WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear fragmentation model

  1. A nuclear fragmentation energy deposition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, D. M.; Wilson, J. W.; Fogarty, T. N.; Buck, W. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    A formalism for target fragment transport is presented with application to energy loss spectra in thin silicon devices. A nuclear data base is recommended that agrees well with the measurements of McNulty et al. using surface barrier detectors. High-energy events observed by McNulty et al., which are not predicted by intranuclear cascade models, are well represented by the present work.

  2. HZEFRG1: An energy-dependent semiempirical nuclear fragmentation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Norbury, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Khan, Ferdous

    1993-01-01

    Methods for calculating cross sections for the breakup of high-energy heavy ions by the combined nuclear and coulomb fields of the interacting nuclei are presented. The nuclear breakup contributions are estimated with an abrasion-ablation model of heavy ion fragmentation that includes an energy-dependent, mean free path. The electromagnetic dissociation contributions arising from the interacting coulomb fields are estimated by using Weizsacker-Williams theory extended to include electric dipole and electric quadrupole contributions. The complete computer code that implements the model is included as an appendix. Extensive comparisons of cross section predictions with available experimental data are made.

  3. A Semi-Classical Model to Study Nuclear Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Martha; Chernomoretz, Ariel; Dorso, Claudio; Lopez, Jorge

    1999-10-01

    A semi-classical model based on the use of molecular dynamics has been developed for the study of heavy-ion reactions at intermediate energies. The model reproduces nucleon-nucleon cross sections through the use of a two-body potential. The study covers several characteristics of heavy-ion collisions, such as formation of necks, and formation of intermediate residue. Preliminary results on the use of the model to study the caloric curve of nuclear matter and the temperature evolution of the system are also discussed.

  4. Carbon fragmentation measurements and validation of the Geant4 nuclear reaction models for hadrontherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Napoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Battistoni, G.; Blancato, A. A.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Giacoppo, F.; Morone, M. C.; Nicolosi, D.; Pandola, L.; Patera, V.; Raciti, G.; Rapisarda, E.; Romano, F.; Sardina, D.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Scuderi, V.; Sfienti, C.; Tropea, S.

    2012-11-01

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary when using heavy-ion beams in hadrontherapy to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Moreover, they are also fundamental to validate and improve the Monte Carlo codes for their use in planning tumor treatments. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections are being measured, and in particular, to our knowledge, no double-differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in the literature. In this work, we have measured the double-differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the 12C fragmentation at 62 A MeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before. In particular, we have compared the experimental data with the predictions of two Geant4 nuclear reaction models: the Binary Light Ions Cascade and the Quantum Molecular Dynamic. From the comparison, it has been observed that the Binary Light Ions Cascade approximates the angular distributions of the fragment production cross sections better than the Quantum Molecular Dynamic model. However, the discrepancies observed between the experimental data and the Monte Carlo simulations lead to the conclusion that the prediction capability of both models needs to be improved at intermediate energies.

  5. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Cheng; Tsang, M B; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy released by splitting Uranium and Thorium isotopes into two, three, four, up to eight fragments with nearly equal size are studied. We found that the energy released come from equally splitting the $^{235,238}$U and $^{230,232}$Th nuclei into to three fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model is employed to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for the excited nuclei. Weighing the the probability distributions of fragments multiplicity at different excitation energies for the $^{238}$U nucleus, we found that an excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u is optimal for the $^{235}$U, $^{238}$U, $^{230}$Th and $^{232}$Th nuclei to release nuclear energy of about 0.7-0.75 MeV/u.

  6. The impact of modeling nuclear fragmentation on delivered dose and radiobiology in ion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lühr, Armin; Hansen, David C; Teiwes, Ricky; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Jäkel, Oliver; Bassler, Niels

    2012-08-21

    The importance of nuclear interactions for ion therapy arises from the influence of the particle spectrum on, first, radiobiology and therefore also on treatment planning, second, the accuracy of measuring dose and, third, the delivered dose distribution. This study tries to determine the qualitative as well as the quantitative influence of the modeling of inelastic nuclear interactions on ion therapy. Thereby, three key disciplines are investigated, namely dose delivery, dose assessment and radiobiology. In order to perform a quantitative analysis, a relative comparison between six different descriptions of nuclear interactions is carried out for carbon ions. The particle transport is simulated with the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT10A while dose planning and radiobiology are covered by the analytic treatment planning program for particles TRiP, which determines the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with the local effect model. The obtained results show that the physical dose distribution can in principle be significantly influenced by the modeling of fragmentation (about 10% for a 20% change in all inelastic nuclear cross sections for a target volume ranging from 15 to 25 cm). While the impact of nuclear fragmentation on stopping power ratios can be neglected, the fluence correction factor may be influenced by the applied nuclear models. In contrast to the results for the physical dose, the variation of the RBE is only small (about 1% for a 20% change in all inelastic nuclear cross sections) suggesting a relatively weak dependence of radiobiology on the detailed composition of the particle energy spectrum of the mixed radiation field. Also, no significant change (about 0.2 mm) of the lateral penumbra of the RBE-weighted dose is observed.

  7. Nuclear subsurface explosion modeling and hydrodynamic fragmentation simulation of hazardous asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premaratne, Pavithra Dhanuka

    Disruption and fragmentation of an asteroid using nuclear explosive devices (NEDs) is a highly complex yet a practical solution to mitigating the impact threat of asteroids with short warning time. A Hypervelocity Asteroid Intercept Vehicle (HAIV) concept, developed at the Asteroid Deflection Research Center (ADRC), consists of a primary vehicle that acts as kinetic impactor and a secondary vehicle that houses NEDs. The kinetic impactor (lead vehicle) strikes the asteroid creating a crater. The secondary vehicle will immediately enter the crater and detonate its nuclear payload creating a blast wave powerful enough to fragment the asteroid. The nuclear subsurface explosion modeling and hydrodynamic simulation has been a challenging research goal that paves the way an array of mission critical information. A mesh-free hydrodynamic simulation method, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) was utilized to obtain both qualitative and quantitative solutions for explosion efficiency. Commercial fluid dynamics packages such as AUTODYN along with the in-house GPU accelerated SPH algorithms were used to validate and optimize high-energy explosion dynamics for a variety of test cases. Energy coupling from the NED to the target body was also examined to determine the effectiveness of nuclear subsurface explosions. Success of a disruption mission also depends on the survivability of the nuclear payload when the secondary vehicle approaches the newly formed crater at a velocity of 10 km/s or higher. The vehicle may come into contact with debris ejecting the crater which required the conceptual development of a Whipple shield. As the vehicle closes on the crater, its skin may also experience extreme temperatures due to heat radiated from the crater bottom. In order to address this thermal problem, a simple metallic thermal shield design was implemented utilizing a radiative heat transfer algorithm and nodal solutions obtained from hydrodynamic simulations.

  8. Description of nuclear fragment formation in terms of a stochastic nucleation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorso, C. O.; Donangelo, R.

    1990-07-01

    Fragment formation is described as a stochastic nucleation process without making explicit assumptions about the degree of equilibration of the nuclear system. On leave of absence from Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21944 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  9. Dependence of simulated positron emitter yields in ion beam cancer therapy on modeling nuclear fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin; Priegnitz, Marlen; Fiedler, Fine;

    2014-01-01

    In ion beam cancer therapy, range verification in patients using positron emission tomography (PET) requires the comparison of measured with simulated positron emitter yields. We found that (1) changes in modeling nuclear interactions strongly affected the positron emitter yields and that (2) Monte...

  10. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Cheng [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Souza, S.R. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Cidade Universitária, Caixa Postal 68528, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tsang, M.B. [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zhang, Feng-Shou, E-mail: fszhang@bnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-08-15

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting {sup 230,232}Th and {sup 235,238}U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for {sup 230,232}Th and {sup 235,238}U are around 0.7–0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  11. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Souza, S. R.; Tsang, M. B.; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting 230,232Th and 235,238U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for 230,232Th and 235,238U are around 0.7-0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  12. Dependence of simulated positron emitter yields in ion beam cancer therapy on modeling nuclear fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lühr, Armin; Priegnitz, Marlen; Fiedler, Fine; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Bassler, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In ion beam cancer therapy, range verification in patients using positron emission tomography (PET) requires the comparison of measured with simulated positron emitter yields. We found that (1) changes in modeling nuclear interactions strongly affected the positron emitter yields and that (2) Monte Carlo simulations with SHIELD-HIT10Areasonably matched the most abundant PET isotopes (11)C and (15)O. We observed an ion-energy (i.e., depth) dependence of the agreement between SHIELD-HIT10Aand measurement. Improved modeling requires more accurate measurements of cross-section values.

  13. Nuclear Fragmentation in Clinical Heavy Ion Beams, Should We Worry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Toftegaard, Jakob

    fragmentation of the primary ions. Even if patient treatment with heavy ions has been established, the influence of nuclear fragmentation is yet to be fully quantified. The fragmentation spectrum of ions is relevant for particle therapy in numerous ways: 1. Dose distribution: A distinct tail of secondary...... on the secondary particle spectrum from fragmentation. b. In addition hereto, fluence correction factors can be calculated which take this effect into account, which are directly a result of nuclear fragmentation in the medium. 3. Radiobiology: Physical dose is not sufficient to describe the outcome of a treatment...... the sensitivity on the three fields mentioned above, including: turning off nuclear fragmentation entirely, changing all ineleastic cross sections +/- 20%, changing key parameters in the Fermi-Breakup (FB) model. Results show nuclear effects have their largest impact on the dose distribution. Stopping power...

  14. Fragmentation Main Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The fragmentation model combines patch size and patch continuity with diversity of vegetation types per patch and rarity of vegetation types per patch. A patch was...

  15. IMPACT fragmentation model developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, Marlon E.; Mains, Deanna L.

    2016-09-01

    The IMPACT fragmentation model has been used by The Aerospace Corporation for more than 25 years to analyze orbital altitude explosions and hypervelocity collisions. The model is semi-empirical, combining mass, energy and momentum conservation laws with empirically derived relationships for fragment characteristics such as number, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and spreading velocity as well as event energy distribution. Model results are used for several types of analysis including assessment of short-term risks to satellites from orbital altitude fragmentations, prediction of the long-term evolution of the orbital debris environment and forensic assessments of breakup events. A new version of IMPACT, version 6, has been completed and incorporates a number of advancements enabled by a multi-year long effort to characterize more than 11,000 debris fragments from more than three dozen historical on-orbit breakup events. These events involved a wide range of causes, energies, and fragmenting objects. Special focus was placed on the explosion model, as the majority of events examined were explosions. Revisions were made to the mass distribution used for explosion events, increasing the number of smaller fragments generated. The algorithm for modeling upper stage large fragment generation was updated. A momentum conserving asymmetric spreading velocity distribution algorithm was implemented to better represent sub-catastrophic events. An approach was developed for modeling sub-catastrophic explosions, those where the majority of the parent object remains intact, based on estimated event energy. Finally, significant modifications were made to the area-to-mass ratio distribution to incorporate the tendencies of different materials to fragment into different shapes. This ability enabled better matches between the observed area-to-mass ratios and those generated by the model. It also opened up additional possibilities for post-event analysis of breakups. The paper will discuss

  16. Validation of nuclear reaction models of 180 MeV proton-induced fragmentation of {sup 27}Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabra, M.S., E-mail: m.sabra@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37212 (United States); Clemens, M.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Weller, R.A.; Mendenhall, M.H. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37212 (United States); Barghouty, A.F. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Malik, F.B. [Department of Physics, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States); Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Kinetic energy, angular distribution, and isobaric cross section data for A = 7-25 fragments formed in p + {sup 27}Al reaction at bombarding energy of 180 MeV are compared with the calculations of the Binary Cascade Model (BIC), the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM), JQMD/PHITS, as well as the Statistical Model with Final State Interaction (SMFSI). For completeness, the kinetic energy spectra of light particles (n, p, {alpha}) formed in p + {sup 27}Al reaction at bombarding energy of 156 MeV are also presented. A general agreement between the data and predictions of these models is found. However, disagreement with the data for the yields of light-mass fragments as well as near-target fragments is also found and discussed. The importance of this comparative study to simulation and analysis of radiation effects on microscopic electrical components operating in space is also discussed.

  17. Fragmentation and the Nuclear Equation of State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Wolfgang [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-2320 (United States)]. E-mail: bauer@pa.msu.edu

    2007-05-01

    Progress on the determination of the order of the fragmentation phase transition, the location of its critical point in the nuclear matter phase diagram, the values of the critical exponents that determine the universality class of the transition, and finite size scaling effects is discussed. Evidence for the presence of Zipf-Mandelbrot-scaling in the relative size of the largest clusters is examined, and the connection to the value of the critical exponent {tau} is established.

  18. Computer Model Of Fragmentation Of Atomic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Norbury, John W.; KHAN FERDOUS; Badavi, Francis F.

    1995-01-01

    High Charge and Energy Semiempirical Nuclear Fragmentation Model (HZEFRG1) computer program developed to be computationally efficient, user-friendly, physics-based program for generating data bases on fragmentation of atomic nuclei. Data bases generated used in calculations pertaining to such radiation-transport applications as shielding against radiation in outer space, radiation dosimetry in outer space, cancer therapy in laboratories with beams of heavy ions, and simulation studies for designing detectors for experiments in nuclear physics. Provides cross sections for production of individual elements and isotopes in breakups of high-energy heavy ions by combined nuclear and Coulomb fields of interacting nuclei. Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77.

  19. Quantum fluctuation effects on nuclear fragment and atomic cluster formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Akira [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Randrup, J.

    1997-05-01

    We investigate the nuclear fragmentation and atomic cluster formation by means of the recently proposed quantal Langevin treatment. It is shown that the effect of the quantal fluctuation is in the opposite direction in nuclear fragment and atomic cluster size distribution. This tendency is understood through the effective classical temperature for the observables. (author)

  20. Nuclear Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossión, Rubén

    2010-09-01

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction). Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  1. Fluctuations and symmetry energy in nuclear fragmentation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, M

    2013-01-25

    Within a dynamical description of nuclear fragmentation, based on the liquid-gas phase transition scenario, we explore the relation between neutron-proton density fluctuations and nuclear symmetry energy. We show that, along the fragmentation path, isovector fluctuations follow the evolution of the local density and approach an equilibrium value connected to the local symmetry energy. Higher-density regions are characterized by smaller average asymmetry and narrower isotopic distributions. This dynamical analysis points out that fragment final state isospin fluctuations can probe the symmetry energy of the density domains from which fragments originate.

  2. Nuclear fragmentation measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Napoli, M. [INFN - Sezione di Catania (Italy); Agodi, C.; Blancato, A. A.; Cavallaro, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Sardina, D.; Scuderi, V. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy); Battistoni, G. [INFN - Sezione di Milano (Italy); Bondi, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Nicolosi, D.; Raciti, G.; Tropea, S. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Italy and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Catania (Italy); Giacoppo, F. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo (Norway); Morone, M. C. [Dipartimento di Biopatologia e Diagnostica per Immagini, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Pandola, L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy); Rapisarda, E. [Nuclear and Radiation Physics Section, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Celestijnenlaan Heverlee (Belgium); Romano, F. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy) and Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche E. Fermi Roma (Italy); and others

    2013-04-19

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary in hadrontherapy and space radiation protection, to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections has been measured and in particular, to our knowledge, no double differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in literature. We have measured the double differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the {sup 12}C fragmentation at 62 AMeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been also used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before.

  3. Nuclear fragmentation measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Napoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Battistoni, G.; Blancato, A. A.; Bondı, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Giacoppo, F.; Morone, M. C.; Nicolosi, D.; Pandola, L.; Raciti, G.; Rapisarda, E.; Romano, F.; Sardina, D.; Scuderi, V.; Sfienti, C.; Tropea, S.

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary in hadrontherapy and space radiation protection, to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections has been measured and in particular, to our knowledge, no double differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in literature. We have measured the double differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the 12C fragmentation at 62 AMeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been also used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before.

  4. Isospin dynamics on neck fragmentation in isotopic nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The neck dynamics in Fermi-energy heavy-ion collisions, to probe the nuclear symmetry energy in the domain of sub-saturation densities, is investigated within an isospin dependent transport model. The single and double ratios of neutron/proton from free nucleons and light clusters (complex particles) in the isotopic reactions are analyzed systematically. Isospin effects of particles produced from the neck fragmentations are explored, which are constrained within the midrapidities ($|y/y_{proj}|<$0.3) and azimuthal angles (70$^{o}\\sim$110$^{o}$, 250$^{o}\\sim$290$^{o}$) in semiperipheral nuclear collisions. It is found that the ratios of the energetic isospin particles strongly depend on the stiffness of nuclear symmetry energy and the effects increase with softening the symmetry energy, which would be a nice probe for extracting the symmetry energy below the normal density in experimentally. A flat structure appears at the tail spectra from the double ratio distributions. The neutron to proton ratio of ligh...

  5. Modeling of Fragmentation of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Parul; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Carlozzi, Alexander; Hart, Kenneth; Bryson, Katie; Sears, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand fragmentation and fracture of a given asteroid and mechanisms of break-up. The focus of the present work is to develop modeling techniques for stony asteroids in 10m-100m range to answer two questions: 1) What is the role of material makeup of an asteroid in the stress distribution? 2)How is stress distribution altered in the presence of pre-existing defects?

  6. Investigation of Nuclear Fragmentation in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions Using Plastic - Nuclear - Track Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    In this experiment CR39 plastic nuclear track detectors will be used which are sensitive to detect relativistic nuclear fragments with charges Z@$>$5. They will be analyzed using an automatic track measuring system which was developed at the University of Siegen.\\\\ \\\\ This allows to measure large quantities of tracks in these passive detectors and to perform high statistics experiments. We intend to measure cross sections for the production of nuclear fragments from heavy ion beams at the SPS. \\\\ \\\\ The energy independence of the cross sections predicted by the idea of limiting fragmentation will be tested at high energies. In exposures with different targets we plan to analyze the factorization of the fragmentation cross sections into a target depending factor and a factor depending on the beam particle and the fragment. The cross sections for one proton remov Coulomb dissociation. \\\\ \\\\ We plan to investigate Coulomb dissociation for different targets and different energies. Fragment and projectile charges ...

  7. High Radiation Environment Nuclear Fragment Separator Magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Stephen [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Gupta, Ramesh [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-01-31

    Superconducting coils wound with HTS conductor can be used in magnets located in a high radiation environment. NbTi and Nb3Sn superconductors must operate at 4.5 K or below where removal of heat is less efficient. The HTS conductor can carry significant current at higher temperatures where the Carnot efficiency is significantly more favorable and where the coolant heat capacity is much larger. Using the HTS conductor the magnet can be operated at 40 K. This project examines the use of HTS conductor for the Michigan State University Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) fragment separator dipole magnet which bends the beam by 30° and is located in a high radiation region that will not be easily accessible. Two of these magnets are needed to select the chosen isotope. There are a number of technical challenges to be addressed in the design of this magnet. The separator dipole is 2 m long and subtends a large angle. The magnet should keep a constant transverse field profile along its beam reference path. Winding coils with a curved inner segment is difficult as the conductor will tend to unwind during the process. In the Phase I project two approaches to winding the conductor were examined. The first was to wind the coils with curved sections on the inner and outer segments with the inner segment wound with negative curvature. The alternate approach was to use a straight segment on the inner segment to avoid negative curvature. In Phase I coils with a limited number of turns were successfully wound and tested at 77 K for both coil configurations. The Phase II program concentrated on the design, coil winding procedures, structural analysis, prototyping and testing of an HTS curved dipole coil at 40 K with a heat load representative of the radiation environment. One of the key criteria of the design of this magnet is to avoid the use of organic materials that would degrade rapidly in radiation. The Lorentz forces expected from the coils interacting with the

  8. DRAGON: Monte Carlo Generator of Particle Production from a Fragmented Fireball in Ultrarelativistic Nuclear Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasik, Boris

    2010-11-01

    A Monte Carlo generator of the final state of hadrons emitted from an ultrarelativistic nuclear collision is introduced. An important feature of the generator is a possible fragmentation of the fireball and emission of the hadrons from fragments. Phase space distribution of the fragments is based on the blast wave model extended to azimuthally non-symmetric fireballs. Parameters of the model can be tuned and this allows to generate final states from various kinds of fireballs. A facultative output in the OSCAR1999A format allows for a comprehensive analysis of phase-space distributions and/or use as an input for an afterburner. DRAGON's purpose is to produce artificial data sets which resemble those coming from real nuclear collisions provided fragmentation occurs at hadronisation and hadrons are emitted from fragments without any further scattering. Its name, DRAGON, stands for DRoplet and hAdron GeneratOr for Nuclear collisions. In a way, the model is similar to THERMINATOR, with the crucial difference that emission from fragments is included.

  9. Coulomb effects in low-energy nuclear fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Chun, Sang Y.; Badavi, Francis F.; John, Sarah

    1993-01-01

    Early versions of the Langley nuclear fragmentation code NUCFRAG (and a publicly released version called HZEFRG1) assumed straight-line trajectories throughout the interaction. As a consequence, NUCFRAG and HZEFRG1 give unrealistic cross sections for large mass removal from the projectile and target at low energies. A correction for the distortion of the trajectory by the nuclear Coulomb fields is used to derive fragmentation cross sections. A simple energy-loss term is applied to estimate the energy downshifts that greatly alter the Coulomb trajectory at low energy. The results, which are far more realistic than prior versions of the code, should provide the data base for future transport calculations. The systematic behavior of charge-removal cross sections compares favorably with results from low-energy experiments.

  10. The Role of Surface Entropy in Statistical Emission of Massive Fragments from Equilibrated Nuclear Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lü, J; T\\~oke, Jan; Lu, Jun

    2003-01-01

    Statistical fragment emission from excited nuclear systems is studied within the framework of a schematic Fermi-gas model combined with Weisskopf's detailed balance approach. The formalism considers thermal expansion of finite nuclear systems and pays special attention to the role of the diffuse surface region in the decay of hot equilibrated systems. It is found that with increasing excitation energy, effects of surface entropy lead to a systematic and significant reduction of effective emission barriers for fragments and, eventually, to the vanishing of these barriers. The formalism provides a natural explanation for the occurrence of negative nuclear heat capacities reported in the literature. It also accounts for the observed linearity of pseudo-Arrhenius plots of the logarithm of the fragment emission probability {\\it versus} the inverse square-root of the excitation energy, but does not predict true Arrhenius behavior of these emission probabilities.

  11. Nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons within a microscopic transport approach

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport model, the nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons has been investigated thoroughly. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing the primary fragments in phase space. The secondary decay process of the fragments is described by the well-known statistical code. It is found that the localized energy released in antibaryon-baryon annihilation is deposited in a nucleus mainly via pion-nucleon collisions, which leads to the emissions of pre-equilibrium particles, fission, evaporation of nucleons and light fragments etc. The strangeness exchange reactions dominate the hyperon production. The averaged mass loss increases with the mass number of target nucleus. A bump structure in the domain of intermediate mass for heavy targets appears owing to the contribution of fission fragments.

  12. Nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons within a microscopic transport approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of the Lanzhou quantum molecular-dynamics transport model, the nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons has been investigated thoroughly. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing the primary fragments in phase space. The secondary decay process of the fragments is described by a well-known statistical code. It is found that the localized energy released in antibaryon-baryon annihilation is deposited in a nucleus mainly via pion-nucleon collisions, which leads to the emissions of pre-equilibrium particles, fission, evaporation of nucleons, light fragments, etc. The strangeness exchange reactions dominate the hyperon production. The averaged mass loss increases with the mass number of target nucleus. A bump structure in the domain of intermediate mass for heavy targets appears owing to the contribution of fission fragments.

  13. Fragment Excitation and Moments of Kinetic Energy Distributions in Nuclear Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Herbert R.

    2004-02-01

    The Random Excitation Model (REX-M) in nuclear fission is formulated with the level density formula from the Fermi-gas model. It is assumed that excitation of fission fragments is totally determined by a temperature calculated from the reaction Q-value. From this assumption fragment excitation, moments of kinetic energy distributions, and neutron evaporation are calculated. It is shown that the measured distributions and the neutron evaporation characteristics are in good agreement with the model calculations. Finally we extend the REX-model to describe aspects of ternary fission.

  14. Impact of numerical models on fragmentation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Mathieu; Gezahengn, Belien; Abbas, Micheline; Bourgeois, Florent

    2013-06-01

    Simulated fragmentation process in granular assemblies is a challenging problem which date back the beginning of the 90'. If first approaches have focus on the fragmentation on a single particle, with the development of robust, fast numerical method is is possible today to simulated such process in a large collection of particles. But the question of the fragmentation problem is still open: should the fragmentation be done dynamically (one particle becoming two fragments) and according which criterion or should the fragment paths be defined initially and which is the impact of the discretization and the model of fragments? The present contribution proposes to investigate the second aspect i.e. the impact of fragment modeling on the fragmentation processes. First to perform such an analysis, the geometry of fragments (disks/sphere or polygon/polyhedra), their behavior (rigid/deformable) and the law governing their interactions are investigated. Then such model will be used in a grinding application where the evolution of fragments and impact on the behavior of the whole packing are investigate.

  15. Modelling distribution functions and fragmentation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, J; Mulders, P J

    1995-01-01

    We present examples for the calculation of the distribution and fragmentation functions using the representation in terms of non-local matrix elements of quark field operators. As specific examples, we use a simple spectator model to estimate the leading twist quark distribution functions and the fragmentation functions for a quark into a nucleon or a pion.

  16. Nuclear fragmentation and charge-exchange reactions induced by pions in the $\\Delta$-resonance region

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Dynamics of the nuclear fragmentations and the charge exchange reactions in pion-nucleus collisions near the $\\Delta$(1232) resonance energies has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport model. An isospin, momentum and density-dependent pion-nucleon potential is implemented in the model, which influences the pion dynamics, in particular the kinetic energy spectra, but weakly impacts the fragmentation mechanism. The absorption process in pion-nucleon collisions to form the $\\Delta$(1232) resonance dominates the heating mechanism of target nucleus. The excitation energy transferred to the target nucleus increases with the pion kinetic energy and is similar for both $\\pi^{-}$ and $\\pi^{+}$ induced reactions. The magnitude of fragmentation of target nucleus weakly depends on the pion energy. The isospin ratio in the pion double charge exchange is influenced by the isospin ingredient of target nucleus.

  17. The NJL Model for Quark Fragmentation Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Ito, W. Bentz, I. Cloet, A W Thomas, K. Yazaki

    2009-10-01

    A description of fragmentation functions which satisfy the momentum and isospin sum rules is presented in an effective quark theory. Concentrating on the pion fragmentation function, we first explain the reason why the elementary (lowest order) fragmentation process q → qπ is completely inadequate to describe the empirical data, although the “crossed” process π → qq describes the quark distribution functions in the pion reasonably well. Then, taking into account cascade-like processes in a modified jet-model approach, we show that the momentum and isospin sum rules can be satisfied naturally without introducing any ad-hoc parameters. We present numerical results for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the invariant mass regularization scheme, and compare the results with the empirical parametrizations. We argue that this NJL-jet model provides a very useful framework to calculate the fragmentation functions in an effective chiral quark theory.

  18. The NJL Model for Quark Fragmentation Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Ito, W. Bentz, I. Cloet, A W Thomas, K. Yazaki

    2009-10-01

    A description of fragmentation functions which satisfy the momentum and isospin sum rules is presented in an effective quark theory. Concentrating on the pion fragmentation function, we first explain the reason why the elementary (lowest order) fragmentation process q → qπ is completely inadequate to describe the empirical data, although the “crossed” process π → qq describes the quark distribution functions in the pion reasonably well. Then, taking into account cascade-like processes in a modified jet-model approach, we show that the momentum and isospin sum rules can be satisfied naturally without introducing any ad-hoc parameters. We present numerical results for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the invariant mass regularization scheme, and compare the results with the empirical parametrizations. We argue that this NJL-jet model provides a very useful framework to calculate the fragmentation functions in an effective chiral quark theory.

  19. Simulation of the mixing process in FCIs with hydrodynamic fragmentation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qian; CAO Xuewu

    2007-01-01

    Fuel Coolant Interactions (FCIs) are important issues in nuclear reactor severe accident analysis. In FCIs,fragmentation model of molten droplets is a key factor to estimate degree of possible damage. In this paper, the mixing process in FCIs is studied by the simulation of MIXA experiment with hydrodynamic fragmentation model. The result shows that hydrodynamic fragmentation model underestimates the fragmentation rate of high temperature molten droplets under the condition of low Weber numbers. It is concluded that models based on thermal fragmentation mechanism should be adopted to analyze the FCI process and its consequence.

  20. Study of Particle Production and Nuclear Fragmentation in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions in Nuclear Emulsions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % EMU11 \\\\ \\\\ We propose to use nuclear emulsions for the study of nuclear collisions of $^{207}$Pb, $^{197}$Au, and any other heavy-ion beams when they are available. We have, in the past, used $^{32}$S at 200A~GeV and $^{16}$O at 200A and 60A~GeV from CERN (Experiment EMU08) and at present the analysis is going on with $^{28}$Si beam from BNL at 14.5A~GeV. It will be important to compare the previous and the present investigations with the new $^{207}$Pb beam at 60-160A~GeV. We want to measure in nuclear emulsion, on an event by event basis, shower particle multiplicity, pseudorapidity density and density fluctuations of charged particles, charge multiplicity and angular distributions of projectile fragments, production and interaction cross-sections of heavily ionizing particles emitted from the target fragmentation. Special emphasis will be placed on the analysis of events produced in the central collisions which are selected on the basis of low energy fragments emitted from the target excitation. It woul...

  1. Isospin and symmetry energy effects on nuclear fragment production in liquid-gas type phase transition region

    CERN Document Server

    Buyukcizmeci, N; Botvina, A S

    2005-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the isospin of nuclei influences the fragment production during the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. Calculations for Au197, Sn124, La124 and Kr78 at various excitation energies were carried out on the basis of the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). We analyzed the behavior of the critical exponent tau with the excitation energy and its dependence on the critical temperature. Relative yields of fragments were classified with respect to the mass number of the fragments in the transition region. In this way, we have demonstrated that nuclear multifragmentation exhibits a 'bimodality' behavior. We have also shown that the symmetry energy has a small influence on fragment mass distribution, however, its effect is more pronounced in the isotope distributions of produced fragments.

  2. Isospin and symmetry energy effects on nuclear fragment distributions in liquid-gas type phase transition region

    CERN Document Server

    Buyukcizmeci, N; Botvina, A S

    2004-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the isospin of nuclei influences the fragment distributions during the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. Calculations for Au197, Sn124, La124 and Kr78 at various excitation energies were carried out on the basis of the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). We analyzed the behavior of the critical exponent tau with the excitation energy and its dependence on the critical temperature. Relative yields of fragments were classified with respect to the mass number of the fragments in the transition region. In this way, we have demonstrated that nuclear multifragmentation exhibits a 'bimodality' behavior. We have also shown that the symmetry energy has a small influence on fragment mass distribution, however, its effect is more pronounced in the isotope distributions of produced fragments.

  3. Analytical relationships of nuclear field and microdosimetric quantities for target fragmentation in tissue systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J.W.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Hajnal, F. (NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (USA))

    1991-04-01

    A simple analytic formula for the nuclear fields formed by target fragmentation in tissue systems is derived using the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA). The energy fluctuations in sensitive localized sites within the tissue system caused by these nuclear events are defined by microdosimetry. In that CSDA is used, the energy fluctuations exclude the role of secondary electrons. The relations also relate to the response of microdosimetric devices to nuclear fragmentation fields.

  4. Research on fission fragment excitation of gases and nuclear pumping of lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, R. T.; Davie, R. N.; Davis, J. F.; Fuller, J. L.; Paternoster, R. R.; Shipman, G. R.; Sterritt, D. E.; Helmick, H. H.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental investigations of fission fragment excited gases are reported along with a theoretical analysis of population inversions in fission fragment excited helium. Other studies reported include: nuclear augmentation of gas lasers, direct nuclear pumping of a helium-xenon laser, measurements of a repetitively pulsed high-power CO2 laser, thermodynamic properties of UF6 and UF6/He mixtures, and nuclear waste disposal utilizing a gaseous core reactor.

  5. Modelling of the PELE fragmentation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreault, J.

    2014-05-01

    The Penetrator with Enhanced Lateral Effect (PELE) is a type of explosive-free projectile that undergoes radial fragmentation upon an impact with a target plate. This type of projectile is composed of a brittle cylindrical shell (the jacket) filled in its core with a material characterized with a large Poisson's ratio. Upon an impact with a target, the axial compression causes the filling to expand in the radial direction. However, due to the brittleness of the jacket material, very little radial deformation can occur which creates a radial stress between the two materials and a hoop stress in the jacket. Fragmentation of the jacket occurs if the hoop stress exceeds the material's ultimate stress. The PELE fragmentation dynamics is explored via Finite-Element Method (FEM) simulations using the Autodyn explicit dynamics hydrocode. The numerical results are compared with an analytical model based on wave interactions, as well as with the experimental investigation of Paulus and Schirm (1996). The comparison is based on the mechanical stress in the filling and the qualitative fragmentation of the jacket.

  6. Studying Nuclear Level Densities of 238U in the Nuclear Reactions within the Macroscopic Nuclear Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Rohallah; Rahmatinejad, Azam; Kakavand, Tayeb; Taheri, Fariba; Aghajani, Maghsood; Khooy, Asghar

    2016-02-01

    In this work the nuclear level density parameters of 238U have been extracted in the back-shifted Fermi gas model (BSFGM), as well as the constant temperature model (CTM), through fitting with the recent experimental data on nuclear level densities measured by the Oslo group. The excitation functions for 238U(p,2nα)233Pa, and 238U(p,4n)235Np reactions and the fragment yields for the fragments of the 238U(p,f) reaction have been calculated using obtained level density parameters. The results are compared to their corresponding experimental values. It was found that the extracted excitation functions and the fragment yields in the CTM coincide well with the experimental values in the low-energy region. This finding is according to the claim made by the Oslo group that the extracted level densities of 238U show a constant temperature behaviour.

  7. Nucleon localization and fragment formation in nuclear fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C. L.; Schuetrumpf, B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-12-01

    Background: An electron localization measure was originally introduced to characterize chemical bond structures in molecules. Recently, a nucleon localization based on Hartree-Fock densities has been introduced to investigate α -cluster structures in light nuclei. Compared to the local nucleonic densities, the nucleon localization function has been shown to be an excellent indicator of shell effects and cluster correlations. Purpose: Using the spatial nucleon localization measure, we investigate the emergence of fragments in fissioning heavy nuclei. Methods: To illustrate basic concepts of nucleon localization, we employ the self-consistent energy density functional method with a quantified energy density functional optimized for fission studies. Results: We study the particle densities and spatial nucleon localization distributions along the fission pathways of 264Fm, 232Th, and 240Pu. We demonstrate that the fission fragments are formed fairly early in the evolution, well before scission. We illustrate the usefulness of the localization measure by showing how the hyperdeformed state of 232Th can be understood in terms of a quasimolecular state made of 132Sn and 100Zr fragments. Conclusions: Compared to nucleonic distributions, the nucleon localization function more effectively quantifies nucleonic clustering: its characteristic oscillating pattern, traced back to shell effects, is a clear fingerprint of cluster/fragment configurations. This is of particular interest for studies of fragment formation and fragment identification in fissioning nuclei.

  8. Iron meteorite fragment studied by atomic and nuclear analytical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesnek, Martin; Štefánik, Milan; Kmječ, Tomáš; Miglierini, Marcel

    2016-10-01

    Chemical and structural compositions of a fragment of Sikhote-Alin iron meteorite were investigated by X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS). XRF and NAA revealed the presence of chemical elements which are characteristic for iron meteorites. XRF also showed a significant amount of Si and Al on the surface of the fragment. MS spectra revealed possible presence of α-Fe(Ni, Co) phase with different local Ni concentration. Furthermore, paramagnetic singlet was detected in Mössbauer spectra recorded at room temperature and at 4.2 K.

  9. Modelling the nuclear parton distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Kulagin, S A

    2016-01-01

    We review a semi-microscopic model of nuclear parton distributions, which takes into account a number of nuclear effects including Fermi motion and nuclear binding, nuclear meson-exchange currents and off-shell corrections to bound nucleon distributions as well as nuclear shadowing effect. We also discuss applications of the model to the lepton-nuclear deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan process and neutrino total cross sections.

  10. Fragment Produced by Nuclear Reaction of Heavy Ions Interacted with Tissue-equivalent Biological Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In heavy ion therapy and radiation biological effects the nuclear fragments from the heavy ion collisions may cause a significant alteration of the radiation field. Nuclear collision between beam particles and tissue nuclei along the penetration path of high-energy ions in tissue or biological-equivalent material causes a loss

  11. Dose equivalent near the bone-soft tissue interface from nuclear fragments produced by high-energy protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavers, M. R.; Poston, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    During manned space missions, high-energy nucleons of cosmic and solar origin collide with atomic nuclei of the human body and produce a broad linear energy transfer spectrum of secondary particles, called target fragments. These nuclear fragments are often more biologically harmful than the direct ionization of the incident nucleon. That these secondary particles increase tissue absorbed dose in regions adjacent to the bone-soft tissue interface was demonstrated in a previous publication. To assess radiological risks to tissue near the bone-soft tissue interface, a computer transport model for nuclear fragments produced by high energy nucleons was used in this study to calculate integral linear energy transfer spectra and dose equivalents resulting from nuclear collisions of 1-GeV protons transversing bone and red bone marrow. In terms of dose equivalent averaged over trabecular bone marrow, target fragments emitted from interactions in both tissues are predicted to be at least as important as the direct ionization of the primary protons-twice as important, if recently recommended radiation weighting factors and "worst-case" geometry are used. The use of conventional dosimetry (absorbed dose weighted by aa linear energy transfer-dependent quality factor) as an appropriate framework for predicting risk from low fluences of high-linear energy transfer target fragments is discussed.

  12. Estimates of the influence of nuclear deformations on the lifetimes of heavy-fragment radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silisteanu, I.; Ivascu, M. (Institutul Central de Fizica, Bucharest (Romania))

    1989-09-01

    We estimate the influence of nuclear ground-state deformations on the lifetimes of heavy-fragment radioactivities. It is shown that deviations from sphericity of the fragments lead to significant corrections of the lifetimes of heavy-fragment radioactivities. Other ideas and refinements recognised within fission-like calculations are extended here to include the excitation of collective modes as a mechanism for enhancing heavy-fragment radioactivity. The estimations are performed for the most interesting cases under the current experimental search. (author).

  13. Nuclear fragmentation of high-energy heavy-ion beams in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardt, D; Schall, I; Geissel, H; Irnich, H; Kraft, G; Magel, A; Mohar, M F; Munzenberg, G; Nickel, F; Scheidenberger, C; Schwab, W; Sihver, L

    1996-01-01

    As a part of the physical-technical program of the heavy-ion therapy project at GSI we have investigated the nuclear fragmentation of high-energy ion beams delivered by the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS, using water as a tissue-equivalent target. For a direct comparison of fragmentation properties, beams of 10B, 12C, 14N, and 16O were produced simultaneously as secondary beams from a primary 18O beam and separated in flight by magnetic beam analysis. The Z-distributions of beam fragments produced in the water target were measured via energy loss in a large ionisation chamber and a scintillator telescope. From these data we obtained both total and partial charge-changing cross sections. In addition we have performed Bragg measurements using two parallel-plate ionization chambers and a water target of variable length. The detailed shape of the measured Bragg curves and the measured cross sections are in good agreement with model calculations based on semi-empirical formulae.

  14. Energy deposition at the bone-tissue interface from nuclear fragments produced by high-energy nucleons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Hajnal, Ferenc; Wilson, John W.

    1990-01-01

    The transport of nuclear fragmentation recoils produced by high-energy nucleons in the region of the bone-tissue interface is considered. Results for the different flux and absorbed dose for recoils produced by 1 GeV protons are presented in a bidirectional transport model. The energy deposition in marrow cavities is seen to be enhanced by recoils produced in bone. Approximate analytic formulae for absorbed dose near the interface region are also presented for a simplified range-energy model.

  15. SPY: A new scission point model based on microscopic ingredients to predict fission fragments properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaître, J.-F.; Dubray, N.; Hilaire, S.; Panebianco, S.; Sida, J.-L.

    2013-12-01

    Our purpose is to determine fission fragments characteristics in a framework of a scission point model named SPY for Scission Point Yields. This approach can be considered as a theoretical laboratory to study fission mechanism since it gives access to the correlation between the fragments properties and their nuclear structure, such as shell correction, pairing, collective degrees of freedom, odd-even effects. Which ones are dominant in final state? What is the impact of compound nucleus structure? The SPY model consists in a statistical description of the fission process at the scission point where fragments are completely formed and well separated with fixed properties. The most important property of the model relies on the nuclear structure of the fragments which is derived from full quantum microscopic calculations. This approach allows computing the fission final state of extremely exotic nuclei which are inaccessible by most of the fission model available on the market.

  16. SPY: A new scission point model based on microscopic ingredients to predict fission fragments properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemaître J.-F.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Our purpose is to determine fission fragments characteristics in a framework of a scission point model named SPY for Scission Point Yields. This approach can be considered as a theoretical laboratory to study fission mechanism since it gives access to the correlation between the fragments properties and their nuclear structure, such as shell correction, pairing, collective degrees of freedom, odd-even effects. Which ones are dominant in final state? What is the impact of compound nucleus structure? The SPY model consists in a statistical description of the fission process at the scission point where fragments are completely formed and well separated with fixed properties. The most important property of the model relies on the nuclear structure of the fragments which is derived from full quantum microscopic calculations. This approach allows computing the fission final state of extremely exotic nuclei which are inaccessible by most of the fission model available on the market.

  17. Nuclear Fragmentation Induced by Relativistic Projectiles Studied in the 4$\\pi$ Configuration of Plastic Track Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % EMU19 \\\\ \\\\ The collisions of heavy ions at relativistic energies have been studied to explore a number of questions related with hot and dense nuclear matter in order to extend our knowledge of nuclear equation-of-state. There are other aspects of these interactions which are studied to expound the process of projectile and/or target disintegrations. The disintegrations in question could be simply binary fissions or more complex processes leading to spallation or complete fragmentation. These important aspects of nuclear reactions are prone to investigations with nuclear track detectors. \\\\ \\\\One of the comparatively new track detector materials, CR-39, is sensitive enough to record particles of Z~$\\geq$~6 with almost 100\\% efficiency up to highly relativistic energies. The wide angle acceptance and exclusive measurements possible with plastic track detectors offer an opportunity to use them in a variety of situations in which high energy charged fragments are produced. The off-line nature of measuring tra...

  18. Brownian shape motion on five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces:nuclear fission-fragment mass distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randrup, Jørgen; Möller, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Although nuclear fission can be understood qualitatively as an evolution of the nuclear shape, a quantitative description has proven to be very elusive. In particular, until now, there existed no model with demonstrated predictive power for the fission-fragment mass yields. Exploiting the expected strongly damped character of nuclear dynamics, we treat the nuclear shape evolution in analogy with Brownian motion and perform random walks on five-dimensional fission potential-energy surfaces which were calculated previously and are the most comprehensive available. Test applications give good reproduction of highly variable experimental mass yields. This novel general approach requires only a single new global parameter, namely, the critical neck size at which the mass split is frozen in, and the results are remarkably insensitive to its specific value.

  19. Brownian shape motion on five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces: Nuclear fission-fragment mass distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Randrup, Jorgen

    2011-01-01

    Although nuclear fission can be understood qualitatively as an evolution of the nuclear shape, a quantitative description has proven to be very elusive. In particular, until now, there exists no model with demonstrated predictive power for the fission fragment mass yields. Exploiting the expected strongly damped character of nuclear dynamics, we treat the nuclear shape evolution in analogy with Brownian motion and perform random walks on five-dimensional fission potential-energy surfaces which were calculated previously and are the most comprehensive available. Test applications give good reproduction of highly variable experimental mass yields. This novel general approach requires only a single new global parameter, namely the critical neck size at which the mass split is frozen in, and the results are remarkably insensitive to its specific value.

  20. Modelling rock fragmentation of Extremely Energetic Rockfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Blasio, Fabio; Dattola, Giuseppe; Battista Crosta, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    Extremely energetic rockfalls (EER) are phenomena for which the combination of a large volume (at least some thousands of m ) and a free fall height of hundreds of metres, results in a large released energy. We fix a threshold value of around 1/50 of kilotons to define such a type of events. Documented examples include several events with dif-ferent size in the Alps (Dru, 2005, 2011, 265,000, 59,200 m3; val Fiscalina - Cima Una, 2007, 40,000 m3; Thurwieser 2004, ca 2 Mm3; Cengalo, 2011, 1.5*105 m3 in 2016, in Switzerland; Civetta, 2013, ca 50,000 m3;), in the Apennines (Gran Sasso, 2006, 30,000 m3), Rocky Mountains (Yosemite, Happy Isles, 38,000 m3), and Himalaya. EERs may become more frequent on steep and sharp mountain peaks as a consequence of permafrost thawing at higher altitudes. In contrast to low energy rockfalls where block disintegration is limited, in EERs the impact after free fall causes an immediate and efficient release of energy much like an explosion. The severe disintegration of the rock and the corresponding air blast are capable of snapping trees many hundreds of metres ahead of the fall area. Pulverized rock at high speed can abrade tree logs, and the resulting suspension flow may travel much further the impact zone, blanketing vast surrounding areas. Using both published accounts of some of these events and collecting direct data for some of them, we present some basic models to describe the involved processes based on analogies with explosions and explosive fragmentation. Of the initial energy, one part is used up in the rock disintegration, and the rest is shared between the shock wave and air blast. The fragmentation energy is calculated based on the fitting of the dust size spectrum by using different proba-bilistic distribution laws and the definition of a surface energy and by considering the involved strain rate. We find the fragmentation is around one third of the initial boulder energy. Finally, we evaluate the velocity of the

  1. Fragmentation modeling of a resin bonded sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilth, William; Ryckelynck, David

    2017-06-01

    Cemented sands exhibit a complex mechanical behavior that can lead to sophisticated models, with numerous parameters without real physical meaning. However, using a rather simple generalized critical state bonded soil model has proven to be a relevant compromise between an easy calibration and good results. The constitutive model formulation considers a non-associated elasto-plastic formulation within the critical state framework. The calibration procedure, using standard laboratory tests, is complemented by the study of an uniaxial compression test observed by tomography. Using finite elements simulations, this test is simulated considering a non-homogeneous 3D media. The tomography of compression sample gives access to 3D displacement fields by using image correlation techniques. Unfortunately these fields have missing experimental data because of the low resolution of correlations for low displacement magnitudes. We propose a recovery method that reconstructs 3D full displacement fields and 2D boundary displacement fields. These fields are mandatory for the calibration of the constitutive parameters by using 3D finite element simulations. The proposed recovery technique is based on a singular value decomposition of available experimental data. This calibration protocol enables an accurate prediction of the fragmentation of the specimen.

  2. The Role of Nuclear Fragmentation in Particle Therapy and Space Radiation Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Cary; La Tessa, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The transport of the so-called HZE particles (those having high charge, Z, and energy, E) through matter is crucially important both in space radiation protection and in the clinical setting where heavy ions are used for cancer treatment. HZE particles are usually considered those having Z > 1, though sometimes Z > 2 is meant. Transport physics is governed by two types of interactions, electromagnetic (ionization energy loss) and nuclear. Models of transport, such as those used in treatment planning and space mission planning must account for both effects in detail. The theory of electromagnetic interactions is well developed, but nucleus-nucleus collisions are so complex that no fundamental physical theory currently describes them. Instead, interaction models are generally anchored to experimental data, which in some areas are far from complete. The lack of fundamental physics knowledge introduces uncertainties in the calculations of exposures and their associated risks. These uncertainties are greatly compounded by the much larger uncertainties in biological response to HZE particles. In this article, we discuss the role of nucleus-nucleus interactions in heavy charged particle therapy and in deep space, where astronauts will receive a chronic low dose from galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and potentially higher short-term doses from sporadic, unpredictable solar energetic particles (SEPs). GCRs include HZE particles; SEPs typically do not and we, therefore, exclude them from consideration in this article. Nucleus-nucleus collisions can result in the breakup of heavy ions into lighter ions. In space, this is generally beneficial because dose and dose equivalent are, on the whole, reduced in the process. The GCRs can be considered a radiation field with a significant high-LET component; when they pass through matter, the high-LET component is attenuated, at the cost of a slight increase in the low-LET component. Not only are the standard measures of risk

  3. Nuclear fragmentation and DNA degradation during programmed cell death in petals of morning glory (Ipomoea nil)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamada, T.; Takatsu, Y.; Kasumi, K.; Ichimura, K.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2006-01-01

    We studied DNA degradation and nuclear fragmentation during programmed cell death (PCD) in petals of Ipomoea nil (L.) Roth flowers. The DNA degradation, as observed on agarose gels, showed a large increase. Using DAPI, which stains DNA, and flow cytometry for DAPI fluorescence, we found that the num

  4. Inhibition of Chk1 by CEP-3891 accelerates mitotic nuclear fragmentation in response to ionizing Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syljuåsen, Randi G; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Nylandsted, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    as a result of defective chromosome segregation when irradiated cells entered their first mitosis, either prematurely without S and G(2) checkpoint arrest in the presence of CEP-3891 or after a prolonged S and G(2) checkpoint arrest in the absence of CEP-3891. The nuclear fragmentation was clearly...

