (ADSS) require significant amount of new nuclear data in extended energy regions as well as for a variety of new materials. This paper reviews these perspectives in the Indian context.

  12. Accelerator driven radiation clean nuclear power system conceptual research symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Zhixiang

    2000-06-01

    The R and D of ADS (Accelerators Driven Subcritical System) in China introduced. 31 theses are presented. It includes the basic principle of ADS, accelerators, sub-critical reactors, neutron physics, nuclear data, partitioning and transmutation

  13. Inertial Confinement Fusion R and D and Nuclear Proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    In a few months, or a few years, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory may achieve fusion gain using 192 powerful lasers to generate x-rays that will compress and heat a small target containing isotopes of hydrogen. This event would mark a major milestone after decades of research on inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It might also mark the beginning of an accelerated global effort to harness fusion energy based on this science and technology. Unlike magnetic confinement fusion (ITER, 2011), in which hot fusion fuel is confined continuously by strong magnetic fields, inertial confinement fusion involves repetitive fusion explosions, taking advantage of some aspects of the science learned from the design and testing of hydrogen bombs. The NIF was built primarily because of the information it would provide on weapons physics, helping the United States to steward its stockpile of nuclear weapons without further underground testing. The U.S. National Academies' National Research Council is now hosting a study to assess the prospects for energy from inertial confinement fusion. While this study has a classified sub-panel on target physics, it has not been charged with examining the potential nuclear proliferation risks associated with ICF R and D. We argue here that this question urgently requires direct and transparent examination, so that means to mitigate risks can be assessed, and the potential residual risks can be balanced against the potential benefits, now being assessed by the NRC. This concern is not new (Holdren, 1978), but its urgency is now higher than ever before.

  14. Cytosol-dependent membrane fusion in ER, nuclear envelope and nuclear pore assembly: biological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafikova, Elvira R; Melikov, Kamran; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2010-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope rearrangements after mitosis are often studied in the reconstitution system based on Xenopus egg extract. In our recent work we partially replaced the membrane vesicles in the reconstitution mix with protein-free liposomes to explore the relative contributions of cytosolic and transmembrane proteins. Here we discuss our finding that cytosolic proteins mediate fusion between membranes lacking functional transmembrane proteins and the role of membrane fusion in endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope reorganization. Cytosol-dependent liposome fusion has allowed us to restore, without adding transmembrane nucleoporins, functionality of nuclear pores, their spatial distribution and chromatin decondensation in nuclei formed at insufficient amounts of membrane material and characterized by only partial decondensation of chromatin and lack of nuclear transport. Both the mechanisms and the biological implications of the discovered coupling between spatial distribution of nuclear pores, chromatin decondensation and nuclear transport are discussed.

  15. Near and long term pulse power requirements for laser driven inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagnon, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    At the Lawrence Livermore Laboraory, major emphasis has been placed upon the development of large, ND:glass laser systems in order to address the basic physics issues associated with light driven fusion targets. A parallel program is directed toward the development of lasers which exhibit higher efficiencies and shorter wavelengths and are thus more suitable as drivers for fusion power plants. This paper discusses the pulse power technology which has been developed to meet the near and far term needs of the laser fusion program at Livermore

  16. Recent US advances in ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Coleman, J.; Greenway, W.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Molvik, A.W.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Sharp, W.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Qin, H.; Sefkow, A.B.; Startsev, E.A.; Welch, D.; Olson, C.

    2007-01-01

    During the past two years, significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the US heavy ion fusion science program in longitudinal beam compression, ion-beam-driven warm dense matter, beam acceleration, high brightness beam transport, and advanced theory and numerical simulations. Innovations in longitudinal compression of intense ion beams by >50X propagating through background plasma enable initial beam target experiments in warm dense matter to begin within the next two years. We are assessing how these new techniques might apply to heavy ion fusion drivers for inertial fusion energy

  17. Nuclear structure in cold rearrangement processes in fission and fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armbruster, P.

    1998-11-01

    In fission and fusion of heavy nuclei large numbers of nucleons are rearranged at a scale of excitation energy very small compared to the binding energy of the nuclei. The energies involved are less than 40 MeV at nuclear temperatures below 1.5 MeV. The shapes of the configurations in the rearrangement of a binary system into a monosystem in fusion, or vice versa in fission, change their elongations by as much as 8 fm, the radius of the monosystem. The dynamics of the reactions macroscopically described by a potential energy surface, inertia parameters, dissipation, and a collision energy is strongly modified by the nuclear structure of the participating nuclei. Experiments showing nuclear structure effects in fusion and fission of the heaviest nuclei are reviewed. The reaction kinematics and the multitude of isotopes involved are investigated by detector techniques and by recoil spectrometers. The advancement of the latter allows to find very small reaction branches in the range of 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -10}. The experiments reveal nuclear structure effects in all stages of the rearrangement processes. These are discussed pointing to analogies in fusion and fission on the microscopic scale, notwithstanding that both processes macroscopically are irreversible. Heavy clusters, as 132Sn, 208Pb, nuclei with closed shell configurations N=82,126, Z=50,82 survive in large parts of the nuclear rearrangement. They determine the asymmetry in the mass distribution of low energy fission, and they allow to synthesise superheavy elements, until now up to element 112. Experiments on the cold rearrangement in fission and fusion are presented. Here, in the range of excitation energies below 12 MeV the phenomena are observed most convincingly. (orig.)

  18. Nuclear fusion TORE SUPRA, a new stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, M.; Laurent, L.

    1995-01-01

    Since almost forty years, the scientists try and neutralize in a pacific aim thermonuclear fusion energy and therefore they use the magnetic confinement of hot plasmas.In France, since 1960 the achieved studies permitted in 1988 to bring into service the TORE SUPRA TOKAMAK, which used, for the first time a superconducting magnet to generate the confinement magnetic field. TORE SUPRA, which didn't still explore its maximal potentialities, will be one of the apparatuses which will be used as basis of the international project ITER development. 5 figs

  19. Antimatter Driven P-B11 Fusion Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammash, Terry; Martin, James; Godfroy, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    One of the major advantages of using P-B11 fusion fuel is that the reaction produces only charged particles in the form of three alpha particles and no neutrons. A fusion concept that lends itself to this fuel cycle is the Magnetically Insulated Inertial Confinement Fusion (MICF) reactor whose distinct advantage lies in the very strong magnetic field that is created when an incident particle (or laser) beam strikes the inner wall of the target pellet. This field serves to thermally insulate the hot plasma from the metal wall thereby allowing thc plasma to burn for a long time and produce a large energy magnification. If used as a propulsion device, we propose using antiprotons to drive the system which we show to be capable of producing very large specific impulse and thrust. By way of validating the confinement propenies of MICF we will address a proposed experiment in which pellets coated with P-B11 fuel at the appropriate ratio will be zapped by a beam of antiprotons that enter the target through a hole. Calculations showing the density and temperature of the generated plasma along with the strength of the magnetic field and other properties of the system will be presented and discussed.

  20. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kai [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Shandong Province (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Song, Yong [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Department of Stomatology, Liu Zhou People' s Hospital, Guangxi (China); Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-lin [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Liu, Ke, E-mail: liuke.1999@aliyun.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial-Head and Neck oncology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Shang, Zheng-jun, E-mail: shangzhengjun@hotmail.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial-Head and Neck oncology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China)

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer–macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. - Highlights: • The fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion. • The resulting hybrid cells acquire a new property of drug resistance. • The resulting hybrid cells express the markers of both parental cells (i.e. vimentin and cytokeratin 18). • The hybrid cells contribute to tumor repopulation in vivo.

  1. Controlled nuclear fusion. Theoretical and technical-physical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, T.; Oomens, N.

    1995-01-01

    It is stated that the realization of controlled fusion is not only a matter of solving technical problems. Also theoretical research in the field of plasma physics is required. A brief state-of-the-art is given of theoretical and technical-physical aspects of nuclear fusion. Attention is paid to magnetic confinement, the importance of theoretical research, plasma heating, plasma diagnostics, and the control of plasma transport. Throughout the article special attention is paid to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. 5 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs

  2. The near future of nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, E.

    2000-01-01

    In this short article the author tries to find an explanation about the withdraw of the Usa from the ITER project. According to the author the American economy is not so flourishing as it seems, it is only the IT (information technologies) sector that is attracting huge foreign investments. Moreover state agencies such as Nasa have difficulties to recruit talented people because they are lured by easy money earned in the new economy. The whole of the ITER project has been reduced: the volume of plasma will be 840 m 3 (instead of 2000 m 3 ) for a fusion power of 500 MW (instead of 1500 MW). Canada is standing for hosting the building site. (A.C.)

  3. The survey of nuclear fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, W.K.

    1981-01-01

    The fusion research evaluation model for analyzing various R and D sinarios, the trend analysis of Tokamak research, and the near-term technologies are discussed. The results of the present study are as follows: A computer code, FUSREV, has been developed based on ECON Inc.'s approach. It consists of the plasma power model and the cost/benefit model. Since the State-of-the Knowledges, which are expected to achieve as the result of subproject R and D's, can only be obtained in the form of probability distribution function, Monte-Carlo method is employed. The test computation of the code shows acceptable results. However, FUSREV has been continuously modified employing new models for both technology and economics

  4. Nuclear transmutation. The reality of cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Tadahiko

    1997-01-01

    The book is introducing the quest on the way to reality of cold fusion. Another point of author is interaction between the quest and social impacts. After the first report on cold fusion by M. Fleischmann and S. Pons on March 1989, the inspired author started a series of following experiments based on his own characteristic background of electrochemistry. The first experiment from March 25 to April 7, 1989 did not show any indications on neutrons, gamma rays, tritium, and heat. The second experiment was initiated at the underground experimental hall of the linear accelerator facilities. This means the shielding of noises coming from outsides. The neutron of about 2.45 MeV was observed after the 1-month continuation of the experiment. The intensity of neutron was nearly 10 to 20 times of the background noise. Furthermore, there were no changes of signals on heat and tritium before and after the experiments. The closed cell experiment was conducted to keep reliability of the experiment. The experiment started on June 1990. In this case, Tritium signals of 100 times of background noise were observed, however, no meaningful signal on neutrons. Anomalous heat was observed after March 24, 1991, where the electric current was increased up to 6 A. On the other hand, there were no appreciable change in neutron and tritium signals. The solid electrolysis was used in the experiment after May 1992, for its high temperature characteristics, where anomalous heat was observed with a certain probability. The experimental system was upgraded in diagnostic methods after 1994. As a result, particular isotopes related to fission reaction were detected. This fact indicates some kinds of transmutations at very local area of the solid surfaces. The author has also pointed out many reactions for a series of this scientific results responded by, for example, well known professors, scientific societies, mass media, and international conferences. Consequently the reactions had almost smeared

  5. Sparking fusion: A step toward laser-initiated nuclear fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, I.

    1996-01-01

    The fusion furnace at the sun's core burns hydrogen to make helium. Each time two hydrogen nuclei, or protons, merge to create a deuterium nucleus, the process releases energy. A chain of additional energy-producing nuclear reactions then converts deuterium into helium. Because protons, with their like electric charges, naturally repel each other, high temperatures and tremendous pressures are needed to force them together closely enough to initiate and sustain the reactions. These mergers cost energy initially, but the return on that investment proves prodigious. On Earth, such an energy payoff has been achieved only in the uncontrolled fury of a detonated hydrogen bomb. The vision of harnessing and controlling nuclear fusion as a terrestrial energy source has yet to be fulfilled. The proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) represents an ambitious effort to use powerful lasers to deposit sufficient energy in a small capsule of nuclear fuel to trigger fusion. The main justification for the project is to ensure that a core group of physicists and engineers maintains its expertise in the physics of nuclear weapons. This article presents both the scientific and political sides of the NIF facility

  6. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research 1990. V. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The thirteenth International Atomic Energy Agency Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, held in Washington D.C., 1-6 October 1990, and organized in cooperation with the United States Department of Energy, was devoted to the exchange and dissemination of reports on the steady progress in the research on both inertial and magnetic confinement fusion, aiming ultimately for the production of commercial energy from controlled thermonuclear reactors. More than two hundred technical papers presented work on tokamak experiments, inertial confinement, non-tokamak confinement systems, magnetic confinement theory and modelling, plasma heating and current drive, the ITER project, technology and reactor concepts, and the economic, safety and environmental aspects of thermonuclear fusion. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. LLNL nuclear data libraries used for fusion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howerton, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Physical Data Group of the Computational Physics Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has as its principal responsibility the development and maintenance of those data that are related to nuclear reaction processes and are needed for Laboratory programs. Among these are the Magnetic Fusion Energy and the Inertial Confinement Fusion programs. To this end, we have developed and maintain a collection of data files or libraries. These include: files of experimental data of neutron induced reactions; an annotated bibliography of literature related to charged particle induced reactions with light nuclei; and four main libraries of evaluated data. We also maintain files of calculational constants developed from the evaluated libraries for use by Laboratory computer codes. The data used for fusion calculations are usually these calculational constants, but since they are derived by prescribed manipulation of evaluated data this discussion will describe the evaluated libraries

  8. Effects of Nuclear Incompressibility on Heavy-Ion Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbensen, Henning; Mişicu, Şerban

    2008-08-01

    We apply the coupled-channels technique to study the hindrance of fusion which has been observed at extreme sub-barrier energies in 64Ni+64Ni and 16O+208Pb collisions. The calculated fusion cross section is sensitive at extreme subbarrier energies to the ion-ion potential for overlapping nuclei but we are not able to reproduce the low-energy data when we apply a conventional Woods-Saxon or proximity type potential in the calculations. The data can, however, be explained quite well by applying the M3Y double-folding potential which has been corrected for the effect of the nuclear incompressibility. The correction is made by including a repulsive contact interaction in the double-folding procedure. This produces a thicker Coulomb barrier and rather shallow pocket in the entrance channel potential, and these two features make it possible to explain the fusion data at the lowest energies.

  9. Fusion-Driven Space Plane for Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammash, T.; Cassenti, B.

    A fusion hybrid reactor where the fusion component is the gasdynamic mirror (GDM) is proposed as the driver of a rocket that would allow a space vehicle of the size of Boeing 747 to travel to the moon in about one day. The energy produced by the reactor is induced by fusion neutrons that impinge on a thorium-232 blanket where they breed uranium-233 and simultane- ously burn it to produce power. For a vehicle of mass 500 metric tons (mT), the thrust required to accelerate it at 1 g is 5 MN, and the specific impulse, Isp, necessary to accelerate 90% of the launch mass to the escape velocity of 11,200 m/sec is found to be 10,182 seconds. For these propulsion parameters, the coolant mass flow rate would be 49 kg/sec. We note that the time it takes the launch mass, initially at rest and accelerated at 1g, to reach the escape velocity is 1,020 seconds. At the above noted rate, the total propellant mass is approximately 50 mT, which is about 10% of the launch mass, validating the Isp needed to accelerate the remainder to the escape velocity. If we assume that the trajectory to the moon is linear, and we account for the deceleration of the vehicle by the earth's gravitational force, and its acceleration by the moon's gravitational force, we can calculate the average velocity and the time it takes to reach the moon. We find that the travel time is about 1.66 days, which in this model is effectively the time for a fly-by. A more rigorous calculation using the restricted three body approach with the third body being the spacecraft, and allowing for a coordinate system that rotates at the circular frequency of the larger masses, shows that the transit time is about 0.65 days, which is comparable to the flight time between New York and Sidney, Australia.

  10. Fusion of ferredoxin and cytochrome P450 enables direct light-driven biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellor, Silas Busck; Nielsen, Agnieszka Janina Zygadlo; Burow, Meike

    2016-01-01

    , and their requirement for NADPH as a source of reducing power. We recently demonstrated targeting and insertion of plant P450s into the photosynthetic membrane, and photosynthesis-driven, NADPH-independent P450 catalytic activity mediated by the electron carrier protein ferredoxin. Here we report the fusion...... of ferredoxin with P450 CYP79A1 from the model plant Sorghum bicolor, which catalyzes the initial step in the pathway leading to biosynthesis of the cyanogenic glucoside dhurrin. Fusion with ferredoxin allows CYP79A1 to obtain electrons for catalysis by interacting directly with photosystem I. Furthermore......, electrons captured by the fused ferredoxin moiety are directed more effectively towards P450 catalytic activity, making the fusion better able to compete with endogenous electron sinks coupled to metabolic pathways. The P450-ferredoxin fusion enzyme obtains reducing power solely from its fused ferredoxin...

  11. An induction Linac driven heavy-ion fusion systems model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuckerman, D.S.; Driemeyer, D.E.; Waganer, L.M.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    A computerized systems model of a heavy-ion fusion (HIF) reactor power plant is presented. The model can be used to analyze the behavior and projected costs of a commercial power plant using an induction linear accelerator (Linac) as a driver. Each major component of the model (targets, reactor cavity, Linac, beam transport, power flow, balance of plant, and costing) is discussed. Various target, reactor cavity, Linac, and beam transport schemes are examined and compared. The preferred operating regime for such a power plant is also examined. The results show that HIF power plants can compete with other advanced energy concepts at the 1000-MW (electric) power level [cost of electricity (COE) -- 50 mill/kW . h] provided that the cost savings predicted for Linacs using higher charge-state ions (+3) can be realized

  12. Fusion fuel ion temperature diagnostic for directly driven implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. B.; Zheng, Z. J.; Peng, H. S.; Zhang, B. H.; Ding, Y. K.; Chen, M.; Chen, H. S.; Wen, T. S.

    2001-09-01

    An ultrafast quenched plastic scintillation detector was used to measure the fusion fuel ion temperature at low implosion (DT) neutron yield (5×108-3×109) in the initial experiment performed at the Shenguang II laser facility. The typical temperatures of exploding pusher targets for direct drive were around 4 keV and the uncertainties were ±15-23%. The detection efficiency of the detector to DT neutrons was calibrated at a K-400 accelerator. The time response function of the detection system was calibrated by implosion neutrons from a DT-filled capsule, which can be regarded as a δ function pulsed neutron source due to its much narrower pulse width than that of the measured neutron time-of-flight spectrum.

  13. Nuclear fusion induced by x rays in a crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, V. B.; Miller, M. B.; Otto, J.; Rakityansky, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    The nuclei that constitute a crystalline lattice oscillate relative to each other with a very low energy that is not sufficient to penetrate through the Coulomb barriers separating them. An additional energy, which is needed to tunnel through the barrier and fuse, can be supplied by external electromagnetic waves (x rays or synchrotron radiation). Exposing the solid compound LiD (lithium deuteride) to x rays for the duration of 111 h, we detect 88 events of nuclear fusion d +6Li→8Be* . Our theoretical estimate agrees with what we observed. One possible application of the phenomenon we found is in measurements of the rates of various nuclear reactions (not necessarily fusion) at extremely low energies inaccessible in accelerator experiments.

  14. Inner/Outer nuclear membrane fusion in nuclear pore assembly: biochemical demonstration and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtman, Boris; Ramos, Corinne; Rasala, Beth; Harel, Amnon; Forbes, Douglass J

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large proteinaceous channels embedded in double nuclear membranes, which carry out nucleocytoplasmic exchange. The mechanism of nuclear pore assembly involves a unique challenge, as it requires creation of a long-lived membrane-lined channel connecting the inner and outer nuclear membranes. This stabilized membrane channel has little evolutionary precedent. Here we mapped inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion in NPC assembly biochemically by using novel assembly intermediates and membrane fusion inhibitors. Incubation of a Xenopus in vitro nuclear assembly system at 14°C revealed an early pore intermediate where nucleoporin subunits POM121 and the Nup107-160 complex were organized in a punctate pattern on the inner nuclear membrane. With time, this intermediate progressed to diffusion channel formation and finally to complete nuclear pore assembly. Correct channel formation was blocked by the hemifusion inhibitor lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), but not if a complementary-shaped lipid, oleic acid (OA), was simultaneously added, as determined with a novel fluorescent dextran-quenching assay. Importantly, recruitment of the bulk of FG nucleoporins, characteristic of mature nuclear pores, was not observed before diffusion channel formation and was prevented by LPC or OA, but not by LPC+OA. These results map the crucial inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion event of NPC assembly downstream of POM121/Nup107-160 complex interaction and upstream or at the time of FG nucleoporin recruitment.

  15. Developments and needs in nuclear analysis of fusion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pampin, R., E-mail: raul.pampin@f4e.europa.eu [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Davis, A. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Izquierdo, J. [F4E Fusion For Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Barcelona 08019 (Spain); Leichtle, D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz Platz 1, D-76344 Karlsruhe (Germany); Loughlin, M.J. [ITER Organisation, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Sanz, J. [UNED, Departamento de Ingenieria Energetica, Juan del Rosal 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Turner, A. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Villari, R. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Wilson, P.P.H. [University of Wisconsin, Nuclear Engineering Department, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Complex fusion nuclear analyses require detailed models, sophisticated acceleration and coupling of cumbersome tools. • Progress on development of tools and methods to meet specific needs of fusion nuclear analysis reported. • Advances in production of reference models and in preparation and QA of acceleration and coupling algorithms shown. • Evaluation and adaptation studies of alternative transport codes presented. • Discussion made of the importance of efforts in these and other areas, considering some of the more pressing needs. -- Abstract: Nuclear analyses provide essential input to the conceptual design, optimisation, engineering and safety case of fusion technology in current experiments, ITER, next-step devices and power plant studies. Calculations are intricate and computer-intensive, typically requiring detailed geometry models, sophisticated acceleration algorithms, high-performance parallel computations, and coupling of large and complex transport and activation codes and databases. This paper reports progress on some key areas in the development of tools and methods to meet the specific needs of fusion nuclear analyses. In particular, advances in the production and modernisation of reference models, in the preparation and quality assurance of acceleration algorithms and coupling schemes, and in the evaluation and adaptation of alternative transport codes are presented. Emphasis is given to ITER-relevant activities, which are the main driver of advances in the field. Discussion is made of the importance of efforts in these and other areas, considering some of the more pressing needs and requirements. In some cases, they call for a more efficient and coordinated use of the scarce resources available.

  16. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research 1990. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Volume 1 of the Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research contains papers given in two of the sessions: A and E. Session A contains the Artsimovich Memorial Lecture and papers on tokamaks; session E papers on plasma heating and current drive. The titles and authors of each paper are listed in the Contents. Abstracts accompany each paper. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Overview of principles and challenges of fusion nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.

    2007-01-01

    Fusion offers very attractive features as a sustainable, broadly available energy source: no emissions of greenhouse gases, no risk of severe accident, and no long-lived radioactive waste. Significant advances in the science and technology of fusion have been realized in the past decades. Seven countries (EU, Japan, USA, Russia, S. Korea, China, and India) comprising about half the world population are constructing a major magnetic fusion facility, called ITER, in France. The objectives of ITER are to demonstrate self-sustaining burning fusion plasma and to test fusion technologies relevant to fusion reactor. Many challenges to the practical utilization of fusion energy remain ahead. Among these challenges is the successful development of Fusion Nuclear Technology (FNT). FNT includes those fusion system components circumscribing the plasma and responsible for tritium production and processing, heat removal at high temperature and power density, and high heat flux components. FNT components face a new and more challenging environment than experienced by any previous nuclear application. Beyond plasma physics, FNT has most of the remaining feasibility and attractiveness issues in the development of fusion as an energy source. The blanket, a key FNT component, determines the critical path to DEMO. The blanket is exposed to an intense radiation environment. Radioactivity and decay heat can be produced in the structure and other blanket elements. Hence, material choices have a large impact on safety and environmental attractiveness. The unique conditions of the fusion environment include high radiation flux, high surface heat flux, strong 3-D-component magnetic field with large gradients, and ultra-low vacuum. These conditions, together with the requirements for high-temperature operation and tritium self-sufficiency, make blanket design and development challenging tasks. The blanket concepts being considered worldwide can be classified into solid breeders and liquid

  18. Technical requirement of experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.; Tillak, M.; Gierszwski, P.; Grover, J.; Puigh, R.; Sze, D.K.; Berwald, D.

    1986-06-01

    The technical issues and requirements of experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology (FNT) have been investigated. The nuclear subsystems addressed are: a) blanket, b) radiation shield, c) tritium processing system, and d) plasma interactive components. Emphasis has been placed on the important and complex development problems of the blanket. A technical planning process for FNT has been developed and applied, including four major elements: 1) characterization of issues, 2) quantification of testing requirements, 3) evaluation of facilities, and 4) development of a test plan to identify the role, timing, characteristics and costs of major experiments and facilities

  19. Cell-fusion method to visualize interphase nuclear pore formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Funakoshi, Tomoko; Imamoto, Naoko

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the nucleus is a complex and sophisticated organelle that organizes genomic DNA to support essential cellular functions. The nuclear surface contains many nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), channels for macromolecular transport between the cytoplasm and nucleus. It is well known that the number of NPCs almost doubles during interphase in cycling cells. However, the mechanism of NPC formation is poorly understood, presumably because a practical system for analysis does not exist. The most difficult obstacle in the visualization of interphase NPC formation is that NPCs already exist after nuclear envelope formation, and these existing NPCs interfere with the observation of nascent NPCs. To overcome this obstacle, we developed a novel system using the cell-fusion technique (heterokaryon method), previously also used to analyze the shuttling of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and the nucleus, to visualize the newly synthesized interphase NPCs. In addition, we used a photobleaching approach that validated the cell-fusion method. We recently used these methods to demonstrate the role of cyclin-dependent protein kinases and of Pom121 in interphase NPC formation in cycling human cells. Here, we describe the details of the cell-fusion approach and compare the system with other NPC formation visualization methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inherently safe nuclear-driven internal combustion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alesso, P.; Chow, Tze-Show; Condit, R.; Heidrich, J.; Pettibone, J.; Streit, R.

    1991-01-01

    A family of nuclear driven engines is described in which nuclear energy released by fissioning of uranium or plutonium in a prompt critical assembly is used to heat a working gas. Engine performance is modeled using a code that calculates hydrodynamics, fission energy production, and neutron transport self-consistently. Results are given demonstrating a large negative temperature coefficient that produces self-shutoff of energy production. Reduced fission product inventory and the self-shutoff provide inherent nuclear safety. It is expected that nuclear engine reactor units could be scaled from 100 MW on up. 7 refs., 3 figs

  1. Ion sources for induction linac driven heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, H.L.; Eylon, S.; Chupp, W.W.

    1994-01-01

    The use of ion sources in induction linacs for heavy ion fusion is fundamentally different from their use in the rf linac-storage rings approach. Induction linacs require very high current, short pulse extraction usually with large apertures which are dictated by the injector design. One is faced with the problem of extracting beams in a pulsed fashion while maintaining high beam quality during the pulse (low emittance). Four types of sources have been studied for this application. The vacuum arc and the rf cusp field source are the plasma-types and the porous plug and hot alumino--silicate surface source are the thermal types. The hot alumino--silicate potassium source has proved to be the best candidate for the next generation of scaled experiments. The porous plug for potassium is somewhat more difficult to use. The vacuum arc suffers from noise and lifetime problems and the rf cusp field source is difficult to use with very short pulses. Operational experience with all of these types of sources is presented

  2. Accelerator driven nuclear energy and transmutation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldeman, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear power generation has been a mature industry for many years. However, despite the overall safety record and the great attractions of nuclear power, especially in times of concern about green house gases emissions, there continues to be some lack of public acceptance of this technology. This sensitivity to nuclear power has several elements in addition to the concern of a potential nuclear accident. These include the possible diversion of plutonium into nuclear weapon production and the concern about the long term storage of plutonium and other transuranic elements. A concept which seeks to allay these fears but still takes advantage of the nuclear fuel cycle and utilises decades of research and development in this technology, is the idea of using modern accelerators to transmute the long lived radio nuclides and simultaneously generate power. A review of the novel concepts for energy production and transmutation of isotopes will be presented. Of the various proposals, the most developed is the Energy Amplifier Concept promoted by Rubbia. The possibility of using high-energy, high-current accelerators to produce large fluxes of neutrons has been known since the earliest days of accelerator technology. E.O. Lawrence, for example, promoted the concept of producing nuclear material with such an accelerator. The Canadians in the early 50s considered using accelerators to produce fuel for their heavy water reactors and there were well advanced designs for a device called the Intense Neutron Generator. The speculative idea of using accelerator produced neutrons for the transmutation of transuranic elements (i.e. elements such as neptunium plutonium and other elements with higher Z atomic number) has also been studied extensively, notably at a number of laboratories in the US, Europe and Japan. However at this time, all facilities that have actually been constructed have been designed primarily for condensed matter studies i.e. studies of the structural properties

  3. Concept of an Accelerator-Driven Advanced Nuclear Energy System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesong Yan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of clean energy is a matter of primary importance for sustainable development as well as a vital approach for solving worldwide energy-related issues. If the low utilization rate of nuclear fuel, nuclear proliferation, and insufficient nuclear safety can be solved, nuclear fission energy could be used as a sustainable and low-carbon clean energy form for thousands of years, providing steady and base-load electrical resources. To address these challenges, we propose an accelerator-driven advanced nuclear energy system (ADANES, consisting of a burner system and a fuel recycle system. In ADANES, the ideal utilization rate of nuclear fuel will be >95%, and the final disposal of nuclear waste will be minimized. The design of a high-temperature ceramic reactor makes the burner system safer. Part of fission products (FPs are removed during the simple reprocessing in the fuel recycle system, significantly reducing the risks of nuclear proliferation of nuclear technology and materials. The ADANES concept integrates nuclear waste transmutation, nuclear fuel breeding, and safety power production, with an ideal closed loop operation of nuclear fission energy, constituting a major innovation of great potential interest for future energy applications.

  4. Development of Fusion Nuclear Technologies and the role of MTR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, J.G. van der; Schaaf, B. van der

    2006-01-01

    Fusion power plant operation will strongly depend on the economy and reliability of crucial components, such as first wall modules, tritium breeding blankets and divertors. Their operating temperature shall be high to accomplish high plant efficiency. The materials properties and component fabrication routes shall also assure long reliable operation to minimize plant outage. The components must be fabricated in large quantities based on demonstrations with a limited amount of test beds. Mock-ups and test loops will, through iteration processes, demonstrate the reliable operation under reference thermal-hydraulic conditions. Although 14 MeV neutrons dominate the nuclear conditions near the first wall, neutron transport analyses have shown that large portions of the components near the plasma have to cope with a neutron spectrum resembling a fission core. Present Materials Test Reactors, MTR's, offer fluxes relevant for large parts of the fusion major components. The mixed and fast fission spectra though is not representative for all fusion conditions. The strong point of MTR's is their ability to generate sufficient displacement damage in the materials in a relatively short time. The cores of MTR's provide sufficient space for irradiation of representative cut-outs of components to allow integrated functional and materials tests in a high flux neutron field. The MTR's are the primary test bed for structural and functional fusion relevant materials. The MTR space and dose rates provide a valuable base line for the developments and demonstrations of fusion key components in a neutron field. In recent years the pebble bed assembly, PBA, irradiated in the HFR, Petten, has shown the feasibility of the helium-cooled concept with lithium ceramics and beryllium multiplier pebble beds. The irradiations produce a wealth of process parameters for the control of the tritium release of the pebbles. The PBA packaging, cooling and tritium purging arrangements closely resemble the

  5. The role of nuclear data for fusion technology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, Robin A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Nuclear data are of fundamental importance in studies of nuclear technology. → Data libraries cover: experiments (EXFOR), theory (RIPL) and evaluations (ENDF). → Libraries are general purpose or special purpose (decay, dosimetry and activation). → Activation files contain many reactions, only a fraction needs to be known precisely. → Covariance data are important, but details of formatting are being worked out. - Abstract: Nuclear data are of fundamental importance in studies of nuclear technology. In these studies, experiments to measure cross sections and decay properties and simulations of the design of fission power plants, fusion devices and accelerators are included. The large amount of data required is stored in computer readable formats in data libraries and the most common of these are the general purpose files used for neutronics or transport calculations. These files also contain the standards against which most measurements are made. The other class of libraries are the special purpose ones containing decay data, fission yields and cross section data for dosimetry and activation. This paper gives examples of what data are available and describes their use for various fusion applications. The focus will be on neutron-induced activation data with examples of how the reactions of particular importance can be identified. All data should be accompanied by estimates of the uncertainty. This is best achieved by including covariance data; however, this is extremely challenging and only a subset of the available data has such uncertainty data. The general principles of how covariance matrices are used are outlined.

  6. Nuclear Fusion Effects Induced in Intense Laser-Generated Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Torrisi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deutered polyethylene (CD2n thin and thick targets were irradiated in high vacuum by infrared laser pulses at 1015W/cm2 intensity. The high laser energy transferred to the polymer generates plasma, expanding in vacuum at supersonic velocity, accelerating hydrogen and carbon ions. Deuterium ions at kinetic energies above 4 MeV have been measured by using ion collectors and SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. At these energies the deuterium–deuterium collisions may induce over threshold fusion effects, in agreement with the high D-D cross-section valuesaround 3 MeV energy. At the first instants of the plasma generation, during which high temperature, density and ionacceleration occur, the D-D fusions occur as confirmed by the detection of mono-energetic protonsand neutrons with a kinetic energy of 3.0 MeV and 2.5 MeV, respectively, produced by the nuclear reaction. The number of fusion events depends strongly on the experimental set-up, i.e. on the laser parameters (intensity, wavelength, focal spot dimension, target conditions (thickness, chemical composition, absorption coefficient, presence of secondary targets and used geometry (incidence angle, laser spot, secondary target positions.A number of D-D fusion events of the order of 106÷7 per laser shot has been measured.

  7. FENDL: International reference nuclear data library for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashchenko, A.B.; Wienke, H.; Ganesan, S.

    1996-01-01

    The IAEA nuclear data section, in co-operation with several national nuclear data centres and research groups, has created the first version of an internationally available fusion evaluated nuclear data library (FENDL-1). The FENDL library has been selected to serve as a comprehensive source of processed and tested nuclear data tailored to the requirements of the engineering design activity (EDA) of the ITER project and other fusion-related development projects. The present version of FENDL consists of the following sublibraries covering the necessary nuclear input for all physics and engineering aspects of the material development, design, operation and safety of the ITER project in its current EDA phase: FENDL/A-1.1: neutron activation cross-sections, selected from different available sources, for 636 nuclides, FENDL/D-1.0: nuclear decay data for 2900 nuclides in ENDF-6 format, FENDL/DS-1.0: neutron activation data for dosimetry by foil activation, FENDL/C-1.0: data for the fusion reactions D(d,n), D(d,p), T(d,n), T(t,2n), He-3(d,p) extracted from ENDF/B-6 and processed, FENDL/E-1.0:data for coupled neutron-photon transport calculations, including a data library for neutron interaction and photon production for 63 elements or isotopes, selected from ENDF/B-6, JENDL-3, or BROND-2, and a photon-atom interaction data library for 34 elements. The benchmark validation of FENDL-1 as required by the customer, i.e. the ITER team, is considered to be a task of high priority in the coming months. The well tested and validated nuclear data libraries in processed form of the FENDL-2 are expected to be ready by mid 1996 for use by the ITER team in the final phase of ITER EDA after extensive benchmarking and integral validation studies in the 1995-1996 period. The FENDL data files can be electronically transferred to users from the IAEA nuclear data section online system through INTERNET. A grand total of 54 (sub)directories with 845 files with total size of about 2 million

  8. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samulyak, Roman V. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Parks, Paul [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  9. ENDF/B-VI nuclear data evaluations for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunford, C.L.; Larson, D.C.; Young, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    The next release of the ENDF/B data library planned for 1989 contains improved data evaluations of interest to the fusion neutronics community. New data formats permit inclusion of energy-angle correlated particle emission spectra and recoil nucleus energy spectra. Enhanced formats for covariance information have been developed. Many new isotopic evaluations will lead to improved energy conservation and kerma factor calculations. Improved nuclear model calculations will provide reliable particle emission data where experimental information is sparse. Improved Bayssian fitting codes will provide more accurate evaluations for data rich reactions such as Li(n,nt)α. All of the most important fusion material evaluations contain these new features. 32 refs., 8 figs

  10. FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.

    1984-10-01

    The Nuclear Fusion Issues chapter contains a comprehensive list of engineering issues for fusion reactor nuclear components. The list explicitly defines the uncertainties associated with the engineering option of a fusion reactor and addresses the potential consequences resulting from each issue. The next chapter identifies the fusion nuclear technology testing needs up to the engineering demonstration stage. (MOW)

  11. FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.

    1984-10-01

    The Nuclear Fusion Issues chapter contains a comprehensive list of engineering issues for fusion reactor nuclear components. The list explicitly defines the uncertainties associated with the engineering option of a fusion reactor and addresses the potential consequences resulting from each issue. The next chapter identifies the fusion nuclear technology testing needs up to the engineering demonstration stage

  12. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1971. Vol. I. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    The ultimate goal of controlled nuclear fusion research is to make a new energy source available to mankind, a source that will be virtually unlimited and that gives promise of being environmentally cleaner than the sources currently exploited. This goal has stimulated research in plasma physics over the past two decades, leading to significant advances in the understanding of matter in its most common state as well as to progress in the confinement and heating of plasma. An indication of this progress is that in several countries considerable effort is being devoted to design studies of fusion reactors and to the technological problems that will be encountered in realizing these reactors. This range of research, from plasma physics to fusion reactor engineering, is shown in the present three-volume publication of the Proceedings of the Fourth Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research. The Conference was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency and was held in Madison, Wisconsin, USA from 17 to 23 June 1971. The Conference was attended by over 500 scientists from 24 countries and 3 international organizations, and 143 papers were presented. These papers are published here in the original language; English translations of the Russian papers will be published in a Special Supplement to the journal Nuclear Fusion. The series of conferences on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research has become a major international forum for the presentation and discussion of results in this important and challenging field. In addition to sponsoring these conferences, the International Atomic Energy Agency supports controlled nuclear fusion research by publishing the journal Nuclear Fusion, and has recently established an International Fusion Research Council. The primary aim of this Council, which had its first meeting in conjunction with the Madison Conference, is to promote international co-operation in controlled nuclear fusion

  13. Impact of Blanket Configuration on the Design of a Fusion-Driven Transmutation Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong Guen Hong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A configuration of a fusion-driven transmutation reactor with a low aspect ratio tokamak-type neutron source was determined in a self-consistent manner by using coupled analysis of tokamak systems and neutron transport. We investigated the impact of blanket configuration on the characteristics of a fusion-driven transmutation reactor. It was shown that by merging the TRU burning blanket and tritium breeding blanket, which uses PbLi as the tritium breeding material and as coolant, effective transmutation is possible. The TRU transmutation capability can be improved with a reduced blanket thickness, and fast fluence at the first wall can be reduced.  Article History: Received: July 10th 2017; Received: Dec 17th 2017; Accepted: February 2nd 2018; Available online How to Cite This Article: Hong, B.G. (2018 Impact of Blanket Configuration on the Design of a Fusion-Driven Transmutation Reactor. International Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 7(1, 65-70. https://doi.org/10.14710/ijred.7.1.65-70

  14. Coiled-coil driven membrane fusion: zipper-like vs. non-zipper-like peptide orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluis, Frank; Dominguez, Juan; Voskuhl, Jens; Kros, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Membrane fusion plays a central role in biological processes such as neurotransmission and exocytosis. An important class of proteins that induce membrane fusion are called SNARE (soluble N-ethyl malemeide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) proteins. To induce membrane fusion, two SNARE proteins embedded in opposing membranes form a four-helix coiled-coil motif together with a third, cytoplasmic, SNARE protein. Coiled-coil formation brings the two membranes into close proximity allowing fusion to occur. Importantly, structural investigations have demonstrated that native membrane fusion only occurs when the orientation of the coiled-coil motif resembles that of a zipper. The zipper orientation arises when parallel coiled-coil formation takes place between peptides that are anchored into apposing membranes at identical termini, thereby forcing the membranes into close contact. Recently, we have designed a synthetic model for membrane fusion, which is based on a set of lipidated coiled-coil forming peptide pairs which are denoted E-K. When incorporated into liposomal membranes, coiled-coil formation between these lipidated peptides induces targeted and efficient membrane fusion of liposomes. Our model system mimics SNARE-driven membrane fusion, as it contains a coiled-coil motif which has a zipper-like orientation, similar to that of the SNARE proteins. Here we investigate whether the zipper-like orientation of the coiled-coil motifs is a prerequisite for membrane fusion in our model system. Our strategy is based on conjugation of the transmembrane anchor to either the N- or the C-terminus of peptides E and K. Whereas the use of a set of complementary peptides with the membrane anchor on identical peptide termini yields the zipper-like orientation of the coiled-coil complex, membrane anchors on opposite peptide termini results in a non-zipper-like coiled-coil orientation. Surprisingly, it was observed that efficient and targeted membrane fusion was

  15. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kai; Song, Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-Lin; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-Jun

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer-macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnet Design Considerations for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kessel, C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); El-Guebaly, L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States) Fusion Technology Institute; Titus, P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a nuclear confinement facility that provides a fusion environment with components of the reactor integrated together to bridge the technical gaps of burning plasma and nuclear science between the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the demonstration power plant (DEMO). Compared with ITER, the FNSF is smaller in size but generates much higher magnetic field, i.e., 30 times higher neutron fluence with three orders of magnitude longer plasma operation at higher operating temperatures for structures surrounding the plasma. Input parameters to the magnet design from system code analysis include magnetic field of 7.5 T at the plasma center with a plasma major radius of 4.8 m and a minor radius of 1.2 m and a peak field of 15.5 T on the toroidal field (TF) coils for the FNSF. Both low-temperature superconductors (LTS) and high-temperature superconductors (HTS) are considered for the FNSF magnet design based on the state-of-the-art fusion magnet technology. The higher magnetic field can be achieved by using the high-performance ternary restacked-rod process Nb3Sn strands for TF magnets. The circular cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to ITER magnets and a high-aspect-ratio rectangular CICC design are evaluated for FNSF magnets, but low-activation-jacket materials may need to be selected. The conductor design concept and TF coil winding pack composition and dimension based on the horizontal maintenance schemes are discussed. Neutron radiation limits for the LTS and HTS superconductors and electrical insulation materials are also reviewed based on the available materials previously tested. The material radiation limits for FNSF magnets are defined as part of the conceptual design studies for FNSF magnets.

  17. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research 1988. V.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Volume 2 of the Proceedings of the Twelfth International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion contains papers given in two of the sessions: D and C. Session D contains papers on magnetic confinement theory and modelling tokamaks, and session C the papers on non-tokamak confinement system. Each of these papers and their authors is listed in the Contents; in turn, each paper contains an abstract for more information as to the contents of a specific paper. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research 1988. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Volume 1 of the Proceedings of the Twelfth International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion contains papers given in two of the sessions: A and E. Session A contains, in addition to the Artsimovich Memorial Lecture, the papers on tokamaks, and session E the papers on heating and current drive. Each of these papers and their authors is listed in the Contents; in turn, each paper contains an abstract for more information as to the contents of a specific paper. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Nuclear fusion induced by Coulomb explosion of heteronuclear clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, I; Jortner, J

    2001-07-16

    We propose a new mechanism for the production of high-energy ( E>3 keV) deuterons, suitable to induce dd nuclear fusion, based on multielectron ionization and Coulomb explosion of heteronuclear deuterium containing molecular clusters, e.g., (D2O)n, in intense ( 10(16)-2x10(18) W/cm2) laser fields. Cluster size equations for E, in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations, reveal important advantages of Coulomb explosion of (D2O)n heteronuclear clusters, as compared with (D)n clusters. These involve the considerably increased D+ kinetic energy and a narrow, high-energy distribution of deuterons.

  20. Physics of thermo-nuclear fusion and the ITER project; La physique de la fusion thermonucleaire et le projet ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garin, P. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee - DRFC, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2003-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the 6 contributions to the workshop 'the physics of thermo-nuclear fusion and the ITER project': 1) the feasibility of magnetic confinement and the issue of heat recovery, 2) heating and current generation in tokamaks, 3) the physics of wall-plasma interaction, 4) recent results at JET, 5) inertial confinement and fast ignition, and 6) the technology of fusion machines based on magnetic confinement. This document presents the principles of thermo-nuclear fusion machines and gives a lot of technical information about JET, Tore-Supra and ITER.

  1. International ITER fusion energy organization. Paving the way to power generation from nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preuschen-Liebenstein, R. von

    2006-01-01

    ITER (Latin: the way) is the acronym of a new international large research facility gradually taking shape after the meeting of Gorbachev and Reagan in Reykjavik in 1985. Under the auspices of the IAEA, worldwide scientific and industrial cooperation with 'home teams' of each of the ITER partners began at that time which were commissioned to accumulate the knowledge and the technology of nuclear fusion in the participating countries. At the end of the preparation and decisionmaking process, the design draft of the ITER reactor was elaborated in international cooperation as the basis of the ITER Convention. After lengthy negotiations among the international ITER partners, a European site for the ITER organization and its reactor was found at Cadarache, France. As the first ITER member, Europe now initiated worldwide cooperation in research and development, seeking to demonstrate the technical and scientific feasibility of tapping fusion power for peaceful purposes. The Council of the European Union (competitiveness), at its meeting on September 25, 2006, decided to sign the ITER Convention about the establishment of the International ITER Fusion Energy Organization ('ITER Organization') and about the mutual obligation to make the necessary contributions towards the construction of ITER. (orig.)