  5. Nuclear fragmentation and DNA degradation during programmed cell death in petals of morning glory (Ipomoea nil)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamada, T.; Takatsu, Y.; Kasumi, K.; Ichimura, K.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2006-01-01

    We studied DNA degradation and nuclear fragmentation during programmed cell death (PCD) in petals of Ipomoea nil (L.) Roth flowers. The DNA degradation, as observed on agarose gels, showed a large increase. Using DAPI, which stains DNA, and flow cytometry for DAPI fluorescence, we found that the

  6. Nuclear Checker Board Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Theodore

    2016-03-01

    The NCB Model 1 , 2 , 3 suggests that the nucleus is a relativistic 2D structure. In 1996 at Argonne National Lab the Checker Board Model was first presented. In that poster presentation it was explained that the relativistic constituent quarks orbit inside the proton at about 85% c and about 99% c inside the neutron. As a way to test the model it was found that the de Broglie wavelength of the up quark matched the calculated circumference of the proton (radius = 0.5194 fm) analogous to the Bohr model of the electron in the H atom. 20 years later it is now accepted that the quarks are moving at relativistic speeds and the orbital motion of the quarks contribute the major part of the spin of the proton. If one considers the motion of the relativistic quarks inside the nucleus (take for example Ca 40) about its center of mass, one realizes that these relativistic quarks are confined to shells inside the nucleus (the He shell {the inner 4 nucleons}, the Oxygen shell ...). So the CBM eliminates the need for an illusionary strong nuclear force in favor of a force based upon an E/M force in perfect spin synchronization in a 2D plane. So the CBM is not at odds with the shell model but instead explains why the nucleus has a shell structure and correctly predicts the shell closures.

  7. Evaluation of excitation energy and spin in fission fragments using the statistical model, and the FIPPS project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sage C.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We review the statistical model and its application for the process of nuclear fission. The expressions for excitation energy and spin distributions for the individual fission fragments are given. We will finally emphasize the importance of measuring prompt gamma decay to further test the statistical model in nuclear fission with the FIPPS project.

  8. Yields of nuclear fragments in the interactions of carbon nuclei with a beryllium target at a projectile energy of 0.6 GeV per nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, B. M.; Alexeev, P. N.; Borodin, Yu. A.; Bulychjov, S. A.; Gudima, K. K.; Dukhovskoy, I. A.; Krutenkova, A. P.; Kulikov, V. V.; Martemianov, M. A.; Matsyuk, M. A.; Mashnik, S. G.; Turdakina, E. N.; Khanov, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    The yields of long-lived nuclear fragments at an angle of 3.5° that originate fromthe fragmentation of carbon ions with an energy of T 0 = 0.6 GeV per nucleon on a berylliumtarget were measured in the FRAGMexperiment at the ITEP TWA heavy-ion accelerator. The momentum spectra of these fragments cover both the fragmentation-maximum region and the cumulative region. The respective differential cross sections change by about five orders of magnitude. The momentum distributions of fragments in the laboratory frame and their kinetic-energy distributions in the rest frame of the fragmenting nucleus are used to test the predictions of four models of ion-ion interactions: BC, INCL++, LAQGSM03.03, and QMD.

  9. Radioactive decay by the emission of heavy nuclear fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, O.A.P.; Roberto, L.A.M.; Medeiros, E.L. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: oaptavares@cbpf.br; emil@cbpf.br

    2007-07-01

    Radioactive decay of nuclei by the emission of heavy ions of C, N, O, F, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, and P isotopes (known as exotic decay or cluster radioactivity) is reinvestigated within the framework of a semiempirical, one-parameter model based on a quantum mechanical, tunnelling mechanism through a potential barrier, where both centrifugal and overlapping effects are considered to half-life evaluations. This treatment appeared to be very adequate at fitting all measured half-life values for the cluster emission cases observed to date. Predictions for new heavy-ion decay cases susceptible of being detected are also reported. (author)

  10. Retained nuclear fragment found during Descemet-stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifflin, Mark D; Neuffer, Marcus C; Mamalis, Nick

    2011-03-01

    An 82-year-old man with a 2- to 3-month history of progressive visual loss due to corneal edema was referred to our center. The ocular history was significant for uneventful cataract surgery approximately 3 years earlier. Pseudophakic bullous keratopathy was diagnosed and Descemet-stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) performed. During surgery, a retained nuclear fragment was discovered in the anterior chamber. The fragment was removed and the DSAEK completed successfully. At the 4-month follow-up, the symptoms had completely resolved and the uncorrected distance visual acuity in the affected eye was 20/40. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nuclear Data for Astrophysical Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Pritychenko, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear physics has been playing an important role in modern astrophysics and cosmology. Since the early 1950's it has been successfully applied for the interpretation and prediction of astrophysical phenomena. Nuclear physics models helped to explain the observed elemental and isotopic abundances and star evolution and provided valuable insights on the Big Bang theory. Today, the variety of elements observed in stellar surfaces, solar system and cosmic rays, and isotope abundances are calculated and compared with the observed values. Consequently, the overall success of the modeling critically depends on the quality of underlying nuclear data that helps to bring physics of macro and micro scales together. To broaden the scope of traditional nuclear astrophysics activities and produce additional complementary information, I will investigate applicability of the U.S. Nuclear Data Program (USNDP) databases for astrophysical applications. EXFOR (Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data) and ENDF (Evaluated Nuclear Dat...

  12. Fragmentation Functions for Heavy Baryons in the Recombination Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭茹

    2011-01-01

    Using the shower parton distributions determined by the recombination model, we predict the fragmentation functions for heavy baryons. Then we obtain the completed fragmentation functions of heavy quarks (c and b) splitting into their hadrons (mesons and baryons containing one heavy valence quark). The calculated process shows that the fragmentation functions for mesons and baryons are not independent if the hadronization of the shower partons is taken into account.%Using the shower parton distributions determined by the recombination model,we predict the fragmentation functions for heavy baryons.Then we obtain the completed fragmentation functions of heavy quarks(c and b)splitting into their hadrons(mesons and baryons containing one heavy valence quark).The calculated process shows that the fragmentation functions for mesons and baryons are not independent if the hadronization of the shower partons is taken into account.

  13. Nuclear Checker Board Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Theodore

    2017-01-01

    The Checkerboard model of the Nucleus has been in the public domain for over 20 years. Over those years it has been described by nuclear and particle physicists as; cute, ``the Bohr model of the nucleus'' and ``reminiscent of the Eightfold Way''. It has also been ridiculed as numerology, laughed at, and even worse. In 2000 the theory was taken to the next level by attempting to explain why the mass of the ``up'' and ``dn'' quarks were significantly heavier than the SM ``u'' and ``d'' quarks. This resulted in a paper published on arXiv.nucl-th/0008026 in 2000, predicting 5 generations of quarks, each quark and negative lepton particle related to each other by a simple geometric mean. The CBM predicts that the radii of the elementary particles are proportional to the cube root of their masses. This was realized Pythagorean musical intervals (octave, perfect 5th, perfect 4th plus two others). Therefore each generation can be explained by a simple right triangle and the height of the hypotenuse. Notice that the height of a right triangle breaks the hypotenuse into two line segments. The geometric mean of those two segments equals the length of the height of this characteristic triangle. Therefore the CBM theory now predicts that all the elementary particles mass are proportion to the cube of their radii. Therefore the mass density of all elementary particles (and perhaps black holes too) are a constant of nature.

  14. Mass and nuclear charge yields for sup 237 Np(2n sub th ,f) at different fission fragment kinetic energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, G.; Barreau, G.; Sicre, A.; Doan, T.P.; Audouard, P.; Leroux, B. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, 33 - Gradignan (France)); Arafa, W.; Brissot, R.; Bocquet, J.P. (Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France). Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires); Faust, H. (Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Koczon, P.; Mutterer, M. (Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Kernphysik); Goennenwein, F. (Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Physikalisches Inst.); Asghar, M. (Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, Algiers (Algeria). Inst. de Physique); Quade, U.; Rudolph, K. (Muenchen Univ. (Germany, F.R.)); Engelhardt, D. (Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany, F.R.)); Piasecki, E. (Warsaw Univ. (Poland))

    1990-09-03

    The recoil mass separator LOHENGRIN of the Laue-Langevin Institute Grenoble has been used to measure for the first time, the yields of light fission fragments from the fissioning system: {sub 93}{sup 239}Np; this odd-Z nucleus is formed after double thermal neutron capture in a {sub 93}{sup 237}Np target. The mass distributions were measured for different kinetic energies between 92 and 115.5 MeV, but the nuclear charge distributions were determined only up to 112 MeV. These distributions are compared to the distributions obtained for the even-even system {sub 94}{sup 240}Pu. At high kinetic energy, the mass distribution shows a prominent peak around mass number A{sub L}=106. These cold fragmentations are discussed in terms of a calculation based on a scission point model extrapolated to the cold fission case. As expected for an odd-Z fissioning nucleus, the nuclear charge distributions do not reveal any odd-even effect. The global neutron odd-even effect is found to be (8.1{plus minus}1.5)%. A simple model has been used to show that most of the neutron odd-even effect results from prompt neutron evaporation from the fragments. (orig.).

  15. Modeling nuclear processes by Simulink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Nahrul Khair Alang Md, E-mail: nahrul@iium.edu.my [Faculty of Engineering, International Islamic University Malaysia, Jalan Gombak, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Modelling and simulation are essential parts in the study of dynamic systems behaviours. In nuclear engineering, modelling and simulation are important to assess the expected results of an experiment before the actual experiment is conducted or in the design of nuclear facilities. In education, modelling can give insight into the dynamic of systems and processes. Most nuclear processes can be described by ordinary or partial differential equations. Efforts expended to solve the equations using analytical or numerical solutions consume time and distract attention from the objectives of modelling itself. This paper presents the use of Simulink, a MATLAB toolbox software that is widely used in control engineering, as a modelling platform for the study of nuclear processes including nuclear reactor behaviours. Starting from the describing equations, Simulink models for heat transfer, radionuclide decay process, delayed neutrons effect, reactor point kinetic equations with delayed neutron groups, and the effect of temperature feedback are used as examples.

  16. Modeling nuclear processes by Simulink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Nahrul Khair Alang Md

    2015-04-01

    Modelling and simulation are essential parts in the study of dynamic systems behaviours. In nuclear engineering, modelling and simulation are important to assess the expected results of an experiment before the actual experiment is conducted or in the design of nuclear facilities. In education, modelling can give insight into the dynamic of systems and processes. Most nuclear processes can be described by ordinary or partial differential equations. Efforts expended to solve the equations using analytical or numerical solutions consume time and distract attention from the objectives of modelling itself. This paper presents the use of Simulink, a MATLAB toolbox software that is widely used in control engineering, as a modelling platform for the study of nuclear processes including nuclear reactor behaviours. Starting from the describing equations, Simulink models for heat transfer, radionuclide decay process, delayed neutrons effect, reactor point kinetic equations with delayed neutron groups, and the effect of temperature feedback are used as examples.

  17. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n ,f ) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verrière, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data are available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. Purpose: In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Methods: Our theoretical framework is the nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large-amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically by using the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). In practice, the TDGCM is implemented in two steps. First, a series of constrained EDF calculations map the configuration and potential-energy landscape of the fissioning system for a small set of collective variables (in this work, the axial quadrupole and octupole moments of the nucleus). Then, nuclear dynamics is modeled by propagating a collective wave packet on the potential-energy surface. Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. Results: We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in two-dimensional collective spaces. Theory and experiment agree typically within two mass units for the position of the asymmetric peak. As expected, calculations are sensitive to the structure of the initial state and the prescription for the collective inertia. We emphasize that results are also sensitive to the continuity of the collective landscape near scission. Conclusions: Our analysis confirms

  18. Modelling of the PELE fragmentation dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verreault, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Penetrator with Enhanced Lateral Effect (PELE) is a type of explosive-free projectile that undergoes radial fragmentation upon an impact with a target plate. This type of projectile is composed of a brittle cylindrical shell (the jacket) filled in its core with a material characterized with a la

  19. Modelling of the PELE fragmentation dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verreault, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Penetrator with Enhanced Lateral Effect (PELE) is a type of explosive-free projectile that undergoes radial fragmentation upon an impact with a target plate. This type of projectile is composed of a brittle cylindrical shell (the jacket) filled in its core with a material characterized with a

  20. Global nuclear material control model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreicer, J.S.; Rutherford, D.A.

    1996-05-01

    The nuclear danger can be reduced by a system for global management, protection, control, and accounting as part of a disposition program for special nuclear materials. The development of an international fissile material management and control regime requires conceptual research supported by an analytical and modeling tool that treats the nuclear fuel cycle as a complete system. Such a tool must represent the fundamental data, information, and capabilities of the fuel cycle including an assessment of the global distribution of military and civilian fissile material inventories, a representation of the proliferation pertinent physical processes, and a framework supportive of national or international perspective. They have developed a prototype global nuclear material management and control systems analysis capability, the Global Nuclear Material Control (GNMC) model. The GNMC model establishes the framework for evaluating the global production, disposition, and safeguards and security requirements for fissile nuclear material.

  1. Sudden corneal edema due to retained lens nuclear fragment presenting 8.5 years after cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Rahul T; Coburn, Amy G

    2011-06-01

    A 79-year-old woman presented with a 1-week history of sudden onset of decreased vision, pain, and redness in the right eye. Ocular history included uneventful cataract surgery in both eyes more than 8 years prior to presentation. Slitlamp examination revealed significant corneal edema and mild iritis. Gonioscopy revealed a retained lens nuclear fragment in the inferior angle. Surgical removal of the fragment improved the patient's condition. The retained nuclear fragment presumably lodged behind the iris at the time of the initial surgery and spontaneously moved forward more than 8 years later. To our knowledge, this is the longest reported delay between phacoemulsification and presentation of a retained nuclear fragment. Before this case, retained nuclear fragments had been associated with complications within a year of surgery only. We recommend gonioscopy in cases of sudden-onset corneal edema extending to the inferior limbus in patients with a history of phacoemulsification.

  2. Systematics of parton fragmentation in $e^+$-$e^-$ and nuclear collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Trainor, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    Parametrizations of fragmentation functions (FFs) from $e^+$-$e^-$ and p-\\=p collisions are combined with a parton spectrum model in a pQCD folding integral to produce minimum-bias {\\em fragment distributions}. A model of in-medium FF modification is included. Calculated fragment distributions are compared with {\\em hard components} from p-p and Au-Au $p_t$ spectra. Data are well described by pQCD over a large kinematic region for a range of Au-Au centralities.

  3. Measurement of the energy spectra of fission fragments using nuclear track detectors and digital image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, Guillermo; Golzarri, Jose I. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 20-364, Mexico D.F. 01000 (Mexico); Castano, Victor M., E-mail: castano@fata.unam.m [Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Santiago de Queretaro, Queretaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2010-08-15

    Energy spectra of fission fragments were determined using a Nuclear Track Methodology (NTM) supported by digital image analysis and numerical data processing using a standard personal computer. The analysis of a californium ({sup 252}Cf) spectrum with this approach shows improvement compared with the values reported previously using the standard procedure, in terms of resolution and accuracy. This new method adds full automation to the technical advantages and cost effectiveness of an NTM.

  4. Percolation and nucleation approaches to nuclear fragmentation: criticality in very small systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, A.J. [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Chung, K.C.

    1994-12-01

    Different criteria for criticality in very small systems are discussed in the context of percolation and nucleation approaches to nuclear fragmentation. It is shown that the probability threshold in percolation and interaction radius threshold in nucleation are very strongly dependent upon the adopted criterion. By using Monte Carlo method, similarities and dissimilarities between nucleation and percolation pictures are also pointed out. (author). 17 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs.

  5. Time invariant scaling in discrete fragmentation models

    CERN Document Server

    Giraud, B G; Giraud, B G; Peschanski, R

    1994-01-01

    Linear rate equations are used to describe the cascading decay of an initial heavy cluster into fragments. We consider moments of arbitrary orders of the mass multiplicity spectrum and derive scaling properties pertaining to their time evolution. We suggest that the mass weighted multiplicity is a suitable observable for the discovery of scaling. Numerical tests validate such properties, even for moderate values of the initial mass (nuclei, percolation clusters, jets of particles etc.). Finite size effects can be simply parametrized.

  6. Nuclear DNA fragmentation during cell death of short-lived ray tracheids in the conifer Pinus densiflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaba, Satoshi; Kubo, Takafumi; Funada, Ryo

    2011-05-01

    One key event in the programmed cell death is nuclear DNA fragmentation. We investigated the timing of nuclear DNA fragmentation during the cell death of short-lived ray tracheids in Pinus densiflora using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Fluorescence due to TUNEL was detected only in deformed nuclei that lacked obvious chromatin in ray tracheids that were adjacent to ray tracheids that no longer contained nuclei. Our observations revealed that nuclear DNA fragmentation occurred only at the final stage of cell death in ray tracheids in situ.

  7. Studying nuclear level densities of {sup 238}U in the nuclear reactions within the macroscopic nuclear models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavi, Rohallah; Aghajani, Maghsood; Khooy, Asghar [Imam Hossein Comprehensive Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Physics; Rahmatinejad, Azam; Taheri, Fariba [Univ. of Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Physics; Kakavand, Tayeb [Imam Khomeini International Univ., Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Physics

    2016-05-01

    In this work the nuclear level density parameters of {sup 238}U have been extracted in the back-shifted Fermi gas model (BSFGM), as well as the constant temperature model (CTM), through fitting with the recent experimental data on nuclear level densities measured by the Oslo group. The excitation functions for {sup 238}U(p,2nα){sup 233}Pa, and {sup 238}U(p,4n){sup 235}Np reactions and the fragment yields for the fragments of the {sup 238}U(p,f) reaction have been calculated using obtained level density parameters. The results are compared to their corresponding experimental values. It was found that the extracted excitation functions and the fragment yields in the CTM coincide well with the experimental values in the low-energy region. This finding is according to the claim made by the Oslo group that the extracted level densities of {sup 238}U show a constant temperature behaviour.

  8. Modeling the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; A. M. Yacout; G. E. Matthern; S. J. Piet; A. Moisseytsev

    2005-07-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative is developing a system dynamics model as part of their broad systems analysis of future nuclear energy in the United States. The model will be used to analyze and compare various proposed technology deployment scenarios. The model will also give a better understanding of the linkages between the various components of the nuclear fuel cycle that includes uranium resources, reactor number and mix, nuclear fuel type and waste management. Each of these components is tightly connected to the nuclear fuel cycle but usually analyzed in isolation of the other parts. This model will attempt to bridge these components into a single model for analysis. This work is part of a multi-national laboratory effort between Argonne National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory and United States Department of Energy. This paper summarizes the basics of the system dynamics model and looks at some results from the model.

  9. Uncertainties in Nuclear Proliferation Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chul Min; Yim, Man-Sung; Park, Hyeon Seok [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    There have been various efforts in the research community to understand the determinants of nuclear proliferation and develop quantitative tools to predict nuclear proliferation events. Such systematic approaches have shown the possibility to provide warning for the international community to prevent nuclear proliferation activities. However, there are still large debates for the robustness of the actual effect of determinants and projection results. Some studies have shown that several factors can cause uncertainties in previous quantitative nuclear proliferation modeling works. This paper analyzes the uncertainties in the past approaches and suggests future works in the view of proliferation history, analysis methods, and variable selection. The research community still lacks the knowledge for the source of uncertainty in current models. Fundamental problems in modeling will remain even other advanced modeling method is developed. Before starting to develop fancy model based on the time dependent proliferation determinants' hypothesis, using graph theory, etc., it is important to analyze the uncertainty of current model to solve the fundamental problems of nuclear proliferation modeling. The uncertainty from different proliferation history coding is small. Serious problems are from limited analysis methods and correlation among the variables. Problems in regression analysis and survival analysis cause huge uncertainties when using the same dataset, which decreases the robustness of the result. Inaccurate variables for nuclear proliferation also increase the uncertainty. To overcome these problems, further quantitative research should focus on analyzing the knowledge suggested on the qualitative nuclear proliferation studies.

  10. β-Amyloid induces nuclear protease-mediated lamin fragmentation independent of caspase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Vijay Sankar; Islam, Md Imamul; Haque, Md Aminul; Shin, Song Yub; Park, Il-Seon

    2016-06-01

    β-Amyloid (Aβ), a hallmark peptide of Alzheimer's disease, induces both caspase-dependent apoptosis and non-apoptotic cell death. In this study, we examined caspase-independent non-apoptotic cell death preceding caspase activation in Aβ42-treated cells. We first determined the optimal treatment conditions for inducing cell death without caspase activation and selected a double-treatment method involving the incubation of cells with Aβ42 for 4 and 6 h (4+6 h sample). We observed that levels of lamin A (LA) and lamin B (LB) were reduced in the 4+6 h samples. This reduction was decreased by treatment with suc-AAPF-CMK, an inhibitor of nuclear scaffold (NS) protease, but not by treatment with z-VAD-FMK, a pan-caspase inhibitor. In addition, suc-AAPF-CMK decreased the changes in nuclear morphology observed in cells in the 4+6 h samples, which were different from nuclear fragmentation observed in STS-treated cells. Furthermore, suc-AAPF-CMK inhibited cell death in the 4+6 h samples. LA and LB fragmentation occurred in the isolated nuclei and was also inhibited by suc-AAPF-CMK. Together, these data indicated that the fragmentation of LA and LB in the Aβ42-treated cells was induced by an NS protease, whose identity is not clearly determined yet. A correlation between Aβ42 toxicity and the lamin fragmentation by NS protease suggests that inhibition of the protease could be an effective method for controlling the pathological process of AD.

  11. Nuclear Data and Nuclear Model Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Developing nuclear data needs towards to sustainable development on fission reactor design and many nuclear applications out the field of fission reactor technology that are growing economicsignificance and that have substantial data requirements are introduced. International standard codes used in nuclear data evaluations and calculations are introduced and compared each other. Generally

  12. The Role of Nuclear Fragmentation in Particle Therapy and Space Radiation Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cary eZeitlin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The transport of so-called HZE particles (those having high charge, Z, and energy, E through matter is crucially important both in space radiation protection and in the clinical setting where heavy ions are used for cancer treatment. Transport physics is governed by two types of interactions, electromagnetic (ionization energy loss and nuclear. Models of transport such as those used in treatment planning and space mission planning must account for both effects in detail. The theory of electromagnetic interactions is well developed, but nucleus-nucleus collisions are so complex that no fundamental physical theory currently describes them. Instead, interaction models are generally anchored to experimental data, which in some areas are far from complete. The lack of fundamental physics knowledge introduces uncertainties in the calculations of exposures and their associated risks. These uncertainties are greatly compounded by the much larger uncertainties in biological response to HZE particles. In this article, we discuss the role of nucleus-nucleus interactions in heavy charged particle therapy and in deep space, where astronauts will receive a chronic low dose from Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs and potentially higher short-term doses from sporadic, unpredictable Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs. GCRs include HZE particles; SEPs typically do not and we therefore exclude them from consideration in this article. Nucleus-nucleus collisions can result in the breakup of heavy ions into lighter ions. In space, this is generally beneficial because dose and dose equivalent are, on the whole, reduced in the process. The GCRs can be considered a radiation field with a significant high-LET component; when they pass through matter, the high-LET component is attenuated, at the cost of a slight increase in the low-LET component. Not only are the standard measures of risk reduced by fragmentation, but it can be argued that fragmentation also reduces the

  13. Gluon fragmentation functions in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Dong-Jing

    2016-01-01

    We derive gluon fragmentation functions in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model by treating a gluon as a pair of color lines formed by fictitious quark and anti-quark ($q\\bar q$). Gluon elementary fragmentation functions are obtained from the quark and anti-quark elementary fragmentation functions for emitting specific mesons in the NJL model under the requirement that the $q\\bar q$ pair maintains in the flavor-singlet state after meson emissions. An integral equation, which iterates the gluon elementary fragmentation functions to all orders, is then solved to yield the gluon fragmentation functions at a model scale. It is observed that these solutions are stable with respect to variation of relevant model parameters, especially after QCD evolution to a higher scale is implemented. We show that the inclusion of the gluon fragmentation functions into the theoretical predictions from only the quark fragmentation functions greatly improves the agreement with the SLD data for the pion and kaon productions in $e^+e^...

  14. Nuclear models on a lattice

    CERN Document Server

    De Soto, F; Carbonell, J; Leroy, J P; Pène, O; Roiesnel, C; Boucaud, Ph.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first results of a quantum field approach to nuclear models obtained by lattice techniques. Renormalization effects for fermion mass and coupling constant in case of scalar and pseudoscalar interaction lagrangian densities are discussed.

  15. Influence of the density of states on the odd-even staggering in the charge distribution of the emitted fragments in nuclear heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleya, N. L.; Souza, S. R.; Carlson, B. V.; Donangelo, R.; Lynch, W. G.; Tsang, M. B.; Winkelbauer, J. R.

    2014-11-01

    The fragmentation of thermalized sources is studied using a version of the Statistical Multifragmentation Model which employs state densities that take the pairing gap in the nuclear levels into account. Attention is focused on the properties of the charge distributions observed in the breakup of the source. Since the microcanonical version of the model used in this study provides the primary fragment excitation energy distribution, one may correlate the reduction of the odd-even staggering in the charge distribution with the increasing occupation of high-energy states. Thus, in the framework of this model, such staggering tends to disappear as a function of the total excitation energy of the source, although the energy per particle may be small for large systems. We also find that, although the deexcitation of the primary fragments should, in principle, blur these odd-even effects as the fragments follow their decay chains, the consistent treatment of pairing may significantly enhance these staggering effects on the final yields. In the framework of this model, we find that odd-even effects in the charge distributions should be observed in the fragmentation of relatively light systems at very low excitation energies. Our results also suggest that the odd-even staggering may provide useful information on the nuclear state density.

  16. Procedure for assessing the performance of a rockfall fragmentation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matas, Gerard; Lantada, Nieves; Corominas, Jordi; Gili, Josep Antoni; Ruiz-Carulla, Roger; Prades, Albert

    2017-04-01

    A Rockfall is a mass instability process frequently observed in road cuts, open pit mines and quarries, steep slopes and cliffs. It is frequently observed that the detached rock mass becomes fragmented when it impacts with the slope surface. The consideration of the fragmentation of the rockfall mass is critical for the calculation of block's trajectories and their impact energies, to further assess their potential to cause damage and design adequate preventive structures. We present here the performance of the RockGIS model. It is a GIS-Based tool that simulates stochastically the fragmentation of the rockfalls, based on a lumped mass approach. In RockGIS, the fragmentation initiates by the disaggregation of the detached rock mass through the pre-existing discontinuities just before the impact with the ground. An energy threshold is defined in order to determine whether the impacting blocks break or not. The distribution of the initial mass between a set of newly generated rock fragments is carried out stochastically following a power law. The trajectories of the new rock fragments are distributed within a cone. The model requires the calibration of both the runout of the resultant blocks and the spatial distribution of the volumes of fragments generated by breakage during their propagation. As this is a coupled process which is controlled by several parameters, a set of performance criteria to be met by the simulation have been defined. The criteria includes: position of the centre of gravity of the whole block distribution, histogram of the runout of the blocks, extent and boundaries of the young debris cover over the slope surface, lateral dispersion of trajectories, total number of blocks generated after fragmentation, volume distribution of the generated fragments, the number of blocks and volume passages past a reference line and the maximum runout distance Since the number of parameters to fit increases significantly when considering fragmentation, the

  17. Azimuthal anisotropies as stringent test for nuclear transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crochet, P.; Rami, F.; Donà, R.; Coffin, J. P.; Fintz, P.; Guillaume, G.; Jundt, F.; Kuhn, C.; Roy, C.; de Schauenburg, B.; Tizniti, L.; Wagner, P.; Alard, J. P.; Andronic, A.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belyaev, I.; Bendarag, A.; Berek, G.; Best, D.; Biegansky, J.; Buta, A.; Čaplar, R.; Cindro, N.; Dupieux, P.; Dželalija, M.; Fan, Z. G.; Fodor, Z.; Fraysse, L.; Freifelder, R. P.; Gobbi, A.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Hong, B.; Jeong, S. C.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Koncz, P.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Lebedev, A.; Leifels, Y.; Manko, V.; Moisa, D.; Mösner, J.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Reisdorf, W.; Ritman, J. L.; Sadchikov, A. G.; Schüll, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczyńska, K.; Sodan, U.; Teh, K. M.; Trzaska, M.; Wang, G. S.; Wessels, J. P.; Wienold, T.; Wisniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Zhilin, A.; Hartnack, C.; FOPI Collaboration

    1997-02-01

    Azimuthal distributions of charged particles and intermediate mass fragments emitted in Au+Au collisions at 600 A MeV have been measured using the FOPI facility at GSI-Darmstadt. Data show a strong increase of the in-plane azimuthal anisotropy ratio with the charge of the detected fragment. Intermediate mass fragments are found to exhibit a strong momentum-space alignment with respect of the reaction plane. The experimental results are presented as a function of the polar centre-of-mass angle and over a broad range of impact parameters. They are compared to the predictions of the Isospin Quantum Molecular Dynamics model using three different parametrisations of the equation of state. We show that such highly accurate data provide stringent test for microscopic transport models and can potentially constrain separately the stiffness of the nuclear equation of state and the momentum dependence of the nuclear interaction.

  18. Preliminary insights into a model for mafic magma fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Matt; Pioli, Laura; Andronico, Daniele; Cristaldi, Antonio; Scollo, Simona

    2017-04-01

    Fragmentation of mafic magmas remains a poorly understood process despite the common occurrence of low viscosity explosive eruptions. In fact, it has been commonly overlooked based on the assumption that low viscosity magmas have very limited explosivity and low potential to undergo brittle fragmentation. However, it is now known that highly explosive, ash forming eruptions can be relatively frequent at several mafic volcanoes. Three questions arise due to this - What is the specific fragmentation mechanism occuring in these eruptions? What are the primary factors controlling fragmentation efficiency? Can a link between eruption style and fragmentation efficiency be quantified? We addressed these questions by coupling theoretical observations and field analysis of the recent May 2016 eruption at Mount Etna volcano. Within this complex 10-day event three paroxysmal episodes of pulsating basaltic lava jets alternating with small lava flows were recorded from a vent within the Voragine crater. The associated plumes which were produced deposited tephra along narrow axes to the east and south east. Sampling was done on the deposits associated with the first two plumes and the third one. We briefly characterise the May 2016 eruption by assessing plume height, eruption phases, total erupted masses and fallout boundaries and comparing them to previous eruptions. We also analyse the total grainsize distribution (TGSD) of the scoria particles formed in the jets. Conventional methods for obtaining grainsize and total distributions of an eruption are based on mass and provide limited information on fragmentation though. For this reason, the TGSD was assessed by coupling particle analyser data and conventional sieving data to assess both particle size and number of particle distributions with better precision. This allowed for more accurate testing of several existing models describing the shape of the TGSD. Coupled further with observations on eruption dynamics and eruption

  19. Quantisation of the string fragmentation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artru, X.; Bowler, M.G.

    1988-01-01

    We quantise the classical Artu-Mennessier strong model with a Feynman sum over histories method. This procedure yields both propagation amplitudes and a Veneziano mass spectrum for mesons, with resonance poles for unstable states. Applied to the process e/sup +/e/sup -/ -> hadrons our amplitudes justify previous applications of string models and in particular the relative amplitudes for different string configurations are in agreement with a recent conjecture of Andersson and Hofmann which can account for the observed Bose-Einstein correlations in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation.

  20. Asteroid fragmentation approaches for modeling atmospheric energy deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register, Paul J.; Mathias, Donovan L.; Wheeler, Lorien F.

    2017-03-01

    During asteroid entry, energy is deposited in the atmosphere through thermal ablation and momentum-loss due to aerodynamic drag. Analytic models of asteroid entry and breakup physics are used to compute the energy deposition, which can then be compared against measured light curves and used to estimate ground damage due to airburst events. This work assesses and compares energy deposition results from four existing approaches to asteroid breakup modeling, and presents a new model that combines key elements of those approaches. The existing approaches considered include a liquid drop or "pancake" model where the object is treated as a single deforming body, and a set of discrete fragment models where the object breaks progressively into individual fragments. The new model incorporates both independent fragments and aggregate debris clouds to represent a broader range of fragmentation behaviors and reproduce more detailed light curve features. All five models are used to estimate the energy deposition rate versus altitude for the Chelyabinsk meteor impact, and results are compared with an observationally derived energy deposition curve. Comparisons show that four of the five approaches are able to match the overall observed energy deposition profile, but the features of the combined model are needed to better replicate both the primary and secondary peaks of the Chelyabinsk curve.

  1. Micromechanical model of the single fiber fragmentation test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.

    2017-01-01

    A shear-lag model is developed for the analysis of single fiber fragmentation tests for the characterization of the mechanical properties of the fiber/matrix interface in composite materials. The model utilizes the relation for the loss in potential energy of Budiansky, Hutchinson and Evans...

  2. Quantitative analysis and comparison of 3D morphology between viable and apoptotic MCF-7 breast cancer cells and characterization of nuclear fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yuhua; Chen, Zhan; Lu, Jianfen; Ables, Elizabeth; Scemama, Jean-Luc; Yang, Li V; Lu, Jun Q; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Morphological changes in apoptotic cells provide essential markers for defining and detection of apoptosis as a fundamental mechanism of cell death. Among these changes, the nuclear fragmentation and condensation have been regarded as the important markers but quantitative characterization of these changes is yet to be achieved. We have acquired confocal image stacks of 206 viable and apoptotic MCF-7 cells stained by three fluorescent dyes. Three-dimensional (3D) parameters were extracted to quantify and compare their differences in morphology. To analyze nuclear fragmentation, a new method has been developed to determine clustering of nuclear voxels in the reconstructed cells due to fluorescence intensity changes in nuclei of apoptotic cells. The results of these studies reveal that the 3D morphological changes in cytoplasm and nuclear membranes in apoptotic cells provide sensitive targets for label-free detection and staging of apoptosis. Furthermore, the clustering analysis and morphological data on nuclear fragmentation are highly useful for derivation of optical cell models and simulation of diffraction images to investigate light scattering by early apoptotic cells, which can lead to future development of label-free and rapid methods of apoptosis assay based on cell morphology.

  3. DNA fragmentation and nuclear phenotype in tendons exposed to low-intensity infrared laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paoli, Flavia; Ramos Cerqueira, Larissa; Martins Ramos, Mayara; Campos, Vera M.; Ferreira-Machado, Samara C.; Geller, Mauro; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2015-03-01

    Clinical protocols are recommended in device guidelines outlined for treating many diseases on empirical basis. However, effects of low-intensity infrared lasers at fluences used in clinical protocols on DNA are controversial. Excitation of endogenous chromophores in tissues and free radicals generation could be described as a consequence of laser used. DNA lesions induced by free radicals cause changes in DNA structure, chromatin organization, ploidy degrees and cell death. In this work, we investigated whether low-intensity infrared laser therapy could alter the fibroblasts nuclei characteristics and induce DNA fragmentation. Tendons of Wistar rats were exposed to low-intensity infrared laser (830 nm), at different fluences (1, 5 and 10 J/cm2), in continuous wave (power output of 10mW, power density of 79.6 mW/cm2). Different frequencies were analyzed for the higher fluence (10 J/cm2), at pulsed emission mode (2.5, 250 and 2500 Hz), with the laser source at surface of skin. Geometric, densitometric and textural parameters obtained for Feulgen-stained nuclei by image analysis were used to define nuclear phenotypes. Significant differences were observed on the nuclear phenotype of tendons after exposure to laser, as well as, high cell death percentages was observed for all fluences and frequencies analyzed here, exception 1 J/cm2 fluence. Our results indicate that low-intensity infrared laser can alter geometric, densitometric and textural parameters in tendon fibroblasts nuclei. Laser can also induce DNA fragmentation, chromatin lost and consequently cell death, using fluences, frequencies and emission modes took out from clinical protocols.

  4. Increased receptor for advanced glycation end products in spermatozoa of diabetic men and its association with sperm nuclear DNA fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, J; Goodarzi, M T; Tavilani, H; Khodadadi, I; Amiri, I

    2012-05-01

    Although the majority of patients with diabetes have disorders in sexual function, associations between diabetes mellitus and sperm function at the molecular level are largely unknown. As receptor for advanced glycation end products plays a key role in many diabetic complications, we hypothesised that it may be involved in sperm nuclear DNA fragmentation. RAGE levels were determined using ELISA and western blot analysis in sperm samples from 32 diabetic and 35 nondiabetic men. Sperm DNA fragmentation was assessed using TUNEL assay. Diabetic men had significantly higher mean levels of RAGE protein (P DNA fragmentation (P DNA fragmentation in diabetic men (r = 0.81, P DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa of diabetic men suggests a central role of RAGE in disturbances in sexual function of diabetic men. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Synergistic impacts of habitat loss and fragmentation on model ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Lewis J; Newbold, Tim; Purves, Drew W; Tittensor, Derek P; Harfoot, Michael B J

    2016-09-28

    Habitat loss and fragmentation are major threats to biodiversity, yet separating their effects is challenging. We use a multi-trophic, trait-based, and spatially explicit general ecosystem model to examine the independent and synergistic effects of these processes on ecosystem structure. We manipulated habitat by removing plant biomass in varying spatial extents, intensities, and configurations. We found that emergent synergistic interactions of loss and fragmentation are major determinants of ecosystem response, including population declines and trophic pyramid shifts. Furthermore, trait-mediated interactions, such as a disproportionate sensitivity of large-sized organisms to fragmentation, produce significant effects in shaping responses. We also show that top-down regulation mitigates the effects of land use on plant biomass loss, suggesting that models lacking these interactions-including most carbon stock models-may not adequately capture land-use change impacts. Our results have important implications for understanding ecosystem responses to environmental change, and assessing the impacts of habitat fragmentation. © 2016 The Authors.

  6. Recursive fragmentation model with quark spin. Application to quark polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Artru, X

    2010-01-01

    An elementary recursive model accounting for the quark spin in the fragmentation of a quark into mesons is presented. The quark spin degree of freedom is represented by a two-components spinor. Spin one meson can be included. The model produces Collins effect and jet handedness. The influence of the initial quark polarisation decays exponentially with the rank of the meson, at dierent rates for longitudinal and transverse polarisations

  7. Synergistic impacts of habitat loss and fragmentation on model ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Drew W.; Tittensor, Derek P.; Harfoot, Michael B. J.

    2016-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation are major threats to biodiversity, yet separating their effects is challenging. We use a multi-trophic, trait-based, and spatially explicit general ecosystem model to examine the independent and synergistic effects of these processes on ecosystem structure. We manipulated habitat by removing plant biomass in varying spatial extents, intensities, and configurations. We found that emergent synergistic interactions of loss and fragmentation are major determinants of ecosystem response, including population declines and trophic pyramid shifts. Furthermore, trait-mediated interactions, such as a disproportionate sensitivity of large-sized organisms to fragmentation, produce significant effects in shaping responses. We also show that top-down regulation mitigates the effects of land use on plant biomass loss, suggesting that models lacking these interactions—including most carbon stock models—may not adequately capture land-use change impacts. Our results have important implications for understanding ecosystem responses to environmental change, and assessing the impacts of habitat fragmentation. PMID:27655763

  8. Tracking energy fluctuations from fragment partitions in the Lattice Gas model

    CERN Document Server

    Gulminelli, F; D'Agostino, M; Chomaz, Ph.

    2004-01-01

    Partial energy fluctuations are known tools to reconstruct microcanonical heat capacities. For nuclear multifragmentation, approximations have been developed to infer fluctuations at freeze out from the observed fragment partitions. The accuracy of this procedure is under debate. Using a well controlled computer experiment, the Lattice Gas model, we show that the proposed method is very accurate if fluctuations are reconstructed following closely the experimental procedure. We also show that a precise reconstruction of the configurational energy at freeze out is especially delicate in the case of classical models like Lennard Jones or Lattice Gas that present a cristallized ground state.

  9. Nuclear fragmentation energy and momentum transfer distributions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Govind S.; Khan, Ferdous

    1989-01-01

    An optical model description of energy and momentum transfer in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, based upon composite particle multiple scattering theory, is presented. Transverse and longitudinal momentum transfers to the projectile are shown to arise from the real and absorptive part of the optical potential, respectively. Comparisons of fragment momentum distribution observables with experiments are made and trends outlined based on our knowledge of the underlying nucleon-nucleon interaction. Corrections to the above calculations are discussed. Finally, use of the model as a tool for estimating collision impact parameters is indicated.

  10. Determination of Nuclear Charge Distributions of Fission Fragments from ^{235}U (n_th, f) with Calorimetric Low Temperature Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabitz, P.; Andrianov, V.; Bishop, S.; Blanc, A.; Dubey, S.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Faust, H.; Gönnenwein, F.; Gomez-Guzman, J. M.; Köster, U.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Mutterer, M.; Scholz, P.; Stolte, S.

    2016-08-01

    Calorimetric low temperature detectors (CLTD's) for heavy-ion detection have been combined with the LOHENGRIN recoil separator at the ILL Grenoble for the determination of nuclear charge distributions of fission fragments produced by thermal neutron-induced fission of ^{235}U. The LOHENGRIN spectrometer separates fission fragments according to their mass-to-ionic-charge ratio and their kinetic energy, but has no selectivity with respect to nuclear charges Z. For the separation of the nuclear charges, one can exploit the nuclear charge-dependent energy loss of the fragments passing through an energy degrader foil (absorber method). This separation requires detector systems with high energy resolution and negligible pulse height defect, as well as degrader foils which are optimized with respect to thickness, homogeneity, and energy loss straggling. In the present, contribution results of test measurements at the Maier Leibnitz tandem accelerator facility in Munich with ^{109}Ag and ^{127}I beams with the aim to determine the most suitable degrader material, as well as measurements at the Institut Laue-Langevin will be presented. These include a systematic study of the quality of Z-separation of fission fragments in the mass range 82le A le 132 and a systematic measurement of ^{92}Rb fission yields, as well as investigations of fission yields toward the symmetry region.

  11. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n,f) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Regnier, D; Schunck, N; Verriere, M

    2016-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r-process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data is available is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically using the time dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in tw...

  12. Habitat fragmentation and reproductive success: a structural equation modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tortorec, Eric; Helle, Samuli; Käyhkö, Niina; Suorsa, Petri; Huhta, Esa; Hakkarainen, Harri

    2013-09-01

    1. There is great interest on the effects of habitat fragmentation, whereby habitat is lost and the spatial configuration of remaining habitat patches is altered, on individual breeding performance. However, we still lack consensus of how this important process affects reproductive success, and whether its effects are mainly due to reduced fecundity or nestling survival. 2. The main reason for this may be the way that habitat fragmentation has been previously modelled. Studies have treated habitat loss and altered spatial configuration as two independent processes instead of as one hierarchical and interdependent process, and therefore have not been able to consider the relative direct and indirect effects of habitat loss and altered spatial configuration. 3. We investigated how habitat (i.e. old forest) fragmentation, caused by intense forest harvesting at the territory and landscape scales, is associated with the number of fledged offspring of an area-sensitive passerine, the Eurasian treecreeper (Certhia familiaris). We used structural equation modelling (SEM) to examine the complex hierarchical associations between habitat loss and altered spatial configuration on the number of fledged offspring, by controlling for individual condition and weather conditions during incubation. 4. Against generally held expectations, treecreeper reproductive success did not show a significant association with habitat fragmentation measured at the territory scale. Instead, our analyses suggested that an increasing amount of habitat at the landscape scale caused a significant increase in nest predation rates, leading to reduced reproductive success. This effect operated directly on nest predation rates, instead of acting indirectly through altered spatial configuration. 5. Because habitat amount and configuration are inherently strongly collinear, particularly when multiple scales are considered, our study demonstrates the usefulness of a SEM approach for hierarchical partitioning

  13. Lineage-specific fragmentation and nuclear relocation of the mitochondrial cox2 gene in chlorophycean green algae (Chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Salinas, Elizabeth; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Li, Zhongkui; Fucíková, Karolina; Brand, Jerry J; Lewis, Louise A; González-Halphen, Diego

    2012-07-01

    In most eukaryotes the subunit 2 of cytochrome c oxidase (COX2) is encoded in intact mitochondrial genes. Some green algae, however, exhibit split cox2 genes (cox2a and cox2b) encoding two polypeptides (COX2A and COX2B) that form a heterodimeric COX2 subunit. Here, we analyzed the distribution of intact and split cox2 gene sequences in 39 phylogenetically diverse green algae in phylum Chlorophyta obtained from databases (28 sequences from 22 taxa) and from new cox2 data generated in this work (23 sequences from 18 taxa). Our results support previous observations based on a smaller number of taxa, indicating that algae in classes Prasinophyceae, Ulvophyceae, and Trebouxiophyceae contain orthodox, intact mitochondrial cox2 genes. In contrast, all of the algae in Chlorophyceae that we examined exhibited split cox2 genes, and could be separated into two groups: one that has a mitochondrion-localized cox2a gene and a nucleus-localized cox2b gene ("Scenedesmus-like"), and another that has both cox2a and cox2b genes in the nucleus ("Chlamydomonas-like"). The location of the split cox2a and cox2b genes was inferred using five different criteria: differences in amino acid sequences, codon usage (mitochondrial vs. nuclear), codon preference (third position frequencies), presence of nucleotide sequences encoding mitochondrial targeting sequences and presence of spliceosomal introns. Distinct green algae could be grouped according to the form of cox2 gene they contain: intact or fragmented, mitochondrion- or nucleus-localized, and intron-containing or intron-less. We present a model describing the events that led to mitochondrial cox2 gene fragmentation and the independent and sequential migration of cox2a and cox2b genes to the nucleus in chlorophycean green algae. We also suggest that the distribution of the different forms of the cox2 gene provides important insights into the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of Chlorophyceae.

  14. Model for self-polarization and motility of keratocyte fragments

    KAUST Repository

    Ziebert, F.

    2011-10-19

    Computational modelling of cell motility on substrates is a formidable challenge; regulatory pathways are intertwined and forces that influence cell motion are not fully quantified. Additional challenges arise from the need to describe a moving deformable cell boundary. Here, we present a simple mathematical model coupling cell shape dynamics, treated by the phase-field approach, to a vector field describing the mean orientation (polarization) of the actin filament network. The model successfully reproduces the primary phenomenology of cell motility: discontinuous onset of motion, diversity of cell shapes and shape oscillations. The results are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments on motility of keratocyte cells and cell fragments. The asymmetry of the shapes is captured to a large extent in this simple model, which may prove useful for the interpretation of experiments.

  15. Experimental and Theoretical Search for a Phase Transition in Nuclear Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Chbihi, A; Salou, S; Gross, D H E

    1999-01-01

    Phase transitions of small isolated systems are signaled by the shape of the caloric equation of state e^*(T), the relationship between the excitation energy per nucleon e^* and temperature. In this work we compare the experimentally deduced e^*(T) to the theoretical predictions. The experimentally accessible temperature was extracted from evaporation spectra from incomplete fusion reactions leading to residue nuclei. The experimental e^*(T) dependence exhibits the characteristic S-shape at e^* = 2-3 MeV/A. Such behavior is expected for a finite system at a phase transition. The observed dependence agrees with predictions of the MMMC-model, which simulates the total accessible phase-space of fragmentation.

  16. Experimental and theoretical search for a phase transition in nuclear fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chbihi, A.; Schapiro, O.; Salou, S.; Gross, D. H. E.

    Phase transitions of small isolated systems are signaled by the shape of the caloric equation of state e*(T), the relationship between the excitation energy per nucleon e* and temperature. In this work we compare the experimentally deduced e*(T) to the theoretical predictions. The experimentally accessible temperature was extracted from evaporation spectra from incomplete fusion reactions leading to residue nuclei. The experimental e*(T) dependence exhibits the characteristic S-shape at e*= 2-3 MeV/A. Such behavior is expected for a finite system at a phase transition. The observed dependence agrees with predictions of the MMMC-model, which simulates the total accessible phase-space of fragmentation.

  17. Nuclear Akt associates with PKC-phosphorylated Ebp1, preventing DNA fragmentation by inhibition of caspase-activated DNase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jee-Yin; Liu, Xia; Liu, Zhixue; Pereira, Lorena; Cheng, Dongmei; Peng, Junmin; Wade, Paul A; Hamburger, Anne W; Ye, Keqiang

    2006-01-01

    Akt promotes cell survival through phosphorylation. The physiological functions of cytoplasmic Akt have been well defined, but little is known about the nuclear counterpart. Employing a cell-free apoptotic assay and NGF-treated PC12 nuclear extracts, we purified Ebp1 as a factor, which contributes to inhibition of DNA fragmentation by CAD. Depletion of Ebp1 from nuclear extracts or knockdown of Ebp1 in PC12 cells abolishes the protective effects of nerve growth factor, whereas overexpression of Ebp1 prevents apoptosis. Ebp1 (S360A), which cannot be phosphorylated by PKC, barely binds Akt or inhibits DNA fragmentation, whereas Ebp1 S360D, which mimics phosphorylation, strongly binds Akt and suppresses apoptosis. Further, phosphorylated nuclear but not cytoplasmic Akt interacts with Ebp1 and enhances its antiapoptotic action independent of Akt kinase activity. Moreover, knocking down of Akt diminishes the antiapoptotic effect of Ebp1 in the nucleus. Thus, nuclear Akt might contribute to suppressing apoptosis through interaction with Ebp1. PMID:16642037

  18. Increased level of circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments indicates metastasis in melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Jan Dominik; Wimberger, Pauline; Wilsch, Katja; Fluck, Michael; Suter, Ludwig; Brunner, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Background: Melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer and, despite recent advances in therapy, about 20% of the patients die of their disease. Early relapse detection and monitoring of therapy response are crucial for efficient treatment of advanced melanoma. Thus, there is a need for blood-based biomarkers in melanoma management. Serum-derived U2 small nuclear RNA fragments (RNU2-1f) were previously shown to be blood-based biomarkers for gastrointestinal and gynecologic malignancies. Here we examined whether RNU2-1f may also serve as diagnostic biomarker in advanced melanoma. Circulating RNU2-1f levels were quantified by comparative reverse transcription PCR in a training cohort of patients with metastatic melanoma (n=33, thereof regionally metastasized to skin and lymph nodes, n=23, and distantly metastasized, n=10) vs. patients with benign naevi (n=16) vs. healthy controls (n=39). RESULTS were validated in an independent patient cohort with distant metastasis (n=16) vs. controls (n=18). Circulating RNU2-1f levels in the training cohort were significantly increased in serum of regionally and distantly metastatic patients, compared with patients with benign naevi or healthy controls (p<0.0001) and allowed accurate detection of regional (AUC 0.80) as well as distant (AUC 0.84) metastasis. In the validation cohort, increased RNU2-1f levels were confirmed and enabled highly specific detection of distant metastasis (sensitivity 81%, specificity 100%, AUC 0.94). This is the first report to suggest a blood-based snRNA serving as a diagnostic biomarker for melanoma metastasis. Our data provide a rationale for further defining clinical utility of circulating RNU2-1f in metastasis detection in the management of melanoma patients at risk of relapse and/or with advanced disease.

  19. Habitat loss other than fragmentation per se decreased nuclear and chloroplast genetic diversity in a monoecious tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Shi, Miao-Miao; Shen, Dong-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Yong

    2012-01-01

    Generally, effect of fragmentation per se on biodiversity has not been separated from the effect of habitat loss. In this paper, using nDNA and cpDNA SSRs, we studied genetic diversity of Castanopsis sclerophylla (Lindl. & Paxton) Schotty populations and decoupled the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation per se. We selected seven nuclear and six cpDNA microsatellite loci and genotyped 460 individuals from mainland and island populations, which were located in the impoundment created in 1959. Number of alleles per locus of populations in larger habitats was significantly higher than that in smaller habitats. There was a significant relationship between the number of alleles per locus and habitat size. Based on this relationship, the predicted genetic diversity of an imaginary population of size equaling the total area of the islands was lower than that of the global population on the islands. Re-sampling demonstrated that low genetic diversity of populations in small habitats was caused by unevenness in sample size. Fisher's α index was similar among habitat types. These results indicate that the decreased nuclear and chloroplast genetic diversity of populations in smaller habitats was mainly caused by habitat loss. For nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite loci, values of F(ST) were 0.066 and 0.893, respectively, and the calculated pollen/seed dispersal ratio was 162.2. When separated into pre-and post-fragmentation cohorts, pollen/seed ratios were 121.2 and 189.5, respectively. Our results suggest that habitat loss explains the early decrease in genetic diversity, while fragmentation per se may play a major role in inbreeding and differentiation among fragmented populations and later loss of genetic diversity.

  20. An efficient Cellular Potts Model algorithm that forbids cell fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Marc; Guesnet, Etienne

    2016-11-01

    The Cellular Potts Model (CPM) is a lattice based modeling technique which is widely used for simulating cellular patterns such as foams or biological tissues. Despite its realism and generality, the standard Monte Carlo algorithm used in the scientific literature to evolve this model preserves connectivity of cells on a limited range of simulation temperature only. We present a new algorithm in which cell fragmentation is forbidden for all simulation temperatures. This allows to significantly enhance realism of the simulated patterns. It also increases the computational efficiency compared with the standard CPM algorithm even at same simulation temperature, thanks to the time spared in not doing unrealistic moves. Moreover, our algorithm restores the detailed balance equation, ensuring that the long-term stage is independent of the chosen acceptance rate and chosen path in the temperature space.

  1. Fuel fragmentation model advances using TEXAS-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, M.L.; El-Beshbeeshy, M.; Nilsuwankowsit, S.; Tang, J. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics

    1998-01-01

    Because an energetic fuel-coolant interaction may be a safety hazard, experiments are being conducted to investigate the fuel-coolant mixing/quenching process (FARO) as well as the energetics of vapor explosion propagation for high temperature fuel melt simulants (KROTOS, WFCI, ZrEX). In both types of experiments, the dynamic breakup of the fuel is one of the key aspects that must be fundamentally understood to better estimate the magnitude of the mixing/quenching process or the explosion energetics. To aid our understanding the TEXAS fuel-coolant interaction computer model has been developed and is being used to analyze these experiments. Recently, the models for dynamic fuel fragmentation during the mixing and explosion phases of the FCI have been improved by further insights into these processes. The purpose of this paper is to describe these enhancements and to demonstrate their improvements by analysis of particular JRC FCI data. (author)

  2. Membrane tethering of APP c-terminal fragments is a prerequisite for T668 phosphorylation preventing nuclear sphere generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Hassan; Kolbe, Katharina; Leonhardt, Gregor; Loosse, Christina; Schröder, Elisabeth; Knauer, Shirley; Marcus, Katrin; Müller, Thorsten

    2016-11-01

    A central molecular hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the β- and γ-secretase-mediated cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which causes the generation of different c-terminal fragments like C99, AICD57, or AICD50 that fully or in part contain the APP transmembrane domain. In this study, we demonstrate that membrane-tethered C99 is phosphorylated by JNK3A at residue T668 (APP695 numbering) to a higher extent than AICD57, whereas AICD50 is not capable of being phosphorylated. The modification decreases the turnover of APP, while the blockade of APP cleavage increases APP phosphorylation. Generation of nuclear spheres, complexes consisting of the translocated AICD, FE65 and other proteins, is significantly reduced as soon as APP c-terminal fragments are accessible for phosphorylation. This APP modification, which we identified as significantly reduced in high plaque-load areas of the human brain, is linearly dependent on the level of APP expression. Accordingly, we show that APP abundance is likewise capable of modulating nuclear sphere generation. Thus, the precise and complex regulation of APP phosphorylation, abundance, and cleavage impacts the generation of nuclear spheres, which are under discussion of being of relevance in neurodegeneration and dementia. Future pharmacological manipulation of nuclear sphere generation may be a promising approach for AD treatment.

  3. Improved Bounded Model Checking for the Universal Fragment of CTL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Xu; Wei Chen; Yan-Yan Xu; Wen-Hui Zhang

    2009-01-01

    SAT-based bounded model checking (BMC) has been introduced as a complementary technique to BDD-based symbolic model checking in recent years, and a lot of successful work has been done in this direction. The approach was first introduced by A. Biere et al. in checking linear temporal logic (LTL) formulae and then also adapted to check formulae of the universal fragment of computation tree logic (ACTL) by W. Penczek et al. As the efficiency of model checking is still an important issue, we present an improved BMC approach for ACTL based on Penczek's method. We consider two aspects of the approach. One is reduction of the number of variables and transitions in the k-model by distinguishing the temporal operator EX from the others. The other is simplification of the transformation of formulae by using uniform path encoding instead of a disjunction of all paths needed in the k-model. With these improvements, for an ACTI, formula, the length of the final encoding of the formula in the worst case is reduced. The improved approach is implemented in the tool BMV and is compared with the original one by applying both to two well known examples, mutual exclusion and dining philosophers. The comparison shows the advantages of the improved approach with respect to the efficiency of model checking.

  4. Hard processes and fragmentation in a unified model for interactions at ultra-relativistic energies; Les processus durs et la fragmentation dans un modele unifie pour les interactions aux energies ultra-relativistes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, H.J

    1999-06-11

    In this work we have developed hard processes and string fragmentation in the framework of interactions at relativistic energies. The hypothesis of the universality of high energy interactions means that many elements of heavy ion collisions can be studied and simulated in simpler nuclear reactions. In particular this hypothesis implies that the fragmentation observed in the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -} follows the same rules as in the collision of 2 lead ions. This work deals with 2 nuclear processes: the e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation reaction and the deep inelastic diffusion. For the first process the string model has been developed to simulate fragmentation by adding an artificial breaking of string due to relativistic effects. A monte-Carlo method has been used to determine the points in a Minkowski space where this breaking occurs. For the second reaction, the theory of semi-hard pomerons is introduced in order to define elementary hadron-hadron interactions. The model of fragmentation proposed in this work can be applied to more complicated reactions such as proton-proton or ion-ion collisions.

  5. Coagulation-Fragmentation Model for Animal Group-Size Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degond, Pierre; Liu, Jian-Guo; Pego, Robert L.

    2017-04-01

    We study coagulation-fragmentation equations inspired by a simple model proposed in fisheries science to explain data for the size distribution of schools of pelagic fish. Although the equations lack detailed balance and admit no H-theorem, we are able to develop a rather complete description of equilibrium profiles and large-time behavior, based on recent developments in complex function theory for Bernstein and Pick functions. In the large-population continuum limit, a scaling-invariant regime is reached in which all equilibria are determined by a single scaling profile. This universal profile exhibits power-law behavior crossing over from exponent -2/3 for small size to -3/2 for large size, with an exponential cutoff.

  6. Coagulation-Fragmentation Model for Animal Group-Size Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degond, Pierre; Liu, Jian-Guo; Pego, Robert L.

    2016-10-01

    We study coagulation-fragmentation equations inspired by a simple model proposed in fisheries science to explain data for the size distribution of schools of pelagic fish. Although the equations lack detailed balance and admit no H-theorem, we are able to develop a rather complete description of equilibrium profiles and large-time behavior, based on recent developments in complex function theory for Bernstein and Pick functions. In the large-population continuum limit, a scaling-invariant regime is reached in which all equilibria are determined by a single scaling profile. This universal profile exhibits power-law behavior crossing over from exponent -2/3 for small size to -3/2 for large size, with an exponential cutoff.

  7. Observation of the in vitro Transcription of the Mouse (Balb/c) Heart Nuclear DNA Fragments by AFM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    It is observed that the regulation sequences at the two ends of every active gene of the heart nuclear DNA fragments may differentially combine with active regulation factors such as some specific binding proteins by using AFM and other experimental technologies. These active genes form different "gene knots", which are separated by "intervals". Using AFM, occasionally, it is also discovered that during the transcription stage, the heart nuclear DNA fragments consist of 3-4-5 "gene knots" and related "intervals", which form various "gene lineages" respectively by some "permutation and combination". Each gene lineage is likely to form nRNA chain-like complexes that are 3 times the quantity of gene knots, and each nRNA chain-like complex is connected with both ends of corresponding gene lineage. One gene knot of the DNA fragments participates the formation of different gene lineage and corresponding RNA chain-like complexes by different combination. By posttranscriptional modification, they can form nmRNA linear chain-like complexes that show the speciality of tissues. The beginnings of transcription units have the same number as gene lineages, and all gene lineages in DNA molecules may transcribe efficiently from corresponding beginnings of transcription unit simultaneously. Our work shows the prospective application of AFM in the research of the diversity of gene lineages formation from gene knots in the transcription stage and the efficiency of gene knots transcription.

  8. Circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments as a novel diagnostic biomarker for pancreatic and colorectal adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Stefanie; Ahrens, Maike

    2013-01-01

    2 small nuclear RNA (RNU2-1). Importantly, we found that the assay signal discriminating tumor from controls was derived from U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) fragments (RNU2-1f) and not from miR-1246. In addition, we observed a remarkable stability of RNU2-1f in serum and provide experimental evidence...... and specificity of 97.7% [95% CI = (87.7, 99.9)] and 90.6% [95% CI = (80.7, 96.5)], respectively [area under the ROC curve 0.972]. Of note, patients with CRC were detected with our assay as early as UICC Stage II with a sensitivity of 81%. In conclusion, this is the first report showing that fragments of U2 sn...... with primary human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we identified 15 diagnostic microRNA candidates. Of those miR-1246 was selected based on its high abundance in serum of tumor carrying mice. Subsequently, we noted a cross reactivity of the established miR-1246 assays with RNA fragments derived from U...

  9. Sperm nuclear DNA fragmentation and its association with semen quality in Greek men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgeni, E; Lymberopoulos, G; Touloupidis, S; Asimakopoulos, B

    2015-12-01

    Due to the limitations of conventional semen analysis in predicting a man's fertility potential, sperm DNA fragmentation was recently introduced as a novel marker of sperm quality. This prospective study was undertaken to investigate the associations between conventional seminal parameters and DNA fragmentation in Greek men. A total of 669 subject data were evaluated in two groups, normozoospermic (n = 184) and non-normozoospermic (n = 485), according to the WHO 2010 (WHO Laboratory Manual for the Examination and Processing of Human Semen, 5th edn. World Health Organization), reference limits. For all the subjects, semen volume, sperm concentration, total count, rapid and total progressive motility and morphology were recorded following the WHO 2010 methods and DNA fragmentation was assessed by the sperm chromatin dispersion assay. An inverse correlation was established between DNA fragmentation and all conventional seminal parameters except semen volume in men with seminal profiles below the reference limits, with statistical significance for rapid and total progressive motility. Normozoospermic men exhibited lower levels of DNA fragmentation than their non-normozoospermic counterparts, even though the values were not always below 30%. DNA fragmentation testing and traditional semen analysis should therefore be considered as complementary diagnostic tools in a comprehensive evaluation of male infertility. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Van Brutzel, Laurent; Chartier, Alan; Gueneau, Christine; Mattsson, Ann E.; Tikare, Veena; Bartel, Timothy; Besmann, T. M.; Stan, Marius; Van Uffelen, Paul

    2010-10-01

    We review the state of modeling and simulation of nuclear fuels with emphasis on the most widely used nuclear fuel, UO2. The hierarchical scheme presented represents a science-based approach to modeling nuclear fuels by progressively passing information in several stages from ab initio to continuum levels. Such an approach is essential to overcome the challenges posed by radioactive materials handling, experimental limitations in modeling extreme conditions and accident scenarios, and the small time and distance scales of fundamental defect processes. When used in conjunction with experimental validation, this multiscale modeling scheme can provide valuable guidance to development of fuel for advanced reactors to meet rising global energy demand.

  11. Unraveling the sperm proteome and post-genomic pathways associated with sperm nuclear DNA fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intasqui, Paula; Camargo, Mariana; Del Giudice, Paula T; Spaine, Deborah M; Carvalho, Valdemir M; Cardozo, Karina H M; Cedenho, Agnaldo P; Bertolla, Ricardo P

    2013-09-01

    Sperm DNA fragmentation has been suggested as a marker for infertility diagnosis and prognosis. Hence, understanding its impact on male physiology and post-genomic pathways would be clinically important. We performed the proteomics and functional enrichment analyses of viable spermatozoa from ejaculates with low and high sperm DNA fragmentation to identify protein expression and pathways altered in association with sperm DNA fragmentation. Sperm DNA fragmentation using the Comet assay and the Komet 6.0.1 software was assessed in raw samples from 89 subjects from a human reproduction service. The Low and High sperm DNA fragmentation groups were formed according to the Olive Tail Moment variable. Spermatozoa proteins from these groups were pooled and analyzed by a shotgun proteomic approach (2D nanoUPLC-ESI-MS(E)). Differentially expressed proteins were used for a functional enrichment study. Two hundred and fifty-seven proteins were identified or quantified in sperm from the Low and High sperm DNA fragmentation groups. Of these, seventy-one proteins were exclusively or overexpressed in the Low group, whereas twenty-three proteins were exclusively or overexpressed in the High group. One hundred and sixty-three proteins were conserved between these groups. We also functionally related the differentially expressed proteins in viable spermatozoa from the groups. Processes such as triacylglycerol metabolism, energy production, protein folding, response to unfolded proteins, and cellular detoxification were found to be altered in these cells. Sperm DNA fragmentation is associated with differential protein expression in viable spermatozoa. These proteins may potentially be used as biomarkers for sperm DNA integrity.

  12. Sensitivity studies of spin cut-off models on fission fragment observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulliez L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A fission fragment de-excitation code, FIFRELIN, is being developed at CEA Cadarache. It allows probing the characteristics of the prompt emitted particles, neutrons and gammas, during the de-excitation process of fully accelerated fission fragments. The knowledge of the initial states of the fragments is important to accurately reproduce the fission fragment observables. In this paper a sensitivity study of various spin cut-off models, completely defining the initial fission fragment angular momentum distribution has been performed. This study shows that the choice of the model has a significant impact on gamma observables such as spectrum and multiplicity and almost none on the neutron observables.

  13. Rotational nuclear models and electron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moya de Guerra, E.

    1986-05-01

    A review is made of the basic formalism involved in the application of nuclear rotational models to the problem of electron scattering from axially symmetric deformed nuclei. Emphasis is made on the use of electron scattering to extract information on the nature of the collective rotational model. In this respect, the interest of using polarized beam and target is discussed with the help of illustrative examples. Concerning the nuclear structure four rotational models are considered: Two microscopic models, namely the Projected Hartree-Fock (PHF) and cranking models; and two collective models, the rigid rotor and the irrotational flow models. The problem of current conservation within the different models is also discussed.

  14. (Studies of target fragmentation in intermediate energy, relativistic and ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loveland, W.D.

    1991-08-01

    The work described herein is part of a project involving the study of low energy (< 10 MeV/A), intermediate energy (10--100 MeV/A) and relativistic (> 250 MeV/A) heavy ion reactions. In the low energy regime, we published a monograph on the properties of the heaviest elements and used that publication as a basis for making a set of best'' semi-empirical predictions of heavy element decay properties. The intermediate energy research effort focussed upon the completion of studies already begun and the initiation of a number of new experiments. In our study of a interaction of 21 MeV/nucleon {sup 129}Xe with {sup 197}Au, we compared the characteristics of the observed deep inelastic phenomena with various models of dissipative reactions and found significant discrepancies between observations and predictions. These discrepancies seemed to be caused by an improper treatment of pre-equilibrium in the early stages of the collision. In our study of the relativistic interaction of 400 MeV/nucleon {sup 12}C with {sup 197}Au, we reported the first direct physical measurement of the properties of the spallation residues from a nucleus-nucleus collision. We found the residue energies to be much lower than those predicted by the intranuclear cascade model, indicating some substantial modifications of that model are needed. But, we also found, indications of significant, non-zero values of the residue transverse momentum, a finding that calls into question the interpretation of a number of radiochemical recoil studies of the kinematics of high energy reactions. A program of performing numerical simulations of intermediate and high energy nuclear collisions using the QMD model was initiated.

  15. Modelling the negative effects of landscape fragmentation on habitat selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langevelde, van F.

    2015-01-01

    Landscape fragmentation constrains movement of animals between habitat patches. Fragmentation may, therefore, limit the possibilities to explore and select the best habitat patches, and some animals may have to cope with low-quality patches due to these movement constraints. If so, these individuals

  16. Modelling the negative effects of landscape fragmentation on habitat selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langevelde, van F.

    2015-01-01

    Landscape fragmentation constrains movement of animals between habitat patches. Fragmentation may, therefore, limit the possibilities to explore and select the best habitat patches, and some animals may have to cope with low-quality patches due to these movement constraints. If so, these individuals

  17. Nuclear targeting by fragmentation of the Potato spindle tuber viroid genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    The whole plant nuclear targeting assay is an experimental system that utilizes transient expression of engineered reporter RNAs encoding an intron-containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) from a vector derived from Potato virus X (PVX). The assay demonstrated the nuclear targeting capability of t...

  18. An improved model for fragment-based lead generation at AstraZeneca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Nathan; Spadola, Loredana; Cowen, Scott; Patel, Joe; Schönherr, Heike; Cao, Qing; McKenzie, Andrew; Edfeldt, Fredrik; Rabow, Al; Goodnow, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Modest success rates in fragment-based lead generation (FBLG) projects at AstraZeneca (AZ) prompted operational changes to improve performance. In this review, we summarize these changes, emphasizing the construction and composition of the AZ fragment library, screening practices and working model. We describe the profiles of the screening method for specific fragment subsets and statistically assess our ability to follow up on fragment hits through near-neighbor selection. Performance analysis of our second-generation fragment library (FL2) in screening campaigns illustrates the complementary nature of flat and 3D fragments in exploring protein-binding pockets and highlights our ability to deliver fragment hits using multiple screening techniques for various target classes. The new model has had profound impact on the successful delivery of lead series to drug discovery projects.

  19. 2-PROTON CORRELATIONS IN THE TARGET FRAGMENTATION REGION OF NUCLEAR COLLISIONS AT 200-A-GEV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AWES, TC; BARLAG, C; BERGER, F; BLOOMER, MA; BLUME, C; BOCK, D; BOCK, R; BOHNE, EM; BUCHER, D; CLAUSSEN, A; CLEWING, G; DRAGON, L; EKLUND, A; GARPMAN, S; GLASOW, R; GUTBROD, HH; HOLKER, G; IDH, J; JACOBS, P; KAMPERT, KH; KOLB, BW; LOHNER, H; LUND, [No Value; OBENSHAIN, FE; OSKARSSON, A; OTTERLUND, [No Value; PEITZMANN, T; PLASIL, F; POSKANZER, AM; PURSCHKE, M; ROTERS, B; SAINI, S; SANTO, R; SCHMIDT, HR; SORENSEN, SP; STEFFENS, K; STEINHAEUSER, P; STENLUND, E; STUKEN, D; YOUNG, GR

    Correlations between protons are studied in the target fragmentation region of reactions of protons and O-16 with C, Cu, Ag, Au and of S-32 With Al and Au at 200 A GeV. The emitted protons were measured with the Plastic Ball detector in the WA80 experiment at the CERN SPS. The comparison of the

  20. Chemical domain of QSAR models from atom-centered fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühne, Ralph; Ebert, Ralf-Uwe; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2009-12-01

    A methodology to characterize the chemical domain of qualitative and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models based on the atom-centered fragment (ACF) approach is introduced. ACFs decompose the molecule into structural pieces, with each non-hydrogen atom of the molecule acting as an ACF center. ACFs vary with respect to their size in terms of the path length covered in each bonding direction starting from a given central atom and how comprehensively the neighbor atoms (including hydrogen) are described in terms of element type and bonding environment. In addition to these different levels of ACF definitions, the ACF match mode as degree of strictness of the ACF comparison between a test compound and a given ACF pool (such as from a training set) has to be specified. Analyses of the prediction statistics of three QSAR models with their training sets as well as with external test sets and associated subsets demonstrate a clear relationship between the prediction performance and the levels of ACF definition and match mode. The findings suggest that second-order ACFs combined with a borderline match mode may serve as a generic and at the same time a mechanistically sound tool to define and evaluate the chemical domain of QSAR models. Moreover, four standard categories of the ACF-based membership to a given chemical domain (outside, borderline outside, borderline inside, inside) are introduced that provide more specific information about the expected QSAR prediction performance. As such, the ACF-based characterization of the chemical domain appears to be particularly useful for QSAR applications in the context of REACH and other regulatory schemes addressing the safety evaluation of chemical compounds.

  1. Safety Cultural Competency Modeling in Nuclear Organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sa Kil; Oh, Yeon Ju; Luo, Meiling; Lee, Yong Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear safety cultural competency model should be supplemented through a bottom-up approach such as behavioral event interview. The developed model, however, is meaningful for determining what should be dealt for enhancing safety cultural competency of nuclear organizations. The more details of the developing process, results, and applications will be introduced later. Organizational culture include safety culture in terms of its organizational characteristics.

  2. Interactions of $^{16}$O Projectile and its Fragments in Nuclear Emulsion at about 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the experiment is to measure the multiplicity ``$ n _{s} $'' and pseudo-rapidity ``$\\eta$'' of the shower particles ($\\beta$~$\\geq$~0.7) produced in different types of collisions (peripheral, semi-central and central), of $^{16}$O and $^{32}$S in nuclear emulsions. The multiplicities and angular distributions of both the grey ``$ n _{g} $'' (mainly due to knock- on and recoil protons), and black ``$ n _{b} $'' (slow evaporated target fragments) particles, and the inter-correlation between them are studied. \\\\ \\\\ The yield, charge and angular distributions of produced relativistic projectile fragments P.F.S., for $ Z _{P} . _{F} . $ $\\geq$~2 are measured and their interactions in emulsions are investigated. \\\\ \\\\ The study of the mean free paths for the projectile fragments with Z $\\geq$ 3 produced from 200~A~GeV $^{16}$ 0 interactions were performed, which show the absence of the anomalous phenomena. \\\\ \\\\ The possible production of zero-spin light neutral scaler bosons and pseudoscaler bosons from...

  3. Modeling news dissemination on nuclear issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis Junior, Jose S.B.; Barroso, Antonio C.O.; Menezes, Mario O., E-mail: jsbrj@ime.usp.b, E-mail: barroso@ipen.b, E-mail: mario@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Using a modified epidemiological model, the dissemination of news by media agents after the occurrence of large scale disasters was studied. A modified compartmented model was developed in a previous paper presented at INAC 2007. There it used to study to the Chernobyl's nuclear accident (1986) and the Concorde airplane crash (2000). Now the model has been applied to a larger and more diverse group of events - nuclear, non-nuclear and naturally caused disasters. To be comprehensive, old and recent events from various regions of the world were selected. A more robust news repository was used, and improved search techniques were developed to ensure that the scripts would not count false positive news. The same model was used but with improved non-linear embedded simulation optimization algorithms to generate the parameters of interest for our model. Individual parameters and some specific combination of them allow some interesting perceptions on how the nature of the accident / disaster gives rise to different profiles of growth and decay of the news. In our studies events involving nuclear causes generate news repercussion with more explosive / robust surge profiles and longer decaying tails than those of other natures. As a consequence of these differences, public opinion and policy makers are also much more sensitive to some issues than to others. The model, through its epidemiological parameters, shows in quantitative manner how 'nervous' the media content generators are with respect to nuclear installations and how resilient this negative feelings about nuclear is. (author)

  4. Modeling nuclear parton distribution functions

    CERN Document Server

    Honkanen, H; Guzey, V

    2013-01-01

    The presence of nuclear medium and collective phenomena which involve several nucleons modify the parton distribution functions of nuclei (nPDFs) compared to those of a free nucleon. These modifications have been investigated by different groups using global analyses of high energy nuclear reaction world data resulting in modern nPDF parametrizations with error estimates, such as EPS09(s), HKN07 and nDS. These phenomenological nPDF sets roughly agree within their uncertainty bands, but have antiquarks for large-$x$ and gluons for the whole $x$-range poorly constrained by the available data. In the kinematics accessible at the LHC this has negative impact on the interpretation of the heavy-ion collision data, especially for the $p + A$ benchmarking runs. The EMC region is also sensitive to the proper definition of $x$, where the nuclear binding effects have to be taken into account, and for heavy nuclei one also needs to take into account that a fraction of the nucleus momentum is carried by the equivalent pho...

  5. Circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments as a novel diagnostic biomarker for pancreatic and colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Stefanie; Ahrens, Maike; Jensen, Steffen Grann; Zöllner, Hannah; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Wos, Alexandra; Mayerle, Julia; Munding, Johanna; Kost, Dennis; Reinacher-Schick, Anke; Liffers, Sven; Schroers, Roland; Chromik, Ansgar M; Meyer, Helmut E; Uhl, Waldemar; Klein-Scory, Susanne; Weiss, Frank U; Stephan, Christian; Schwarte-Waldhoff, Irmgard; Lerch, Markus M; Tannapfel, Andrea; Schmiegel, Wolff; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg; Hahn, Stephan A

    2013-01-15

    Improved non-invasive strategies for early cancer detection are urgently needed to reduce morbidity and mortality. Non-coding RNAs, such as microRNAs and small nucleolar RNAs, have been proposed as biomarkers for non-invasive cancer diagnosis. Analyzing serum derived from nude mice implanted with primary human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we identified 15 diagnostic microRNA candidates. Of those miR-1246 was selected based on its high abundance in serum of tumor carrying mice. Subsequently, we noted a cross reactivity of the established miR-1246 assays with RNA fragments derived from U2 small nuclear RNA (RNU2-1). Importantly, we found that the assay signal discriminating tumor from controls was derived from U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) fragments (RNU2-1f) and not from miR-1246. In addition, we observed a remarkable stability of RNU2-1f in serum and provide experimental evidence that hsa-miR-1246 is likely a pseudo microRNA. In a next step, RNU2-1f was measured by qRT-PCR and normalized to cel-54 in 191 serum/plasma samples from PDAC and colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patients. In comparison to 129 controls, we were able to classify samples as cancerous with a sensitivity and specificity of 97.7% [95% CI = (87.7, 99.9)] and 90.6% [95% CI = (80.7, 96.5)], respectively [area under the ROC curve 0.972]. Of note, patients with CRC were detected with our assay as early as UICC Stage II with a sensitivity of 81%. In conclusion, this is the first report showing that fragments of U2 snRNA are highly stable in serum and plasma and may serve as novel diagnostic biomarker for PDAC and CRC for future prospective screening studies. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  6. Observation and Analysis of in vitro Expression of Mouse Heart Nuclear DNA Fragments by AFM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using AFM,we observed linear chain-like complexes formed by some specific proteins and the multi-mRNAs during the in vitro expression of some active genes on the DNA fragments. The LDH mRNA in the multi-mRNA complex can in vitro translate LDH. Via AFM, we also discovered that nmRNA prepared from heart muscles, along with some specific proteins can form linear chain-like nmRNA complexes in which LDH mRNA can also translate LDH in vitro. Our work shows the prospective application of AFM in the research of the biological reaction of the active genes on the DNA fragments.

  7. A Predictive Model of Fragmentation using Adaptive Mesh Refinement and a Hierarchical Material Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koniges, A E; Masters, N D; Fisher, A C; Anderson, R W; Eder, D C; Benson, D; Kaiser, T B; Gunney, B T; Wang, P; Maddox, B R; Hansen, J F; Kalantar, D H; Dixit, P; Jarmakani, H; Meyers, M A

    2009-03-03

    Fragmentation is a fundamental material process that naturally spans spatial scales from microscopic to macroscopic. We developed a mathematical framework using an innovative combination of hierarchical material modeling (HMM) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to connect the continuum to microstructural regimes. This framework has been implemented in a new multi-physics, multi-scale, 3D simulation code, NIF ALE-AMR. New multi-material volume fraction and interface reconstruction algorithms were developed for this new code, which is leading the world effort in hydrodynamic simulations that combine AMR with ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) techniques. The interface reconstruction algorithm is also used to produce fragments following material failure. In general, the material strength and failure models have history vector components that must be advected along with other properties of the mesh during remap stage of the ALE hydrodynamics. The fragmentation models are validated against an electromagnetically driven expanding ring experiment and dedicated laser-based fragmentation experiments conducted at the Jupiter Laser Facility. As part of the exit plan, the NIF ALE-AMR code was applied to a number of fragmentation problems of interest to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). One example shows the added benefit of multi-material ALE-AMR that relaxes the requirement that material boundaries must be along mesh boundaries.

  8. Measurement of the energy spectrum of {sup 252}Cf fission fragments using nuclear track detectors and digital image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J. I. [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Castano, V. M. [UNAM, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Santiago de Queretaro, 76230 Queretaro (Mexico); Gaso, I. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Mena, M.; Segovia, N. [UNAM, Instituto de Geofisica, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-02-15

    The energy spectrum of {sup 252}Cf fission fragments was measured using nuclear track detectors and digital image analysis system. The detection material was fused silica glass. The detectors were chemically etched in an 8% HF solution. After experimenting with various etching time, it was found that the best resolution of the track diameter distribution was obtained after 30 minutes of etching. Both Gaussian and Lorentzian curves were fit to the track diameter distribution histograms and used to determine the basic parameters of the distribution of the light (N{sub L}) and heavy (N{sub H}) formed peaks and the minimum of the central valley (N{sub V}). Advantages of the method presented here include the fully-automated analysis process, the low cost of the nuclear track detectors and the simplicity of the nuclear track method. The distribution resolution obtained by this method is comparable with the resolution obtained by electronic analysis devices. The descriptive variables calculated were very close to those obtained by other methods based on the use of semiconductor detectors. (Author)

  9. Towards consistent nuclear models and comprehensive nuclear data evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouland, O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hale, G M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lynn, J E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Talou, P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bernard, D [FRANCE; Litaize, O [FRANCE; Noguere, G [FRANCE; De Saint Jean, C [FRANCE; Serot, O [FRANCE

    2010-01-01

    The essence of this paper is to enlighten the consistency achieved nowadays in nuclear data and uncertainties assessments in terms of compound nucleus reaction theory from neutron separation energy to continuum. Making the continuity of theories used in resolved (R-matrix theory), unresolved resonance (average R-matrix theory) and continuum (optical model) rangcs by the generalization of the so-called SPRT method, consistent average parameters are extracted from observed measurements and associated covariances are therefore calculated over the whole energy range. This paper recalls, in particular, recent advances on fission cross section calculations and is willing to suggest some hints for future developments.

  10. Investigation of fine-structure dips in fission-fragment mass distribution: An asymmetric two centre shell model approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sham S.

    2017-04-01

    The fission fragment mass distribution followed by neutron emission is studied for the 208Pb (18O , f) reaction using the asymmetric two centre shell model. The measured mass distribution spectrum reveals new kind of systematics on shell structure and leads to an improved understanding of structure effects in nuclear fission. A detailed investigation of shell effects both in potential and cranking mass parameter has been carried out for explaining the observed fine structure dips (i.e., less probable distributions) corresponding to shell closure (Z = 50 and/or N = 82) of fission fragments and their complementary partners. The available energy states for the decay process are obtained by solving the Schrödinger equation and found that first-five eigenstates are sufficient in reproducing the observed mass distribution spectrum. An outcome of the asymmetric two centre shell model also completely favours the observed claim that ;the total number of emitted neutrons between correlated pairs of fission fragments should not exceed 6;. A complete observed spectrum is obtained by adding the mass distribution yields of all 6-neutron emission channels. This suggests a possible importance of extending these calculations to get new insight into an understanding of the dynamical behaviour of fragment formation in the fission process.

  11. WORLD MODEL OICONYMIC FRAGMENT OF ANGLO-SAXON CUMBRIA SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Евгения Васильевна Заверткина

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the formation process of a linguistic world picture in the form of an oiconymic fragment of a nomination world picture - an interference product of language and cultural traditions of Celtic population and Angle conquerors. Semantic research of oiconyms in an onomasiological aspect enables to see how an oiconymic fragment of a nomination world picture of Cumbria social stratum of the Anglo-Saxon period was formed. Formation of oiconymic nomination in dynamics, creation and evolution of oiconymic fragment of a nominative world picture of Cumbria society during the Anglo-Saxon conquest period were carried out according to linguistic and cultural experience and traditions of Celtic and Angle communities of the above mentioned space and time continuum. Research of oiconymic fragment of a world nominative picture of the Anglo-Saxon period is of great importance. The English language history begins since that period. Oiconymic lexicon semantics is some kind of storehouse of Celts and Angles relic world pictures fixed in appellatives of oiconymic etymons and lost in other lexicon elements of English language.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2014-2-19

  12. Characteristics of the tomato nuclear genome as determined by sequencing undermethylated EcoRI digested fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y.; van der Hoeven, R. S.; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    A collection of 9,990 single-pass nuclear genomic sequences, corresponding to 5 Mb of tomato DNA, were obtained using methylation filtration (MF) strategy and reduced to 7,053 unique undermethylated genomic islands (UGIs) distributed as follows: (1) 59% non-coding sequences, (2) 28% coding...... sequences, (3) 12% transposons-96% of which are class I retroelements, and (4) 1% organellar sequences integrated into the nuclear genome over the past approximately 100 million years. A more detailed analysis of coding UGIs indicates that the unmethylated portion of tomato genes extends as far as 676 bp...... upstream and 766 bp downstream of coding regions with an average of 174 and 171 bp, respectively. Based on the analysis of the UGI copy distribution, the undermethylated portion of the tomato genome is determined to account for the majority of the unmethylated genes in the genome and is estimated...

  13. Observation of Transcription Regulation in the Mouse Heart Nuclear DNA Fragments and the Specific-protein Interaction by AFM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Using atom force microscopy (AFM), in vitro transcription, PAGE and other experimental technologies, it is observed that, in active genes of mice (Balb/c) nuclear DNA fragments of non-transcriptional state, only regulation sequences at both ends are associated with scaffold proteins (indissociable proteins) and some transcriptional factors such as complexes (dissociable proteins) made of gene-coding proteins and specific auxiliary small molecules, while there are no combining proteins in intermediate coding sequences. However, in active genes of transcriptional state, both regulation sequences and intermediate coding sequences are associated with active transcriptional factors by non-covalent bonds.This paper shows the prospective application of AFM observation and in vitro transcription in the research on gene expression and regulation. It also offers some theoretical basis for localization of specific genes in human genomes.

  14. Model Action Plan for Nuclear Forensics and Nuclear Attribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudder, G B; Niemeyer, S; Smith, D K; Kristo, M J

    2004-03-01

    Nuclear forensics and nuclear attribution have become increasingly important tools in the fight against illegal trafficking in nuclear and radiological materials. This technical report documents the field of nuclear forensics and nuclear attribution in a comprehensive manner, summarizing tools and procedures that have heretofore been described independently in the scientific literature. This report also provides national policy-makers, decision-makers, and technical managers with guidance for responding to incidents involving the interdiction of nuclear and radiological materials. However, due to the significant capital costs of the equipment and the specialized expertise of the personnel, work in the field of nuclear forensics has been restricted so far to a handful of national and international laboratories. In fact, there are a limited number of specialists who have experience working with interdicted nuclear materials and affiliated evidence. Most of the laboratories that have the requisite equipment, personnel, and experience to perform nuclear forensic analysis are participants in the Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group or ITWG (see Section 1.8). Consequently, there is a need to disseminate information on an appropriate response to incidents of nuclear smuggling, including a comprehensive approach to gathering evidence that meets appropriate legal standards and to developing insights into the source and routes of nuclear and radiological contraband. Appendix A presents a ''Menu of Options'' for other Member States to request assistance from the ITWG Nuclear Forensics Laboratories (INFL) on nuclear forensic cases.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation as a tool to predict blasting fragmentation based on the Kuz Ram model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Mario A.; Ficarazzo, Francesco

    2006-04-01

    Rock fragmentation is considered the most important aspect of production blasting because of its direct effects on the costs of drilling and blasting and on the economics of the subsequent operations of loading, hauling and crushing. Over the past three decades, significant progress has been made in the development of new technologies for blasting applications. These technologies include increasingly sophisticated computer models for blast design and blast performance prediction. Rock fragmentation depends on many variables such as rock mass properties, site geology, in situ fracturing and blasting parameters and as such has no complete theoretical solution for its prediction. However, empirical models for the estimation of size distribution of rock fragments have been developed. In this study, a blast fragmentation Monte Carlo-based simulator, based on the Kuz-Ram fragmentation model, has been developed to predict the entire fragmentation size distribution, taking into account intact and joints rock properties, the type and properties of explosives and the drilling pattern. Results produced by this simulator were quite favorable when compared with real fragmentation data obtained from a blast quarry. It is anticipated that the use of Monte Carlo simulation will increase our understanding of the effects of rock mass and explosive properties on the rock fragmentation by blasting, as well as increase our confidence in these empirical models. This understanding will translate into improvements in blasting operations, its corresponding costs and the overall economics of open pit mines and rock quarries.

  16. Mobile Learning Model and Process Optimization in the Era of Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Jun; Yu, Gui-Hua

    2017-01-01

    In the context of mobile Internet, college students' leisure time has fragmentation characteristics to improve the value of time, it is of great practical significance to make full use of fragmentation time to study effectively. This research focuses on mobile learning model and its effect, firstly, qualitative research is used to construct the…

  17. Nuclear Physics——Energy Dependence of String Fragmentation Function and φ Meson Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SABen-hao; WANGZhong-qi

    2003-01-01

    Strangeness enhancement was suggested in the early eighties as one of the most promising signatures for the creation of a Quark-Gluon Plasma(QGP) phase in relativistic nuclear collisions.Following the experimental observations on strangeness enhancement in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the SPS energies the WA97 has measured a clear enhancement of multi-strange baryons (Λ, Ξ, Ω )with their strange quark content in 158 AGeV/c Pb+Pb collisions relative to p+Pb collisions.

  18. Nuclear Transparency in a Relativistic Quark Model

    CERN Document Server

    Iwama, T; Yazaki, K; Iwama, Tetsu; Kohama, Akihisa; Yazaki, Koichi

    1998-01-01

    We examine the nuclear transparency for the quasi-elastic ($e, e'p$) process at large momentum transfers in a relativistic quantum-mechanical model for the internal structure of the proton, using a relativistic harmonic oscillator model. A proton in a nuclear target is struck by the incident electron and then propagates through the residual nucleus suffering from soft interactions with other nucleons. We call the proton "dynamical" when we take into account of internal excitations, and "inert" when we freeze it to the ground state. When the dynamical proton is struck with a hard (large-momentum transfer) interaction, it shrinks, i.e., small-sized configuration dominates the process. It then travels through nuclear medium as a time-dependent mixture of intrinsic excited states and thus changing its size. Its absorption due to the soft interactions with nuclear medium depends on its transverse-size. Since the nuclear transparency is a measure of the absorption strength, we calculate it in our model for the dyna...

  19. Experimental test of nuclear magnetization distribution and nuclear structure models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beirsdorfer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lopez-Urrutia, J Crespo R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Utter, S. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1999-02-26

    Models exist that ascribe the nuclear magnetic fields to the presence of a single nucleon whose spin is not neutralized by pairing it up with that of another nucleon; other models assume that the generation of the magnetic field is shared among some or all nucleons throughout the nucleus. All models predict the same magnetic field external to the nucleus since this is an anchor provided by experiments. The models differ, however, in their predictions of the magnetic field arrangement within the nucleus for which no data exist. The only way to distinguish which model gives the correct description of the nucleus would be to use a probe inserted into the nucleus. The goal of our project was to develop exactly such a probe and to use it to measure fundamental nuclear quantities that have eluded experimental scrutiny. The need for accurately knowing such quantities extends far beyond nuclear physics and has ramifications in parity violation experiments on atomic traps and the testing of the standard model in elementary particle physics. Unlike scattering experiments that employ streams of free particles, our technique to probe the internal magnetic field distribution of the nucleus rests on using a single bound electron. Quantum mechanics shows that an electron in the innermost orbital surrounding the nucleus constantly dives into the nucleus and thus samples the fields that exist inside. This sampling of the nucleus usually results in only minute shifts in the electron' s average orbital, which would be difficult to detect. By studying two particular energy states of the electron, we can, however, dramatically enhance the effects of the distribution of the magnetic fields in the nucleus. In fact about 2% of the energy difference between the two states, dubbed the hyperfine splitting, is determined by the effects related to the distribution of magnetic fields in the nucleus, A precise measurement of this energy difference (better than 0.01%) would then allow us to

  20. Isospin dependence of nuclear multifragmentation in statistical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lei; XIE Dong-Zhu; ZHANG Yan-Ping; GAO Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of nuclear disintegration mechanisms with increasing excitation energy, from com- pound nucleus to multifragmentation, has been studied by using the Statistical Multifragmentation Model (SMM) within a micro-canonical ensemble. We discuss the observable characteristics as functions of excitation energy in multifragmentation, concentrating on the isospin dependence of the model in its decaying mechanism and break-up fragment configuration by comparing the A = 200, Z = 78 and A = 200, Z = 100 systems. The calculations indicate that the neutron-rich system (Z = 78) translates to a fission-like process from evaporation later than the symmetric nucleus at a lower excitation energy, but gets a larger average multiplicity as the excitation energy increases above 1.0 MeV/u.

  1. Optimized $\\delta$ expansion for relativistic nuclear models

    CERN Document Server

    Krein, G I; Peres-Menezes, D; Nielsen, M; Pinto, M B

    1998-01-01

    The optimized $\\delta$-expansion is a nonperturbative approach for field theoretic models which combines the techniques of perturbation theory and the variational principle. This technique is discussed in the $\\lambda \\phi^4$ model and then implemented in the Walecka model for the equation of state of nuclear matter. The results obtained with the $\\delta$ expansion are compared with those obtained with the traditional mean field, relativistic Hartree and Hartree-Fock approximations.

  2. The Relationship between Seminal Melatonin with Sperm Parameters, DNA Fragmentation and Nuclear Maturity in Intra-Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Sharbatoghli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Melatonin, the chief secretory product of the pineal gland, regulates dynamic physiological adaptations that occur in seasonally breeding mammals as a response to changes in daylight hours. Because of the presence of melatonin in semen and the membrane melatonin receptor in spermatozoa, the impact of melatonin on the regulation of male infertility is still questionable. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of endogenous melatonin on human semen parameters (sperm concentration, motility and normal morphology, DNA fragmentation (DF and nuclear maturity. Materials and Methods: In this clinical prospective study, semen samples from 75 infertile men were routinely analyzed and assessed for melatonin and total antioxidant capacity (TAC levels using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and colorimetric assay kits, respectively. DF was examined by the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD test. Acidic aniline blue staining was used to detect chromatin defects in the sperm nuclei. Results: There was no significant correlation between seminal plasma melatonin and TAC with sperm parameters and nuclear maturity. However, we observed a positive significant correlation between DF and melatonin level (r=0.273, P<0.05. Conclusion: Melatonin in seminal plasma is positively correlated with damaged sperm DNA of infertile patients. The mechanism of this phenomenon needs further study.

  3. Finite lifetime fragment model for synchronic band formation in dust tails of comets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishioka, Kimihiko; Watanabe, Junichi (Olympus Optical Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan) National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    Synchronic band (SYB) formation in comet dust tails is explained on the basis of a finite lifetime fragment model. Parent particles ejected from the comet nucleus break up at various times, and fragments with a finite lifetime are produced. The observed SYB is produced by the new fragments; it is formed within the lifetime. The model has been applied to SYBs in three comets, and the SYB particle lifetime was found to range from 25 to 70 days. The model describes well the shape of a SYB of Comet West. 14 refs.