  2. N + 1 redundancy on ATCA instrumentation for Nuclear Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, Miguel, E-mail: miguelfc@ipfn.ist.utl.pt [Associação EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico – Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Sousa, Jorge; Rodrigues, António P.; Batista, António J.N.; Combo, Álvaro; Carvalho, Bernardo B.; Santos, Bruno; Carvalho, Paulo F.; Gonçalves, Bruno [Associação EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico – Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Correia, Carlos M.B.A. [Centro de Instrumentação, Departamento de Física, Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Varandas, Carlos A.F. [Associação EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico – Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► In Nuclear Fusion, demanding security and high-availability requirements call for redundancy to be available. ► ATCA standard features desirable redundancy features for Fusion instrumentation. ► The developed control and data acquisition hardware modules support additional redundancy schemes. ► Implementation of N + 1 redundancy of host processor and I/O data modules. -- Abstract: The role of redundancy on control and data acquisition systems has gained a significant importance in the case of Nuclear Fusion, as demanding security and high-availability requirements call for redundancy to be available. IPFN's control and data acquisition system hardware is based on an Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture (ATCA) set of I/O (DAC/ADC endpoints) and data/timing switch modules, which handle data and timing from all I/O endpoints. Modules communicate through Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (PCIe), established over the ATCA backplane and controlled by one or more external hosts. The developed hardware modules were designed to take advantage of ATCA specification's redundancy features, namely at the hardware management level, including support of: (i) multiple host operation with N + 1 redundancy – in which a designated failover host takes over data previously assigned to a suddenly malfunctioning host and (ii) N + 1 redundancy of I/O and data/timing switch modules. This paper briefly describes IPFN's control and data acquisition system, which is being developed for ITER fast plant system controller (FPSC), and analyses the hardware implementation of its supported redundancy features.

  3. Effect of a generalized particle momentum distribution on plasma nuclear fusion rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong E.; Zubarev, Alexander L.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the effect of a generalized particle momentum distribution derived by Galitskii and Yakimets (GY) on nuclear reaction rates in plasma. We derive an approximate semi-analytical formula for nuclear fusion reaction rate between nuclei in a plasma (quantum plasma nuclear fusion; or QPNF). The QPNF formula is applied to calculate deuteron-deuteron fusion rate in a plasma, and the results are compared with the results calculated with the conventional Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution. As an application, we investigate the deuteron-deuteron fusion rate for mobile deuterons in a deuterated metal/alloy. The calculated deuteron-deuteron fusion rates at low energies are enormously enhanced due to the modified tail of the GY's generalized momentum distribution. Our preliminary estimates indicate also that the deuteron-lithium (D+Li) fusion rate and the proton-lithium (p+Li) fusion rate in a metal/alloy at ambient temperatures are also substantially enhanced. (author)

  4. Energy sustainability to long-term. The role of nuclear fusion; Sostenibilidad energetica a largo plazo. el papel de la fusion nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez Varas, G.; Perlado, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    In this article, a dissertation is done about energy sustainability and the role of the different types of energy on that. It has been analyzed more deeply the role of nuclear fusion in the sustainable energy development. (Author) 34 refs.

  5. POTENTIAL OF A CATALYZED (D,D FUSION-DRIVEN HYBRID REACTOR FOR THE REGENERATION OF LWR SPENT FUEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin YAPICI

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available The potential of a catalyzed (D, D fusion-driven hybrid blanket is investigated for the regeneration of light water reactor spent fuel. Total enrichment grade is 2.172 % at beginning of regeneration. The hybrid blanket has excellent neutronic performance and is investigated to achieve different cumulative fission fuel enrichment (CFFE grades. A regeneration period of up to 36 months is investigated by a plant factor of 75% under a first wall catalyzed (D, D fusion neutron current load of 10 14. Neutron (14.1 MeV/cm 2. s and 10 14 neuton (2.45 MeV/cm 2. s. This corresponds to a first wall load of 2.64 MW/m 2. Regeneration periods of 12, 20, 28 and 36 months are considered, resulting in final enrichment grades of 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, and 4.5 %, respectively. The blanket energy multiplication M is quite high and increases only by ~ 30 % in 36 months. The electricity production remains fairly constant during this period. Consequently, this power exploits the non-nuclear island very well. At the same time, the peak-to-average fission power density ratio ? decreases by ~10 %.

  6. Nuclear fusion project. Semi-annual report of the Association KfK/EURATOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kast, G.

    1987-05-01

    This semi-annual report gives 36 short descriptions of the work done in the framework of the Nuclear Fusion Project and outlines studies for NET/INTOR and for ECRH power sources at 150 GHz. Tables of fusion technology contracts, of NET contracts, of KfK departments contributing to the Fusion Project, and of the Fusion Project management staff complete this report. (GG)

  7. HIBALL - a conceptual heavy ion beam driven fusion reactor study. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badger, B.; El-Guebaly, L.; Engelstad, R.; Hassanein, A.; Klein, A.; Kulcinski, G.; Larsen, E.; Lee, K.; Lovell, E.; Moses, G.

    1981-12-01

    A preliminary concept for a heavy-ion beam driven inertial confinement fusion power plant is presented. The high repetition rate of the RF accelerator driver is utilized to serve four reactor chambers alternatingly. In the chambers a novel first-wall protection scheme is used. At a target gain of 83 the total net electrical output is 3.8 GW. The recirculating power fraction is below 15%. The main goal of the comprehensive HIBALL study (which is continuing) is to demonstrate the compatibility of the design of the driver, the target and the reactor chambers. Though preliminary, the present dessign is essentially self-consistent. Tentative cost estimates are given. The costs compare well with those found in similar studies on other types of fusion reactors. (orig.) [de

  8. Nuclear-fusion research. To bring the sun on the earh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zohm, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    The course treats first the foundations of nuclear fusion. In the second part the concepts for the realization of nuclear fusion in the laboratory are described. Finally in the last part a survey on the present status of the research as well an outlook on future work is given

  9. FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.

    1984-10-01

    The following chapters are included in this study: (1) fusion nuclear issues, (2) survey of experimental needs, (3) requirements of the experiments, (4) non-fusion facilities, (5) fusion facilities for nuclear experiments, and (6) fusion research and development scenarios. (MOW)

  10. Nuclear inner membrane fusion facilitated by yeast Jem1p is required for spindle pole body fusion but not for the first mitotic nuclear division during yeast mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi; Hirata, Aiko; Endo, Toshiya

    2008-11-01

    During mating of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two haploid nuclei fuse to produce a diploid nucleus. The process of nuclear fusion requires two J proteins, Jem1p in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen and Sec63p, which forms a complex with Sec71p and Sec72p, in the ER membrane. Zygotes of mutants defective in the functions of Jem1p or Sec63p contain two haploid nuclei that were closely apposed but failed to fuse. Here we analyzed the ultrastructure of nuclei in jem1 Delta and sec71 Delta mutant zygotes using electron microscope with the freeze-substituted fixation method. Three-dimensional reconstitution of nuclear structures from electron microscope serial sections revealed that Jem1p facilitates nuclear inner-membrane fusion and spindle pole body (SPB) fusion while Sec71p facilitates nuclear outer-membrane fusion. Two haploid SPBs that failed to fuse could duplicate, and mitotic nuclear division of the unfused haploid nuclei started in jem1 Delta and sec71 Delta mutant zygotes. This observation suggests that nuclear inner-membrane fusion is required for SPB fusion, but not for SPB duplication in the first mitotic cell division.

  11. Nuclear fusion: sixty years of efforts, great advances and challenges. May nuclear fusion replace fossil energies? The Grail which makes start-ups dream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilbaud, Sylvain; Pajot, Philippe; Delbecq, Denis

    2016-01-01

    A first article proposes an overview of sixty years of researches, investments and realisations aimed at a better knowledge and control of nuclear fusion to solve the Planet's energy problems. After a brief overview of the Sun as an example, and while presenting the principle of magnetic fusion in a tokamak, some key figures illustration the development of ITER, the authors describe magnetic fusion as the royal road to nuclear fusion (challenges for the ITER project, development of Stellarator as a concurrent of tokamaks), and inertial fusion as an alternate approach (principle, military interest, plasma physics). They also indicate other approaches based on a change of energy source, a change in ignition process, or a change in fuel. In a second article, the author discusses the economic perspectives of nuclear fusion: a supposed unlimited fuel, existence of radioactive releases and pollution, operation risks and costs, technical challenges to be faced, a development to be amortised on more than a century except if more compact processes are elaborated and developed. The author also discusses issues of profitability and of proliferation. The third and last article comments the existence of many start-ups, notably financed by Silicon Valley rich companies, which invest in researches and projects on nuclear fusion. They try to develop more compact systems, and aim at manufacturing their first prototypes by 2020. On the other side, academics remain doubtful about their ability to reach their objectives

  12. Nuclear challenges and progress in designing stellarator fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Guebaly, L.A.; Wilson, P.; Henderson, D.; Sawan, M.; Sviatoslavsky, G.; Tautges, T.; Slaybaugh, R.; Kiedrowski, B.; Ibrahim, A.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 5-6 decades, stellarator power plants have been studied in the US, Europe, and Japan as an alternate to the mainline magnetic fusion tokamaks, offering steady-state operation and eliminating the risk of plasma disruptions. The earlier 1980s studies suggested large-scale stellarator power plants with an average major radius exceeding 20 m. The most recent development of the compact stellarator concept delivered ARIES-CS - a compact stellarator with 7.75 m average major radius, approaching that of tokamaks. For stellarators, the most important engineering parameter that determines the machine size and cost is the minimum distance between the plasma boundary and mid-coil. Accommodating the breeding blanket and necessary shield within this distance to protect the ARIES-CS superconducting magnet represents a challenging task. Selecting the ARIES-CS nuclear and engineering parameters to produce an economic optimum, modeling the complex geometry for 3D nuclear analysis to confirm the key parameters, and minimizing the radwaste stream received considerable attention during the design process. These engineering design elements combined with advanced physics helped enable the compact stellarator to be a viable concept. This paper provides a brief historical overview of the progress in designing stellarator power plants and a perspective on the successful integration of the nuclear activity into the final ARIES-CS configuration

  13. Laser - driven high - energy ions and their application to inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghesi, M.

    2007-01-01

    The acceleration of high-energy ion beams (up to several tens of MeV per nucleon) following the interaction of short and intense laser pulses with solid targets has been one of the most important results of recent laser-plasma research [1]. The acceleration is driven by relativistic electrons, which acquire energy directly from the laser pulse and set up extremely large (∼TV/m) space charge fields at the target interfaces. The properties of laser-driven ion beams (high brightness and laminarity, high-energy cut-off, ultrashort burst duration) distinguish them from lower energy ions accelerated in earlier experiments at moderate laser intensities, and compare favourably with those of 'conventional' accelerator beams. In view of these properties, laser-driven ion beams can be employed in a number of innovative applications in the scientific, technological and medical areas. We will discuss in particular aspects of interest to their application in an Inertial Confinement Fusion context. Laser-driven protons are indeed being considered as a possible trigger for Fast Ignition of a precompressed fuel.[2] Recent results relating to the optimization of beam energy and focusing will be presented. These include the use of laser-driven impulsive fields for proton beam collimation and focusing [3], and the investigation of acceleration in presence of finite-scale plasma gradient. Proposed target developments enabling proton production at high repetition rate will also be discussed. Another important area of application of proton beams is diagnostic use in a particle probing arrangement for detection of density non-homogeneities [4] and electric/magnetic fields [5]. We will discuss the use of laser-driven proton beams for the diagnosis of magnetic and electric fields in planar and hohlraum targets and for the detection of fields associated to relativistic electron propagation through dense matter, an issue of high relevance for electron driven Fast Ignition. [1] M

  14. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation, industrial applications, plasma physics and nuclear fusion 1986-1996. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques, and Instrumentation, Industrial Applications, Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1986-1996. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all of these papers have abstracts in English. Contents cover the three main areas of (i) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactor and Particle Accelerator Applications, and Nuclear Data), (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, and Tracers), and (iii) Plasma Physics and Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion

  15. A unified modeling approach for physical experiment design and optimization in laser driven inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Haiyan; Huang, Yunbao; Jiang, Shaoen; Jing, Longfei; Tianxuan, Huang; Ding, Yongkun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A unified modeling approach for physical experiment design is presented. • Any laser facility can be flexibly defined and included with two scripts. • Complex targets and laser beams can be parametrically modeled for optimization. • Automatically mapping of laser beam energy facilitates targets shape optimization. - Abstract: Physical experiment design and optimization is very essential for laser driven inertial confinement fusion due to the high cost of each shot. However, only limited experiments with simple structure or shape on several laser facilities can be designed and evaluated in available codes, and targets are usually defined by programming, which may lead to it difficult for complex shape target design and optimization on arbitrary laser facilities. A unified modeling approach for physical experiment design and optimization on any laser facilities is presented in this paper. Its core idea includes: (1) any laser facility can be flexibly defined and included with two scripts, (2) complex shape targets and laser beams can be parametrically modeled based on features, (3) an automatically mapping scheme of laser beam energy onto discrete mesh elements of targets enable targets or laser beams be optimized without any additional interactive modeling or programming, and (4) significant computation algorithms are additionally presented to efficiently evaluate radiation symmetry on the target. Finally, examples are demonstrated to validate the significance of such unified modeling approach for physical experiments design and optimization in laser driven inertial confinement fusion.

  16. Dynamic assembly of brambleberry mediates nuclear envelope fusion during early development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Elliott W; Zhang, Hong; Marlow, Florence L; Kapp, Lee; Lu, Sumei; Mullins, Mary C

    2012-08-03

    To accommodate the large cells following zygote formation, early blastomeres employ modified cell divisions. Karyomeres are one such modification, mitotic intermediates wherein individual chromatin masses are surrounded by nuclear envelope; the karyomeres then fuse to form a single mononucleus. We identified brambleberry, a maternal-effect zebrafish mutant that disrupts karyomere fusion, resulting in formation of multiple micronuclei. As karyomeres form, Brambleberry protein localizes to the nuclear envelope, with prominent puncta evident near karyomere-karyomere interfaces corresponding to membrane fusion sites. brambleberry corresponds to an unannotated gene with similarity to Kar5p, a protein that participates in nuclear fusion in yeast. We also demonstrate that Brambleberry is required for pronuclear fusion following fertilization in zebrafish. Our studies provide insight into the machinery required for karyomere fusion and suggest that specialized proteins are necessary for proper nuclear division in large dividing blastomeres. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. IAEA specialists' meeting on the fusion evaluated nuclear data library related to the ITER activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulo, V.; Lorenz, A.

    1988-01-01

    This is the summary report of an IAEA Specialists' Meeting on the Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library Related to the ITER Activity, convened by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in Vienna from 16 to 18 November 1987. The objective of the meeting was to formulate a detailed programme and time schedule for the development of the Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (FENDL) to meet the future needs of the ITER activity

  18. Transmutation of nuclear waste in accelerator-driven systems

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera-Martínez, A

    2004-01-01

    Today more than ever energy is not only a cornerstone of human development, but also a key to the environmental sustainability of economic activity. In this context, the role of nuclear power may be emphasized in the years to come. Nevertheless, the problems of nuclear waste, safety and proliferation still remain to be solved. It is believed that the use of accelerator-driven systems (ADSs) for nuclear waste transmutation and energy production would address these problems in a simple, clean and economically viable, and therefore sustainable, manner. This thesis covers the major nuclear physics aspects of ADSs, in particular the spallation process and the core neutronics specific to this type of systems. The need for accurate nuclear data is described, together with a detailed analysis of the specific isotopes and energy ranges in which this data needs to be improved and the impact of their uncertainty. Preliminary experimental results for some of these isotopes, produced by the Neutron Time-of-Flight (n_TOF) ...

  19. Possible in-lattice confinement fusion (LCF). Dynamic application of atomic and nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawarasaki, Yuuki

    1995-01-01

    New scheme of a nuclear fusion reactor system is proposed, the basic concept of which comes from ingenious combination of hitherto developed techniques and verified facts; 1) so-called cold fusion (CF), 2) plasma of both magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF), and 3) accelerator-based D-T(D) neutron source. Details of the LCF reactor physics require dynamics of atomic data as well as nuclear data; interaction of ions with matters in solid and the problems of radiation damage. (author)

  20. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1971. Vol. III. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    The ultimate goal of controlled nuclear fusion research is to make a new energy source available to mankind, a source that will be virtually unlimited and that gives promise of being environmentally cleaner than the sources currently exploited. This goal has stimulated research in plasma physics over the past two decades, leading to significant advances in the understanding of matter in its most common state as well as to progress in the confinement and heating of plasma. An indication of this progress is that in several countries considerable effort is being devoted to design studies of fusion reactors and to the technological problems that will be encountered in realizing these reactors. This range of research, from plasma physics to fusion reactor engineering, is shown in the present three-volume publication of the Proceedings of the Fourth Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research. The Conference was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency and was held in Madison, Wisconsin, USA from 17 to 23 June 1971. The enthusiastic co-operation of the University of Wisconsin and of the United States Atomic Energy Commission in the organization of the Conference is gratefully acknowledged. The Conference was attended by over 500 scientists from 24 countries and 3 international organizations, and 143 papers were presented. These papers are published here in the original language; English translations of the Russian papers will be published in a Special Supplement to the journal Nuclear Fusion. The series of conferences on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research has become a major international forum for the presentation and discussion of results in this important and challenging field. In addition to sponsoring these conferences, the International Atomic Energy Agency supports controlled nuclear fusion research by publishing the journal Nuclear Fusion, and has recently established an International Fusion Research Council

  1. Present state and near future prospect of nuclear fusion research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Kenichi

    1995-01-01

    In place of the cold war, the destruction of global environment has become to be recognized as the largest threat for mankind. In such circumstance, nuclear fusion has the features that it does not release the substances which cause global warming and acid rain, the fuel resources are contained in seawater, therefore, infinite and distributed uniformly and so on. Nuclear fusion is the fundamental energy source in the sun and space, and aiming at realizing this reaction on the earth as early as possible, now is the time to show the physical and engineering feasibility of nuclear fusion power generation. The progress of the research and development of nuclear fusion is described. At present, the critical plasma condition has been attained for a moment in tokamak type nuclear fusion devices, and the attainment of the self ignition condition is studied. As the methods of realizing nuclear fusion reaction, deuterium-tritium reaction is utilized, and magnetic field confinement and inertia confinement methods are regarded as promising. The performance attained by the various nuclear fusion devices in the world is shown. The elucidation of the factors that decide plasma performance is very difficult. The outline of the ITER project is mentioned. The third stage plan of research and development is explained. The prospect for near future is the start of experiment with the ITER at the beginning of the next century. (K.I.)

  2. Technological forecasting a long time of the scientific-technological development of the nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schettert, Plinio G.; Oliveira, Wagner S.; Aquino, Afonso R.

    2009-01-01

    With base in the introduction in long time of the nuclear fusion inside of a system of viable energy, taking in consideration economic factors, would imply on investment in a long period. The objective of this project utilizing the method of the Delphi technique is the technological forecast a long time of the scientific-technological development of the nuclear fusion and its impact. This research project will be carried through different stages of improvement of variables. A questionnaire based on information and analysis of the literature validated for specialists in nuclear fusion becomes this project a tool in the elaboration future of a database contends variables on the theme nuclear fusion and its perspectives. The database will be composed for the answers and suggestions obtained, with exploratory and extrapolatory elements, on the theme a great number of specialists involving in the nuclear fusion area. The database is analyzed for the configuration of variables that represent elements as scientific-technological factors, economical, political, social and environmental among others. As final result of the research with the Delphi technique, different scenes obtained with the variables will be indicated by convergent factors or not on the approached perspectives. The analysis of the data will be possible through of improve of statistical analysis tools. This is the first analyzes of the answers. The questionnaire was validated with nuclear fusion specialists from the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil and the Center of Nuclear Fusion of the Technical University of Lisbon in Portugal. (author)

  3. Prm3p is a pheromone-induced peripheral nuclear envelope protein required for yeast nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shu; Tobery, Cynthia E; Rose, Mark D

    2009-05-01

    Nuclear membrane fusion is the last step in the mating pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We adapted a bioinformatics approach to identify putative pheromone-induced membrane proteins potentially required for nuclear membrane fusion. One protein, Prm3p, was found to be required for nuclear membrane fusion; disruption of PRM3 caused a strong bilateral defect, in which nuclear congression was completed but fusion did not occur. Prm3p was localized to the nuclear envelope in pheromone-responding cells, with significant colocalization with the spindle pole body in zygotes. A previous report, using a truncated protein, claimed that Prm3p is localized to the inner nuclear envelope. Based on biochemistry, immunoelectron microscopy and live cell microscopy, we find that functional Prm3p is a peripheral membrane protein exposed on the cytoplasmic face of the outer nuclear envelope. In support of this, mutations in a putative nuclear localization sequence had no effect on full-length protein function or localization. In contrast, point mutations and deletions in the highly conserved hydrophobic carboxy-terminal domain disrupted both protein function and localization. Genetic analysis, colocalization, and biochemical experiments indicate that Prm3p interacts directly with Kar5p, suggesting that nuclear membrane fusion is mediated by a protein complex.

  4. Laser Intertial Fusion Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Kevin James [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-04-08

    of fixed fuel configurations that would normally require a computationally burdensome number of depletion zones. Alternatively, Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) adjusts the depletion zone size according to the variation in flux across the zone or fractional contribution to total absorption or fission. A parametric analysis on a fully mixed fuel core was performed using the LNC and ABL code suites. The resulting system parameters are found to optimize performance metrics using a 20 MT DU fuel load with a 20% TRISO packing and a 300 μm kernel radius operated with a fusion input power of 500 MW and a fission blanket gain of 4.0. LFFH potentially offers a proliferation resistant technology relative to other nuclear energy systems primarily because of no need for fuel enrichment or reprocessing. A figure of merit of the material attractiveness is examined and it is found that the fuel is effectively contaminated to an unattractive level shortly after the system is started due to fission product and minor actinide build up.

  5. Nuclear fusion during yeast mating occurs by a three-step pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melloy, Patricia; Shen, Shu; White, Erin; McIntosh, J Richard; Rose, Mark D

    2007-11-19

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mating culminates in nuclear fusion to produce a diploid zygote. Two models for nuclear fusion have been proposed: a one-step model in which the outer and inner nuclear membranes and the spindle pole bodies (SPBs) fuse simultaneously and a three-step model in which the three events occur separately. To differentiate between these models, we used electron tomography and time-lapse light microscopy of early stage wild-type zygotes. We observe two distinct SPBs in approximately 80% of zygotes that contain fused nuclei, whereas we only see fused or partially fused SPBs in zygotes in which the site of nuclear envelope (NE) fusion is already dilated. This demonstrates that SPB fusion occurs after NE fusion. Time-lapse microscopy of zygotes containing fluorescent protein tags that localize to either the NE lumen or the nucleoplasm demonstrates that outer membrane fusion precedes inner membrane fusion. We conclude that nuclear fusion occurs by a three-step pathway.

  6. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven nuclear reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Margarone, Daniele; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, Andriy; Krása, Josef; Kucharik, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Bellutti, P.; Korn, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2015), s. 014030 ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : laser plasma * nuclear reaction * laser fusion Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (UFP-V) Impact factor: 2.404, year: 2015

  7. Superconducting Coils for Small Nuclear Fusion Rocket Engines, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal focuses on the superconducting coils subsystem, a critical subsystem for the PFRC reactor and Direct Fusion Drive and other fusion and electric...

  8. Fusion power by magnetic confinement: plans and the associated need for nuclear engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, R.L.; Beard, D.S.

    1975-01-01

    An essential ingredient in the fusion development plan will be the training of appropriate scientific and technical manpower. In examining the need for fusion-trained nuclear engineers, it is projected that an additional 120 to 250 engineers at the MS and PhD levels will be needed between now and 1980. To be most effective, these graduates must not only be trained in the ''classic'' physical, nuclear, mechanical, and electrical sciences, but they will need specialized training in fusion plasma physics and fusion materials science. To help develop the appropriate educational programs, close cooperation between U. S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) headquarters, ERDA laboratories, private industry, and the universities will be essential. An emerging need for a carefully structured ''fusion technology'' option in nuclear engineering departments is plainly evident and is already beginning to be developed at leading institutions

  9. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), RO-077125 Magurele (Romania); Cabellos, O. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Kodeli, I. [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Koning, A. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Konobeyev, A.Yu. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Leeb, H. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Atominstitut, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8–10, 1040 Wien (Austria); Rochman, D. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sauvan, P. [Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, C. Juan del Rosal, 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sublet, J.-C. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Trkov, A. [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Dupont, E. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, Paris (France); Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J. [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-15

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations.

  10. The Fukushima nuclear disaster and its effects on media framing of fission and fusion energy technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Luísa; Horta, Ana; Pereira, Sérgio; Delicado, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Accepted version. This paper presents results of a comparison of media coverage of fusion and fission energy technologies in three countries (Germany, Spain and Portugal) and in the English language international print media addressing transnational elite, from 2008 to 2012. The analysis showed that the accident in Fukushima in March 2010 did not have significant impact on media framing of nuclear fusion in the major part of print media under investigation. In fact, fusion is clearly disso...

  11. Vegetative hyphal fusion and subsequent nuclear behavior in Epichloë grass endophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Jun-Ya; Charlton, Nikki D; Yi, Mihwa; Young, Carolyn A; Craven, Kelly D

    2015-01-01

    Epichloë species (including the former genus Neotyphodium) are fungal symbionts of many agronomically important forage grasses, and provide their grass hosts with protection from a wide range of biotic and abiotic stresses. Epichloë species include many interspecific hybrids with allodiploid-like genomes, which may provide the potential for combined traits or recombination to generate new traits. Though circumstantial evidence suggests that such interspecific hybrids might have arisen from nuclear fusion events following vegetative hyphal fusion between different Epichloë strains, this hypothesis has not been addressed empirically. Here, we investigated vegetative hyphal fusion and subsequent nuclear behavior in Epichloë species. A majority of Epichloë strains, especially those having a sexual stage, underwent self vegetative hyphal fusion. Vegetative fusion also occurred between two hyphae from different Epichloë strains. Though Epichloë spp. are uninucleate fungi, hyphal fusion resulted in two nuclei stably sharing the same cytoplasm, which might ultimately lead to nuclear fusion. In addition, protoplast fusion experiments gave rise to uninucleate putative hybrids, which apparently had two markers, one from each parent within the same nucleus. These results are consistent with the notion that interspecific hybrids arise from vegetative hyphal fusion. However, we also discuss additional factors, such as post-hybridization selection, that may be important to explain the recognized prevalence of hybrids in Epichloë species.

  12. Vegetative hyphal fusion and subsequent nuclear behavior in Epichloë grass endophytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ya Shoji

    Full Text Available Epichloë species (including the former genus Neotyphodium are fungal symbionts of many agronomically important forage grasses, and provide their grass hosts with protection from a wide range of biotic and abiotic stresses. Epichloë species include many interspecific hybrids with allodiploid-like genomes, which may provide the potential for combined traits or recombination to generate new traits. Though circumstantial evidence suggests that such interspecific hybrids might have arisen from nuclear fusion events following vegetative hyphal fusion between different Epichloë strains, this hypothesis has not been addressed empirically. Here, we investigated vegetative hyphal fusion and subsequent nuclear behavior in Epichloë species. A majority of Epichloë strains, especially those having a sexual stage, underwent self vegetative hyphal fusion. Vegetative fusion also occurred between two hyphae from different Epichloë strains. Though Epichloë spp. are uninucleate fungi, hyphal fusion resulted in two nuclei stably sharing the same cytoplasm, which might ultimately lead to nuclear fusion. In addition, protoplast fusion experiments gave rise to uninucleate putative hybrids, which apparently had two markers, one from each parent within the same nucleus. These results are consistent with the notion that interspecific hybrids arise from vegetative hyphal fusion. However, we also discuss additional factors, such as post-hybridization selection, that may be important to explain the recognized prevalence of hybrids in Epichloë species.

  13. Safety analysis of fusion reactors pertaining to nuclear incidents and accidents. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raeder, J.; Weller, A.; Wolf, R.; Jin, X.; Boccaccini, L.V.; Stieglitz, R.; Carloni, D.; Pistner, C.; Herb, J.

    2013-11-01

    The BfS gave the projekt partners IPP, KIT, Oeko-Institut e. V., and GRS the order to carry out a literature study on the topic of safety of fusion power plants regarding nuclear incidents and accidents. In the framework of this study the actual status of science and technology of the safety concept of fusion power plants should be determined and the applicability of the nuclear safety regulations hitherto developed for nuclear power plants checked. For future commercial fusion power plants today only conceptional designs exist. The most advanced conceptual study for a future fusion power plant is the European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS) from the year 2005, which is based on the tokamak principle. In this study also fundamental aspects of the safety concept of nuclear fusion are treated. Hereby several different conceptual approaches are discussed, which differ among others also in the lay-out approaches relevant for the safety of a facility like for instance the choice of the breeding concept or the materials for the blanket/divertor structure and the coolants. The safety concept of nuclear fusion is oriented on safety concepts for facilities with radioactive inventory. It is based on the concept of tiered safety levels. In order to check whether for the nuclear fusion a safety concept comparable with the nuclear fission at all is necessary, in a first step it was considered, which consequences are possible at a postulated release o large parts of the radioactive inventory of a fusion power plant. Such a worst-case scenario was compared with a corresponding, postulated release of large parts of the radioactive inventory of a nuclear power plant. As scale hereby served the radiological criterion, at the transgression of which in the environment of the facility an evacuation would be necessary. In a next step the transferability of the safety concept of the tiered safety levels of nuclear technology to the fusion was checked. Beside events transferable from

  14. Conceptual study of fusion-driven transmutation reactor with ITER physics and engineering constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bong

    2011-10-01

    A conceptual study of fusion-driven transmutation reactor was performed based on ITER physics and engineering constraints. A compact reactor concept is desirable from an economic viewpoint. For the optimal design of a reactor, a radial build of reactor components has to be determined by considering the plasma physics and engineering constraints which inter-relate various reactor components. In a transmutation reactor, design of blanket and shield play a key role in determining the size of a reactor; the blanket should produce enough tritium for tritium self-sufficiency, the transmutation rate of waste has to be maximized, and the shield should provide sufficient protection for the superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil. To determine the radial build of the blanket and the shield, not only a radiation transport analysis but also a burnup calculation were coupled with the system analysis and it allowed the self-consistent determination of the design parameters of a transmutation reactor.

  15. High Efficiency RF Heating for Small Nuclear Fusion Rocket Engines, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High power nuclear fusion propulsion systems will require high efficiency radio-frequency heating systems in the MHz range for plasma heating. This proposal is for a...

  16. Target design for high fusion yield with the double Z-pinch-driven hohlraum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesey, R. A.; Herrmann, M. C.; Lemke, R. W.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Cuneo, M. E.; Stygar, W. A.; Bennett, G. R.; Campbell, R. B.; Christenson, P. J.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Porter, J. L.; Slutz, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    A key demonstration on the path to inertial fusion energy is the achievement of high fusion yield (hundreds of MJ) and high target gain. Toward this goal, an indirect-drive high-yield inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target involving two Z-pinch x-ray sources heating a central secondary hohlraum is described by Hammer et al. [Phys. Plasmas 6, 2129 (1999)]. In subsequent research at Sandia National Laboratories, theoretical/computational models have been developed and an extensive series of validation experiments have been performed to study hohlraum energetics, capsule coupling, and capsule implosion symmetry for this system. These models have been used to design a high-yield Z-pinch-driven ICF target that incorporates the latest experience in capsule design, hohlraum symmetry control, and x-ray production by Z pinches. An x-ray energy output of 9 MJ per pinch, suitably pulse-shaped, is sufficient for this concept to drive 0.3-0.5 GJ capsules. For the first time, integrated two-dimensional (2D) hohlraum/capsule radiation-hydrodynamics simulations have demonstrated adequate hohlraum coupling, time-dependent radiation symmetry control, and the successful implosion, ignition, and burn of a high-yield capsule in the double Z-pinch hohlraum. An important new feature of this target design is mode-selective symmetry control: the use of burn-through shields offset from the capsule that selectively tune certain low-order asymmetry modes (P 2 ,P 4 ) without significantly perturbing higher-order modes and without a significant energy penalty. This paper will describe the capsule and hohlraum design that have produced 0.4-0.5 GJ yields in 2D simulations, provide a preliminary estimate of the Z-pinch load and accelerator requirements necessary to drive the system, and suggest future directions for target design work

  17. Numerical studies for the nuclear fusion reactor Wendelstein 7-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelbe, Hauke [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The nuclear fusion experiment Wendelstein 7-X is currently under construction in Greifswald, Germany. After completion in 2014, the experiment will be the largest and most advanced stellarator ever built. The cryostat hosting the superconducting coils and the vacuum vessel has a diameter of 16 meters and a height of 5 meters, and the magnetic field will be 2.5 T on axis. Wendelstein 7-X is designed to prove simultaneous high density, high temperature, steady-state plasma operation. The first plasma is planned for 2015. After first tests the plasma pulse time will be gradually increased up to 30 minutes from 2019 on. The core plasma temperature in this device will be over 100 million degree. Therefore, contact with the plasma facing components must be done carefully. One challenge in this connection is that the plasma shape will change during operation due to internal plasma currents generated by the plasma itself. Using state-of-the-art codes, we are investigating and developing operational scenarios for the first, relatively short plasma pulses, that allow us to address important issues for the later steady-state operation.

  18. The timing system of the RFX Nuclear Fusion Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, V.; Flor, G.; Manduchi, G.; Piacentini, I.

    1992-01-01

    The REX Nuclear Fusion Experiment [1] in Padova, Italy, employs a distributed system to produce precision trigger signals for the fast control of the experiment and for the experiment-wide synchronization of data acquisition channels. The hardware of the system is based on a set of CAMAC modules. The modules have been integrated into a hardware/software system which provides the following features: 1) generation of pre-programmed timing events, 2) distribution of asynchronous (not pre-programmed) timing events, 3) gating of timing event generation by Machine Protection System, 4) automatic stop of timing sequence in case of highway damage, 5) dual-speed time base for transient recorders, 6) system-wide precision of ≤ 3 μs, time resolution ≥ 10 μs. The operation of the timing system is fully integrated into the RFX data acquisition system software. The Timing System Software consists of three layers: the lowest one corresponds directly to the CAMAC modules, the intermediate one provides pseudo-devices which essentially correspond to specific features for the modules (e.g. a dual frequency clock source for transient recorders), the highest level provides system set-up support. The system is fully operational and was first used during the commissioning of the RFX Power Supplies in spring '91. (author)

  19. Thermonuclear fusion product diagnostics by nuclear track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehling, E.; Schumacher, U. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany, F.R.)); Paretzke, H.G. (Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung m.b.H. Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz)

    1984-01-01

    The nuclear track detector materials CR-39 and PM-355 are capable of proton and alpha particle track recording and thus well suited to charged particle diagnostics in thermonuclear fusion devices. In a study to determine the respective absolute recording efficiencies and energy resolutions for protons and alpha particles in real diagnostics situations, a series of experiments with monoenergetic particles of known energies and angles of incidence were performed. Alpha particles could be quantitatively detected for angles of incidence of up to 70 deg, and their etch pit depth rather than the diameter for defined etching conditions gave satisfying information on the alpha particle energy. Contrary to other investigators, however, we found a monotonically decreasing detection probability for protons already above 3 MeV and no proton track could be developed above incident energies of 7 to 8 MeV. The proton detection depends more strongly on the angle of incidence; only tracks of protons with angles of incidence smaller than 30 deg could be made visible by etching. The proton energy could be derived from track diameter measurements better than from etch pit depths.

  20. Toroidal coil for torus type nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Daisaburo; Jinbo, Kensaku.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To facilitate clamping operation in the joint section of a toroidal coil in the nuclear fusion device even if the device has a narrow central space. Structure: A clamp bolt for joining upper and lower coil conductors comprises a first bolt, which is provided in one end portion with a thread for fitting a clamp nut, has a hollow intermediate portion and is provided at the other end with an opening of a smaller diameter than that of the hollow intermediate portion and also with an inner receiving surface, and a second bolt, which is provided in one end portion with a thread for fitting a clamp nut and in the other end portion with a raised portion and is adapted to be inserted on the raised portion side into the hollow intermediate portion of the first bolt such that it is extendable in the axial direction. When inserting this clamp bolt into a see-through hole in the conductor joint section its length is reduced, and at the time of clamping it is extended with the raised portion of the second bolt locked by the receiving surface of the first bolt. (Horiuchi, T.)

  1. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation industrial applications plasma physics and nuclear fusion. 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation, with Industrial Applications (of Nuclear Physics and Engineering), and with Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1980-1994. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, and panels of experts may contain some papers in other languages (French, Russian, or Spanish), but all papers have abstracts in English. Price quotes are in Austrian Schillings, do not include local taxes, and are subject to change without notice. Contents cover the three main categories of (i) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Chemistry, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactors and Particle Accelerator Applications, Nuclear Data); (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, Tracers); and (iii) Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion

  2. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation industrial applications plasma physics and nuclear fusion, 1980-1993. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation, with Industrial Applications (of Nuclear Physics and Engineering), and with Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1980-1993. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, and panels of experts may contain some papers in other languages (French, Russian, or Spanish), but all papers have abstracts in English. Price quotes are in Austrian Schillings, do not include local taxes, and are subject to change without notice. Contents cover the three main categories of (I) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Chemistry, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactors and Particle Accelerator Applications, Nuclear Data); (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, Tracers); and (iii) Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion

  3. Situation and role of industrial fields in nuclear fusion reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Gen-ichi

    1983-01-01

    Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) established the nuclear fusion technical committee in October, 1980, and has investigated the attitude of industrial fields in progressing nuclear fusion research and development and the measures to cooperate with national development plans. Corresponding to the new long term plan and the establishment of the basic policy for nuclear fusion research and development by Atomic Energy Commission of Japan in June, 1982, JAIF has settled the policy on the situation and role of industrial fields. In this report, first the necessity of firmly grasping the position of nuclear fusion research in atomic energy development is described, next, the present status of the research and development in Japan is reported, and it is mentioned that the role of manufacturers in reinforcing engineering has become more important in industrial fields. In the stage of the construction of a nuclear fusion reactor, the experiences in the engineering safety in fission reactors, environmental safety and system engineering will be utilized. Japanese industrial fields feature that they have made larger cooperation with national projects even in the research and development stage as compared to foreign countries. When the plan of next phase system will be promoted in the future, the cooperating methods in the past should be evaluated, investigated and improved, and the experiences in fast breeder reactors and advanced heavy water reactors should be referred to. Finally, the problems and the countermeasures in nuclear fusion development are described. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  4. Nuclear Material Detection by One-Short-Pulse-Laser-Driven Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aymond, F. [Univ. of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Bridgewater, Jon S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Croft, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Deppert, O. [Technische Universitat Darmstadt (Germany); Devlin, Matthew James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Falk, Katerina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fernandez, Juan Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gautier, Donald Cort [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gonzales, Manuel A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Goodsell, Alison Victoria [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Guler, Nevzat [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hamilton, Christopher Eric [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henzlova, Daniela [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Iliev, Metodi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Johnson, Randall Philip [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jung, Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kleinschmidt, Annika [Technische Universitat Darmstadt (Germany); Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pomerantz, Ishay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Roth, Markus [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Santi, Peter Angelo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shimada, Tsutomu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wurden, Glen Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Palaniyappan, Sasikumar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McCary, E. [Univ. of Texas at Austin, TX (United States)

    2015-01-28

    Covered in the PowerPoint presentation are the following areas: Motivation and requirements for active interrogation of nuclear material; laser-driven neutron source; neutron diagnostics; active interrogation of nuclear material; and, conclusions, remarks, and future works.

  5. Personnel Radiation Protection at the ITER Nuclear Fusion Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coniglio, A.; Sandri, S.; D'Arienzo, M.

    2006-01-01

    The hosting site for the ITER nuclear fusion experiment was finally chosen in France (Cadarache). The radiation protection program for the ITER personnel involved into operation and maintenance activities will be then tested in the near future. Related studies were mainly carried out during the last ten years and important assessments were performed at the Frascati ENEA Research Center in Italy. In this ambit individual and collective doses to the operators were calculated for different categories of working activities involving more and less critical systems. The radiation protection organization was outlined and the related program was proposed. A short review of the analyses performed in this field by the Italian investigators of the ENEA Radiation Protection Institute is shown here. The principal parameter taken into account in these evaluations was the collective dose due to the different working activities. This quantity has been assessed considering the following radiological source terms: a) the prompt radiation during the plasma burning phase, b) the gamma radiation due to the neutron activation of the solid structures, c) the activated corrosion products (ACPs) generated in the water cooling system (WCS) by corrosion of the inner wall of the piping under the neutron flux, d) tritium concentration in the atmosphere of the working premises. Individual doses have been integrated over the different worker typology, considering the design evolution for the different systems and the required person power. Ordinary, inspection and maintenance activities were taken into account to assess the person power, sometime also construction, plant modifications and unscheduled maintenance were included in the working activities list. The collective dose assessed for ITER fusion projects has been compared with that of the fission power stations and analogies and differences have been pointed out. In this review the dose assessment process is recalled starting from the

  6. Great expectations: a review of nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.; MacKerron, G.

    1989-01-01

    Fusion research policy has recently come under scrutiny, prompted by rising research costs and increasing doubt about the value of such long-term work. This paper reviews the basic principles of fusion, the research and development still required, the costs of research to date, justifications for it, and future policy options; and examines in broad terms some of the ways in which fusion can be and has been evaluated. Throughout, the emphasis is on the need to compare fusion on equal terms with those technological options with which it may compete, and in the context of different energy futures. (author)

  7. Study on system integration of robots operated in nuclear fusion facility and nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Kiyoshi

    2004-07-01

    A present robot is required to apply to many fields such as amusement, welfare and protection against disasters. The are however only limited numbers of the robots, which can work under the actual conditions as a robot system. It is caused by the following reasons: (1) the robot system cannot be realized by the only collection of the elemental technologies, (2) the performance of the robot is determined by that of the integrated system composed of the complicated elements with many functions, and (3) the respective elements have to be optimized in the integrated robot system with a well balance among them, through their examination, adjustment and improvement. Therefore, the system integration of the robot composed of a large number of elements is the most critical issue to realize the robot system for actual use. In the present paper, I describe the necessary approaches and elemental technologies to solve the issues on the system integration of the typical robot systems for maintenance in the nuclear fusion facility and rescue in the accident of the nuclear power plant facilities. These robots work under the intense radiation condition and restricted space in place of human. In particular, I propose a new approach to realize the system integration of the robot for actual use from the viewpoints of not only the environment and working conditions but also the restructure and optimization of the required elemental technologies with a well balance in the robot system. Based on the above approach, I have a contribution to realize the robot systems working under the actual conditions for maintenance in the nuclear fusion facility and rescue in the accident of the nuclear power plant facilities. (author)

  8. Expression of Leukemia-Associated Nup98 Fusion Proteins Generates an Aberrant Nuclear Envelope Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Martinelli, Valérie; Nilles, Nadine; Fruhmann, Gernot; Chatel, Guillaume; Juge, Sabine; Sauder, Ursula; Di Giacomo, Danika; Mecucci, Cristina; Schwaller, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the nucleoporin NUP98 have been described in several hematopoietic malignancies, in particular acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the resulting chimeric proteins, Nup98's N-terminal region is fused to the C-terminal region of about 30 different partners, including homeodomain (HD) transcription factors. While transcriptional targets of distinct Nup98 chimeras related to immortalization are relatively well described, little is known about other potential cellular effects of these fusion proteins. By comparing the sub-nuclear localization of a large number of Nup98 fusions with HD and non-HD partners throughout the cell cycle we found that while all Nup98 chimeras were nuclear during interphase, only Nup98-HD fusion proteins exhibited a characteristic speckled appearance. During mitosis, only Nup98-HD fusions were concentrated on chromosomes. Despite the difference in localization, all tested Nup98 chimera provoked morphological alterations in the nuclear envelope (NE), in particular affecting the nuclear lamina and the lamina-associated polypeptide 2α (LAP2α). Importantly, such aberrations were not only observed in transiently transfected HeLa cells but also in mouse bone marrow cells immortalized by Nup98 fusions and in cells derived from leukemia patients harboring Nup98 fusions. Our findings unravel Nup98 fusion-associated NE alterations that may contribute to leukemogenesis.

  9. Expression of Leukemia-Associated Nup98 Fusion Proteins Generates an Aberrant Nuclear Envelope Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birthe Fahrenkrog

    Full Text Available Chromosomal translocations involving the nucleoporin NUP98 have been described in several hematopoietic malignancies, in particular acute myeloid leukemia (AML. In the resulting chimeric proteins, Nup98's N-terminal region is fused to the C-terminal region of about 30 different partners, including homeodomain (HD transcription factors. While transcriptional targets of distinct Nup98 chimeras related to immortalization are relatively well described, little is known about other potential cellular effects of these fusion proteins. By comparing the sub-nuclear localization of a large number of Nup98 fusions with HD and non-HD partners throughout the cell cycle we found that while all Nup98 chimeras were nuclear during interphase, only Nup98-HD fusion proteins exhibited a characteristic speckled appearance. During mitosis, only Nup98-HD fusions were concentrated on chromosomes. Despite the difference in localization, all tested Nup98 chimera provoked morphological alterations in the nuclear envelope (NE, in particular affecting the nuclear lamina and the lamina-associated polypeptide 2α (LAP2α. Importantly, such aberrations were not only observed in transiently transfected HeLa cells but also in mouse bone marrow cells immortalized by Nup98 fusions and in cells derived from leukemia patients harboring Nup98 fusions. Our findings unravel Nup98 fusion-associated NE alterations that may contribute to leukemogenesis.