  4. Collins fragmentation function for pions and kaons in a spectator model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchetta, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Gamberg, L.P. [Penn State Univ., Berks, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Goldstein, G.R. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Mukherjee, A. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India). Physics Dept.

    2007-07-15

    We calculate the Collins fragmentation function in the framework of a spectator model with pseudoscalar pion-quark coupling and a Gaussian form factor at the vertex. We determine the model parameters by fitting the unpolarized fragmentation function for pions and kaons. We show that the Collins function for the pions in this model is in reasonable agreement with recent parametrizations obtained by fits of the available data. In addition, we compute for the first time the Collins function for the kaons. (orig.)

  5. Chronic sleep fragmentation exacerbates amyloid β deposition in Alzheimer's disease model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakawa, Eiko N; Miyazaki, Koyomi; Maruo, Kazushi; Yagihara, Hiroko; Fujita, Hiromi; Wada, Keiji; Nagai, Yoshitaka

    2017-07-13

    Sleep fragmentation due to intermittent nocturnal arousal resulting in a reduction of total sleep time and sleep efficiency is a common symptom among people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and elderly people with normal cognitive function. Although epidemiological studies have indicated an association between sleep fragmentation and elevated risk of AD, a relevant disease model to elucidate the underlying mechanisms was lacking owing to technical limitations. Here we successfully induced chronic sleep fragmentation in AD model mice using a recently developed running-wheel-based device and demonstrate that chronic sleep fragmentation increases amyloid β deposition. Notably, the severity of amyloid β deposition exhibited a significant positive correlation with the extent of sleep fragmentation. These findings provide a useful contribution to the development of novel treatments that decelerate the disease course of AD in the patients, or decrease the risk of developing AD in healthy elderly people through the improvement of sleep quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Connexions for the nuclear geometrical collective model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosensteel, G.; Sparks, N.

    2015-11-01

    The Bohr-Mottelson-Frankfurt model of nuclear rotations and quadrupole vibrations is a foundational model in nuclear structure physics. The model, also called the geometrical collective model or simply GCM(3), has two hidden mathematical structures, one group theoretic and the other differential geometric. Although the group structure has been understood for some time, the geometric structure is a new feature that this paper investigates in some detail. Using the de Rham Laplacian \\triangle =\\star d \\star d for the kinetic energy extends significantly the physical scope of the GCM(3) model. This Laplacian contains a ‘magnetic’ term due to the connexion between base manifold rotational and fibre vortex degrees of freedom. When the connexion specializes to irrotational flow, the Laplacian reduces to the Bohr-Mottelson kinetic energy operator.

  7. Communication: Fragment-based Hamiltonian model of electronic charge-excitation gaps and gap closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valone, S M; Pilania, G; Liu, X Y; Allen, J R; Wu, T-C; Atlas, S R; Dunlap, D H

    2015-11-14

    Capturing key electronic properties such as charge excitation gaps within models at or above the atomic scale presents an ongoing challenge to understanding molecular, nanoscale, and condensed phase systems. One strategy is to describe the system in terms of properties of interacting material fragments, but it is unclear how to accomplish this for charge-excitation and charge-transfer phenomena. Hamiltonian models such as the Hubbard model provide formal frameworks for analyzing gap properties but are couched purely in terms of states of electrons, rather than the states of the fragments at the scale of interest. The recently introduced Fragment Hamiltonian (FH) model uses fragments in different charge states as its building blocks, enabling a uniform, quantum-mechanical treatment that captures the charge-excitation gap. These gaps are preserved in terms of inter-fragment charge-transfer hopping integrals T and on-fragment parameters U((FH)). The FH model generalizes the standard Hubbard model (a single intra-band hopping integral t and on-site repulsion U) from quantum states for electrons to quantum states for fragments. We demonstrate that even for simple two-fragment and multi-fragment systems, gap closure is enabled once T exceeds the threshold set by U((FH)), thus providing new insight into the nature of metal-insulator transitions. This result is in contrast to the standard Hubbard model for 1d rings, for which Lieb and Wu proved that gap closure was impossible, regardless of the choices for t and U.

  8. Communication: Fragment-based Hamiltonian model of electronic charge-excitation gaps and gap closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valone, S. M.; Pilania, G.; Liu, X. Y. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Allen, J. R.; Wu, T.-C.; Atlas, S. R.; Dunlap, D. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2015-11-14

    Capturing key electronic properties such as charge excitation gaps within models at or above the atomic scale presents an ongoing challenge to understanding molecular, nanoscale, and condensed phase systems. One strategy is to describe the system in terms of properties of interacting material fragments, but it is unclear how to accomplish this for charge-excitation and charge-transfer phenomena. Hamiltonian models such as the Hubbard model provide formal frameworks for analyzing gap properties but are couched purely in terms of states of electrons, rather than the states of the fragments at the scale of interest. The recently introduced Fragment Hamiltonian (FH) model uses fragments in different charge states as its building blocks, enabling a uniform, quantum-mechanical treatment that captures the charge-excitation gap. These gaps are preserved in terms of inter-fragment charge-transfer hopping integrals T and on-fragment parameters U{sup (FH)}. The FH model generalizes the standard Hubbard model (a single intra-band hopping integral t and on-site repulsion U) from quantum states for electrons to quantum states for fragments. We demonstrate that even for simple two-fragment and multi-fragment systems, gap closure is enabled once T exceeds the threshold set by U{sup (FH)}, thus providing new insight into the nature of metal-insulator transitions. This result is in contrast to the standard Hubbard model for 1d rings, for which Lieb and Wu proved that gap closure was impossible, regardless of the choices for t and U.

  9. FOUNDATION OF NUCLEAR ALGEBRAIC MODELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周孝谦

    1990-01-01

    Based upon Tomonoga-Rowe's many body theory, we find that the algebraic models, including IBM and FDSM are simplest extension of Rowe-Rosensteel's sp(3R).Dynkin-Gruber's subalgebra embedding method is applied to find an appropriate algebra and it's reduction chains conforming to physical requirement. The separated cases sp(6) and so(8) now appear as two branches stemming from the same root D6-O(12). Transitional ease between sp(6) and so(8) is inherently include.

  10. Organizational model of the nuclear sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metri, Paulo, E-mail: pmetri@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN/CGRC), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Brazilian Constitution prohibits private investment in many activities of the Nuclear Industry. Right now, it is in progress a constitutional amendment that allows private companies to build and operate nuclear power plants of its own. This work rescues the historical reasons that led the Congress of 1988 to choose the State owned model for this sector. In addition, the arguments that are used to propose the present changes are repeated here. As indicated in INAC 2015 website, 'sustainable development is supported by three pillars: social, economic and environmental'. Thus, the organizational model to be adopted for the Nuclear Sector must meet these requirements. The official objectives of the energy sector, as set out in the law 9,478, are remembered. New objectives, better established, and also adapted to the electrical subsector, are shown. Besides the use of these objectives to choose the sources and related technologies for the electric generation, they also can be used as evaluation criteria to help in the decision process of the organizational model for the Nuclear Sector. Acting in this way, it is ensured that social, economic and environmental requirements are being attended. Finally, if the developed evaluation criteria are applied, the impacts of each organizational model can be analyzed and preliminary conclusion and recommendation can be made. (author)

  11. Nuclear fragmentation in central collisions: Ni + Au from 32 to 90 A*MeV; Fragmentation dans les collisions centrales du systeme Ni + Au de 32 a 90 A MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellaize, N

    2000-11-03

    Heavy ion collisions are one of tools for studying nuclear system far away from its equilibrium state. This work concerns the most violent collisions in the Ni + Au system for incident energies ranging from 32 up to 90 AMeV. These events were detected with the multidetector INDRA and selected by the Principal Component Analysis (multidimensional analysis). This method classifies the events according their detection features and their degree of dissipation. We observed two deexcitation mechanisms: a fusion/fission - evaporation process and a multifragmentation process. Those two coexist from 32 to 52 AMeV whereas only one subsists at 90 AMeV. For those two mechanisms, an component was observed which seems to be linked to the initial phase of the reaction. The energy fluctuations of this component leads to variations in the energy deposit which determines the deexcitation of the system. The experimental multifragmentation data of the Ni + Au system (52 and 90 AMeV) were compared to the predictions of a statistical model and to the experimental data of the system Xe + Sn at 50 AMeV (also detected with INDRA). These comparisons show the lack of collective radial energy for fragments (Z{>=}10) in the Ni + Au system, and show that the degree of multifragmentation depends of the thermal excitation energy. Mean kinetic energies of particles and lights fragments (Z{>=}10) are larger in the Ni + Au system than the Xe + Sn system. This observation shows that these particles are more sensitive to the entrance channel for an asymmetric system than for a symmetric system (for the same number of nucleons). (author)

  12. [Analysis of fragments of intergenome spacers of human body observed in chromosomes containing no nuclear organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriyanova, N S; Nechvolodov, K K; Korsunenko, A V

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repetitions of rDNA provide so-called nuclear organizations (NOR). On the other hand, rDNA-structures are observed in some NOR chromosomes. It was demonstrated that, in addition to ribosome biogenesis, nucleoli provided a number of functions: cell cycle regulation, stress-induced response, transcription regulation, which often induced cell cascades. The mechanisms of the induction of rDNA segments in NOR chromosomes are obscure and require further research. About 1/3 repetitions are associated with nucleoli and SINE/Alu repetitions, homogeneous repetition, and tandem repetition. Perhaps, relative position of nucleoli and chromosomes may facilitate/prevent interaction of chromosomes with rDNA clusters. The variability of two larger repetitions in the central part of rMGS, LR1, and LR2 similar by -90% and separated by several hundred pairs of bases from each other was studied in our previous works. This work was devoted to the search for the LR1-LR2 segments in other chromosomes, characterization of their terminal tips at rupture points and genome areas of incorporation of the LR1-LR2 segments.

  13. Combined statistical and dynamical model of ternary nuclear fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestone, J. P.

    2004-08-01

    The statistical theory of particle evaporation from hot compound nuclei can be used to calculate the probability that particles are evaporated from the nuclear surface with not enough energy to surmount the Coulomb barrier. These quasievaporated particles exist between the nuclear surface and the Coulomb barrier for a short period of time before returning to the nuclear fluid. Occasionally, a quasievaporated charged particle emitted into the region surrounding the pre-scission neck material, fails to be reabsorbed by either of the main fragments as they accelerate away from each other after scission. This new particle emission mechanism can be used to explain many of the properties of ternary nuclear fission.

  14. Study of Particle Production and Nuclear Fragmentation in Collisions of $^{16}$O Beams with Emulsion Nuclei at 13-200 A GeV

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    .SK 2\\\\ \\\\ The aim of the experiment is to study, on an event by event basis, multiplicities of produced charged particles, pseudo-rapidity density distributions globally and in selected regions of pseudo-rapidity, density fluctuations, multiplicity and angular distributions of nuclear fragments and recoiling protons (30-400~A~MeV) and cross sections for production and interation of light and medium (Z=2-8) projectile fragments. \\\\ \\\\ The detectors are emulsion chambers as well as conventional emulsion stacks. The emulsion chambers consist of several layers of a plastic substrate, each coated with nuclear emulsion on both sides. Since the best measurement accuracy is obtained for the particles with the smallest emission angles, this design is especially suited for the pseudo-rapidity determination. The emulsion stacks, of both high and low sensitivity, have been exposed in the conventional way, with the beam parallel to the emulsion sheets. These stacks are used to study the fragmentation of the interaction n...

  15. New approach to assess sperm DNA fragmentation dynamics: Fine-tuning mathematical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Isabel; Dorado, Jesús; Morrell, Jane; Gosálvez, Jaime; Crespo, Francisco; Jiménez, Juan M; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Sperm DNA fragmentation (sDF) has been proved to be an important parameter in order to predict in vitro the potential fertility of a semen sample. Colloid centrifugation could be a suitable technique to select those donkey sperm more resistant to DNA fragmentation after thawing. Previous studies have shown that to elucidate the latent damage of the DNA molecule, sDF should be assessed dynamically, where the rate of fragmentation between treatments indicates how resistant the DNA is to iatrogenic damage. The rate of fragmentation is calculated using the slope of a linear regression equation. However, it has not been studied if sDF dynamics fit this model. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of different after-thawing centrifugation protocols on sperm DNA fragmentation and elucidate the most accurate mathematical model (linear regression, exponential or polynomial) for DNA fragmentation over time in frozen-thawed donkey semen. After submitting post-thaw semen samples to no centrifugation (UDC), sperm washing (SW) or single layer centrifugation (SLC) protocols, sDF values after 6 h of incubation were significantly lower in SLC samples than in SW or UDC. Coefficient of determination (R(2)) values were significantly higher for a second order polynomial model than for linear or exponential. The highest values for acceleration of fragmentation (aSDF) were obtained for SW, followed by SLC and UDC. SLC after thawing seems to preserve longer DNA longevity in comparison to UDC and SW. Moreover, the fine-tuning of models has shown that sDF dynamics in frozen-thawed donkey semen fit a second order polynomial model, which implies that fragmentation rate is not constant and fragmentation acceleration must be taken into account to elucidate hidden damage in the DNA molecule.

  16. Nuclear Structure Functions from Constituent Quark Model

    CERN Document Server

    Arash, F; Arash, Firooz; Atashbar-Tehrani, Shahin

    1999-01-01

    We have used the notion of the constituent quark model of nucleon, where a constituent quark carries its own internal structure, and applied it to determine nuclear structure functions ratios. It is found that the description of experimental data require the inclusion of strong shadowing effect for $x<0.01$. Using the idea of vector meson dominance model and other ingredients this effect is calculated in the context of the constituent quark model. It is rather striking that the constituent quark model, used here, gives a good account of the data for a wide range of atomic mass number from A=4 to A=204.

  17. Combinatorial nuclear level-density model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moller, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aberg, Sven [LUND SWEDEN; Uhrenhoit, Henrik [LUND SWEDEN; Ickhikawa, Takatoshi [RIKEN

    2008-01-01

    A microscopic nuclear level-density model is presented. The model is a completely combinatorial (micro-canonical) model based on the folded-Yukawa single-particle potential and includes explicit treatment of pairing, rotational and vibrational states. The microscopic character of all states enables extraction of level distribution functions with respect to pairing gaps, parity and angular momentum. The results of the model are compared to available experimental data: neutron separation energy level spacings, data on total level-density functions from the Oslo method and data on parity ratios.

  18. Modeling of 3D-structure for regular fragments of low similarity unknown structure proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Zhihong; Chen Jie; Lin Xiwen; Sang Yanchao

    2007-01-01

    Because it is hard to search similar structure for low similarity unknown structure proteins dimefly from the Protein Data Bank(PDB)database,3D-structure is modeled in this paper for secondary structure regular fragments(α-Helices,β-Strands)of such proteins by the protein secondary structure prediction software,the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool(BLAST)and the side chain construction software SCWRL3.First.the protein secondary structure prediction software is adopted to extract secondary structure fragments from the unknown structure proteins.Then.regular fragments are regulated by BLAST based on comparative modeling,providing main chain configurations.Finally,SCWRL3 is applied to assemble side chains for regular fragments,so that 3D-structure of regular fragments of low similarity un known structure protein is obtained.Regular fragments of several neurotoxins ale used for test.Simulation results show that the prediction errors are less than 0.06nm for regular fragments less than 10 amino acids,implying the simpleness and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Nuclear level density: Shell-model approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen'kov, Roman; Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of the nuclear level density is necessary for understanding various reactions, including those in the stellar environment. Usually the combinatorics of a Fermi gas plus pairing is used for finding the level density. Recently a practical algorithm avoiding diagonalization of huge matrices was developed for calculating the density of many-body nuclear energy levels with certain quantum numbers for a full shell-model Hamiltonian. The underlying physics is that of quantum chaos and intrinsic thermalization in a closed system of interacting particles. We briefly explain this algorithm and, when possible, demonstrate the agreement of the results with those derived from exact diagonalization. The resulting level density is much smoother than that coming from conventional mean-field combinatorics. We study the role of various components of residual interactions in the process of thermalization, stressing the influence of incoherent collision-like processes. The shell-model results for the traditionally used parameters are also compared with standard phenomenological approaches.

  20. Nuclear multifragmentation: Basic concepts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Chaudhuri; S Mallik; S Das Gupta

    2014-05-01

    We present a brief overview of nuclear multifragmentation reaction. Basic formalism of canonical thermodynamical model based on equilibrium statistical mechanics is described. This model is used to calculate basic observables of nuclear multifragmentation like mass distribution, fragment multiplicity, isotopic distribution and isoscaling. Extension of canonical thermodynamical model to a projectile fragmentation model is outlined. Application of the projectile fragmentation model for calculating average number of intermediate mass fragments and the average size of the largest cluster at different bound, differential charge distribution and cross-section of neutron-rich nuclei of different projectile fragmentation reactions at different energies are described. Application of nuclear multifragmentation reaction in basic research as well as in other domains is outlined.

  1. Computational modeling of nuclear thermal rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peery, Steven D.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: rocket engine transient simulation (ROCETS) system; ROCETS performance simulations composed of integrated component models; ROCETS system architecture significant features; ROCETS engineering nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) modules; ROCETS system easily adapts Fortran engineering modules; ROCETS NTR reactor module; ROCETS NTR turbomachinery module; detailed reactor analysis; predicted reactor power profiles; turbine bypass impact on system; and ROCETS NTR engine simulation summary.

  2. Incorporating fragmentation and non-native species into distribution models to inform fluvial fish conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew T; Papeş, Monica; Long, James M

    2017-09-06

    Fluvial fishes face increased imperilment from anthropogenic activities, but the specific factors contributing most to range declines are often poorly understood. For example, the shoal bass (Micropterus cataractae) is a fluvial-specialist species experiencing continual range loss, yet how perceived threats have contributed to range loss is largely unknown. We employed species distribution models (SDMs) to disentangle which factors are contributing most to shoal bass range loss by estimating a potential distribution based on natural abiotic factors and by estimating a series of current, occupied distributions that also incorporated variables characterizing land cover, non-native species, and fragmentation intensity (no fragmentation, dams only, and dams and large impoundments). Model construction allowed for interspecific relationships between non-native congeners and shoal bass to vary across fragmentation intensities. Results from the potential distribution model estimated shoal bass presence throughout much of their native basin, whereas models of current occupied distribution illustrated increased range loss as fragmentation intensified. Response curves from current occupied models indicated a potential interaction between fragmentation intensity and the relationship between shoal bass and non-native congeners, wherein non-natives may be favored at the highest fragmentation intensity. Response curves also suggested that free-flowing fragment lengths of > 100 km were necessary to support shoal bass presence. Model evaluation, including an independent validation, suggested models had favorable predictive and discriminative abilities. Similar approaches that use readily-available, diverse geospatial datasets may deliver insights into the biology and conservation needs of other fluvial species facing similar threats. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Fragmentation and Hadronization

    OpenAIRE

    Webber, B. R.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental data, theoretical ideas and models concerning jet fragmentation and the hadronization process are reviewed, concentrating on the following topics: factorization and small-x resummation of fragmentation functions, hadronization models, single-particle yields and spectra in Z decay, comparisons between quark and gluon jets, current and target fragmentation in deep inelastic scattering, heavy quark fragmentation, Bose-Einstein correlations and WW fragmentation.

  4. The Nuclear Yukawa Model on a Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    de Soto, F; Carbonell, J

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of the quantum field theory approach to nuclear Yukawa model obtained by standard lattice techniques. We have considered the simplest case of two identical fermions interacting via a scalar meson exchange. Calculations have been performed using Wilson fermions in the quenched approximation. We found the existence of a critical coupling constant above which the model cannot be numerically solved. The range of the accessible coupling constants is below the threshold value for producing two-body bound states. Two-body scattering lengths have been obtained and compared to the non relativistic results.

  5. Few-body models for nuclear astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Descouvemont

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We present applications of microscopic models to nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest, and we essentially focus on few-body systems. The calculation of radiative-capture and transfer cross sections is outlined, and we discuss the corresponding reaction rates. Microscopic theories are briefly presented, and we emphasize on the matrix elements of four-body systems. The microscopic extension of the R-matrix theory to nuclear reactions is described. Applications to the 2H(d, γ4He, 2H(d, p3H and 2H(d, n3He reactions are presented. We show the importance of the tensor force to reproduce the low-energy behaviour of the cross sections.

  6. Few-body models for nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descouvemont, P., E-mail: pdesc@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucléaire Théorique et Physique Mathématique, C.P. 229, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Baye, D., E-mail: dbaye@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucléaire Théorique et Physique Mathématique, C.P. 229, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Physique Quantique, C.P. 165/82, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Suzuki, Y., E-mail: suzuki@nt.sc.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Aoyama, S., E-mail: aoyama@cc.niigata-u.ac.jp [Center for Academic Information Service, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Arai, K., E-mail: arai@nagaoka-ct.ac.jp [Division of General Education, Nagaoka National College of Technology, 888 Nishikatakai, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-8532 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    We present applications of microscopic models to nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest, and we essentially focus on few-body systems. The calculation of radiative-capture and transfer cross sections is outlined, and we discuss the corresponding reaction rates. Microscopic theories are briefly presented, and we emphasize on the matrix elements of four-body systems. The microscopic extension of the R-matrix theory to nuclear reactions is described. Applications to the {sup 2}H(d, γ){sup 4}He, {sup 2}H(d, p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d, n){sup 3}He reactions are presented. We show the importance of the tensor force to reproduce the low-energy behaviour of the cross sections.

  7. Common Cause Failure Modeling: Aerospace Versus Nuclear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, James E.; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert W.; Hark, Frank; Hatfield, G. Spencer

    2010-01-01

    Aggregate nuclear plant failure data is used to produce generic common-cause factors that are specifically for use in the common-cause failure models of NUREG/CR-5485. Furthermore, the models presented in NUREG/CR-5485 are specifically designed to incorporate two significantly distinct assumptions about the methods of surveillance testing from whence this aggregate failure data came. What are the implications of using these NUREG generic factors to model the common-cause failures of aerospace systems? Herein, the implications of using the NUREG generic factors in the modeling of aerospace systems are investigated in detail and strong recommendations for modeling the common-cause failures of aerospace systems are given.

  8. Suggesting model fragments for sentences in Dutch laws

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. de Maat; R. Winkels

    2010-01-01

    A main issue in the field of artificial intelligence and law is the translation of source of law that are written in natural language into formal models of law. This article describes a step in that transformation: the creation of models for individual sentences in a source of law. The approach uses

  9. A Fragment-Cloud Approach for Modeling Atmospheric Breakup of Asteroids with Varied Internal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Lorien; Mathias, Donovan; NASA Engineering Risk Assessment Team, NASA Asteroid Threat Assessment Project

    2016-10-01

    As an asteroid descends toward Earth, it deposits energy in the atmosphere through aerodynamic drag and ablation. Asteroid impact risk assessments rely on energy deposition estimates to predict blast overpressures and ground damage that may result from an airburst, such as the one that occurred over Chelyabinsk, Russia in 2013. The rates and altitudes at which energy is deposited along the entry trajectory depend upon how the bolide fragments, which in turn depends upon its internal structure and composition. In this work, an analytic asteroid fragmentation model has been developed to model the atmospheric breakup and resulting energy deposition of asteroids with a range of internal structures. The modeling approach combines successive fragmentation of larger independent pieces with aggregate debris clouds released with each fragmentation event. The model can vary the number and masses of fragments produced, the amount of mass released as debris clouds, and the size-strength scaling used to increase the robustness of smaller fragments. The initial asteroid body can be seeded with a distribution of independent fragment sizes amid a remaining debris mass to represent loose rubble pile conglomerations, or can be defined as a monolith with an outer regolith layer. This approach enables the model to represent a range of breakup behaviors and reproduce detailed energy deposition features such as multiple flares due to successive burst events, high-altitude regolith blow-off, or initial disruption of rubble piles followed by more energetic breakup of the constituent boulders. These capabilities provide a means to investigate sensitivities of ground damage to potential variations in asteroid structure.

  10. Benchmarking nuclear models of FLUKA and GEANT4 for carbon ion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehlen, T T; Cerutti, F; Dosanjh, M; Ferrari, A [European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Gudowska, I [Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260 S-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Mairani, A [INFN Milan, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Quesada, J M, E-mail: Till.Tobias.Boehlen@cern.c [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain)

    2010-10-07

    As carbon ions, at therapeutic energies, penetrate tissue, they undergo inelastic nuclear reactions and give rise to significant yields of secondary fragment fluences. Therefore, an accurate prediction of these fluences resulting from the primary carbon interactions is necessary in the patient's body in order to precisely simulate the spatial dose distribution and the resulting biological effect. In this paper, the performance of nuclear fragmentation models of the Monte Carlo transport codes, FLUKA and GEANT4, in tissue-like media and for an energy regime relevant for therapeutic carbon ions is investigated. The ability of these Monte Carlo codes to reproduce experimental data of charge-changing cross sections and integral and differential yields of secondary charged fragments is evaluated. For the fragment yields, the main focus is on the consideration of experimental approximations and uncertainties such as the energy measurement by time-of-flight. For GEANT4, the hadronic models G4BinaryLightIonReaction and G4QMD are benchmarked together with some recently enhanced de-excitation models. For non-differential quantities, discrepancies of some tens of percent are found for both codes. For differential quantities, even larger deviations are found. Implications of these findings for the therapeutic use of carbon ions are discussed.

  11. String fragmentation model and inclusive production of K mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleem, F.E.; Saleem, M.; Rafique, M. (Punjab Univ., Lahore (Pakistan))

    1992-06-30

    In this paper an account of the inclusive production of K mesons in electron-positron annihilation is given. The most recent measurements on the cross section are exhibited and compared with the predictions of the Lund model. The model gives a satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. The result from different experiments on cross section, the mean multiplicity per multihadronic event and various other characteristics are found to be consistent.

  12. Nuclear Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    This chapter first gives a survey on the history of the discovery of nuclear fission. It briefly presents the liquid-drop and shell models and their application to the fission process. The most important quantities accessible to experimental determination such as mass yields, nuclear charge distribution, prompt neutron emission, kinetic energy distribution, ternary fragment yields, angular distributions, and properties of fission isomers are presented as well as the instrumentation and techniques used for their measurement. The contribution concentrates on the fundamental aspects of nuclear fission. The practical aspects of nuclear fission are discussed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0720-2_57 of Vol. 6.

  13. Thermodynamics from three-dimensional many-body fragmentation simulations on a cellular automaton model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, A; Perdang, J

    2004-10-01

    The thermal equilibrium of many-body systems subject to finite range interactions is investigated numerically, by means of a multipurpose 3D cellular automaton dynamic model developed by the authors. The numerical experiments, carried out at fixed number of bodies, volume and energy, demonstrate the formation of an equilibrium among 3D aggregates of bodies. The distribution of the aggregates against size obeys a power law of (negative) exponent tau approximately 2.2 (against 1.3 in 2D). Our experiments, indicating that the exponent is insensitive to the precise parameter values and the precise parametrization of the interactions, are consistent with the idea of the existence of a universality class corresponding to the thermal equilibrium. The numerical value for the exponent tau is in agreement with the theoretical thermal equilibrium analyses based on various other approaches, numerical and semianalytical, indicating that the cellular automaton approach provides an adequate methodology to investigate thermal equilibria. In this paper, as an illustration of this method, we refer to the problem of formation of clusters of nucleons in heavy ion collisions of nuclei leading on to fragmentation. The theoretical tau value, however, corresponding to the thermal equilibrium among the aggregation clusters, is 15 percent lower than the empirical value ( approximately 2.6 ) , as measured in laboratory nuclear fragmentation experiments induced by collision. There is then only a very approximate correspondence between the experimental and the thermal equilibrium value. On the basis of the results of this paper and of a previous paper of this series, we conjecture that the approximate agreement is due to a partial establishment of a thermodynamic equilibrium during the collision of the nuclei. The thermal equilibrium gives the main contribution to the observed tau value; the deviation from this possibly universal value is largely the consequence of the lack of full thermal

  14. A Model for Deformation and Fragmentation in Crushable Brittle Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    910. [13] Bažant ZP, Caner FC, Carol I, Adley MD, Akers SA. Microplane model M4 for concrete. I. formulation with work-conjugate deviatoric stress...ASCE J Eng Mech 2000;126:944–53. [14] Asaro RJ. Crystal plasticity. ASME J Appl Mech 1983;50:921–34. [15] Bažant ZP, Caner FC, Adley MD, Akers SA...Fracturing rate effect and creep in microplane model for dynamics. ASCE J Eng Mech 2000;126:962–70. [16] Bažant ZP, Adley MD, Caner FC, Carol I, Jirásek

  15. Circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments as a novel diagnostic biomarker for primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Zaslavska, Elena; Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Stefanie; Ahle, Guido; Seidel, Sabine; Schlegel, Uwe; Schmiegel, Wolff; Hahn, Stephan; Schroers, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSLs) are highly aggressive tumors. Chemotherapy has improved prognosis significantly; however, early diagnosis is crucial for effective treatment. Presently, the diagnosis of PCNSL depends on histopathology of tumor biopsies. We have previously demonstrated differential expression of microRNAs in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with PCNSL. Based on promising findings about circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments (RNU2-1f) as novel blood-based biomarkers for pancreatic, colorectal, and lung cancer, we investigated RNU2-1f in the CSF of PCNSL patients. CSF was collected from patients with PCNSL (n = 72) and control patients with various neurologic disorders (n = 47). Sequential CSF samples were collected from 9 PCNSL patients. RNU2-1f levels were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Measurement of RNU2-1f levels in CSF enabled the differentiation of patients with PCNSL from controls with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.909 with a sensitivity of 68.1% and a specificity of 91.4%. The diagnostic accuracy was further improved by combined determination of RNU2-1f and miR-21, resulting in AUC of 0.987 with a sensitivity of 91.7% and a specificity of 95.7%. In consecutive measurements of RNU2-1f, which were performed in 9 patients at different stages of the disease course, RNU2-1f CSF levels paralleled the course of the disease. Our data suggest that the measurement of RNU2-1f detected in CSF can be used as a diagnostic marker and also as a possible marker for treatment monitoring. These promising results need to be evaluated within a larger patient cohort. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments as a novel diagnostic tool for patients with epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Jan Dominik; Baraniskin, Alexander; Hahn, Stephan A; Mosel, Frank; Bredemeier, Maren; Wimberger, Pauline; Kimmig, Rainer; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among malignancies in women. Despite advances in treatment, >50% of patients relapse. For disease monitoring, the identification of a blood-based biomarker would be of prime interest. In this regard, noncoding RNAs, such as microRNA (miRNA) or small nuclear RNA (snRNA), have been suggested as biomarkers for noninvasive cancer diagnosis. In the present study, we sought to identify differentially expressed miRNA/snRNA in sera of ovarian cancer patients and investigate their potential to aid in therapy monitoring. miRNA/snRNA abundance was investigated in serum (n = 10) by microarray analysis and validated in an extended serum set (n = 119) by reverse-transcription quantitative PCR. Abundance of U2-1 snRNA fragment (RNU2-1f) was significantly increased in sera of ovarian cancer patients (P < 0.0001) and paralleled International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage as well as residual tumor burden after surgery (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.011, respectively). Moreover, for patients with suboptimal debulking, preoperative RNU2-1f concentration was associated with radiographic response after chemotherapy and with platinum resistance (P = 0.0088 and P = 0.0015, respectively). Interestingly, according to the RNU2-1f abundance dynamics, persistent RNU2-1f positivity before surgery and after chemotherapy identified a subgroup of patients with high risk of recurrence and poor prognosis. This is the first report to suggest that a circulating snRNA can serve as an auxiliary diagnostic tool for monitoring tumor dynamics in ovarian cancer. Our results provide a rationale to further investigate whether this high-risk patient group may benefit from additional therapies that are directly applied after chemotherapy.

  17. Analysis of single hyphal growth and fragmentation in submerged cultures using a population model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabben, Preben; Nielsen, Søren; Michelsen, Michael Locht

    1997-01-01

    Carlo method is shown to be superior with respect to versatility. With measurements of 100 hyphal elements to represent a steady state and using the Monte Carlo method and a statistical test it is shown that one can discriminate between four models of hyphal fragmentation in submerged cultures. (C) 1997......Descriptions of population dynamics in submerged cultures are important when studying the mechanisms of growth and fragmentation of filamentous microorganisms. Population models are traditionally formulated as population balance equations. Population models of filamentous morphology are difficult...... to solve because of random fragmentation, which introduces an integral term into the population balance equations. Balances for the systemic properties, e.g. concentration of hyphal elements, substrate concentration, average total hyphal length, and average number of growing tips, are set up. Based...

  18. Mathematical Modeling for Simulation of Nuclear Reactor Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Salah Ud-Din Khan; Shahab Ud-Din Khan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have developed a mathematical model for the nuclear reactor analysis to be implemented in the nuclear reactor code. THEATRe is nuclear reactor analysis code which can only work for the cylindrical type fuel reactor and cannot applicable for the plate type fuel nuclear reactor. Therefore, the current studies encompasses on the modification of THEATRe code for the plate type fuel element. This mathematical model is applicable to the thermal analysis of the reactor which is ver...

  19. Numerical modeling of rock fracture and fragmentation under impact loading using discrete element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enan Chi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The fracture and fragmentation of rock materials are basic and important problem in geomechanics and blasting engineering. An approach, which can simulate the process of fracture and fragmentation of rock materials, is introduced in this work. A beam–particle model is first introduced in the frame of the discrete element method. In the beam–particle model, the neighboring elements are connected by beams. Consequently, a beam network is formed in the particle system. The strength characteristics of rock materials are reflected by the beam network. The strength criterion was then built to verify whether a beam exists or not. The process of rock fracture and fragmentation is described by the gradual disappearance of beams. Finally, two cases were presented to indicate the validity of the method proposed in this work.

  20. Nuclear reactor core modelling in multifunctional simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Nuclear Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-06-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development of nuclear reactor core models for the APROS multifunctional simulation environment and the use of the core models in various kinds of applications. The work was started in 1986 as a part of the development of the entire APROS simulation system. The aim was to create core models that would serve in a reliable manner in an interactive, modular and multifunctional simulator/plant analyser environment. One-dimensional and three-dimensional core neutronics models have been developed. Both models have two energy groups and six delayed neutron groups. The three-dimensional finite difference type core model is able to describe both BWR- and PWR-type cores with quadratic fuel assemblies and VVER-type cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The one- and three-dimensional core neutronics models can be connected with the homogeneous, the five-equation or the six-equation thermal hydraulic models of APROS. The key feature of APROS is that the same physical models can be used in various applications. The nuclear reactor core models of APROS have been built in such a manner that the same models can be used in simulator and plant analyser applications, as well as in safety analysis. In the APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the three-dimensional reactor core and either the homogeneous, the five- or the six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the number of flow channels have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the three-dimensional core model and thus, at present, these particular selections make the major difference between a safety analysis core model and a training simulator core model. The emphasis on this thesis is on the three-dimensional core model and its capability to analyse symmetric and asymmetric events in the core. The factors affecting the calculation times of various three-dimensional BWR, PWR and WWER-type APROS core models have been

  1. Fiber pull-out test and single fiber fragmentation test - analysis and modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Lilholt, Hans

    2016-01-01

    for fiber/matrix debonding and a frictional sliding shear stress. Results for the debond length and fiber debond displacement are compared with results from similar models for single fiber pull-out experiments where the specimen is gripped at the end opposite to the end where the fiber is pulling......-out and with results for a single fiber fragmentation test....

  2. [Preparation of monoclonal antibody against 4-amylphenol and homology modeling of its Fv fragment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Wu, Haizhen; Fei, Jing; Zhang, Lujia; Ye, Jiang; Zhang, Huizhan

    2017-03-01

    Objective To prepare and characterize a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against 4-amylphenol (4-AP), clone its cDNA sequence and make homology modeling for its Fv fragment. Methods A high-affinity anti-4-AP mAb was generated from a hybridoma cell line F10 using electrofusion between splenocytes from APA-BSA-immunized mouse and Sp2/0 myeloma cells. Then we extracted the mRNA of F10 cells and cloned the cDNA of mAb. The homology modeling and molecular docking of its Fv fragment was conducted with biological software. Results Under the optimum conditions, the ic-ELISA equation was y=A2+(A1-A2)/(1+(x/x0)(p)) (A1=1.28; A2=-0.066; x0=12560.75; p=0.74) with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.997. The lowest detectable limit was 0.65 μg/mL. The heavy and light chains of mAb respectively belonged to IgG1 and Kappa. The homology modeling and molecular docking studies revealed that the binding of 4-Ap and mAb was attributed to the hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions. Conclusion The study successfully established a stable 4-AP mAb-secreting hybridoma cell line. The study on spatial structure of Fv fragment using homology modeling provided a reference for the development and design of single chain variable fragments.

  3. Single-stranded DNA fragments of insect-specific nuclear polyhedrosis virus act as selective DNA insecticides for gypsy moth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberemok, Volodymyr V; Skorokhod, Oleksii A

    2014-07-01

    This paper focuses on the DNA insecticides as a novel preparation against gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) based on DNA fragments of the anti-apoptotic gene of its nuclear polyhedrosis virus. It was found that the external application of a solution with two single-stranded DNA fragments from BIR and RING domains of LdMNPV (L.dispar multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus) IAP-3 (inhibitor of apoptosis) gene induces a significantly higher mortality of gypsy moth caterpillars in comparison with the application of the control solutions. This effect does not depend on the infection of caterpillars with LdMNPV. The results also show that DNA insecticides based on LdMNPV IAP-3 gene fragments can be selective in action, and at least are not harmful to tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) and black cutworm (Agrotis ipsilon). Part of the gypsy moth genome cloned with the fragments of BIR and RING domains of LdMNPV IAP-3 gene as primers, has an overlap with the corresponding part of the LdMNPV IAP-3 gene and L.dispar IAP-1 mRNA for an inhibitor of apoptosis protein with the high cover by query, allows assuming that we cloned a part of gypsy moth anti-apoptosis gene. This finding gives the grounding that proposed here DNA insecticides might act through the blocking of the mechanisms involved in post transcriptional expression of insect anti-apoptosis genes. The results show the insecticidal potential of the viral genome fragments that can be used to create safe and relatively fast-acting DNA insecticides to control the quantity of gypsy moth populations, important task for forestry and agriculture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Jens; Schuler, Martin; Gauler, Thomas Christoph; Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Stefanie; Ahrens, Maike; Hoffmann, Andreas-Claudius; Kasper, Stefan; Nensa, Felix; Gomez, Benedikt; Hahnemann, Maria; Breitenbuecher, Frank; Cheufou, Danjouma; Özkan, Filiz; Darwiche, Kaid; Hoiczyk, Mathias; Reis, Henning; Welter, Stefan; Eberhardt, Wilfried Ernst Erich; Eisenacher, Martin; Teschler, Helmut; Stamatis, Georgios; Schmiegel, Wolff; Hahn, Stephan Albrecht; Baraniskin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Lung cancer accounts for one in five cancer deaths. Broad screening strategies for high-risk populations are unavailable, and the validation of biomarkers for early cancer detection remains a prime interest. Therefore, we investigated the value of circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments (RNU2-1f) as a biomarker for diagnosis, prognosis estimation and treatment monitoring in a large lung cancer cohort. We determined RNU2-1f abundance in sera of patients with treatment-naive lung cancer (n = 211, 25.6 % early stage), chronic lung disease (n = 56) and healthy controls (n = 58) by reverse transcription quantitative PCR. Initial levels and changes after one chemotherapy cycle were correlated with treatment outcomes in patient subsets. Relative serum RNU2-1f expression levels (REL) were elevated in lung cancer patients compared with patients with chronic lung disease and healthy controls (p < 0.0001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the complete data set (lung cancer vs. healthy) was 0.91 (95 % CI 0.87-0.95). By applying a REL of -4.505 as diagnostic cutoff (Youden's criterion), sensitivity and specificity reached 0.86 and 0.81, respectively. To determine the generalization error, in a subsampling study, sensitivity and specificity were estimated as 0.82 and 0.77 for the application to future, independent samples. High initial RNU2-1f REL were associated with shorter median survival in stage IIIB/IV disease (RNU2-1fhigh = 228 days/RNU2-1flow = 484 days; p = 0.009, log-rank test, HR1.43 95 % CI 1.23-1.66). Multivariate analysis confirmed RNU2-1f as an independent prognostic factor. Patients with subsequent RNU2-1f reduction had a trend toward better treatment outcome. Serum RNU2-1f may serve as a biomarker for lung cancer detection, prognosis prediction and treatment monitoring.

  5. Twist-3 T-odd fragmentation functions G⊥ and G˜⊥ in a spectator model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongliang; Lu, Zhun; Schmidt, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    We present a calculation of the twist-3 T-odd chiral-even fragmentation functions G⊥ and G˜⊥ using a spectator model. We consider the effect gluon exchange to calculate all necessary one-loop diagrams for the quark-quark and quark-gluon-quark correlation functions. We find that the gluon loops corrections generate non-zero contribution to these two fragmentation function. We numerically calculate their half-kT moments by integrating over the transverse momentum and also verify the equation of motion relation among G⊥, G˜⊥ and the Collins function.

  6. Excited State Contributions to the Heavy Baryon Fragmentation Functions in a Quark-Diquark Model

    CERN Document Server

    Adamov, A D; Goldstein, Gary R.

    2001-01-01

    Spin dependent fragmentation functions for heavy flavor quarks to fragment into heavy baryons are calculated in a quark-diquark model. The production of intermediate spin 1/2 and 3/2 excited states is explicity included. The resulting $\\Lambda_b$ production rate and polarization at LEP energies are in agreement with experiment. The $\\Lambda_c$ and $\\Xi_c$ functions are also obtained. The spin independent $f_1(z)$ is compared to data. The integrated values for production rates agree with the data.

  7. Study of system- size effects in multi- fragmentation using Quantum Molecular Dynamics model

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, J; Aichelin, Jörg; Singh, Jaivir; Puri, Rajeev K.

    2001-01-01

    We report, for the first time, the dependence of the multiplicity of different fragments on the system size employing a quantum molecular dynamics model. This dependence is extracted from the simulations of symmetric collisions of Ca+Ca, Ni+Ni, Nb+Nb, Xe+Xe, Er+Er, Au+Au and U+U at incident energies between 50 A MeV and 1 A GeV. We find that the multiplicity of different fragments scales with the size of the system which can be parameterized by a simple power law.

  8. Modeling the spatial distribution of fragments formed from tidally disrupted stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girma, Eden; Guillochon, James

    2017-01-01

    Roughly once every 104 years, a star passes close enough to the supermassive black hole Sgr A* at the center of the Milky Way to be pulled apart by the black hole’s tidal forces. The star is then ‘spaghettified’ into a long stream of mass, with approximately one half being bound to Sgr A* and the other half unbound. Hydrodynamical simulations of this process have revealed that within this stream, the local self-gravity dominates the tidal field of Sgr A*. This residual self-gravity allows for planetary-mass fragments to form along the stream that are then shot out into the galaxy at velocities determined by a spread of binding energies. We develop a Monte Carlo code in Python that models and plots the evolving position of these fragments for a variety of initial conditions that are likely realized in nature. This code utilizes an n-body integrator to differentially solve for the position, velocity, and acceleration of each fragment at every time step. We find that the while the most unbound fragments seem to escape the galaxy entirely, there could potentially be fragments travelling within a few hundred parsecs of our solar system.

  9. A comparative study of model ingredients: Fragmentation in heavy-ion collisions using quantum molecular dynamics model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanjeev Kumar; Suneel Kumar

    2010-05-01

    We aim to understand the role of NN cross-sections, equation of state as well as different model ingredients such as width of Gaussian, clusterization range and different clusterization algorithms in multifragmentation using quantum molecular dynamics model. We notice that all model ingredients have sizable effect on the fragment pattern.

  10. Nuclear isomerism in fission fragments produced by the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf; Isomerisme nucleaire dans les fragments de fission produits dans la fission spontanee du {sup 252}Cf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautherin, C

    1997-09-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of the nuclear structure of neutron-rich nuclei, via the search of isomeric nuclear states. Neutron-rich nuclei were produced in the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf. The experimental study of isomeric states in these nuclei was performed with the {gamma}-array EUROGAM II, coupled to an additional and original fission fragment detector composed by photovoltaic cells, SAPhIR. The photovoltaic cells are well adapted to detect low energy heavy ions and have good energy and time resolutions to obtain a good fission fragment detection. This experiment led to the discovery of new isomeric states in {sup 135}Xe, {sup 104}Mo, {sup 146,147,148}Ce and {sup 152,154,156}Nd, with lifetimes between 60 ns and 2 {mu}s. Level schemes of these nuclei have been completed. An interpretation of the isomeric states in the nuclei {sup 154,156}Nd and {sup 156,158}Sm was performed by Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov calculations using the DIS Gogny force with two quasi-particles excitations. The confrontation with the experimental results led to an interpretation of these isomeric states as K-isomers. (author)

  11. Thermochemical Fragment Energy Method for Biomolecules: Application to a Collagen Model Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Ernesto; Díaz, Natalia; Suárez, Dimas

    2009-06-09

    Herein, we first review different methodologies that have been proposed for computing the quantum mechanical (QM) energy and other molecular properties of large systems through a linear combination of subsystem (fragment) energies, which can be computed using conventional QM packages. Particularly, we emphasize the similarities among the different methods that can be considered as variants of the multibody expansion technique. Nevertheless, on the basis of thermochemical arguments, we propose yet another variant of the fragment energy methods, which could be useful for, and readily applicable to, biomolecules using either QM or hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics methods. The proposed computational scheme is applied to investigate the stability of a triple-helical collagen model peptide. To better address the actual applicability of the fragment QM method and to properly compare with experimental data, we compute average energies by carrying out single-point fragment QM calculations on structures generated by a classical molecular dynamics simulation. The QM calculations are done using a density functional level of theory combined with an implicit solvent model. Other free-energy terms such as attractive dispersion interactions or thermal contributions are included using molecular mechanics. The importance of correcting both the intermolecular and intramolecular basis set superposition error (BSSE) in the QM calculations is also discussed in detail. On the basis of the favorable comparison of our fragment-based energies with experimental data and former theoretical results, we conclude that the fragment QM energy strategy could be an interesting addition to the multimethod toolbox for biomolecular simulations in order to investigate those situations (e.g., interactions with metal clusters) that are beyond the range of applicability of common molecular mechanics methods.

  12. Modelling of nuclear power plant decommissioning financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemš, J; Knápek, J; Králík, T; Hejhal, M; Kubančák, J; Vašíček, J

    2015-06-01

    Costs related to the decommissioning of nuclear power plants create a significant financial burden for nuclear power plant operators. This article discusses the various methodologies employed by selected European countries for financing of the liabilities related to the nuclear power plant decommissioning. The article also presents methodology of allocation of future decommissioning costs to the running costs of nuclear power plant in the form of fee imposed on each megawatt hour generated. The application of the methodology is presented in the form of a case study on a new nuclear power plant with installed capacity 1000 MW.

  13. Modeling Fragment Simulating Projectile Penetration into Steel Plates Using Finite Elements and Meshfree Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O’Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulating fragment penetration into steel involves complicated modeling of severe behavior of the materials through multiple phases of response. Penetration of a fragment-like projectile was simulated using finite element (FE and meshfree particle formulations. Extreme deformation and failure of the material during the penetration event were modeled with several approaches to evaluate each as to how well it represents the actual physics of the material and structural response. A steel Fragment Simulating Projectile (FSP – designed to simulate a fragment of metal from a weapon casing – was simulated for normal impact into a flat square plate. A range of impact velocities was used to examine levels of exit velocity ranging from relatively small to one on the same level as the impact velocity. The numerical code EPIC, used for all the simulations presented herein, contains the element and particle formulations, as well as the explicit methodology and constitutive models needed to perform these simulations. These simulations were compared against experimental data, evaluating the damage caused to the projectile and the target plates, as well as comparing the residual velocity when the projectile perforated the target.

  14. Computer Generated Cardiac Model For Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, John F.; Miller, Tom R.

    1981-07-01

    A computer generated mathematical model of a thallium-201 myocardial image is described which is based on realistic geometric and physiological assumptions. The left ventricle is represented by an ellipsoid truncated by aortic and mitral valve planes. Initially, an image of a motionless left ventricle is calculated with the location, size, and relative activity of perfusion defects selected by the designer. The calculation includes corrections for photon attenuation by overlying structures and the relative distribution of activity within the tissues. Motion of the ventricular walls is simulated either by a weighted sum of images at different stages in the cardiac cycle or by a blurring function whose width varies with position. Camera and collimator blurring are estimated by the MTF of the system measured at a representative depth in a phantom. Statistical noise is added using a Poisson random number generator. The usefulness of this model is due to two factors: the a priori characterization of location and extent of perfusion defects and the strong visual similarity of the images to actual clinical studies. These properties should permit systematic evaluation of image processing algorithms using this model. The principles employed in developing this cardiac image model can readily be applied to the simulation of other nuclear medicine studies and to other medical imaging modalities including computed tomography, ultrasound, and digital radiography.

  15. Rocketdyne/Westinghouse nuclear thermal rocket engine modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: systems approach needed for nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) design optimization; generic NTR engine power balance codes; rocketdyne nuclear thermal system code; software capabilities; steady state model; NTR engine optimizer code-logic; reactor power calculation logic; sample multi-component configuration; NTR design code output; generic NTR code at Rocketdyne; Rocketdyne NTR model; and nuclear thermal rocket modeling directions.

  16. Experimental study of nuclear fragmentation of 200 and 400 MeV/u 12C ions in water for applications in particle therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haettner, E.; Iwase, H.; Krämer, M.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon ion beams in the energy range of about 100-450 MeV/u offer excellent conditions for tumour therapy, in particular for the treatment of deep-seated radio-resistant tumours. Their depth-dose distribution is characterized by a low dose in the entrance channel, small lateral beam spread and an elevated biological effectiveness in the Bragg peak region. In comparison to protons the radiation field of heavier ions stopping in tissue is however more complex due to nuclear fragmentation reactions occurring along their stopping path. This results in an attenuation of the primary beam flux and a build-up of lower-Z fragments with longer ranges causing the characteristic dose tail beyond the Bragg peak. In the present work the characteristics of secondary charged particles at various depths of water were investigated experimentally using 12C ion beams of 200 and 400 MeV/u delivered by the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS-18 at GSI Darmstadt. The nuclear charge Zf of secondary fragments was identified by combining energy loss and time-of-flight (TOF) measurements. Energy spectra and yields were recorded at lab angles of 0° - 10° and at seven different water depths corresponding to the entrance channel, the Bragg peak region and the tail of the Bragg curve.

  17. Experimental study of nuclear fragmentation of 200 and 400 MeV/u (12)C ions in water for applications in particle therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haettner, E; Iwase, H; Krämer, M; Kraft, G; Schardt, D

    2013-12-01

    Carbon ion beams in the energy range of about 100-450 MeV/u offer excellent conditions for tumour therapy, in particular for the treatment of deep-seated radio-resistant tumours. Their depth-dose distribution is characterized by a low dose in the entrance channel, small lateral beam spread and an elevated biological effectiveness in the Bragg peak region. In comparison to protons the radiation field of heavier ions stopping in tissue is however more complex due to nuclear fragmentation reactions occurring along their stopping path. This results in an attenuation of the primary beam flux and a build-up of lower-Z fragments with longer ranges causing the characteristic dose tail beyond the Bragg peak. In the present work the characteristics of secondary charged particles at various depths of water were investigated experimentally using (12)C ion beams of 200 and 400 MeV/u delivered by the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS-18 at GSI Darmstadt. The nuclear charge Zf of secondary fragments was identified by combining energy loss and time-of-flight (TOF) measurements. Energy spectra and yields were recorded at lab angles of 0° - 10° and at seven different water depths corresponding to the entrance channel, the Bragg peak region and the tail of the Bragg curve.

  18. Impacts of forest fragmentation on species richness: a hierarchical approach to community modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipkin, Elise F.; DeWan, Amielle; Royle, J. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    1. Species richness is often used as a tool for prioritizing conservation action. One method for predicting richness and other summaries of community structure is to develop species-specific models of occurrence probability based on habitat or landscape characteristics. However, this approach can be challenging for rare or elusive species for which survey data are often sparse. 2. Recent developments have allowed for improved inference about community structure based on species-specific models of occurrence probability, integrated within a hierarchical modelling framework. This framework offers advantages to inference about species richness over typical approaches by accounting for both species-level effects and the aggregated effects of landscape composition on a community as a whole, thus leading to increased precision in estimates of species richness by improving occupancy estimates for all species, including those that were observed infrequently. 3. We developed a hierarchical model to assess the community response of breeding birds in the Hudson River Valley, New York, to habitat fragmentation and analysed the model using a Bayesian approach. 4. The model was designed to estimate species-specific occurrence and the effects of fragment area and edge (as measured through the perimeter and the perimeter/area ratio, P/A), while accounting for imperfect detection of species. 5. We used the fitted model to make predictions of species richness within forest fragments of variable morphology. The model revealed that species richness of the observed bird community was maximized in small forest fragments with a high P/A. However, the number of forest interior species, a subset of the community with high conservation value, was maximized in large fragments with low P/A. 6. Synthesis and applications. Our results demonstrate the importance of understanding the responses of both individual, and groups of species, to environmental heterogeneity while illustrating the utility

  19. Modeling and experimental examination of water level effects on radon exhalation from fragmented uranium ore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yong-Jun; Dai, Xin-Tao; Ding, De-Xin; Zhao, Ya-Li

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a one-dimensional steady-state mathematical model of radon transport in fragmented uranium ore was established according to Fick's law and radon transfer theory in an air-water interface. The model was utilized to obtain an analytical solution for radon concentration in the air-water, two-phase system under steady state conditions, as well as a corresponding radon exhalation rate calculation formula. We also designed a one-dimensional experimental apparatus for simulating radon diffusion migration in the uranium ore with various water levels to verify the mathematical model. The predicted results were in close agreement with the measured results, suggesting that the proposed model can be readily used to determine radon concentrations and exhalation rates in fragmented uranium ore with varying water levels. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. An improved nuclear mass model: FRDM (2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Peter

    2011-10-01

    We have developed an improved nuclear mass model which we plan to finalize in 2012, so we designate it FRDM(2012). Relative to our previous mass table in 1995 we do a full four-dimensional variation of the shape coordinates EPS2, EPS3, EPS4, and EPS6, we consider axial asymmetric shape degrees of freedom and we vary the density symmetry parameter L. Other additional features are also implemented. With respect to the Audi 2003 data base we now have an accuracy of 0.57 MeV. We have carefully tested the extrapolation properties of the new mass table by adjusting model parameters to limited data sets and testing on extended data sets and find it is highly reliable in new regions of nuclei. We discuss what the remaining differences between model calculations and experiment tell us about the limitations of the currently used effective single-particle potential and possible extensions. DOE No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  1. Systematic study of the fragmentation of low-lying dipole strength in odd-{ital A} rare earth nuclei investigated in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nord, A.; Schiller, A.; Eckert, T.; Beck, O.; Besserer, J.; von Brentano, P.; Fischer, R.; Herzberg, R.; Jaeger, D.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Maser, H.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H.H.; Rittner, M.; Zilges, A. [Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, Universitaet Stuttgart, Allmandring 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)]|[Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments were performed on the rare earth nuclei {sup 155}Gd and {sup 159}Tb to study the fragmentation of the {ital M}1 {ital scissors} {ital mode} in {ital odd} deformed nuclei and to establish a kind of systematics. Using the bremsstrahlung photon beam of the Stuttgart Dynamitron (end point energy 4.1 MeV) and high resolution Ge-{gamma} spectrometers detailed information was obtained on excitation energies, decay widths, transition probabilities, and branching ratios. The results are compared to those observed recently for the neighboring odd nuclei {sup 161,163}Dy and {sup 157}Gd. Whereas in the odd Dy isotopes the dipole strength is rather concentrated, both Gd isotopes show a strong fragmentation of the strength into about 25 ({sup 155}Gd) and 90 transitions ({sup 157}Gd) in the energy range 2{endash}4 MeV. The nucleus {sup 159}Tb linking the odd Dy and Gd isotopes exhibits an intermediate strength fragmentation. In general the observed total strength in the odd nuclei is reduced by a factor of 2{endash}3 as compared to their neighboring even-even isotopes. The different fragmentation behavior of the dipole strengths in the odd Dy and Gd isotopes is unexplained up to now. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Systematic study of the fragmentation of low-lying dipole strength in odd-A rare earth nuclei investigated in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, A.; Schiller, A.; Eckert, T.; Beck, O.; Besserer, J.; von Brentano, P.; Fischer, R.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Jäger, D.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Maser, H.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.; Rittner, M.; Zilges, A.

    1996-11-01

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments were performed on the rare earth nuclei 155Gd and 159Tb to study the fragmentation of the M1 scissors mode in odd deformed nuclei and to establish a kind of systematics. Using the bremsstrahlung photon beam of the Stuttgart Dynamitron (end point energy 4.1 MeV) and high resolution Ge-γ spectrometers detailed information was obtained on excitation energies, decay widths, transition probabilities, and branching ratios. The results are compared to those observed recently for the neighboring odd nuclei 161,163Dy and 157Gd. Whereas in the odd Dy isotopes the dipole strength is rather concentrated, both Gd isotopes show a strong fragmentation of the strength into about 25 (155Gd) and 90 transitions (157Gd) in the energy range 2-4 MeV. The nucleus 159Tb linking the odd Dy and Gd isotopes exhibits an intermediate strength fragmentation. In general the observed total strength in the odd nuclei is reduced by a factor of 2-3 as compared to their neighboring even-even isotopes. The different fragmentation behavior of the dipole strengths in the odd Dy and Gd isotopes is unexplained up to now.

  3. Autologous cartilage fragments in a composite scaffold for one stage osteochondral repair in a goat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Marmotti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a culture-free approach to osteochondral repair with minced autologous cartilage fragments loaded onto a scaffold composed of a hyaluronic acid (HA-derived membrane, platelet-rich fibrin matrix (PRFM and fibrin glue. The aim of the study was to demonstrate in vitro the outgrowth of chondrocytes from cartilage fragments onto this scaffold and, in vivo, the formation of functional repair tissue in goat osteochondral defects. Two sections were considered: 1 in vitro: minced articular cartilage from goat stifle joints was loaded onto scaffolds, cultured for 1 or 2 months, and then evaluated histologically and immunohistochemically; 2 in vivo: 2 unilateral critically-sized trochlear osteochondral defects were created in 15 adult goats; defects were treated with cartilage fragments embedded in the scaffold (Group 1, with the scaffold alone (Group 2, or untreated (Group 3. Repair processes were evaluated morphologically, histologically, immunohistochemically and biomechanically at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. We found that in vitro, chondrocytes from cartilage fragments migrated to the scaffold and, at 2 months, matrix positive for collagen type II was observed in the constructs. In vivo, morphological and histological assessment demonstrated that cartilage fragment-loaded scaffolds led to the formation of functional hyaline-like repair tissue. Repair in Group 1 was superior to that of control groups, both histologically and mechanically. Autologous cartilage fragments loaded onto an HA/PRFM/fibrin glue scaffold provided a viable cell source and allowed for an improvement of the repair process of osteochondral defects in a goat model, representing an effective alternative for one-stage repair of osteochondral lesions.

  4. Physics-Based Fragment Acceleration Modeling for Pressurized Tank Burst Risk Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Ted A.; Lawrence, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    As part of comprehensive efforts to develop physics-based risk assessment techniques for space systems at NASA, coupled computational fluid and rigid body dynamic simulations were carried out to investigate the flow mechanisms that accelerate tank fragments in bursting pressurized vessels. Simulations of several configurations were compared to analyses based on the industry-standard Baker explosion model, and were used to formulate an improved version of the model. The standard model, which neglects an external fluid, was found to agree best with simulation results only in configurations where the internal-to-external pressure ratio is very high and fragment curvature is small. The improved model introduces terms that accommodate an external fluid and better account for variations based on circumferential fragment count. Physics-based analysis was critical in increasing the model's range of applicability. The improved tank burst model can be used to produce more accurate risk assessments of space vehicle failure modes that involve high-speed debris, such as exploding propellant tanks and bursting rocket engines.

  5. A fragment-cloud model for asteroid breakup and atmospheric energy deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Lorien F.; Register, Paul J.; Mathias, Donovan L.

    2017-10-01

    As asteroids break up during atmospheric entry, they deposit energy that can be seen in flares of light and, if substantial enough, can produce damaging blast waves. Analytic models of asteroid breakup and energy deposition processes are needed in order to assess potential airburst hazards, and to enable inferences about asteroid properties or breakup physics to be made from comparisons with observed meteors. This paper presents a fragment-cloud model (FCM) that is able to represent a broad range of breakup behaviors and the resulting variations in energy deposition in ways that make it a useful tool for both applications. Sensitivity studies are performed to investigate how variations the model's fragmentation parameters affect the energy deposition results for asteroids 20-500 m in diameter. The model is also used to match observational data from the Chelyabinsk meteor and infer potential asteroid properties and representative modeling parameter ranges. Results illustrate how the model's fragmentation parameters can introduce different energy deposition features, and how much they affect the overall energy deposition rates, magnitudes, and altitudes that would drive ground damage for risk assessment applications.

  6. Spallation Fragment Investigation on Nb, Au and Pb by Using Many Stage Dynamical Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The formation cross section of the nuclides production of proton-induced nuclear reactions withintermediate energy is of importance for a variety of applications. For instance, the mass and chargedistribution of residual products produced in the spallation reactions needs to be studied, because it canprovide useful information for the disposal of nuclear waste and residual radioactivity generated by thespallation neutron target system. At present work, we developed the many stage dynamical model

  7. Process and data fragmentation-oriented enterprise network integration with collaboration modelling and collaboration agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Wang, Ze-yuan; Cao, Zhi-chao; Du, Rui-yang; Luo, Hao

    2015-08-01

    With the process of globalisation and the development of management models and information technology, enterprise cooperation and collaboration has developed from intra-enterprise integration, outsourcing and inter-enterprise integration, and supply chain management, to virtual enterprises and enterprise networks. Some midfielder enterprises begin to serve for different supply chains. Therefore, they combine related supply chains into a complex enterprise network. The main challenges for enterprise network's integration and collaboration are business process and data fragmentation beyond organisational boundaries. This paper reviews the requirements of enterprise network's integration and collaboration, as well as the development of new information technologies. Based on service-oriented architecture (SOA), collaboration modelling and collaboration agents are introduced to solve problems of collaborative management for service convergence under the condition of process and data fragmentation. A model-driven methodology is developed to design and deploy the integrating framework. An industrial experiment is designed and implemented to illustrate the usage of developed technologies in this paper.

  8. Modeling fragmentation with new high order finite element technology and node splitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olovsson Lars

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of fragmentation has historically been linked to the weapons industry where the main goal is to optimize a bomb or to design effective blast shields. Numerical modeling of fragmentation from dynamic loading has traditionally been modeled by legacy finite element solvers that rely on element erosion to model material failure. However this method results in the removal of too much material. This is not realistic as retaining the mass of the structure is critical to modeling the event correctly. We propose a new approach implemented in the IMPETUS AFEA SOLVER® based on the following: New High Order Finite Elements that can easily deal with very large deformations; Stochastic distribution of initial damage that allows for a non homogeneous distribution of fragments; and a Node Splitting Algorithm that allows for material fracture without element erosion that is mesh independent. The approach is evaluated for various materials and scenarios: -Titanium ring electromagnetic compression; Hard steel Taylor bar impact, Fused silica Taylor bar impact, Steel cylinder explosion, The results obtained from the simulations are representative of the failure mechanisms observed experimentally. The main benefit of this approach is good energy conservation (no loss of mass and numerical robustness even in complex situations.

  9. SPY: a new scission-point model based on microscopic inputs to predict fission fragment properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panebianco, Stefano; Lemaître, Jean-Francois; Sida, Jean-Luc [CEA Centre de Saclay, Gif-sur-Ivette (France); Dubray, Noëel [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Goriely, Stephane [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophisique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    Despite the difficulty in describing the whole fission dynamics, the main fragment characteristics can be determined in a static approach based on a so-called scission-point model. Within this framework, a new Scission-Point model for the calculations of fission fragment Yields (SPY) has been developed. This model, initially based on the approach developed by Wilkins in the late seventies, consists in performing a static energy balance at scission, where the two fragments are supposed to be completely separated so that their macroscopic properties (mass and charge) can be considered as fixed. Given the knowledge of the system state density, averaged quantities such as mass and charge yields, mean kinetic and excitation energy can then be extracted in the framework of a microcanonical statistical description. The main advantage of the SPY model is the introduction of one of the most up-to-date microscopic descriptions of the nucleus for the individual energy of each fragment and, in the future, for their state density. These quantities are obtained in the framework of HFB calculations using the Gogny nucleon-nucleon interaction, ensuring an overall coherence of the model. Starting from a description of the SPY model and its main features, a comparison between the SPY predictions and experimental data will be discussed for some specific cases, from light nuclei around mercury to major actinides. Moreover, extensive predictions over the whole chart of nuclides will be discussed, with particular attention to their implication in stellar nucleosynthesis. Finally, future developments, mainly concerning the introduction of microscopic state densities, will be briefly discussed. (author)

  10. SPY: a new scission-point model based on microscopic inputs to predict fission fragment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Stefano; Dubray, Nöel; Goriely, Stéphane; Hilaire, Stéphane; Lemaître, Jean-François; Sida, Jean-Luc

    2014-04-01

    Despite the difficulty in describing the whole fission dynamics, the main fragment characteristics can be determined in a static approach based on a so-called scission-point model. Within this framework, a new Scission-Point model for the calculations of fission fragment Yields (SPY) has been developed. This model, initially based on the approach developed by Wilkins in the late seventies, consists in performing a static energy balance at scission, where the two fragments are supposed to be completely separated so that their macroscopic properties (mass and charge) can be considered as fixed. Given the knowledge of the system state density, averaged quantities such as mass and charge yields, mean kinetic and excitation energy can then be extracted in the framework of a microcanonical statistical description. The main advantage of the SPY model is the introduction of one of the most up-to-date microscopic descriptions of the nucleus for the individual energy of each fragment and, in the future, for their state density. These quantities are obtained in the framework of HFB calculations using the Gogny nucleon-nucleon interaction, ensuring an overall coherence of the model. Starting from a description of the SPY model and its main features, a comparison between the SPY predictions and experimental data will be discussed for some specific cases, from light nuclei around mercury to major actinides. Moreover, extensive predictions over the whole chart of nuclides will be discussed, with particular attention to their implication in stellar nucleosynthesis. Finally, future developments, mainly concerning the introduction of microscopic state densities, will be briefly discussed.

  11. SPY: a new scission-point model based on microscopic inputs to predict fission fragment properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panebianco Stefano

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the difficulty in describing the whole fission dynamics, the main fragment characteristics can be determined in a static approach based on a so-called scission-point model. Within this framework, a new Scission-Point model for the calculations of fission fragment Yields (SPY has been developed. This model, initially based on the approach developed by Wilkins in the late seventies, consists in performing a static energy balance at scission, where the two fragments are supposed to be completely separated so that their macroscopic properties (mass and charge can be considered as fixed. Given the knowledge of the system state density, averaged quantities such as mass and charge yields, mean kinetic and excitation energy can then be extracted in the framework of a microcanonical statistical description. The main advantage of the SPY model is the introduction of one of the most up-to-date microscopic descriptions of the nucleus for the individual energy of each fragment and, in the future, for their state density. These quantities are obtained in the framework of HFB calculations using the Gogny nucleon-nucleon interaction, ensuring an overall coherence of the model. Starting from a description of the SPY model and its main features, a comparison between the SPY predictions and experimental data will be discussed for some specific cases, from light nuclei around mercury to major actinides. Moreover, extensive predictions over the whole chart of nuclides will be discussed, with particular attention to their implication in stellar nucleosynthesis. Finally, future developments, mainly concerning the introduction of microscopic state densities, will be briefly discussed.

  12. [Studies of target fragmentation in intermediate energy, relativistic and ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions]. Nuclear chemistry progress report, August 1, 1990--August 1, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loveland, W.D.

    1991-08-01

    The work described herein is part of a project involving the study of low energy (< 10 MeV/A), intermediate energy (10--100 MeV/A) and relativistic (> 250 MeV/A) heavy ion reactions. In the low energy regime, we published a monograph on the properties of the heaviest elements and used that publication as a basis for making a set of ``best`` semi-empirical predictions of heavy element decay properties. The intermediate energy research effort focussed upon the completion of studies already begun and the initiation of a number of new experiments. In our study of a interaction of 21 MeV/nucleon {sup 129}Xe with {sup 197}Au, we compared the characteristics of the observed deep inelastic phenomena with various models of dissipative reactions and found significant discrepancies between observations and predictions. These discrepancies seemed to be caused by an improper treatment of pre-equilibrium in the early stages of the collision. In our study of the relativistic interaction of 400 MeV/nucleon {sup 12}C with {sup 197}Au, we reported the first direct physical measurement of the properties of the spallation residues from a nucleus-nucleus collision. We found the residue energies to be much lower than those predicted by the intranuclear cascade model, indicating some substantial modifications of that model are needed. But, we also found, indications of significant, non-zero values of the residue transverse momentum, a finding that calls into question the interpretation of a number of radiochemical recoil studies of the kinematics of high energy reactions. A program of performing numerical simulations of intermediate and high energy nuclear collisions using the QMD model was initiated.

  13. Benchmarking geant4 nuclear models for hadron therapy with 95 MeV/nucleon carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudouet, J.; Cussol, D.; Durand, D.; Labalme, M.

    2014-05-01

    In carbon therapy, the interaction of the incoming beam with human tissue may lead to the production of a large amount of nuclear fragments and secondary light particles. An accurate estimation of the biological dose on the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissue thus requires sophisticated simulation tools based on nuclear reaction models. The validity of such models requires intensive comparisons with as many sets of experimental data as possible. Up to now, a rather limited set of double differential carbon fragmentation cross sections has been measured in the energy range used in hadron therapy (up to 400 MeV/nucleon). However, new data have been recently obtained at intermediate energy (95 MeV/nucleon). The aim of this work is to compare the reaction models embedded in the geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit with these new data. The strengths and weaknesses of each tested model, i.e., G4BinaryLightIonReaction, G4QMDReaction, and INCL++, coupled to two different de-excitation models, i.e., the generalized evaporation model and the Fermi break-up model, are discussed.

  14. Automated Fragmentation Polarizable Embedding Density Functional Theory (PE-DFT) Calculations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Shielding Constants of Proteins with Application to Chemical Shift Predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Bratholm, L.A.; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard

    2017-01-01

    Full-protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants based on ab initio calculations are desirable, because they can assist in elucidating protein structures from NMR experiments. In this work, we present NMR shielding constants computed using a new automated fragmentation (J. Phys. ...... can obtain a representative subset of snapshots that gives the smallest predicted error, compared to experiment. Finally, we use this subset of snapshots to calculate the NMR shielding constants at the PE-KT3/pcSseg-2 level of theory for all atoms in the protein GB3....

  15. Neutrinoless Double Beta Nuclear Matrix Elements Around Mass 80 in the Nuclear Shell Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Naotaka; Higashiyama, Koji; Taguchi, Daisuke; Teruya, Eri

    The observation of the neutrinoless double-beta decay can determine whether the neutrino is a Majorana particle or not. In its theoretical nuclear side it is particularly important to estimate three types of nuclear matrix elements, namely, Fermi (F), Gamow-Teller (GT), and tensor (T) types matrix elements. The shell model calculations and also the pair-truncated shell model calculations are carried out to check the model dependence on nuclear matrix elements. In this work the neutrinoless double-beta decay for mass A = 82 nuclei is studied. It is found that the matrix elements are quite sensitive to the ground state wavefunctions.

  16. Nuclear chemistry model of borated fuel crud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawicki, J.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    Fuel crud deposits on Callaway Cycle 9 once-burnt high-axial offset anomaly (AOA {approx} -15%) feed assemblies revealed a complex 4-phase matted-layered morphology of a new type that is uncommon in pressurized water reactors [1-3]. The up to 140-{open_square}m-thick crud flakes consisted predominantly of insoluble needle-like particles of Ni-Fe oxy-borate Ni{sub 2}FeBO{sub 5} (bonaccordite) and granular precipitates of m-ZrO{sub 2} (baddeleyite), along with nickel oxide NiO (bunsenite) and minor amount of nickel ferrite NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (trevorite). Furthermore, boron in crud flakes showed that the concentration of {sup 10}B had depleted to 10.2{+-}0.2%, as compared to its 20% natural isotopic abundance and its 17% end-of-cycle abundance in bulk coolant. The form and depth distribution of Ni{sub 2}FeBO{sub 5} and m-ZrO{sub 2} precipitates, as well as substantial {sup 10}B burn-up, point to a strongly alkaline environment at the clad surface of the high-duty fuel rods. This paper extends a nuclear chemistry model of heavily borated fuel crud deposits. The paper shows that the local nuclear heat and lithium buildup from {sup 10}B(n,{open_square}){sup 7}Li reactions may help to create hydrothermal and chemical conditions within the crud layer in favor of Ni{sub 2}FeBO{sub 5} formation and a ZrO{sub 2} dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. Consistent with the model, the hydrothermal formation of Ni{sub 2}FeBO{sub 5} needles was recently proved to be possible in laboratory tests with aqueous NiO-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}-LiOH slurries, at temperatures only slightly exceeding 400 C. (author)

  17. A model of dust fragmentation in near-nucleus jet-like features on Comet P/Halley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Ichishiro; Huebner, W. F.; Boice, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    A model for dusty gas flows and dust fragmentation in cometary atmospheres is developed and applied to interpret the dust intensity profiles near the nucleus of Comet P/Halley. It is found that fragmentation is not the only physical mechanism for explaining the dust intensity profiles from the 1/z dependence in the region about 1 to 40 km from the nucleus. A combination of the geometric effect and dust fragmentation is a likely explanation for the profiles.

  18. A study of detonation timing and fragmentation using 3-D finite element techniques and a damage constitutive model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preece, D.S.; Thorne, B.J.

    1996-03-01

    The transient dynamics finite element computer program, PRONTO-3D, has been used in conjunction with a damage constitutive model to study the influence of detonation timing on rock fragmentation during blasting. The primary motivation of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of precise detonators in improving fragmentation. PRONTO-3D simulations show that a delay time of 0.0 sec between adjacent blastholes results in significantly more fragmentation than a 0.5 ms delay.

  19. Nuclear reaction modeling, verification experiments, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, F.S.

    1995-10-01

    This presentation summarized the recent accomplishments and future promise of the neutron nuclear physics program at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scatter Center (MLNSC) and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility. The unique capabilities of the spallation sources enable a broad range of experiments in weapons-related physics, basic science, nuclear technology, industrial applications, and medical physics.

  20. Sperm nuclear DNA fragmentation rate is associated with differential protein expression and enriched functions in human seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intasqui, Paula; Camargo, Mariana; Del Giudice, Paula T; Spaine, Deborah M; Carvalho, Valdemir M; Cardozo, Karina H M; Zylbersztejn, Daniel S; Bertolla, Ricardo P

    2013-10-01

    To analyse the proteomic profile of seminal plasma with the aim of identifying the proteins and post-genomic pathways associated with sperm DNA fragmentation. A cross-sectional study including 89 subjects from a human reproduction service was carried out. All semen samples were assessed for sperm DNA fragmentation using a comet assay. Results from 60 sperm were analysed using Komet 6.0.1 software and the 'Olive tail moment' variable was used to stratify these into low and high sperm DNA fragmentation groups. Seminal plasma proteins from the two groups were pooled and used for proteomic analysis. Quantitative data were used for functional enrichment studies. Seventy-two proteins were identified or quantified in seminal plasma. Of these, nine were differentially expressed in the low group and 21 in the high group. Forty-two proteins were conserved between these groups. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that sperm DNA fragmentation was related to functions such as lipoprotein particle remodelling and regulation, fatty acid binding and immune response. Proteins found exclusively in the low group may be involved in correcting spermatogenesis and/or improving sperm function. Proteins in the high group were associated with increased innate immune response, sperm motility and/or maturation and inhibition of mitochondrial apoptosis. Protein expression and post-genomic pathways of seminal plasma differ according to the rate of sperm DNA integrity. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  1. Bulk plasma fragmentation in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma: A hybrid modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shu-Xia; Zhang, Yu-Ru; Gao, Fei; Wang, You-Nian; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2015-06-01

    A hybrid model is used to investigate the fragmentation of C4F8 inductive discharges. Indeed, the resulting reactive species are crucial for the optimization of the Si-based etching process, since they determine the mechanisms of fluorination, polymerization, and sputtering. In this paper, we present the dissociation degree, the density ratio of F vs. CxFy (i.e., fluorocarbon (fc) neutrals), the neutral vs. positive ion density ratio, details on the neutral and ion components, and fractions of various fc neutrals (or ions) in the total fc neutral (or ion) density in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma source, as well as the effect of pressure and power on these results. To analyze the fragmentation behavior, the electron density and temperature and electron energy probability function (EEPF) are investigated. Moreover, the main electron-impact generation sources for all considered neutrals and ions are determined from the complicated C4F8 reaction set used in the model. The C4F8 plasma fragmentation is explained, taking into account many factors, such as the EEPF characteristics, the dominance of primary and secondary processes, and the thresholds of dissociation and ionization. The simulation results are compared with experiments from literature, and reasonable agreement is obtained. Some discrepancies are observed, which can probably be attributed to the simplified polymer surface kinetics assumed in the model.

  2. Fragmentation functions of pions and kaons in the nonlocal chiral quark model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kao Chung Wen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the unpolarized pion and kaon fragmentation functions using the nonlocal chiral-quark model. In this model the interactions between the quarks and pseudoscalar mesons is manifested nonlocally. In addition, the explicit flavor SU(3 symmetry breaking effect is taken into account in terms of the current quark masses. The results of our model are evaluated to higher Q2 value Q2 = 4 GeV2 by the DGLAP evolution. Then we compare them with the empirical parametrizations. We find that our results are in relatively good agreement with the empirical parametrizations and the other theoretical estimations.

  3. TDH solution of the Suzuki model of nuclear monopole oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalski, J.

    1987-09-01

    The exact time-dependent Hartree solution of the schematic model describing nuclear monopole oscillation — the Suzuki model — is presented. The energies of vibrational states are quantized according to the gauge-invariant periodic quantization prescription.

  4. Non-functional plastid ndh gene fragments are present in the nuclear genome of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karsch): insights from in silico analysis of nuclear and organellar genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranade, Sonali Sachin; García-Gil, María Rosario; Rosselló, Josep A

    2016-04-01

    Many genes have been lost from the prokaryote plastidial genome during the early events of endosymbiosis in eukaryotes. Some of them were definitively lost, but others were relocated and functionally integrated to the host nuclear genomes through serial events of gene transfer during plant evolution. In gymnosperms, plastid genome sequencing has revealed the loss of ndh genes from several species of Gnetales and Pinaceae, including Norway spruce (Picea abies). This study aims to trace the ndh genes in the nuclear and organellar Norway spruce genomes. The plastid genomes of higher plants contain 11 ndh genes which are homologues of mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of the proton-pumping NADH-dehydrogenase (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase) or complex I (electron transport chain). Ndh genes encode 11 NDH polypeptides forming the Ndh complex (analogous to complex I) which seems to be primarily involved in chloro-respiration processes. We considered ndh genes from the plastidial genome of four gymnosperms (Cryptomeria japonica, Cycas revoluta, Ginkgo biloba, Podocarpus totara) and a single angiosperm species (Arabidopsis thaliana) to trace putative homologs in the nuclear and organellar Norway spruce genomes using tBLASTn to assess the evolutionary fate of ndh genes in Norway spruce and to address their genomic location(s), structure, integrity and functionality. The results obtained from tBLASTn were subsequently analyzed by performing homology search for finding ndh specific conserved domains using conserved domain search. We report the presence of non-functional plastid ndh gene fragments, excepting ndhE and ndhG genes, in the nuclear genome of Norway spruce. Regulatory transcriptional elements like promoters, TATA boxes and enhancers were detected in the upstream regions of some ndh fragments. We also found transposable elements in the flanking regions of few ndh fragments suggesting nuclear rearrangements in those regions. These evidences

  5. Geant4 models for simulation of hadron/ion nuclear interactions at moderate and low energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivantchenko, Anton; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Quesada, Jose-Manuel; Wright, Dennis

    The Geant4 toolkit is intended for Monte Carlo simulation of particle transport in media. It was initially designed for High Energy Physics purposes such as experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The toolkit offers a set of models allowing effective simulation of cosmic ray interactions with different materials. For moderate and low energy hadron/ion interactions with nuclei there are a number of competitive models: Binary and Bertini intra-nuclear cascade models, quantum molecular dynamic model (QMD), INCL/ABLA cascade model, and Chiral Invariant Phase Space Decay model (CHIPS). We report the status of these models for the recent version of Geant4 (release 9.3, December 2009). The Bertini cascade in-ternal cross sections were upgraded. The native Geant4 precompound and deexcitation models were used in the Binary cascade and QMD. They were significantly improved including emis-sion of light fragments, the Fermi break-up model, the General Evaporation Model (GEM), the multi-fragmentation model, and the fission model. Comparisons between model predictions and data for thin target experiments for neutron, proton, light ions, and isotope production are presented and discussed. The focus of these validations is concentrated on target materials important for space missions.

  6. Modeling fabrication of nuclear components: An integrative approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hench, K.W.

    1996-08-01

    Reduction of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the general downsizing of the nuclear weapons complex has presented challenges for Los Alamos. One is to design an optimized fabrication facility to manufacture nuclear weapon primary components in an environment of intense regulation and shrinking budgets. This dissertation presents an integrative two-stage approach to modeling the casting operation for fabrication of nuclear weapon primary components. The first stage optimizes personnel radiation exposure for the casting operation layout by modeling the operation as a facility layout problem formulated as a quadratic assignment problem. The solution procedure uses an evolutionary heuristic technique. The best solutions to the layout problem are used as input to the second stage - a simulation model that assesses the impact of competing layouts on operational performance. The focus of the simulation model is to determine the layout that minimizes personnel radiation exposures and nuclear material movement, and maximizes the utilization of capacity for finished units.

  7. Spanish Electric Sector Nuclear R and D Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casero, M.; Francia, L.

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents the R and D model that, based on the experience gained and lessons learned in nearly forty years of nuclear power use in Spain, is Promoted by the Spanish Electricity Sector for the nuclear R and D activities it develops in a coordinated manner in the frame of the Nuclear Energy Committee of the Association Espanola de la Industria Electrica (UNESA). (Author)

  8. Statistical models for nuclear decay from evaporation to vaporization

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, A J

    2000-01-01

    Elements of equilibrium statistical mechanics: Introduction. Microstates and macrostates. Sub-systems and convolution. The Boltzmann distribution. Statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. The grand canonical ensemble. Equations of state for ideal and real gases. Pseudo-equilibrium. Statistical models of nuclear decay. Nuclear physics background: Introduction. Elements of the theory of nuclear reactions. Quantum mechanical description of scattering from a potential. Decay rates and widths. Level and state densities in atomic nuclei. Angular momentum in quantum mechanics. History of statistical

  9. Benchmarking GEANT4 nuclear models for carbon-therapy at 95 MeV/A

    CERN Document Server

    Dudouet, J; Durand, D; Labalme, M

    2013-01-01

    In carbon-therapy, the interaction of the incoming beam with human tissues may lead to the production of a large amount of nuclear fragments and secondary light particles. An accurate estimation of the biological dose deposited into the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissues thus requires sophisticated simulation tools based on nuclear reaction models. The validity of such models requires intensive comparisons with as many sets of experimental data as possible. Up to now, a rather limited set of double di erential carbon fragmentation cross sections have been measured in the energy range used in hadrontherapy (up to 400 MeV/A). However, new data have been recently obtained at intermediate energy (95 MeV/A). The aim of this work is to compare the reaction models embedded in the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit with these new data. The strengths and weaknesses of each tested model, i.e. G4BinaryLightIonReaction, G4QMDReaction and INCL++, coupled to two di fferent de-excitation models, i.e. the generalized evaporat...

  10. Production of a fluorescence probe in ion-beam radiolysis of aqueous coumarin-3-carboxylic acid solution-2: Effects of nuclear fragmentation and its simulation with PHITS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeyama, Takuya [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Yamashita, Shinichi; Taguchi, Mitsumasa [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Baldacchino, Gerard [CEA Saclay, IRAMIS, UMR 3299 CEA-CNRS SIS2M, Laboratoire de Radiolyse, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Sihver, Lembit [Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, TX 77843-3133 (United States); Department of Roanoke College, Salem, VA 24153 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Murakami, Takeshi [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Katsumura, Yosuke, E-mail: katsu@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    The G(OH) values in aqueous coumarin-3-carboxylic-acid (3-CCA) solutions irradiated with {sup 12}C{sup 6+} beams having the energies of 135, 290 and 400 MeV/u were measured by a fluorescent method around the Bragg peak, with 0.6 mm intervals, and quartz cells of 1 cm optical lengths, at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). For each ion, the G(OH) has been calculated as a function of dose average LET and position. The calculated results have been compared to measurements, and the results, reproducibility and reliability of the calculations are discussed in the paper. - Highlights: > Therapeutic ion beam has energy of several hundred MeV/u because it is necessary for a few tens cm range. > With such high energy, nuclear fragmentations of carbon ions occur resulting in production of lighter ions. > In this study, OH yield in water radiolysis near the Bragg peak of therapeutic ion beams was measured. > Measured yields are discussed considering nuclear fragmentation by PHITS code.

  11. Building virtual 3D bone fragment models to control diaphyseal fracture reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leloup, Thierry; Schuind, Frederic; Lasudry, Nadine; Van Ham, Philippe

    1999-05-01

    Most fractures of the long bones are displaced and need to be surgically reduced. External fixation is often used but the crucial point of this technique is the control of reduction, which is effected with a brilliance amplifier. This system, giving instantly a x-ray image, has many disadvantages. It implies frequent irradiation to the patient and the surgical team, the visual field is limited, the supplied images are distorted and it only gives 2D information. Consequently, the reduction is occasionally imperfect although intraoperatively it appears acceptable. Using the pains inserted in each fragment as markers and an optical tracker, it is possible to build a virtual 3D model for each principal fragment and to follow its movement during the reduction. This system will supply a 3D image of the fracture in real time and without irradiation. The brilliance amplifier could then be replaced by such a virtual reality system to provide the surgeon with an accurate tool facilitating the reduction of the fracture. The purpose of this work is to show how to build the 3D model for each principal bone fragment.

  12. Multi-Orbital Molecular Compound (TTM-TTP)I3: Effective Model and Fragment Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiizu, Masahisa; Omori, Yukiko; Suzumura, Yoshikazu; Bonnet, Marie-Laure; Robert, Vincent; Ishibashi, Shoji; Seo, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structure of the molecular compound (TTM-TTP)I3, which exhibits a peculiar intra-molecular charge ordering, has been studied using multi-configuration ab initio calculations. First we derive an effective Hubbard-type model based on the molecular orbitals (MOs) of TTM-TTP; we set up a two-orbital Hamiltonian for the two MOs near the Fermi energy and determine its full parameters: the transfer integrals, the Coulomb and exchange interactions. The tight-binding band structure obtained from these transfer integrals is consistent with the result of the direct band calculation based on density functional theory. Then, by decomposing the frontier MOs into two parts, i.e., fragments, we find that the stacked TTM-TTP molecules can be described by a two-leg ladder model, while the inter-fragment Coulomb energies are scaled to the inverse of their distances. This result indicates that the fragment picture that we proposed earlier [M.-L. Bonnet et al.: J. Chem. Phys. 132 (2010) 214705] successfully describes the low-energy properties of this compound.

  13. Molecular modeling of sialyloligosaccharide fragments into the active site of influenza virus N9 neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veluraja, K; Suresh, M X; Christlet, T H; Rafi, Z A

    2001-08-01

    Molecular modeling studies have been carried out to investigate the interactions between substrate sialyloligosaccharide (SOS) fragments bearing different glycosidic linkages and influenza virus N9 neuraminidase, a surface glycoprotein of influenza virus subtype N9. The studies revealed that the allowed orientation for sialic acid (SA) is less than 1% in the Eulerian space at the active site. The active site of this enzyme has enough space to accommodate various SOS fragments, NeuNAcalpha(2-3)Gal, NeuNAcalpha(2-6)Gal, NeuNAcalpha(2-8)NeuNAc and NeuNAcalpha(2-9)NeuNAc, but on specific conformations. In the bound conformation, among these substrates there exists a conformational similarity leading to a structural similarity, which may be an essential requirement for the cleavage activity of the neuraminidases irrespective of the type of glycosidic linkage.

  14. A Discrete Element Model of Armor Glass Fragmentation and Comminution Failure Under Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wei [Advanced Computing, Mathematics, and Data Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99354; Sun, Xin [Advanced Computing, Mathematics, and Data Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99354

    2016-02-15

    Because of its exceptional compressive resistance and crystal-clear appearance, lightweight glass has been traditionally used in transparent armor applications. However, due to its brittle nature, glass fails differently from ductile materials in the sense that glass fragmentation occurs instantly ahead of the projectile tip upon penetration. The effective residual strength of the armor glass then inevitably relies on the damaged glass strength within such comminuted zones with confinement from the surrounding intact materials. Physical understanding of damaged glass strength therefore becomes highly critical to the further development of armor designs. In the present study, a discrete element based modeling framework has been developed to understand and predict the evolution of compressive damages and residual strength of armor glasses. With the characteristic fragmentation and comminution failures explicitly resolved, their influences on the mechanical degradation of the loaded glass materials have been evaluated. The effects of essential loading conditions and material properties have also been investigated.

  15. Apoptotic DNA Degradation into Oligonucleosomal Fragments, but Not Apoptotic Nuclear Morphology, Relies on a Cytosolic Pool of DFF40/CAD Endonuclease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Guimarais, Victoria; Gil-Guiñon, Estel; Gabernet, Gisela; García-Belinchón, Mercè; Sánchez-Osuna, María; Casanelles, Elisenda; Comella, Joan X.; Yuste, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death is characterized by nuclear fragmentation and oligonucleosomal DNA degradation, mediated by the caspase-dependent specific activation of DFF40/CAD endonuclease. Here, we describe how, upon apoptotic stimuli, SK-N-AS human neuroblastoma-derived cells show apoptotic nuclear morphology without displaying concomitant internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Cytotoxicity afforded after staurosporine treatment is comparable with that obtained in SH-SY5Y cells, which exhibit a complete apoptotic phenotype. SK-N-AS cell death is a caspase-dependent process that can be impaired by the pan-caspase inhibitor q-VD-OPh. The endogenous inhibitor of DFF40/CAD, ICAD, is correctly processed, and dff40/cad cDNA sequence does not reveal mutations altering its amino acid composition. Biochemical approaches show that both SH-SY5Y and SK-N-AS resting cells express comparable levels of DFF40/CAD. However, the endonuclease is poorly expressed in the cytosolic fraction of healthy SK-N-AS cells. Despite this differential subcellular distribution of DFF40/CAD, we find no differences in the subcellular localization of both pro-caspase-3 and ICAD between the analyzed cell lines. After staurosporine treatment, the preferential processing of ICAD in the cytosolic fraction allows the translocation of DFF40/CAD from this fraction to a chromatin-enriched one. Therefore, the low levels of cytosolic DFF40/CAD detected in SK-N-AS cells determine the absence of DNA laddering after staurosporine treatment. In these cells DFF40/CAD cytosolic levels can be restored by the overexpression of their own endonuclease, which is sufficient to make them proficient at degrading their chromatin into oligonucleosome-size fragments after staurosporine treatment. Altogether, the cytosolic levels of DFF40/CAD are determinants in achieving a complete apoptotic phenotype, including oligonucleosomal DNA degradation. PMID:22253444

  16. Tumorigenic fragments of APC cause dominant defects in directional cell migration in multiple model systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A. Nelson

    2012-11-01

    Nonsense mutations that result in the expression of truncated, N-terminal, fragments of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC tumour suppressor protein are found in most sporadic and some hereditary colorectal cancers. These mutations can cause tumorigenesis by eliminating β-catenin-binding sites from APC, which leads to upregulation of β-catenin and thereby results in the induction of oncogenes such as MYC. Here we show that, in three distinct experimental model systems, expression of an N-terminal fragment of APC (N-APC results in loss of directionality, but not speed, of cell motility independently of changes in β-catenin regulation. We developed a system to culture and fluorescently label live pieces of gut tissue to record high-resolution three-dimensional time-lapse movies of cells in situ. This revealed an unexpected complexity of normal gut cell migration, a key process in gut epithelial maintenance, with cells moving with spatial and temporal discontinuity. Quantitative comparison of gut tissue from wild-type mice and APC heterozygotes (APCMin/+; multiple intestinal neoplasia model demonstrated that cells in precancerous epithelia lack directional preference when moving along the crypt-villus axis. This effect was reproduced in diverse experimental systems: in developing chicken embryos, mesoderm cells expressing N-APC failed to migrate normally; in amoeboid Dictyostelium, which lack endogenous APC, expressing an N-APC fragment maintained cell motility, but the cells failed to perform directional chemotaxis; and multicellular Dictyostelium slug aggregates similarly failed to perform phototaxis. We propose that N-terminal fragments of APC represent a gain-of-function mutation that causes cells within tissue to fail to migrate directionally in response to relevant guidance cues. Consistent with this idea, crypts in histologically normal tissues of APCMin/+ intestines are overpopulated with cells, suggesting that a lack of migration might cause cell

  17. Extraction of Nuclear Matter Properties from Nuclear Masses by a Model of Equation of State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.C.Chung; C.S.Wang; A.J.Santiago

    2001-01-01

    The extraction of nuclear matter properties from measured nuclear masses is investigated in the energy density functional formalism of nuclei.It is shown that the volume energy a1 and the nuclear incompressibility Ko depend essentially on μnN -+- pZ - 2EN,whereas the symmetry energy J and the density symmetry coefficient L as well as symmetry incompressibility Ks depend essentially on μn - μp,where μp =μp - Ec/ Z,μn and μp are the neutron and proton chemical potentials respectively,EN the nuclear energy,and Ec the Coulomb energy.The obtained symmetry energy is J = 28.5 MeV,while other coefficients are uncertain within ranges depending on the model of nuclear equation of state.``

  18. ANOMALOUS REACTION MEAN FREE PATHS OF NUCLEAR PROJECTILE FRAGMENTS FROM HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AT 2 AGeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedlander, E.M.; Gimpel, R.W.; Heckman, H.H.; Karant, Y.J.; Judek, B.; Ganssauge, E.

    1982-08-01

    We present in detail the description and the analysis of two independent experiments using Bevalac beams of {sup 16}O and {sup 56}Fe. From their results it is concluded that the reaction mean free paths of relativistic projectile fragments, 3 {<=} Z {<=} 26, are shorter for a few centimeters after emission than at large distances where they are compatible with values predicted from experiments on beam nuclei. The probability that this effect is due to a statistical fluctuation is <10{sup -3}. The effect is enhanced in later generations of fragments, the correlation between successive generations suggesting a kind of "memory" for the anomaly. Various systematic and spurious effects as well as conventional explanations are discussed mainly on the basis of direct experimental observations internal to our data, and found not to explain our results. The data can be interpreted by the relatively rare occurrence of anomalous fragments that interact with an unexpectedly large cross section. The statistical methods used in the analysis of the observations are fully described.

  19. Feasibility Study for the Measurement of Nuclear Fragmentation Cross Sections with NA61/SHINE at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Aduszkiewicz, A

    2017-01-01

    A detailed knowledge of the fragmentation cross sections of intermediate mass nuclei is of paramount importance to understand the propagation of cosmic rays in our Galaxy and to evaluate the background for dark matter searches with space-based cosmic-ray experiments such as AMS. Therefore, we suggest a one-week test run in 2018 with secondary ions to establish the capabilities of NA61/SHINE to measure fragmentation cross sections at isotope level. No major modifications to the experimental setup of NA61/SHINE are needed to perform this feasibility study. The experience gained during the test run will be used to formulate a comprehensive measurement campaign for cosmic-ray related fragmentation cross sections for the possible extension of the NA61/SHINE physics program beyond 2020. The test data on carbon-proton and oxygen-proton interactions at 13A GeV/c that we intend to collect during the proposed test run have already the potential to reduce the current cross section uncertainties.