  10. Development and characterization of a Z-pinch-driven hohlraum high-yield inertial confinement fusion target concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuneo, Michael E.; Vesey, Roger A.; Porter, John L. Jr.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Fehl, David L.; Gilliland, Terrance L.; Hanson, David L.; McGurn, John S.; Reynolds, Paul G.; Ruggles, Laurence E.; Seamen, Hans; Spielman, Rick B.; Struve, Ken W.; Stygar, William A.; Simpson, Walter W.; Torres, Jose A.; Wenger, David F.; Hammer, James H.; Rambo, Peter W.; Peterson, Darrell L.

    2001-01-01

    Initial experiments to study the Z-pinch-driven hohlraum high-yield inertial confinement fusion (ICF) concept of Hammer, Tabak, and Porter [Hammer et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2129 (1999)] are described. The relationship between measured pinch power, hohlraum temperature, and secondary hohlraum coupling ('hohlraum energetics') is well understood from zero-dimensional semianalytic, and two-dimensional view factor and radiation magnetohydrodynamics models. These experiments have shown the highest x-ray powers coupled to any Z-pinch-driven secondary hohlraum (26±5 TW), indicating the concept could scale to fusion yields of >200 MJ. A novel, single-sided power feed, double-pinch driven secondary that meets the pinch simultaneity requirements for polar radiation symmetry has also been developed. This source will permit investigation of the pinch power balance and hohlraum geometry requirements for ICF relevant secondary radiation symmetry, leading to a capsule implosion capability on the Z accelerator [Spielman et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2105 (1998)

  11. Trends of plasma physics and nuclear fusion research life cycle and research effort curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohe, Takeru; Kanada, Yasumasa; Momota, Hiromu; Ichikawa, Y.H.

    1979-05-01

    This paper presents a quantitative analysis of research trends in the fields of plasma physics and nuclear fusion. This analysis is based on information retrieval from available data bases such as INSPEC tapes. The results indicate that plasma physics research is now in the maturation phase of its life cycle, and that nuclear fusion research is in its growth phase. This paper indicates that there is a correlation between the number of accumulated papers in the fields of plasma physics and nuclear fusion and the experimentally attained values of the plasma ignition parameter ntT. Using this correlation ''research effort curve'', we forecast that the scientific feasibility of controlled fusion using magnetic confinement systems will be proved around 1983. (author)

  12. Disposition of nuclear waste using subcritical accelerator-driven systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venneri, F.; Li, N.; Williamson, M.; Houts, M.; Lawrence, G.

    1998-12-31

    Spent fuel from nuclear power plants contains large quantities of Pu, other actinides, and fission products (FP). This creates challenges for permanent disposal because of the long half-lives of some isotopes and the potential for diversion of the fissile material. Two issues of concern for the US repository concept are: (1) long-term radiological risk peaking tens-of-thousands of years in the future; and (2) short-term thermal loading (decay heat) that limits capacity. An accelerator-driven neutron source can destroy actinides through fission, and can convert long-lived fission products to shorter-lived or stable isotopes. Studies over the past decade have established that accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) can have a major beneficial impact on the nuclear waste problem. Specifically, the ATW concept the authors are evaluating: (1) destroys over 99.9% of the actinides; (2) destroys over 99.9% of the Tc and I; (3) separates Sr-90 and Cs-137; (4) separates uranium from the spent fuel; (5) produces electric power.

  13. Laser-driven nuclear-polarized hydrogen internal gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, J.; Crawford, C.; Clasie, B.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-01-01

    We report the performance of a laser-driven polarized internal hydrogen gas target (LDT) in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. This target used the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping to produce nuclear spin polarized hydrogen gas that was fed into a cylindrical storage (target) cell. We present in this paper the performance of the target, methods that were tried to improve the figure-of-merit (FOM) of the target, and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results from the simulation. The best experimental result achieved was at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1x10 18 atoms/s, where the sample beam exiting the storage cell had 58.2% degree of dissociation and 50.5% polarization. Based on this measurement, the atomic fraction in the storage cell was 49.6% and the density averaged nuclear polarization was 25.0%. This represents the highest FOM for hydrogen from an LDT and is higher than the best FOM reported by atomic beam sources that used storage cells

  14. C+C Fusion Cross Sections Measurements for Nuclear Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Carnelli, P. F. F.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Jiang, C. L.; Lai, J.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Paul, M.; Giardina, G.; Eidelman, S.; Venanzoni, G.; Battaglieri, M.; Mandaglio, G.

    2015-01-01

    Total fusion cross section of carbon isotopes were obtained using the newly developed MUSIC detector. MUSIC is a highly efficient, active target-detector system designed to measure fusion excitation functions with radioactive beams. The present measurements are relevant for understanding x-ray superbursts. The results of the first MUSIC campaign as well as the astrophysical implications are presented in this work

  15. Functional analysis for complex systems of nuclear fusion plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinna, Tonio, E-mail: tonio.pinna@enea.it; Dongiovanni, Danilo Nicola; Iannone, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Functional analysis for complex systems. • Functional Flow Block Diagrams (FFBD). • IDEFØ diagrams. • Petri Net algorithm - Abstract: In system engineering context, a functional analysis is the systematic process of identifying, describing and correlating the functions a system must perform in order to be successful at any foreseen life-cycle phase or operational state/mode. By focusing on what the system must do disregarding the implementation, the functional analysis supports an unbiased system requirement allocation analysis. The system function architecture is defined in terms of process, protection (interlock) or nuclear safety functions. Then, the system functions are analyzed from several points of view in order to highlight the various pieces of information defining the way the system is designed to accomplish its mission as defined in the system requirement documents. The process functional flow is identified and represented by Functional Flow Block Diagrams (FFBD) while the system function interfaces are identified and represented by IDEFØ diagrams. Function interfaces are defined as relationships across identified functions in terms of function input (from other functions or requirements), output (added value or outcome of the function), controls (from other functions or systems) and mechanisms necessary to fulfill the function. The function architecture is further detailed by considering for each function: a) the phase of application, b) the actions performed c) the controlled variable and control actions to be foreseen in the implementation of the functions, d) the system involved in the control action, e) the equipment involved in the function, f) the requirements allocated to the function. The methodology here presented are suggested for the designing of fusion facilities and reactors already from the first phases of the pre-conceptual design, as it is now for DEMO.

  16. ITER, a major step toward nuclear fusion energy; ITER, une etape majeure vers l'energie de fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, K.; Holtkamp, N.; Pick, M.; Gauche, F.; Garin, P.; Bigot, B.; Luciani, J.F.; Mougniot, J.C.; Watteau, J.P.; Saoutic, B.; Becoulet, A.; Libeyre, P.; Beaumont, B.; Simonin, A.; Giancarli, L.; Rosenvallon, S.; Gastaldi, O.; Marbach, G.; Boudot, C.; Ioki, K.; Mitchell, N.; Girard, J.Ph.; Giraud, B.; Lignini, F.; Giguet, E.; Bofusch, E.; Friconneau, J.P.; Di Pace, L.; Pampin, R.; Cook, I.; Maisonnier, D.; Campbell, D.; Hayward, J.; Li Puma, A.; Norajitra, P.; Sardain, P.; Tran, M.Q.; Ward, D.; Moslang, A.; Carre, F.; Serpantie, J.P

    2007-01-15

    This document gathers together a series of articles dedicated to ITER. They are organized into 5 parts. The first part describes the potential of fusion as a source of energy that will be able to face the challenge of a continuously increasing demand. After a reminder of the main fusion reactions and the conditions to obtain fusion, the second part focuses on the magnetic fusion based concepts with a special emphasis on the tokamak configuration. In the third part the main components of ITER are described: first the plasma facing components, then the vacuum vessel, the superconducting magnets and the heating systems. In the fourth part short papers concerning ITER safety, the maintenance through remote handling systems, the tritium breeding blanket, are given, along with a full article on the waste management. It is interesting to notice that the nuclear wastes will represent: -) between 1600 and 3800 tons of housekeeping and process wastes produced during the 20 years of operation of ITER (20% very low level waste, 75% low or medium activity with short life and 5% medium activity with long life), -) about 750 tons from component replacement during ITER active operation, and -) about 30000 tons from the decommissioning of ITER. The last part presents the European concepts for a power plant based on a fusion reactor. A basic design is given along with a state of the art of the research on the materials that will be used for the structures. It is highlighted that synergies between fission and fusion technologies exist in at least 4 areas: nuclear design code system, high temperature materials, safety approach, and in-service inspection, maintenance and dismantling. (A.C.)

  17. Inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export of transcription factors by leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Akiko; Sarma, Nayan J; Abdul-Nabi, Anmaar M; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2010-05-21

    NUP98 is a nucleoporin that plays complex roles in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of macromolecules. Rearrangements of the NUP98 gene in human leukemia result in the expression of numerous fusion oncoproteins whose effect on nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins on CRM1-mediated nuclear export. NUP98-HOXA9, a prototypic NUP98 fusion, inhibited the nuclear export of two known CRM1 substrates: mutated cytoplasmic nucleophosmin and HIV-1 Rev. In vitro binding assays revealed that NUP98-HOXA9 binds CRM1 through the FG repeat motif in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner similar to but stronger than the interaction between CRM1 and its export substrates. Two NUP98 fusions, NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10, whose fusion partners are structurally and functionally unrelated, interacted with endogenous CRM1 in myeloid cells as shown by co-immunoprecipitation. These leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins interacted with CRM1, Ran, and the nucleoporin NUP214 in a manner fundamentally different from that of wild-type NUP98. NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10 formed characteristic aggregates within the nuclei of a myeloid cell line and primary human CD34+ cells and caused aberrant localization of CRM1 to these aggregates. These NUP98 fusions caused nuclear accumulation of two transcription factors, NFAT and NFkappaB, that are regulated by CRM1-mediated export. The nuclear entrapment of NFAT and NFkappaB correlated with enhanced transcription from promoters responsive to these transcription factors. Taken together, the results suggest a new mechanism by which NUP98 fusions dysregulate transcription and cause leukemia, namely, inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export with aberrant nuclear retention of transcriptional regulators.

  18. Fusion-related work at the Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksson, H.; Mompean, F.J.; Kodeli, I.

    2007-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank is part of an international network of data centres in charge of the compilation and dissemination of basic nuclear reaction data. Through its activities in the reaction data field, the NEA participates in the preparation of data for the modelling of future nuclear facility concepts and the development of reactor installations. A working party at the NEA on international nuclear data evaluation cooperation (WPEC) is established to promote the exchange of nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations and validation. WPEC provides a framework for co-operative activities, such as the high priority request list for experimental data of special interest for certain applications, such as IFMIF or ITER. The NEA Data Bank administrates the collection and validation as well as the distribution of the Joint Evaluated Fusion and Fission (JEFF) library, where the activities in the European Fusion and Activation File projects (EFF and EAF respectively) play an important role for new data evaluations. The topics cover verification of activation and transport data, calculation methods and validation via integral experiments. The EFF project brings together all available expertise in Europe related to the nuclear data requirements of existing and future fusion devices, and the project contributed greatly to the internationally recognised nuclear data library JEFF-3.1, released in May 2005. The NEA also provides tools for the EFF project, such as computer codes for nuclear energy and radiation physics applications. Of special interest for fusion applications are the integral experiments collected in the Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive Database (SINBAD) database. SINBAD is an internationally established set of radiation shielding and dosimetry data containing over 80 experiments relevant for reactor and accelerator shielding. About 30 of these experiments are dedicated to fusion blanket neutronics. Materials

  19. ER-associated SNAREs and Sey1p mediate nuclear fusion at two distinct steps during yeast mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jason V; Arlow, Tim; Inkellis, Elizabeth R; Koo, Timothy S; Rose, Mark D

    2013-12-01

    During yeast mating, two haploid nuclei fuse membranes to form a single diploid nucleus. However, the known proteins required for nuclear fusion are unlikely to function as direct fusogens (i.e., they are unlikely to directly catalyze lipid bilayer fusion) based on their predicted structure and localization. Therefore we screened known fusogens from vesicle trafficking (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors [SNAREs]) and homotypic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fusion (Sey1p) for additional roles in nuclear fusion. Here we demonstrate that the ER-localized SNAREs Sec20p, Ufe1p, Use1p, and Bos1p are required for efficient nuclear fusion. In contrast, Sey1p is required indirectly for nuclear fusion; sey1Δ zygotes accumulate ER at the zone of cell fusion, causing a block in nuclear congression. However, double mutants of Sey1p and Sec20p, Ufe1p, or Use1p, but not Bos1p, display extreme ER morphology defects, worse than either single mutant, suggesting that retrograde SNAREs fuse ER in the absence of Sey1p. Together these data demonstrate that SNAREs mediate nuclear fusion, ER fusion after cell fusion is necessary to complete nuclear congression, and there exists a SNARE-mediated, Sey1p-independent ER fusion pathway.

  20. Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naraghi, M.

    1976-01-01

    It is proposed that Iran as a world's potential supplier of fossile fuel should participate in fusion research and gain experience in this new field. Fusion, as an ultimate source of energy in future, and the problems concerned with the fusion reactors are reviewed. Furthermore; plasma heating, magnetic and inertial confinement in a fusion reactor are discussed. A brief description of tokamak, theta pinch and magnetic mirror reactors is also included

  1. Optimal usage of computing grid network in the fields of nuclear fusion computing task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenev, D.

    2006-01-01

    Nowadays the nuclear power becomes the main source of energy. To make its usage more efficient, the scientists created complicated simulation models, which require powerful computers. The grid computing is the answer to powerful and accessible computing resources. The article observes, and estimates the optimal configuration of the grid environment in the fields of the complicated nuclear fusion computing tasks. (author)

  2. Above-barrier enhancement of fusion in the He-6+Bi-209 nuclear reaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Penionzhkevich, Y. E.; Muzychka, YA.; Lukyanov, S. M.; Kalpakchieva, R.; Skobelev, N. K.; Perelygin, V. P.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Mikhailov, L. V.; Ugryumov, V. Yu.; Vincour, Jiří; Dlouhý, Zdeněk; Kostov, L.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Poroshin, NO.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 9 (2002), s. 1563-1568 ISSN 1063-7788 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048102 Keywords : nuclear * reaction * fusion * barrier Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.533, year: 2002

  3. Fusion option to dispose of spent nuclear fuel and transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The fusion option is examined to solve the disposition problems of the spent nuclear fuel and the transuranic elements. The analysis of this report shows that the top rated solution, the elimination of the transuranic elements and the long-lived fission products, can be achieved in a fusion reactor. A 167 MW of fusion power from a D-T plasma for sixty years with an availability factor of 0.75 can transmute all the transuranic elements and the long-lived fission products of the 70,000 tons of the US inventory of spent nuclear fuel generated up to the year 2015. The operating time can be reduced to thirty years with use of 334 MW of fusion power, a system study is needed to define the optimum time. In addition, the fusion solution eliminates the need for a geological repository site, which is a major advantage. Meanwhile, such utilization of the fusion power will provide an excellent opportunity to develop fusion energy for the future. Fusion blankets with a liquid carrier for the transuranic elements can achieve a transmutation rate for the transuranic elements up to 80 kg/MW.y of fusion power with k eff of 0.98. In addition, the liquid blankets have several advantages relative to the other blanket options. The energy from this transmutation is utilized to produce revenue for the system. Molten salt (Flibe) and lithium-lead eutectic are identified as the most promising liquids for this application, both materials are under development for future fusion blanket concepts. The Flibe molten salt with transuranic elements was developed and used successfully as nuclear fuel for the molten salt breeder reactor in the 1960's

  4. Cell fusion through a microslit between adhered cells and observation of their nuclear behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Ken-Ichi; Hosokawa, Kazuo; Kondo, Eitaro; Ito, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Mizuo

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes a novel cell fusion method which induces cell fusion between adhered cells through a microslit for preventing nuclear mixing. For this purpose, a microfluidic device which had ∼ 100 cell pairing structures (CPSs) making cell pairs through microslits with 2.1 ± 0.3 µm width was fabricated. After trapping NIH3T3 cells with hydrodynamic forces at the CPSs, the cells were fused through the microslit by the Sendai virus envelope method. With following timelapse observation, we discovered that the spread cells were much less susceptible to nuclear migration passing through the microslit compared with round cells, and that cytoplasmic fraction containing mitochondria was transferred through the microslit without nuclear mixing. These findings will provide an effective method for cell fusion without nuclear mixing, and will lead to an efficient method for reprograming and transdifferentiation of target cells toward regenerative medicine. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Studies on nuclear fusion energy potential based on a long-term world energy and environment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokimatsu, K.; Fujino, J.; Asaoka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates introduction conditions and potential of nuclear fusion energy as energy supply and CO 2 mitigation technologies in the 21st century. Time horizon of the 21st century, 10 regionally allocated world energy/environment model (Linearized Dynamic New Earth 21) is used for this study. Following nuclear fusion technological data are taken into consideration: cost of electricity (COE) in nuclear fusion introduction year, annual COE reduction rates, regional introduction year, and maximum regional plant capacity constraints by maximum plant construction speed. We made simulation under a constraint of atmospheric CO 2 concentration of 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv) targeted at year 2100, assuming that sequestration technologies and unknown innovative technologies for CO 2 reduction are available. The results indicate that under the 550ppm scenario with nuclear fusion within maximum construction speed, 66mill/kWh is required for introducing nuclear fusion in 2050, 92 mill/kWh in 2060, and 106 mill/kWh in 2070. Therefore, tokamak type nuclear fusion reactors of present several reactor cost estimates are expected to be introduced between 2060 and 2070, and electricity generation fraction by nuclear fusion will go around 20% in 2100 if nuclear fusion energy growth is limited only by the maximum construction speed. CO 2 reduction by nuclear fusion introduced in 2050 from business-as-usual (BAU) scenario without nuclear fusion is about 20% of total reduction amount in 2100. In conclusion, nuclear fusion energy is revealed to be one of the candidates of energy supply technologies and CO 2 mitigation technologies. Cost competitiveness and removal of capacity constraint factors are desired for use of nuclear fusion energy in a large scale. (author)

  6. Nuclear fusion project. Semi-annual report of the Association KfK/EURATOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    Nuclear fusion is one of the main activities of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center (KfK). It is organized as a project under the Directorate of Reactor Development and Safety. The work of KfK concentrates on technology aspects of nuclear fusion with magnetic confinement. It is part of the European Fusion Programme where KfK participates as an association to EURATOM. Close links have been established to the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP). In the Entwicklungsgemeinschaft Kernfusion KfK and IPP cooperate for the development of future fusion experiments joining the experience gained in plasma physics (IPP) and materials, safety, and nuclear technology (KfK), respectively. As in the present strategy of the European Fusion Programme the Next European Tokamak (NET) is foreseen as the major next step, most of the activities of KfK address this subject. In addition to the contributions to NET, studies are carried out to innovate INTOR, the worldwide cooperation for an experimental reactor under the auspices of IAEA. Furthermore, the Entwicklungsgemeinschaft Kernfusion has evaluated the feasibility of a fusion reactor with a stellarator confinement. (orig./GG)

  7. Controlled Nuclear Fusion by Magnetic Confinement and ITER

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit; Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2005-01-01

    For may years harnessing fusion energy was considered the final solution to the world's energy crisis. ITER is the last step in the elusive quest. This presentation will provide in its various acientific, technological and political aspects.

  8. Introduction to the controlled nuclear fusion (magnetic containment systems)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, J.A.; Guasp, J.; Martin, R.

    1975-01-01

    The magnetic containment systems, their more important features, and their potentiality to became thermonuclear reactors is described. The work is based upon the first part of a set of lectures dedicated to Plasma and Fusion Physics. (author)

  9. X-Pinch Plasma Generation Testing for Neutron Source Development and Nuclear Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam A.Gabbar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear fusion is a sought-out technology in which two light elements are fused together to create a heavier element and releases energy. Two primary nuclear fusion technologies are being researched today: magnetic and inertial confinement. However, a new type of nuclear fusion technology is currently being research: multi-pinch plasma beams. At the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, there is research on multi-pinch plasma beam technology as an alternative to nuclear fusion. The objective is to intersect two plasma arcs at the center of the chamber. This is a precursor of nuclear fusion using multi-pinch. The innovation portion of the students’ work is the miniaturization of this concept using high energy electrical DC pulses. The experiment achieved the temperature of 2300 K at the intersection. In comparison to the simulation data, the temperature from the simulation is 7000 K at the intersection. Additionally, energy harvesting devices, both photovoltaics and a thermoelectric generator, were placed in the chamber to observe the viable energy extraction.

  10. Intense deuterium nuclear fusion of pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally within highly deuterated atom clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshiaki, A; Zhang, Y C

    2002-01-01

    Embedded nano-Pd particles of 5 nm in size instantly abundant D-atoms more than 250% in the atomic ratio against Pd-atoms at room temperature when they are kept in D sub 2 gas pressurized to less than 10 atm. In such ultrahigh densities, 2-4 D-atoms can be coagulated inside each octahedral space of Pd lattice (pycnodeuterium-lump). When a stimulation energy such as latticequake causing by ultrasonic wave was supplied to those highly deuterated Pd particles, intense deuterium nuclear fusion (''solid fusion'') was generated there and both excess heat and sup 4 He gas were abundantly produced. Naturally, these facts can not be realized at all in bulk Pd. The results show that the nuclear fusion occurs without any hazardous rays in pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally inside the each cell of the host metal lattice. These unit cells correspond to minimum unit of the solid fusion reactor as a ''Lattice Reactor''. (author)

  11. Study of fusion mechanism of halo nuclear 11Be+208Pb by applying QMD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ning; Li Zhuxia

    2001-01-01

    The authors have studied the fusion reaction for 11 Be + 208 Pb near barrier by applying QMD model, and find that in t he fusion reaction induced by halo nuclei there simultaneously exist two mechanisms competing with each other. On one hand, 11 Be is a weakly bound nuclear system and is easily broke up caused by the interaction with target, when it approaches to target, so the fusion cross section is suppressed. On the other hand, several neutrons of 11 Be transfer into 208 Pb and interact with 208 Pb to cause the local radius of 208 Pb increase and result in an enhancement of fusion cross section. The fusion cross sections calculated show an enhancement near barrier, and the calculated results agree with the experimental data reasonably well

  12. Conservation of proteo-lipid nuclear membrane fusion machinery during early embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Richard D; Veeriah, Selvaraju; Applebee, Christopher J; Larijani, Banafshé

    2014-01-01

    The fusogenic lipid diacylglycerol is essential for remodeling gamete and zygote nuclear envelopes (NE) during early embryogenesis. It is unclear whether upstream signaling molecules are likewise conserved. Here we demonstrate PLCγ and its activator SFK1, which co-operate during male pronuclear envelope formation, also promote the subsequent male and female pronuclear fusion. PLCγ and SFK1 interact directly at the fusion site leading to PLCγ activation. This is accompanied by a spatially restricted reduction of PtdIns(4,5)P2. Consequently, pronuclear fusion is blocked by PLCγ or SFK1 inhibition. These findings identify new regulators of events in the early embryo and suggest a conserved "toolkit" of fusion machinery drives successive NE fusion events during embryogenesis.

  13. Argonne National Laboratory contributions to the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    A total of sixteen papers with authors from Argonne National Laboratory were presented at the First International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT), held in Tokyo, Japan, in April 1988. The papers cover the results of recent investigations in blanket design and analysis, fusion neutronics, materials experiments in liquid metal corrosion and solid breeders, tritium recovery analysis, experiments and analysis for liquid metal MHD, reactor safety and economic analysis, and transient electromagnetic analysis.

  14. Argonne National Laboratory contributions to the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    A total of sixteen papers with authors from Argonne National Laboratory were presented at the First International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT), held in Tokyo, Japan, in April 1988. The papers cover the results of recent investigations in blanket design and analysis, fusion neutronics, materials experiments in liquid metal corrosion and solid breeders, tritium recovery analysis, experiments and analysis for liquid metal MHD, reactor safety and economic analysis, and transient electromagnetic analysis

  15. Nuclear fusion and fission, and related technologies department: 2007 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-12-01

    ENEA continues to contribute to broadening plasma physics knowledge as well as to developing the relevant technologies in the framework of the EURATOM-ENEA Association for fusion. This report describes the 2007 research activities carried out by the ENEA Fusion Research Group of the Nuclear Fusion and Fission, and Related Technologies Department (FPN). Other ENEA research groups also contributed to the activities. The following fields were addressed: magnetically confined nuclear fusion (physics and technology), superconductivity and inertial fusion. Planning of the 2007 fusion activities took into account the different scenarios determined by the new organisation of the European programme based on the start of ITER construction. The establishment of the ITER International Organisation and the European Domestic Agency (Fusion for Energy) required a new organisational scheme. This has implied not only the implementation of a more project oriented structure but also the need to launch the constitution of a consortium agreement between the Associations in order to cope with the needs for the design and construction of the components of ITER that require specific know-how, e.g., diagnostics and test blanket module

  16. Final Technical Report for "Nuclear Technologies for Near Term Fusion Devices"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Paul P.H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sawan, Mohamed E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Davis, Andrew [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Bohm, Tim D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-09-05

    Over approximately 18 years, this project evolved to focus on a number of related topics, all tied to the nuclear analysis of fusion energy systems. For the earliest years, the University of Wisconsin (UW)’s effort was in support of the Advanced Power Extraction (APEX) study to investigate high power density first wall and blanket systems. A variety of design concepts were studied before this study gave way to a design effort for a US Test Blanket Module (TBM) to be installed in ITER. Simultaneous to this TBM project, nuclear analysis supported the conceptual design of a number of fusion nuclear science facilities that might fill a role in the path to fusion energy. Beginning in approximately 2005, this project added a component focused on the development of novel radiation transport software capability in support of the above nuclear analysis needs. Specifically, a clear need was identified to support neutron and photon transport on the complex geometries associated with Computer-Aided Design (CAD). Following the initial development of the Direct Accelerated Geoemtry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) capability, additional features were added, including unstructured mesh tallies and multi-physics analysis such as the Rigorous 2-Step (R2S) methodology for Shutdown Dose Rate (SDR) prediction. Throughout the project, there were also smaller tasks in support of the fusion materials community and for the testing of changes to the nuclear data that is fundamental to this kind of nuclear analysis.

  17. Evaluation of economical introduction of nuclear fusion based on a long-term world energy and environment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokimatsu, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Okano, K.; Konishi, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Yamaji, K.

    2003-01-01

    Debates about whether or not to invest heavily in nuclear fusion as a future innovative energy option have been made within the context of energy technology development strategies. The time frame by which nuclear fusion could become competitive in the energy market has not been adequately studied, nor has roles of the nuclear fusion in energy systems and the environment. The present study has two objectives. One is to reveal the conditions under which nuclear fusion could be introduced economically (hereafter, we refer to such introductory conditions as breakeven prices) in future energy systems. The other objective is to evaluate the future roles of nuclear fusion in energy systems and in the environment. Here we chose two roles that nuclear fusion will take on when breakeven prices are achieved: i) reduction of annual global total energy systems cost, and ii) mitigation of carbon tax (shadow price of carbon) under CO 2 constraints. Future uncertainties are key issues in evaluating nuclear fusion. Here we treated the following uncertainties: energy demand scenarios, introduction time frame for nuclear fusion, capacity projections of nuclear fusion, CO 2 target in 2100. From our investigations, we conclude that the presently designed nuclear fusion reactors may be ready for economical introduction into energy systems beginning around 2050-2060, and we can confirm that the favorable introduction of the reactors would reduce both the annual energy systems cost and the carbon tax (the shadow price of carbon) under a CO 2 concentration constraint; however, latter introduction of them decreases the cost and the tax less than five times. Earlier introduction of nuclear fusion reactors are desirable for energy systems and environment. (author)

  18. Kar5p is required for multiple functions in both inner and outer nuclear envelope fusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jason V; Rose, Mark D

    2014-12-02

    During mating in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two haploid nuclei fuse via two sequential membrane fusion steps. SNAREs (i.e., soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) and Prm3p mediate outer nuclear membrane fusion, but the inner membrane fusogen remains unknown. Kar5p is a highly conserved transmembrane protein that localizes adjacent to the spindle pole body (SPB), mediates nuclear envelope fusion, and recruits Prm3p adjacent to the SPB. To separate Kar5p's functions, we tested localization, Prm3p recruitment, and nuclear fusion efficiency in various kar5 mutants. All domains and the conserved cysteine residues were essential for nuclear fusion. Several kar5 mutant proteins localized properly but did not mediate Prm3p recruitment; other kar5 mutant proteins localized and recruited Prm3p but were nevertheless defective for nuclear fusion, demonstrating additional functions beyond Prm3p recruitment. We identified one Kar5p domain required for SPB localization, which is dependent on the half-bridge protein Mps3p. Electron microscopy revealed a kar5 mutant that arrests with expanded nuclear envelope bridges, suggesting that Kar5p is required after outer nuclear envelope fusion. Finally, a split-GFP assay demonstrated that Kar5p localizes to both the inner and outer nuclear envelope. These insights suggest a mechanism by which Kar5p mediates inner nuclear membrane fusion. Copyright © 2015 Rogers and Rose.

  19. Accelerator driven systems for energy production and waste incineration: Physics, design and related nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, M.; Stanculescu, A.; Paver, N.

    2003-01-01

    This volume contains the notes of lectures given at the workshops 'Hybrid Nuclear Systems for Energy Production, Utilisation of Actinides and Transmutation of Long-lived Radioactive Waste' and 'Nuclear Data for Science and Technology: Accelerator Driven Waste Incineration', held at the Abdus Salam ICTP in September 2001. The subject of the first workshop was focused on the so-called Accelerator Driven Systems, and covered the most important physics and technological aspects of this innovative field. The second workshop was devoted to an exhaustive survey on the acquisition, evaluation, retrieval and validation of the nuclear data relevant to the design of Accelerator Driven Systems

  20. An effect of nuclear electric quadrupole moments in thermonuclear fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, B. R.; Srnka, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration of the nuclear electric quadrupole terms in the expression for the fusion Coulomb barrier suggests that this electrostatic barrier may be substantially modified from that calculated under the usual plasma assumption that the nuclei are electric monopoles. This effect is a result of the nonspherical potential shape and the spatial quantization of the nuclear spins of the fully stripped ions in the presence of a magnetic field. For monopole-quadrupole fuel cycles like p-B-11, the fusion cross-section may be substantially increased at low energies if the protons are injected at a small angle relative to the confining magnetic field.

  1. The international thermonuclear experimental reactor and the future of nuclear fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Chuanhong

    2010-01-01

    Energy shortage and environmental problems are now the two largest challenges for human beings. Magnetic confinement nuclear fusion, which has achieved great progress since the 1990's, is anticipated to be a way to realize an ideal source of energy in the future because of its abundance, environmental compatibility, and zero carbon release. Exemplified by the construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the development of nuclear fusion energy is now in its engineering phase, and should be realized by the middle of this century if all objectives of the ITER project are met. (author)

  2. Waste management strategy for nuclear fusion power systems from a regulatory perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1977-12-06

    A waste management strategy for future nuclear fusion power systems is developed using existing regulatory methodology. The first step is the development of a reference fuel cycle. Next, the waste streams from such a facility are identified. Then a waste management system is defined to safely handle and dispose of these wastes. The future regulator must identify the decisions necessary to establish waste management performance criteria. The data base and methodologies necessary to make these decisions must then be developed. Safe management of nuclear fusion wastes is not only a technological challenge, but encompasses significant social, political, and ethical questions as well.

  3. Waste management strategy for nuclear fusion power systems from a regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    A waste management strategy for future nuclear fusion power systems is developed using existing regulatory methodology. The first step is the development of a reference fuel cycle. Next, the waste streams from such a facility are identified. Then a waste management system is defined to safely handle and dispose of these wastes. The future regulator must identify the decisions necessary to establish waste management performance criteria. The data base and methodologies necessary to make these decisions must then be developed. Safe management of nuclear fusion wastes is not only a technological challenge, but encompasses significant social, political, and ethical questions as well

  4. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research 1990. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Volume 2 of the Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Research contains papers in two sessions: the first part, on Magnetic Confinement Theory and Modelling, was presented in session D at the conference; the second part, on Non-Tokamak Confinement Systems, was given in session C of the conference. Abstracts accompany each paper. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Study of 9 Be + 29 Si system nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Figueira, M.C. da.

    1991-01-01

    Fusion cross sections for the 9 Be + 29 Si system have been measured in the energy range between 17 and 38 MeV (lab) by detecting the evaporation residues with the time of flight technique. Angular distributions have been measured from 7.5 0 C to 35 0 C in the laboratory frame at E( 9 Be) = 26 and 38 MeV. The measured fusion cross sections are significantly smaller than the total reaction cross sections obtained from fits to the elastic scattering data in the same energy range. Comparison with existing data for compound systems with A= 38 shows that this effect can not be understood in terms of the statistical yrast line of the formed compound nucleus. A systematic analysis of the energy dependence of the ratio between the fusion cross section and the total reaction cross section, for the system 9 Be + 29 Si and many other available in the literature has been performed. The saturation value can be associated to the nucleon or cluster separation energy of the light nuclei participant in the collision, leading to an hindrance of the fusion cross section. (author)

  6. Nuclear-fusion research. To bring the sun on the earh; Kernfusionsforschung. Die Sonne auf die Erde holen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zohm, Hartmut

    2009-07-01

    The course treats first the foundations of nuclear fusion. In the second part the concepts for the realization of nuclear fusion in the laboratory are described. Finally in the last part a survey on the present status of the research as well an outlook on future work is given.

  7. Role and use of nuclear theories and models in practical evaluation of neutron nuclear data needed for fission and fusion reactor design and other nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, A.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the various nuclear models used in the evaluation of neutron nuclear data for fission and fusion reactors is presented. Computer codes embodying the principles of the relevant nuclear models are compared with each other and with experimental data. The regions of validity and limitations of the conceptual formalisms are also included, along with the effects of the numerical procedures used in the codes themselves. Conclusions and recommendations for future demands are outlined.15 tables, 15 figures, 90 references

  8. Apparatus and method for extracting power from energetic ions produced in nuclear fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Rax, Jean M.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method of extracting power from energetic ions produced by nuclear fusion in a toroidal plasma to enhance respectively the toroidal plasma current and fusion reactivity. By injecting waves of predetermined frequency and phase traveling substantially in a selected poloidal direction within the plasma, the energetic ions become diffused in energy and space such that the energetic ions lose energy and amplify the waves. The amplified waves are further adapted to travel substantially in a selected toroidal direction to increase preferentially the energy of electrons traveling in one toroidal direction which, in turn, enhances or generates a toroidal plasma current. In an further adaptation, the amplified waves can be made to preferentially increase the energy of fuel ions within the plasma to enhance the fusion reactivity of the fuel ions. The described direct, or in situ, conversion of the energetic ion energy provides an efficient and economical means of delivering power to a fusion reactor.

  9. ITER: the Sun rises over nuclear fusion with West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacco, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The ITER project is considered as a critical step on the way to commercial production of electricity by a thermonuclear reactor based on controlled fusion. This project notably requires the development of a divertor which is the objective of the West project which will use the famous Cadarache superconductive magnet reactor, Tore Supra. After having outlined the future lack of fossil energies at the world scale, presented the operation principles of tokamaks and recalled some results obtained in their development, this article justifies the use of superconductive magnets. It presents the ITER project as a step in the production of thermonuclear electricity. ITER will be in fact a proof that such plants can be realised, and it should be followed by Demo, a demonstration power plant, by 2050. The article presents the West project, a test bench for ITER, which introduced modifications in the Tore Supra reactor to create conditions almost similar to that existing at the surface of the Sun. It notably comprises a divertor made of tungsten for the fusion with tritium. It finally outlines that the fusion will be a hot one, not a cold one

  10. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research Vol. I. Proceedings of a Symposium on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Research on controlled nuclear fusion was first disclosed at the Second United Nations Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, held at Geneva in 1958. From the information given, it was evident that a better understanding of the behaviour of hot dense plasmas was needed before the goal of economic energy release from nuclear fusion could be reached. The fact that research since then has been most complex and costly has enhanced the desirability of international co-operation and exchange of information and experience. Having organized its First Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research at Salzburg in 1961, the International Atomic Energy Agency again provided the means for such cooperation in organizing its Second Conference on this subject on 6-10 September, 1965, at Culham, Abingdon, Berks, England. The meeting was arranged with the generous help of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority at their Culham Laboratory, where the facilities and assistance of the staff were greatly appreciated. At the meeting, which was attended by 268 participants from 26 member states and three international organizations, significant results from many experiments, including those from the new and larger machines, became available. It has now become feasible to intercorrelate data obtained from a number of similar machines; this has led to a more complete understanding of plasma behaviour. No breakthrough was reported nor had been expected towards the economical release of the energy from fusion, but there was increased understanding of the problems of production, control and containment of high-density and high-temperature plasmas.

  11. Nuclear fusion. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research, development, and assessment of nuclear fusion for applications in reactor engineering and technology. Citations discuss various engineering problems associated with reactor design, magnetic systems, nuclear materials, plasma generation and control, blankets, environments, economics, and safety. Also discussed are tokamak devices, stellarators, inertial confinement, reflectometry, and magnetohydrodynamics. Studies sponsored by the Department of Energy are not included. (Contains a minimum of 249 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Hybrid fusion reactor for production of nuclear fuel with minimum radioactive contamination of the fuel cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikhov, E. P.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Azizov, E. A.; Ignatiev, V. V.; Subbotin, S. A.; Tsibulskiy, V. F.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the results of the system research on the coordinated development of nuclear and fusion power engineering in the current century. Considering the increasing problems of resource procurement, including limited natural uranium resources, it seems reasonable to use fusion reactors as high-power neutron sources for production of nuclear fuel in a blanket. It is shown that the share of fusion sources in this structural configuration of the energy system can be relatively small. A fundamentally important aspect of this solution to the problem of closure of the fuel cycle is that recycling of highly active spent fuel can be abandoned. Radioactivity released during the recycling of the spent fuel from the hybrid reactor blanket is at least two orders of magnitude lower than during the production of the same number of fissile isotopes after the recycling of the spent fuel from a fast reactor.

  13. Realizing "2001: A Space Odyssey": Piloted Spherical Torus Nuclear Fusion Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Craig H.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Juhasz, Albert J.

    2005-01-01

    A conceptual vehicle design enabling fast, piloted outer solar system travel was created predicated on a small aspect ratio spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor. The initial requirements were satisfied by the vehicle concept, which could deliver a 172 mt crew payload from Earth to Jupiter rendezvous in 118 days, with an initial mass in low Earth orbit of 1,690 mt. Engineering conceptual design, analysis, and assessment was performed on all major systems including artificial gravity payload, central truss, nuclear fusion reactor, power conversion, magnetic nozzle, fast wave plasma heating, tankage, fuel pellet injector, startup/re-start fission reactor and battery bank, refrigeration, reaction control, communications, mission design, and space operations. Detailed fusion reactor design included analysis of plasma characteristics, power balance/utilization, first wall, toroidal field coils, heat transfer, and neutron/x-ray radiation. Technical comparisons are made between the vehicle concept and the interplanetary spacecraft depicted in the motion picture 2001: A Space Odyssey.

  14. Color-coded Live Imaging of Heterokaryon Formation and Nuclear Fusion of Hybridizing Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Takuro; Hasegawa, Kosuke; Nakamura, Miki; Kunisada, Takahiro; Shimizu, Masahito; Saji, Shigetoyo; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-08-01

    Fusion of cancer cells has been studied for over half a century. However, the steps involved after initial fusion between cells, such as heterokaryon formation and nuclear fusion, have been difficult to observe in real time. In order to be able to visualize these steps, we have established cancer-cell sublines from the human HT-1080 fibrosarcoma, one expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) linked to histone H2B in the nucleus and a red fluorescent protein (RFP) in the cytoplasm and the other subline expressing RFP in the nucleus (mCherry) linked to histone H2B and GFP in the cytoplasm. The two reciprocal color-coded sublines of HT-1080 cells were fused using the Sendai virus. The fused cells were cultured on plastic and observed using an Olympus FV1000 confocal microscope. Multi-nucleate (heterokaryotic) cancer cells, in addition to hybrid cancer cells with single-or multiple-fused nuclei, including fused mitotic nuclei, were observed among the fused cells. Heterokaryons with red, green, orange and yellow nuclei were observed by confocal imaging, even in single hybrid cells. The orange and yellow nuclei indicate nuclear fusion. Red and green nuclei remained unfused. Cell fusion with heterokaryon formation and subsequent nuclear fusion resulting in hybridization may be an important natural phenomenon between cancer cells that may make them more malignant. The ability to image the complex processes following cell fusion using reciprocal color-coded cancer cells will allow greater understanding of the genetic basis of malignancy. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. Concept of an Accelerator-Driven Advanced Nuclear Energy System

    OpenAIRE

    Xuesong Yan; Lei Yang; Xunchao Zhang; Wenlong Zhan

    2017-01-01

    The utilization of clean energy is a matter of primary importance for sustainable development as well as a vital approach for solving worldwide energy-related issues. If the low utilization rate of nuclear fuel, nuclear proliferation, and insufficient nuclear safety can be solved, nuclear fission energy could be used as a sustainable and low-carbon clean energy form for thousands of years, providing steady and base-load electrical resources. To address these challenges, we propose an accelera...

  16. Nuclear data requirements for accelerator driven sub-critical systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    available data sources from the IAEA, published literature and CERN publications on energy amplifier and perspectives based upon India's work on nuclear data [1–. 3] in our attempt to present a bird's eye view of the nuclear data needs of the. ADSS in the Indian context. The improvement of basic nuclear data is part of the.

  17. The Fukushima nuclear disaster and its effects on media framing of fission and fusion energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Luisa; Horta, Ana; Pereira, Sergio; Delicado, Ana [Institute of Social Sciences of the University of Lisbon, Av. Prof. Anibal de Bettencourt, 9 1600-189 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents results of a comparison of media coverage of fusion and fission energy technologies in three countries (Germany, Spain and Portugal) and in the English language international print media addressing transnational elite, from 2008 to 2012. The analysis showed that the accident in Fukushima in March 2010 did not have significant impact on media framing of nuclear fusion in the major part of print media under investigation. In fact, fusion is clearly dissociated from traditional nuclear (fission) energy and from nuclear accidents. It tends to be portrayed as a safe, clean and unlimited source of energy, although less credited when confronted with research costs, technological feasibility and the possibility to be achieved in a reasonable period of time. On the contrary, fission is portrayed as a hazardous source of energy, expensive when compared to research costs of renewables, hardly a long-term energy option, susceptible to contribute to the proliferation of nuclear weapons or rogue military use. Fukushima accident was consistently discussed in the context of safety problems of nuclear power plants and in many cases appeared not as an isolated event but rather as a reminder of previous nuclear disasters such as Three Miles Island and Chernobyl. (authors)

  18. The Fukushima nuclear disaster and its effects on media framing of fission and fusion energy technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Luisa; Horta, Ana; Pereira, Sergio; Delicado, Ana

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of a comparison of media coverage of fusion and fission energy technologies in three countries (Germany, Spain and Portugal) and in the English language international print media addressing transnational elite, from 2008 to 2012. The analysis showed that the accident in Fukushima in March 2010 did not have significant impact on media framing of nuclear fusion in the major part of print media under investigation. In fact, fusion is clearly dissociated from traditional nuclear (fission) energy and from nuclear accidents. It tends to be portrayed as a safe, clean and unlimited source of energy, although less credited when confronted with research costs, technological feasibility and the possibility to be achieved in a reasonable period of time. On the contrary, fission is portrayed as a hazardous source of energy, expensive when compared to research costs of renewables, hardly a long-term energy option, susceptible to contribute to the proliferation of nuclear weapons or rogue military use. Fukushima accident was consistently discussed in the context of safety problems of nuclear power plants and in many cases appeared not as an isolated event but rather as a reminder of previous nuclear disasters such as Three Miles Island and Chernobyl. (authors)

  19. Recent progress in research on tungsten materials for nuclear fusion applications in Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rieth, M.; Dudarev, S.L.; Gonzalez de Vicente, S.M.; Aktaa, J.; Ahlgren, T.; Antusch, S.; Armstrong, D.E.J.; Balden, M.; Baluc, N.; Barthe, M.-F.; Basuki, W.W.; Battabyal, M.; Becquart, C.S.; Blagoeva, N.; Boldyryeva, Hanna; Brinkmann, J.; Celino, M.; Ciupinski, L.; Correia, J.B.; De Backer, A.; Domain, C.; Gaganidze, E.; García-Rosales, C.; Gibson, J.; Gilbert, M.R.; Giusepponi, S.; Gludovatz, B.; Greuner, H.; Heinola, K.; Höschen, T.; Hoffmann, A.; Holstein, A.; Koch, F.; Krauss, W.; Li, H.; Lindig, S.; Linke, J.; Linsmeier, Ch.; López-Ruiz, P.; Maier, H.; Matějíček, Jiří; Mishra, T.P.; Muhammed, M.; Muñoz, A.; Muzyk, M.; Nordlund, K.; Nguyen-Manh, D.; Opschoor, J.; Ordás, N.; Palacios, Y.; Pintsuk, G.; Pippan, R.; Reiser, J.; Riesch, J.; Roberts, S. G.; Romaner, L.; Rosiński, M.; Sanchez, M.; Schulmeyer, W.; Traxler, H.; Ureña, G.; van der Laan, J.G.; Veleva, L.; Wahlberg, S.; Walter, M.; Weber, T.; Weitkamp, T.; Wurster, S.; Yar, M.A.; You, J.H.; Zivelonghi, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 432, 1-3 (2013), s. 482-500 ISSN 0022-3115 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tungsten * joining * composites * graded materials * fusion materials Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics Impact factor: 2.016, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022311512004278

  20. 1991 US-Japan workshop on Nuclear Fusion in Dense Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, S.; Tajima, T.