  20. Existence Results for a Michaud Fractional, Nonlocal, and Randomly Position Structured Fragmentation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile Franc Doungmo Goufo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Until now, classical models of clusters’ fission remain unable to fully explain strange phenomena like the phenomenon of shattering (Ziff and McGrady, 1987 and the sudden appearance of infinitely many particles in some systems having initial finite number of particles. That is why there is a need to extend classical models to models with fractional derivative order and use new and various techniques to analyze them. In this paper, we prove the existence of strongly continuous solution operators for nonlocal fragmentation models with Michaud time derivative of fractional order (Samko et al., 1993. We focus on the case where the splitting rate is dependent on size and position and where new particles generating from fragmentation are distributed in space randomly according to some probability density. In the analysis, we make use of the substochastic semigroup theory, the subordination principle for differential equations of fractional order (Prüss, 1993, Bazhlekova, 2000, the analogy of Hille-Yosida theorem for fractional model (Prüss, 1993, and useful properties of Mittag-Leffler relaxation function (Berberan-Santos, 2005. We are then able to show that the solution operator to the full model is positive and contractive.

  1. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems FY16 Modeling Efforts at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cetiner, Sacit M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Greenwood, Michael Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Qualls, A. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Guler Yigitoglu, Askin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fugate, David W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A nuclear hybrid system uses a nuclear reactor as the basic power generation unit. The power generated by the nuclear reactor is utilized by one or more power customers as either thermal power, electrical power, or both. In general, a nuclear hybrid system will couple the nuclear reactor to at least one thermal power user in addition to the power conversion system. The definition and architecture of a particular nuclear hybrid system is flexible depending on local markets needs and opportunities. For example, locations in need of potable water may be best served by coupling a desalination plant to the nuclear system. Similarly, an area near oil refineries may have a need for emission free hydrogen production. A nuclear hybrid system expands the nuclear power plant from its more familiar central power station role by diversifying its immediately and directly connected customer base. The definition, design, analysis, and optimization work currently performed with respect to the nuclear hybrid systems represents the work of three national laboratories. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is the lead lab working with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Each laboratory is providing modeling and simulation expertise for the integration of the hybrid system.

  2. Novel fragmentation model for pulverized coal particles gasification in low temperature air thermal plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Rastko D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New system for start-up and flame support based on coal gasification by low temperature air thermal plasma is planned to supplement current heavy oil system in Serbian thermal power plants in order to decrease air pollutions emission and operational costs. Locally introduced plasma thermal energy heats up and ignites entrained coal particles, thus starting chain process which releases heat energy from gasified coal particles inside burner channel. Important stages during particle combustion, such as particle devolatilisation and char combustion, are described with satisfying accuracy in existing commercial CFD codes that are extensively used as powerful tool for pulverized coal combustion and gasification modeling. However, during plasma coal gasification, high plasma temperature induces strong thermal stresses inside interacting coal particles. These stresses lead to “thermal shock” and extensive particle fragmentation during which coal particles with initial size of 50-100 m disintegrate into fragments of at most 5-10 m. This intensifies volatile release by a factor 3-4 and substantially accelerates the oxidation of combustible matter. Particle fragmentation, due to its small size and thus limited influence on combustion process is commonly neglected in modelling. The main focus of this work is to suggest novel approach to pulverized coal gasification under high temperature conditions and to implement it into commercial comprehensive code ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. Proposed model was validated against experimental data obtained in newly built pilot scale D.C plasma burner test facility. Newly developed model showed very good agreement with experimental results with relative error less than 10%, while the standard built-in gasification model had error up to 25%.

  3. An investigation of the potential effect of sperm nuclear vacuoles in human spermatozoa on DNA fragmentation using a neutral and alkaline Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuszek, E; Kiewisz, J; Skowronska, P; Liss, J; Lukaszuk, M; Bruszczynska, A; Jakiel, G; Lukaszuk, K

    2017-03-01

    Presence of vacuoles and degree of sperm DNA damage are considered to be the basic factors used for the assessment of sperm fertilization capacity. We aimed to investigate the link between these two parameters. According to our knowledge, this is the first study where the Comet assay was used to assess the degree of DNA fragmentation of sperm categorized by Motile Sperm Organelle Morphology Examination (MSOME) Grades. Semen samples from 10 patients were assessed. Spermatozoa were graded into four MSOME groups according to the Vanderzwalmen's criteria. A total of 3930 motile spermatozoa were selected one-by-one using an inverted microscope and transferred onto two different slides. The degree of DNA fragmentation was analyzed by alkaline and neutral Comet assay. Results of the neutral Comet assay showed that Grade I spermatozoa (absence of vacuoles) presented significantly lower dsDNA fragmentation level (mean: 3.13 ± 1.17%) than Grade II (maximum of two small vacuoles; mean: 10.34 ± 2.65%), Grade III (more than two small vacuoles or at least one large vacuole; mean: 23.88 ± 8.37%), and Grade IV (large vacuoles associated with abnormal head shapes or other abnormalities; mean: 36.94 ± 7.78%; p fragmentation level (mean: 8.33 ± 3.62%) than Grade III (mean: 25.64 ± 9.15%) and Grade IV (mean: 40.10 ± 9.10%, p  0.05). Probably, the vacuoles may be responsible for double strand DNA breaks rather than single strand DNA breaks (only 2.39% spermatozoa in MSOME Grade II, 1.76% in III, and 3.16% in IV has single strand breaks). The results demonstrate that lower MSOME grading correlates with lower sperm DNA fragmentation. Therefore, the observation of sperm nuclear vacuoles using real-time optical microscopy without precise DNA fragmentation examination is not sufficient for optimal sperm selection for intracytoplasmic sperm injection. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  4. Pion Effect of Nuclear Matter in a Chiral Sigma Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jin-niu; Y.Ogawa; H.Toki; A.Hosaka; SHEN Hong

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new framework for the study of the nuclear matter based on the linear sigma model.We introduce a completely new viewpoint on the treatment of the nuclear matter with the inclusion of the pion.We extend the relativistic chiral mean field model by using the similar method in the tensor optimized shell model.We also regulate the pion-nucleon interaction by considering the form-factor and short range repulsion effects.We obtain the equation of state of nuclear matter and study the importance of the pion effect.

  5. Systematic investigation of projectile fragmentation using beams of unstable B and C isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Thies, R; Adachi, T; Aksyutina, Y; Alcantara-Núñes, J; Altstadt, S; Alvarez-Pol, H; Ashwood, N; Aumann, T; Avdeichikov, V; Barr, M; Beceiro-Novo, S; Bemmerer, D; Benlliure, J; Bertulani, C A; Boretzky, K; Borge, M J G; Burgunder, G; Caamano, M; Caesar, C; Casarejos, E; Catford, W; Cederkäll, J; Chakraborty, S; Chartier, M; Chulkov, L V; Cortina-Gil, D; Crespo, R; Datta, U; Fernández, P Díaz; Dillmann, I; Elekes, Z; Enders, J; Ershova, O; Estradé, A; Farinon, F; Fraile, L M; Freer, M; Freudenberger, M; Fynbo, H O U; Galaviz, D; Geissel, H; Gernhäuser, R; Göbel, K; Golubev, P; Diaz, D Gonzalez; Hagdahl, J; Heftrich, T; Heil, M; Heine, M; Henriques, A; Holl, M; Ickert, G; Ignatov, A; Jakobsson, B; Johansson, H T; Jonson, B; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kanungo, R; Kelic-Heil, A; Knöbel, R; Kröll, T; Krücken, R; Kurcewicz, J; Kurz, N; Labiche, M; Langer, C; Bleis, T Le; Lemmon, R; Lepyoshkina, O; Lindberg, S; Machado, J; Marganiec, J; Maroussov, V; Mostazo, M; Movsesyan, A; Najafi, A; Nilsson, T; Nociforo, C; Panin, V; Paschalis, S; Perea, A; Petri, M; Pietri, S; Plag, R; Prochazka, A; Rahaman, A; Rastrepina, G; Reifarth, R; Ribeiro, G; Ricciardi, M V; Rigollet, C; Riisager, K; Röder, M; Rossi, D; del Rio, J Sanchez; Savran, D; Scheit, H; Simon, H; Sorlin, O; Stoica, V; Streicher, B; Taylor, J T; Tengblad, O; Terashima, S; Togano, Y; Uberseder, E; Van de Walle, J; Velho, P; Volkov, V; Wagner, A; Wamers, F; Weick, H; Weigand, M; Wheldon, C; Wilson, G; Wimmer, C; Winfield, J S; Woods, P; Yakorev, D; Zhukov, M V; Zilges, A; Zuber, K

    2016-01-01

    Background: Models describing nuclear fragmentation and fragmentation-fission deliver important input for planning nuclear physics experiments and future radioactive ion beam facilities. These models are usually benchmarked against data from stable beam experiments. In the future, two-step fragmentation reactions with exotic nuclei as stepping stones are a promising tool to reach the most neutron-rich nuclei, creating a need for models to describe also these reactions. Purpose: We want to extend the presently available data on fragmentation reactions towards the light exotic region on the nuclear chart. Furthermore, we want to improve the understanding of projectile fragmentation especially for unstable isotopes. Method: We have measured projectile fragments from 10,12-18C and 10-15B isotopes colliding with a carbon target. These measurements were all performed within one experiment, which gives rise to a very consistent dataset. We compare our data to model calculations. Results: One-proton removal cross sec...

  6. Telmisartan Inhibits Cell Proliferation by Blocking Nuclear Translocation of ProHB-EGF C-Terminal Fragment in Colon Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Keiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Morimoto, Chie; Inoue, Yoshimasa; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tsukamoto, Hironobu; Shimura, Takaya; Kataoka, Hiromi; Kamiya, Takeshi; Nishiwaki, Eiji; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Joh, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Current treatment target toward advanced colorectal cancers is mainly focused on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, but its additive effects with chemotherapy are still limited. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) cleaves the proheparin-binding epidermal growth factor like growth factor (proHB-EGF). And soluble HB-EGF activates EGFR. In parallel, the carboxy-terminal fragment of proHB-EGF (HB-EGF-CTF) translocates into the inner nuclear membrane, and subsequently exerts on the regulation of cell proliferation by binding nuclear promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) protein, a transcriptional repressor, thereby causing its nuclear export. We hypothesized that the inhibition of HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation may be a new strategy in preventing cell proliferation. Methods 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbor-13-acetate (TPA) was treated to activate ADAM. Nine-thousand chemical compounds were screened for their efficacies in blocking the binding of HB-EGF-CTF to promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) with Alphascreen system. The obtained candidates were then used to block the binding of HB-EGF-CTF to PLZF in colon cancer cells, HT29 and HCT116. Cell proliferation was investigated with a growth curve assay. The intracellular localization, and association between HB-EGF-CTF and PLZF, was assessed with immunofluorescent staining, and immunoprecipitation and Western blotting, respectively. The effects of obtained candidates on EGFR phosphorylation and on nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF and export of PLZF during the angiotensin II type1 receptor (AT1R) knockdown were also investigated. Results Telmisartan and candesartan were found to be potential candidates. Telmisartan inhibited TPA-induced cell proliferation stronger than candesartan. Telmisartan, but not candesartan blocked the nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF, and binding of HB-EGF-CTF to PLZF, during TPA stimulation. Both telmisartan and candesartan did not inhibit TPA

  7. Fish dispersal in fragmented landscapes: a modeling framework for quantifying the permeability of structural barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pépino, Marc; Rodríguez, Marco A; Magnan, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    Dispersal is a key determinant of the spatial distribution and abundance of populations, but human-made fragmentation can create barriers that hinder dispersal and reduce population viability. This study presents a modeling framework based on dispersal kernels (modified Laplace distributions) that describe stream fish dispersal in the presence of obstacles to passage. We used mark-recapture trials to quantify summer dispersal of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in four streams crossed by a highway. The analysis identified population heterogeneity in dispersal behavior, as revealed by the presence of a dominant sedentary component (48-72% of all individuals) characterized by short mean dispersal distance (dispersal distance (56-1086 m). We did not detect evidence of barrier effects on dispersal through highway crossings. Simulation of various plausible scenarios indicated that detectability of barrier effects was strongly dependent on features of sampling design, such as spatial configuration of the sampling area, barrier extent, and sample size. The proposed modeling framework extends conventional dispersal kernels by incorporating structural barriers. A major strength of the approach is that ecological process (dispersal model) and sampling design (observation model) are incorporated simultaneously into the analysis. This feature can facilitate the use of prior knowledge to improve sampling efficiency of mark-recapture trials in movement studies. Model-based estimation of barrier permeability and its associated uncertainty provides a rigorous approach for quantifying the effect of barriers on stream fish dispersal and assessing population dynamics of stream fish in fragmented landscapes.

  8. Effect of Spinach (Spinacea oleracea on DNA fragmentation in pentylenetetrazole induced experimental epileptic rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monami Mondal (Mukherjee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Epilepsy is a restrained neurological disorder, with a constant neuronal damage, ranging from severe, life-threatening and disabling situations. It leads to oxidative brain damages through DNA fragmentation. Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ is a convulsant used to produce experimental epileptic animals. Investigation proved; antioxidant enriched Spinacea oleracea (SO or spinach, a commonly available herb, has a modulatory role on the damaging effects of free radicals. Methods The study was conducted with twenty-four adult male Holtzman strain albino rats (200-250gm. These rats were divided into groups of Control, SO treated control, PTZ induced experimental epileptic group and SO pretreated PTZ induced experimental epileptic group. The epileptic model was prepared by intraperitoneal administration of PTZ at a dose of 40 mg/kg body weight. Aqueous leaf extract of SO was orally given at a dose of 400 mg /kg body weight, for fourteen consecutive days. After the behavioral study serum and brain tissue samples were collected for the estimation of nitric oxide (NO, DNA fragmentation and antioxidants level. Results Pretreatment with SO leaf extract showed significant decrease in the seizure score, ictal phase, serum NO level, LPO levels and rate of DNA fragmentation. The interictal phase, SOD, CAT, GSH activity of different parts of the brain were significantly increased in SO pretreated PTZ induced group. Conclusion SO is found to play a vital role to provide protection against the oxidative damage of epileptic brain by amending the levels of antioxidants and serum NO level.

  9. Selecting a Conservation Surrogate Species for Small Fragmented Habitats Using Ecological Niche Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Anne-Isola Nekaris

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flagship species are traditionally large, charismatic animals used to rally conservation efforts. Accepted flagship definitions suggest they need only fulfil a strategic role, unlike umbrella species that are used to shelter cohabitant taxa. The criteria used to select both flagship and umbrella species may not stand up in the face of dramatic forest loss, where remaining fragments may only contain species that do not suit either set of criteria. The Cinderella species concept covers aesthetically pleasing and overlooked species that fulfil the criteria of flagships or umbrellas. Such species are also more likely to occur in fragmented habitats. We tested Cinderella criteria on mammals in the fragmented forests of the Sri Lankan Wet Zone. We selected taxa that fulfilled both strategic and ecological roles. We created a shortlist of ten species, and from a survey of local perceptions highlighted two finalists. We tested these for umbrella characteristics against the original shortlist, utilizing Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt modelling, and analysed distribution overlap using ArcGIS. The criteria highlighted Loris tardigradus tardigradus and Prionailurus viverrinus as finalists, with the former having highest flagship potential. We suggest Cinderella species can be effective conservation surrogates especially in habitats where traditional flagship species have been extirpated.

  10. Strong signal of dynamical long-range correlating among target fragments in relativistic and ultra-relativistic nuclear interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, D; Bhattacharya, S; Ghosh, J; Das, R

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports an investigation on the two-particle long-range angular correlation among the target fragments produced in sup 2 sup 8 Si-AgBr interactions at 14.5 AGeV, sup 1 sup 6 O-AgBr interactions at 60 AGeV and sup 3 sup 2 S-AgBr interactions at 200 AGeV. The experimental data have been compared with Monte Carlo simulated events to extract dynamical correlation. The data exhibit two-particle long-range correlation in emission angle space at all energies. (author)

  11. Tracing a phase transition with fluctuations of the largest fragment size: Statistical multifragmentation models and the ALADIN S254 data

    CERN Document Server

    Pietrzak, T; Aumann, T; Bacri, C O; Barczyk, T; Bassini, R; Bianchin, S; Boiano, C; Botvina, A S; Boudard, A; Brzychczyk, J; Chbihi, A; Cibor, J; Czech, B; De Napoli, M; Ducret, J -E; Emling, H; Frankland, J D; Hellstrom, M; Henzlova, D; Imme, G; Iori, I; Johansson, H; Kezzar, K; Lafriakh, A; Le Fèvre, A; Gentil, E Le; Leifels, Y; Luhning, J; Lukasik, J; Lynch, W G; Lynen, U; Majka, Z; Mocko, M; Muller, W F J; Mykulyak, A; Orth, H; Otte, A N; Palit, R; Pawlowski, P; Pullia, A; Raciti, G; Rapisarda, E; Sann, H; Schwarz, C; Sfienti, C; Simon, H; Summerer, K; Trautmann, W; Tsang, M B; Verde, G; Volant, C; Wallace, M; Weick, H; Wiechula, J; Wieloch, A; Zwieglinski, B

    2010-01-01

    A phase transition signature associated with cumulants of the largest fragment size distribution has been identified in statistical multifragmentation models and examined in analysis of the ALADIN S254 data on fragmentation of neutron-poor and neutron-rich projectiles. Characteristics of the transition point indicated by this signature are weakly dependent on the A/Z ratio of the fragmenting spectator source. In particular, chemical freeze-out temperatures are estimated within the range 5.9 to 6.5 MeV. The experimental results are well reproduced by the SMM model.

  12. Structure solution with ARCIMBOLDO using fragments derived from distant homology models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammito, Massimo; Meindl, Kathrin; de Ilarduya, Iñaki M; Millán, Claudia; Artola-Recolons, Cecilia; Hermoso, Juan A; Usón, Isabel

    2014-09-01

    Molecular replacement, one of the general methods used to solve the crystallographic phase problem, relies on the availability of suitable models for placement in the unit cell of the unknown structure in order to provide initial phases. ARCIMBOLDO, originally conceived for ab initio phasing, operates at the limit of this approach, using small, very accurate fragments such as polyalanine α-helices. A distant homolog may contain accurate building blocks, but it may not be evident which sub-structure is the most suitable purely from the degree of conservation. Trying out all alternative possibilities in a systematic way is computationally expensive, even if effective. In the present study, the solution of the previously unknown structure of MltE, an outer membrane-anchored endolytic peptidoglycan lytic transglycosylase from Escherichia coli, is described. The asymmetric unit contains a dimer of this 194 amino acid protein. The closest available homolog was the catalytic domain of Slt70 (PDB code 1QTE). Originally, this template was used omitting contiguous spans of aminoacids and setting as many ARCIMBOLDO runs as models, each aiming to locate two copies sequentially with PHASER. Fragment trimming against the correlation coefficient prior to expansion through density modification and autotracing in SHELXE was essential. Analysis of the figures of merit led to the strategy to optimize the search model against the experimental data now implemented within ARCIMBOLDO-SHREDDER (http://chango.ibmb.csic.es/SHREDDER). In this strategy, the initial template is systematically shredded, and fragments are scored against each unique solution of the rotation function. Results are combined into a score per residue and the template is trimmed accordingly.

  13. Isospin dependence of nuclear multifragmentation in statistical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蕾; 谢东珠; 张艳萍; 高远

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of nuclear disintegration mechanisms with increasing excitation energy, from compound nucleus to multifragmentation, has been studied by using the Statistical Multifragmentation Model (SMM) within a micro-canonical ensemble. We discuss the o

  14. Applying Functional Modeling for Accident Management of Nuclear Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Morten; Zhang, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    The paper investigate applications of functional modeling for accident management in complex industrial plant with special reference to nuclear power production. Main applications for information sharing among decision makers and decision support are identified. An overview of Multilevel Flow...

  15. Secondary radiation measurements for particle therapy applications: nuclear fragmentation produced by $^4$He ion beams in a PMMA target

    CERN Document Server

    Marafini, M; Pinci, D; Battistoni, G; Collamati, F; De Lucia, E; Faccini, R; Frallicciardi, P M; Mancini-Terracciano, C; Mattei, I; Muraro, S; Piersanti, L; Rovituso, M; Rucinski, A; Russomando, A; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Camillocci, E Solfaroli; Toppi, M; Traini, G; Voena, C; Patera, V

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays there is a growing interest in Particle Therapy treatments exploiting light ion beams against tumors due to their enhanced Relative Biological Effectiveness and high space selectivity. In particular promising results are obtained by the use of $^4$He projectiles. Unlike the treatments performed using protons, the beam ions can undergo a fragmentation process when interacting with the atomic nuclei in the patient body. In this paper the results of measurements performed at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy center are reported. For the first time the absolute fluxes and the energy spectra of the fragments - protons, deuterons, and tritons - produced by $^4$He ion beams of 102, 125 and 145 MeV/u energies on a poly-methyl methacrylate target were evaluated at different angles. The obtained results are particularly relevant in view of the necessary optimization and review of the Treatment Planning Software being developed for clinical use of $^4$He beams in clinical routine and the relative benchmarking of ...

  16. Structural study on silkworm eclosion hormone fragment (1-34) in solution by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, N.; Takai, M.; Umemura, I.; Kanaori, K.; Nosaka, A.Y. [International Research Laboratories, Ciba-Geigy Japan Ltd., P.O. Box 1, Takarazuka (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    Eclosion hormone (EH) is a neuropeptide hormone which controls the ecdysis behavior in insect. The three dimensional structure of the N-terminal fragment (1-34) of the eclosion hormone which was predicted to contain a compact region crucial for the EH activity was studied in 50% d{sub 3}-trifluoroethanol(TFE)/50% H{sub 2}O at pH 3 and 298 K by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy with the combined use of distance geometry and molecular dynamics calculations. NMR results indicated that the fragment actually assumes an {alpha}-helix between Ala10 and Gln20, but no rigid structure is present from Cys21 through the C-terminus and for the N-terminal region (Ser1-Asp9). The elucidated structure was compared with the predicted structure of the native EH for the further development of the design of the insecticide. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  17. Charge-to-mass dispersion methods for abrasion-ablation fragmentation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, L. W.; Norbury, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Methods to describe the charge-to-mass dispersion distributions of projectile prefragments are presented and used to determine individual isotope cross-sections or various elements produced in the fragmentation of relativistic argon nuclei by carbon targets. Although slight improvements in predicted cross-sections are obtained for the quantum mechanical giant dipole resonance (GDR) distribution when compared qith the predictions of the geometric GDR model, the closest agreement between theory and experiment continues to be obtained with the simple hypergeometric distribution, which treats the nucleons in the nucleus as completely uncorrelated.

  18. Diffusion energy profiles in silica mesoporous molecular sieves modelled with the fragment molecular orbital method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskop, Luke; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Gordon, Mark S.

    2013-07-01

    The fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method is used to model truncated portions of mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) pores. The application of the FMO/RHF (restricted Hartree-Fock) method to MCM-41 type MSNs is discussed and an error analysis is given. The FMO/RHF method is shown to reliably approximate the RHF energy (error ∼0.2 kcal/mol), dipole moment (error ∼0.2 debye) and energy gradient (root mean square [RMS] error ∼0.2 × 10-3 a.u./bohr). Several FMO fragmentation schemes are employed to provide guidance for future applications to MSN models. An MSN pore model is functionalised with (phenyl)propyl substituents and the diffusion barrier for benzene passing through the pore is computed by the FMO/RHF-D method with the Grimme dispersion correction (RHF-D). For the reaction coordinates examined here, the maximum FMO/RHF-D interaction energies range from -0.3 to -5.8 kcal/mol.

  19. Quark fragmentation to $\\pi^{\\pm}$, $\\pi^{0}$, $K^{\\pm}$, $p$ and $\\bar{p}$ in the nuclear environment

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Ammosov, V V; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Baturin, V; Baumgarten, C; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Borysenko, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V V; Capitani, G P; Chiang, H C; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E G; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G M; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Ely, J; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Feshchenko, A; Felawka, L; Fox, B; Franz, J; Frullani, S; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Garutti, E; Gaskell, D; Gavrilov, G E; Karibian, V; Graw, G; Grebenyuk, O; Greeniaus, L G; Gregor, I M; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Königsmann, K C; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikas, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Lindemann, T; Lipka, K; Lorenzon, W; Lü, J; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H O; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaev, M A; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganessyan, K; Ohsuga, H; Pickert, N; Potashov, S Yu; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Yu I; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Scarlett, C; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Schwind, A; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shanidze, R G; Shearer, C; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V B; Simani, M C; Sinram, K; Stancari, M D; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stösslein, U; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S P; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A R; Tkabladze, A V; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Vetterli, Martin C; Vikhrov, V; Vincter, M G; Vogel, C; Vogt, M; Volmer, J; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Ybeles-Smit, G V; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B; Zohrabyan, H G; Zupranski, P

    2003-01-01

    The influence of the nuclear medium on lepto-production of hadrons was studied in the HERMES experiment at DESY in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of 27.6 GeV positrons off deuterium, nitrogen and krypton targets. The differential multiplicity for krypton relative to that of deuterium has been measured for the first time for various identified hadrons ($\\pi^+$, $\\pi^-$, $\\pi^0$, $K^+$, $K^-$, $p$ and $\\bar{p}$) as a function of the virtual photon energy $\

  20. Monte Carlo Numerical Models for Nuclear Logging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusheng Li

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear logging is one of most important logging services provided by many oil service companies. The main parameters of interest are formation porosity, bulk density, and natural radiation. Other services are also provided from using complex nuclear logging tools, such as formation lithology/mineralogy, etc. Some parameters can be measured by using neutron logging tools and some can only be measured by using a gamma ray tool. To understand the response of nuclear logging tools, the neutron transport/diffusion theory and photon diffusion theory are needed. Unfortunately, for most cases there are no analytical answers if complex tool geometry is involved. For many years, Monte Carlo numerical models have been used by nuclear scientists in the well logging industry to address these challenges. The models have been widely employed in the optimization of nuclear logging tool design, and the development of interpretation methods for nuclear logs. They have also been used to predict the response of nuclear logging systems for forward simulation problems. In this case, the system parameters including geometry, materials and nuclear sources, etc., are pre-defined and the transportation and interactions of nuclear particles (such as neutrons, photons and/or electrons in the regions of interest are simulated according to detailed nuclear physics theory and their nuclear cross-section data (probability of interacting. Then the deposited energies of particles entering the detectors are recorded and tallied and the tool responses to such a scenario are generated. A general-purpose code named Monte Carlo N– Particle (MCNP has been the industry-standard for some time. In this paper, we briefly introduce the fundamental principles of Monte Carlo numerical modeling and review the physics of MCNP. Some of the latest developments of Monte Carlo Models are also reviewed. A variety of examples are presented to illustrate the uses of Monte Carlo numerical models

  1. Nuclear Hybrid Energy System Model Stability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, Michael Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cetiner, Sacit M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fugate, David W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    A Nuclear Hybrid Energy System (NHES) uses a nuclear reactor as the basic power generation unit, and the power generated is used by multiple customers as combinations of thermal power or electrical power. The definition and architecture of a particular NHES can be adapted based on the needs and opportunities of different localities and markets. For example, locations in need of potable water may be best served by coupling a desalination plant to the NHES. Similarly, a location near oil refineries may have a need for emission-free hydrogen production. Using the flexible, multi-domain capabilities of Modelica, Argonne National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are investigating the dynamics (e.g., thermal hydraulics and electrical generation/consumption) and cost of a hybrid system. This paper examines the NHES work underway, emphasizing the control system developed for individual subsystems and the overall supervisory control system.

  2. Lung surfactant protein A (SP-A) interactions with model lung surfactant lipids and an SP-B fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Muzaddid; Jackman, Donna; Booth, Valerie

    2011-06-07

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is the most abundant protein component of lung surfactant, a complex mixture of proteins and lipids. SP-A performs host defense activities and modulates the biophysical properties of surfactant in concerted action with surfactant protein B (SP-B). Current models of lung surfactant mechanism generally assume SP-A functions in its octadecameric form. However, one of the findings of this study is that when SP-A is bound to detergent and lipid micelles that mimic lung surfactant phospholipids, it exists predominantly as smaller oligomers, in sharp contrast to the much larger forms observed when alone in water. These investigations were carried out in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), dodecylphosphocholine (DPC), lysomyristoylphosphatidylcholine (LMPC), lysomyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (LMPG), and mixed LMPC + LMPG micelles, using solution and diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We have also probed SP-A's interaction with Mini-B, a biologically active synthetic fragment of SP-B, in the presence of micelles. Despite variations in Mini-B's own interactions with micelles of different compositions, SP-A is found to interact with Mini-B in all micelle systems and perhaps to undergo a further structural rearrangement upon interacting with Mini-B. The degree of SP-A-Mini-B interaction appears to be dependent on the type of lipid headgroup and is likely mediated through the micelles, rather than direct binding.

  3. Experimental research of methods for clustering and selecting image fragments using spatial invariant equivalent models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilenko, Vladimir G.; Lazarev, Alexander A.; Nikitovich, Diana V.

    2014-08-01

    In the paper, we show that the nonlinear spatial non-linear equivalency functions on the basis of continuous logic equivalence (nonequivalence) operations have better discriminatory properties for comparing images. Further, using the equivalent model of multiport neural networks and associative memory, (including matrix-matrix and matrix-tensor with adaptive-weighted correlation, multi-port neural-net auto-associative and hetero-associative memory (MP NN AAM and HAM ) and the proposed architecture based on them, we show how we can modify these models and architectures for space-invariant associative recognition and clustering (high performance parallel clustering processing) images. We consider possible implementations of 2D image classifiers, devices for partitioning image fragments into clusters and their architectures. The main base unit of such architectures is a matrix-matrix or matrix-tensor equivalentor, which can be implemented on the basis of two traditional correlators. We show that the classifiers based on the equivalency paradigm and optoelectronic architectures with space-time integration and parallel-serial 2D images processing have advantages such as increased memory capacity (more than ten times of the number of neurons!), High performance in different modes . We present the results of associative significant dimension (128x128, 610x340) image recognition - renewal modeling. It will be shown that these models are capable to recognize images with a significant percentage (20- 30%) damaged pixels. The experimental results show that such models can be successfully used for auto-and heteroassociative pattern recognition. We show simulation results of using these modifications for clustering and learning models and algorithms for cluster analysis of specific images and divide them into categories of the array. Show example of a cluster division of image fragments, letters and graphics for clusters with simultaneous formation of the outputweighted spatial

  4. Towards a self-consistent dynamical nuclear model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Niu, Y. F.; Colò, G.; Bortignon, P. F.

    2017-04-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is a powerful and accurate tool, exploited in nuclear physics to investigate the ground-state and some of the collective properties of nuclei along the whole nuclear chart. Models based on DFT are not, however, suitable for the description of single-particle dynamics in nuclei. Following the field theoretical approach by A Bohr and B R Mottelson to describe nuclear interactions between single-particle and vibrational degrees of freedom, we have taken important steps towards the building of a microscopic dynamic nuclear model. In connection with this, one important issue that needs to be better understood is the renormalization of the effective interaction in the particle-vibration approach. One possible way to renormalize the interaction is by the so-called subtraction method. In this contribution, we will implement the subtraction method in our model for the first time and study its consequences.

  5. Dynamical fragmentation of flux tubes in the Friedberg-Lee model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, S.; Greiner, C.; Mosel, U.; Thoma, M. H.

    1997-02-01

    We present two novel dynamical features of flux tubes in the Friedberg-Lee model. First the fusion of two (anti-)parallel flux tubes, where we extract a string-string interaction potential which has a qualitative similarity to the nucleon-nucleon potential in the Friedberg-Lee model obtained by Koepf et al. Furthermore we show the dynamical breakup of flux tubes via q overlineq- particle production and the disintegration into mesons. We find, as a shortcoming of the present realization of the model, that the full dynamical transport approach presented in a previous publication fails to provide the disintegration mechanism in the semiclassical limit. Therefore, in addition, we present here a molecular dynamical approach for the motion of the quarks and show, as a first application, the space-time development of the wuarks and their mean-fields for Lund-type string fragmentation processes.

  6. Polarization energy gradients in combined quantum mechanics, effective fragment potential, and polarizable continuum model calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Gordon, Mark S

    2007-03-28

    A method that combines quantum mechanics (QM), typically a solute, the effective fragment potential (EFP) discrete solvent model, and the polarizable continuum model is described. The EFP induced dipoles and polarizable continuum model (PCM) induced surface charges are determined in a self-consistent fashion. The gradients of these two energies with respect to molecular coordinate changes are derived and implemented. In general, the gradients can be formulated as simple electrostatic forces and torques among the QM nuclei, electrons, EFP static multipoles, induced dipoles, and PCM induced charges. Molecular geometry optimizations can be performed efficiently with these gradients. The formulas derived for EFPPCM can be generally applied to other combined molecular mechanics and continuum methods that employ induced dipoles and charges.

  7. Evidence of self-affine target fragmentation process in relativistic nuclear collision at a few GeV/n

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, D; Bhattacharya, S; Ghosh, J; Sarkar, R

    2003-01-01

    Self-affine multiplicity scaling is investigated in the framework of two-dimensional factorial moment methodology using the concept of Hurst exponent (H). Investigation on the experimental data of target fragments emitted in sup 1 sup 2 C-AgBr and sup 2 sup 4 Mg-AgBr interactions at 4.5 A GeV revealed that best power law behaviour is exhibited at H = 0.5 for sup 1 sup 2 C initiated interactions indicating self-affine multiplicity fluctuations. But for sup 2 sup 4 Mg-AgBr interactions it cannot be unambiguously concluded whether the nature of dynamical fluctuations is self-affine or self-similar. The signal of multifractality is observed for both the interactions.

  8. A caspase-3-cleaved fragment of the glial glutamate transporter EAAT2 is sumoylated and targeted to promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies in mutant SOD1-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Stuart L; Boston-Howes, William; Lavina, Zeno S; Gustincich, Stefano; Brown, Robert H; Pasinelli, Piera; Trotti, Davide

    2007-11-02

    EAAT2 (excitatory amino acid transporter 2) is a high affinity, Na+-dependent glutamate transporter of glial origin that is essential for the clearance of synaptically released glutamate and prevention of excitotoxicity. During the course of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and in a transgenic mutant SOD1 mouse model of the disease, expression and activity of EAAT2 is remarkably reduced. We previously showed that some of the mutant SOD1 proteins exposed to oxidative stress inhibit EAAT2 by triggering caspase-3 cleavage of EAAT2 at a single defined locus. This gives rise to two fragments that we termed truncated EAAT2 and COOH terminus of EAAT2 (CTE). In this study, we report that analysis of spinal cord homogenates prepared from mutant G93A-SOD1 mice reveals CTE to be of a higher molecular weight than expected because it is conjugated with SUMO-1. The sumoylated CTE fragment (CTE-SUMO-1) accumulates in the spinal cord of these mice as early as presymptomatic stage (70 days of age) and not in other central nervous system areas unaffected by the disease. The presence and accumulation of CTE-SUMO-1 is specific to ALS mice, since it does not occur in the R6/2 mouse model for Huntington disease. Furthermore, using an astroglial cell line, primary culture of astrocytes, and tissue samples from G93A-SOD1 mice, we show that CTE-SUMO-1 is targeted to promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies. Since one of the proposed functions of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies is regulation of gene transcription, we suggest a possible novel mechanism by which the glial glutamate transporter EAAT2 could contribute to the pathology of ALS.

  9. Analysis of U2 small nuclear RNA fragments in the bile differentiates cholangiocarcinoma from primary sclerosing cholangitis and other benign biliary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Stefanie; Schumacher, Brigitte; Gerges, Christian; Bracht, Thilo; Sitek, Barbara; Meyer, Helmut E; Gerken, Guido; Dechene, Alexander; Schlaak, Jörg F; Schroers, Roland; Pox, Christian; Schmiegel, Wolff; Hahn, Stephan A

    2014-07-01

    Up to now the diagnosis of early stage cholangiocarcinoma (CC) has remained difficult, with low sensitivities reported for current diagnostic methods. Based on recent promising findings about circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments (RNU2-1f) as novel blood-based biomarkers for pancreatic and colorectal adenocarcinoma, we studied the utility of RNU2-1f as a diagnostic marker of CC in bile fluid. Bile fluid was collected from patients with CC (n = 12), controls (patients with choledocholithiasis) (n = 11) and with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC; n = 11). RNU2-1f levels were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction normalized to cel-54. Measurement of RNU2-1f levels in bile fluids enabled the differentiation of patients with CC from controls in all cases. Furthermore, RNU2-1f levels in bile fluids of patients with CC were significantly higher than in patients with PSC, resulting in a receiver-operating characteristic curve area of 0.856, with sensitivity of 67 % and specificity of 91 %. Our data suggest that the measurement of RNU2-1 fragments detected in the bile fluid can be used as a diagnostic marker for CC and should be included in future prospective diagnostic studies for this disease entity.

  10. Sizing of rock fragmentation modeling due to bench blasting using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karami Alireza; Afiuni-Zadeh Somaieh

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important characters of blasting, a basic step of surface mining, is rock fragmentation because it directly effects on the costs of drilling and economics of the subsequent operations of loading, hauling and crushing in mines. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and radial basis function (RBF) show potentials for modeling the behavior of complex nonlinear processes such as those involved in fragmentation due to blasting of rocks. We developed ANFIS and RBF methods for modeling of sizing of rock fragmentation due to bench blasting by estimation of 80%passing size (K80) of Golgohar iron mine of Sirjan, Iran. Comparing the results of ANFIS and RBF models shows that although the statistical parame-ters RBF model is acceptable but ANFIS proposed model is superior and also simpler because ANFIS model is constructed using only two input parameters while seven input parameters used for construction of RBF model.

  11. Ontology aided modeling of organic reaction mechanisms with flexible and fragment based XML markup procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Punnaivanam; Aghila, Gnanasekaran

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism models for primary organic reactions encoding the structural fragments undergoing substitution, addition, elimination, and rearrangements are developed. In the proposed models, each and every structural component of mechanistic pathways is represented with flexible and fragment based markup technique in XML syntax. A significant feature of the system is the encoding of the electron movements along with the other components like charges, partial charges, half bonded species, lone pair electrons, free radicals, reaction arrows, etc. needed for a complete representation of reaction mechanism. The rendering of reaction schemes described with the proposed methodology is achieved with a concise XML extension language interoperating with the structure markup. The reaction scheme is visualized as 2D graphics in a browser by converting them into SVG documents enabling the desired layouts normally perceived by the chemists conventionally. An automatic representation of the complex patterns of the reaction mechanism is achieved by reusing the knowledge in chemical ontologies and developing artificial intelligence components in terms of axioms.

  12. Wave front fragmentation due to ventricular geometry in a model of the rabbit heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jack M.

    2002-09-01

    The role of the heart's complex shape in causing the fragmentation of activation wave fronts characteristic of ventricular fibrillation (VF) has not been well studied. We used a finite element model of cardiac propagation capable of simulating functional reentry on curved two-dimensional surfaces to test the hypothesis that uneven surface curvature can cause local propagation block leading to proliferation of reentrant wave fronts. We found that when reentry was induced on a flat sheet, it rotated in a repeatable meander pattern without breaking up. However, when a model of the rabbit ventricles was formed from the same medium, reentrant wave fronts followed complex, nonrepeating trajectories. Local propagation block often occurred when wave fronts propagated across regions where the Gaussian curvature of the surface changed rapidly. This type of block did not occur every time wave fronts crossed such a region; rather, it only occurred when the wave front was very close behind the previous wave in the cycle and was therefore propagating into relatively inexcitable tissue. Close wave front spacing resulted from nonstationary reentrant propagation. Thus, uneven surface curvature and nonstationary reentrant propagation worked in concert to produce wave front fragmentation and complex activation patterns. None of the factors previously thought to be necessary for local propagation block (e.g., heterogeneous refractory period, steep action potential duration restitution) were present. We conclude that the complex geometry of the heart may be an important determinant of VF activation patterns.

  13. (Im)precise nuclear forces: From experiment to model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Perez, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    The nuclear force is the most fundamental building block in nuclear science. It is the cornerstone of every nuclear application from nuclear reactors to the production of heavy elements in supernovae. Despite being rigorously derived from the Standard Model, the actual determination of the nuclear force requires adjusting a set of parameters to reproduce experimental data. This introduces uncertainties that need to be quantified and propagated into all nuclear applications. I'll review a series of works on the determination of the Nucleon-Nucleon interaction from a collection of over 8000 elastic scattering data. Statistical tools used on the selection of data and the propagation of statistical uncertainties will be presented. The implications for charge independence of the pion-nucleon coupling constant and the predictive power of chiral interactions will be discussed. Although this is not the final word on theoretical nuclear uncertainties, as other sources of errors should be explored, this series of works allow to set the foundations for a new era for uncertainty quantification in nuclear applications. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Funding was also provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Award DE-SC0008511 (NUCLEI SciDAC Collaboration)

  14. Nuclear mass dependence of chaotic dynamics in Ginocchio model

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshinaga, N; Shigehara, T; Yoshinaga, Naotaka; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Shigehara, Takaomi

    1995-01-01

    The chaotic dynamics in nuclear collective motion is studied in the framework of a schematic shell model which has only monopole and quadrupole degrees of freedom. The model is shown to reproduce the experimentally observed global trend toward less chaotic motion in heavier nuclei. The relation between current approach and the earlier studies with bosonic models is discussed.

  15. Nuclear fragmentation for Xe+Au and Xe+Ag systems at an energy of 44 A.MeV, formation and decay of hot nuclei; Etude de la fragmentation nucleaire pour les systemes XE+AU et XE+AG a 44 A.MeV, production et decroissance de noyaux chauds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meslin, C.

    1995-01-01

    A study of the formation and the decay of hot nuclear fragments produced in the reactions Xe+Au and Xe+Ag at an energy of 44 A.MeV is presented in this thesis. The 4{pi} experimental setup consisted of four multidetectors -two for the detection of the fragments (Z>7; DELF and XYZT) and two for the detection of the charged particles (Z<6; MUR and TONNEAU) and allowed an analysis using ``complete events`` (80 % of the total charge and the total parallel linear momentum of the entrance channel) to be carried out. The reaction mechanism is binary with as observed at low energy an almost complete relaxation of the incident energy. The collision results in two hot fragments at the beginning of the exit channel which decay by evaporation and/or fragmentation. In addition of these two body events, we have identified a new dynamic mechanism where we detect a small fragment, called the neck, coming form the overlap of the nuclei during the interaction, in coincidence with a projectile-like fragment and a target-like fragment. For the most dissipative collisions, the deep inelastic collision have allowed an estimation of the lifetime of the hot nuclear fragments to be made. This is possible using proximity effects and fragment-fragment space-time correlations of the decay of one or two primary partners from the deep inelastic collisions. This method is seen to reach its limits in the case of the reactions studied here. (authors). 61 refs.

  16. Towards many-body based nuclear reaction modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilaire, Stéphane; Goriely, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    The increasing need for cross sections far from the valley of stability poses a challenge for nuclear reaction models. So far, predictions of cross sections have relied on more or less phenomenological approaches, depending on parameters adjusted to available experimental data or deduced from systematic expressions. While such predictions are expected to be reliable for nuclei not too far from the experimentally known regions, it is clearly preferable to use more fundamental approaches, based on sound physical principles, when dealing with very exotic nuclei. Thanks to the high computer power available today, all the ingredients required to model a nuclear reaction can now be (and have been) microscopically (or semi-microscopically) determined starting from the information provided by a nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. This concerns nuclear masses, optical model potential, nuclear level densities, photon strength functions, as well as fission barriers. All these nuclear model ingredients, traditionally given by phenomenological expressions, now have a microscopic counterpart implemented in the TALYS nuclear reaction code. We are thus now able to perform fully microscopic cross section calculations. The quality of these ingredients and the impact of using them instead of the usually adopted phenomenological parameters will be discussed. Perspectives for the coming years will be drawn on the improvements one can expect.

  17. Analysis of length distribution of short DNA fragments induced by 7Li ions using the random-breakage model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Fuquan; ZHAO Kui; ZHAN Yong; CAO Tianguang; NI Meinan; SUI Li; CAI Minghui; ZHUO Yizhong

    2005-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is an important bio-macromolecule. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are considered to be the most important initial damage responsible for all biological effects induced by ionizing radiation. In this paper the length distribution of DNA fragments induced by 7Li ionizing radiation is fitted with the random breakage model. In this model, the parameter u is the average number of DSBs on every DNA molecule induced by ionizing radiation. The fitting result shows that the random breakage model cannot describe the distribution of DNA fragments in lower doses, while the random breakage model is in better accordance with the experimental data in higher doses. It is shown that the length distribution of DNA fragments has random statistical feature in higher doses. In this situation, the random breakage model looks like a model without any parameter since the u has specific physical meaning and can directly be obtained from experimental data.

  18. Neutrinoless double beta nuclear matrix elements around mass 80 in the nuclear shell-model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, N.; Higashiyama, K.; Taguchi, D.; Teruya, E.

    2015-05-01

    The observation of the neutrinoless double-beta decay can determine whether the neutrino is a Majorana particle or not. For theoretical nuclear physics it is particularly important to estimate three types of matrix elements, namely Fermi (F), Gamow-Teller (GT), and tensor (T) matrix elements. In this paper, we carry out shell-model calculations and also pair-truncated shell-model calculations to check the model dependence in the case of mass A=82 nuclei.

  19. Neutrinoless double beta nuclear matrix elements around mass 80 in the nuclear shell-model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinaga N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The observation of the neutrinoless double-beta decay can determine whether the neutrino is a Majorana particle or not. For theoretical nuclear physics it is particularly important to estimate three types of matrix elements, namely Fermi (F, Gamow-Teller (GT, and tensor (T matrix elements. In this paper, we carry out shell-model calculations and also pair-truncated shell-model calculations to check the model dependence in the case of mass A=82 nuclei.

  20. Relativistic Mean-Field Models and Nuclear Matter Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Dutra, M; Carlson, B V; Delfino, A; Menezes, D P; Avancini, S S; Stone, J R; Providência, C; Typel, S

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a preliminary study of 147 relativistic mean-field (RMF) hadronic models used in the literature, regarding their behavior in the nuclear matter regime. We analyze here different kinds of such models, namely: (i) linear models, (ii) nonlinear \\sigma^3+\\sigma^4 models, (iii) \\sigma^3+\\sigma^4+\\omega^4 models, (iv) models containing mixing terms in the fields \\sigma and \\omega, (v) density dependent models, and (vi) point-coupling ones. In the finite range models, the attractive (repulsive) interaction is described in the Lagrangian density by the \\sigma (\\omega) field. The isospin dependence of the interaction is modeled by the \\rho meson field. We submit these sets of RMF models to eleven macroscopic (experimental and empirical) constraints, used in a recent study in which 240 Skyrme parametrizations were analyzed. Such constraints cover a wide range of properties related to symmetric nuclear matter (SNM), pure neutron matter (PNM), and both SNM and PNM.

  1. An improved algorithm for MFR fragment assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontaxis, Georg, E-mail: georg.kontaxis@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Max F. Perutz Laboratories, Department of Structural and Computational Biology, Centre for Molecular Biology (Austria)

    2012-06-15

    A method for generating protein backbone models from backbone only NMR data is presented, which is based on molecular fragment replacement (MFR). In a first step, the PDB database is mined for homologous peptide fragments using experimental backbone-only data i.e. backbone chemical shifts (CS) and residual dipolar couplings (RDC). Second, this fragment library is refined against the experimental restraints. Finally, the fragments are assembled into a protein backbone fold using a rigid body docking algorithm using the RDCs as restraints. For improved performance, backbone nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) may be included at that stage. Compared to previous implementations of MFR-derived structure determination protocols this model-building algorithm offers improved stability and reliability. Furthermore, relative to CS-ROSETTA based methods, it provides faster performance and straightforward implementation with the option to easily include further types of restraints and additional energy terms.

  2. On an Increase of Critical Current in High Temperature Superconductors Doped with $^{238}U$ Due to the Production of Nuclear Photofission Fragment Tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Goncharov, I N

    2001-01-01

    The effect of appreciable increasing J_c(B,T) in HTSC (especially at liquid nitrogen temperatures of 62-78 K and magnetic fields of above 0.5 T) due to the production of fast heavy ion tracks, including those of doped U nuclear fission fragments, is known. The tracks are additional effective pinning-centers. The results described in the literature have been obtained for {235}U doped HTSC after reactor thermal neutron irradiations. Disadvantages of such a method are analyzed in this paper, in particular in case of its use for current-carrying Bi-2223/Ag tape, because a very high radioactivity level slowly decreasing in time arises. The author has suggested to use {238}U nuclear photofission in over a giant resonance energy range (E_gamma ~10-20 MeV). The experimental results obtained after tape irradiation with gamma-quanta (E_gamma \\leq 24 MeV), including a time dependence of radioactivity level, are presented. Possibilities of practical realization of this method are discussed.