    1991-10-01

    The scientific areas covered at the Workshop may be classified into the following subfields: (1) basic theory of dense plasma physics and its interface with atomic physics and nuclear physics; (2) physics of dense z-pinches, ICF plasmas etc; (3) stellar interior plasmas; (4) cold fusion; and (5) other dense plasmas

  1. Preparation of processed nuclear data libraries for thermal, fast and fusion research and power reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, S.

    1994-03-01

    A Consultants Meeting on ''Preparation of Processed Nuclear Data Libraries for Thermal, Fast and Fusion Research and Power Reactor Applications'' was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency and held during December 13-16, 1993 December 8-10, 1993 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna. The detailed agenda, the complete list of participants and the recommendations are presented in this report. (author)

  2. 1991 US-Japan workshop on Nuclear Fusion in Dense Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, S. (ed.) (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics); Tajima, T. (ed.) (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies)

    1991-10-01

    The scientific areas covered at the Workshop may be classified into the following subfields: (1) basic theory of dense plasma physics and its interface with atomic physics and nuclear physics; (2) physics of dense z-pinches, ICF plasmas etc; (3) stellar interior plasmas; (4) cold fusion; and (5) other dense plasmas.

  3. 1991 US-Japan workshop on Nuclear Fusion in Dense Plasmas. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, S. [ed.] [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Tajima, T. [ed.] [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1991-10-01

    The scientific areas covered at the Workshop may be classified into the following subfields: (1) basic theory of dense plasma physics and its interface with atomic physics and nuclear physics; (2) physics of dense z-pinches, ICF plasmas etc; (3) stellar interior plasmas; (4) cold fusion; and (5) other dense plasmas.

  4. Influence of hexadecapole deformations of the nuclear shape of subbarrier fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Niello, J.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic study of the contribution of hexadecapole deformations to the enhancement of subbarrier fusion cross reactions is carried out. The analysis is based on calculations that cover the full range of values of hexadecapole deformations found in actual nuclear systems. The interplay of this shape degree of freedom with the presence of prolate quadrupole deformations is also contemplated. (Author) [es

  5. Historical evolution of nuclear energy systems development and related activities in JAERI. Fission, fusion, accelerator utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tone, Tatsuzo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Overview of the historical evolution of nuclear energy systems development and related activities in JAERI is given in the report. This report reviews the research and development for light water reactor, fast breeder reactor, high temperature gas reactor, fusion reactor and utilization of accelerator-based neutron source. (author)

  6. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research 1994. V. 3. Proceedings of the fifteenth international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This is the third volume of the proceedings of the 15th International Atomic Energy Agency Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research held in Seville, Spain, from 26 September - 1 October 1994. Contained in it are 29 papers on inertial confinement and 46 papers on magnetic confinement. Refs, figs, tabs

  7. Research in the field of neutronics and nuclear data for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistoni, P.

    2001-01-01

    A reliable and validated nuclear database is required for the design of a fusion reactor. Neutrons produced by the fusion reactions between deuterium and tritium have a very peaked energy spectrum at 14 MeV, requiring a substantial extrapolation with respect to the database made available from fission studies. The correct evaluation of shielding properties, damage, nuclear heating and of tritium breeding performance in the blanket surrounding the reaction chamber is crucial to the correct reactor design. Moreover, the attractiveness of fusion relies in the low activation of the reactor components and in the minimal production of long-term radioactive waste that is pursued with development of low activation materials. Beside the materials development, Europe is carrying out a co-ordinated program for the development of adequate nuclear database and numerical tools, directed to evaluations, processing, application, and benchmarking of cross sections including uncertainty information. Experimental validation of data and of the relative uncertainties is also pursued, both on material samples and on more design-oriented experiments. A general view of the research work in the field of neutronics and nuclear data for fusion will be given in the presentation, with emphasis to the experimental validation activity.(author)

  8. Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  9. Nuclear data for fusion: Validation of typical pre-processing methods for radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, T.; Sublet, J.C.; Morgan, L.; Leadbeater, T.W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We quantify the effect of processing nuclear data from ENDF to ACE format. • We consider the differences between fission and fusion angular distributions. • C-nat(n,el) at 2.0 MeV has a 0.6% deviation between original and processed data. • Fe-56(n,el) at 14.1 MeV has a 11.0% deviation between original and processed data. • Processed data do not accurately depict ENDF distributions for fusion energies. - Abstract: Nuclear data form the basis of the radiation transport codes used to design and simulate the behaviour of nuclear facilities, such as the ITER and DEMO fusion reactors. Typically these data and codes are biased towards fission and high-energy physics applications yet are still applied to fusion problems. With increasing interest in fusion applications, the lack of fusion specific codes and relevant data libraries is becoming increasingly apparent. Industry standard radiation transport codes require pre-processing of the evaluated data libraries prior to use in simulation. Historically these methods focus on speed of simulation at the cost of accurate data representation. For legacy applications this has not been a major concern, but current fusion needs differ significantly. Pre-processing reconstructs the differential and double differential interaction cross sections with a coarse binned structure, or more recently as a tabulated cumulative distribution function. This work looks at the validity of applying these processing methods to data used in fusion specific calculations in comparison to fission. The relative effects of applying this pre-processing mechanism, to both fission and fusion relevant reaction channels are demonstrated, and as such the poor representation of these distributions for the fusion energy regime. For the nat C(n,el) reaction at 2.0 MeV, the binned differential cross section deviates from the original data by 0.6% on average. For the 56 Fe(n,el) reaction at 14.1 MeV, the deviation increases to 11.0%. We

  10. 1: the atom. 2: radioactivity. 3: man and radiations. 4: the energy. 5: nuclear energy: fusion and fission. 6: the operation of a nuclear reactor. 7: the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This series of 7 digest booklets present the bases of the nuclear physics and of the nuclear energy: 1 - the atom (structure of matter, chemical elements and isotopes, the four fundamental interactions, nuclear physics); 2 - radioactivity (definition, origins of radioelements, applications of radioactivity); 3 - man and radiations (radiations diversity, biological effects, radioprotection, examples of radiation applications); 4 - energy (energy states, different forms of energy, characteristics); 5 - nuclear energy: fusion and fission (nuclear energy release, thermonuclear fusion, nuclear fission and chain reaction); 6 - operation of a nuclear reactor (nuclear fission, reactor components, reactor types); 7 - nuclear fuel cycle (nuclear fuel preparation, fuel consumption, reprocessing, wastes management). (J.S.)

  11. Autophagy contributes to regulation of nuclear dynamics during vegetative growth and hyphal fusion in Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Ramos, Cristina; Roca, M Gabriela; Di Pietro, Antonio; Roncero, M Isabel G; Ruiz-Roldán, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    In the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, vegetative hyphal fusion triggers nuclear mitotic division in the invading hypha followed by migration of a nucleus into the receptor hypha and degradation of the resident nucleus. Here we examined the role of autophagy in fusion-induced nuclear degradation. A search of the F. oxysporum genome database for autophagy pathway components identified putative orthologs of 16 core autophagy-related (ATG) genes in yeast, including the ubiquitin-like protein Atg8, which is required for the formation of autophagosomal membranes. F. oxysporum Foatg8Δ mutants were generated in a strain harboring H1-cherry fluorescent protein (ChFP)-labeled nuclei to facilitate analysis of nuclear dynamics. The Foatg8Δ mutants did not show MDC-positive staining in contrast to the wild type and the FoATG8-complemented (cFoATG8) strain, suggesting that FoAtg8 is required for autophagy in F. oxysporum. The Foatg8Δ strains displayed reduced rates of hyphal growth, conidiation, and fusion, and were significantly attenuated in virulence on tomato plants and in the nonvertebrate animal host Galleria mellonella. In contrast to wild-type hyphae, which are almost exclusively composed of uninucleated hyphal compartments, the hyphae of the Foatg8Δ mutants contained a significant fraction of hyphal compartments with 2 or more nuclei. The increase in the number of nuclei per hyphal compartment was particularly evident after hyphal fusion events. Time-lapse microscopy analyses revealed abnormal mitotic patterns during vegetative growth in the Foatg8Δ mutants. Our results suggest that autophagy mediates nuclear degradation after hyphal fusion and has a general function in the control of nuclear distribution in F. oxysporum.

  12. Controlled nuclear fusion, a challenge on the engineer. Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, H.

    1978-01-01

    A very important and complex subject, on which the engineer together with the physicist must meditate very intensely, concerns the practicableness, the operation safety and the economy of the electrotechnical components and systems as are required in the actual reactor scale. There upon it depends essentially according to which plasma-physical concept - magnetic inclusion or inertia inclusion - a fusion reactor could work in the future. The blanket structure, the breeding of the tritium connected therewith and the electrotechnical problems, which are recognized at the transmission of plasma-physical concepts into actual reactor scales and at the adaptation to reactor requirements are discussed in this contribution. (orig.) 891 HP 892 AG [de

  13. To the non-local theory of cold nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, Boris V

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we revisit the cold fusion (CF) phenomenon using the generalized Bolzmann kinetics theory which can represent the non-local physics of this CF phenomenon. This approach can identify the conditions when the CF can take place as the soliton creation under the influence of the intensive sound waves. The vast mathematical modelling leads to affirmation that all parts of soliton move with the same velocity and with the small internal change of the pressure. The zone of the high density is shaped on the soliton's front. It means that the regime of the 'acoustic CF' could be realized from the position of the non-local hydrodynamics.

  14. Fusion reactivities and neutron source characteristics of beam-driven toroidal reactors with both D and T injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Towner, H.H.

    1976-01-01

    The reactor performance is considered for intensely beam-driven tokamak plasmas with 50:50 D-T composition maintained by neutral-beam injection of both D and T, together with plasma recycling. The D and T are injected with equal intensity and velocity. This mode of operation is most appropriate for high-duty-factor, high-power-density operation, in the absence of pellet injection. The isotropic velocity distributions of energetic D and T ions (for multi-angle injection) are calculated from a simple slowing-down model, but include a tail above the injection velocity. The neutron source characteristics are determined from fusion reactivities calculated for beam-target, hot-ion, and thermonuclear reactions. For conditions where Q approximates 1, beam-target reactions are dominant, although reactions among the hot ions contribute substantially to P/sub fusion/ when n/sub hot//n /sub e/ greater than or equal to 0.2

  15. Fusion energy: 'clean' nuclear power with cheap fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, H.

    1976-01-01

    Because of the world energy crisis the possible use of thermonuclear energy is exciting great interest, particularly in the United States. Of primary importance is that the fuel required is cheap and readily available - it is the world's water resources. The basic long standing fundamental problem is to produce a stable plasma; the difficulties and the reasons for them are discussed. Of the machines and methods designed to overcome the problem, to date the Russian-developed Tokamak appears the most likely to succeed. The confidence in this equipment is shown by the number under construction or design in the U.S.; brief descriptions are given of a number of 'tokamaks' being built by Government agencies and universities and by industry. The Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) hopes that some useful energy can be produced by 1985 and a 500MW generator by 1995-97. Of importance also to the understanding of the fusion reaction are fundamental investigations with, for instance, particle accelerators. Work at Oakridge, Livermore, Princeton and Brookhaven is discussed. Other experiments e.g. laser induced fusion, are also considered. (G.P.)

  16. Application of Recommended Design Practices for Conceptual Nuclear Fusion Space Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Craig H.

    2004-01-01

    An AIAA Special Project Report was recently produced by AIAA's Nuclear and Future Flight Propulsion Technical Committee and is currently in peer review. The Report provides recommended design practices for conceptual engineering studies of nuclear fusion space propulsion systems. Discussion and recommendations are made on key topics including design reference missions, degree of technological extrapolation and concomitant risk, thoroughness in calculating mass properties (nominal mass properties, weight-growth contingency and propellant margins, and specific impulse), and thoroughness in calculating power generation and usage (power-flow, power contingencies, specific power). The report represents a general consensus of the nuclear fusion space propulsion system conceptual design community and proposes 15 recommendations. This paper expands on the Report by providing specific examples illustrating how to apply each of the recommendations.

  17. Window of cold nuclear fusion and biased-pulse electrolysis experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Akito; Jida, Toshiyuki; Maekawa, Fujio; Sugimoto, Hisashi; Yoshida, Shigeo

    1989-01-01

    Based on the electron screening effect and the excitation of deuteron harmonic oscillators in palladium lattice, theoretical aspects are given to explain the cold fusion phenomena and the possibility of nuclear heating. A narrow window is proposed to meet ≅ 10 watts per cubic centimeter for the nuclear heating, by the hypothetical excitation-screening model. A relatively wide window is feasible to meet a few fusion events per second per cc under the non-stationary conditions of deuteron-charging and discharging. For stationary lattice conditions, the probability of cold fusion is not feasible at all. To confirm the cold fusion phenomena, a heavy water electrolysis experiment was carried out using biased-pulse-electrolytic currents, expecting the enhancement of cold fusion events under charging and discharging of deuterons. For the neutron detection, a cross-checking system between a recoil-proton scintillation detector and a 3 He thermal neutron detector was employed to see coincident time-patterns of neutron emission from an electrolysis cell. To check the energy of emitted neutrons, pulse height spectrum of the recoil-proton detector was monitored. Up to the D-charging time of 300 hr, neutron yields of 1-2 n/s/cc were obtained for time-intervals of 60-200 hr. From the recoil-proton spectra, it was confirmed that 2.45 MeV neutrons by the D(d, n) 3 He fusion branch were emitted. The observed time-patterns of neutron emission suggest the existence of cold fusion under the charging and discharging conditions. (orig.)

  18. Mitochondrial fusion is increased by the nuclear coactivator PGC-1beta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Liesa

    Full Text Available There is no evidence to date on whether transcriptional regulators are able to shift the balance between mitochondrial fusion and fission events through selective control of gene expression.Here, we demonstrate that reduced mitochondrial size observed in knock-out mice for the transcriptional regulator PGC-1beta is associated with a selective reduction in Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2 expression, a mitochondrial fusion protein. This decrease in Mfn2 is specific since expression of the remaining components of mitochondrial fusion and fission machinery were not affected. Furthermore, PGC-1beta increases mitochondrial fusion and elongates mitochondrial tubules. This PGC-1beta-induced elongation specifically requires Mfn2 as this process is absent in Mfn2-ablated cells. Finally, we show that PGC-1beta increases Mfn2 promoter activity and transcription by coactivating the nuclear receptor Estrogen Related Receptor alpha (ERRalpha.Taken together, our data reveal a novel mechanism by which mammalian cells control mitochondrial fusion. In addition, we describe a novel role of PGC-1beta in mitochondrial physiology, namely the control of mitochondrial fusion mainly through Mfn2.

  19. New technology and neo-science on the nuclear fusion reactor engineering. ITER and super high speed phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    This research meeting has been held under cooperation of the ''nuclear fusion reactor engineering research group'' and ''nuclear fusion reactor materials research group'' of the Yayoi Research Group. This meeting was planned and conducted for 2 days under the following predominant thema: Present status of research on thermo-nuclear fusion experimental reactor engineering design (ITER/EDA) and its promoting method in Japan, and a new scientific side in the research and development of nuclear fusion reactor materials or the super high speed phenomena. In the former item, the following reports were published: Creative period of R and D on the nuclear fusion reactor, present statue and future development of ITER/EDA, meanings of ITER under realization of the nuclear fusion energy, and others. And in the latter item, the following reports were published: Nuclear fusion materials engineering and system quantum engineering, dynamic imagination of atom and molecule using pulse snap shot method, laser wake field acceleration and ultra short x-ray pulse generation, development of T-cube laser in JAERI, and others. (G.K.)

  20. Fusion technology development: first wall/blanket system and component testing in existing nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.S.; Bohn, T.S.; Deis, G.A.; Judd, J.L.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Millsap, D.A.; Scott, A.J.; Wessol, D.E.

    1980-12-01

    A novel concept to produce a reasonable simulation of a fusion first wall/blanket test environment employing an existing nuclear facility, the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, is presented. Preliminary results show that an asymmetric, nuclear test environment with surface and volumetric heating rates similar to those expected in a fusion first wall/blanket or divertor chamber surface appears feasible. The proposed concept takes advantage of nuclear reactions within the annulus of an existing test space (15 cm in diameter and approximately 100 cm high) to provide an energy flux to the surface of a test module. The principal reaction considered involves 3 He in the annulus as follows: n + 3 He → p + t + 0.75 MeV. Bulk heating in the test module is accomplished by neutron thermalization, gamma heating, and absorption reactions involving 6 Li in the blanket breeding region. The concept can be extended to modified core configurations that will accommodate test modules of different sizes and types. It makes possible development testing of first wall/blanket systems and other fusion components on a scale and in ways not otherwise available until actual high-power fusion reactors are built

  1. Nuclear dynamics during germination, conidiation, and hyphal fusion of Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Roldán, M Carmen; Köhli, Michael; Roncero, M Isabel G; Philippsen, Peter; Di Pietro, Antonio; Espeso, Eduardo A

    2010-08-01

    In many fungal pathogens, infection is initiated by conidial germination. Subsequent stages involve germ tube elongation, conidiation, and vegetative hyphal fusion (anastomosis). Here, we used live-cell fluorescence to study the dynamics of green fluorescent protein (GFP)- and cherry fluorescent protein (ChFP)-labeled nuclei in the plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. Hyphae of F. oxysporum have uninucleated cells and exhibit an acropetal nuclear pedigree, where only the nucleus in the apical compartment is mitotically active. In contrast, conidiation follows a basopetal pattern, whereby mononucleated microconidia are generated by repeated mitotic cycles of the subapical nucleus in the phialide, followed by septation and cell abscission. Vegetative hyphal fusion is preceded by directed growth of the fusion hypha toward the receptor hypha and followed by a series of postfusion nuclear events, including mitosis of the apical nucleus of the fusion hypha, migration of a daughter nucleus into the receptor hypha, and degradation of the resident nucleus. These previously unreported patterns of nuclear dynamics in F. oxysporum could be intimately related to its pathogenic lifestyle.

  2. Green fluorescence protein-based content-mixing assay of SNARE-driven membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Paul; Kong, Byoungjae; Jung, Young-Hun; Park, Joon-Bum; Shin, Jonghyeok; Park, Myungseo; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2017-06-17

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins mediate intracellular membrane fusion by forming a ternary SNARE complex. A minimalist approach utilizing proteoliposomes with reconstituted SNARE proteins yielded a wealth of information pinpointing the molecular mechanism of SNARE-mediated fusion and its regulation by accessory proteins. Two important attributes of a membrane fusion are lipid-mixing and the formation of an aqueous passage between apposing membranes. These two attributes are typically observed by using various fluorescent dyes. Currently available in vitro assay systems for observing fusion pore opening have several weaknesses such as cargo-bleeding, incomplete removal of unencapsulated dyes, and inadequate information regarding the size of the fusion pore, limiting measurements of the final stage of membrane fusion. In the present study, we used a biotinylated green fluorescence protein and streptavidin conjugated with Dylight 594 (DyStrp) as a Föster resonance energy transfer (FRET) donor and acceptor, respectively. This FRET pair encapsulated in each v-vesicle containing synaptobrevin and t-vesicle containing a binary acceptor complex of syntaxin 1a and synaptosomal-associated protein 25 revealed the opening of a large fusion pore of more than 5 nm, without the unwanted signals from unencapsulated dyes or leakage. This system enabled determination of the stoichiometry of the merging vesicles because the FRET efficiency of the FRET pair depended on the molar ratio between dyes. Here, we report a robust and informative assay for SNARE-mediated fusion pore opening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nuclear fusion - basic research in the tense atmosphere of social expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkau, K.

    1989-01-01

    Since researchers offered to assist society in showing the energy problem through fusion, basic researchers have come under pressure to run large institutes requiring a great deal of organization. They have also entered the area of conflict between science and the state, through the use of considerable resources linked to the hopes and expectations of the public and the state. The tension curves of scientific freedom, the state's requirements, the scientist's egoismus and his social obligations can still only be resolved through scientific institutions. This is also valid for nuclear fusion projects such as NET or ITER. (DG) [de

  4. Nuclear data requirements for accelerator driven sub-critical systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (b) Compilations coordinated by a classical data centre, computerized visual- izations, large data files information management, evaluations, that include nuclear model based predictions, creating ... and resources with a comprehensive approach to cover as many known ADSS de- signs as possible to meet the nuclear data ...

  5. 15 N utilization in nitride nuclear fuels for advanced nuclear power reactors and accelerator - driven systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, D.

    2005-01-01

    15 N utilization for nitride nuclear fuels production for nuclear power reactors and accelerator - driven systems is presented. Nitride nuclear fuel is the obvious choice for advanced nuclear reactors and ADS because of its favorable properties: a high melting point, excellent thermal conductivity, high fissile density, lower fission gas release and good radiation tolerance. The application of nitride fuels in nuclear reactors and ADS requires use of 15 N enriched nitrogen to suppress 14 C production due to (n,p) reaction on 14 N. Accelerator - driven system is a recent development merging of accelerator and fission reactor technologies to generate electricity and transmute long - lived radioactive wastes as minor actinides: Np, Am, Cm. A high-energy proton beam hitting a heavy metal target produces neutrons by spallation. The neutrons cause fission in the fuel, but unlike in conventional reactors, the fuel is sub-critical and fission ceases when the accelerator is turned off. Nitride fuel is a promising candidate for transmutation in ADS of minor actinides, which are converted into nitrides with 15 N for that purpose. Tacking into account that the world wide market is about 20 to 40 Kg 15 N annually, the supply of that isotope for nitride fuel production for nuclear power reactors and ADS would therefore demand an increase in production capacity by a factor of 1000. For an industrial plant producing 100 t/y 15 N, using present technology of isotopic exchange in NITROX system, the first separation stage of the cascade would be fed with 10M HNO 3 solution of 600 mc/h flow - rate. If conversion of HNO 3 into NO, NO 2 , at the enriching end of the columns, would be done with gaseous SO 2 , for a production plant of 100 t/y 15 N a consumption of 4 million t SO 2 /y and a production of 70 % H 2 SO 4 waste solution of 4.5 million mc/y are estimated. The reconversion of H 2 SO 4 into SO 2 in order to recycle of SO 2 is a problem to be solved to compensate the cost of SO 2

  6. Fusion reactor cost reductions by employing non-nuclear grade components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourque, R.F.; Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Sonn, D.L.; Wise, R.K.

    1987-09-01

    The Cascade inertial confinement fusion reactor fits the requirements of low radioactive inventories and inherent safety and is therefore a candidate for non-nuclear construction throughout. This reactor consists of a rotating blanket of ceramic granules that absorb the energy from D-T target explosions occurring along the rotational axis. Laser energy is beamed in axially from both ends. Two cost estimates were made for an 815 MWe Cascade power plant. One was based on an ''all conventional'' plant, which is constructed and costed using well-established, conventional fossil power plant methods. The second was a ''nuclear plus conventional'' design, constructed and costed using a combination of fossil and fission reactor plant methods and standards that would be typical of advanced fission reactors. The total capital requirements for the ''all conventional'' construction plant were estimated in 1985 dollars at $1490 M, including indirect costs. Similarly, the ''nuclear plus conventional'' construction plant was estimated at $1940 M. The savings of $450 M (23%) represents strictly the difference between Cascade ICF power plants designed and constructed to nuclear safety-related requirements versus all non-nuclear. This example clearly shows that, if fusion plants can take advantage of low activation materials and inherent safety features to eliminate the need for nuclear-related expenses, then such plants may have economic advantages over nuclear-grade systems. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  7. Nuclear microbeam study of advanced materials for fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, L.C.; Alves, E.; Grime, G.W.; Silva, M.F. da; Soares, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The Oxford scanning proton microprobe was used to study SiC fibres, SiC/SiC ceramic composites and Be pebbles, which are some of the most important materials for fusion technology. For the SiC materials, although the results reveal a high degree of homogeneity and purity in the composition of the fibres, some grains containing heavy metals were detected in the composites. Rutherford backscattering analysis further allowed establishing that at least some of these grains are not on the surface of the material but rather distributed throughout the bulk of the SiC composites. The two different types of Be pebbles analysed also showed very different levels of contaminants. The information obtained with the microbeam analysis is confronted with the one resulting from the broad beam PIXE and RBS analysis

  8. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The 14th International Atomic Energy Agency Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Research was held in Wuerzburg, Germany, 30 September - 7 October 1992. Its proceedings were published in four volumes. Volume 1 contains major papers on tokamak experiments, the text of the Artsimovich Memorial Lecture held by Prof. P.K. Kaw, and papers on plasma heating and current drive. Volume 2 contains papers on magnetic confinement theory and modelling and on non-tokamak confinement systems. Volume 3 contains papers on inertial confinement, the ITER project, and technology and reactor concepts. Volume 4 contains summaries on (i) tokamak experiments, heating and current drive, (ii) alternative magnetic systems, (iii) magnetic confinement theory, (iv) inertial confinement, and (v) technology and reactor concepts. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. Intertwined electron-nuclear motion in frustrated double ionization in driven heteronuclear molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilà, A.; Zhu, J.; Scrinzi, A.; Emmanouilidou, A.

    2018-03-01

    We study frustrated double ionization (FDI) in a strongly-driven heteronuclear molecule HeH+ and compare with H2. We compute the probability distribution of the sum of the final kinetic energies of the nuclei for strongly-driven HeH+. We find that this distribution has more than one peak for strongly-driven HeH+, a feature we do not find to be present for strongly-driven H2. Moreover, we compute the probability distribution of the principal quantum number n of FDI. We find that this distribution has several peaks for strongly-driven HeH+, while the respective distribution has one main peak and a ‘shoulder’ at lower principal quantum numbers n for strongly-driven H2. Surprisingly, we find this feature to be a clear signature of the intertwined electron-nuclear motion.

  10. Development of an inertial confinement fusion platform to study charged-particle-producing nuclear reactions relevant to nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Bacher, A.; Brune, C. R.; Casey, D. T.; Forrest, C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hohenberger, M.; Sayre, D. B.; Bionta, R. M.; Bourgade, J.-L.; Caggiano, J. A.; Cerjan, C.; Craxton, R. S.; Dearborn, D.; Farrell, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Garcia, E. M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hale, G.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hohensee, M.; Holunga, D. M.; Hoppe, M.; Janezic, R.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kim, Y. H.; Knauer, J. P.; Kohut, T. R.; Lahmann, B.; Landoas, O.; Li, C. K.; Marshall, F. J.; Masse, L.; McEvoy, A.; McKenty, P.; McNabb, D. P.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T. G.; Paris, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Pino, J.; Radha, P. B.; Remington, B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Robey, H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rosse, B.; Rubery, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Sanchez, J.; Schmitt, M.; Schoff, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Seka, W.; Sio, H.; Stoeckl, C.; Tipton, R. E.

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the development of a platform to study astrophysically relevant nuclear reactions using inertial-confinement fusion implosions on the OMEGA and National Ignition Facility laser facilities, with a particular focus on optimizing the implosions to study charged-particle-producing reactions. Primary requirements on the platform are high yield, for high statistics in the fusion product measurements, combined with low areal density, to allow the charged fusion products to escape. This is optimally achieved with direct-drive exploding pusher implosions using thin-glass-shell capsules. Mitigation strategies to eliminate a possible target sheath potential which would accelerate the emitted ions are discussed. The potential impact of kinetic effects on the implosions is also considered. The platform is initially employed to study the complementary T(t,2n)α, T(3He,np)α and 3He(3He,2p)α reactions. Proof-of-principle results from the first experiments demonstrating the ability to accurately measure the energy and yields of charged particles are presented. Lessons learned from these experiments will be used in studies of other reactions. The goals are to explore thermonuclear reaction rates and fundamental nuclear physics in stellar-like plasma environments, and to push this new frontier of nuclear astrophysics into unique regimes not reachable through existing platforms, with thermal ion velocity distributions, plasma screening, and low reactant energies.

  11. Reactivity Monitoring of Accelerator-Driven Nuclear Reactor Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenhove, W.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis provides a methodology and set-up of a reactivity monitoring tool for Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS). The reactivity monitoring tool should guarantee the operation of an ADS at a safe margin from criticality. Robustness is assured in different aspects of the monitoring tool: the choice

  12. The high-density Z-pinch as a pulsed fusion neutron source for fusion nuclear technology and materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Sethian, J.D.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The dense Z-pinch (DZP) is one of the earliest and simplest plasma heating and confinement schemes. Recent experimental advances based on plasma initiation from hair-like (10s μm in radius) solid hydrogen filaments have so far not encountered the usually devastating MHD instabilities that plagued early DZP experiments. These encouraging results along with debt of a number of proof-of principle, high-current (1--2 MA in 10--100 ns) experiments have prompted consideration of the DZP as a pulsed source of DT fusion neutrons of sufficient strength (/dot S//sub N/ ≥ 10 19 n/s) to provide uncollided neutron fluxes in excess of I/sub ω/ = 5--10 MW/m 2 over test volumes of 10--30 litre or greater. While this neutron source would be pulsed (100s ns pulse widths, 10--100 Hz pulse rate), giving flux time compressions in the range 10 5 --10 6 , its simplicity, near-time feasibility, low cost, high-Q operation, and relevance to fusion systems that may provide a pulsed commercial end-product (e.g., inertial confinement or the DZP itself) together create the impetus for preliminary considerations as a neutron source for fusion nuclear technology and materials testings. The results of a preliminary parametric systems study (focusing primarily on physics issues), conceptual design, and cost versus performance analyses are presented. The DZP promises an expensive and efficient means to provide pulsed DT neutrons at an average rate in excess of 10 19 n/s, with neutron currents I/sub ω/ /approx lt/ 10 MW/m 2 over volumes V/sub exp/ ≥ 30 litre using single-pulse technologies that differ little from those being used in present-day experiments. 34 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  13. Prospects for fusion applications of reversed-field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) as a source of fusion neutrons for use in developing key fusion nuclear technologies is examined. This Fusion Test Facility (FTF) would emphasize high neutron wall loading, small plasma volume, low fusion and driver powers, and steady-state operation. Both parametric tradeoffs based on present-day physics understanding and a conceptual design based on an approx.1-MW/m 2 (neutron) driven operation are reported. 10 refs

  14. Evaluation of ammonium bifluoride fusion for rapid dissolution in post-detonation nuclear forensic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubley, Nicholas T. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Brockman, John D. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor Center; Robertson, J. David [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor Center; Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-10-01

    Dissolution of geological reference materials by fusion with ammonium bifluoride, NH{sub 4}HF{sub 2} or ABF, was evaluated for its potential use in post-detonation nuclear forensics. The fusion procedure was optimized such that the total dissolution time was <3 h without compromising recovery. Geological reference materials containing various levels of silicates were dissolved and measured by ICP-MS to quantify elemental recovery. Dissolutions of NIST 278 obsidian and urban canyon matrix were performed with radiotracer spikes to measure potential loss of volatile elements during the fusion procedure via gamma-ray spectroscopy. Elemental percent recoveries obtained by ICP-MS were found to be 80-120% while recoveries of radiotracers were observed to be 90-100% with the exception of iodine.

  15. Long-term modelling of Carbon Capture and Storage, Nuclear Fusion, and large-scale District Heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grohnheit, Poul Erik; Korsholm, Søren Bang; Lüthje, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Among the technologies for mitigating greenhouse gasses, carbon capture and storage (CCS) and nuclear fusion are interesting in the long term. In several studies with time horizon 2050 CCS has been identified as an important technology, while nuclear fusion cannot become commercially available...... on nuclear fusion and the Pan European TIMES model, respectively. In the next decades CCS can be a driver for the development and expansion of large-scale district heating systems, which are currently widespread in Europe, Korea and China, and with large potentials in North America. If fusion will replace...... fossil fuel power plants with CCS in the second half of the century, the same infrastructure for heat distribution can be used which will support the penetration of both technologies. This paper will address the issue of infrastructure development and the use of CCS and fusion technologies using...

  16. Quark-level analogue of nuclear fusion with doubly heavy baryons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, Marek; Rosner, Jonathan L

    2017-11-01

    The essence of nuclear fusion is that energy can be released by the rearrangement of nucleons between the initial- and final-state nuclei. The recent discovery of the first doubly charmed baryon , which contains two charm quarks (c) and one up quark (u) and has a mass of about 3,621 megaelectronvolts (MeV) (the mass of the proton is 938 MeV) also revealed a large binding energy of about 130 MeV between the two charm quarks. Here we report that this strong binding enables a quark-rearrangement, exothermic reaction in which two heavy baryons (Λ c ) undergo fusion to produce the doubly charmed baryon and a neutron n (), resulting in an energy release of 12 MeV. This reaction is a quark-level analogue of the deuterium-tritium nuclear fusion reaction (DT → 4 He n). The much larger binding energy (approximately 280 MeV) between two bottom quarks (b) causes the analogous reaction with bottom quarks () to have a much larger energy release of about 138 MeV. We suggest some experimental setups in which the highly exothermic nature of the fusion of two heavy-quark baryons might manifest itself. At present, however, the very short lifetimes of the heavy bottom and charm quarks preclude any practical applications of such reactions.

  17. Modeling, analysis and experiments for fusion nuclear technology: FNT progress report: Modeling and FINESSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Tillack, M.S.; Raffray, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    This document is a progress report on two technical studies carried out during 1986, both of which relate to the implementation phase of FNT. The first, which is a follow-up to FINESSE, focuses on specific key questions for: (1) very near-term (0 to 3 years) non-fusion experiments and facilities, and (2) FNT testing in a fusion facility. The second is the initial stage of a detailed effort to develop theory, models and computer codes for predicting the performance of nuclear components. Chapters are presented on (1) introduction and chapter summaries, (2) non-fusion experiments and facilities, (3) fusion testing issues, and (4) theory and modeling. Chapter 2 is an assessment of the relative advantages of many solid breeders, neutron multipliers and configurations. Various issues affecting design and cost of the blanket are examined in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 reports on the progress of the initial stage of an effort to develop theory and analytical and numerical models for nuclear components. A major part of the effort has focused on modeling of MHD effects for liquid metal blankets. Progress has also been made on modeling tritium transport and inventory in solid breeder blankets and the thermomechanical behavior of liquid-metal-cooled limiters

  18. Quark-level analogue of nuclear fusion with doubly heavy baryons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, Marek; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2017-11-01

    The essence of nuclear fusion is that energy can be released by the rearrangement of nucleons between the initial- and final-state nuclei. The recent discovery of the first doubly charmed baryon , which contains two charm quarks (c) and one up quark (u) and has a mass of about 3,621 megaelectronvolts (MeV) (the mass of the proton is 938 MeV) also revealed a large binding energy of about 130 MeV between the two charm quarks. Here we report that this strong binding enables a quark-rearrangement, exothermic reaction in which two heavy baryons (Λc) undergo fusion to produce the doubly charmed baryon and a neutron n (), resulting in an energy release of 12 MeV. This reaction is a quark-level analogue of the deuterium–tritium nuclear fusion reaction (DT → 4He n). The much larger binding energy (approximately 280 MeV) between two bottom quarks (b) causes the analogous reaction with bottom quarks () to have a much larger energy release of about 138 MeV. We suggest some experimental setups in which the highly exothermic nature of the fusion of two heavy-quark baryons might manifest itself. At present, however, the very short lifetimes of the heavy bottom and charm quarks preclude any practical applications of such reactions.

  19. Discourse, Power, and Knowledge in the Management of "Big Science": The Production of Consensus in a Nuclear Fusion Research Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Extends a Foucauldian view of power/knowledge to the archetypical knowledge-intensive organization, the scientific research laboratory. Describes the discursive production of power/knowledge at the "big science" laboratory conducting nuclear fusion research and illuminates a critical incident in which the fusion research…

  20. Nuclear fusion induced by X-rays in a crystal

    OpenAIRE

    Belyaev, V. B.; Miller, M. B.; Otto, J.; Rakityansky, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclei that constitute a crystalline lattice, oscillate relative to each other with a very low energy that is not sufficient to penetrate through the Coulomb barriers separating them. An additional energy, which is needed to tunnel through the barrier and fuse, can be supplied by external electromagnetic waves (X-rays or the synchrotron radiation). Exposing to the X-rays the solid compound LiD (lithium-deuteride) for the duration of 111 hours, we have detected 88 events of the nuclear fus...

  1. Nuclear-driven flashlamp pumping of the atomic iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.

    1992-03-01

    This report is a study of the atomic iodine laser pumped with nuclear- excited XeBr fluorescence. Preliminary experiments, conducted in the TRIGA reactor investigated the fluorescence of the excimer XeBr under nuclear pumping with 10 B and 3 He, for use as a flashlamp gas to stimulate the laser. These measurements included a determination of the fluorescence efficiency (light emitted in the wavelength region of interest, divided by energy deposited in the gas) of XeBr under nuclear pumping, with varying excimer mixtures. Maximum fluorescence efficiencies were approximately 1%. In order to better understand XeBr under nuclear excitation, a kinetics model of the system was prepared. The model generated the time-dependant concentrations of 20 reaction species for three pulse sizes, a TRIGA pulse, a fast burst reactor pulse, and an e-beam pulse. The modeling results predicted fluorescence efficiencies significantly higher (peak efficiencies of approximately 10%) than recorded in the fluorescence experiments. The cause of this discrepancy was not fully determined. A ray tracing computer model was also prepared to evaluate the efficiency with which nuclear-induced fluorescence generated in one cavity of a laser could be coupled into another cavity containing an iodine lasant. Finally, an experimental laser cell was constructed to verify that nuclear-induced XeBr fluorescence could be used to stimulate a laser. Lasing was achieved at 1.31 micron in the TRIGA using C 3 F 7 I, a common iodine lasant. Peak laser powers were approximately 20 mW. Measured flashlamp pump powers at threshold agreed well with literature values, as did lasant pressure dependency on laser operation

  2. Nuclear-driven flashlamp pumping of the atomic iodine laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miley, G.H.

    1992-03-01

    This report is a study of the atomic iodine laser pumped with nuclear- excited XeBr fluorescence. Preliminary experiments, conducted in the TRIGA reactor investigated the fluorescence of the excimer XeBr under nuclear pumping with {sup 10}B and {sup 3}He, for use as a flashlamp gas to stimulate the laser. These measurements included a determination of the fluorescence efficiency (light emitted in the wavelength region of interest, divided by energy deposited in the gas) of XeBr under nuclear pumping, with varying excimer mixtures. Maximum fluorescence efficiencies were approximately 1%. In order to better understand XeBr under nuclear excitation, a kinetics model of the system was prepared. The model generated the time-dependant concentrations of 20 reaction species for three pulse sizes, a TRIGA pulse, a fast burst reactor pulse, and an e-beam pulse. The modeling results predicted fluorescence efficiencies significantly higher (peak efficiencies of approximately 10%) than recorded in the fluorescence experiments. The cause of this discrepancy was not fully determined. A ray tracing computer model was also prepared to evaluate the efficiency with which nuclear-induced fluorescence generated in one cavity of a laser could be coupled into another cavity containing an iodine lasant. Finally, an experimental laser cell was constructed to verify that nuclear-induced XeBr fluorescence could be used to stimulate a laser. Lasing was achieved at 1.31 micron in the TRIGA using C{sub 3}F{sub 7}I, a common iodine lasant. Peak laser powers were approximately 20 mW. Measured flashlamp pump powers at threshold agreed well with literature values, as did lasant pressure dependency on laser operation.

  3. Argonne National Laboratory papers presented at third ANS topical meeting on the technology of controlled nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The 9 papers included in this Technical Memorandum were presented at the Third ANS Topical Meeting on the Technology of Controlled Nuclear Fusion that was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 9-11, 1978

  4. Dynamic Assembly of Brambleberry Mediates Nuclear Envelope Fusion during Early Development

    OpenAIRE

    Abrams, Elliott W.; Zhang, Hong; Marlow, Florence L.; Kapp, Lee; Lu, Sumei; Mullins, Mary C.

    2012-01-01

    To accommodate the large cells following zygote formation, early blastomeres employ modified cell divisions. Karyomeres are one such modification, a mitotic intermediate wherein individual chromatin masses are surrounded by nuclear envelope, which then fuse to form a single mononucleus. We identified brambleberry, a maternal-effect zebrafish mutant that disrupts karyomere fusion resulting in formation of multiple micronuclei. brambleberry is a previously unannotated gene homolo...

  5. Nuclear data for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). Summary report of technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, R.; Mengoni, A.

    2005-10-01

    Experts on reaction cross-section databases participated in a Technical Meeting organized at the Forschungszentrum Zentrum (FZK), Karlsruhe, Germany on 4-6 October 2005. The overall objective of the meeting was to explore the possibilities for improving the status of the nuclear database for the assessment of radiation damage to structural components of large fusion devices. The discussions and recommendations of the meeting are briefly described in this report. (author)

  6. Outer nuclear membrane fusion of adjacent nuclei in varicella-zoster virus-induced syncytia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Lianwei; Huang, Xiumin; Fu, Wenkun; Pan, Dequan; Cai, Linli; Ye, Jianghui; Liu, Jian; Xia, Ningshao; Cheng, Tong; Zhu, Hua

    2017-12-01

    Syncytia formation has been considered important for cell-to-cell spread and pathogenesis of many viruses. As a syncytium forms, individual nuclei often congregate together, allowing close contact of nuclear membranes and possibly fusion to occur. However, there is currently no reported evidence of nuclear membrane fusion between adjacent nuclei in wild-type virus-induced syncytia. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is one typical syncytia-inducing virus that causes chickenpox and shingles in humans. Here, we report, for the first time, an interesting observation of apparent fusion of the outer nuclear membranes from juxtaposed nuclei that comprise VZV syncytia both in ARPE-19 human epithelial cells in vitro and in human skin xenografts in the SCID-hu mouse model in vivo. This work reveals a novel aspect of VZV-related cytopathic effect in the context of multinucleated syncytia. Additionally, the information provided by this study could be helpful for future studies on interactions of viruses with host cell nuclei. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neutron excess generation by fusion neutron source for self-consistency of nuclear energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masaki; Artisyuk, V.; Chmelev, A.

    1999-01-01

    The present day fission energy technology faces with the problem of transmutation of dangerous radionuclides that requires neutron excess generation. Nuclear energy system based on fission reactors needs fuel breeding and, therefore, suffers from lack of neutron excess to apply large-scale transmutation option including elimination of fission products. Fusion neutron source (FNS) was proposed to improve neutron balance in the nuclear energy system. Energy associated with the performance of FNS should be small enough to keep the position of neutron excess generator, thus, leaving the role of dominant energy producers to fission reactors. The present paper deals with development of general methodology to estimate the effect of neutron excess generation by FNS on the performance of nuclear energy system as a whole. Multiplication of fusion neutrons in both non-fissionable and fissionable multipliers was considered. Based on the present methodology it was concluded that neutron self-consistency with respect to fuel breeding and transmutation of fission products can be attained with small fraction of energy associated with innovated fusion facilities. (author)

  8. Specific regulation of thermosensitive lipid droplet fusion by a nuclear hormone receptor pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiwei; Li, Qi; Kong, Yuanyuan; Wu, Shuang; Cui, Qingpo; Zhang, Mingming; Zhang, Shaobing O

    2017-08-15

    Nuclear receptors play important roles in regulating fat metabolism and energy production in humans. The regulatory functions and endogenous ligands of many nuclear receptors are still unidentified, however. Here, we report that CYP-37A1 (ortholog of human cytochrome P450 CYP4V2), EMB-8 (ortholog of human P450 oxidoreductase POR), and DAF-12 (homolog of human nuclear receptors VDR/LXR) constitute a hormone synthesis and nuclear receptor pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans This pathway specifically regulates the thermosensitive fusion of fat-storing lipid droplets. CYP-37A1, together with EMB-8, synthesizes a lipophilic hormone not identical to Δ7-dafachronic acid, which represses the fusion-promoting function of DAF-12. CYP-37A1 also negatively regulates thermotolerance and lifespan at high temperature in a DAF-12-dependent manner. Human CYP4V2 can substitute for CYP-37A1 in C. elegans This finding suggests the existence of a conserved CYP4V2-POR-nuclear receptor pathway that functions in converting multilocular lipid droplets to unilocular ones in human cells; misregulation of this pathway may lead to pathogenic fat storage.