  3. Secondary radiation measurements for particle therapy applications: nuclear fragmentation produced by 4He ion beams in a PMMA target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marafini, M.; Paramatti, R.; Pinci, D.; Battistoni, G.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Frallicciardi, P. M.; Mancini-Terracciano, C.; Mattei, I.; Muraro, S.; Piersanti, L.; Rovituso, M.; Rucinski, A.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Toppi, M.; Traini, G.; Voena, C.; Patera, V.

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays there is a growing interest in particle therapy treatments exploiting light ion beams against tumors due to their enhanced relative biological effectiveness and high space selectivity. In particular promising results are obtained by the use of 4He projectiles. Unlike the treatments performed using protons, the beam ions can undergo a fragmentation process when interacting with the atomic nuclei in the patient body. In this paper the results of measurements performed at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy center are reported. For the first time the absolute fluxes and the energy spectra of the fragments—protons, deuterons, and tritons—produced by 4He ion beams of 102, 125 and 145 MeV u-1 energies on a poly-methyl methacrylate target were evaluated at different angles. The obtained results are particularly relevant in view of the necessary optimization and review of the treatment planning software being developed for clinical use of 4He beams in clinical routine and the relative bench-marking of Monte Carlo algorithm predictions.

  4. Dependence of X-ray Burst Models on Nuclear Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Schatz, H

    2016-01-01

    X-ray burst model predictions of light curves and final composition of the nuclear ashes are affected by uncertain nuclear physics. Nuclear masses play an important role. Significant progress has been made in measuring the masses of very neutron deficient rare isotopes along the path of the rapid proton capture process (rp-process) in X-ray bursts. This paper identifies the remaining nuclear mass uncertainties in X-ray burst models using a one zone model that takes into account the changes in temperature and density evolution caused by changes in the nuclear physics. Two types of bursts are investigated - a typical mixed H/He burst with a limited rp-process and an extreme mixed H/He burst with an extended rp-process. Only three remaining nuclear mass uncertainties affect the light curve predictions of a typical H/He burst, and only three additional masses affect the composition strongly. A larger number of mass uncertainties remains to be addressed for the extreme H/He burst. Mass uncertainties of better than...

  5. Modelling and modal properties of nuclear fuel assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeman V.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the modelling and modal analysis of the hexagonal type nuclear fuel assembly. This very complicated mechanical system is created from the many beam type components shaped into spacer grids. The cyclic and central symmetry of the fuel rod package and load-bearing skeleton is advantageous for the fuel assembly decomposition into six identical revolved fuel rod segments, centre tube and skeleton linked by several spacer grids in horizontal planes. The derived mathematical model is used for the modal analysis of the Russian TVSA-T fuel assembly and validated in terms of experimentally determined natural frequencies, modes and static deformations caused by lateral force and torsional couple of forces. The presented model is the first necessary step for modelling of the nuclear fuel assembly vibration caused by different sources of excitation during the nuclear reactor VVER type operation.

  6. Pharmacophore modeling for anti-Chagas drug design using the fragment molecular orbital method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryunosuke Yoshino

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a neglected tropical disease that causes severe human health problems. To develop a new chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of Chagas disease, we predicted a pharmacophore model for T. cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (TcDHODH by fragment molecular orbital (FMO calculation for orotate, oxonate, and 43 orotate derivatives.Intermolecular interactions in the complexes of TcDHODH with orotate, oxonate, and 43 orotate derivatives were analyzed by FMO calculation at the MP2/6-31G level. The results indicated that the orotate moiety, which is the base fragment of these compounds, interacts with the Lys43, Asn67, and Asn194 residues of TcDHODH and the cofactor flavin mononucleotide (FMN, whereas functional groups introduced at the orotate 5-position strongly interact with the Lys214 residue.FMO-based interaction energy analyses revealed a pharmacophore model for TcDHODH inhibitor. Hydrogen bond acceptor pharmacophores correspond to Lys43 and Lys214, hydrogen bond donor and acceptor pharmacophores correspond to Asn67 and Asn194, and the aromatic ring pharmacophore corresponds to FMN, which shows important characteristics of compounds that inhibit TcDHODH. In addition, the Lys214 residue is not conserved between TcDHODH and human DHODH. Our analysis suggests that these orotate derivatives should preferentially bind to TcDHODH, increasing their selectivity. Our results obtained by pharmacophore modeling provides insight into the structural requirements for the design of TcDHODH inhibitors and their development as new anti-Chagas drugs.

  7. Interacting boson models of nuclear and nucleon structure

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, R

    1998-01-01

    Interacting boson models provide an elegant and powerful method to describe collective excitations of complex systems by introducing a set of effective degrees of freedom. We review the interacting boson model of nuclear structure and discuss a recent extension to the nucleon and its excited states.

  8. Modelling aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste phosphate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poluektov, Pavel P.; Schmidt, Olga V.; Kascheev, Vladimir A.; Ojovan, Michael I.

    2017-02-01

    A model is presented on nuclear sodium alumina phosphate (NAP) glass aqueous corrosion accounting for dissolution of radioactive glass and formation of corrosion products surface layer on the glass contacting ground water of a disposal environment. Modelling is used to process available experimental data demonstrating the generic inhibiting role of corrosion products on the NAP glass surface.

  9. Microscopic nuclear models for astrophysics: The Brussels BRUSLIB nuclear library and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, M.; Goriely, S.

    2006-10-01

    Astrophysics is in need of a broad variety of nuclear data. This concerns static ground state properties, characteristics of excited nuclei, spontaneous decay properties, or interactions of nuclei with (mainly) nucleons, α-particles or photons. A strong theoretical activity complementing laboratory efforts is also mandatory. A large variety of highly ‘exotic’ laboratory-unreachable nuclei are indeed involved in the astrophysics modelling. Even when laboratory-studied nuclei are considered, theory has very often to be called for. Mastering the huge volume of nuclear information and making it available in an accurate and usable form for incorporation into astrophysics models is clearly of pivotal importance. The recognition of this necessity has been the driving motivation for the construction of the Brussels library (BRUSLIB) of computed data of astrophysics relevance. It provides an extended information in tabular form on masses, nuclear level densities and partition functions, fission barriers, and thermonuclear reaction rates. In addition of the unprecedented broadness of its scope, BRUSLIB has the unique and most important feature of relying to the largest possible extent on global and coherent microscopic nuclear models. The models of this sort that we have developed to predict the basic properties of the nuclei and of their interactions are briefly reviewed. The content of the BRUSLIB library that relies on these models is described, as well as a user-friendly nuclear network generator (NETGEN) complementing BRUSLIB. Finally, an application of BRUSLIB and NETGEN to the p-process nucleosynthesis during He detonation in sub-Chandrasekhar CO white dwarfs is proposed.

  10. Microscopic nuclear models for astrophysics: The Brussels BRUSLIB nuclear library and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, M. [Institut d Astronomie et d Astrophysique, CP 226, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: marnould@astro.ulb.ac.be; Goriely, S. [Institut d Astronomie et d Astrophysique, CP 226, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2006-10-17

    Astrophysics is in need of a broad variety of nuclear data. This concerns static ground state properties, characteristics of excited nuclei, spontaneous decay properties, or interactions of nuclei with (mainly) nucleons, {alpha}-particles or photons. A strong theoretical activity complementing laboratory efforts is also mandatory. A large variety of highly 'exotic' laboratory-unreachable nuclei are indeed involved in the astrophysics modelling. Even when laboratory-studied nuclei are considered, theory has very often to be called for. Mastering the huge volume of nuclear information and making it available in an accurate and usable form for incorporation into astrophysics models is clearly of pivotal importance. The recognition of this necessity has been the driving motivation for the construction of the Brussels library (BRUSLIB) of computed data of astrophysics relevance. It provides an extended information in tabular form on masses, nuclear level densities and partition functions, fission barriers, and thermonuclear reaction rates. In addition of the unprecedented broadness of its scope, BRUSLIB has the unique and most important feature of relying to the largest possible extent on global and coherent microscopic nuclear models. The models of this sort that we have developed to predict the basic properties of the nuclei and of their interactions are briefly reviewed. The content of the BRUSLIB library that relies on these models is described, as well as a user-friendly nuclear network generator (NETGEN) complementing BRUSLIB. Finally, an application of BRUSLIB and NETGEN to the p-process nucleosynthesis during He detonation in sub-Chandrasekhar CO white dwarfs is proposed.

  11. PROGRESSIVE FRAGMENT MODELING OF FAILURE WAVE IN CERAMICS UNDER PLANAR IMPACT LOADING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Guo-wen; LIU Zhan-fang; HUANG Pei-yan

    2006-01-01

    Polycrystalline ceramics have heterogeneous meso-structures which result in high singularity in stress distribution. Based on this, a progressive fragment model was proposed which describes the failure wave formation and propagation in shocked ceramics.The governing equation of the failure wave was characterized by inelastic bulk strain with material damage and fracture. And the inelastic bulk strain consists of dilatant strain from nucleation and expansion of microcracks and condensed strain from collapse of original pores. Numerical simulation of the free surface velocity was performed in good agreement with planar impact experiments on 92.93% aluminas at China Academy of Engineering Physics. And the longitudinal, lateral and shear stress histories upon the arrival of the failure wave were predicted, which present the diminished shear strength and lost spall strength in the failed layer.

  12. Large Time Asymptotics for a Continuous Coagulation-Fragmentation Model with Degenerate Size-Dependent Diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Desvillettes, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    We study a continuous coagulation-fragmentation model with constant kernels for reacting polymers (see [M. Aizenman and T. Bak, Comm. Math. Phys., 65 (1979), pp. 203-230]). The polymers are set to diffuse within a smooth bounded one-dimensional domain with no-flux boundary conditions. In particular, we consider size-dependent diffusion coefficients, which may degenerate for small and large cluster-sizes. We prove that the entropy-entropy dissipation method applies directly in this inhomogeneous setting. We first show the necessary basic a priori estimates in dimension one, and second we show faster-than-polynomial convergence toward global equilibria for diffusion coefficients which vanish not faster than linearly for large sizes. This extends the previous results of [J.A. Carrillo, L. Desvillettes, and K. Fellner, Comm. Math. Phys., 278 (2008), pp. 433-451], which assumes that the diffusion coefficients are bounded below. © 2009 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  13. Modeling of Flow in Nuclear Reactor Fuel Cell Outlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František URBAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Safe and effective load of nuclear reactor fuel cells demands qualitative and quantitative analysis of relations between coolant temperature in fuel cell outlet temperature measured by thermocouple and middle temperature of coolant in thermocouple plane position. In laboratory at Insitute of thermal power engineering of the Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava was installed an experimental physical fuel cell model of VVER 440 nuclear power plant with V 213 nuclear reactors. Objective of measurements on physical model was temperature and velocity profiles analysis in the fuel cell outlet. In this paper the measured temperature and velocity profiles are compared with the results of CFD simulation of fuel cell physical model coolant flow.

  14. Estimation of Schiff moments using the nuclear shell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruya, Eri; Yoshinaga, Naotaka; Arai, Ryoichi; Higashiyama, Koji

    2014-09-01

    The existence of finite permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of an elementary particle or an atom indicates violation of time-reversal symmetry. The time reversal invariance implies violation of charge and parity symmetry through the CPT theorem. The predicted fundamental particle's EDMs are too small to be observed in the Standard Model. However, some models beyond the Standard Model produce much larger EDMs which may be observed in future. Thus, if we observe finite EDMs, we can conclude that we need a new extended model for the Standard Model and the specific value of an EDM gives a constraint on constructing a new model. Experimental efforts searching for atomic EDMs are now in progress. The EDM of a neutral atom is mainly induced by the nuclear Schiff moment, since the electron EDM is very small and the nuclear EDM is shielded by outside electrons owing to the Schiff theorem. In this work we estimate the Schiff moments for the lowest 1/2+ states of Xe isotopes around the mass 130. The nuclear wave functions beyond mean-field theories are calculated in terms of the nuclear shell model. We discuss influences of core excitations and over shell excitations on the Schiff moments.

  15. Ranking and validation of the spallation models for description of intermediate mass fragment emission from p + Ag collisions at 480 MeV incident proton beam energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sushil K.; Kamys, Bogusław; Goldenbaum, Frank; Filges, Detlef

    2016-06-01

    Double-differential cross-sections d2σ/dΩ dE for isotopically identified intermediate mass fragments ( 6Li up to 27Mg from nuclear reactions induced by 480 MeV protons impinging on a silver target were analyzed in the frame of a two-step model. The first step of the reaction was described by the intranuclear cascade model INCL4.6 and the second one by four different models (ABLA07,GEM2, GEMINI++, and SMM). The experimental spectra reveal the presence of low-energy, isotropic as well as high-energy, forward-peaked contributions. The INCL4.6 model offers a possibility to describe the latter contribution for light intermediate mass fragments by coalescence of the emitted nucleons. The qualitative agreement of the model predictions with the data was observed but the high-energy tails of the spectra were significantly overestimated. The shape of the isotropic part of the spectra was reproduced by all four models. The GEM2 model strongly underestimated the value of the cross-sections for heavier IMF whereas the SMM and ABLA07 models generally overestimated the data. The best quantitative description of the data was offered by GEMINI++, however, a discrepancy between the data and the model cross-sections still remained for almost all reaction products, especially at forward angles. It indicates that non-equilibrium processes are present which cannot be reproduced by the applied models. The goodness of the data description was judged quantitatively using two statistical deviation factors, the H-factor and the M-factor, as a tool for ranking and validation of the theoretical models.

  16. Prediction of nuclear proteins using SVM and HMM models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghava Gajendra PS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nucleus, a highly organized organelle, plays important role in cellular homeostasis. The nuclear proteins are crucial for chromosomal maintenance/segregation, gene expression, RNA processing/export, and many other processes. Several methods have been developed for predicting the nuclear proteins in the past. The aim of the present study is to develop a new method for predicting nuclear proteins with higher accuracy. Results All modules were trained and tested on a non-redundant dataset and evaluated using five-fold cross-validation technique. Firstly, Support Vector Machines (SVM based modules have been developed using amino acid and dipeptide compositions and achieved a Mathews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.59 and 0.61 respectively. Secondly, we have developed SVM modules using split amino acid compositions (SAAC and achieved the maximum MCC of 0.66. Thirdly, a hidden Markov model (HMM based module/profile was developed for searching exclusively nuclear and non-nuclear domains in a protein. Finally, a hybrid module was developed by combining SVM module and HMM profile and achieved a MCC of 0.87 with an accuracy of 94.61%. This method performs better than the existing methods when evaluated on blind/independent datasets. Our method estimated 31.51%, 21.89%, 26.31%, 25.72% and 24.95% of the proteins as nuclear proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, mouse and human proteomes respectively. Based on the above modules, we have developed a web server NpPred for predicting nuclear proteins http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/nppred/. Conclusion This study describes a highly accurate method for predicting nuclear proteins. SVM module has been developed for the first time using SAAC for predicting nuclear proteins, where amino acid composition of N-terminus and the remaining protein were computed separately. In addition, our study is a first documentation where exclusively nuclear

  17. Cleavage of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and nuclear accumulation of the cytoplasmic carboxy-terminal fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Julia L; Mills, Sarah J; Naquin, Ryan T; Alam, Jawed; Re, Richard N

    2007-04-01

    Our published studies show that the distribution of the ANG II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor (AT(1)R), expressed as a enhanced yellow fluorescent fusion (YFP) protein (AT(1)R/EYFP), is altered upon cellular treatment with ANG II or coexpression with intracellular ANG II. AT(1)R accumulates in nuclei of cells only in the presence of ANG II. Several transmembrane receptors are known to accumulate in nuclei, some as holoreceptors and others as cleaved receptor products. The present study was designed to determine whether the AT(1)R is cleaved before nuclear transport. A plasmid encoding a rat AT(1)R labeled at the amino terminus with enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and at the carboxy terminus with EYFP was employed. Image analyses of this protein in COS-7 cells, CCF-STTG1 glial cells, and A10 vascular smooth muscle cells show the two fluorescent moieties to be largely spatially colocalized in untreated cells. ANG II treatment, however, leads to a separation of the fluorescent moieties with yellow fluorescence accumulating in more than 30% of cellular nuclei. Immunoblot analyses of extracts and conditioned media from transfected cells indicate that the CFP domain fused to the extracellular amino-terminal AT(1)R domain is cleaved from the membrane and that the YFP domain, together with the intracellular cytoplasmic carboxy terminus of the AT(1)R, is also cleaved from the membrane-bound receptor. The carboxy terminus of the AT(1)R is essential for cleavage; cleavage does not occur in protein deleted with respect to this region. Overexpressed native AT(1)R (nonfusion) is also cleaved; the intracellular 6-kDa cytoplasmic domain product accumulates to a significantly higher level with ANG II treatment.

  18. Fragmentation and monomer lengthening of rod-like polymers, a relevant model for prion proliferation

    CERN Document Server

    Ciuperca, Ionel Sorin; Palade, Liviu Iulian; Pujo-Menjouet, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The Greer, Pujo-Menjouet andWebb model [Greer et al., J. Theoret. Biol., 242 (2006), 598-606] for prion dynamics was found to be in good agreement with experimental observations under no-flow conditions. The objective of this work is to generalize the problem to the framework of general polymerization-fragmentation under flow motion, motivated by the fact that laboratory work often involves prion dynamics under flow conditions in order to observe faster processes. Moreover, understanding and modelling the microstructure influence of macroscopically monitored non-Newtonian behaviour is crucial for sensor design, with the goal to provide practical information about ongoing molecular evolution. This paper's results can then be considered as one step in the mathematical understanding of such models, namely the proof of positivity and existence of solutions in suitable functional spaces. To that purpose, we introduce a new model based on the rigid-rod polymer theory to account for the polymer dynamics under flow c...

  19. Correlation measurements of fission-fragment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberstedt, S.; Belgya, T.; Billnert, R.; Borcea, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Göök, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Karlsson, J.; Kis, Z.; Martinez, T.; Oberstedt, A.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Takác, K.

    2010-10-01

    For the development of future nuclear fission applications and for a responsible handling of nuclear waste the a-priori assessment of the fission-fragments' heat production and toxicity is a fundamental necessity. The success of an indispensable modelling of the fission process strongly depends on a good understanding of the particular mechanism of scission, the mass fragmentation and partition of excitation energy. Experimental observables are fission-fragment properties like mass- and energy-distributions, and the prompt neutron as well as γ-ray multiplicities and emission spectra. The latter quantities should preferably be known as a function of fragment mass and excitation energy. Those data are highly demanded as published by the OECD-NEA in its high priority data request list. With the construction of the double (v, E) spectrometer VERDI we aim at measuring pre- and post-neutron masses directly and simultaneously to avoid prompt neutron corrections. From the simultaneous measurement of pre- and post-neutron fission-fragment data the prompt neutron multiplicity may then be inferred fully correlated with fragment mass yield and total kinetic energy. Using an ultra-fast fission event trigger spectral prompt fission γ-ray measurements may be performed. For that purpose recently developed lanthanum-halide detectors, with excellent timing characteristics, were coupled to the VERDI spectrometer allowing for a very good discrimination of fission γ-rays and prompt neutrons due to their different time-of-flight.

  20. Vapor film collapse triggered by external pressure pulse and the fragmentation of melt droplet in FCIs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qian; TONG Lili; CAO Xuewu; KRIVENTSEV Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    The fragmentation process of high-temperature molten drop is a key factor to determine the ratio heat transferred to power in FCIs,which estimates the possible damage degree during the hypothetical severe accident in the nuclear reactors.In this paper,the fragmentation process of melt droplet in FCIs is investigated by theoretic analysis.The fragmentation mechanism is studied when an external pressure pulse applied to a melt droplet,which is surrounded by vapor film.The vapor film collapse which induces fragmentation of melt droplet is analyzed and modeled.And then the generated pressure is calculated.The vapor film collapse model is introduced to fragmentation correlation,and the predicted fragment size is calculated and compared with experimental data.The result shows that the developed model can predict the diameter of fragments and can be used to calculate the fragmentation process appreciatively.

  1. Nuclear chirality, a model and the data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starosta, K.; Koike, T.

    2017-09-01

    In the last decade, the manifestation of chirality in atomic nuclei has become the subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies. The common feature of current model calculations is that the chiral geometry of angular momentum coupling is extracted from expectation values of orientation operators, rather than being a starting point in construction of a model. However, using the particle-hole coupling model for triaxial odd-odd nuclei it is possible to construct a basis which contains right-handed, left-handed and planar states of angular momentum coupling. If this basis is used, the chirality is an explicit rather than an extracted feature as in any other models with non-chiral bases. The time-reversal symmetry, which relates the basis states of opposite handedness, can be used to reduce the dimension of matrices for diagonalization of the model Hamiltonian, proving the effectiveness of this approach. Moreover, the final model eigenstate wave functions show a concentration of amplitudes among a relatively small number (˜1%) of components compared to the full model space. In that sense, the ‘chiral’ basis provides a useful tool to examine model predictions providing direct insight into the structure of doublet states. In this work, similarities and differences between the rotational behaviour of an axial and triaxial body provide a starting point for derivation of the basis optimal for valence nucleon coupling to an axial and a triaxial core. The derived ‘chiral’ basis is optimal for coupling of a valence particle and hole to the triaxial core. Model predictions are presented and discussed. A comprehensive review of current experimental data on observed chiral band candidates is also provided.

  2. An Elastic Model of Blebbing in Nuclear Lamin Meshworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkhouser, Chloe; Sknepnek, Rastko; Shimi, Takeshi; Goldman, Anne; Goldman, Robert; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2013-03-01

    A two-component continuum elastic model is introduced to analyze a nuclear lamin meshwork, a structural element of the lamina of the nuclear envelope. The main component of the lamina is a meshwork of lamin protein filaments providing mechanical support to the nucleus and also playing a role in gene expression. Abnormalities in nuclear shape are associated with a variety of pathologies, including some forms of cancer and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, and are often characterized by protruding structures termed nuclear blebs. Nuclear blebs are rich in A-type lamins and may be related to pathological gene expression. We apply the two-dimensional elastic shell model to determine which characteristics of the meshwork could be responsible for blebbing, including heterogeneities in the meshwork thickness and mesh size. We find that if one component of the lamin meshwork, rich in A-type lamins, has a tendency to form a larger mesh size than that rich in B-type lamins, this is sufficient to cause segregation of the lamin components and also to form blebs rich in A-type lamins. The model produces structures with comparable morphologies and mesh size distributions as the lamin meshworks of real, pathological nuclei. Funded by US DoE Award DEFG02-08ER46539 and by the DDR&E and AFOSR under Award FA9550-10-1-0167; simulations performed on NU Quest cluster

  3. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of benzophenone tagged pyridine analogues towards activation of caspase activated DNase mediated nuclear fragmentation in Dalton's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghorbani, Mohammed; Thirusangu, Prabhu; Gurupadaswamy, H D; Girish, V; Shamanth Neralagundi, H G; Prabhakar, B T; Khanum, Shaukath Ara

    2016-04-01

    A series of benzophenones possessing pyridine nucleus 8a-l were synthesized by multistep reaction sequence and evaluated for antiproliferative activity against DLA cells by in vitro and in vivo studies. The results suggested that, compounds 8b with fluoro group and 8e with chloro substituent at the benzoyl ring of benzophenone scaffold as well as pyridine ring with hydroxy group exhibited significant activity. Further investigation in mouse model suggests that compounds 8b and 8e have the potency to activate caspase activated DNase (endonuclease) which is responsible for DNA fragmentation, a primary hallmark of apoptosis and thereby inhibits the Dalton's lymphoma ascites tumour growth.

  4. Modelling Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Leitner, T; Mosel, U

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a model to describe the interactions of neutrinos with nucleons and nuclei via charged and neutral currents, focusing on the region of the quasielastic and Delta(1232) peaks. For neutrino nucleon collisions a fully relativistic formalism is used. The extension to finite nuclei has been done in the framework of a coupled-channel BUU transport model where we have studied exclusive channels taking into account in-medium effects and final state interactions.

  5. The Intrinsic Dynamics and Unfolding Process of an Antibody Fab Fragment Revealed by Elastic Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Guo Su

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies have been increasingly used as pharmaceuticals in clinical treatment. Thermal stability and unfolding process are important properties that must be considered in antibody design. In this paper, the structure-encoded dynamical properties and the unfolding process of the Fab fragment of the phosphocholine-binding antibody McPC603 are investigated by use of the normal mode analysis of Gaussian network model (GNM. Firstly, the temperature factors for the residues of the protein were calculated with GNM and then compared with the experimental measurements. A good result was obtained, which provides the validity for the use of GNM to study the dynamical properties of the protein. Then, with this approach, the mean-square fluctuation (MSF of the residues, as well as the MSF in the internal distance (MSFID between all pairwise residues, was calculated to investigate the mobility and flexibility of the protein, respectively. It is found that the mobility and flexibility of the constant regions are higher than those of the variable regions, and the six complementarity-determining regions (CDRs in the variable regions also exhibit relative large mobility and flexibility. The large amplitude motions of the CDRs are considered to be associated with the immune function of the antibody. In addition, the unfolding process of the protein was simulated by iterative use of the GNM. In our method, only the topology of protein native structure is taken into account, and the protein unfolding process is simulated through breaking the native contacts one by one according to the MSFID values between the residues. It is found that the flexible regions tend to unfold earlier. The sequence of the unfolding events obtained by our method is consistent with the hydrogen-deuterium exchange experimental results. Our studies imply that the unfolding behavior of the Fab fragment of antibody McPc603 is largely determined by the intrinsic dynamics of the protein.

  6. Habitat fragmentation, vole population fluctuations, and the ROMPA hypothesis: An experimental test using model landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzli, George O

    2016-11-01

    Increased habitat fragmentation leads to smaller size of habitat patches and to greater distance between patches. The ROMPA hypothesis (ratio of optimal to marginal patch area) uniquely links vole population fluctuations to the composition of the landscape. It states that as ROMPA decreases (fragmentation increases), vole population fluctuations will increase (including the tendency to display multi-annual cycles in abundance) because decreased proportions of optimal habitat result in greater population declines and longer recovery time after a harsh season. To date, only comparative observations in the field have supported the hypothesis. This paper reports the results of the first experimental test. I used prairie voles, Microtus ochrogaster, and mowed grassland to create model landscapes with 3 levels of ROMPA (high with 25% mowed, medium with 50% mowed and low with 75% mowed). As ROMPA decreased, distances between patches of favorable habitat (high cover) increased owing to a greater proportion of unfavorable (mowed) habitat. Results from the first year with intensive live trapping indicated that the preconditions for operation of the hypothesis existed (inversely density dependent emigration and, as ROMPA decreased, increased per capita mortality and decreased per capita movement between optimal patches). Nevertheless, contrary to the prediction of the hypothesis that populations in landscapes with high ROMPA should have the lowest variability, 5 years of trapping indicated that variability was lowest with medium ROMPA. The design of field experiments may never be perfect, but these results indicate that the ROMPA hypothesis needs further rigorous testing. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. The Gogny-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov nuclear-mass model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goriely, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, CP-226, Brussels (Belgium); Hilaire, S.; Girod, M.; Peru, S. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France)

    2016-07-15

    We present the Gogny-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model which reproduces nuclear masses with an accuracy comparable with the best mass formulas. In contrast to the Skyrme-HFB nuclear-mass models, an explicit and self-consistent account of all the quadrupole correlation energies is included within the 5D collective Hamiltonian approach. The final rms deviation with respect to the 2353 measured masses is 789 keV in the 2012 atomic mass evaluation. In addition, the D1M Gogny force is shown to predict nuclear and neutron matter properties in agreement with microscopic calculations based on realistic two- and three-body forces. The D1M properties and its predictions of various observables are compared with those of D1S and D1N. (orig.)

  8. Structural models of antibody variable fragments: A method for investigating binding mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Samuel; Brard, Frédéric; Coquerel, Gérard; Perez, Guy; Tron, François

    1998-03-01

    The value of comparative molecular modeling for elucidating structure-function relationships was demonstrated by analyzing six anti-nucleosome autoantibody variable fragments. Structural models were built using the automated procedure developed in the COMPOSER software, subsequently minimized with the AMBER force field, and validated according to several standard geometric and chemical criteria. Canonical class assignment from Chothia and Lesk's [Chottin and Lesk, J. Mol. Biol., 196 (1987) 901; Chothia et al., Nature, 342 (1989) 877] work was used as a supplementary validation tool for five of the six hypervariable loops. The analysis, based on the hypothesis that antigen binding could occur through electrostatic interactions, reveals a diversity of possible binding mechanisms of anti-nucleosome or anti-histone antibodies to their cognate antigen. These results lead us to postulate that anti-nucleosome autoantibodies could have different origins. Since both anti-DNA and anti-nculeosome autoantibodies are produced during the course of systemic lupus erythematosus, a non-organ specific autoimmune disease, a comparative structural and electrostatic analysis of the two populations of autoantibodies may constitute a way to elucidate their origin and the role of the antigen in tolerance breakdown. The present study illustrates some interests, advantages and limits of a methodology based on the use of comparative modeling and analysis of molecular surface properties.

  9. Compositional Fragmentation Model for the Oxidation of Sulfide Particles in a Flash Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Sánchez, Víctor Roberto; Pérez-Tello, Manuel; Duarte-Ruiz, Cirilo Andrés; Sohn, Hong Yong

    2014-04-01

    A mathematical model to predict the size distribution and chemical composition of a cloud of sulfide particles during high-temperature oxidation in a flash reactor is presented. The model incorporates the expansion and further fragmentation of the reacting particles along their trajectories throughout the reaction chamber. A relevant feature of the present formulation is its flexibility to treat a variety of flash reacting systems, such as the flash smelting and flash converting processes. This is accomplished by computing the chemical composition of individual particles and the size distribution and overall composition of the particle cloud in separate modules, which are coupled through a database of particle properties previously stored on disk. The flash converting of solid copper mattes is considered as an example. The model predictions showed good agreement with the experimental data collected in a large laboratory reactor in terms of particle size distribution and sulfur remaining in the population of particles. The cumulative contribution and distribution coefficients are introduced to quantify the relationship between specific particle sizes in the feed and those in the reacted products upon oxidation, the latter of which has practical implications on the amount and chemical composition of dust particles produced during the industrial operation.

  10. Stochastic modeling of deterioration in nuclear power plant components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xianxun

    2007-12-01

    The risk-based life-cycle management of engineering systems in a nuclear power plant is intended to ensure safe and economically efficient operation of energy generation infrastructure over its entire service life. An important element of life-cycle management is to understand, model and forecast the effect of various degradation mechanisms affecting the performance of engineering systems, structures and components. The modeling of degradation in nuclear plant components is confounded by large sampling and temporal uncertainties. The reason is that nuclear systems are not readily accessible for inspections due to high level of radiation and large costs associated with remote data collection methods. The models of degradation used by industry are largely derived from ordinary linear regression methods. The main objective of this thesis is to develop more advanced techniques based on stochastic process theory to model deterioration in engineering components with the purpose of providing more scientific basis to life-cycle management of aging nuclear power plants. This thesis proposes a stochastic gamma process (GP) model for deterioration and develops a suite of statistical techniques for calibrating the model parameters. The gamma process is a versatile and mathematically tractable stochastic model for a wide variety of degradation phenomena, and another desirable property is its nonnegative, monotonically increasing sample paths. In the thesis, the GP model is extended by including additional covariates and also modeling for random effects. The optimization of age-based replacement and condition-based maintenance strategies is also presented. The thesis also investigates improved regression techniques for modeling deterioration. A linear mixed-effects (LME) regression model is presented to resolve an inconsistency of the traditional regression models. The proposed LME model assumes that the randomness in deterioration is decomposed into two parts: the unobserved

  11. nuclear bound states in a dynamical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareš, J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2006-05-01

    A comprehensive data base of K-atom level shifts and widths is re-analyzed in order to study the density dependence of the K¯-nuclear optical potential. Significant departure from a tρ form is found only for ρ(r)/ρ ≲ 0.2 and extrapolation to nuclear-matter density ρ yields an attractive potential, about 170 MeV deep. Partial restoration of chiral symmetry compatible with pionic atoms and low-energy pion-nuclear data plays no role at the relevant low-density regime, but this effect is not ruled out at densities of order ρ and beyond. K¯-nuclear bound states are generated across the periodic table self consistently, using a relativistic mean-field model Lagrangian which couples the K¯ to the scalar and vector meson fields mediating the nuclear interactions. The reduced phase space available for K¯ absorption from these bound states is taken into account by adding an energy-dependent imaginary term which underlies the corresponding K¯-nuclear level widths, with a strength required by fits to the atomic data. Substantial polarization of the core nucleus is found for light nuclei, and the binding energies and widths calculated in this dynamical model differ appreciably from those calculated for a static nucleus. A wide range of binding energies is spanned by varying the K¯ couplings to the meson fields. Our calculations provide a lower limit of Γ=50±10 MeV on the width of nuclear bound states for K¯-binding energy in the range B˜100-200 MeV. Comments are made on the interpretation of the FINUDA experiment at DAΦNE which claimed evidence for deeply bound Kpp states in light nuclei.

  12. Restoring habitat corridors in fragmented landscapes using optimization and percolation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin C. Williams; Stephanie A. Snyder

    2005-01-01

    Landscape fragmentation and habitat loss are significant threats to the conservation of biological diversity. Creating and restoring corridors between isolated habitat patches can help mitigate or reverse the impacts of fragmentation. It is important that restoration and protection efforts be undertaken in the most efficient and effective way possible because...

  13. Jaguars on the move: modeling movement to mitigate fragmentation from road expansion in the Mayan Forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colchero, Fernando; Conde, Dalia Amor; Manterola, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Road-induced habitat fragmentation is one of the greatest threats to large carnivores. Wildlife passes have been used to reduce fragmentation by mitigating the effects of roads as barriers to animal movement. However, direct observations of animals crossing roads are extremely rare and thus...

  14. Dependence of Two-proton Radioactivity on Nuclear Pairing Models

    CERN Document Server

    Oishi, Tomohiro; Pastore, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of two-proton emitting decays to the nuclear pairing correlation is discussed within a time-dependent three-body model. We focus on the $^6$Be nucleus assuming $\\alpha + p + p$ configuration, and its decay process is described as a time-evolution of the three-body resonance state. A noticeable model-dependence of two-proton decay width is found by utilizing schematic density-dependent contact (SDDC) and the finite-range Minnesota pairing models. The model-dependence with the SDDC pairing interaction can be understood from the density distribution of the resonance state, which reflects a synergy of participating interactions. Our result suggests that two-proton decay width may be a suitable reference quantity to sophisticate the nuclear pairing model beyond the nucleon driplines.

  15. Multiscale Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification for Nuclear Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estep, Donald [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); El-Azab, Anter [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Pernice, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Peterson, John W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Polyakov, Peter [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Tavener, Simon [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Xiu, Dongbin [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2017-03-23

    In this project, we will address the challenges associated with constructing high fidelity multiscale models of nuclear fuel performance. We (*) propose a novel approach for coupling mesoscale and macroscale models, (*) devise efficient numerical methods for simulating the coupled system, and (*) devise and analyze effective numerical approaches for error and uncertainty quantification for the coupled multiscale system. As an integral part of the project, we will carry out analysis of the effects of upscaling and downscaling, investigate efficient methods for stochastic sensitivity analysis of the individual macroscale and mesoscale models, and carry out a posteriori error analysis for computed results. We will pursue development and implementation of solutions in software used at Idaho National Laboratories on models of interest to the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program.

  16. Psychometric model for safety culture assessment in nuclear research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, C.S. do, E-mail: claudio.souza@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2468, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, D.A., E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN – SP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mesquita, R.N. de, E-mail: rnavarro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN – SP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • A psychometric model to evaluate ‘safety climate’ at nuclear research facilities. • The model presented evidences of good psychometric qualities. • The model was applied to nuclear research facilities in Brazil. • Some ‘safety culture’ weaknesses were detected in the assessed organization. • A potential tool to develop safety management programs in nuclear facilities. - Abstract: A safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants depends not only on technical performance, but also on the people and on the organization. Organizational factors have been recognized as the main causal mechanisms of accidents by research organizations through USA, Europe and Japan. Deficiencies related with these factors reveal weaknesses in the organization’s safety culture. A significant number of instruments to assess the safety culture based on psychometric models that evaluate safety climate through questionnaires, and which are based on reliability and validity evidences, have been published in health and ‘safety at work’ areas. However, there are few safety culture assessment instruments with these characteristics (reliability and validity) available on nuclear literature. Therefore, this work proposes an instrument to evaluate, with valid and reliable measures, the safety climate of nuclear research facilities. The instrument was developed based on methodological principles applied to research modeling and its psychometric properties were evaluated by a reliability analysis and validation of content, face and construct. The instrument was applied to an important nuclear research organization in Brazil. This organization comprises 4 research reactors and many nuclear laboratories. The survey results made possible a demographic characterization and the identification of some possible safety culture weaknesses and pointing out potential areas to be improved in the assessed organization. Good evidence of reliability with Cronbach's alpha

  17. Modeling Deep Burn TRISO particle nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M., E-mail: besmanntm@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Stoller, R.E., E-mail: stollerre@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Samolyuk, G., E-mail: samolyukgd@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Schuck, P.C., E-mail: schuckpc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Golubov, S.I., E-mail: golubovsi@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Rudin, S.P., E-mail: srudin@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wills, J.M., E-mail: jxw@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Coe, J.D., E-mail: jcoe@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wirth, B.D., E-mail: bdwirth@utk.edu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0750 (United States); Kim, S., E-mail: sungtae@cae.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin, 1509 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Morgan, D.D., E-mail: ddmorgan@engr.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin, 1509 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Szlufarska, I., E-mail: izabela@engr.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin, 1509 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Under the DOE Deep Burn program TRISO fuel is being investigated as a fuel form for consuming plutonium and minor actinides, and for greater efficiency in uranium utilization. The result will thus be to drive TRISO particulate fuel to very high burn-ups. In the current effort the various phenomena in the TRISO particle are being modeled using a variety of techniques. The chemical behavior is being treated utilizing thermochemical analysis to identify phase formation/transformation and chemical activities in the particle, including kernel migration. Density functional theory is being used to understand fission product diffusion within the plutonia oxide kernel, the fission product's attack on the SiC coating layer, as well as fission product diffusion through an alternative coating layer, ZrC. Finally, a multiscale approach is being used to understand thermal transport, including the effect of radiation damage induced defects, in a model SiC material.

  18. Nuclear-induced XeBr/asterisk/ photolytic laser model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Parameters for a photolytically pumped alkyl iodide lasant gas by the nuclear-induced XeBr excimer fluorescence are calculated according to a detailed kinetic model. High gain on the atomic iodine 2P1/2 state is estimated and 100-mJ pulses with an average power output on the order of 1 kW appear possible.

  19. Mechanisms in Impact Fragmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Wittel, Falk K.; Carmona, Humberto A.; Kun, Ferenc; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2015-01-01

    The brittle fragmentation of spheres is studied numerically by a 3D Discrete Element Model. Large scale computer simulations are performed with models that consist of agglomerates of many spherical particles, interconnected by beam-truss elements. We focus on a detailed description of the fragmentation process and study several fragmentation mechanisms involved. The evolution of meridional cracks is studied in detail. These cracks are found to initiate in the inside of the specimen with quasi...

  20. Experimental verification of proton beam monitoring in a human body by use of activity image of positron-emitting nuclei generated by nuclear fragmentation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Teiji; Miyatake, Aya; Inoue, Kazumasa; Gomi-Miyagishi, Tomoko; Kohno, Ryosuke; Kameoka, Satoru; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Ogino, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Proton therapy is a form of radiotherapy that enables concentration of dose on a tumor by use of a scanned or modulated Bragg peak. Therefore, it is very important to evaluate the proton-irradiated volume accurately. The proton-irradiated volume can be confirmed by detection of pair-annihilation gamma rays from positron-emitting nuclei generated by the nuclear fragmentation reaction of the incident protons on target nuclei using a PET apparatus. The activity of the positron-emitting nuclei generated in a patient was measured with a PET-CT apparatus after proton beam irradiation of the patient. Activity measurement was performed in patients with tumors of the brain, head and neck, liver, lungs, and sacrum. The 3-D PET image obtained on the CT image showed the visual correspondence with the irradiation area of the proton beam. Moreover, it was confirmed that there were differences in the strength of activity from the PET-CT images obtained at each irradiation site. The values of activity obtained from both measurement and calculation based on the reaction cross section were compared, and it was confirmed that the intensity and the distribution of the activity changed with the start time of the PET imaging after proton beam irradiation. The clinical use of this information about the positron-emitting nuclei will be important for promoting proton treatment with higher accuracy in the future.

  1. Sleep Fragmentation Exacerbates Mechanical Hypersensitivity and Alters Subsequent Sleep-Wake Behavior in a Mouse Model of Musculoskeletal Sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Blair C.; Opp, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep deprivation, or sleep disruption, enhances pain in human subjects. Chronic musculoskeletal pain is prevalent in our society, and constitutes a tremendous public health burden. Although preclinical models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain demonstrate effects on sleep, few studies focus on musculoskeletal pain. We reported elsewhere in this issue of SLEEP that musculoskeletal sensitization alters sleep of mice. In this study we hypothesize that sleep fragmentation during the development of musculoskeletal sensitization will exacerbate subsequent pain responses and alter sleep-wake behavior of mice. Design: This is a preclinical study using C57BL/6J mice to determine the effect on behavioral outcomes of sleep fragmentation combined with musculoskeletal sensitization. Methods: Musculoskeletal sensitization, a model of chronic muscle pain, was induced using two unilateral injections of acidified saline (pH 4.0) into the gastrocnemius muscle, spaced 5 days apart. Musculoskeletal sensitization manifests as mechanical hypersensitivity determined by von Frey filament testing at the hindpaws. Sleep fragmentation took place during the consecutive 12-h light periods of the 5 days between intramuscular injections. Electroencephalogram (EEG) and body temperature were recorded from some mice at baseline and for 3 weeks after musculoskeletal sensitization. Mechanical hypersensitivity was determined at preinjection baseline and on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after sensitization. Two additional experiments were conducted to determine the independent effects of sleep fragmentation or musculoskeletal sensitization on mechanical hypersensitivity. Results: Five days of sleep fragmentation alone did not induce mechanical hypersensitivity, whereas sleep fragmentation combined with musculoskeletal sensitization resulted in prolonged and exacerbated mechanical hypersensitivity. Sleep fragmentation combined with musculoskeletal sensitization had an effect on

  2. The fundamental role of symmetry in nuclear models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, D. J. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7 (Canada)

    2013-06-10

    The purpose of these lectures is to illustrate how symmetry and pattern recognition play essential roles in the progression from experimental observation to an understanding of nuclear phenomena in terms of interacting neutrons and protons. We do not discuss weak interactions nor relativistic and sub-nucleon degrees of freedom. The explicit use of symmetry and the power of algebraic methods, in combination with analytical and geometrical methods are illustrated by their use in deriving a shell-model description of nuclear rotational dynamics and the structure of deformed nuclei.

  3. Multilevel flow modeling of Monju Nuclear Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Morten; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2011-01-01

    Multilevel Flow Modeling is a method for modeling complex processes on multiple levels of means-end and part-whole abstraction. The modeling method has been applied on a wide range of processes including power plants, chemical engineering plants and power systems. The modeling method is supported...... functions and structure. The paper will describe how MFM can be used to represent the goals and functions of the Japanese Monju Nuclear Power Plant. A detailed explanation will be given of the model describing the relations between levels of goal, function and structural. Furthermore, it will be explained...

  4. Modeling Deep Burn TRISO Particle Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Samolyuk, German D [ORNL; Schuck, Paul C [ORNL; Rudin, Sven [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wills, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wirth, Brian D. [University of California, Berkeley; Kim, Sungtae [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Under the DOE Deep Burn program TRISO fuel is being investigated as a fuel form for consuming plutonium and minor actinides, and for greater efficiency in uranium utilization. The result will thus be to drive TRISO particulate fuel to very high burn-ups. In the current effort the various phenomena in the TRISO particle are being modeled using a variety of techniques. The chemical behavior is being treated utilizing thermochemical analysis to identify phase formation/transformation and chemical activities in the particle, including kernel migration. First principles calculations are being used to investigate the critical issue of fission product palladium attack on the SiC coating layer. Density functional theory is being used to understand fission product diffusion within the plutonia oxide kernel. Kinetic Monte Carlo techniques are shedding light on transport of fission products, most notably silver, through the carbon and SiC coating layers. The diffusion of fission products through an alternative coating layer, ZrC, is being assessed via DFT methods. Finally, a multiscale approach is being used to understand thermal transport, including the effect of radiation damage induced defects, in a model SiC material.

  5. Nuclear symmetry energy in a modified quark meson coupling model

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, R N; Panda, P K; Barik, N; Frederico, T

    2015-01-01

    We study nuclear symmetry energy and the thermodynamic instabilities of asymmetric nuclear matter in a self-consistent manner by using a modified quark-meson coupling model where the confining interaction for quarks inside a nucleon is represented by a phenomenologically averaged potential in an equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. The nucleon-nucleon interaction in nuclear matter is then realized by introducing additional quark couplings to $\\sigma$, $\\omega$, and $\\rho$ mesons through mean-field approximations. We find an analytic expression for the symmetry energy ${\\cal E}_{sym}$ as a function of its slope $L$. Our result establishes a linear correlation between $L$ and ${\\cal E}_{sym}$. We also analyze the constraint on neutron star radii in $(pn)$ matter with $\\beta$ equilibrium.

  6. Nuclear rho transparencies in a relativistic Glauber model

    CERN Document Server

    Cosyn, Wim

    2013-01-01

    [Background] The recent Jefferson Lab data for the nuclear transparency in $\\rho^ {0}$ electroproduction have the potential to settle the scale for the onset of color transparency (CT) in vector meson production. [Purpose] To compare the data to calculations in a relativistic and quantum-mechanical Glauber model and to investigate whether they are in accordance with results including color transparency given that the computation of $\\rho$-nucleus attenuations is subject to some uncertainties. [Method] We compute the nuclear transparencies in a multiple-scattering Glauber model and account for effects stemming from color transparency, from $\\rho$-meson decay, and from short-range correlations (SRC) in the final-state interactions (FSI). [Results] The robustness of the model is tested by comparing the mass dependence and the hard-scale dependence of the $A(e,e'p)$ nuclear transparencies with the data. The hard-scale dependence of the $(e,e' \\rho ^ {0})$ nuclear transparencies for $^ {12}$C and $^ {56}$Fe are on...

  7. K- nuclear potentials from in-medium chirally motivated models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplý, A.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Gazda, D.; Mareš, J.

    2011-10-01

    A self-consistent scheme for constructing K- nuclear optical potentials from subthreshold in-medium K¯N s-wave scattering amplitudes is presented and applied to analysis of kaonic atoms data and to calculations of K- quasibound nuclear states. The amplitudes are taken from a chirally motivated meson-baryon coupled-channel model, both at the Tomozawa-Weinberg leading order and at the next to leading order. Typical kaonic atoms potentials are characterized by a real part -ReVK-chiral=85±5 MeV at nuclear matter density, in contrast to half this depth obtained in some derivations based on in-medium K¯N threshold amplitudes. The moderate agreement with data is much improved by adding complex ρ- and ρ2-dependent phenomenological terms, found to be dominated by ρ2 contributions that could represent K¯NN→YN absorption and dispersion, outside the scope of meson-baryon chiral models. Depths of the real potentials are then near 180 MeV. The effects of p-wave interactions are studied and found secondary to those of the dominant s-wave contributions. The in-medium dynamics of the coupled-channel model is discussed and systematic studies of K- quasibound nuclear states are presented.