  9. New options for developing of nuclear energy using an accelerator-driven reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi.

    1997-01-01

    Fissile fuel can be produced at a high rate using an accelerator-driven Pu-fueled subcritical fast reactor. Thus, the necessity of early introduction of the fast reactor can be moderated. High reliability of the proton accelerator, which is essential to implementing an accelerator-driven reactor in the nuclear energy field can be achieved by a slight extension of the accelerator's length, with only a small economical penalty. Subcritical operation provides flexible nuclear energy options including high neutron economy producing the fuel, transmuting high-level wastes, such as minor actinides, and of converting efficiently the excess Pu and military Pu into proliferation-resistant fuel

  10. Laser inertial fusion-based energy: Neutronic design aspects of a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Kevin James

    . Alternatively, Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) adjusts the depletion zone size according to the variation in flux across the zone or fractional contribution to total absorption or fission. A parametric analysis on a fully mixed fuel core was performed using the LNC and ABL code suites. The resulting system parameters are found to optimize performance metrics using a 20 MT DU fuel load with a 20% TRISO packing and a 300 im kernel diameter operated with a fusion input power of 500 MW and a fission blanket gain of 4.0. LFFH potentially offers a proliferation resistant technology relative to other nuclear energy systems primarily because of no need for fuel enrichment or reprocessing. A figure of merit of the material attractiveness is examined and it is found that the fuel is effectively contaminated to an unattractive level shortly after the system is started due to fission product and minor actinide build up.

  11. Perspective: THz-driven nuclear dynamics from solids to molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hamm

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen dramatic developments in the technology of intense pulsed light sources in the THz frequency range. Since many dipole-active excitations in solids and molecules also lie in this range, there is now a tremendous potential to use these light sources to study linear and nonlinear dynamics in such systems. While several experimental investigations of THz-driven dynamics in solid-state systems have demonstrated a variety of interesting linear and nonlinear phenomena, comparatively few efforts have been made to drive analogous dynamics in molecular systems. In the present Perspective article, we discuss the similarities and differences between THz-driven dynamics in solid-state and molecular systems on both conceptual and practical levels. We also discuss the experimental parameters needed for these types of experiments and thereby provide design criteria for a further development of this new research branch. Finally, we present a few recent examples to illustrate the rich physics that may be learned from nonlinear THz excitations of phonons in solids as well as inter-molecular vibrations in liquid and gas-phase systems.

  12. Inquiry on nuclear fusion for peaceful uses by the 12th Committee of Industry of the Italian Parliament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolini, E.

    1987-01-01

    The paper is a statement by the author to the 12th Committee of Industry of the Italian Parliament concerning the Inquiry on nuclear fusion for peaceful uses. The basis concepts of thermonuclear fusion are outlined. A description is given of the European Programme, and the role of the JET Project within that Programme. The role of the JET Project in the field of fusion research is described, in detail. Preliminary answers to the Committee's questions on fusion posed previously are also reported. (U.K.)

  13. Nuclear fusion and carbon flashes on neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taam, R. E.; Picklum, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports on detailed calculations of the thermal evolution of the carbon-burning shells in the envelopes of accreting neutron stars for mass-accretion rates of 1 hundred-billionth to 2 billionths of a solar mass per yr and neutron-star masses of 0.56 and 1.41 solar masses. The work of Hansen and Van Horn (1975) is extended to higher densities, and a more detailed treatment of nuclear processing in the hydrogen- and helium-burning regions is included. Results of steady-state calculations are presented, and results of time-dependent computations are examined for accretion rates of 3 ten-billionths and 1 billionth of solar mass per yr. It is found that two evolutionary sequences lead to carbon flashes and that the carbon abundance at the base of the helium shell is a strong function of accretion rate. Upper limits are placed on the accretion rates at which carbon flashes will be important.

  14. Experiments and nuclear measurements in search of cold fusion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottesfeld, S.; Anderson, R. E.; Baker, D. A.; Bolton, R. D.; Butterfield, K. B.; Garzon, F. H.; Goulding, C. A.; Johnson, M. W.; Leonard, E. M.; Springer, T. E.; Zawodzinski, T.

    1990-09-01

    This paper reports a collaborative effort of a team which formed at Los Alamos to investigate the announcement that “cold fusion” may be occurring in electrochemical cells using palladium cathodes and platinum anodes in a LiOD electrolyte. Four electrochemical cells were construced and operated for 3-5 weeks under various geometrical and electrical conditions. Nuclear diagnostic measurements included high and low resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, integral neutron counting with well detectors and banks of3He tubes, and neutron spectroscopy with NE-213 scintillators. For one of the cells, the deuterium loading of the cathode was determined from resistance measurements to be D/Pd⩽ 0.8. No conclusive evidence was found for the production of neutrons or 2.223-MeV gammas above levels consistent with background. The results of the measurements of tritium levels in the cell electrolytes are also reported. Experiments to reproduce the observation of neutrons from high pressure Ti- D 2 gas experiments were also performed with negative results.

  15. Nuclear-thermal-coupled optimization code for the fusion breeding blanket conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jia, E-mail: lijia@ustc.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027, Anhui (China); Jiang, Kecheng; Zhang, Xiaokang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China); Nie, Xingchen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027, Anhui (China); Zhu, Qinjun; Liu, Songlin [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A nuclear-thermal-coupled predesign code has been developed for optimizing the radial build arrangement of fusion breeding blanket. • Coupling module aims at speeding up the efficiency of design progress by coupling the neutronics calculation code with the thermal-hydraulic analysis code. • Radial build optimization algorithm aims at optimal arrangement of breeding blanket considering one or multiple specified objectives subject to the design criteria such as material temperature limit and available TBR. - Abstract: Fusion breeding blanket as one of the key in-vessel components performs the functions of breeding the tritium, removing the nuclear heat and heat flux from plasma chamber as well as acting as part of shielding system. The radial build design which determines the arrangement of function zones and material properties on the radial direction is the basis of the detailed design of fusion breeding blanket. For facilitating the radial build design, this study aims for developing a pre-design code to optimize the radial build of blanket with considering the performance of nuclear and thermal-hydraulic simultaneously. Two main features of this code are: (1) Coupling of the neutronics analysis with the thermal-hydraulic analysis to speed up the analysis progress; (2) preliminary optimization algorithm using one or multiple specified objectives subject to the design criteria in the form of constrains imposed on design variables and performance parameters within the possible engineering ranges. This pre-design code has been applied to the conceptual design of water-cooled ceramic breeding blanket in project of China fusion engineering testing reactor (CFETR).

  16. Preconceptual design of hyfire. A fusion driven high temperature electrolysis plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varljen, T.C.; Chi, J.W.H.; Karbowski, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has been engaged in a scoping study to investigate the potential merits of coupling a fusion reactor with a high temperature blanket to a high temperature electrolysis (HTE) process to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Westinghouse is assisting this study in the areas of systems design integration, plasma engineering, balance of plant design and electrolyzer technology. The aim of the work done in the past year has been to focus on a reference design point for the plant, which has been designated HYFIRE. In prior work, the STARFIRE commercial tokamak fusion reactor was directly used as the fusion driver. This report describes a new design obtained by scaling the basic STARFIRE design to permit the achievement of a blanket power of 6000 MWt. The high temperature blanket design employs a thermally insulated refractory oxide region which provides high temperature (>1000 deg. C) steam at moderate pressures to high temperature electrolysis units. The electrolysis process selected is based on the high temperature, solid electrolyte fuel cell technology developed by Westinghouse. An initial process design and plant layout has been completed; component cost and plant economics studies are now underway to develop estimates of hydrogen production costs and to determine the sensitivity of this cost to changes in major design parameters. (author)

  17. Collection of Summaries of reports on result of research at basic experiment device for nuclear fusion reactor blanket design, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The development of nuclear fusion reactors reached such stage that the generation of fusion power output comparable with the input power into core plasma is possible. At present, the engineering design of the international thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor, ITER, is advanced by the cooperation of Japan, USA, Europe and Russia, aiming at the start of operation at the beginning of 21st century. This meeting for reporting the results has been held every year, and this time, it was held on May 19, 1995 at University of Tokyo with the theme ''The interface properties of fusion reactor materials and the control of particle transport''. About 50 participants from academic, governmental and industrial circles discussed actively on the theme. Three lectures on the topics of fusion reactor engineering and materials and seven lectures on the basic experiment of fusion reactor blanket design related to the next period project were given at the meeting. (K.I.)

  18. News from the Library: Nucleonica - web-driven nuclear science

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2012-01-01

    Most of us are familiar with the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart. It spreads from wall to wall and tells you all about decay chains of all known nuclides and isotopes.   The good news is that this resource is freely available here, the homepage of a suite of resources for nuclear science: a mass activity calculator, a decay engine, dosimetry and shielding calculations, range and stopping power calculations, gamma spectrum generator and analyzer, a virtual cloud chamber and a packaging calculator to name a few. All these programmes have been tested and approved by leading world experts. You can register to access these programmes here. A basic license is free, so anybody who is serious about Nuclear Science should register as soon as possible! A Premium account gives even more options in the calculations and utilities. If you think a premium account to Nucleonica would be useful for your work and for CERN in general, please contact CERN Library. Access the resource here. Literature in Focus: ...

  19. Accelerator-driven sub-critical reactor system (ADS) for nuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this talk we present an overview of accelerator-driven sub-critical reactor systems. (ADS), and bring out their attractive features for the elimination of troublesome long-lived compo- nents of the spent fuel, as well as for nuclear energy generation utilizing thorium as fuel. In India, there is an interest in the ...

  20. Accelerator-driven subcritical fission in molten salt core: Closing the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed; Badgley, Karie; Baker, William; Comeaux, Justin; Gerity, James; Kellams, Joshua; McInturff, Al; Pogue, Nathaniel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Simpson, Michael; Sooby, Elizabeth; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    A technology for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) is being developed as a basis for the destruction of the transuranics in used nuclear fuel. The molten salt fuel is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and the chlorides of the transuranics and fission products. The core is driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. This approach uniquely provides an intrinsically safe means to drive a core fueled only with transuranics, thereby eliminating competing breeding terms.

  1. Decree 2805 by means of which the National Accounting and Control of Basic Nuclear Materials and Special Fusionable Materials System, is established

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This Decree has for object to establish a National Accounting and Control of Basic Nuclear Materials and Special Fusionable Materials System, under the supervision of the National Council for the Nuclear Industry Development. Its aims are to account nuclear materials, to control nuclear activities, to preserve and control nuclear information, to keep technical relationship with specialized organizations, and to garant nuclear safeguards [es

  2. Neutronics of accelerator-driven subcritical fission for burning transuranics in used nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattarov, A.; Assadi, S.; Badgley, K.; Baty, A.; Comeaux, J.; Gerity, J.; Kellams, J.; Mcintyre, P.; Pogue, N.; Sooby, E.; Tsvetkov, P.; Rosaire, G.; Mann, T.

    2013-04-01

    We report the development of a conceptual design for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS). ADSMS is capable of destroying all of the transuranics at the same rate and proportion as they are produced in a conventional nuclear power plant. The ADSMS core is fueled solely by transuranics extracted from used nuclear fuel and reduces its radiotoxicity by a factor 10,000. ADSMS offers a way to close the nuclear fuel cycle so that the full energy potential in the fertile fuels uranium and thorium can be recovered.

  3. Nuclear models, experiments and data libraries needed for numerical simulation of accelerator-driven system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauge, E.; Bersillon, O.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the transparencies of the speech concerning the nuclear models, experiments and data libraries needed for numerical simulation of Accelerator-Driven Systems. The first part concerning the nuclear models defines the spallation process, the corresponding models (intra-nuclear cascade, statistical model, Fermi breakup, fission, transport, decay and macroscopic aspects) and the code systems. The second part devoted to the experiments presents the angular measurements, the integral measurements, the residual nuclei and the energy deposition. In the last part, dealing with the data libraries, the author details the fundamental quantities as the reaction cross-section, the low energy transport databases and the decay libraries. (A.L.B.)

  4. Analysis of nuclear export using photoactivatable GFP fusion proteins and interspecies heterokaryons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakrieko, Kerry-Ann; Ivanova, Iordanka A; Dagnino, Lina

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, we review protocols for the analysis of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors and nuclear proteins, using two different approaches. The first involves the use of photoactivatable forms of the protein of interest by fusion to photoactivatable green fluorescent protein to follow its movement out of the nucleus by live-cell confocal microscopy. This methodology allows for the kinetic characterization of protein movements as well as measurement of steady-state levels. In a second procedure to assess the ability of a nuclear protein to move into and out of the nucleus, we describe the use of interspecies heterokaryon assays, which provide a measurement of steady-state distribution. These technologies are directly applicable to the analysis of nucleocytoplasmic movements not only of transcription factors, but also other nuclear proteins.

  5. New laser-driven nuclear excitation studies. Concepts and proposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drska, L.; Hanus, V.; Sinor, M.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. There has been a great interest in the processes of nuclear excitation and triggering in high-parameter laser-produced plasmas in recent years. A series of papers devoted to the theory of this event has been published. Several experiments have already been attempted to study the excitation of the lowest nuclear levels of medium / high-Z nuclides (Ta 181, U 235 etc.), all the same unsuccessful or inconclusive. In the first part of this paper, the situation will be overviewed and analysis of the reasons of this unsatisfactory state of affairs will be accomplished. Prospects of the possible solving of the problem by using novel / projected laser facilities (esp. LIL / PETAL, XFEL, ELI-Phase) will be outlined. Potential of the future ELI Beam Facility in the Czech Republic in this area will be stressed. In the second part, some proposals for the excitation and triggering studies using combined high-power and high-intensity LIL / PETAL system (2012) with multi-kilojoule and multi-petawatt parameters will be discussed. Results of preliminary simulations supporting the thinking about potential projects will be shown and conditions essential for meaningful effort in this area will be analyzed. Problems of realistic simulations of such experiments will be addressed. Completely novel chances for the excitation / triggering studies would be started by constructed / projected facilities XFEL (coherent X-rays ∼ 12 keV, 2014) and ELI (multi-petawatt Phase 1, 2015). Application of intense / coherent high-energy X-rays and / or intense electron / ion beams allows new experimental schemes, extends the range of nuclides to be studied and (maybe) will enable to test some new triggering methods. In the last part of the presentation some possibilities in point (esp. for ELI Beamlines), will be drawn up. Acknowledgements. This research has been supported by the Research Program no. 6840770022 of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the

  6. Recent progress in research on tungsten materials for nuclear fusion applications in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieth, M.; Dudarev, S. L.; Gonzalez de Vicente, S. M.; Aktaa, J.; Ahlgren, T.; Antusch, S.; Armstrong, D. E. J.; Balden, M.; Baluc, N.; Barthe, M.-F.; Basuki, W. W.; Battabyal, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Blagoeva, D.; Boldyryeva, H.; Brinkmann, J.; Celino, M.; Ciupinski, L.; Correia, J. B.; De Backer, A.; Domain, C.; Gaganidze, E.; García-Rosales, C.; Gibson, J.; Gilbert, M. R.; Giusepponi, S.; Gludovatz, B.; Greuner, H.; Heinola, K.; Höschen, T.; Hoffmann, A.; Holstein, N.; Koch, F.; Krauss, W.; Li, H.; Lindig, S.; Linke, J.; Linsmeier, Ch.; López-Ruiz, P.; Maier, H.; Matejicek, J.; Mishra, T. P.; Muhammed, M.; Muñoz, A.; Muzyk, M.; Nordlund, K.; Nguyen-Manh, D.; Opschoor, J.; Ordás, N.; Palacios, T.; Pintsuk, G.; Pippan, R.; Reiser, J.; Riesch, J.; Roberts, S. G.; Romaner, L.; Rosiński, M.; Sanchez, M.; Schulmeyer, W.; Traxler, H.; Ureña, A.; van der Laan, J. G.; Veleva, L.; Wahlberg, S.; Walter, M.; Weber, T.; Weitkamp, T.; Wurster, S.; Yar, M. A.; You, J. H.; Zivelonghi, A.

    2013-01-01

    The current magnetic confinement nuclear fusion power reactor concepts going beyond ITER are based on assumptions about the availability of materials with extreme mechanical, heat, and neutron load capacity. In Europe, the development of such structural and armour materials together with the necessary production, machining, and fabrication technologies is pursued within the EFDA long-term fusion materials programme. This paper reviews the progress of work within the programme in the area of tungsten and tungsten alloys. Results, conclusions, and future projections are summarized for each of the programme's main subtopics, which are: (1) fabrication, (2) structural W materials, (3) W armour materials, and (4) materials science and modelling. It gives a detailed overview of the latest results on materials research, fabrication processes, joining options, high heat flux testing, plasticity studies, modelling, and validation experiments.

  7. Recent progress in research on tungsten materials for nuclear fusion applications in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieth, M.; Dudarev, S.L.; Gonzalez de Vicente, S.M.; Aktaa, J.; Ahlgren, T.; Antusch, S.; Armstrong, D.E.J.; Balden, M.; Baluc, N.; Barthe, M.-F.; Basuki, W.W.; Battabyal, M.; Becquart, C.S.; Blagoeva, D.; Boldyryeva, H.

    2013-01-01

    The current magnetic confinement nuclear fusion power reactor concepts going beyond ITER are based on assumptions about the availability of materials with extreme mechanical, heat, and neutron load capacity. In Europe, the development of such structural and armour materials together with the necessary production, machining, and fabrication technologies is pursued within the EFDA long-term fusion materials programme. This paper reviews the progress of work within the programme in the area of tungsten and tungsten alloys. Results, conclusions, and future projections are summarized for each of the programme’s main subtopics, which are: (1) fabrication, (2) structural W materials, (3) W armour materials, and (4) materials science and modelling. It gives a detailed overview of the latest results on materials research, fabrication processes, joining options, high heat flux testing, plasticity studies, modelling, and validation experiments.

  8. Recent progress in research on tungsten materials for nuclear fusion applications in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieth, M., E-mail: Michael.rieth@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe (Germany); Dudarev, S.L. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Gonzalez de Vicente, S.M. [EFDA-Close Support Unit, Garching (Germany); Aktaa, J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe (Germany); Ahlgren, T. [University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Antusch, S. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe (Germany); Armstrong, D.E.J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Balden, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Baluc, N. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, CRPP EPFL - Materials, 5232 Villigen/PSI (Switzerland); Barthe, M.-F. [CNRS, UPR3079 CEMHTI, 1D Avenue, de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Universite d' Orleans, Polytech ou Faculte des Sciences, Avenue du Parc Floral, BP 6749, 45067 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Basuki, W.W. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe (Germany); Battabyal, M. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, CRPP EPFL - Materials, 5232 Villigen/PSI (Switzerland); Becquart, C.S. [Unite Materiaux et Transformations, UMR 8207, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Blagoeva, D. [NRG, Nuclear Research and consultancy Group, Petten (Netherlands); Boldyryeva, H. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Za Slovankou 3, 18200 Praha (Czech Republic); and others

    2013-01-15

    The current magnetic confinement nuclear fusion power reactor concepts going beyond ITER are based on assumptions about the availability of materials with extreme mechanical, heat, and neutron load capacity. In Europe, the development of such structural and armour materials together with the necessary production, machining, and fabrication technologies is pursued within the EFDA long-term fusion materials programme. This paper reviews the progress of work within the programme in the area of tungsten and tungsten alloys. Results, conclusions, and future projections are summarized for each of the programme's main subtopics, which are: (1) fabrication, (2) structural W materials, (3) W armour materials, and (4) materials science and modelling. It gives a detailed overview of the latest results on materials research, fabrication processes, joining options, high heat flux testing, plasticity studies, modelling, and validation experiments.

  9. New applications of planar image fusion in clinical nuclear medicine and radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckier, Lionel S; Koncicki, Holly M

    2006-01-01

    Fusion of multiple modalities has become an integral part of modern imaging methodology, especially in nuclear medicine where PET and SPECT scanning are frequently paired with computed tomography (CT). We have extended image fusion from the tomographic realm to planar imaging in 2 specific applications. In the first, we combine planar scintigraphic images with photographic images of the body part of interest, using a predetermined transformation of images between the frames of reference. This technique is especially helpful in "hot spot" imaging applications where minimal background activity makes it difficult to locate abnormalities in an anatomic context. The technique has been demonstrated to be accurate, and results in increased reader confidence. We have also begun fusing orthopedic radiographs with photographic images of the extremities, using fiducial markers within each image set to perform an affine transformation unique for the particular image set. Preliminary results indicate that this method is accurate, and clinical evaluation is underway.

  10. Papers presented at the fourteenth international conference on plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains the contributions of the CIEMAT's Fusion Unit to the 14th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research that was held by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Wurzburg, Germany from 30 September to 7 October 1992. Three papers were presented that summarized the main lines of work done in the Unit during the previous two years: The first one on the theoretical advances in the understanding of the Flexible Heliac TJ-II under construction, the second on the confinement studies performed in the operating TJ-I Tokamak and the third one on the description of the physical properties of the soon to be started TJ-IU Torsatron. (Author) 25 refs

  11. Accelerator driven reactors and nuclear waste management projects in the Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janouch, F. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Mach, R. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Rez near Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-10-01

    The Czech Republic is almost the only country in the central Europe which continues with the construction of nuclear power reactors. Its small territory and dense population causes public worries concerning the disposal of the spent nuclear fuel. The Czech nuclear scientists and the power companies and the nuclear industries are therefore looking for alternative solutions. The Los Alamos ATW project had received a positive response in the Czech mass-media and even in the industrial and governmental quarters. The recent scientific symposium {open_quotes}Accelerator driven reactors and nuclear waste management{close_quotes} convened at the Liblice castle near Prague, 27-29. 6. 1994 and sponsored by the Czech Energy Company CEZ, reviewed the competencies and experimental basis in the Czech republic and made the first attempt to formulate the national approach and to establish international collaboration in this area.

  12. Nuclear data for the production of radioisotopes in fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.T.; Schenter, R.E.; Mann, F.M.; Ikeda, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The fusion materials irradiation facility (FMIF) is a neutron source generator that will produce a high-intensity 14-MeV neutron field for testing candidate fusion materials under reactor irradiation conditions. The construction of such a facility is one of the very important development stages toward realization of fusion energy as a practical energy source for electricity production. As a result of the high-intensity neutron field, 10 MW/m 2 or more equivalent neutron wall loading, and the relatively high-energy (10- to 20-MeV) neutrons, the FMIF, as future fusion reactors, also bears the potential capability of producing a significant quantity of radioisotopes. A study is being conducted to identify the potential capability of the FMIF to produce radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications. Two types of radioisotopes are involved: one is already available; the second might not be readily available using conventional production methods. For those radioisotopes that are not readily available, the FMIF could develop significant benefits for future generations as a result of the availability of such radioisotopes for medical or industrial applications. The current production of radioisotopes could help finance the operation of the FMIF for irradiating the candidate fusion materials; thus this concept is attractive. In any case, nuclear data are needed for calculating the neutron flux and spectrum in the FMIF and the potential production rates of these isotopes. In this paper, the authors report the result of a preliminary investigation on the production of 99 Mo, the parent radioisotope for 99m Tc

  13. Disposition of nuclear waste using subcritical accelerator-driven systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venneri, F.; Li, N.; Williamson, M.; Houts, M.; Lawrence, G.

    1998-01-01

    Studies have shown that the repository long-term radiological risk is from the long-lived transuranics and the fission products Tc-99 and I-129, thermal loading concerns arise mainly form the short-lived fission products Sr-90 and Cs-137. In relation to the disposition of nuclear waste, ATW is expected to accomplish the following: (1) destroy over 99.9% of the actinides; (2) destroy over 99.9% of the Tc and I; (3) separate Sr and Cs (short half-life isotopes); (4) separate uranium; (5) produce electricity. In the ATW concept, spent fuel would be shipped to a ATW site where the plutonium, other transuranics and selected long-lived fission products would be destroyed by fission or transmutation in their only pass through the facility. This approach contrasts with the present-day reprocessing practices in Europe and Japan, during which high purity plutonium is produced and used in the fabrication of fresh mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) that is shipped off-site for use in light water reactors

  14. Future on the ITER program. On a branch of research on nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaike, Akira

    2000-01-01

    As a huge cost for research and development of nuclear fusion is required, some international cooperative research such as ITER program have been intended to promote, to which Japanese response is required. As the program can be understood on its meaning at a viewpoint of promotion of basic science, concept on a key of energy problem is not insufficient yet And, its effect on technical problems and environment cannot be neglected Here was shown some proposals necessity for discussion on how the program had to be promoted under consideration of these problems. When a large scale program consuming national budget will be carried out, it is natural that agreement of national peoples must be obtained. Regretfully, in Japan discussion on science program above all nuclear policy has scarcely been experienced at citizens' levels, and some bitter experiences, where the concerned have promoted it in one side under a concept without any change once decided, have been pressured without any response to scientific advancements and social changes. Therefore, future plan on the nuclear fusion must be carried out a number of thorough discussion at a wide range from various viewpoints such as its realizing feasibility, safety, economics, and so forth, to promote careful adaptabilities. And, the concerned under promotion of the program and the relatives in the academic community seem to have a responsibility to easily explain present condition and scope of the plan to not only scientists but also citizens to awake them to promote its discussion with them. (G.K.)

  15. Mission to Mars by catalyzed nuclear reactions of the commercialized cold fusion power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Tae Ho [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The chemical compound source is deficient to reach to the power as much as the journey to Mars, unless the massive equipment is installed like the nuclear fusion reactor. However, there is very significant limitations of making up the facility due to the propellant power. Therefore, the light and cheap energy source, Low energy nuclear reactions (LENRs), powered rocket has been proposed. In this paper, the power conditions by LENRs are analyzed. After the successful Apollo mission to Moon of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the U.S. government, the civilian companies have proposed for the manned mission to Mars for the commercial journey purposes. The nuclear power has been a critical issue for the energy source in the travel, especially, by the LENR of LENUCO, Champaign, USA. As the velocity of the rocket increases, the mass flow rate decreases. It could be imaginable to take the reasonable velocity of spacecraft. The energy of the travel system is and will be created for the better one in economical and safe method. There is the imagination of boarding pass for spacecraft ticket shows the selected companies of cold fusion products. In order to solve the limitations of the conventional power sources like the chemical and solar energies, it is reasonable to design LENR concept. Since the economical and safe spacecraft is very important in the long journey on and beyond the Mars orbit, a new energy source, LENR, should be studied much more.

  16. Bump evolution driven by the x-ray ablation Richtmyer-Meshkov effect in plastic inertial confinement fusion Ablators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loomis Eric

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Growth of hydrodynamic instabilities at the interfaces of inertial confinement fusion capsules (ICF due to ablator and fuel non-uniformities are a primary concern for the ICF program. Recently, observed jetting and parasitic mix into the fuel were attributed to isolated defects on the outer surface of the capsule. Strategies for mitigation of these defects exist, however, they require reduced uncertainties in Equation of State (EOS models prior to invoking them. In light of this, we have begun a campaign to measure the growth of isolated defects (bumps due to x-ray ablation Richtmyer-Meshkov in plastic ablators to validate these models. Experiments used hohlraums with radiation temperatures near 70 eV driven by 15 beams from the Omega laser (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, NY, which sent a ∼1.25Mbar shock into a planar CH target placed over one laser entrance hole. Targets consisted of 2-D arrays of quasi-gaussian bumps (10 microns tall, 34 microns FWHM deposited on the surface facing into the hohlraum. On-axis radiography with a saran (Cl Heα − 2.76keV backlighter was used to measure bump evolution prior to shock breakout. Shock speed measurements were also performed to determine target conditions. Simulations using the LEOS 5310 and SESAME 7592 models required the simulated laser power be turned down to 80 and 88%, respectively to match observed shock speeds. Both LEOS 5310 and SESAME 7592 simulations agreed with measured bump areal densities out to 6 ns where ablative RM oscillations were observed in previous laser-driven experiments, but did not occur in the x-ray driven case. The QEOS model, conversely, over predicted shock speeds and under predicted areal density in the bump.

  17. Failure of the Woods-Saxon nuclear potential to simultaneously reproduce precise fusion and elastic scattering measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, A.; Hinde, D. J.; Dasgupta, M.; Newton, J. O.; Butt, R. D.; Hagino, K.

    2007-01-01

    A precise fusion excitation function has been measured for the 12 C+ 208 Pb reaction at energies around the barrier, allowing the fusion barrier distribution to be extracted. The fusion cross sections at high energies differ significantly from existing fusion data. Coupled reaction channels calculations have been carried out with the code FRESCO. A bare potential previously claimed to uniquely describe a wide range of 12 C+ 208 Pb near-barrier reaction channels failed to reproduce the new fusion data. The nuclear potential diffuseness of 0.95 fm which fits the fusion excitation function over a broad energy range fails to reproduce the elastic scattering. A diffuseness of 0.55 fm reproduces the fusion barrier distribution and elastic scattering data, but significantly overpredicts the fusion cross sections at high energies. This may be due to physical processes not included in the calculations. To constrain calculations, it is desirable to have precisely measured fusion cross sections, especially at energies around the barrier

  18. IAEA technical meeting on nuclear data library for advanced systems - Fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, R.; Mengoni, A.

    2008-04-01

    A Technical Meeting on 'Nuclear Data Library for Advanced Systems - Fusion Devices' was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 31 October to 2 November 2007. The main objective of the initiative has been to define a proposal and detailed plan of activities for a Co-ordinated Research Project on this subject. Details of the discussions which took place at the meeting, including a review of the current activities in the field, a list of recommendations and a proposed timeline schedule for the CRP are summarized in this report. (author)

  19. Evaluation of the fusion-related neutron nuclear data for JENDL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Satoshi

    1988-01-01

    Status of the neutron nuclear data evaluations for JENDL-3 will be described for nuclides important in the development of D-T fusion reactors. In this article, however, only explanation of the evaluations for the very light mass region will be presented to avoid overlapping with what are given in another papers submitted to this seminar. Emphases are placed on the tritium production cross sections, inelastic scattering cross sections including the double-differential neutron emission spectrum (DDX), threshold reaction cross sections and photon production cross sections. The methods employed to prepare JENDL-3T library and their results will be summarized. (author)

  20. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C. [Department of Microbiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Dauer, William [Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Johnson, David [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR 97201 (United States); Roller, Richard J., E-mail: richard-roller@uiowa.edu [Department of Microbiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway. - Highlights: • We show that wild-type HSV can induce breakdown of the nuclear envelope in a specific cell system. • The viral fusion proteins gB and gH are required for induction of nuclear envelope breakdown. • Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the HSV UL34 gene.

  1. Oscillatory vapour shielding of liquid metal walls in nuclear fusion devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eden, G G; Kvon, V; van de Sanden, M C M; Morgan, T W

    2017-08-04

    Providing an efficacious plasma facing surface between the extreme plasma heat exhaust and the structural materials of nuclear fusion devices is a major challenge on the road to electricity production by fusion power plants. The performance of solid plasma facing surfaces may become critically reduced over time due to progressing damage accumulation. Liquid metals, however, are now gaining interest in solving the challenge of extreme heat flux hitting the reactor walls. A key advantage of liquid metals is the use of vapour shielding to reduce the plasma exhaust. Here we demonstrate that this phenomenon is oscillatory by nature. The dynamics of a Sn vapour cloud are investigated by exposing liquid Sn targets to H and He plasmas at heat fluxes greater than 5 MW m -2 . The observations indicate the presence of a dynamic equilibrium between the plasma and liquid target ruled by recombinatory processes in the plasma, leading to an approximately stable surface temperature.Vapour shielding is one of the interesting mechanisms for reducing the heat load to plasma facing components in fusion reactors. Here the authors report on the observation of a dynamic equilibrium between the plasma and the divertor liquid Sn surface leading to an overall stable surface temperature.

  2. D-D nuclear fusion processes induced in polyethylene foams by TW Laser-generated plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrisi L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deuterium-Deuterium fusion processes were generated by focusing the 3 TW PALS Laser on solid deuterated polyethylene targets placed in vacuum. Deuterium ion acceleration of the order of 4 MeV was obtained using laser irradiance Iλ2 ∼ 5 × 1016 W μm2/cm2 on the target. Thin and thick targets, at low and high density, were irradiated and plasma properties were monitored “on line” and “off line”. The ion emission from plasma was monitored with Thomson Parabola Spectrometer, track detectors and ion collectors. Fast semiconductor detectors based on SiC and fast plastic scintillators, both employed in time-of-flight configuration, have permitted to detect the characteristic 3.0 MeV protons and 2.45 MeV neutrons emission from the nuclear fusion reactions. From massive absorbent targets we have evaluated the neutron flux by varying from negligible values up to about 5 × 107 neutrons per laser shot in the case of foams targets, indicating a reaction rate of the order of 108 fusion events per laser shot using “advanced targets”.

  3. The nuclear fusion reactor. How close are we to its realisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackner, K.

    2001-01-01

    A fusion power plant would rely on practically unlimited supplies of primary materials, and possess very favourable environmental and safety properties. Exploiting the nuclear fusion reaction for continuous power production requires, however, the solution of some of the most demanding physics and technology issues. At the same time the final proof of principle of a self-sustaining fusion reaction can only be delivered in a device with a thermal power rating in the 1 GW range, as the power production by fusion reactions increases much stronger with volume than the energy losses from a hot plasma. A range of well conceived tokamak devices have generated during the last couple of decades the experimental basis and the physics understanding for proceeding now to the construction of such a demonstration device: ITER. This device will also incorporate, partly in the form of test modules, nearly all the critical technologies required for the operation of a commercial power plant. A notable exception to this are materials, where the much lower neutron fluence of ITER allows to work with readily available, conventional steels, whereas power plants will have to use radiation resistant, low-activation materials now under development. The presentation summarizes briefly the development path that has led to the ITER design, and the physics criteria determining its layout. Seven technologies were identified by the international design team (constituted by engineers and scientists from Japan, the European Union, the Russian Federation, and the USA) as critical, and made subject to seven large R and D projects, successfully carried out with an investment of about 400 Million $. The roadmap for the development beyond ITER foresees as subsequent step a power plant (DEMO) that will already be largely identical to the first generation of commercial installations. The physics of this device will be completely verified by the beginning of its planning by the operating experience of ITER

  4. A Spherical Torus Nuclear Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion Vehicle Concept for Fast Interplanetary Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Craig H.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.; Juhasz, Albert J.

    1998-01-01

    A conceptual vehicle design enabling fast outer solar system travel was produced predicated on a small aspect ratio spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor. Initial requirements were for a human mission to Saturn with a greater than 5% payload mass fraction and a one way trip time of less than one year. Analysis revealed that the vehicle could deliver a 108 mt crew habitat payload to Saturn rendezvous in 235 days, with an initial mass in low Earth orbit of 2,941 mt. Engineering conceptual design, analysis, and assessment was performed on all ma or systems including payload, central truss, nuclear reactor (including divertor and fuel injector), power conversion (including turbine, compressor, alternator, radiator, recuperator, and conditioning), magnetic nozzle, neutral beam injector, tankage, start/re-start reactor and battery, refrigeration, communications, reaction control, and in-space operations. Detailed assessment was done on reactor operations, including plasma characteristics, power balance, power utilization, and component design.

  5. Applications of Research Reactors Towards Research on Materials for Nuclear Fusion Technology. Proceedings of a Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    Controlled nuclear fusion is widely considered to represent a nearly unlimited source of energy. Recent progress in the quest for fusion energy includes the design and current construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), for which a licence has recently been obtained as a first of its kind fusion nuclear installation. ITER is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy production in excess of 500 MW for several consecutive minutes. ITER, however, will not be able to address all the nuclear fusion technology issues associated with the design, construction and operation of a commercial fusion power plant. The demonstration of an adequate tritium or fuel breeding ratio, as well as the development, characterization and testing of structural and functional materials in an integrated nuclear fusion environment, are examples of issues for which ITER is unable to deliver complete answers. To fill this knowledge gap, several facilities are being discussed, such as the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility and, eventually, a fusion demonstration power plant (DEMO). However, for these facilities, a vast body of preliminary research remains to be performed, for instance, concerning the preselection and testing of suitable materials able to withstand the high temperature and pressure, and intense radiation environment of a fusion reactor. Given their capacity for material testing in terms of available intense neutron fluxes, dedicated irradiation facilities and post-irradiation examination laboratories, high flux research reactors or material test reactors (MTRs) will play an indispensable role in the development of fusion technology. Moreover, research reactors have already achieved an esteemed legacy in the understanding of material properties and behaviour, and the knowledge gained from experiments in fission materials in certain cases can be applied to fusion systems, particularly those

  6. Limitation of fusion power plant installation on future power grids under the effect of renewable and nuclear power sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Shutaro, E-mail: takeda.shutarou.55r@st.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Advanced Integrated Studies in Human Survivability, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto (Japan); Sakurai, Shigeki [Graduate School of Advanced Integrated Studies in Human Survivability, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto (Japan); Yamamoto, Yasushi [Faculty of Engineering Science, Kansai University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta; Konishi, Satoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Future power grids would be unstable due to renewable and nuclear power sources. • Output interruptions of fusion plant would cause disturbances to future grids. • Simulation results suggested they would create limitations in fusion installation. • A novel diagram was presented to illustrate this suggested limitation. - Abstract: Future power grids would be unstable because of the larger share of renewable and nuclear power sources. This instability might bring some additional difficulties to fusion plant installation. Therefore, the authors carried out a quantitative feasibility study from the aspect of grid stability through simulation. Results showed that the more renewable and nuclear sources are linked to a grid, the greater disturbance the grid experiences upon a sudden output interruption of a fusion power plant, e.g. plasma disruption. The frequency deviations surpassed 0.2 Hz on some grids, suggesting potential limitations of fusion plant installation on future grids. To clearly show the suggested limitations of fusion plant installations, a novel diagram was presented.

  7. Radioactivity and fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, H.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is expected to give an ultimate solution to energy problems over the long term. From recent progress in developing technology for fusion reactors, we can anticipate a prototype fusion reactor by 2030. This review article describes the present status of nuclear fusion research, including muon catalyzed fusion (μCF) which attracts quite new physical interest. Tritium is an essential component of fusion reactors, because the first-stage fusion reactors will utilize a mixture of deuterium and tritium as their fuel. The knowledge about tritium as well as the fusion-neutron induced radioactivity is summarized in terms of nuclear fusion research. (orig.)

  8. Evaluating laser-driven Bremsstrahlung radiation sources for imaging and analysis of nuclear waste packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher P; Brenner, Ceri M; Stitt, Camilla A; Armstrong, Chris; Rusby, Dean R; Mirfayzi, Seyed R; Wilson, Lucy A; Alejo, Aarón; Ahmed, Hamad; Allott, Ric; Butler, Nicholas M H; Clarke, Robert J; Haddock, David; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Higginson, Adam; Murphy, Christopher; Notley, Margaret; Paraskevoulakos, Charilaos; Jowsey, John; McKenna, Paul; Neely, David; Kar, Satya; Scott, Thomas B

    2016-11-15

    A small scale sample nuclear waste package, consisting of a 28mm diameter uranium penny encased in grout, was imaged by absorption contrast radiography using a single pulse exposure from an X-ray source driven by a high-power laser. The Vulcan laser was used to deliver a focused pulse of photons to a tantalum foil, in order to generate a bright burst of highly penetrating X-rays (with energy >500keV), with a source size of waste materials. This feasibility study successfully demonstrated non-destructive radiography of encapsulated, high density, nuclear material. With recent developments of high-power laser systems, to 10Hz operation, a laser-driven multi-modal beamline for waste monitoring applications is envisioned. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Protein Sub-Nuclear Localization Based on Effective Fusion Representations and Dimension Reduction Algorithm LDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunfang Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An effective representation of a protein sequence plays a crucial role in protein sub-nuclear localization. The existing representations, such as dipeptide composition (DipC, pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC and position specific scoring matrix (PSSM, are insufficient to represent protein sequence due to their single perspectives. Thus, this paper proposes two fusion feature representations of DipPSSM and PseAAPSSM to integrate PSSM with DipC and PseAAC, respectively. When constructing each fusion representation, we introduce the balance factors to value the importance of its components. The optimal values of the balance factors are sought by genetic algorithm. Due to the high dimensionality of the proposed representations, linear discriminant analysis (LDA is used to find its important low dimensional structure, which is essential for classification and location prediction. The numerical experiments on two public datasets with KNN classifier and cross-validation tests showed that in terms of the common indexes of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and MCC, the proposed fusing representations outperform the traditional representations in protein sub-nuclear localization, and the representation treated by LDA outperforms the untreated one.

  10. Computer simulations of the scraper element for the nuclear fusion experiment Wendelstein 7-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelbe, Hauke; Sunn Pedersen, Thomas; Geiger, Joachim; Bozhenkov, Sergey; Feng, Yuehe [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    The nuclear fusion experiment Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X), located in Greifswald (Germany), will go into operation in a few months (summer 2015). Than W7-X will become the world leading stellarator. The stellarator concept is intrinsically capable of steady state operation while other nuclear fusion concepts based on magnetic confinement such as the Tokamak have to operate in pulsed mode. In W7-X the plasma-wall interaction will take place at a specifically designed region called the divertor. The divertor itself has regions with different heat load capabilities, the most prominent parts can withstand energy fluxes of up to 10 MW/m{sup 2} in steady state operation (almost the energy flux at the surface of the sun). Simulations of certain experimental scenarios have shown that the heat flux limit may be exceeded at one special region of the divertor where the cooling capabilities are less strong. There are several options to deal with this challenge. One of them are an additional divertor plate, called the scraper element (SE), that takes up some of the heat load that would otherwise hit and damage the vulnerable region. The talk is about the effects of an SE in steady state operation as well as the development of new magnetic field configurations to test the SE in an early operational phase.

  11. Low-Z coating as a first wall of nuclear fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, Tatsuo; Okada, Masatoshi

    1984-01-01

    The tokamak nuclear fusion devices of the largest scale in the world, TFTR in USA and JET in Europe, started the operation from the end of 1982 to 1983. Also in Japan, the tokamak JT-60 is scheduled to begin the operation in 1985. One of the technological obstacles is the problem of first walls facing directly to plasma and subjected to high particle loading and thermal loading. Moreover, first walls achieve the active role of controlling impurities in plasma and recycling hydrogen isotopes. It is impossible to find a single material which satisfies all these requirements. The compounding of materials can create a material having new function, but also has the meaning of expanding the range of material selection. One of the material compounding methods is surface coating. In this paper, as the materials for first walls, the characteristics of low Z materials are discussed from the design examples of actual takamak nuclear fusion devices. The outline of first walls is explained. High priority is given to the impurity control in plasma, and in view of plasma energy emissivity and the rate of self sputtering, low Z material coating seems to be the solution. The merits and the problems of such low Z material coating are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  12. Study of the Nuclear Fusion in $d \\mu{}^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Bystritsky, V M; Gerasimov, V V; Knowles, P E; Mulhauser, F; Popov, N P; Volnykh, V P; Wozniak, J

    2005-01-01

    Experimental study of the nuclear fusion reaction in charge-asymmetrical $d \\mu{}^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ complex ($d \\mu{}^{3}\\mathrm{He} \\rightarrow \\alpha$ (3.5 MeV) + $p$ (14.64 MeV)) is presented. The 14.64-MeV protons were detected by three pairs of Si($dE-E$) telescopes placed around the cryogenic target filled with the $\\mathrm{D}_2 + {}^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ gas at 34 K. The 6.85 keV $\\gamma$ rays emitted during the de-excitation of the $d \\mu{}^3 \\mathrm{He}$ complex were detected by a germanium detector. The measurements were performed at two $\\mathrm{D}_2 + {^{3}\\mathrm{He}}$ target densities, $\\varphi = 0.0585$ and $\\varphi = 0.169$ (relative to liquid hydrogen density) with an atomic concentration of $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ $c_{{}^3\\mathrm{He}} = 0.0469$. The values of the effective rate of nuclear fusion in $d \\mu{}^3\\mathrm{He}$ was obtained for the first time: $\\tilde{\\lambda}_{f} = (4.5^{+2.6}_{-2.0}) \\cdot 10^5 \\mbox{s}^{-1} (\\varphi = 0.0585)$; $\\tilde{\\lambda}_{f} = (6.9^{+3.6}_{-3.0}) \\cdot 10^5 \\mbox{s}^{-...

  13. Protein Sub-Nuclear Localization Based on Effective Fusion Representations and Dimension Reduction Algorithm LDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shunfang; Liu, Shuhui

    2015-12-19

    An effective representation of a protein sequence plays a crucial role in protein sub-nuclear localization. The existing representations, such as dipeptide composition (DipC), pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and position specific scoring matrix (PSSM), are insufficient to represent protein sequence due to their single perspectives. Thus, this paper proposes two fusion feature representations of DipPSSM and PseAAPSSM to integrate PSSM with DipC and PseAAC, respectively. When constructing each fusion representation, we introduce the balance factors to value the importance of its components. The optimal values of the balance factors are sought by genetic algorithm. Due to the high dimensionality of the proposed representations, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is used to find its important low dimensional structure, which is essential for classification and location prediction. The numerical experiments on two public datasets with KNN classifier and cross-validation tests showed that in terms of the common indexes of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and MCC, the proposed fusing representations outperform the traditional representations in protein sub-nuclear localization, and the representation treated by LDA outperforms the untreated one.

  14. Evidence of parasexual activity in "asexual amoebae" Cochliopodium spp. (Amoebozoa): extensive cellular and nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekle, Yonas I; Anderson, O Roger; Lecky, Ariel F

    2014-09-01

    The majority of microbial eukaryotes have long been considered asexual, though new evidence indicates sex, or sexual-like (parasexual) behaviors that deviate from the usual union of two gametes, among other variant aspects. Over a dozen amoebozoans are implicated to have sexual stages. However, the exact mechanism by which sex occurs in these lineages remains elusive. This is mainly due to the diverse quality and cryptic nature of their life cycle. In this study we present evidence of some previously unreported aspects of the life cycle of an amoeba, Cochliopodium, that undergoes unusual intraspecific interactions using light microscopy and immunocytochemistry. Similar to other amoebozoans, Cochliopodium, is considered asexual with no published reports of sex or parasexuality. We also investigated environmental conditions that govern the observed intraspecific interactions. Both light microscopic and immunocytochemistry evidence demonstrates Cochliopodium undergoes cellular fusion (plasmogamy) and nuclear fusion (karyogamy). Large plasmodia eventually undergo karyogamy and contain large fused, polyploid, nuclei. These are observed to fragment, subsequently, by karyotomy (nuclear fission) and cytoplasmic fission to yield uninucleated amoebae. This process could lead to a non-meiotic, parasexual exchange of chromosomes in Cochliopodium. These findings strongly suggest that Cochliopodium is involved in parasexual activity and should no longer be considered strictly asexual. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Lessons learnt from ITER safety and licensing for DEMO and future nuclear fusion facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Neill, E-mail: neill.taylor@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Cortes, Pierre [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St. Paul lez Durance (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •The ITER safety and licensing process successfully reached the stage of the granting of the authorization to construct the facility. •Despite differences between ITER and DEMO, there are lessons to be learned for DEMO safety and licensing. •A number of issues have been identified where development is required for DEMO, strategies to be decided, technical issues to be resolved. -- Abstract: One of the strong motivations for pursuing the development of fusion energy is its potentially low environmental impact and very good safety performance. But this safety and environmental potential can only be fully realized by careful design choices. For DEMO and other fusion facilities that will require nuclear licensing, S and E objectives and criteria should be set at an early stage and taken into account when choosing basic design options and throughout the design process. Studies in recent decades of the safety of fusion power plant concepts give a useful basis on which to build the S and E approach and to assess the impact of design choices. The experience of licensing ITER is of particular value, even though there are some important differences between ITER and DEMO. The ITER project has developed a safety case, produced a preliminary safety report and had it examined by the French nuclear safety authorities, leading to the licence to construct the facility. The key technical issues that arose during this process are recalled, particularly those that may also have an impact on DEMO safety. These include issues related to postulated accident scenarios, environmental releases during operation, occupational radiation exposure, and radioactive waste.

  16. Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Boyd, J K; Powers, J J; Seifried, J E

    2008-10-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system, called LIFE, to generate power and burn nuclear waste. We utilize inertial confinement fusion to drive a subcritical fission blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. It is composed of TRISO-based fuel cooled by the molten salt flibe. Low-yield (37.5 MJ) targets and a repetition rate of 13.3 Hz produce a 500 MW fusion source that is coupled to the subcritical blanket, which provides an additional gain of 4-8, depending on the fuel. In the present work, we describe the neutron transport and nuclear burnup analysis. We utilize standard analysis tools including, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, ORIGEN2 and Monteburns to perform the nuclear design. These analyses focus primarily on a fuel composed of depleted uranium not requiring chemical reprocessing or enrichment. However, other fuels such as weapons grade plutonium and highly-enriched uranium are also under consideration. In addition, we have developed a methodology using {sup 6}Li as a burnable poison to replace the tritium burned in the fusion targets and to maintain constant power over the lifetime of the engine. The results from depleted uranium analyses suggest up to 99% burnup of actinides is attainable while maintaining full power at 2GW for more than five decades.

  17. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of the Structural Topology and Lipid Interactions of a Viral Fusion Protein Chimera Containing the Fusion Peptide and Transmembrane Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongwei; Lee, Myungwoon; Liao, Shu-Yu; Hong, Mei

    2016-12-13

    The fusion peptide (FP) and transmembrane domain (TMD) of viral fusion proteins play important roles during virus-cell membrane fusion, by inducing membrane curvature and transient dehydration. The structure of the water-soluble ectodomain of viral fusion proteins has been extensively studied crystallographically, but the structures of the FP and TMD bound to phospholipid membranes are not well understood. We recently investigated the conformations and lipid interactions of the separate FP and TMD peptides of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) fusion protein F using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. These studies provide structural information about the two domains when they are spatially well separated in the fusion process. To investigate how these two domains are structured relative to each other in the postfusion state, when the ectodomain forms a six-helix bundle that is thought to force the FP and TMD together in the membrane, we have now expressed and purified a chimera of the FP and TMD, connected by a Gly-Lys linker, and measured the chemical shifts and interdomain contacts of the protein in several lipid membranes. The FP-TMD chimera exhibits α-helical chemical shifts in all the membranes examined and does not cause strong curvature of lamellar membranes or membranes with negative spontaneous curvature. These properties differ qualitatively from those of the separate peptides, indicating that the FP and TMD interact with each other in the lipid membrane. However, no 13 C- 13 C cross peaks are observed in two-dimensional correlation spectra, suggesting that the two helices are not tightly associated. These results suggest that the ectodomain six-helix bundle does not propagate into the membrane to the two hydrophobic termini. However, the loosely associated FP and TMD helices are found to generate significant negative Gaussian curvature to membranes that possess spontaneous positive curvature, consistent with the notion that the FP-TMD assembly may

  18. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.7--nuclear fusion and plasma physics sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 22 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the seventh one, the content is about nuclear fusion and plasma physics sub-volume

  19. Accelerator-driven nuclear synergetic systems-an overview of the research activities in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde, H.; Baecklin, A.; Carius, S. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The rapid development of the accelerator technology which enables the construction of reliable and very intense neutron sources has initiated a growing interest for accelerator driven transmutation systems in Sweden. After the Specialist Meeting on Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology for Radwaste and other Applications on 24-28 June 1991 at Saltsjoebaden, Sweden, the research activities oriented towards accelerator-driven systems have been started at several research centers in Sweden. Also the governmental agencies responsible for the spent fuel policy showed a positive attitude to these activities through a limited financial support, particularly for studies of the safety aspects of these systems. Also the nuclear power industry and utilities show a positive interest in the research on these concepts. The present paper presents an overview of the Swedish research activities on accelerator-driven systems and the proposed future coordination, organizations and prospects for this research in the context of the national nuclear energy and spent fuel policy. The Swedish perspective for international cooperation is also described.

  20. Fusion-driven actinide burner design study. Second quarterly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, J.W.H.; Gold, R.E.; Holman, R.R.

    1975-11-01

    The Second Quarterly Progress Report summarizes the status at the mid-point of the conceptual design effort. The fusion driver continues to pose some of the principal design problems due to the necessity of advancing plasma engineering and technology for long pulse, high duty cycle operation. The development of credible design solutions to these problems is one of the major objectives of the study. The TF and OH coil designs have been modified to provide a more compact arrangement in the nose region of the TF coils and to ensure fully cryostable operation. A unique concept has been developed to effectively shield the TF coils from the poloidal fields. A vacuum vessel concept which separates the functions for sustaining the differential pressure load and for sealing the vacuum system is described. The thickness of the blanket has been decreased to reduce the power density and the actinide inventory. Determination and presentation of actinide depletion characteristics represents a major element thus far in the study and is a principal objective. Evaluation of the changes in the hazard only during irradiation proved to be an inadequate measure of the reduction in long term hazards due to the importance of radioactive daughter products which appear much later in time. Therefore, comparisons have been made of long term decay characteristics before and after irradiation in the actinide burner. It has also been noted that some of the actinides that are produced during irradiation have beneficial applications as radioisotopic power sources. These and other considerations suggest that alternate approaches to assessing the waste management problem be considered to develop a meaningful perspective on long term hazards from the actinides

  1. Fusion-driven actinide burner design study. Second quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, J.W.H.; Gold, R.E.; Holman, R.R.

    1975-11-01

    The Second Quarterly Progress Report summarizes the status at the mid-point of the conceptual design effort. The fusion driver continues to pose some of the principal design problems due to the necessity of advancing plasma engineering and technology for long pulse, high duty cycle operation. The development of credible design solutions to these problems is one of the major objectives of the study. The TF and OH coil designs have been modified to provide a more compact arrangement in the nose region of the TF coils and to ensure fully cryostable operation. A unique concept has been developed to effectively shield the TF coils from the poloidal fields. A vacuum vessel concept which separates the functions for sustaining the differential pressure load and for sealing the vacuum system is described. The thickness of the blanket has been decreased to reduce the power density and the actinide inventory. Determination and presentation of actinide depletion characteristics represents a major element thus far in the study and is a principal objective. Evaluation of the changes in the hazard only during irradiation proved to be an inadequate measure of the reduction in long term hazards due to the importance of radioactive daughter products which appear much later in time. Therefore, comparisons have been made of long term decay characteristics before and after irradiation in the actinide burner. It has also been noted that some of the actinides that are produced during irradiation have beneficial applications as radioisotopic power sources. These and other considerations suggest that alternate approaches to assessing the waste management problem be considered to develop a meaningful perspective on long term hazards from the actinides.

  2. NNDC [National Nuclear Data Center] support for fusion nuclear data needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunford, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The National Data Center (NNDC) located at Brookhaven National Laboratory is an outgrowth of the Sigma Center founded by D.J. Hughes to compile low energy neutron reaction data in the 1950's. The center has played a lead role in the production of evaluated nuclear data (ENDF/B) for the United States nuclear power program. This data file, now in its sixth version, is produced as a cooperative effort of many DOE funded organizations via the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (GSEWG). The NNDC's role, in addition to providing the structure and leadership for CSEWG, is to supply compiled bibliographic and experimental data and provide file processing, checking, distribution and documentation services. In the past, the NNDC has also produced nuclear data evaluations.lt. slash

  3. Fusion: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2006-01-01

    The article gives an overview and introduction to the activities of SCK-CEN's research programme on fusion. The decision to construct the ITER international nuclear fusion experiment in Cadarache is highlighted. A summary of the Belgian contributions to fusion research is given with particular emphasis on studies of radiation effects on diagnostics systems, radiation effects on remote handling sensing systems, fusion waste management and socio-economic studies

  4. Nuclear data for accelerator-driven transmutation. Annual report 1998/99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.; Johansson, C.; Klug, J.; Olsson, N.; Renberg, P.U.

    1999-09-01

    The present project, supported as a research task agreement by the Nuclear Power Inspectorate, the Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, Barsebaeck Kraft AB and Vattenfall AB, started according to the plan 1998-07-01. From 1999-01-01 the project also receives support from the Defence Research Institute. The primary objective from the supporting organizations is to promote research and research education of relevance for development of the national competence within nuclear energy. The aim of the project is in short to: promote development of the competence within nuclear physics and nuclear technology by supporting PhD students; push forward the international research front regarding fundamental nuclear data within the presently highlighted research area 'accelerator-driven transmutation'; strengthen the Swedish influence within the mentioned research area by expanding the international contact network; and constitute a basis for Swedish participation in the nuclear data activities at IAEA and OECD/NEA. The project is run by the Department of Neutron Research at Uppsala University, and is utilizing the unique neutron beam facility at the national The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL) at Uppsala University. In this document, we give a status report after the first year (1998-07-01--1999-06-30) of the project

  5. Nuclear data for accelerator-driven transmutation. Annual report 1998/99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomgren, J.; Johansson, C.; Klug, J.; Olsson, N.; Renberg, P.U. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Neutron Research. The Svedberg Lab.

    1999-09-01

    The present project, supported as a research task agreement by the Nuclear Power Inspectorate, the Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, Barsebaeck Kraft AB and Vattenfall AB, started according to the plan 1998-07-01. From 1999-01-01 the project also receives support from the Defence Research Institute. The primary objective from the supporting organizations is to promote research and research education of relevance for development of the national competence within nuclear energy. The aim of the project is in short to: promote development of the competence within nuclear physics and nuclear technology by supporting PhD students; push forward the international research front regarding fundamental nuclear data within the presently highlighted research area 'accelerator-driven transmutation'; strengthen the Swedish influence within the mentioned research area by expanding the international contact network; and constitute a basis for Swedish participation in the nuclear data activities at IAEA and OECD/NEA. The project is run by the Department of Neutron Research at Uppsala University, and is utilizing the unique neutron beam facility at the national The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL) at Uppsala University. In this document, we give a status report after the first year (1998-07-01--1999-06-30) of the project.

  6. Integrated Approach to Dense Magnetized Plasmas Applications in Nuclear Fusion Technology. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2007-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    Through its coordinated research activities, the IAEA promotes the development and application of nuclear technologies in Member States. The scientific and technical knowledge required for the construction and operation of large nuclear fusion research facilities, including ITER and the Laser Megajoule in France, and the Z machine and the National Ignition Facility in the United States of America, necessitates several accompanying research and development programmes in physics and technology. This is particularly true in the areas of materials science and fusion technology. Hence, the long standing IAEA effort to conduct coordinated research projects (CRPs) in these areas is aimed at: (i) the development of appropriate technical tools to investigate the issue of materials damage and degradation in a fusion plasma environment; and (ii) the emergence of a knowledge based understanding of the various processes underlying materials damage and degradation, thereby leading to the identification of suitable candidate materials fulfilling the stringent requirements of a fusion environment in any next step facility. Dense magnetized plasma (DMP) devices serve as a first test bench for testing of fusion relevant plasma facing materials, diagnostic development and calibration, technologies and scaling to conceptual principles of larger devices while sophisticated testing facilities such as the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) are being designed. The CRP on Integrated Approach to Dense Magnetized Plasmas Applications in Nuclear Fusion Technology described herein was initiated in 2007 with the participation of 12 research institutions in 8 Member States and was concluded in 2011. It was designed with specific research objectives falling into two main categories: support to mainstream fusion research and development of DMP technology. This publication is a compilation of the individual reports submitted by the 12 CRP participants. These reports discuss

  7. X-Ray Radiography of Laser-Driven Shocks for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, A.; Radha, P. B.; Edgell, D. H.; Hu, S. X.; Boehly, T. R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Regan, S. P.; Shvydky, A.

    2017-10-01

    Side-on x-ray radiography of shock waves transiting through the planar plastic ablator and cryogenic fuel layer will be used to study shock timing, shock coalescence, shock breakout, and hydrodynamic mixing at the ablator-fuel interface. The injection of ablator material into the fuel can potentially compromise implosion target performance. The difference in refractive indices of the ablator and the fuel can be exploited to image shocks transiting the interface. An experiment to probe the ablator-fuel interface and a postprocessor to the hydrodynamic code DRACO that uses refraction enhanced imaging to view shocks are presented. The advantages of this technique to view shocks are explored and additional applications such as viewing the spatial location of multiple shocks, or the evolution of nonuniformity on shock fronts are discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  8. Review of the safety concept for fusion reactor concepts and transferability of the nuclear fission regulation to potential fusion power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeder, Juergen; Weller, Arthur; Wolf, Robert [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching (Germany); Jin, Xue Zhou; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Stieglitz, Robert; Carloni, Dario [Karlsruher Institute fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pistner, Christoph [Oeko-Institut e.V., Darmstadt (Germany); Herb, Joachim [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Koeln (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    This paper summarizes the current state of the art in science and technology of the safety concept for future fusion power plants (FPPs) and examines the transferability of the current nuclear fission regulation to the concepts of future fusion power plants. At the moment there exist only conceptual designs of future fusion power plants. The most detailed concepts with regards to safety aspects were found in the European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS). The plant concepts discussed in the PPCS are based on magnetic confinement of the plasma. The safety concept of fusion power plants, which has been developed during the last decades, is based on the safety concepts of installations with radioactive inventories, especially nuclear fission power plants. It applies the concept of defence in depth. However, there are specific differences between the implementations of the safety concepts due to the physical and technological characteristics of fusion and fission. It is analysed whether for fusion a safety concept is required comparable to the one of fission. For this the consequences of a purely hypothetical release of large amounts of the radioactive inventory of a fusion power plant and a fission power plant are compared. In such an event the evacuation criterion outside the plant is exceeded by several orders of magnitude for a fission power plant. For a fusion power plant the expected radiological consequences are of the order of the evacuation criterion. Therefore, a safety concept is also necessary for fusion to guarantee the confinement of the radioactive inventory. The comparison between the safety concepts for fusion and fission shows that the fundamental safety function ''confinement of the radioactive materials'' can be transferred directly in a methodical way. For a fusion power plant this fundamental safety function is based on both, physical barriers as well as on active retention functions. After the termination of the fusion

  9. Trend of nuclear fusion research and development that are entering the stage of experimental reactor and its charm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    By having attained the plasma characteristics that almost satisfy the aimed-at critical plasma conditions by JT-60 of Japan, TFTR of USA and JET of EU, the research and development of nuclear fusion in the world advanced to the stage of materializing the construction and operation of a fusion experimental reactor. At present, the design of the international thermo-nuclear fusion experimental reactor (ITER) reached the final stage by the international cooperation of Japan, USA, EU and Russia. In July, 1996, the informal international preparatory consultation aiming at its construction was begun by four partners. This report was made by summarizing the various technical informations which were obtained as the results of the investigation activities of the committee. In this book, the ITER project which aims at the first step for the practical use with advanced technologies, the development of core plasma research, the development of fusion reactor engineering, fusion reactor systems, the safety of fusion reactors, plasma-wall interaction by irradiation and discharge mode, the recent research and development of superconducting coils, the theoretical elucidation of plasma, electric power generation technology, the new concepts of low aspect ratio tokamak, free boundary plasma and DREAM reactor, and the development strategy are described. (K.I.)

  10. Accelerator-driven transmutation technology: a high-tech solution to some nuclear waste problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hechanova, A.E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses current technical and non-technical issues regarding the innovative concept of using accelerator-driven transmutation processes for nuclear waste management. Two complex and related issues are addressed. First, the evolution of the current U.S. conceptual design is identified to indicate that there has been sufficient technological advancement with regard to a 1991 scientific peer review to warrant the advent of a large-scale national research and development program. Second, the economics and politics of the transmutation system are examined to identify non-technical barriers to the implementation of the program. Although a number of key challenges are identified in this paper, the benefits of the research and development effort and the potential paradigm shift in attitude toward resource stewardship could greatly enhance public confidence in nuclear waste management that will have rapid positive repercussions on nuclear technology research and commercial applications. (author)

  11. Nuclear fusion as energetic source: plasma of deuterium and tritium in TFTR Tokamak. La fusion nuclear como alternativa energetica: plasmas de deuterio y tritio en el Tokamak TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagle, J.A.; Loarte, A.

    1994-01-01

    In the last two years some scientifical and technological developments in fusion energy have contributed to consider this energy as an alternative source of electric power energy. The Physics plasma laboratory of Princeton University worked with plasma of 50% deuterium and 50% tritium and produced 3 Mw of fusion power. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) opens a new way to find new energy sources.

  12. Nuclear data for accelerator-driven transmutation. Annual report 2000 / 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.; Johansson, C.; Klug, J.; Olsson, N.; Pomp, S.; Renberg, P.U.

    2001-09-01

    The present project, supported as a research task agreement by SKI, SKB, Barsebaeck Kraft AB and Vattenfall AB, started 1998-07-01. From 1999-01-01 the project also receives support from the Defence Research Establishment. The primary objective from the supporting organizations is to promote research and research education of relevance for development of the national competence within nuclear energy. The aim of the project is in short to: promote development of the competence within nuclear physics and nuclear technology by supporting licentiate and PhD students, push forward the international research front regarding fundamental nuclear data within the presently highlighted research area 'accelerator-driven transmutation', strengthen the Swedish influence within the mentioned research area by expanding the international contact network, constitute a basis for Swedish participation in the nuclear data activities at IAEA and OECD/NEA. The project is run by the Department of Neutron Research at Uppsala University, and is utilizing the unique neutron beam facility at the national The Svedberg Laboratory. In this document, we give a status report after the third year (2000-07-01--2001-06-30) of the project. The annual report also includes a report with the title: Charge-exchange giant resonances as probes of nuclear structure. This report is indexed separately

  13. FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.

    1984-10-01

    This volume contains the following chapters (1) neutronics tests, (2) fluence considerations, (3) instrumentation and test matrix, (4) non-neutron test stands, (5) accelerator-based point neutron sources, (6) utilization of fission reactors, (7) tandem mirror test facilities, (8) tokamak fusion test facilities, (9) reliability development testing impacts on fusion reactor availability, and (10) fusion development scenarios. In addition, the following appendices are included: (1) evaluation of experience from fast breeder reactors, (2) observations of experts from the fission field, (3) evaluation of experience from the aerospace industry, (4) characterization of fusion nuclear systems operating environment, (5) modelling of MFTF-α+T high gamma mode performance, and (6) small-scale, multiple effects testing at US/DOE breeder reactor in-pile facilities

  14. Multiscale integral analysis of a HT leakage in a fusion nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde, M.; Fradera, J.; Perlado, J. M.; Zamora, I.; Martínez-Saban, E.; Colomer, C.; Briani, P.

    2016-05-01

    The present work presents an example of the application of an integral methodology based on a multiscale analysis that covers the whole tritium cycle within a nuclear fusion power plant, from a micro scale, analyzing key components where tritium is leaked through permeation, to a macro scale, considering its atmospheric transport. A leakage from the Nuclear Power Plants, (NPP) primary to the secondary side of a heat exchanger (HEX) is considered for the present example. Both primary and secondary loop coolants are assumed to be He. Leakage is placed inside the HEX, leaking tritium in elementary tritium (HT) form to the secondary loop where it permeates through the piping structural material to the exterior. The Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system removes the leaked tritium towards the NPP exhaust. The HEX is modelled with system codes and coupled to Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) to account for tritium dispersion inside the nuclear power plants buildings and in site environment. Finally, tritium dispersion is calculated with an atmospheric transport code and a dosimetry analysis is carried out. Results show how the implemented methodology is capable of assessing the impact of tritium from the microscale to the atmospheric scale including the dosimetric aspect.

  15. Evaluation of CFETR as a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility using multiple system codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, V.S.; Garofalo, A.M.; Leuer, J.A.; Costley, A.E.; Wan, B.N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a multi-system codes benchmarking study of the recently published China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) pre-conceptual design (Wan et al 2014 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 42 495). Two system codes, General Atomics System Code (GASC) and Tokamak Energy System Code (TESC), using different methodologies to arrive at CFETR performance parameters under the same CFETR constraints show that the correlation between the physics performance and the fusion performance is consistent, and the computed parameters are in good agreement. Optimization of the first wall surface for tritium breeding and the minimization of the machine size are highly compatible. Variations of the plasma currents and profiles lead to changes in the required normalized physics performance, however, they do not significantly affect the optimized size of the machine. GASC and TESC have also been used to explore a lower aspect ratio, larger volume plasma taking advantage of the engineering flexibility in the CFETR design. Assuming the ITER steady-state scenario physics, the larger plasma together with a moderately higher B T and I p can result in a high gain Q fus  ∼ 12, P fus  ∼ 1 GW machine approaching DEMO-like performance. It is concluded that the CFETR baseline mode can meet the minimum goal of the Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) mission and advanced physics will enable it to address comprehensively the outstanding critical technology gaps on the path to a demonstration reactor (DEMO). Before proceeding with CFETR construction steady-state operation has to be demonstrated, further development is needed to solve the divertor heat load issue, and blankets have to be designed with tritium breeding ratio (TBR) >1 as a target. (paper)

  16. Helium desorption in EFDA iron materials for use in nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar R, A. R.; Pinedo V, J. L.; Sanchez, F. J.; Ibarra, A.; Vila, R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper the implantation with monoenergetic ions (He + ) was realized with an energy of 5 KeV in iron samples (99.9999 %) EFDA (European Fusion Development Agreement) using a collimated beam, after this a Thermal Desorption Spectrometry of Helium (THeDS) was made using a leak meter that detects amounts of helium of up to 10 - - 12 mbar l/s. Doses with which the implantation was carried out were 2 x 10 15 He + /cm 2 , 1 x 10 16 He + /cm 2 , 2 x 10 16 He + /cm 2 , 1 x 10 17 He + /cm 2 during times of 90 s, 450 s, 900 s and 4500 s, respectively. Also, using the SRIM program was calculated the depth at which the helium ions penetrate the sample of pure ion, finding that the maximum distance is 0.025μm in the sample. For this study, 11 samples of Fe EFDA were prepared to find defects that are caused after implantation of helium in order to provide valuable information to the manufacture of materials for future fusion reactors. However understand the effects of helium in the micro structural evolution and mechanical properties of structural materials are some of the most difficult questions to answer in materials research for nuclear fusion. When analyzing the spectra of THeDS was found that five different groups of desorption peaks existed, which are attributed to defects of He caused in the material, these defects are He n V (2≤n≤6), He n V m , He V for the groups I, II and IV respectively. These results are due to the comparison of the peaks presented in the desorption spectrum of He, with those of other authors who have made theoretical calculations. Is important to note that the thermal desorption spectrum of helium was different depending on the dose with which the implantation of He + was performed. (Author)

  17. Safety issues to be taken into account in designing future nuclear fusion facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrault, Didier, E-mail: didier.perrault@irsn.fr

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Assess if decay heat removal is a safety function. • Re-study accidents considered for ITER and identify those specific to DEMO. • Limit tritium inventory and optimize main gaseous tritium release routes. • Take into account constraints related to requirements of waste disposal routes. - Abstract: For several years now, the French “Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire” has been carrying out expertise of ITER fusion facility safety files at the request of the French “Autorité de Sûreté Nucléaire”. As part of the lengthy process which should lead to mastering nuclear fusion, different fusion facility projects are currently under study throughout the world to be ready to continue building on the work which will take place in the ITER facility. On the basis of the experience acquired during the ITER safety expertise, the IRSN has carried out a preliminary study of the safety issues which seem necessary to take into account right from the earliest design phase of these DEMO facilities. The issues studied have included the decay heat removal, exposure to ionizing radiation, potential accidents, and effluent releases and waste. The study shows that it will be important to give priority to the following actions, given that their results would have a major influence on the design: assess if decay heat removal is a safety function, re-study the accidents considered in the context of the ITER project and identify those specific to DEMO, and optimize each of the main routes for gaseous tritium releases.

  18. Fusion neutronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yican

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a systematic and comprehensive introduction to fusion neutronics, covering all key topics from the fundamental theories and methodologies, as well as a wide range of fusion system designs and experiments. It is the first-ever book focusing on the subject of fusion neutronics research. Compared with other nuclear devices such as fission reactors and accelerators, fusion systems are normally characterized by their complex geometry and nuclear physics, which entail new challenges for neutronics such as complicated modeling, deep penetration, low simulation efficiency, multi-physics coupling, etc. The book focuses on the neutronics characteristics of fusion systems and introduces a series of theories and methodologies that were developed to address the challenges of fusion neutronics, and which have since been widely applied all over the world. Further, it introduces readers to neutronics design’s unique principles and procedures, experimental methodologies and technologies for fusion systems...

  19. Effects of nuclear fusion produced neutrons on silicon semiconductor plasma X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kohagura, J; Hirata, M; Numakura, T; Minami, R; Watanabe, H; Sasuga, T; Nishizawa, Y; Yoshida, M; Nagashima, S; Tamano, T; Yatsu, K; Miyoshi, S; Hirano, K; Maezawa, H

    2002-01-01

    The effects of nuclear fusion produced neutrons on the X-ray energy responses of semiconductor detectors are characterized. The degradation of the response of position-sensitive X-ray tomography detectors in the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak is found after neutron exposure produced by deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium plasma fusion experiments. For the purpose of further detailed characterization of the neutron degradation effects, an azimuthally varying-field (AVF) cyclotron accelerator is employed using well-calibrated neutron fluence. These neutron effects on the detector responses are characterized using synchrotron radiation from a 2.5 GeV positron storage ring at the Photon Factory (KEK). The effects of neutrons on X-ray sensitive semiconductor depletion thicknesses are also investigated using an impedance analyser. Novel findings of (i) the dependence of the response degradation on X-ray energies as well as (ii) the recovery of the degraded detector response due to the detector bias applic...

  20. Nuclear relocation of STAT6 reliably predicts NAB2-STAT6 fusion for the diagnosis of solitary fibrous tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsche, Christian; Schweizer, Leonille; Renner, Marcus; Warth, Arne; Jones, David T W; Sahm, Felix; Reuss, David E; Capper, David; Knösel, Thomas; Schulz, Birte; Petersen, Iver; Ulrich, Alexis; Renker, Eva Kristin; Lehner, Burkhard; Pfister, Stefan M; Schirmacher, Peter; von Deimling, Andreas; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear relocation of STAT6 has been shown in tumours with NAB2-STAT6 fusion, and has been proposed as an ancillary marker for the diagnosis of solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs). The aim of this study was to verify the utility of STAT6 immunohistology in diagnosing SFT. A total of 689 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumours comprising 35 pleural SFTs and 654 other mesenchymal tumours were investigated for STAT6 expression using immunohistochemistry. Nine dedifferentiated liposarcomas (DDLSs) and five SFTs were also examined for the presence of NAB2-STAT6 fusion at the protein level using the proximity ligation assay (PLA), and for copy number variants (CNVs) with the Illumina Infinium Human Methylation450 array. Thirty-four of 35 SFTs showed strong nuclear STAT6 expression. Furthermore, five of 68 DDLSs, two of 130 undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas and one of 63 cases of nodular fasciitis showed moderate to strong nuclear STAT6 expression. The PLA indicated the presence of NAB2-STAT6 fusion protein in SFTs, but signal was also detected in some DDLSs. Copy number analysis showed an overall low frequency of chromosomal imbalances in SFTs, but complex karyotypes in DDLSs, including amplification of STAT6 and MDM2 loci. The detection of nuclear relocation of STAT6 with immunohistochemistry is a characteristic of SFTs, and may serve as a diagnostic marker that indicates NAB2-STAT6 fusion and helps to discriminate SFTs from histological mimics. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Status review of methods for the calculation of fast neutron nuclear data for structural materials of fast and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulo, V.

    1989-01-01

    The report contains the texts of the 9 invited papers delivered during the Second Research Co-ordination Meeting on ''Methods for the Calculation of Fast Neutron Nuclear Data for Structural Materials and Fast and Fusion Reactors'' held in Vienna during 15-17 February 1988. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 9 papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Outline of Summary Meeting on Nuclear Fusion Research by Grant-in-Aid (1986-1989) by Monbusho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori; Nakazawa, Masaharu; Iguchi, Tetsuo

    1990-01-01

    The Summary Meeting on Nuclear Fusion Research by Grant-in-Aid (1986∼1989) of Monbusho was held on Jan. 30∼Feb. 1, 1989 at Gakushi-kaikan in Tokyo. About 300 papers were presented on the research activities as well as some special topics. (author)

  3. Search for evidence of nuclear involvement in the fatal explosion of a 'cold fusion' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, P.M.; Whipple, R.E.; Andresen, B.D.; Russo, R.E.; Bazan, F.; Brunk, J.L.; Wong, K.M.

    1995-01-01

    Forensic analyses of debris from the fatal explosion of an electrochemical 'cold fusion' cell at SRI International were conducted at LLNL at the request of Cal-OSHA. One investigation focused on the possibility of conventional nuclear reaction mechanisms contributing to the total energy inventory of the incident. Selected metal components of the electrolysis apparatus were subjected to nondestructive γ-ray spectrometry with high-sensitivity, low-background Ge detector systems. The anticipated analytes in these studies were radioactivation products potentially induced in the explosion residue by either fast or thermal neutrons. The results of this investigation were negative within the temporal constraints of the incident and the analytical sensitivities of the instrumentation. (author) 5 refs.; 1 fig.; 2 tabs

  4. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research 1994. V.2. Proceedings of the fifteenth international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This is the second volume of the proceedings of the 15th International Atomic Energy Agency Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research held in Seville, Spain, from 26 September - 1 October 1994. Contained it volume 2 are the combined poster sessions on core plasma physics and divertor and edge physics (20 papers), the combined poster session on plasma heating and current drive and concept optimization (17 papers), the combined poster session on helical system physics, pinches and open systems (10 papers), as well as the oral papers on pinches and open systems (6 papers); the ITER project (19 papers); and on new devices, reactors and technology (24 papers). Refs, figs, tabs

  5. Absorption-Fluctuation Theorem for Nuclear Reactions: Brink-Axel, Incomplete Fusion and All That

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M. S.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the connection between absorption, averages and fluctuations in nuclear reactions. The fluctuations in the entrance channel result in the compound-nucleus Hauser-Feshbach cross section, and the fluctuations in the intermediate channels result in modifications of multistep reaction cross sections, while the fluctuations in the final channel result in hybrid cross sections that can be used to describe incomplete fusion reactions. We discuss the latter in detail and comment on the validity of the assumptions used in the development of the Surrogate method. We also discuss the theory of multistep reactions with regards to intermediate state fluctuations and the energy dependence and non-locality of the intermediate-channel optical potentials

  6. Single Vesicle Assaying of SNARE-Synaptotagmin-Driven Fusion Reveals Fast and Slow Modes of Both Docking and Fusion and Intrasample Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M. Christensen, Sune; W. Mortensen, Michael; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    the docking or the fusion of vesicles. Here we report a fluorescence microscopy-based assay to monitor SNARE-mediated docking and fusion of individual vesicle pairs. In situ measurement of the concentration of diffusing particles allowed us to quantify docking rates by a maximum-likelihood approach....... This analysis showed that C2AB and Ca(2+) accelerate vesicle-vesicle docking with more than two orders of magnitude. Comparison of the measured docking rates with ensemble lipid mixing kinetics, however, suggests that in most cases bilayer fusion remains therate-limiting step. Our single vesicle results show...... that only 60% of the vesicles dock and only 6% of docked vesicles fuse. Lipid mixing on single vesicles was fast (t(mix)fusion pathways cannot be rationalized...

  7. Application of gas-cooled Accelerator Driven System (ADS) transmutation devices to sustainable nuclear energy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abanades, A., E-mail: abanades@etsii.upm.es [ETSII/Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, J.Gutierrez Abascal, 2-28006 Madrid (Spain); Garcia, C.; Garcia, L. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologia y Ciencias Aplicadas. Quinta de los, Molinos, Ave. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Ciudad de la Habana, CP 10400, Apartado Postal 6163 (Cuba); Escriva, A.; Perez-Navarro, A. [Instituto de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, C.P. 46022 Valencia (Spain); Rosales, J. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologia y Ciencias Aplicadas. Quinta de los, Molinos, Ave. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Ciudad de la Habana, CP 10400, Apartado Postal 6163 (Cuba)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Utilization of Accelerator Driven System (ADS) for Hydrogen production. > Evaluation of the potential use of gas-cooled ADS for a sustainable use of Uranium resources by transmutation of nuclear wastes, electricity and Hydrogen production. > Application of the Sulfur-Iodine thermochemical process to subcritical systems. > Application of CINDER90 to calculate burn-up in subcritical systems. - Abstract: The conceptual design of a pebble bed gas-cooled transmutation device is shown with the aim to evaluate its potential for its deployment in the context of the sustainable nuclear energy development, which considers high temperature reactors for their operation in cogeneration mode, producing electricity, heat and Hydrogen. As differential characteristics our device operates in subcritical mode, driven by a neutron source activated by an accelerator that adds clear safety advantages and fuel flexibility opening the possibility to reduce the nuclear stockpile producing energy from actual LWR irradiated fuel with an efficiency of 45-46%, either in the form of Hydrogen, electricity, or both.

  8. Application of gas-cooled Accelerator Driven System (ADS) transmutation devices to sustainable nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abanades, A.; Garcia, C.; Garcia, L.; Escriva, A.; Perez-Navarro, A.; Rosales, J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Utilization of Accelerator Driven System (ADS) for Hydrogen production. → Evaluation of the potential use of gas-cooled ADS for a sustainable use of Uranium resources by transmutation of nuclear wastes, electricity and Hydrogen production. → Application of the Sulfur-Iodine thermochemical process to subcritical systems. → Application of CINDER90 to calculate burn-up in subcritical systems. - Abstract: The conceptual design of a pebble bed gas-cooled transmutation device is shown with the aim to evaluate its potential for its deployment in the context of the sustainable nuclear energy development, which considers high temperature reactors for their operation in cogeneration mode, producing electricity, heat and Hydrogen. As differential characteristics our device operates in subcritical mode, driven by a neutron source activated by an accelerator that adds clear safety advantages and fuel flexibility opening the possibility to reduce the nuclear stockpile producing energy from actual LWR irradiated fuel with an efficiency of 45-46%, either in the form of Hydrogen, electricity, or both.

  9. Accelerator-Driven System Analysis by Using Different Nuclear Data Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sugawara

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An accelerator-driven system (ADS has been investigated to transmute minor actinide (MA included in high-level waste. In the neutronic design of the ADS, the accuracy of nuclear data for MA and lead bismuth (LBE which is the candidate material for coolant and spallation target, is important. To know the current accuracy of nuclear data libraries, this study aims to compare representative nuclear data libraries, JENDL-4.0, 3.3, ENDF/B-VII.1 and VII.0 through the neutronic calculation of the ADS geometry proposed as the IAEA benchmark problem. The calculation results showed that about 1.1%dk, 0.7%dk and 2.7%dk differences were observed between JENDL-4.0 and ENDF/B-VII.1, ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 at the beginning of cycle, respectively. These results mean that the current nuclear data libraries are still insufficient for the neutronic design of the ADS. The enhancement of nuclear data libraries by cross section measurement is required and, moreover, integral experiments with MA and LBE isotopes are essential

  10. The Los Alamos accelerator driven transmutation of nuclear waste (ATW) concept development of the ATW target/blanket system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venneri, F.; Williamson, M.A.; Ning, L.

    1997-01-01

    The studies carried out in the frame of the Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) program developed at Los Alamos in order to solve the nuclear waste problem and to build a new generation of safer and non-proliferant nuclear power plants, are presented

  11. Selected works of basic research on the physics and technology of accelerator driven clean nuclear power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Zhixiang

    2002-01-01

    38 theses are presented in this selected works of basic research on the physics and technology of accelerator driven clean nuclear power system. It includes reactor physics and experiment, accelerators physics and technology, nuclear physics, material research and partitioning. 13 abstracts, which has been presented on magazines home and abroad, are collected in the appendix

  12. Guide to General Atomic studies of hypothetical nuclear driven accidents for the Fort St. Vrain reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, T.; Tobias, M.

    1974-03-01

    The work of the General Atomic Company (GAC) in preparing those portions of the Final Safety Analysis Report for the Fort St. Vrain Reactor (FSV) having to do with hypothetical nuclear driven accidents has been reviewed and a guide to this literature has been prepared. The sources for this study are the Final Safety Analysis Report itself, the Quarterly and Monthly Progress Reports, Topical Reports, and Technical Specifications. The problems considered and the methods used are outlined. An appendix gives a systematic analysis which was used as a guide in organizing the references. (U.S.)

  13. Dual roles of TRF1 in tethering telomeres to the nuclear envelope and protecting them from fusion during meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lina; Tu, Zhaowei; Liu, Chao; Liu, Hongbin; Kaldis, Philipp; Chen, Zijiang; Li, Wei

    2018-01-08

    Telomeres integrity is indispensable for chromosomal stability by preventing chromosome erosion and end-to-end fusions. During meiosis, telomeres attach to the inner nuclear envelope and cluster into a highly crowded microenvironment at the bouquet stage, which requires specific mechanisms to protect the telomeres from fusion. Here, we demonstrate that germ cell-specific knockout of a shelterin complex subunit, Trf1, results in arrest of spermatocytes at two different stages. The obliterated telomere-nuclear envelope attachment in Trf1-deficient spermatocytes impairs homologue synapsis and recombination, resulting in a pachytene-like arrest, while the meiotic division arrest might stem from chromosome end-to-end fusion due to the failure of recruiting meiosis specific telomere associated proteins. Further investigations uncovered that TRF1 could directly interact with Speedy A, and Speedy A might work as a scaffold protein to further recruit Cdk2, thus protecting telomeres from fusion at this stage. Together, our results reveal a novel mechanism of TRF1, Speedy A, and Cdk2 in protecting telomere from fusion in a highly crowded microenvironment during meiosis.

  14. Multi-layered nanoparticles for penetrating the endosome and nuclear membrane via a step-wise membrane fusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Hidetaka; Kudo, Asako; Minoura, Arisa; Yamaguti, Masaya; Khalil, Ikramy A; Moriguchi, Rumiko; Masuda, Tomoya; Danev, Radostin; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Kogure, Kentaro; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2009-05-01

    Efficient targeting of DNA to the nucleus is a prerequisite for effective gene therapy. The gene-delivery vehicle must penetrate through the plasma membrane, and the DNA-impermeable double-membraned nuclear envelope, and deposit its DNA cargo in a form ready for transcription. Here we introduce a concept for overcoming intracellular membrane barriers that involves step-wise membrane fusion. To achieve this, a nanotechnology was developed that creates a multi-layered nanoparticle, which we refer to as a Tetra-lamellar Multi-functional Envelope-type Nano Device (T-MEND). The critical structural elements of the T-MEND are a DNA-polycation condensed core coated with two nuclear membrane-fusogenic inner envelopes and two endosome-fusogenic outer envelopes, which are shed in stepwise fashion. A double-lamellar membrane structure is required for nuclear delivery via the stepwise fusion of double layered nuclear membrane structure. Intracellular membrane fusions to endosomes and nuclear membranes were verified by spectral imaging of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between donor and acceptor fluorophores that had been dually labeled on the liposome surface. Coating the core with the minimum number of nucleus-fusogenic lipid envelopes (i.e., 2) is essential to facilitate transcription. As a result, the T-MEND achieves dramatic levels of transgene expression in non-dividing cells.

  15. NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion is required for nuclear envelope formation and completion of nuclear pore complex assembly in Xenopus laevis egg extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Tina; Ramadan, Kristijan; Schlundt, Andreas; Kartenbeck, Jürgen; Meyer, Hemmo H

    2007-08-15

    Despite the progress in understanding nuclear envelope (NE) reformation after mitosis, it has remained unclear what drives the required membrane fusion and how exactly this is coordinated with nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. Here, we show that, like other intracellular fusion reactions, NE fusion in Xenopus laevis egg extracts is mediated by SNARE proteins that require activation by NSF. Antibodies against Xenopus NSF, depletion of NSF or the dominant-negative NSF(E329Q) variant specifically inhibited NE formation. Staging experiments further revealed that NSF was required until sealing of the envelope was completed. Moreover, excess exogenous alpha-SNAP that blocks SNARE function prevented membrane fusion and caused accumulation of non-flattened vesicles on the chromatin surface. Under these conditions, the nucleoporins Nup107 and gp210 were fully recruited, whereas assembly of FxFG-repeat-containing nucleoporins was blocked. Together, we define NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events as essential steps during NE formation downstream of Nup107 recruitment, and upstream of membrane flattening and completion of NPC assembly.

  16. 1: the atom. 2: radioactivity. 3: man and radiations. 4: the energy. 5: nuclear energy: fusion and fission. 6: the operation of a nuclear reactor. 7: the nuclear fuel cycle; 1: l'atome. 2: la radioactivite. 3: l'homme et les rayonnements. 4: l'energie. 5: l'energie nucleaire: fusion et fission. 6: le fonctionnement d'un reacteur nucleaire. 7: le cycle du combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This series of 7 digest booklets present the bases of the nuclear physics and of the nuclear energy: 1 - the atom (structure of matter, chemical elements and isotopes, the four fundamental interactions, nuclear physics); 2 - radioactivity (definition, origins of radioelements, applications of radioactivity); 3 - man and radiations (radiations diversity, biological effects, radioprotection, examples of radiation applications); 4 - energy (energy states, different forms of energy, characteristics); 5 - nuclear energy: fusion and fission (nuclear energy release, thermonuclear fusion, nuclear fission and chain reaction); 6 - operation of a nuclear reactor (nuclear fission, reactor components, reactor types); 7 - nuclear fuel cycle (nuclear fuel preparation, fuel consumption, reprocessing, wastes management). (J.S.)

  17. On-the-fly, electric-field-driven, coupled electron-nuclear dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Garth A; Acocella, Angela; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2008-10-09

    An on-the-fly, electric field driven, coupled electron-nuclear dynamics approach is developed and applied to model the photodissociation of water in the A((1)B1) excited state. In this method, a quantum propagator evolves the photon-induced electronic dynamics in the ultrafast time scale, and a quasi-classical surface hopping approach describes the nuclear dynamics in the slower time scale. In addition, strong system-field interactions are explicitly included in the electronic propagator. This theoretical development enables us to study rapid photon-induced bond dissociation dynamics and demonstrates the partial breakdown of electronic coherence as well as electronic population trapping in the excited state when the molecular vibrations detune the system with respect to the applied field. The method offers a practical way to use on-the-fly dynamics for modeling light-molecule interactions that lead to interesting photochemical events.

  18. Conceptual study of high power proton linac for accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system

    CERN Document Server

    Yu Qi; Ouyang Hua Fu; Xu Tao Guang

    2001-01-01

    As a prior option of the next generation of energy source, the accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system (ADS) can use efficiently the uranium and thorium resource, transmute the high-level long-lived radioactive wastes and raise nuclear safety. The ADS accelerator should provide the proton beam with tens megawatts. The superconducting linac is a good selection of ADS accelerator because of its high efficiency and low beam loss rate. The ADS accelerator presented by the consists of a 5 MeV radio-frequency quadrupole, a 100 MeV independently phased superconducting cavity linac and a 1 GeV elliptical superconducting cavity linac. The accelerating structures and main parameters are determined and the research and development plan is considered

  19. JSPS-CAS Core University Program seminar on summary of 10-year collaborations in plasma and nuclear fusion research area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, Kazuo; Wang Kongjia

    2011-07-01

    The JSPS-CAS Core University Program (CUP) seminar on “Summary of 10-year Collaborations in Plasma and Nuclear Fusion Research Area” was held from March 9 to March 11, 2011 in the Okinawa Prefectural Art Museum, Naha city, Okinawa, Japan. The collaboration program on plasma and nuclear fusion started from 2001 under the auspices of Japanese Society of Promotion of Science (JSPS) and Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). This year is the last year of the CUP. This seminar was organized in the framework of the CUP. In the seminar, 29 oral talks were presented, having 14 Chinese and 30 Japanese participants. These presentations covered key topics related to the collaboration categories: (1) improvement of core plasma properties, (2) basic research on fusion reactor technologies, and (3) theory and numerical simulation. This seminar aims at summarizing the results obtained through the collaborations for 10 years, and discussing future prospects of China-Japan collaboration in plasma and nuclear fusion research areas. (author)

  20. Possible generation of heat from nuclear fusion in Earth's inner core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Mikio

    2016-11-23

    The cause and source of the heat released from Earth's interior have not yet been determined. Some research groups have proposed that the heat is supplied by radioactive decay or by a nuclear georeactor. Here we postulate that the generation of heat is the result of three-body nuclear fusion of deuterons confined in hexagonal FeDx core-centre crystals; the reaction rate is enhanced by the combined attraction effects of high-pressure (~364 GPa) and high-temperature (~5700 K) and by the physical catalysis of neutral pions: 2 D +  2 D +  2 D → 2 1 H +  4 He + 2  + 20.85 MeV. The possible heat generation rate can be calculated as 8.12 × 10 12  J/m 3 , based on the assumption that Earth's primitive heat supply has already been exhausted. The H and He atoms produced and the anti-neutrino are incorporated as Fe-H based alloys in the H-rich portion of inner core, are released from Earth's interior to the universe, and pass through Earth, respectively.

  1. Temperature dependence of nuclear fission time in heavy-ion fusion-fission reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, Chris; Roy, Sanil; Gray, Thomas H.; Zaccone, Alessio

    2017-11-01

    Accounting for viscous damping within Fokker-Planck equations led to various improvements in the understanding and analysis of nuclear fission of heavy nuclei. Analytical expressions for the fission time are typically provided by Kramers' theory, which improves on the Bohr-Wheeler estimate by including the time scale related to many-particle dissipative processes along the deformation coordinate. However, Kramers' formula breaks down for sufficiently high excitation energies where Kramers' assumption of a large barrier no longer holds. Focusing on the overdamped regime for energies T >1 MeV, Kramers' theory should be replaced by a new analytical theory derived from the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck first-passage time method that is proposed here. The theory is applied to fission time data from fusion-fission experiments on 16O+208Pb→224Th . The proposed model provides an internally consistent one-parameter fitting of fission data with a constant nuclear friction as the fitting parameter, whereas Kramers' fitting requires a value of friction which falls out of the allowed range. The theory provides also an analytical formula that in future work can be easily implemented in numerical codes such as cascade or joanne4.

  2. Different sets of ER-resident J-proteins regulate distinct polar nuclear-membrane fusion events in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Masaya; Endo, Toshiya; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi

    2014-11-01

    Angiosperm female gametophytes contain a central cell with two polar nuclei. In many species, including Arabidopsis thaliana, the polar nuclei fuse during female gametogenesis. We previously showed that BiP, an Hsp70 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), was essential for membrane fusion during female gametogenesis. Hsp70 function requires partner proteins for full activity. J-domain containing proteins (J-proteins) are the major Hsp70 functional partners. A. thaliana ER contains three soluble J-proteins, AtERdj3A, AtERdj3B, and AtP58(IPK). Here, we analyzed mutants of these proteins and determined that double-mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3A or AtERdj3B were defective in polar nuclear fusion. Electron microscopy analysis identified that polar nuclei were in close contact, but no membrane fusion occurred in mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3A. The polar nuclear outer membrane appeared to be connected via the ER remaining at the inner unfused membrane in mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3B. These results indicate that ER-resident J-proteins, AtP58(IPK)/AtERdj3A and AtP58(IPK)/AtERdj3B, function at distinct steps of polar nuclear-membrane fusion. Similar to the bip1 bip2 double mutant female gametophytes, the aterdj3a atp58(ipk) double mutant female gametophytes defective in fusion of the outer polar nuclear membrane displayed aberrant endosperm proliferation after fertilization with wild-type pollen. However, endosperm proliferated normally after fertilization of the aterdj3b atp58(ipk) double mutant female gametophytes defective in fusion of the inner membrane. Our results indicate that the polar nuclear fusion defect itself does not cause an endosperm proliferation defect. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. On the enhancement of p-11B fusion reaction rate in laser-driven plasma by α → p collisional energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloni, Fabio; Margarone, Daniele; Picciotto, Antonino; Schillaci, Francesco; Giuffrida, Lorenzo

    2018-02-01

    The possibility of triggering an avalanche reaction in laser-driven p-11B fusion by the effect of collisional energy transfer from α particles to protons has recently been debated, especially in connection to the high yield of α particles (4 × 108 per laser shot) achieved on engineered targets at the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS), with a pulse of 500 J, 0.3 ns FWHM. We elucidate this controversial subject within the framework of a simple two-population model for protons, based on the binary collision theory in a plasma. We find an avalanche characteristic time of almost 1 μs for the 675 keV fusion cross section resonance in typical PALS plasma, upon idealized confinement conditions. This avalanche time is one order of magnitude higher than previously reported, meaning that no such process can substantially develop in plasma at the PALS on the 675 keV resonance, not even in the most optimistic confinement scenarios. Nevertheless, we put forward for further investigation that more realistic conditions for setting up the avalanche regime could rather be attained by suitably targeting the narrow 163 keV resonance in the fusion cross section, also in connection to recently proposed laser-driven magnetic trapping techniques.

  4. Accelerator-driven transmutation: a high-tech solution to some nuclear waste problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hechanova, A.E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses current technical and political issues regarding the innovative concept of using accelerator-driven transmutation processes for nuclear waste management. Two complex and related issues are addressed. First, the evolution and improvements of the design technologies are identified to indicate that there has been sufficient technological advancement with regard to a 1991 scientific peer review to warrant the advent of a large-scale national research and development program. Second, the economics and politics of the transmutation system are examined to identify non-technical barriers to the implementation of the program. Transmutation of waste has been historically viewed by nuclear engineers as one of those technologies that is too good to be true and probably too expensive to be feasible. The concept discussed in the present paper uses neutrons ( which result from protons accelerated into spallation targets)to transmute the major very long-lived hazardous materials such as the radioactive isotopes of technetium, iodine, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium. Although not a new concept, accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) lead by a team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has made some significant advances which are discussed in the present paper. (authors)

  5. Copper benchmark experiment for the testing of JEFF-3.2 nuclear data for fusion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelone, M.; Flammini, D.; Loreti, S.; Moro, F.; Pillon, M.; Villar, R.; Klix, A.; Fischer, U.; Kodeli, I.; Perel, R. L.; Pohorecky, W.

    2017-09-01

    A neutronics benchmark experiment on a pure Copper block (dimensions 60 × 70 × 70 cm3) aimed at testing and validating the recent nuclear data libraries for fusion applications was performed in the frame of the European Fusion Program at the 14 MeV ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG). Reaction rates, neutron flux spectra and doses were measured using different experimental techniques (e.g. activation foils techniques, NE213 scintillator and thermoluminescent detectors). This paper first summarizes the analyses of the experiment carried-out using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code and the European JEFF-3.2 library. Large discrepancies between calculation (C) and experiment (E) were found for the reaction rates both in the high and low neutron energy range. The analysis was complemented by sensitivity/uncertainty analyses (S/U) using the deterministic and Monte Carlo SUSD3D and MCSEN codes, respectively. The S/U analyses enabled to identify the cross sections and energy ranges which are mostly affecting the calculated responses. The largest discrepancy among the C/E values was observed for the thermal (capture) reactions indicating severe deficiencies in the 63,65Cu capture and elastic cross sections at lower rather than at high energy. Deterministic and MC codes produced similar results. The 14 MeV copper experiment and its analysis thus calls for a revision of the JEFF-3.2 copper cross section and covariance data evaluation. A new analysis of the experiment was performed with the MCNP5 code using the revised JEFF-3.3-T2 library released by NEA and a new, not yet distributed, revised JEFF-3.2 Cu evaluation produced by KIT. A noticeable improvement of the C/E results was obtained with both new libraries.

  6. Copper benchmark experiment for the testing of JEFF-3.2 nuclear data for fusion applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelone M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A neutronics benchmark experiment on a pure Copper block (dimensions 60 × 70 × 70 cm3 aimed at testing and validating the recent nuclear data libraries for fusion applications was performed in the frame of the European Fusion Program at the 14 MeV ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG. Reaction rates, neutron flux spectra and doses were measured using different experimental techniques (e.g. activation foils techniques, NE213 scintillator and thermoluminescent detectors. This paper first summarizes the analyses of the experiment carried-out using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code and the European JEFF-3.2 library. Large discrepancies between calculation (C and experiment (E were found for the reaction rates both in the high and low neutron energy range. The analysis was complemented by sensitivity/uncertainty analyses (S/U using the deterministic and Monte Carlo SUSD3D and MCSEN codes, respectively. The S/U analyses enabled to identify the cross sections and energy ranges which are mostly affecting the calculated responses. The largest discrepancy among the C/E values was observed for the thermal (capture reactions indicating severe deficiencies in the 63,65Cu capture and elastic cross sections at lower rather than at high energy. Deterministic and MC codes produced similar results. The 14 MeV copper experiment and its analysis thus calls for a revision of the JEFF-3.2 copper cross section and covariance data evaluation. A new analysis of the experiment was performed with the MCNP5 code using the revised JEFF-3.3-T2 library released by NEA and a new, not yet distributed, revised JEFF-3.2 Cu evaluation produced by KIT. A noticeable improvement of the C/E results was obtained with both new libraries.

  7. High energy nuclear reactions ('Spallation') and their application in calculation of the Acceleration Driven Systems (ADS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Pedro Carlos Russo

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a study of high energy nuclear reactions which are fundamental to dene the source term in accelerator driven systems. These nuclear reactions, also known as spallation, consist in the interaction of high energetic hadrons with nucleons in the atomic nucleus. The phenomenology of these reactions consist in two step. In the rst, the proton interacts through multiple scattering in a process called intra-nuclear cascade. It is followed by a step in which the excited nucleus, coming from the intranuclear cascade, could either, evaporates particles to achieve a moderate energy state or fission. This process is known as competition between evaporation and fission. In this work the main nuclear models, Bertini and Cugnon are reviewed, since these models are fundamental for design purposes of the source term in ADS, due to lack of evaluated nuclear data for these reactions. The implementation and validation of the calculation methods for the design of the source is carried out to implement the methodology of source design using the program MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended), devoted to calculation of transport of these particles and the validation performed by an international cooperation together with a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) of the International Atomic Energy Agency and available jobs, in order to qualify the calculations on nuclear reactions and the de-excitation channels involved, providing a state of the art of design and methodology for calculating external sources of spallation for source driven systems. The CRISP, is a brazilian code for the phenomenological description of the reactions involved and the models implemented in the code were reviewed and improved to continue the qualification process. Due to failure of the main models in describing the production of light nuclides, the multifragmentation reaction model was studied. Because the discrepancies in the calculations of production of these nuclides are attributes to the

  8. Nuclear fusion - The Sun's promise: the race for nuclear fusion. The Canadian who wants to save the World. How ITER wants to get back on track

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupin, Ludovic; Lucas, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    As some projects of development of reactor based on nuclear fusion already exist in France and in North America as prototypes or only projects with different objectives in terms of fabrication and exploitation, with the high ambition to produce an unlimited energy, a first article describes the works performed by start-ups in North America to develop new concepts of reactors based on nuclear fusion. These reactors are smaller, more flexible and less expensive than previous projects, and their development is supported by actors of the digital economy. A second article focuses on the example of General Fusion, a young Canadian company located near Vancouver, which is building its first prototypes of fusion reactor, and which succeeded in raising funds (more than hundred millions dollars), and grew from 4 to 65 employees in five years. The third article discusses the situation of ITER, the international experimental reactor which is being built in Cadarache, its delays and cost overruns, and the policy implemented by its new manager to try to get the project back on track

  9. Effective donor cell fusion conditions for production of cloned dogs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, JungEun; Oh, HyunJu; Hong, SoGun; Kim, MinJung; Kim, GeonA; Koo, OkJae; Kang, SungKeun; Jang, Goo; Lee, ByeongChun

    2011-03-01

    As shown by the birth of the first cloned dog 'Snuppy', a protocol to produce viable cloned dogs has been reported. In order to evaluate optimum fusion conditions for improving dog cloning efficiency, in vivo matured oocytes were reconstructed with adult somatic cells from a female Pekingese using different fusion conditions. Fusion with needle vs chamber methods, and with low vs high pulse strength was compared by evaluating fusion rate and in vivo development of canine cloned embryos. The fusion rates in the high voltage groups were significantly higher than in the low voltage groups regardless of fusion method (83.5 vs 66.1% for the needle fusion method, 67.4 vs 37.9% for the fusion chamber method). After embryo transfer, one each pregnancy was detected after using the needle fusion method with high and low voltage and in the chamber fusion method with high voltage, whereas no pregnancy was detected using the chamber method with low voltage. However, only the pregnancy from the needle fusion method with high voltage was maintained to term and one healthy puppy was delivered. The results of the present study demonstrated that two DC pulses of 3.8 to 4.0 kV/cm for 15 μsec using the needle fusion method were the most effective method for the production of cloned dogs under the conditions of this experiment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ion acceleration and D-D nuclear fusion in laser-generated plasma from advanced deuterated polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, Lorenzo

    2014-10-23

    Deuterated polyethylene targets have been irradiated by means of a 1016 W/cm2 laser using 600 J pulse energy, 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration and 70 micron spot diameter. The plasma parameters were measured using on-line diagnostics based on ion collectors, SiC detectors and plastic scintillators, all employed in time-of-flight configuration. In addition, a Thomson parabola spectrometer, an X-ray streak camera, and calibrated neutron dosimeter bubble detectors were employed. Characteristic protons and neutrons at maximum energies of 3.0 MeV and 2.45 MeV, respectively, were detected, confirming that energy spectra of reaction products coming from deuterium-deuterium nuclear fusion occur. In thick advanced targets a fusion rate of the order of 2 × 108 fusions per laser shot was calculated.

  11. Ion Acceleration and D-D Nuclear Fusion in Laser-Generated Plasma from Advanced Deuterated Polyethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Torrisi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Deuterated polyethylene targets have been irradiated by means of a 1016 W/cm2 laser using 600 J pulse energy, 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration and 70 micron spot diameter. The plasma parameters were measured using on-line diagnostics based on ion collectors, SiC detectors and plastic scintillators, all employed in time-of-flight configuration. In addition, a Thomson parabola spectrometer, an X-ray streak camera, and calibrated neutron dosimeter bubble detectors were employed. Characteristic protons and neutrons at maximum energies of 3.0 MeV and 2.45 MeV, respectively, were detected, confirming that energy spectra of reaction products coming from deuterium-deuterium nuclear fusion occur. In thick advanced targets a fusion rate of the order of 2 × 108 fusions per laser shot was calculated.

  12. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C; Dauer, William; Johnson, David; Roller, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Advantages of Production of New Fissionable Nuclides for the Nuclear Power Industry in Hybrid Fusion-Fission Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibulskiy, V. F.; Andrianova, E. A.; Davidenko, V. D.; Rodionova, E. V.; Tsibulskiy, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    A concept of a large-scale nuclear power engineering system equipped with fusion and fission reactors is presented. The reactors have a joint fuel cycle, which imposes the lowest risk of the radiation impact on the environment. The formation of such a system is considered within the framework of the evolution of the current nuclear power industry with the dominance of thermal reactors, gradual transition to the thorium fuel cycle, and integration into the system of the hybrid fusion-fission reactors for breeding nuclear fuel for fission reactors. Such evolution of the nuclear power engineering system will allow preservation of the existing structure with the dominance of thermal reactors, enable the reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) with low burnup, and prevent the dangerous accumulation of minor actinides. The proposed structure of the nuclear power engineering system minimizes the risk of radioactive contamination of the environment and the SNF reprocessing facilities, decreasing it by more than one order of magnitude in comparison with the proposed scheme of closing the uranium-plutonium fuel cycle based on the reprocessing of SNF with high burnup from fast reactors.

  14. Studies of breakeven prices and electricity supply potentials of nuclear fusion by a long-term world energy and environment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokimatsu, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Okano, K.; Yoshida, T.; Hiwatari, R.; Konishi, S.; Nishio, S.; Fujino, J.; Ogawa, Y.; Yamaji, K.

    2002-01-01

    In response to social demand, this paper investigates the breakeven price (BP) and potential electricity supply of nuclear fusion energy in the 21st century by means of a world energy and environment model. We set the following objectives in this paper: (i) to reveal the economics of the introduction conditions of nuclear fusion; (ii) to know when tokamak-type nuclear fusion reactors are expected to be introduced cost-effectively into future energy systems; (iii) to estimate the share in 2100 of electricity produced by the presently designed reactors that could be economically selected in the year. The model can give in detail the energy and environment technologies and price-induced energy saving, and can illustrate optimal energy supply structures by minimizing the costs of total discounted energy systems at a discount rate of 5%. The following parameters of nuclear fusion were considered: cost of electricity (COE) in the nuclear fusion introduction year, annual COE reduction rates, regional introduction year, and regional nuclear fusion capacity projection. The investigations are carried out for three nuclear fusion projections one of which includes tritium breeding constraints, four future CO 2 concentration constraints, and technological assumptions on fossil fuels, nuclear fission, CO 2 sequestration, and anonymous innovative technologies. It is concluded that: (1) the BPs are from 65 to 125 mill kW -1 h -1 depending on the introduction year of nuclear fusion under the 550 ppmv CO 2 concentration constraints; those of a business-as-usual (BAU) case are from 51 to 68 mill kW -1 h -1 . Uncertainties resulting from the CO 2 concentration constraints and the technological options influenced the BPs by plus/minus some 10-30 mill kW -1 h -1 , (2) tokamak-type nuclear fusion reactors (as presently designed, with a COE range around 70-130 mill kW -1 h -1 ) would be favourably introduced into energy systems after 2060 based on the economic criteria under the 450 and

  15. Report of 6th research meeting on basic process of fuel cycle for nuclear fusion reactors, Yayoi Research Group; 3rd expert committee on research of nuclear fusion fuel material correlation basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    In this report, the lecture materials of Yayoi Research Group, 6th research meeting on basic process of fuel cycle for nuclear fusion reactors which was held at the University of Tokyo on March 25, 1996, are collected. This workshop was held also as 3rd expert committee on research of nuclear fusion fuel material correlation basis of Atomic Energy Society of Japan. This workshop has the character of the preparatory meeting for the session on `Interface effect in nuclear fusion energy system` of the international workshop `Interface effect in quantum energy system`, and 6 lectures and one comment were given. The topics were deuterium transport in Mo under deuterium ion implantation, the change of the stratum structure of graphite by hydrogen ion irradiation, the tritium behavior in opposing materials, the basic studies of the irradiation effects of solid breeding materials, the research on the behavior of hydroxyl group on the surface of solid breeding materials, the sweep gas effect on the surface of solid breeding materials, and the dynamic behavior of ion-implanted deuterium in proton-conductive oxides. (K.I.)

  16. Report of 6th research meeting on basic process of fuel cycle for nuclear fusion reactors, Yayoi Research Group; 3rd expert committee on research of nuclear fusion fuel material correlation basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    In this report, the lecture materials of Yayoi Research Group, 6th research meeting on basic process of fuel cycle for nuclear fusion reactors which was held at the University of Tokyo on March 25, 1996, are collected. This workshop was held also as 3rd expert committee on research of nuclear fusion fuel material correlation basis of Atomic Energy Society of Japan. This workshop has the character of the preparatory meeting for the session on 'Interface effect in nuclear fusion energy system' of the international workshop 'Interface effect in quantum energy system', and 6 lectures and one comment were given. The topics were deuterium transport in Mo under deuterium ion implantation, the change of the stratum structure of graphite by hydrogen ion irradiation, the tritium behavior in opposing materials, the basic studies of the irradiation effects of solid breeding materials, the research on the behavior of hydroxyl group on the surface of solid breeding materials, the sweep gas effect on the surface of solid breeding materials, and the dynamic behavior of ion-implanted deuterium in proton-conductive oxides. (K.I.)

  17. ROS1 protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of ROS1 fusion protein-driven non-small cell lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskoski, Robert

    2017-07-01

    ROS1 protein-tyrosine kinase fusion proteins are expressed in 1-2% of non-small cell lung cancers. The ROS1 fusion partners include CD74, CCDC6, EZR, FIG, KDELR2, LRIG3, MSN, SDC4, SLC34A2, TMEM106B, TMP3, and TPD52L1. Physiological ROS1 is closely related to the ALK, LTK, and insulin receptor protein-tyrosine kinases. ROS1 is a so-called orphan receptor because the identity of its activating ligand, if any, is unknown. The receptor is expressed during development, but little is expressed in adults and its physiological function is unknown. The human ROS1 gene encodes 2347 amino acid residues and ROS1 is the largest protein-tyrosine kinase receptor protein. Unlike the ALK fusion proteins that are activated by the dimerization induced by their amino-terminal portions, the amino-terminal domains of several of its fusion proteins including CD74 apparently lack the ability to induce dimerization so that the mechanism of constitutive protein kinase activation is unknown. Downstream signaling from the ROS1 fusion protein leads to the activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK1/2 cell proliferation module, the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase cell survival pathway, and the Vav3 cell migration pathway. Moreover, several of the ROS1 fusion proteins are implicated in the pathogenesis of a very small proportion of other cancers including glioblastoma, angiosarcoma, and cholangiocarcinoma as well as ovarian, gastric, and colorectal carcinomas. The occurrence of oncogenic ROS1 fusion proteins, particularly in non-small cell lung cancer, has fostered considerable interest in the development of ROS1 inhibitors. Although the percentage of lung cancers driven by ROS1 fusion proteins is low, owing to the large number of new cases of non-small cell lung cancer per year, the number of new cases of ROS1-positive lung cancers is significant and ranges from 2000 to 4000 per year in the United States and 10,000-15,000 worldwide. Crizotinib was the first inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug

  18. Vesicular PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and Rab7 are key effectors of sea urchin zygote nuclear membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lete, Marta G; Byrne, Richard D; Alonso, Alicia; Poccia, Dominic; Larijani, Banafshé

    2017-01-15

    Regulation of nuclear envelope dynamics is an important example of the universal phenomena of membrane fusion. The signalling molecules involved in nuclear membrane fusion might also be conserved during the formation of both pronuclear and zygote nuclear envelopes in the fertilised egg. Here, we determine that class-I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are needed for in vitro nuclear envelope formation. We show that, in vivo, PtdIns(3,4,5)P 3 is transiently located in vesicles around the male pronucleus at the time of nuclear envelope formation, and around male and female pronuclei before membrane fusion. We illustrate that class-I PI3K activity is also necessary for fusion of the female and male pronuclear membranes. We demonstrate, using coincidence amplified Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) monitored using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), a protein-lipid interaction of Rab7 GTPase and PtdIns(3,4,5)P 3 that occurs during pronuclear membrane fusion to create the zygote nuclear envelope. We present a working model, which includes several molecular steps in the pathways controlling fusion of nuclear envelope membranes. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Detailed determination of the fusion nuclear radius in reactions involving weakly bound projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Camacho, A.; Aguilera, E. F.; Quiroz, E. M.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed determination of the fusion radius parameter is performed within the Distorted Wave Born Approximation for reactions involving weakly bound projectiles. Specifically, a simultaneous X 2- analysis of elastic and fusion cross section data is done using a Woods-Saxon potential with volume and surface parts. The volume part is assumed to be responsible for fusion reactions while the surface part for all other direct reactions. It is proved that in order to fit fusion data, particularly for energies below the Coulomb barrier where fusion is enhanced, it is necessary to have a value of around 1.4 fm for the fusion radial parameter of the fusion potential (W F ). This value is much higher than that frequently used in Barrier Penetration models (1.0 fm). The calculations are performed for reactions involving the weakly bound projectile 9 Be with several medium mass targets. (Author)

  20. Additive manufacturing of 316L stainless steel by electron beam melting for nuclear fusion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yuan; Rännar, Lars-Erik; Liu, Leifeng; Koptyug, Andrey; Wikman, Stefan; Olsen, Jon; Cui, Daqing; Shen, Zhijian

    2017-04-01

    A feasibility study was performed to fabricate ITER In-Vessel components by one of the metal additive manufacturing methods, Electron Beam Melting® (EBM®). Solid specimens of SS316L with 99.8% relative density were prepared from gas atomized precursor powder granules. After the EBM® process the phase remains as austenite and the composition has practically not been changed. The RCC-MR code used for nuclear pressure vessels provides guidelines for this study and tensile tests and Charpy-V tests were carried out at 22 °C (RT) and 250 °C (ET). This work provides the first set of mechanical and microstructure data of EBM® SS316L for nuclear fusion applications. The mechanical testing shows that the yield strength, ductility and toughness are well above the acceptance criteria and only the ultimate tensile strength of EBM® SS316L is below the RCC-MR code. Microstructure characterizations reveal the presence of hierarchical structures consisting of solidified melt pools, columnar grains and irregular shaped sub-grains. Lots of precipitates enriched in Cr and Mo are observed at columnar grain boundaries while no sign of element segregation is shown at the sub-grain boundaries. Such a unique microstructure forms during a non-equilibrium process, comprising rapid solidification and a gradient 'annealing' process due to anisotropic thermal flow of accumulated heat inside the powder granule matrix. Relations between process parameters, specimen geometry (total building time) and sub-grain structure are discussed. Defects are formed mainly due to the large layer thickness (100 μm) which generates insufficient bonding between a few of the adjacently formed melt pools during the process. Further studies should focus on adjusting layer thickness to improve the strength of EBM® SS316L and optimizing total building time.

  1. Fusion fuel and renewables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entler, Slavomir

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that fusion fuel meets all aspects applied when defining renewables. A table of definitions of renewables is presented. The sections of the paper are as follows: An industrial renewable source; Nuclear fusion; Current situation in research; Definitions of renewable sources; Energy concept of nuclear fusion; Fusion fuel; Natural energy flow; Environmental impacts; Fusion fuel assessment; Sustainable power; and Energy mix from renewables. (P.A.)

  2. FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.

    1984-10-01

    This chapter deals with the analysis and engineering scaling of solid breeded blankets. The limits under which full component behavior can be achieved under changed test conditions are explored. The characterization of these test requirements for integrated testing contributes to the overall test matrix and test plan for the understanding and development of fusion nuclear technology. The second chapter covers the analysis and engineering scaling of liquid metal blankets. The testing goals for a complete blanket program are described. (MOW)

  3. Image fusion in open-architecture quality-oriented nuclear medicine and radiology departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohjonen, H.

    1997-01-01

    Imaging examinations of patients belong to the most widely used diagnostic procedures in hospitals. Multimodal digital imaging is becoming increasingly common in many fields of diagnosis and therapy planning. Patients are frequently examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT) or ultrasound imaging (US) in addition to single photon (SPET) or positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of the study was to provide means for improving the quality of the whole imaging and viewing chain in nuclear medicine and radiology. The specific aims were: (1) to construct and test a model for a quality assurance system in radiology based on ISO standards, (2) to plan a Dicom based image network for fusion purposes using ATM and Ethernet technologies, (3) to test different segmentation methods in quantitative SPET, (4) to study and implement a registration and visualisation method for multimodal imaging, (5) to apply the developed method in selected clinical brain and abdominal images, and (6) to investigate the accuracy of the registration procedure for brain SPET and MRI

  4. Customizable scientific web-portal for DIII-D nuclear fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abla, G; Kim, E N; Schissel, D P

    2010-01-01

    Increasing utilization of the Internet and convenient web technologies has made the web-portal a major application interface for remote participation and control of scientific instruments. While web-portals have provided a centralized gateway for multiple computational services, the amount of visual output often is overwhelming due to the high volume of data generated by complex scientific instruments and experiments. Since each scientist may have different priorities and areas of interest in the experiment, filtering and organizing information based on the individual user's need can increase the usability and efficiency of a web-portal. DIII-D is the largest magnetic nuclear fusion device in the US. A web-portal has been designed to support the experimental activities of DIII-D researchers worldwide. It offers a customizable interface with personalized page layouts and list of services for users to select. Each individual user can create a unique working environment to fit his own needs and interests. Customizable services are: real-time experiment status monitoring, diagnostic data access, interactive data analysis and visualization. The web-portal also supports interactive collaborations by providing collaborative logbook, and online instant announcement services. The DIII-D web-portal development utilizes multi-tier software architecture, and Web 2.0 technologies and tools, such as AJAX and Django, to develop a highly-interactive and customizable user interface.

  5. Customizable scientific web-portal for DIII-D nuclear fusion experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abla, G; Kim, E N; Schissel, D P, E-mail: abla@fusion.gat.co [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Increasing utilization of the Internet and convenient web technologies has made the web-portal a major application interface for remote participation and control of scientific instruments. While web-portals have provided a centralized gateway for multiple computational services, the amount of visual output often is overwhelming due to the high volume of data generated by complex scientific instruments and experiments. Since each scientist may have different priorities and areas of interest in the experiment, filtering and organizing information based on the individual user's need can increase the usability and efficiency of a web-portal. DIII-D is the largest magnetic nuclear fusion device in the US. A web-portal has been designed to support the experimental activities of DIII-D researchers worldwide. It offers a customizable interface with personalized page layouts and list of services for users to select. Each individual user can create a unique working environment to fit his own needs and interests. Customizable services are: real-time experiment status monitoring, diagnostic data access, interactive data analysis and visualization. The web-portal also supports interactive collaborations by providing collaborative logbook, and online instant announcement services. The DIII-D web-portal development utilizes multi-tier software architecture, and Web 2.0 technologies and tools, such as AJAX and Django, to develop a highly-interactive and customizable user interface.

  6. Image fusion in open-architecture quality-oriented nuclear medicine and radiology departments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohjonen, H

    1997-12-31

    Imaging examinations of patients belong to the most widely used diagnostic procedures in hospitals. Multimodal digital imaging is becoming increasingly common in many fields of diagnosis and therapy planning. Patients are frequently examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT) or ultrasound imaging (US) in addition to single photon (SPET) or positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of the study was to provide means for improving the quality of the whole imaging and viewing chain in nuclear medicine and radiology. The specific aims were: (1) to construct and test a model for a quality assurance system in radiology based on ISO standards, (2) to plan a Dicom based image network for fusion purposes using ATM and Ethernet technologies, (3) to test different segmentation methods in quantitative SPET, (4) to study and implement a registration and visualisation method for multimodal imaging, (5) to apply the developed method in selected clinical brain and abdominal images, and (6) to investigate the accuracy of the registration procedure for brain SPET and MRI 90 refs. The thesis includes also six previous publications by author

  7. Application of super-computer to field of plasma physics and nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the fields of plasma physics and nuclear fusion research, for carrying out the various numerical simulation of plasma, enormous amount of computation is required, accordingly, the computers as fast as possible are necessary. In the Electronic Computer Center attached to the Institute for Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, which is a national common utilization facility, the full scale super-computer VP-100 made in Japan was adopted, and utmost effort has been exerted to increase the speed of large scale computation as well as numerical simulation. In this paper, super-computers are briefly explained, and the example of especially the aspect of performance in the case of the Computer Center is described. Actually, the scale of simulation is limited by the capability of computers. The performance obtained by the computer code for research and the average performance obtained by the computer codes of wide range by using the VP-100 are discussed. Present fast computers are about 10 MFLOPS, therefore, the computers having the performance surpassing 100 MFLOPS may be super-computers. The features of vector computers, the performance related to application programs and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  8. Influence of nuclear data uncertainties on thorium fusion-fission hybrid blanket nucleonic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.T.; Mathews, D.R.

    1979-09-01

    The fusion-fission hybrid blanket proposed for the Tandem Mirror Hybrid Reactor employs thorium metal as the fertile material. Based on the ENDF/B-IV nuclear data, the 233 U and tritium production rate and blanket energy multiplication averaged over the blanket lifetime of about 9 MW-yr/m 2 are 0.76 and 1.12 per D-T neutron and 4.8, respectively. At the time of the blanket discharge, the 233 U enrichment in the thorium metal is about 3%. The thorium cross sections given by the ENDF/B-IV and V were reviewed, and the important partial cross sections such as (n,2n), (n,3n), and (n,γ) were found to be known to +-10 to 20% in the respective energy range of interest. A sensitivity study showed that the 233 U and tritium production rate and blanket energy multiplication are relatively sensitive to the thorium capture and fission cross section uncertainties. In order to predict the above parameters within +-1%, the Th(n,γ) and Th(n,νf) cross sections must be measured within about +-2% in the energy range 3 to 3000 keV and 13.5 to 15 MeV, respectively

  9. Customizable scientific web-portal for DIII-D nuclear fusion experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abla, G.; Kim, E. N.; Schissel, D. P.

    2010-04-01

    Increasing utilization of the Internet and convenient web technologies has made the web-portal a major application interface for remote participation and control of scientific instruments. While web-portals have provided a centralized gateway for multiple computational services, the amount of visual output often is overwhelming due to the high volume of data generated by complex scientific instruments and experiments. Since each scientist may have different priorities and areas of interest in the experiment, filtering and organizing information based on the individual user's need can increase the usability and efficiency of a web-portal. DIII-D is the largest magnetic nuclear fusion device in the US. A web-portal has been designed to support the experimental activities of DIII-D researchers worldwide. It offers a customizable interface with personalized page layouts and list of services for users to select. Each individual user can create a unique working environment to fit his own needs and interests. Customizable services are: real-time experiment status monitoring, diagnostic data access, interactive data analysis and visualization. The web-portal also supports interactive collaborations by providing collaborative logbook, and online instant announcement services. The DIII-D web-portal development utilizes multi-tier software architecture, and Web 2.0 technologies and tools, such as AJAX and Django, to develop a highly-interactive and customizable user interface.

  10. Alternative energy source II; Proceedings of the Second Miami International Conference, Miami Beach, Fla., December 10-13, 1979. Volume 6 - Nuclear energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veziroglu, T. N.

    This volume examines conventional nuclear energy, breeder reactors, and thermonuclear energy. The particular papers presented consider current developments in nuclear breeder technology, fusion-driven fissile fuel breeder systems, and the fusion fission hybrid reactor. The implications of nuclear energy utilization in the Phillipines and the internationally safeguarded atomic fuel exchanger center for the Asian-Pacific basin are also discussed.

  11. Fusion between perinuclear virions and the outer nuclear membrane requires the fusogenic activity of herpes simplex virus gB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Catherine C; Wisner, Todd W; Hannah, Brian P; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Johnson, David C

    2009-11-01

    Herpesviruses cross nuclear membranes (NMs) in two steps, as follows: (i) capsids assemble and bud through the inner NM into the perinuclear space, producing enveloped virus particles, and (ii) the envelopes of these virus particles fuse with the outer NM. Two herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoproteins, gB and gH (the latter, likely complexed as a heterodimer with gL), are necessary for the second step of this process. Mutants lacking both gB and gH accumulate in the perinuclear space or in herniations (membrane vesicles derived from the inner NM). Both gB and gH/gL are also known to act directly in fusing the virion envelope with host cell membranes during HSV entry into cells, i.e., both glycoproteins appear to function directly in different aspects of the membrane fusion process. We hypothesized that HSV gB and gH/gL also act directly in the membrane fusion that occurs during virus egress from the nucleus. Previous studies of the role of gB and gH/gL in nuclear egress involved HSV gB and gH null mutants that could potentially also possess gross defects in the virion envelope. Here, we produced recombinant HSV-expressing mutant forms of gB with single amino acid substitutions in the hydrophobic "fusion loops." These fusion loops are thought to play a direct role in membrane fusion by insertion into cellular membranes. HSV recombinants expressing gB with any one of four fusion loop mutations (W174R, W174Y, Y179K, and A261D) were unable to enter cells. Moreover, two of the mutants, W174Y and Y179K, displayed reduced abilities to mediate HSV cell-to-cell spread, and W174R and A261D exhibited no spread. All mutant viruses exhibited defects in nuclear egress, enveloped virions accumulated in herniations and in the perinuclear space, and fewer enveloped virions were detected on cell surfaces. These results support the hypothesis that gB functions directly to mediate the fusion between perinuclear virus particles and the outer NM.

  12. Introduction to nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Sun

    1987-03-01

    This book deals with nuclear physics with basic introduction, like atomic theory of material, movement theory of material, an atom, natural radioactivity, nuclear atom, electromagnetic waves, X rays, the quantum theory, special commercial theory, wavelength and particle, spectrum and hydrogen atom, meaning of wavelength driven, optics spectrum and electronic distribution, microstructure and Zeeman's effect, X rays spectrum and atom structure, an atomic nucleus, conversion rule of a radioactive element, properties of radiation and interaction with material, artificial nuclear decay and artificial radioactivity, acceleration of electric charge particle, neutron physics, nuclear fission, nuclear fission reactor and a thermonuclear reaction and nuclear fusion.

  13. Evaluating laser-driven Bremsstrahlung radiation sources for imaging and analysis of nuclear waste packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Christopher P., E-mail: cj0810@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Brenner, Ceri M. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Stitt, Camilla A. [Interface Analysis Centre, HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Armstrong, Chris; Rusby, Dean R. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Mirfayzi, Seyed R. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Wilson, Lucy A. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Alejo, Aarón; Ahmed, Hamad [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Allott, Ric [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Butler, Nicholas M.H. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Clarke, Robert J.; Haddock, David; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Higginson, Adam [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Murphy, Christopher [Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Notley, Margaret [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Paraskevoulakos, Charilaos [Interface Analysis Centre, HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Jowsey, John [Ground Floor North B582, Sellafield Ltd, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • X-ray generation was achieved via laser interaction with a tantalum thin foil target. • Picosecond X-ray pulse from a sub-mm spot generated high resolution images. • MeV X-ray emission is possible, permitting analysis of full scale waste containers. • In parallel neutron emission of 10{sup 7}–10{sup 9} neutrons per steradian per pulse was attained. • Development of a 10 Hz diode pumped laser system for waste monitoring is envisioned. - Abstract: A small scale sample nuclear waste package, consisting of a 28 mm diameter uranium penny encased in grout, was imaged by absorption contrast radiography using a single pulse exposure from an X-ray source driven by a high-power laser. The Vulcan laser was used to deliver a focused pulse of photons to a tantalum foil, in order to generate a bright burst of highly penetrating X-rays (with energy >500 keV), with a source size of <0.5 mm. BAS-TR and BAS-SR image plates were used for image capture, alongside a newly developed Thalium doped Caesium Iodide scintillator-based detector coupled to CCD chips. The uranium penny was clearly resolved to sub-mm accuracy over a 30 cm{sup 2} scan area from a single shot acquisition. In addition, neutron generation was demonstrated in situ with the X-ray beam, with a single shot, thus demonstrating the potential for multi-modal criticality testing of waste materials. This feasibility study successfully demonstrated non-destructive radiography of encapsulated, high density, nuclear material. With recent developments of high-power laser systems, to 10 Hz operation, a laser-driven multi-modal beamline for waste monitoring applications is envisioned.

  14. Nuclear Fusion Project. Semi-annual report of the Association KfK/EURATOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kast, G.

    1987-12-01

    Short communications give a survey of 38 technology tasks, the development of ECRH power sources at 150 GHz, and 8 NET study contracts. The fusion technology contracts and the NET contracts are listed in the appendices I and II, respectively, while the KfK departments contributing to the Fusion Project and the Fusion Project Management Staff are listed in appendices III and IV, respectively. (GG)

  15. Nuclear data for accelerator-driven transmutation. Annual Report 2001/2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.; Johansson, C.; Klug, J.; Olsson, N.; Pomp, S.; Renberg, P.U.

    2002-07-01

    The present project started 1998-07-01. The primary objective from the supporting organizations is to promote research and research education of relevance for development of the national competence within nuclear energy. The aim of the project is in short to: promote development of the competence within nuclear physics and nuclear technology by supporting licentiate and PhD students; push forward the international research front regarding fundamental nuclear data within the presently highlighted research area 'accelerator-driven transmutation'; strengthen the Swedish in influence within the mentioned research area by expanding the international contact network; constitute a basis for Swedish participation in the nuclear data activities at IAEA and OECD/NEA. The project is run by the Department of Neutron Research (INF)at Uppsala University, and is utilizing the unique neutron beam facility at the national The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL) at Uppsala University. Transmutation techniques in accelerator-driven systems (ADS) involve high-energy neutrons, created in the proton-induced spallation of a heavy target nucleus. The existing nuclear data libraries developed for reactors of today go up to about 20 MeV,which covers all available energies for that application; but with a spallator coupled to a core, neutrons with energies up to 1 - 2 GeV will be present. Although a large majority of the neutrons will be below 20 MeV, the relatively small fraction at higher energies still has to be characterized. Above ∼ 200 MeV, direct reaction models work reasonably well, while at lower energies nuclear distortion plays a non-trivial role. This makes the 20 - 200 MeV region the most important for new experimental cross section data. Very little high-quality neutron-induced data exist in this energy domain.Only the total cross section and the np scattering cross section have been investigated extensively. Besides this, there are data on neutron elastic scattering from UC Davis at

  16. Post-fusion treatment with MG132 increases transcription factor expression in somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jinyoung; Lee, Joohyeong; Kim, Jinyoung; Park, Junhong; Lee, Eunsong

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of post-fusion treatment of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) oocytes with the proteasomal inhibitor MG132 on maturation promoting factor (MPF) activity, nuclear remodeling, embryonic development, and gene expression of cloned pig embryos. Immediately after electrofusion, SCNT oocytes were treated with MG132 and/or caffeine for 2 hr, vanadate for 0.5 hr, or vanadate for 0.5 hr followed by MG132 for 1.5 hr. Of the MG132 concentrations tested (0-5 microM), the 1 microM concentration showed a higher rate of blastocyst formation (25.9%) than 0 (14.2%), 0.5 (16.9%), and 5 microM (16.9%). Post-fusion treatment with MG132, caffeine, and both MG132 and caffeine improved blastocyst formation (22.1%, 21.4%, and 24.4%, respectively), whereas vanadate treatment inhibited blastocyst formation (6.5%) compared to the control (11.1%). When examined 2 hr after fusion and 1 hr after activation, MPF activity remained at a higher (P fusion with caffeine and/or MG132, but it was decreased by vanadate. The rate of oocytes showing premature chromosome condensation was not altered by MG132 but was decreased by vanadate treatment. In addition, formation of single pronuclei was increased by MG132 compared to control and vanadate treatment. MG132-treated embryos showed increased expression of POU5F1, DPPA2, DPPA3, DPPA5, and NDP52l1 genes compared to control embryos. Our results demonstrate that post-fusion treatment of SCNT oocytes with MG132 prevents MPF degradation and increases expression of transcription factors in SCNT embryos, which are necessary for normal development of SCNT embryos. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Induction of polyploidy by nuclear fusion mechanism upon decreased expression of the nuclear envelope protein LAP2β in the human osteosarcoma cell line U2OS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shoshan, Shirley Oren; Simon, Amos J; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Shaklai, Sigal; Paz-Yaacov, Nurit; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon; Trakhtenbrot, Luba

    2014-01-28

    Polyploidy has been recognized for many years as an important hallmark of cancer cells. Polyploid cells can arise through cell fusion, endoreplication and abortive cell cycle. The inner nuclear membrane protein LAP2β plays key roles in nuclear envelope breakdown and reassembly during mitosis, initiation of replication and transcriptional repression. Here we studied the function of LAP2β in the maintenance of cell ploidy state, a role which has not yet been assigned to this protein. By knocking down the expression of LAP2β, using both viral and non-viral RNAi approaches in osteosarcoma derived U2OS cells, we detected enlarged nuclear size, nearly doubling of DNA content and chromosomal duplications, as analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization and spectral karyotyping methodologies. Spectral karyotyping analyses revealed that near-hexaploid karyotypes of LAP2β knocked down cells consisted of not only seven duplicated chromosomal markers, as could be anticipated by genome duplication mechanism, but also of four single chromosomal markers. Furthermore, spectral karyotyping analysis revealed that both of two near-triploid U2OS sub-clones contained the seven markers that were duplicated in LAP2β knocked down cells, whereas the four single chromosomal markers were detected only in one of them. Gene expression profiling of LAP2β knocked down cells revealed that up to a third of the genes exhibiting significant changes in their expression are involved in cancer progression. Our results suggest that nuclear fusion mechanism underlies the polyploidization induction upon LAP2β reduced expression. Our study implies on a novel role of LAP2β in the maintenance of cell ploidy status. LAP2β depleted U2OS cells can serve as a model to investigate polyploidy and aneuploidy formation by nuclear fusion mechanism and its involvement in cancerogenesis.

  18. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research. Vol. II. Proceedings of a Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Physics Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Research on controlled nuclear fusion was first disclosed at the Second United Nations Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, held at Geneva in 1958. From the information given, it was evident that a better understanding of the behaviour of hot dense plasmas was needed before the goal of economic energy release from nuclear fusion could be reached. The fact that research since then has been most complex and costly has enhanced the desirability of international co-operation and exchange of information and experience. Having organized its First Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research at Salzburg in 1961, the International Atomic Energy Agency again provided the means for such cooperation in organizing its Second Conference on this subject on 6-10 September, 1965, at Culham, Abingdon, Berks, England. The meeting was arranged with the generous help of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority at their Culham Laboratory, where the facilities and assistance of the staff were greatly appreciated. At the meeting, which was attended by 268 participants from 26 member states and three international organizations, significant results from many experiments, including those from the new and larger machines, became available. It has now become feasible to intercorrelate data obtained from a number of similar machines; this has led to a more complete understanding of plasma behaviour. No breakthrough was reported nor had been expected towards the economical release of the energy from fusion, but there was increased understanding of the problems of production, control and containment of high-density and high-temperature plasmas

  19. Fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs

  20. A review of nuclear data needs and their status for fusion reactor technology with some suggestions on a strategy to satisfy the requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Cheng, E.T.

    1991-09-01

    A review was performed on the needs and status of nuclear data for fusion-reactor technology. Generally, the status of nuclear data for fusion has been improved during the past two decades due to the dedicated effort of the nuclear data developers. However, there are still deficiencies in the nuclear data base, particularly in the areas of activation and neutron scattering cross sections. Activation cross sections were found to be unsatisfactory in 83 of the 153 reactions reviewed. The scattering cross sections for fluorine and boron will need to be improved at energies above 1 MeV. Suggestions concerning a strategy to address the specific fusion nuclear data needs for dosimetry and activation are also provided

  1. Application of variance reduction technique to nuclear transmutation system driven by accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasa, Toshinobu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In Japan, it is the basic policy to dispose the high level radioactive waste arising from spent nuclear fuel in stable deep strata after glass solidification. If the useful elements in the waste can be separated and utilized, resources are effectively used, and it can be expected to guarantee high economical efficiency and safety in the disposal in strata. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute proposed the hybrid type transmutation system, in which high intensity proton accelerator and subcritical fast core are combined, or the nuclear reactor which is optimized for the exclusive use for transmutation. The tungsten target, minor actinide nitride fuel transmutation system and the melted minor actinide chloride salt target fuel transmutation system are outlined. The conceptual figures of both systems are shown. As the method of analysis, Version 2.70 of Lahet Code System which was developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory in USA was adopted. In case of carrying out the analysis of accelerator-driven subcritical core in the energy range below 20 MeV, variance reduction technique must be applied. (K.I.)

  2. Fusion systems engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Summaries of research are included for each of the following topics: (1) fusion reactor systems studies, (2) development of blanket processing technology for fusion reactors, (3) safety studies of fusion concepts, (4) the MACK/MACKLIB system for nuclear response functions, and (5) energy storage and power supply systems for fusion reactors

  3. Nuclear fusion project. Semi-annual report of the Association KfK/EURATOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kast, G.

    1988-07-01

    Short communications give a survey of 38 technology tasks, the development of ECRH power sources at 150 GHz, and 9 NET study are listed in the appendices I and II, respectively, while the KfK departments contributing to the Fusion Project and the Fusion Project Management Staff are listed in appendices III and IV, respectively. (GG)

  4. Calibration of a Fusion Experiment to Investigate the Nuclear Caloric Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Ashleigh

    2017-09-01

    In order to investigate the nuclear equation of state (EoS), the relation between two thermodynamic quantities can be examined. The correlation between the temperature and excitation energy of a nucleus, also known as the caloric curve, has been previously observed in peripheral heavy-ion collisions to exhibit a dependence on the neutron-proton asymmetry. To further investigate this result, fusion reactions (78Kr + 12C and 86Kr + 12C) were measured; the beam energy was varied in the range 15-35 MeV/u in order to vary the excitation energy. The light charged particles (LCPs) evaporated from the compound nucleus were measured in the Si-CsI(TI)/PD detector array FAUST (Forward Array Using Silicon Technology). The LCPs carry information about the temperature. The calibration of FAUST will be described in this presentation. The silicon detectors have resistive surfaces in perpendicular directions to allow position measurement of the LCP's to better than 200 um. The resistive nature requires a position-dependent correction to the energy calibration to take full advantage of the energy resolution. The momentum is calculated from the energy of these particles, and their position on the detectors. A parameterized formula based on the Bethe-Bloch equation was used to straighten the particle identification (PID) lines measured with the dE-E technique. The energy calibration of the CsI detectors is based on the silicon detector energy calibration and the PID. A precision slotted mask enables the relative positions of the detectors to be determined. DOE Grant: DE-FG02-93ER40773 and REU Grant: PHY - 1659847.

  5. Nuclear fusion-independent smooth muscle differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells induced by a smooth muscle environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Jack, Gregory S; Rao, Nagesh; Zuk, Patricia; Ignarro, Louis J; Wu, Benjamin; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2012-03-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells hASC have been isolated and were shown to have multilineage differentiation capacity. Although both plasticity and cell fusion have been suggested as mechanisms for cell differentiation in vivo, the effect of the local in vivo environment on the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells has not been evaluated. We previously reported the in vitro capacity of smooth muscle differentiation of these cells. In this study, we evaluate the effect of an in vivo smooth muscle environment in the differentiation of hASC. We studied this by two experimental designs: (a) in vivo evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation of hASC injected into a smooth muscle environment and (b) in vitro evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation capacity of hASC exposed to bladder smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate a time-dependent differentiation of hASC into mature smooth muscle cells when these cells are injected into the smooth musculature of the urinary bladder. Similar findings were seen when the cells were cocultured in vitro with primary bladder smooth muscle cells. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated that microenvironment cues rather than nuclear fusion are responsible for this differentiation. We conclude that cell plasticity is present in hASCs, and their differentiation is accomplished in the absence of nuclear fusion. Copyright © 2011 AlphaMed Press.

  6. Records for conversion of laser energy to nuclear energy in exploding nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jortner, Joshua; Last, Isidore

    2017-09-01

    Table-top nuclear fusion reactions in the chemical physics laboratory can be driven by high-energy dynamics of Coulomb exploding, multicharged, deuterium containing nanostructures generated by ultraintense, femtosecond, near-infrared laser pulses. Theoretical-computational studies of table-top laser-driven nuclear fusion of high-energy (up to 15 MeV) deuterons with 7Li, 6Li and D nuclei demonstrate the attainment of high fusion yields within a source-target reaction design, which constitutes the highest table-top fusion efficiencies obtained up to date. The conversion efficiency of laser energy to nuclear energy (0.1-1.0%) for table-top fusion is comparable to that for DT fusion currently accomplished for 'big science' inertial fusion setups.

  7. Double-Pionic Fusion of Nuclear Systems and the ''ABC'' Effect: Approaching a Puzzle by Exclusive and Kinematically Complete Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashkanov, M.; Clement, H.; Doroshkevich, E.; Khakimova, O.; Kren, F.; Meier, R.; Pricking, A.; Skorodko, T.; Wagner, G. J.; Bargholtz, C.; Geren, L.; Lindberg, K.; Tegner, P.-E.; Zartova, I.; Berlowski, M.; Stepaniak, J.; Bogoslawsky, D.; Ivanov, G.; Jiganov, E.; Morosov, B.

    2009-01-01

    The ABC effect--a puzzling low-mass enhancement in the ππ invariant mass spectrum, first observed by Abashian, Booth, and Crowe--is well known from inclusive measurements of two-pion production in nuclear fusion reactions. Here we report on the first exclusive and kinematically complete measurements of the most basic double-pionic fusion reaction pn→dπ 0 π 0 at beam energies of 1.03 and 1.35 GeV. The measurements, which have been carried out at CELSIUS-WASA, reveal the ABC effect to be a (ππ) I=L=0 channel phenomenon associated with both a resonancelike energy dependence in the integral cross section and the formation of a ΔΔ system in the intermediate state. A corresponding simple s-channel resonance ansatz provides a surprisingly good description of the data

  8. Monte Carlo studies in accelerator-driven systems for transmutation of high-level nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarer, Basar [Gazi Universitesi Fen-Edebiyat Fakueltesi Fizik Boeluemue, Besevler, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: sarer@gazi.edu.tr; Korkmaz, M. Emin [Gazi Universitesi Fen-Edebiyat Fakueltesi Fizik Boeluemue, Besevler, Ankara (Turkey); Guenay, Mehtap [Inoenue Universitesi Fen-Edebiyat Fakueltesi Fizik Boeluemue, Malatya (Turkey); Aydin, Abdullah [Kirikkale Universitesi Fen-Edebiyat Fakueltesi Fizik Boeuemue, Kirikkale (Turkey)

    2008-07-15

    A spallation neutron source was modeled using a high energy proton accelerator for transmutation of {sup 239}Pu, minor actinides {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am and long-lived fission products {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, which are created from the operation of nuclear power reactors for the production of electricity. The acceleration driven system (ADS) is composed of a natural lead target, beam window, subcritical core, reflector, and structural material. The neutrons are produced by the spallation reaction of protons from a high intensity linear accelerator in the spallation target, and the fission reaction in the core. It is used a hexagonal lattice for the waste and fuel assemblies. The system is driven by a 1 GeV, 10 mA proton beam incident on a natural lead cylindrical target. The protons were uniformly distributed across the beam. The core is a cylindrical assembly. The main vessel is surrounded by a reflector made of graphite. The axes of the proton beam and the target are concentric with the main vessel axis. The structural walls and the beam window are made of the same material, stainless steel, HT9. We investigated the following neutronics parameters: spallation neutron and proton yields, spatial and energy distribution of the spallation neutrons, and protons, heat deposition, and the production rates of hydrogen and helium, transmutation rate of minor actinides and fission products. In the calculations, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX, which is a combination of LAHET and MCNP, was used. To transport a wide variety of particles, The Los Alamos High Energy Transport Code (LAHET) was used.

  9. Nuclear fusion as new energy option in a global single-regional energy system model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eherer, C.; Baumann, M.; Dueweke, J.; Hamacher, T.

    2005-01-01

    Is there a window of opportunity for fusion on the electricity market under 'business as usual' conditions, and if not, how do the boundary conditions have to look like to open such a window? This question is addressed within a subtask of the Socio-Economic Research on Fusion (SERF) programme of the European Commission. The most advanced energy-modelling framework, the TIMES model generator developed by the Energy Technology System Analysis Project group of the IEA (ETSAP) has been used to implement a global single-regional partial equilibrium energy model. Within the current activities the potential role of fusion power in various future energy scenarios is studied. The final energy demand projections of the baseline of the investigations are based on IIASA-WEC Scenario B. Under the quite conservative baseline assumptions fusion only enters the model solution with 35 GW in 2100 and it can be observed that coal technologies dominate electricity production in 2100. Scenario variations show that the role of fusion power is strongly affected by the availability of GEN IV fission breeding technologies as energy option and by CO 2 emission caps. The former appear to be a major competitor of fusion power while the latter open a window of opportunity for fusion power on the electricity market. An interesting outcome is furthermore that the possible share of fusion electricity is more sensitive to the potential of primary resources like coal, gas and uranium, than to the share of solar and wind power in the system. This indicates that both kinds of technologies, renewables and fusion power, can coexist in future energy systems in case of CO 2 emission policies and/or resource scarcity scenarios. It is shown that Endogenous Technological Learning (ETL), a more consistent description of technological progress than mere time series, has an impact on the model results. (author)

  10. Nuclear data processing for cross-sections generation for fusion-fission, ADS, and IV generation reactors utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasquez, Carlos E.; Fernandes, Lorena C.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Costa, Antonella L. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    One of the mains topics about nuclear reactors is the microscopic cross section for incident neutrons. Therefore, in this work, it is evaluated the microscopic and macroscopic cross section for a nuclide and a material. One of the nuclides microscopic cross-section studied is the {sup 56}Fe which is the highest compound from the material macroscopic cross section studied SS316. On the other hand, it was studied the microscopic cross section of the {sup 242}Pu which is one of the nuclides that composes the nuclear fuel. The nuclear fuel chosen is a spent fuel reprocessed by UREX+ technique and spiked with thorium with 20% of fissile material. Therefore it was studied the macroscopic cross section from this nuclear fuel. Both of them were compared by using three different ways to reprocess the nuclides, one for LWR, another for ADS and the last one for Fusion reactors. The library used was JEFF-3.2 recommend for the reactors studied. The comparison was made at 1200 K for the nuclear fuel and 700K for the SS316.The results present differences due to the energy discretization, the number of groups chosen for each reactor and some nuclear reactions taken into consideration according to the neutron spectrum for each reactor. The nuclides were processed by NJOY99.364 and plotted with MCNP-Vised. (author)

  11. Leukemia-Associated Nup214 Fusion Proteins Disturb the XPO1-Mediated Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Transport Pathway and Thereby the NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shoko; Cigdem, Sadik; Okuwaki, Mitsuru; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear-cytoplasmic transport through nuclear pore complexes is mediated by nuclear transport receptors. Previous reports have suggested that aberrant nuclear-cytoplasmic transport due to mutations or overexpression of nuclear pore complexes and nuclear transport receptors is closely linked to diseases. Nup214, a component of nuclear pore complexes, has been found as chimeric fusion proteins in leukemia. Among various Nup214 fusion proteins, SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 have been shown to be engaged in tumorigenesis, but their oncogenic mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we examined the functions of the Nup214 fusion proteins by focusing on their effects on nuclear-cytoplasmic transport. We found that SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 interact with exportin-1 (XPO1)/CRM1 and nuclear RNA export factor 1 (NXF1)/TAP, which mediate leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES)-dependent protein export and mRNA export, respectively. SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 decreased the XPO1-mediated nuclear export of NES proteins such as cyclin B and proteins involved in the NF-κB signaling pathway by tethering XPO1 onto nuclear dots where Nup214 fusion proteins are localized. We also demonstrated that SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 expression inhibited NF-κB-mediated transcription by abnormal tethering of the complex containing p65 and its inhibitor, IκB, in the nucleus. These results suggest that SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 perturb the regulation of gene expression through alteration of the nuclear-cytoplasmic transport system. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Real-time Data Fusion Platforms: The Need of Multi-dimensional Data-driven Research in Biomedical Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raje, Satyajeet; Kite, Bobbie; Ramanathan, Jay; Payne, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Systems designed to expedite data preprocessing tasks such as data discovery, interpretation, and integration that are required before data analysis drastically impact the pace of biomedical informatics research. Current commercial interactive and real-time data integration tools are designed for large-scale business analytics requirements. In this paper we identify the need for end-to-end data fusion platforms from the researcher's perspective, supporting ad-hoc data interpretation and integration.

  13. Storage and Containment of Nuclear Targets for Pulsed Fission-Fusion Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The combined fission-fusion fuel target is the heart of an engine concept that can open the solar system to fast and efficient human exploration. This is a unique...

  14. The role of fusion in the future of nuclear power. A European point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palumbo, D.; Grieger, G.

    1977-01-01

    In the long range three major energy sources will offer the potential of delivering vast amounts of energy: - fast breeders; - thermonuclear fusion; - solar energy. Taking into account the particular situation of Europe, i.e. high population density, high degree of industrialization, and, in average, rather low and variable sunshine intensity, fusion seems to offer specific advantages, including - easy availability and widespread distribution of fuel; - steady operation; - high temperature operation (assuming material problems solved) allowing either for an increased thermal efficiency or for the delivery of process heat; - probably less radioactive problems and therefore easier public acceptance; - no proliferation problems. The principle of thermonuclear fusion requires the confinement of a sufficiently dense deuterium-tritium plasma mixture heated to temperatures of about 10 keV and continuously exchanged to make up for the burn-up rate. All present and future fusion experiments aim at gradually approaching the demonstration of the feasibility of this process. The European Fusion Programme is carried out as a joint coordinated enterprise of nine associated laboratories led by the Commission of the European Communities. It is strongly concentrated on toroidal magnetic confinement devices, in particular the Tokamaks. It is centred around the large proposed Tokamak experiment JET (Joint European Torus) whose operation is planned to start at the beginning of the next decade. This experiment aims at reaching plasma conditions close to the ones needed for a thermonuclear fusion reactor. If the results turn out to be positive, an experimental power reactor might be the next step [fr

  15. Low-energy nuclear reaction of the 14N+169Tm system: Incomplete fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R.; Sharma, Vijay R.; Yadav, Abhishek; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Agarwal, Avinash; Appannababu, S.; Mukherjee, S.; Singh, B. P.; Ali, R.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2017-11-01

    Excitation functions of reaction residues produced in the 14N+169Tm system have been measured to high precision at energies above the fusion barrier, ranging from 1.04 VB to 1.30 VB , and analyzed in the framework of the statistical model code pace4. Analysis of α -emitting channels points toward the onset of incomplete fusion even at slightly above-barrier energies where complete fusion is supposed to be one of the dominant processes. The onset and strength of incomplete fusion have been deduced and studied in terms of various entrance channel parameters. Present results together with the reanalysis of existing data for various projectile-target combinations conclusively suggest strong influence of projectile structure on the onset of incomplete fusion. Also, a strong dependence on the Coulomb effect (ZPZT) has been observed for the present system along with different projectile-target combinations available in the literature. It is concluded that the fraction of incomplete fusion linearly increases with ZPZT and is found to be more for larger ZPZT values, indicating significantly important linear systematics.

  16. Nuclear and Physical Properties of Dielectrics under Neutron Irradiation in Fast (BN-600) and Fusion (DEMO-S) Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokhin, D. A.; Chernov, V. M.; Blokhin, A. I.

    2017-12-01

    Nuclear and physical properties (activation and transmutation of elements) of BN and Al2O3 dielectric materials subjected to neutron irradiation for up to 5 years in Russian fast (BN-600) and fusion (DEMO-S) reactors were calculated using the ACDAM-2.0 software complex for different post-irradiation cooling times (up to 10 years). Analytical relations were derived for the calculated quantities. The results may be used in the analysis of properties of irradiated dielectric materials and may help establish the rules for safe handling of these materials.

  17. Summary report from 1. research coordination meeting on nuclear data libraries for advance systems - fusion devices (FENDL - 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, A.; Forrest, R.; Mengoni, A.

    2009-03-01

    The first Research Co-ordination Meeting of the Nuclear Data Libraries for Advance Systems - Fusion Devices (FENDL - 3) was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 2 to 5 December 2008. A summary of the meeting is given in this report along with discussions which took place. An important outcome of the meeting was the agreement to create a new FENDL-3.0 Starter Library. Finally, a list of task assignments was prepared together with the plan for future CRP activities. (author)

  18. Nuclear Data Libraries for Advanced Systems - Fusion Devices (FENDL-3). Summary report from the Second Research Coordination Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawan, Mohamed E.

    2010-06-01

    The second Research Co-ordination Meeting of the Nuclear Data Libraries for Advanced Systems - Fusion Devices (FENDL - 3) was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 23 to 26 March 2010. A summary of the meeting is given in this report along with the discussions which took place. An important outcome of the meeting was the decision to provide ENDF data libraries (FENDL-3/T) by April 2011. Finally, a list of task assignments was prepared together with the plan for future CRP activities. (author)

  19. Osteoclast Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie Julie Møller, Anaïs; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Søe, Kent

    2017-01-01

    Investigations addressing the molecular keys of osteoclast fusion are primarily based on end-point analyses. No matter if investigations are performed in vivo or in vitro the impact of a given factor is predominantly analyzed by counting the number of multi-nucleated cells, the number of nuclei per...... multinucleated cell or TRAcP activity. But end-point analyses do not show how the fusion came about. This would not be a problem if fusion of osteoclasts was a random process and occurred by the same molecular mechanism from beginning to end. However, we and others have in the recent period published data...... suggesting that fusion partners may specifically select each other and that heterogeneity between the partners seems to play a role. Therefore, we set out to directly test the hypothesis that fusion factors have a heterogenic involvement at different stages of nuclearity. Therefore, we have analyzed...

  20. Fusion physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lackner, Karl; Tran, Minh Quang

    2012-01-01

    This publication is a comprehensive reference for graduate students and an invaluable guide for more experienced researchers. It provides an introduction to nuclear fusion and its status and prospects, and features specialized chapters written by leaders in the field, presenting the main research and development concepts in fusion physics. It starts with an introduction to the case for the development of fusion as an energy source. Magnetic and inertial confinement are addressed. Dedicated chapters focus on the physics of confinement, the equilibrium and stability of tokamaks, diagnostics, heating and current drive by neutral beam and radiofrequency waves, and plasma–wall interactions. While the tokamak is a leading concept for the realization of fusion, other concepts (helical confinement and, in a broader sense, other magnetic and inertial configurations) are also addressed in the book. At over 1100 pages, this publication provides an unparalleled resource for fusion physicists and engineers.

  1. Fusion systems engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Research during this report period has covered the following areas: (1) fusion reactor systems studies, (2) development of blanket processing technology for fusion reactors, (3) safety studies of fusion concepts, (4) MACKLIB-IV, a new library of nuclear response functions, (5) energy storage and power supply requirements for commercial fusion reactors, (6) blanket/shield design evaluation for commercial fusion reactors, and (7) cross section measurements, evaluations, and techniques

  2. Number-Theory in Nuclear-Physics in Number-Theory: Non-Primality Factorization As Fission VS. Primality As Fusion; Composites' Islands of INstability: Feshbach-Resonances?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Edward

    2011-10-01

    Numbers: primality/indivisibility/non-factorization versus compositeness/divisibility /factor-ization, often in tandem but not always, provocatively close analogy to nuclear-physics: (2 + 1)=(fusion)=3; (3+1)=(fission)=4[=2 × 2]; (4+1)=(fusion)=5; (5 +1)=(fission)=6[=2 × 3]; (6 + 1)=(fusion)=7; (7+1)=(fission)=8[= 2 × 4 = 2 × 2 × 2]; (8 + 1) =(non: fission nor fusion)= 9[=3 × 3]; then ONLY composites' Islands of fusion-INstability: 8, 9, 10; then 14, 15, 16,... Could inter-digit Feshbach-resonances exist??? Applications to: quantum-information/computing non-Shore factorization, millennium-problem Riemann-hypotheses proof as Goodkin BEC intersection with graph-theory ``short-cut'' method: Rayleigh(1870)-Polya(1922)-``Anderson'' (1958)-localization, Goldbach-conjecture, financial auditing/accounting as quantum-statistical-physics;... abound!!!

  3. Fusion between Intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages in a cancer context results in nuclear reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Anne E; Anderson, Eric C; Davies, Paige S; Silk, Alain D; Pelz, Carl; Impey, Soren; Wong, Melissa H

    2011-02-15

    The most deadly phase in cancer progression is attributed to the inappropriate acquisition of molecular machinery leading to metastatic transformation and spread of disease to distant organs. Although it is appreciated that metastasis involves epithelial-mesenchymal interplay, the underlying mechanism defining this process is poorly understood. Specifically, how cancer cells evade immune surveillance and gain the ability to navigate the circulatory system remains a focus. One possible mechanism underlying metastatic conversion is fusion between blood-derived immune cells and cancer cells. While this notion is a century old, in vivo evidence that cell fusion occurs within tumors and imparts genetic or physiologic changes remains controversial. We have previously demonstrated in vivo cell fusion between blood cells and intestinal epithelial cells in an injury setting. Here, we hypothesize that immune cells, such as macrophages, fuse with tumor cells imparting metastatic capabilities by transferring their cellular identity. We used parabiosis to introduce fluorescent-labeled bone marrow-derived cells to mice with intestinal tumors, finding that fusion between circulating blood-derived cells and tumor epithelium occurs during the natural course of tumorigenesis. Moreover, we identify the macrophage as a key cellular partner for this process. Interestingly, cell fusion hybrids retain a transcriptome identity characteristic of both parental derivatives, while also expressing a unique subset of transcripts. Our data supports the novel possibility that tumorigenic cell fusion may impart physical behavior attributed to migratory macrophages, including navigation of circulation and immune evasion. As such, cell fusion may represent a promising novel mechanism underlying the metastatic conversion of cancer cells. ©2011 AACR.

  4. NUCLEAR HEATING IN LIF DOSEMETERS IN A FUSION NEUTRON FIELD, TRIAL OF DIRECT COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTAL AND SIMULATED RESULTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorecki, Wladyslaw; Obryk, Barbara

    2017-09-29

    The results of nuclear heating measured by means of thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD-LiF) in a Cu block irradiated by 14 MeV neutrons are presented. The integral Cu experiment relevant for verification of copper nuclear data at neutron energies characteristic for fusion facilities was performed in the ENEA FNG Laboratory at Frascati. Five types of TLDs were used: highly photon sensitive LiF:Mg,Cu,P (MCP-N), 7LiF:Mg,Cu,P (MCP-7) and standard, lower sensitivity LiF:Mg,Ti (MTS-N), 7LiF:Mg,Ti (MTS-7) and 6LiF:Mg,Ti (MTS-6). Calibration of the detectors was performed with gamma rays in terms of air-kerma (10 mGy of 137Cs air-kerma). Nuclear heating in the Cu block was also calculated with the use of MCNP transport code Nuclear heating in Cu and air in TLD's positions was calculated as well. The nuclear heating contribution from all simulated by MCNP6 code particles including protons, deuterons, alphas tritons and heavier ions produced by the neutron interactions were calculated. A trial of the direct comparison between experimental results and results of simulation was performed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Experimental investigation of adiabatic compression and heating using collision of an MHD-driven jet with a gas target cloud for magnetized target fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Byonghoon; Li, Hui; Bellan, Paul

    2017-10-01

    We are studying magnetized target fusion using an experimental method where an imploding liner compressing a plasma is simulated by a high-speed MHD-driven plasma jet colliding with a gas target cloud. This has the advantage of being non-destructive so orders of magnitude more shots are possible. Since the actual density and temperature are much more modest than fusion-relevant values, the goal is to determine the scaling of the increase in density and temperature when an actual experimental plasma is adiabatically compressed. Two new-developed diagnostics are operating and providing data. The first new diagnostic is a fiber-coupled interferometer which measures line-integrated electron density not only as a function of time, but also as a function of position along the jet. The second new diagnostic is laser Thomson scattering which measures electron density and temperature at the location where the jet collides with the cloud. These diagnostics show that when the jet collides with a target cloud the jet slows down substantially and both the electron density and temperature increase. The experimental measurements are being compared with 3D MHD and hybrid kinetic numerical simulations that model the actual experimental geometry.

  6. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma and solitary fibrous tumors carry the NAB2-STAT6 fusion and can be diagnosed by nuclear expression of STAT6 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Leonille; Koelsche, Christian; Sahm, Felix; Piro, Rosario M; Capper, David; Reuss, David E; Pusch, Stefan; Habel, Antje; Meyer, Jochen; Göck, Tanja; Jones, David T W; Mawrin, Christian; Schittenhelm, Jens; Becker, Albert; Heim, Stephanie; Simon, Matthias; Herold-Mende, Christel; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Paulus, Werner; König, Rainer; Wiestler, Otmar D; Pfister, Stefan M; von Deimling, Andreas

    2013-05-01

    Non-central nervous system hemangiopericytoma (HPC) and solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) are considered by pathologists as two variants of a single tumor entity now subsumed under the entity SFT. Recent detection of frequent NAB2-STAT6 fusions in both, HPC and SFT, provided additional support for this view. On the other hand, current neuropathological practice still distinguishes between HPC and SFT. The present study set out to identify genes involved in the formation of meningeal HPC. We performed exome sequencing and detected the NAB2-STAT6 fusion in DNA of 8/10 meningeal HPC thereby providing evidence of close relationship of these tumors with peripheral SFT. Due to the considerable effort required for exome sequencing, we sought to explore surrogate markers for the NAB2-STAT6 fusion protein. We adopted the Duolink proximity ligation assay and demonstrated the presence of NAB2-STAT6 fusion protein in 17/17 HPC and the absence in 15/15 meningiomas. More practical, presence of the NAB2-STAT6 fusion protein resulted in a strong nuclear signal in STAT6 immunohistochemistry. The nuclear reallocation of STAT6 was detected in 35/37 meningeal HPC and 25/25 meningeal SFT but not in 87 meningiomas representing the most important differential diagnosis. Tissues not harboring the NAB2-STAT6 fusion protein presented with nuclear expression of NAB2 and cytoplasmic expression of STAT6 proteins. In conclusion, we provide strong evidence for meningeal HPC and SFT to constitute variants of a single entity which is defined by NAB2-STAT6 fusion. In addition, we demonstrate that this fusion can be rapidly detected by STAT6 immunohistochemistry which shows a consistent nuclear reallocation. This immunohistochemical assay may prove valuable for the differentiation of HPC and SFT from other mesenchymal neoplasms.

  7. Production of cloned dogs by decreasing the interval between fusion and activation during somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sue; Park, Sun Woo; Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Joung Joo; Lee, Eugine; Kim, Yeun Wook; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Shin, Taeyoung; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2009-05-01

    To improve the efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in dogs, we evaluated whether or not the interval between fusion and activation affects the success rate of SCNT. Oocytes retrieved from outbred dogs were reconstructed with adult somatic cells from a male or female Golden Retriever. In total, 151 and 225 reconstructed oocytes were transferred to 9 and 14 naturally synchronized surrogates for male and female donor cells, respectively. Chromosomal morphology was evaluated in 12 oocytes held for an interval of 2 hr between fusion and activation and 14 oocytes held for an interval of 4 hr. Three hundred seventy-six and 288 embryos were transferred to 23 and 16 surrogates for the 2 and 4 hr interval groups, respectively. Both the male (two pregnant surrogates gave birth to three puppies) and female (one pregnant surrogate gave birth to one puppy) donor cells gave birth to live puppies (P > 0.05). In the 2 hr group, significantly more reconstructed oocytes showed condensed, metaphase-like chromosomes compared to the 4 hr group (P dogs carried pregnancies to term and four puppies were born. These results demonstrate that decreasing the interval between fusion and activation increases the success rate of clone production and pregnancy. These results may increase the overall efficiency of SCNT in the canine family. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. On the importance of minimizing "coast-time" in x-ray driven inertially confined fusion implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Kritcher, A.; Callahan, D. A.; Landen, O.; Patel, P. K.; Springer, P. T.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Kline, J.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Moore, A.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Ralph, J.; Salmonson, J. D.; Widmann, K.

    2017-09-01

    By the time an inertially confined fusion (ICF) implosion has converged a factor of 20, its surface area has shrunk 400 × , making it an inefficient x-ray energy absorber. So, ICF implosions are traditionally designed to have the laser drive shut off at a time, toff, well before bang-time, tBT, for a coast-time of t coast = t B T - t o f f > 1 ns. High-foot implosions on NIF showed a strong dependence of many key ICF performance quantities on reduced coast-time (by extending the duration of laser power after the peak power is first reached), most notably stagnation pressure and fusion yield. Herein we show that the ablation pressure, pabl, which drives high-foot implosions, is essentially triangular in temporal shape, and that reducing tcoast boosts pabl by as much as ˜ 2 × prior to stagnation thus increasing fuel and hot-spot compression and implosion speed. One-dimensional simulations are used to track hydrodynamic characteristics for implosions with various coast-times and various assumed rates of hohlraum cooling after toff to illustrate how the late-time conditions exterior to the implosion can impact the fusion performance. A simple rocket model-like analytic theory demonstrates that reducing coast-time can lead to a ˜ 15 % higher implosion velocity because the reduction in x-ray absorption efficiency at late-time is somewhat compensated by small ( ˜ 5 % - 10 %) ablator mass remaining. Together with the increased ablation pressure, the additional implosion speed for short coast-time implosions can boost the stagnation pressure by ˜ 2 × as compared to a longer coast-time version of the same implosion. Four key dimensionless parameters are identified and we find that reducing coast-time to as little as 500 ps still provides some benefit. Finally, we show how the high-foot implosion data is consistent with the above mentioned picture.

  9. X-ray spectroscopy of highly ionized heavy ions as an advanced research for controlled nuclear fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zschornack, G.; Musiol, G.

    1988-01-01

    Diagnostics and modelling of nuclear fusion plasmas require a detailed knowledge of atomic and molecular data for highly ionized heavy ions. Experimental verification of atomic data is made on the basis of IAEA recommendations using the method of high-resolution wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in order to obtain contributions extensioning the available atomic data lists. Basic facilities for producing highly charged heavy ions are the electron-ion rings of the heavy ion collective accelerator and the electron beam ion source KRYON-2 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research at Dubna. For high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy with these sources a computer-aided crystal diffraction spectrometer has been developed the precision of which is achieved by using advanced principles of measurement and control. Relativistic atomic structure calculations have been carried out for a great number of elements and configurations to obtain data in ionization regions heavily accessible to the experiment. (author)

  10. Future developments of power supply from nuclear fission and fusion until the middle of the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this study made by General Technology Systems (Netherlands) is to provide information about nuclear fission and fusion as methods for power generation, with which, in the framework of a study into the possibilities of durable energy sources, choices may be made from the various possibilities for future energy supply. The physical processes upon which the power generation relies are treated briefly. The technologies employed are discussed together with their changes and improvements, now and in the future, and the economic factors by which they are accompanied. How much of this energy will be used in the Netherlands, is discussed. In order to know the opinion of others about these subjects the dealers of the current nuclear power stations were asked to give their opinions which are collected in a supplement. 166 refs.; 18 figs.; 19 tabs

  11. Association EURATOM-FZJ. Annual progress report 2010. Nuclear fusion project. SC-FZJ 86(11)/4.1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schorn, Ralph P.

    2011-01-01

    Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ) as a EURATOM Association coordinates its fusion research activities within the Nuclear Fusion Project (KFS). The programme is based on several institutes and is well embedded into the European fusion research structure, where FZJ is now focussing on the two topics ''plasma-wall interactions'' and ''ITER technology''. The major part of the Juelich research activities is located within the Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK). The former Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP, now IEK-4 Plasma Physics) has by far the largest share of scientific staff in physics and technology for fusion, operates the TEXTOR tokamak, performs scientific work on JET and DIII-D, supports the Wendelstein 7-X construc-tion and takes up significant projects related to the ITER development. IEK-2 (Microstructure and Properties of Materials) operates the high heat flux test facilities JUDITH 1 and 2 which are installed inside a hot cell and in a controlled area which is licensed to operate with toxic and radiating materials; this group represents the materials science expertise within the Juelich fusion programme. The Central Technology Division (ZAT) provides engineering expertise and specialised workshop capacities. The Juelich Supercomputing Centre (JSC) operates various types of supercomputer systems, among which one device (HPC-FF) is dedicated exclusively to fusion research within EFDA. The Association EURATOM-FZJ has very close contacts to the neighbouring EURATOM associations in Belgium and The Netherlands. In 1996 they together have founded the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (TEC) which provides a clustering of resources in order to perform a co-ordinated R and D programme, to operate or construct large facilities (TEXTOR, MAGNUM-PSI), to combine different kinds of expertise and to allow for the forming of a strong partner-ship as a consortium within the ITER construction phase. An updated TEC agreement with a

  12. Function of Nup98 subtypes and their fusion proteins, Nup98-TopIIβ and Nup98-SETBP1 in nuclear-cytoplasmic transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shoko; Yokokawa, Takafumi; Iizuka, Gemmei; Cigdem, Sadik; Okuwaki, Mitsuru; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2017-05-20

    Nup98 is a component of the nuclear pore complex. The nup98-fusion genes derived by chromosome translocations are involved in hematopoietic malignancies. Here, we investigated the functions of Nup98 isoforms and two unexamined Nup98-fusion proteins, Nup98-TopIIβ and Nup98-SETBP1. We first demonstrated that two Nup98 isoforms are expressed in various mouse tissues and similarly localized in the nucleus and the nuclear envelope. We also showed that Nup98-TopIIβ and Nup98-SETBP1 are localized in the nucleus and partially co-localized with full-length Nup98 and a nuclear export receptor XPO1. We demonstrated that Nup98-TopIIβ and Nup98-SETBP1 negatively regulate the XPO1-mediated protein export. Our results will contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanism by which the Nup98-fusion proteins induce tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 3D Surface Mapping of Capsule Fill-Tube Assemblies used in Laser-Driven Fusion Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buice, E.S.; Alger, E.T.; Antipa, N.A.; Bhandarkar, S.D.; Biesiada, T.A.; Conder, A.D.; Dzenitis, E.G.; Flegel, M.S.; Hamza, A.V.; Heinbockel, C.L.; Horner, J.; Johnson, M.A.; Kegelmeyer, L.M.; Meyer, J.S.; Montesanti, R.C.; Reynolds, J.L.; Taylor, J.S.; Wegner, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a 3D surface mapping system used to measure the surface of a fusion target Capsule Fill-Tube Assembly (CFTA). The CFTA consists of a hollow Ge-doped plastic sphere, called a capsule, ranging in outer diameter between 2.2 mm and 2.6 mm and an attached 150 (micro)m diameter glass-core fill-tube that tapers down to a 10(micro) diameter at the capsule. The mapping system is an enabling technology to facilitate a quality assurance program and to archive 3D surface information of each capsule used in fusion ignition experiments that are currently being performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The 3D Surface Mapping System is designed to locate and quantify surface features with a height of 50 nm and 300 nm in width or larger. Additionally, the system will be calibrated such that the 3D measured surface can be related to the capsule surface angular coordinate system to within 0.25 degree (1σ), which corresponds to approximately 5 (micro)m linear error on the capsule surface.

  14. 3D Surface Mapping of Capsule Fill-Tube Assemblies used in Laser-Driven Fusion Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buice, E S; Alger, E T; Antipa, N A; Bhandarkar, S D; Biesiada, T A; Conder, A D; Dzenitis, E G; Flegel, M S; Hamza, A V; Heinbockel, C L; Horner, J; Johnson, M A; Kegelmeyer, L M; Meyer, J S; Montesanti, R C; Reynolds, J L; Taylor, J S; Wegner, P J

    2011-02-18

    This paper presents the development of a 3D surface mapping system used to measure the surface of a fusion target Capsule Fill-Tube Assembly (CFTA). The CFTA consists of a hollow Ge-doped plastic sphere, called a capsule, ranging in outer diameter between 2.2 mm and 2.6 mm and an attached 150 {micro}m diameter glass-core fill-tube that tapers down to a 10{micro} diameter at the capsule. The mapping system is an enabling technology to facilitate a quality assurance program and to archive 3D surface information of each capsule used in fusion ignition experiments that are currently being performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The 3D Surface Mapping System is designed to locate and quantify surface features with a height of 50 nm and 300 nm in width or larger. Additionally, the system will be calibrated such that the 3D measured surface can be related to the capsule surface angular coordinate system to within 0.25 degree (1{sigma}), which corresponds to approximately 5 {micro}m linear error on the capsule surface.

  15. Plasma-Jet-Driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion (PJMIF): Physics and Design for a Plasma Liner Formation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Scott; Cassibry, Jason; Witherspoon, F. Douglas

    2014-10-01

    Spherically imploding plasma liners are a potential standoff compression driver for magneto-inertial fusion, which is a hybrid of and operates in an intermediate density between those of magnetic and inertial fusion. We propose to use an array of merging supersonic plasma jets to form a spherically imploding plasma liner. The jets are to be formed by pulsed coaxial guns with contoured electrodes that are placed sufficiently far from the location of target compression such that no hardware is repetitively destroyed. As such, the repetition rate can be higher (e.g., 1 Hz) and ultimately the power-plant economics can be more attractive than most other MIF approaches. During the R&D phase, a high experimental shot rate at reasonably low cost (e.g., gun plasma-liner-formation experiment, which will provide experimental data on: (i) scaling of peak liner ram pressure versus initial jet parameters, (ii) liner non-uniformity characterization and control, and (iii) control of liner profiles for eventual gain optimization.

  16. Exploring incomplete fusion fraction in 6,7Li induced nuclear reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parkar V. V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We have included breakup effects explicitly to simultaneously calculate the measured cross-sections of the complete fusion, incomplete fusion, and total fusion for 6,7Li projectiles on various targets using the Continuum Discretized Coupled Channels method. The breakup absorption cross-sections obtained with different choices of short range imaginary potentials are utilized to evaluate the individual α-capture and d/t-capture cross-sections and compare with the measured data. It is interesting to note, while in case of 7Li projectile the cross-sections for triton-ICF/triton-capture is far more dominant than α-ICF/α-capture at all energies, similar behavior is not observed in case of 6Li projectile for the deuteron-ICF/deuteron-capture and α-ICF/α-capture. Both these observations are also corroborated by the experimental data for all the systems studied.

  17. Exploring incomplete fusion fraction in 6,7Li induced nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkar, V. V.; Jha, V.; Kailas, S.

    2017-11-01

    We have included breakup effects explicitly to simultaneously calculate the measured cross-sections of the complete fusion, incomplete fusion, and total fusion for 6,7Li projectiles on various targets using the Continuum Discretized Coupled Channels method. The breakup absorption cross-sections obtained with different choices of short range imaginary potentials are utilized to evaluate the individual α-capture and d/t-capture cross-sections and compare with the measured data. It is interesting to note, while in case of 7Li projectile the cross-sections for triton-ICF/triton-capture is far more dominant than α-ICF/α-capture at all energies, similar behavior is not observed in case of 6Li projectile for the deuteron-ICF/deuteron-capture and α-ICF/α-capture. Both these observations are also corroborated by the experimental data for all the systems studied.

  18. On the implementation of a chain nuclear reaction of thermonuclear fusion on the basis of the p+11B process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, V. S.; Krainov, V. P.; Zagreev, B. V.; Matafonov, A. P.

    2015-07-01

    Various theoretical and experimental schemes for implementing a thermonuclear reactor on the basis of the p+11B reaction are considered. They include beam collisions, fusion in degenerate plasmas, ignition upon plasma acceleration by ponderomotive forces, and the irradiation of a solid-state target from 11B with a proton beam under conditions of a Coulomb explosion of hydrogen microdrops. The possibility of employing ultra-short high-intensity laser pulses to initiate the p+11B reaction under conditions far from thermodynamic equilibrium is discussed. This and some other weakly radioactive thermonuclear reactions are promising owing to their ecological cleanness—there are virtually no neutrons among fusion products. Nuclear reactions that follow the p+11B reaction may generate high-energy protons, sustaining a chain reaction, and this is an advantage of the p+11B option. The approach used also makes it possible to study nuclear reactions under conditions close to those in the early Universe or in the interior of stars.

  19. SHOW. A program for the integrated analysis of the data produced in a nuclear fusion experimental device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracco, G.; Tudisco, O. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Energia

    1998-03-01

    The report describes the program SHOW, an application devoted to the integrated analysis of the data produced in nuclear fusion experimental devices. The program is currently used for the analysis of the FTU data and a version is also available at JET. The code is written in FORTRAN 77, runs on IBM mainframes under MVS operating system and makes use of the GDDM graphical package. The program, that operates both in batch and interactive modes, permits to perform a graphical analysis of the data collected in the experimental databases. The report contains as appendixes the detailed description of all the program options together with a short illustration of the FTU databases. [Italiano] Il rapporto descrive il programma SHOW. Si tratta di una applicazione che permette l`analisi integrata dei dati prodotti da apparati sperimentali dedicati allo studio della fusione nucleare controllata. Il programma e` utilizzato per l`analisi dei dati di FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) e una versione e` disponibile anche al JET (Joint European Torus). Il codice e` scritto in FORTRAN 77 per mainframes IBM con sistema operativo MVS ed utilizza il pacchetto grafico GDDM. Il programma puo` funzionare sia in modo batch che in modo interattivo e permette di compiere l`elaborazione grafica dei dati raccolti nelle basi di dati sperimentali. Il rapporto contiene come appendici la descrizione dettagliata di tutte le opzioni del programma e una breve illustrazione delle basi di dati disponibili per FTU.

  20. Data-driven technology for engineering systems health management design approach, feature construction, fault diagnosis, prognosis, fusion and decisions

    CERN Document Server

    Niu, Gang

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces condition-based maintenance (CBM)/data-driven prognostics and health management (PHM) in detail, first explaining the PHM design approach from a systems engineering perspective, then summarizing and elaborating on the data-driven methodology for feature construction, as well as feature-based fault diagnosis and prognosis. The book includes a wealth of illustrations and tables to help explain the algorithms, as well as practical examples showing how to use this tool to solve situations for which analytic solutions are poorly suited. It equips readers to apply the concepts discussed in order to analyze and solve a variety of problems in PHM system design, feature construction, fault diagnosis and prognosis.