  8. MMSNF 2005. Materials models and simulations for nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freyss, M.; Durinck, J.; Carlot, G.; Sabathier, C.; Martin, P.; Garcia, P.; Ripert, M.; Blanpain, P.; Lippens, M.; Schut, H.; Federov, A.V.; Bakker, K.; Osaka, M.; Miwa, S.; Sato, I.; Tanaka, K.; Kurosaki, K.; Uno, M.; Yamanaka, S.; Govers, K.; Verwerft, M.; Hou, M.; Lemehov, S.E.; Terentyev, D.; Govers, K.; Kotomin, E.A.; Ashley, N.J.; Grimes, R.W.; Van Uffelen, P.; Mastrikov, Y.; Zhukovskii, Y.; Rondinella, V.V.; Kurosaki, K.; Uno, M.; Yamanaka, S.; Minato, K.; Phillpot, S.; Watanabe, T.; Shukla, P.; Sinnott, S.; Nino, J.; Grimes, R.; Staicu, D.; Hiernaut, J.P.; Wiss, T.; Rondinella, V.V.; Ronchi, C.; Yakub, E.; Kaye, M.H.; Morrison, C.; Higgs, J.D.; Akbari, F.; Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.; Gueneau, C.; Gosse, S.; Chatain, S.; Dumas, J.C.; Sundman, B.; Dupin, N.; Konings, R.; Noel, H.; Veshchunov, M.; Dubourg, R.; Ozrin, C.V.; Veshchunov, M.S.; Welland, M.T.; Blanc, V.; Michel, B.; Ricaud, J.M.; Calabrese, R.; Vettraino, F.; Tverberg, T.; Kissane, M.; Tulenko, J.; Stan, M.; Ramirez, J.C.; Cristea, P.; Rachid, J.; Kotomin, E.; Ciriello, A.; Rondinella, V.V.; Staicu, D.; Wiss, T.; Konings, R.; Somers, J.; Killeen, J

    2006-07-01

    The MMSNF Workshop series aims at stimulating research and discussions on models and simulations of nuclear fuels and coupling the results into fuel performance codes.This edition was focused on materials science and engineering for fuel performance codes. The presentations were grouped in three technical sessions: fundamental modelling of fuel properties; integral fuel performance codes and their validation; collaborations and integration of activities. (A.L.B.)

  9. Nuclear single-particle states: dynamical shell model and energy density functional methods

    CERN Document Server

    Bortignon, P F; Sagawa, H

    2010-01-01

    We discuss different approaches to the problem of reproducing the observed features of nuclear single-particle (s.p.) spectra. In particular, we analyze the dominant energy peaks, and the single-particle strength fragmentation, using the example of neutron states in 208Pb. Our main emphasis is the interpretation of that fragmentation as due to particle-vibration coupling (PVC). We compare with recent Energy Density Functional (EDF) approaches, and try to present a critical perspective.

  10. Sequence Determination from Overlapping Fragments: A Simple Model of Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrida, Bernard; Fink, Thomas M.

    2002-02-01

    Assembling fragments randomly sampled from along a sequence is the basis of whole-genome shotgun sequencing, a technique used to map the DNA of the human and other genomes. We calculate the probability that a random sequence can be recovered from a collection of overlapping fragments. We provide an exact solution for an infinite alphabet and in the case of constant overlaps. For the general problem we apply two assembly strategies and give the probability that the assembly puzzle can be solved in the limit of infinitely many fragments.

  11. The effect of surgically implanted bullet fragments on the spinal cord in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindel, N L; Marcillo, A E; Tay, B K; Bunge, R P; Eismont, F J

    2001-06-01

    Whether or not to remove bullets or bullet fragments from the spinal column of a neurologically intact patient has been a subject of continual debate. The controversy is due in part to a lack of information about the long-term effects of bullet fragments on spinal cord tissue. Although many studies have demonstrated the toxic effects of metal fragments on brain tissue, to our knowledge no one has evaluated the effects of the metals contained in commercially available bullets on spinal cord tissue. Copper, aluminum, and lead fragments from three commercially available bullet cartridges were implanted in intradural and extradural locations in seventeen New Zealand White rabbits. At an average of 9.8 months, the metal content of specimens of blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and liver were determined. The spinal cords were harvested and examined histologically. There was a significant increase in the copper level of blood from the rabbits with an implanted copper fragment compared with that of the control animals (p = 0.007). Concentrations of copper and lead were not elevated, compared with the control values, in the serum or liver. Histological examination of the spinal cords revealed major destruction of both the axons and the myelin of the dorsal column adjacent to the intradural copper fragments. Intradural fragments of lead caused similar destruction of myelin and axons in the dorsal column, but to a lesser degree. Minimal spinal cord or meningeal histological changes were noted around the aluminum intradural fragments, and no pathological changes were found near any fragments placed in an extradural location. The results of this study show that certain metals contained in commercially available bullets can cause varying degrees of neural destruction independent of the initial mechanical injury caused by implantation. Of the three metals tested, copper fragments consistently caused a substantial localized area of neural injury within the spinal cord. In our study

  12. Radiation Damage in Nuclear Fuel for Advanced Burner Reactors: Modeling and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Niels Gronbech; Asta, Mark; Ozolins, Nigel Browning' Vidvuds; de Walle, Axel van; Wolverton, Christopher

    2011-12-29

    The consortium has completed its existence and we are here highlighting work and accomplishments. As outlined in the proposal, the objective of the work was to advance the theoretical understanding of advanced nuclear fuel materials (oxides) toward a comprehensive modeling strategy that incorporates the different relevant scales involved in radiation damage in oxide fuels. Approaching this we set out to investigate and develop a set of directions: 1) Fission fragment and ion trajectory studies through advanced molecular dynamics methods that allow for statistical multi-scale simulations. This work also includes an investigation of appropriate interatomic force fields useful for the energetic multi-scale phenomena of high energy collisions; 2) Studies of defect and gas bubble formation through electronic structure and Monte Carlo simulations; and 3) an experimental component for the characterization of materials such that comparisons can be obtained between theory and experiment.

  13. Radiation Damage in Nuclear Fuel for Advanced Burner Reactors: Modeling and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Niels Gronbech; Asta, Mark; Ozolins, Nigel Browning' Vidvuds; de Walle, Axel van; Wolverton, Christopher

    2011-12-29

    The consortium has completed its existence and we are here highlighting work and accomplishments. As outlined in the proposal, the objective of the work was to advance the theoretical understanding of advanced nuclear fuel materials (oxides) toward a comprehensive modeling strategy that incorporates the different relevant scales involved in radiation damage in oxide fuels. Approaching this we set out to investigate and develop a set of directions: 1) Fission fragment and ion trajectory studies through advanced molecular dynamics methods that allow for statistical multi-scale simulations. This work also includes an investigation of appropriate interatomic force fields useful for the energetic multi-scale phenomena of high energy collisions; 2) Studies of defect and gas bubble formation through electronic structure and Monte Carlo simulations; and 3) an experimental component for the characterization of materials such that comparisons can be obtained between theory and experiment.

  14. INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

    2011-07-18

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  15. A dynamical systems model for nuclear power plant risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Stephen Michael

    The recent transition to an open access generation marketplace has forced nuclear plant operators to become much more cost conscious and focused on plant performance. Coincidentally, the regulatory perspective also is in a state of transition from a command and control framework to one that is risk-informed and performance-based. Due to these structural changes in the economics and regulatory system associated with commercial nuclear power plant operation, there is an increased need for plant management to explicitly manage nuclear safety risk. Application of probabilistic risk assessment techniques to model plant hardware has provided a significant contribution to understanding the potential initiating events and equipment failures that can lead to core damage accidents. Application of the lessons learned from these analyses has supported improved plant operation and safety over the previous decade. However, this analytical approach has not been nearly as successful in addressing the impact of plant processes and management effectiveness on the risks of plant operation. Thus, the research described in this dissertation presents a different approach to address this issue. Here we propose a dynamical model that describes the interaction of important plant processes among themselves and their overall impact on nuclear safety risk. We first provide a review of the techniques that are applied in a conventional probabilistic risk assessment of commercially operating nuclear power plants and summarize the typical results obtained. The limitations of the conventional approach and the status of research previously performed to address these limitations also are presented. Next, we present the case for the application of an alternative approach using dynamical systems theory. This includes a discussion of previous applications of dynamical models to study other important socio-economic issues. Next, we review the analytical techniques that are applicable to analysis of

  16. Engine System Model Development for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karl W.; Simpson, Steven P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to design, analyze, and evaluate conceptual Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) engine systems, an improved NTP design and analysis tool has been developed. The NTP tool utilizes the Rocket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) system tool and many of the routines from the Enabler reactor model found in Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS). Improved non-nuclear component models and an external shield model were added to the tool. With the addition of a nearly complete system reliability model, the tool will provide performance, sizing, and reliability data for NERVA-Derived NTP engine systems. A new detailed reactor model is also being developed and will replace Enabler. The new model will allow more flexibility in reactor geometry and include detailed thermal hydraulics and neutronics models. A description of the reactor, component, and reliability models is provided. Another key feature of the modeling process is the use of comprehensive spreadsheets for each engine case. The spreadsheets include individual worksheets for each subsystem with data, plots, and scaled figures, making the output very useful to each engineering discipline. Sample performance and sizing results with the Enabler reactor model are provided including sensitivities. Before selecting an engine design, all figures of merit must be considered including the overall impacts on the vehicle and mission. Evaluations based on key figures of merit of these results and results with the new reactor model will be performed. The impacts of clustering and external shielding will also be addressed. Over time, the reactor model will be upgraded to design and analyze other NTP concepts with CERMET and carbide fuel cores.

  17. Dynamics of fragments and associated phenomena in heavy-ion collisions using a modified secondary algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rohit [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India)

    2016-05-06

    We discuss the stability of fragments identified by secondary algorithms used to construct fragments within quantum molecular dynamics model. For this purpose we employ three different algorithms for fragment identification. 1) The conventional minimum spanning tree (MST) method based on the spatial correlations, 2) an improved version of MST with additional binding energy constraints of cold nuclear matter, 3) and that of hot matter. We find significant role of thermal binding energies over cold matter binding energies. Significant role is observed for fragment multiplicities and stopping of fragments. Whereas insignificant effect is observed on fragment’s flow.

  18. Analysing and modelling the impact of habitat fragmentation on species diversity: a macroecological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Matthews

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available My research aimed to examine a variety of macroecological and biogeographical patterns using a large number of purely habitat island datasets (i.e. isolated patches of natural habitat set within in a matrix of human land uses sourced from both the literature and my own sampling, with the objective of testing various macroecological and biogeographical patterns. These patterns can be grouped under four broad headings: 1 species–area relationships (SAR, 2 nestedness, 3 species abundance distributions (SADs and 4 species incidence functions (function of area. Overall, I found that there were few hard macroecological generalities that hold in all cases across habitat island systems. This is because most habitat island systems are highly disturbed environments, with a variety of confounding variables and ‘undesirable’ species (e.g. species associated with human land uses acting to modulate the patterns of interest. Nonetheless, some clear patterns did emerge. For example, the power model was by the far the best general SAR model for habitat islands. The slope of the island species–area relationship (ISAR was related to the matrix type surrounding archipelagos, such that habitat island ISARs were shallower than true island ISARs. Significant compositional and functional nestedness was rare in habitat island datasets, although island area was seemingly responsible for what nestedness was observed. Species abundance distribution models were found to provide useful information for conservation in fragmented landscapes, but the presence of undesirable species substantially affected the shape of the SAD. In conclusion, I found that the application of theory derived from the study of true islands, to habitat island systems, is inappropriate as it fails to incorporate factors that are unique to habitat islands. 

  19. Sleep fragmentation and motor restlessness in a Drosophila model of Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Amanda; Pranski, Elaine; Miller, R Daniel; Radmard, Sara; Bernhard, Doug; Jinnah, H A; Betarbet, Ranjita; Rye, David B; Sanyal, Subhabrata

    2012-06-19

    Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS), first chronicled by Willis in 1672 and described in more detail by Ekbom in 1945, is a prevalent sensorimotor neurological disorder (5%-10% in the population) with a circadian predilection for the evening and night. Characteristic clinical features also include a compelling urge to move during periods of rest, relief with movement, involuntary movements in sleep (viz., periodic leg movements of sleep), and fragmented sleep. Although the pathophysiology of RLS is unknown, dopaminergic neurotransmission and deficits in iron availability modulate expressivity. Genome-wide association studies have identified a polymorphism in an intronic region of the BTBD9 gene on chromosome 6 that confers substantial risk for RLS. Here, we report that loss of the Drosophila homolog CG1826 (dBTBD9) appreciably disrupts sleep with concomitant increases in waking and motor activity. We further show that BTBD9 regulates brain dopamine levels in flies and controls iron homeostasis through the iron regulatory protein-2 in human cell lines. To our knowledge, this represents the first reverse genetic analysis of a "novel" or heretofore poorly understood gene implicated in an exceedingly common and complex sleep disorder and the development of an RLS animal model that closely recapitulates all disease phenotypes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Basic Model of a Control Assembly Drop in Nuclear Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek BULÍN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the modelling and dynamic analysis of a nonlinear system representing a control assembly of the VVER 440/V213 nuclear reactor. A simple rigid body model intended for basic dynamic analyses is introduced. It contains the influences of the pressurized water and mainly the eects of possible control assembly contacts with guiding tubes inside the reactor. Another approach based on a complex multibody model is further described and the suitability of both modelling approaches is discussed.

  1. Compartmental analysis of dynamic nuclear medicine data: models and identifiability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbary, Fabrice; Garbarino, Sara; Vivaldi, Valentina

    2016-12-01

    Compartmental models based on tracer mass balance are extensively used in clinical and pre-clinical nuclear medicine in order to obtain quantitative information on tracer metabolism in the biological tissue. This paper is the first of a series of two that deal with the problem of tracer coefficient estimation via compartmental modelling in an inverse problem framework. Specifically, here we discuss the identifiability problem for a general n-dimension compartmental system and provide uniqueness results in the case of two-compartment and three-compartment compartmental models. The second paper will utilize this framework in order to show how nonlinear regularization schemes can be applied to obtain numerical estimates of the tracer coefficients in the case of nuclear medicine data corresponding to brain, liver and kidney physiology.

  2. Heat Transfer Modeling of Dry Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1999-01-13

    The present work was undertaken to provide heat transfer model that accurately predicts the thermal performance of dry spent nuclear fuel storage facilities. One of the storage configurations being considered for DOE Aluminum-clad Spent Nuclear Fuel (Al-SNF), such as the Material and Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel, is in a dry storage facility. To support design studies of storage options a computational and experimental program has been conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The main objective is to develop heat transfer models including natural convection effects internal to an interim dry storage canister and to geological codisposal Waste Package (WP). Calculated temperatures will be used to demonstrate engineering viability of a dry storage option in enclosed interim storage and geological repository WP and to assess the chemical and physical behaviors of the Al-SNF in the dry storage facilities. The current paper describes the modeling approaches and presents the computational results along with the experimental data.

  3. Modeling transient heat transfer in nuclear waste repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaw-Yang; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2009-09-30

    The heat of high-level nuclear waste may be generated and released from a canister at final disposal sites. The waste heat may affect the engineering properties of waste canisters, buffers, and backfill material in the emplacement tunnel and the host rock. This study addresses the problem of the heat generated from the waste canister and analyzes the heat distribution between the buffer and the host rock, which is considered as a radial two-layer heat flux problem. A conceptual model is first constructed for the heat conduction in a nuclear waste repository and then mathematical equations are formulated for modeling heat flow distribution at repository sites. The Laplace transforms are employed to develop a solution for the temperature distributions in the buffer and the host rock in the Laplace domain, which is numerically inverted to the time-domain solution using the modified Crump method. The transient temperature distributions for both the single- and multi-borehole cases are simulated in the hypothetical geological repositories of nuclear waste. The results show that the temperature distributions in the thermal field are significantly affected by the decay heat of the waste canister, the thermal properties of the buffer and the host rock, the disposal spacing, and the thickness of the host rock at a nuclear waste repository.

  4. Relativistic mean-field models and nuclear matter constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutra, M.; Lourenco, O.; Carlson, B. V. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica-CTA, 12228-900, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Delfino, A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-150, Boa Viagem, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Menezes, D. P.; Avancini, S. S. [Departamento de Fisica, CFM, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, CP. 476, CEP 88.040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Stone, J. R. [Oxford Physics, University of Oxford, OX1 3PU Oxford (United Kingdom) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Providencia, C. [Centro de Fisica Computacional, Department of Physics, University of Coimbra, P-3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Typel, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Theorie, Planckstrasse 1,D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-05-06

    This work presents a preliminary study of 147 relativistic mean-field (RMF) hadronic models used in the literature, regarding their behavior in the nuclear matter regime. We analyze here different kinds of such models, namely: (i) linear models, (ii) nonlinear {sigma}{sup 3}+{sigma}{sup 4} models, (iii) {sigma}{sup 3}+{sigma}{sup 4}+{omega}{sup 4} models, (iv) models containing mixing terms in the fields {sigma} and {omega}, (v) density dependent models, and (vi) point-coupling ones. In the finite range models, the attractive (repulsive) interaction is described in the Lagrangian density by the {sigma} ({omega}) field. The isospin dependence of the interaction is modeled by the {rho} meson field. We submit these sets of RMF models to eleven macroscopic (experimental and empirical) constraints, used in a recent study in which 240 Skyrme parametrizations were analyzed. Such constraints cover a wide range of properties related to symmetric nuclear matter (SNM), pure neutron matter (PNM), and both SNM and PNM.

  5. An operational approach to standard nuclear process model (SNPM) and SAP nuclear software implementation at Slovenske Elektrarne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, C.C. [Nuclear Power Plants Operation Department, Slovenske Elektrarne, a.s., Mlynske nivy 47, 821 09 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2010-07-01

    Benchmarking efforts in the fall of 2006 showed significant performance gaps in multiple measured processes between the Slovenske Elektrarne (SE) nuclear organization and the highest performing nuclear organizations in the world. While overall performance of the SE nuclear fleet was good and in the second quartile, when compared to the worldwide population of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), SE leadership set new goals to improve safety and operational performance to the first decile of the worldwide PWR Fleet. To meet these goals the SE nuclear team initiated a project to identify and implement the Best Practice nuclear processes in multiple areas. The benchmarking process identified the Standard Nuclear Performance Model (SNPM), used in the US nuclear fleet, as the industry best practice process model. The Slovenske Elektrarne nuclear management team used various change management techniques to clearly establish the case for organizational and process change within the nuclear organization. The project organization established by the SE nuclear management team relied heavily on functional line organization personnel to gain early acceptance of the project goals and methods thereby reducing organizational opposition to the significant organizational and process changes. The choice of a standardized process model used, all or in part, by approximately one third of the nuclear industry worldwide greatly facilitated the development and acceptance of the changes. Use of a nuclear proven templated software platform significantly reduced development and testing efforts for the resulting fully integrated solution. In the spring of 2007 SE set in motion a set of initiatives that has resulted in a significant redesign of most processes related to nuclear plant maintenance and continuous improvement. Significant organizational structure changes have been designed and implemented to align the organization to the SNPM processes and programs. The completion of the initial

  6. Correlation measurements of fission-fragment properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberstedt A.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available For the development of future nuclear fission applications and for a responsible handling of nuclear waste the a-priori assessment of the fission-fragments’ heat production and toxicity is a fundamental necessity. The success of an indispensable modelling of the fission process strongly depends on a good understanding of the particular mechanism of scission, the mass fragmentation and partition of excitation energy. Experimental observables are fission-fragment properties like mass- and energy-distributions, and the prompt neutron as well as γ-ray multiplicities and emission spectra. The latter quantities should preferably be known as a function of fragment mass and excitation energy. Those data are highly demanded as published by the OECD-NEA in its high priority data request list. With the construction of the double (v, E spectrometer VERDI we aim at measuring pre- and post-neutron masses directly and simultaneously to avoid prompt neutron corrections. From the simultaneous measurement of pre- and post-neutron fission-fragment data the prompt neutron multiplicity may then be inferred fully correlated with fragment mass yield and total kinetic energy. Using an ultra-fast fission event trigger spectral prompt fission γ-ray measurements may be performed. For that purpose recently developed lanthanum-halide detectors, with excellent timing characteristics, were coupled to the VERDI spectrometer allowing for a very good discrimination of fission γ-rays and prompt neutrons due to their different time-of-flight.

  7. Towards an efficient multiphysics model for nuclear reactor dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obaidurrahman K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Availability of fast computer resources nowadays has facilitated more in-depth modeling of complex engineering systems which involve strong multiphysics interactions. This multiphysics modeling is an important necessity in nuclear reactor safety studies where efforts are being made worldwide to combine the knowledge from all associated disciplines at one place to accomplish the most realistic simulation of involved phenomenon. On these lines coupled modeling of nuclear reactor neutron kinetics, fuel heat transfer and coolant transport is a regular practice nowadays for transient analysis of reactor core. However optimization between modeling accuracy and computational economy has always been a challenging task to ensure the adequate degree of reliability in such extensive numerical exercises. Complex reactor core modeling involves estimation of evolving 3-D core thermal state, which in turn demands an expensive multichannel based detailed core thermal hydraulics model. A novel approach of power weighted coupling between core neutronics and thermal hydraulics presented in this work aims to reduce the bulk of core thermal calculations in core dynamics modeling to a significant extent without compromising accuracy of computation. Coupled core model has been validated against a series of international benchmarks. Accuracy and computational efficiency of the proposed multiphysics model has been demonstrated by analyzing a reactivity initiated transient.

  8. Sizing of rock fragmentation modeling due to bench blasting using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system and radial basis function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karami Alireza; Afiuni-Zadeh Somaieh

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important characters of blasting,a basic step of surface mining,is rock fragmentation.It directly effects on the costs of drilling and economics of the subsequent operations of loading,hauling and crushing in mines.Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and radial basis function (RBF)show potentials for modeling the behavior of complex nonlinear processes such as those involved in fragmentation due to blasting of rocks.In this paper we developed ANFIS and RBF methods for modeling of sizing of rock fragmentation due to bench blasting by estimation of 80% passing size (K80) of Golgohar iron ore mine of Sir jan,Iran.Comparing the results of ANFIS and RBF models shows that although the statistical parameters RBF model is acceptable but the ANFIS proposed model is superior and also simpler because the ANFIS model is constructed using only two input parameters while seven input parameters used for construction of the RBF model.

  9. Cluster Formation and Nuclear Fragmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    1.19ClusterFormationandNuclearFragmentation ̄1)ZhengYuming;J.Richert;P.Wagner(*CentredeRecherchesNucleairs,IN2P3-CNRSandUniver...

  10. Universal Behavior of Nuclear Fragmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    1.18UnivetalBehaviorofNuclearFragmentation ̄1)ZhengYuming;J.Richert ̄*;P.Wager ̄*(*CentredeRecherchesNudeairs,IN2P3-CNRSandUniwe...

  11. Light fragments from (C + Be interactions at 0.6 GeV/nucleon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramov B.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear fragments emitted at 3.5° in 12C fragmentation at 0.6 GeV/nucleon have been measured. The spectra obtained are used for testing the predictions of four ion-ion interaction models: INCL++, BC, LAQGSM03.03 and QMD as well as for the comparison with the analytical parametrization in the framework of thermodynamical picture of fragmentation.

  12. Nuclear EMC effect in non-extensive statistical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Luis A.; Mirez, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    In the present work, we attempt to describe the nuclear EMC effect by using the proton structure functions obtained from the non-extensive statistical quark model. We record that such model has three fundamental variables, the temperature T, the radius, and the Tsallis parameter q. By combining different small changes, a good agreement with the experimental data may be obtained. Another interesting point of the model is to allow phenomenological interpretation, for instance, with q constant and changing the radius and the temperature or changing the radius and q and keeping the temperature.

  13. The s Process: Nuclear Physics, Stellar Models, Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Kaeppeler, Franz; Bisterzo, Sara; Aoki, Wako

    2010-01-01

    Nucleosynthesis in the s process takes place in the He burning layers of low mass AGB stars and during the He and C burning phases of massive stars. The s process contributes about half of the element abundances between Cu and Bi in solar system material. Depending on stellar mass and metallicity the resulting s-abundance patterns exhibit characteristic features, which provide comprehensive information for our understanding of the stellar life cycle and for the chemical evolution of galaxies. The rapidly growing body of detailed abundance observations, in particular for AGB and post-AGB stars, for objects in binary systems, and for the very faint metal-poor population represents exciting challenges and constraints for stellar model calculations. Based on updated and improved nuclear physics data for the s-process reaction network, current models are aiming at ab initio solution for the stellar physics related to convection and mixing processes. Progress in the intimately related areas of observations, nuclear...

  14. Nuclear Level Density: Shell Model vs Mean Field

    CERN Document Server

    Sen'kov, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of the nuclear level density is necessary for understanding various reactions including those in the stellar environment. Usually the combinatorics of Fermi-gas plus pairing is used for finding the level density. Recently a practical algorithm avoiding diagonalization of huge matrices was developed for calculating the density of many-body nuclear energy levels with certain quantum numbers for a full shell-model Hamiltonian. The underlying physics is that of quantum chaos and intrinsic thermalization in a closed system of interacting particles. We briefly explain this algorithm and, when possible, demonstrate the agreement of the results with those derived from exact diagonalization. The resulting level density is much smoother than that coming from the conventional mean-field combinatorics. We study the role of various components of residual interactions in the process of thermalization, stressing the influence of incoherent collision-like processes. The shell-model results for the traditionally...

  15. Sloppy nuclear energy density functionals: effective model reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Niksic, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Concepts from information geometry are used to analyse parameter sensitivity for a nuclear energy density functional, representative of a class of semi-empirical functionals that start from a microscopically motivated ansatz for the density dependence of the energy of a system of protons and neutrons. It is shown that such functionals are sloppy, characterized by an exponential range of sensitivity to parameter variations. Responsive to only a few stiff parameter combinations, they exhibit an exponential decrease of sensitivity to variations of the remaining soft parameters. By interpreting the space of model predictions as a manifold embedded in the data space, with the parameters of the functional as coordinates on the manifold, it is also shown that the exponential distribution of model manifold widths corresponds to the distribution of parameter sensitivity. Using the Manifold Boundary Approximation Method, we illustrate how to systematically construct effective nuclear density functionals of successively...

  16. Applying Functional Modeling for Accident Management of Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Morten; Zhang Xinxin [Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China)

    2014-08-15

    The paper investigate applications of functional modeling for accident management in complex industrial plant with special reference to nuclear power production. Main applications for information sharing among decision makers and decision support are identified. An overview of Multilevel Flow Modeling is given and a detailed presentation of the foundational means-end concepts is presented and the conditions for proper use in modelling accidents are identified. It is shown that Multilevel Flow Modeling can be used for modelling and reasoning about design basis accidents. Its possible role for information sharing and decision support in accidents beyond design basis is also indicated. A modelling example demonstrating the application of Multilevel Flow Modelling and reasoning for a PWR LOCA is presented.

  17. Multilevel Flow Modeling for Nuclear Power Plant Diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gola, G; Thunem, Harald P-J; Thunem, Atoosa P-J

    2012-01-01

    As complexity and safety requirements of current and future nuclear power plants increase, innovative methods are being investigated to perform accurate and reliable system diagnoses. Detecting malfunctions, identifying their causes and possibly predicting their consequences are major challenges...... detected anomalies. The combination of a data reconciliation system and the Multilevel Flow Modeling approach is illustrated with regard to the secondary loop of the Loviisa-2 Pressurized Water Reactor located in Finland....

  18. Nuclear superfluidity in isospin asymmetric matter within the Skyrme model

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre, R.

    2013-01-01

    The phase diagram of the superfluid phase coupled to spin singlet (S=0) and isospin triplet (T=1) states in infinite nuclear matter is analyzed within the nonrelativistic Skyrme model. We use an approach that allows a unified and consistent treatment of the particle-hole and particle-particle channels. The gap equation is solved for the full range of accessible densities, isospin asymmetries, and temperatures. The characteristic features of each of the components Tz=0, +1, -1 are emphasized. ...

  19. Fragmentation and clustering in star matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulminelli F.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The specificity of the crust-core phase transition in neutron star at zero and finite temperature will be discussed. It will be shown that, as a consequence of the presence of long range Coulomb interactions, the equivalence of statistical ensembles is violated and a clusterised phase is expected which is not accessible in the grancanonical ensemble. A specific analytical Nuclear Statistical Equilibrium model will be presented and some new quantitative results relevant for the supernova dynamics will be shown. Finally, the analogies and differences with the phenomenon of nuclear fragmentation will be highlighted.

  20. Sequence-dependent abnormal aggregation of human Tau fragment in an inducible cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Ling; Hu, Ji-Ying; Hu, Meng-Yun; Zhang, Yi; Hong, Zheng-Yuan; Cheng, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Jie; Pang, Dai-Wen; Liang, Yi

    2015-08-01

    A pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD) is the accumulation of misfolded hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein Tau within neurons, forming neurofibrillary tangles and leading to synaptic dysfunction and neuronal death. Here we study sequence-dependent abnormal aggregation of human fragment Tau244-372 in an inducible cell model. As evidenced by confocal laser scanning microscopy, Western blot, and immunogold electron microscopy, fibril-forming motifs are essential and sufficient for abnormal aggregation of Tau244-372 in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells induced by Congo red: when its two fibril-forming segments PHF6 and PHF6* are deleted, Tau244-372 does lose its ability to form fibrils in SH-SY5Y cells, and the replacement of PHF6 and PHF6* with an unrelated amyloidogenic sequence IFQINS from human lysozyme does rescue the fibril-forming ability of Tau244-372 in SH-SY5Y cells. By contrast, insertion of a non-fibril forming peptide GGGGGG does not drive the disabled Tau244-372 to misfold in SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, as revealed by quantum dots based probes combined with annexin V staining, annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection assay, and immunofluorescence, fibril-forming motifs are essential and sufficient for early apoptosis of living SH-SY5Y cells induced by abnormal aggregation of Tau244-372. Our results suggest that fibril-forming motifs could be the determinants of Tau protein tending to misfold in living cells, thereby inducing neuronal apoptosis and causing the initiation and development of AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Predicting which species will benefit from corridors in fragmented landscapes from population growth models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgens, Brian R; Haddad, Nick M

    2003-05-01

    Connecting isolated patches of habitat in fragmented landscapes with corridors is a popular conservation strategy. This strategy is also controversial in large part because of uncertainty about what characteristics of a species and its environment promote corridor use. In this article we address the question, For what types of species will populations benefit from corridors? We asked this question using a model of two logistically growing populations connected by migration in which both emigration and migration success were determined by the presence or absence of a corridor. We found that in the short run (e.g., during recovery from disaster), corridors are most effective for species with fast-growing populations that have low survivorship when dispersing through unsuitable (matrix) habitat. We also found that emigration rates and habitat-specific mortality rates are key determinants of the effects of corridors on population size. In the long term, corridors are most likely to benefit species with slow-growing populations that have low survivorship when dispersing through matrix habitat. Our results confirm the major conclusions from previous empirical studies of corridor benefits. However, most studies fail to consider the most appropriate questions to determine the potential benefits of habitat corridors. First, what is the time scale of the conservation goal? Corridors have positive effects on different suites of species in the short and long term. Second, is the major threat of local extinction due to sustained population decline or boom-bust cycles? Third, what is the migration rate through the matrix? Fourth, what fraction of migrants dispersing through the matrix successfully immigrate to another patch?

  2. Azimuthal correlations of hadrons and fragments in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Two-particle (two-fragment) azimuthal correlation functions are studied by using a simple formula which describes uniformly azimuthal distributions of final-state charged particles and nuclear fragments.This formula is obtained in the framework of a multi-source thermal model (or multi-source ideal gas model).The calculated results are compared and found to be in agreement with the experimental data of charged hadrons and nuclear fragments in nucleus-nucleus collisions at intermediate and high energies.

  3. Benchmarking nuclear models for Gamow–Teller response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinova, E., E-mail: elena.litvinova@wmich.edu [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5252 (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Brown, B.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Fang, D.-L. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Marketin, T. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb (Croatia); Zegers, R.G.T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)

    2014-03-07

    A comparative study of the nuclear Gamow–Teller response (GTR) within conceptually different state-of-the-art approaches is presented. Three nuclear microscopic models are considered: (i) the recently developed charge-exchange relativistic time blocking approximation (RTBA) based on the covariant density functional theory, (ii) the shell model (SM) with an extended “jj77” model space and (iii) the non-relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) with a Brueckner G-matrix effective interaction. We study the physics cases where two or all three of these models can be applied. The Gamow–Teller response functions are calculated for {sup 208}Pb, {sup 132}Sn and {sup 78}Ni within both RTBA and QRPA. The strengths obtained for {sup 208}Pb are compared to data that enable a firm model benchmarking. For the nucleus {sup 132}Sn, also SM calculations are performed within the model space truncated at the level of a particle–hole (ph) coupled to vibration configurations. This allows a consistent comparison to the RTBA where ph⊗phonon coupling is responsible for the spreading width and considerable quenching of the GTR. Differences between the models and perspectives of their future developments are discussed.

  4. Identification of a nuclear-localized nuclease from wheat cells undergoing programmed cell death that is able to trigger DNA fragmentation and apoptotic morphology on nuclei from human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Fernando; Cejudo, Francisco J

    2006-08-01

    PCD (programmed cell death) in plants presents important morphological and biochemical differences compared with apoptosis in animal cells. This raises the question of whether PCD arose independently or from a common ancestor in plants and animals. In the present study we describe a cell-free system, using wheat grain nucellar cells undergoing PCD, to analyse nucleus dismantling, the final stage of PCD. We have identified a Ca2+/Mg2+ nuclease and a serine protease localized to the nucleus of dying nucellar cells. Nuclear extracts from nucellar cells undergoing PCD triggered DNA fragmentation and other apoptotic morphology in nuclei from different plant tissues. Inhibition of the serine protease did not affect DNA laddering. Furthermore, we show that the nuclear extracts from plant cells triggered DNA fragmentation and apoptotic morphology in nuclei from human cells. The inhibition of the nucleolytic activity with Zn2+ or EDTA blocked the morphological changes of the nucleus. Moreover, nuclear extracts from apoptotic human cells triggered DNA fragmentation and apoptotic morphology in nuclei from plant cells. These results show that degradation of the nucleus is morphologically and biochemically similar in plant and animal cells. The implication of this finding on the origin of PCD in plants and animals is discussed.

  5. Temperature dependence of the nuclear binding energy: effects on the EOS for hot nuclear matter using different models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, O.G. [La Plata Univ. (Argentina). Fac. of Astron. and Geophys.; Civitarese, O. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of La Plata (Argentina); Reboiro, M. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of La Plata (Argentina)

    1997-05-01

    Effects due to the temperature dependence of the nuclear binding energy upon the equation of state (EOS) for hot nuclear matter are studied. Nuclear contributions to the free energy are represented by temperature dependent liquid drop model terms. Phase coexistence is assumed for temperatures of the order of 1 MeV {<=} T {<=} 6 MeV, baryon number densities {rho} of the order of 10{sup -4}fm{sup -3} {<=} {rho} {<=} 10{sup -1}fm{sup -3} and lepton fractions of the order of 0.2 {<=} y{sub 1} {<=} 0.4. It is found that the total pressure of the system is not affected by the temperature dependence of the nuclear free energy, in spite of changes observed in the nuclear pressure due to the different parametrizations used to represent the nuclear binding energy. (orig.).

  6. The influence of fragmentation models in the production of hadron jets in electron–positron annihilation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hasheminia M; Mirjalili A; Zomorrodian M E; Sepehri A

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of electron–positron annihilations to hadrons at high energies shows that apart from two-jet events, there are also signs of three-jet events which are interpreted according to the QCD, as a gluon radiated by a quark. In this paper, we investigate the fragmentation of quarks and gluons to hadron jets. We show that gluon jets have a higher multiplicity compared to quark jets of the same energy. Furthermore, inclusion of different flavours in the distributions shows that quark jets are flavour-dependent, but gluon jets are not. The differences between quark and gluon jets also manifest themselves in the fragmentation functions. We observe that the fragmentation for gluon jet is softer than that for quark jet, because the radiation of soft gluons is larger for gluon jetsand that gluon cannot be present as a valence parton inside a produced hadron. We provide possible explanations for these features in this paper.

  7. U(6)-Phonon model of nuclear collective motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganev, H. G.

    2015-05-01

    The U(6)-phonon model of nuclear collective motion with the semi-direct product structure [HW(21)]U(6) is obtained as a hydrodynamic (macroscopic) limit of the fully microscopic proton-neutron symplectic model (PNSM) with Sp(12, R) dynamical group. The phonon structure of the [HW(21)]U(6) model enables it to simultaneously include the giant monopole and quadrupole, as well as dipole resonances and their coupling to the low-lying collective states. The U(6) intrinsic structure of the [HW(21)]U(6) model, from the other side, gives a framework for the simultaneous shell-model interpretation of the ground state band and the other excited low-lying collective bands. It follows then that the states of the whole nuclear Hilbert space which can be put into one-to-one correspondence with those of a 21-dimensional oscillator with an intrinsic (base) U(6) structure. The latter can be determined in such a way that it is compatible with the proton-neutron structure of the nucleus. The macroscopic limit of the Sp(12, R) algebra, therefore, provides a rigorous mechanism for implementing the unified model ideas of coupling the valence particles to the core collective degrees of freedom within a fully microscopic framework without introducing redundant variables or violating the Pauli principle.

  8. Models and simulations of nuclear fuel materials properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stan, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)], E-mail: mastan@lanl.gov; Ramirez, J.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Cristea, P. [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, Bucuresti-Magurele (Romania); Hu, S.Y.; Deo, C.; Uberuaga, B.P.; Srivilliputhur, S.; Rudin, S.P.; Wills, J.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-10-11

    To address the complexity of the phenomena that occur in a nuclear fuel element, a multi-scale method was developed. The method incorporates theory-based atomistic and continuum models into finite element simulations to predict heat transport phenomena. By relating micro and nano-scale models to the macroscopic equilibrium and non-equilibrium simulations, the predictive character of the method is improved. The multi-scale approach was applied to calculations of point defect concentration, helium bubbles formation, oxygen diffusivity, and simulations of heat and mass transport in UO{sub 2+x}.

  9. Nuclear Hybrid Energy System Modeling: RELAP5 Dynamic Coupling Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan Anderson; Haihua Zhao; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; George Mesina

    2012-09-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) research team is currently developing a dynamic simulation of an integrated hybrid energy system. A detailed simulation of proposed NHES architectures will allow initial computational demonstration of a tightly coupled NHES to identify key reactor subsystem requirements, identify candidate reactor technologies for a hybrid system, and identify key challenges to operation of the coupled system. This work will provide a baseline for later coupling of design-specific reactor models through industry collaboration. The modeling capability addressed in this report focuses on the reactor subsystem simulation.

  10. Nuclear model calculations and their role in space radiation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, L. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Heilbronn, L. H.

    2002-01-01

    Proper assessments of spacecraft shielding requirements and concomitant estimates of risk to spacecraft crews from energetic space radiation requires accurate, quantitative methods of characterizing the compositional changes in these radiation fields as they pass through thick absorbers. These quantitative methods are also needed for characterizing accelerator beams used in space radiobiology studies. Because of the impracticality/impossibility of measuring these altered radiation fields inside critical internal body organs of biological test specimens and humans, computational methods rather than direct measurements must be used. Since composition changes in the fields arise from nuclear interaction processes (elastic, inelastic and breakup), knowledge of the appropriate cross sections and spectra must be available. Experiments alone cannot provide the necessary cross section and secondary particle (neutron and charged particle) spectral data because of the large number of nuclear species and wide range of energies involved in space radiation research. Hence, nuclear models are needed. In this paper current methods of predicting total and absorption cross sections and secondary particle (neutrons and ions) yields and spectra for space radiation protection analyses are reviewed. Model shortcomings are discussed and future needs presented. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All right reserved.

  11. Quantum fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Peschanski, R

    1993-01-01

    Phenomenological and theoretical aspects of fragmentation for elementary particles (resp. nuclei) are discussed. It is shown that some concepts of classical fragmentation remain relevant in a microscopic framework, exhibiting non-trivial properties of quantum relativistic field theory (resp. lattice percolation). Email contact: pesch@amoco.saclay.cea.fr

  12. A model for the control of DNA integrity by the sperm nuclear matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna E Gawecka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The highly condensed chromatin of mammalian spermatozoa is usually considered to be biologically inert before fertilization. However, we have demonstrated that even in this compacted state, sperm chromatin is subject to degradation at open configurations associated with the nuclear matrix through a process we have termed sperm chromatin fragmentation (SCF. This suggests that a mechanism exists to monitor the health of spermatozoa during transit through the male reproductive tract and to destroy the genome of defective sperm cells. The site of DNA damage in SCF, the matrix attachment sites, are the same that we hypothesize initiate DNA synthesis in the zygote. When sperm that have damaged DNA are injected into the oocyte, the newly created zygote responds by delaying DNA synthesis in the male pronucleus and, if the damage is severe enough, arresting the embryo′s development. Here we present a model for paternal DNA regulation by the nuclear matrix that begins during sperm maturation and continues through early embryonic development.

  13. A model for neutrino emission from nuclear accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Compact object mergers involving at least one neutron star can produce short-lived black hole accretion engines. Over tens to hundreds of milliseconds such an engine consumes a disk of hot, nuclear-density fluid, and drives changes to its surrounding environment through luminous emission of neutrinos. The neutrino emission may drive an ultrarelativistic jet, may peel off the disk's outer layers as a wind, may irradiate those winds or other forms of ejecta and thereby change their composition, may change the composition and thermodynamic state of the disk itself, and may oscillate in its flavor content. We present the full spatial-, angular-, and energy-dependence of the neutrino distribution function around a realistic model of a nuclear accretion disk, to inform future explorations of these types of behaviors. Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC).

  14. Analysis of proton-induced fragment production cross sections by the Quantum Molecular Dynamics plus Statistical Decay Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Osamu; Fukahori, Tokio; Niita, Koji; Maruyama, Toshiki; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Iwamoto, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    The production cross sections of various fragments from proton-induced reactions on {sup 56}Fe and {sup 27}Al have been analyzed by the Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) plus Statistical Decay Model (SDM). It was found that the mass and charge distributions calculated with and without the statistical decay have very different shapes. These results also depend strongly on the impact parameter, showing an importance of the dynamical treatment as realized by the QMD approach. The calculated results were compared with experimental data in the energy region from 50 MeV to 5 GeV. The QMD+SDM calculation could reproduce the production cross sections of the light clusters and intermediate-mass to heavy fragments in a good accuracy. The production cross section of {sup 7}Be was, however, underpredicted by approximately 2 orders of magnitude, showing the necessity of another reaction mechanism not taken into account in the present model. (author)

  15. Designing tools for oil exploration using nuclear modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauborgne Marie-Laure

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When designing nuclear tools for oil exploration, one of the first steps is typically nuclear modeling for concept evaluation and initial characterization. Having an accurate model, including the availability of accurate cross sections, is essential to reduce or avoid time consuming and costly design iterations. During tool response characterization, modeling is benchmarked with experimental data and then used to complement and to expand the database to make it more detailed and inclusive of more measurement environments which are difficult or impossible to reproduce in the laboratory. We present comparisons of our modeling results obtained using the ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/B-VII cross section data bases, focusing on the response to a few elements found in the tool, borehole and subsurface formation. For neutron-induced inelastic and capture gamma ray spectroscopy, major obstacles may be caused by missing or inaccurate cross sections for essential materials. We show examples of the benchmarking of modeling results against experimental data obtained during tool characterization and discuss observed discrepancies.

  16. Nuclear-deformation energies according to a liquid-drop model with a sharp surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocki, J.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1982-05-01

    We present an atlas of 665 deformation-energy maps and 150 maps of other properties of interest, relevant for nuclear systems idealized as uniformly charged drops endowed with a surface tension. The nuclear shapes are parametrized in terms of two spheres modified by a smoothly fitted quadratic surface of revolution and are specified by three variables: asymmetry, sphere separation, and a neck variable (that goes over into a fragment-deformation variable after scission). The maps and related tables should be useful for the study of macroscopic aspects of nuclear fission and of collisions between any two nuclei in the periodic table.

  17. Spontaneous Current-layer Fragmentation and Cascading Reconnection in Solar Flares. I. Model and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárta, Miroslav; Büchner, Jörg; Karlický, Marian; Skála, Jan

    2011-08-01

    Magnetic reconnection is commonly considered to be a mechanism of solar (eruptive) flares. A deeper study of this scenario reveals, however, a number of open issues. Among them is the fundamental question of how the magnetic energy is transferred from large, accumulation scales to plasma scales where its actual dissipation takes place. In order to investigate this transfer over a broad range of scales, we address this question by means of a high-resolution MHD simulation. The simulation results indicate that the magnetic-energy transfer to small scales is realized via a cascade of consecutively smaller and smaller flux ropes (plasmoids), analogous to the vortex-tube cascade in (incompressible) fluid dynamics. Both tearing and (driven) "fragmenting coalescence" processes are equally important for the consecutive fragmentation of the magnetic field (and associated current density) into smaller elements. At the later stages, a dynamic balance between tearing and coalescence processes reveals a steady (power-law) scaling typical of cascading processes. It is shown that cascading reconnection also addresses other open issues in solar-flare research, such as the duality between the regular large-scale picture of (eruptive) flares and the observed signatures of fragmented (chaotic) energy release, as well as the huge number of accelerated particles. Indeed, spontaneous current-layer fragmentation and the formation of multiple channelized dissipative/acceleration regions embedded in the current layer appear to be intrinsic to the cascading process. The multiple small-scale current sheets may also facilitate the acceleration of a large number of particles. The structure, distribution, and dynamics of the embedded potential acceleration regions in a current layer fragmented by cascading reconnection are studied and discussed.

  18. Determination of the nucleon-nucleon interaction in the ImQMD model by nuclear reaction at the Fermi energy region

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Cheng; Qin, Yujiao; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Ning

    2013-01-01

    The nucleon-nucleon interaction is investigated by using the ImQMD model with the three sets of parameters IQ1, IQ2 and IQ3 in which the corresponding incompressibility coefficients of nuclear matter are different. The charge distribution of fragments for various reaction systems are calculated at different incident energies. The parameters strongly affect the charge distribution below the threshold energy of nuclear multifragmentation. The fragment multiplicity spectrum for $^{238}$U+$^{197}$Au at 15 AMeV and the charge distribution for $^{129}$Xe+$^{120}$Sn at 32 and 45 AMeV, and $^{197}$Au+$^{197}$Au at 35 AMeV are reproduced by the ImQMD model with the set of parameter IQ3. It is concluded that charge distribution of the fragments and the fragment multiplicity spectrum are good observables for studying N-N interaction, the Fermi energy region is a sensitive energy region to explore the N-N interaction, and IQ3 is a suitable set of parameters for the ImQMD model.

  19. Bulk plasma fragmentation in a C{sub 4}F{sub 8} inductively coupled plasma: A hybrid modeling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Shu-Xia; Zhang, Yu-Ru [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Research Group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium); Gao, Fei; Wang, You-Nian [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Bogaerts, Annemie [Research Group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2015-06-28

    A hybrid model is used to investigate the fragmentation of C{sub 4}F{sub 8} inductive discharges. Indeed, the resulting reactive species are crucial for the optimization of the Si-based etching process, since they determine the mechanisms of fluorination, polymerization, and sputtering. In this paper, we present the dissociation degree, the density ratio of F vs. C{sub x}F{sub y} (i.e., fluorocarbon (fc) neutrals), the neutral vs. positive ion density ratio, details on the neutral and ion components, and fractions of various fc neutrals (or ions) in the total fc neutral (or ion) density in a C{sub 4}F{sub 8} inductively coupled plasma source, as well as the effect of pressure and power on these results. To analyze the fragmentation behavior, the electron density and temperature and electron energy probability function (EEPF) are investigated. Moreover, the main electron-impact generation sources for all considered neutrals and ions are determined from the complicated C{sub 4}F{sub 8} reaction set used in the model. The C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasma fragmentation is explained, taking into account many factors, such as the EEPF characteristics, the dominance of primary and secondary processes, and the thresholds of dissociation and ionization. The simulation results are compared with experiments from literature, and reasonable agreement is obtained. Some discrepancies are observed, which can probably be attributed to the simplified polymer surface kinetics assumed in the model.

  20. Small-angle fragmentation of carbon ions at 0.6 GeV/n: a comparison with models of ion-ion interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krutenkova A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Momentum distributions of hydrogen and helium isotopes from 12C fragmentation at 3.5° were measured at 0.6 GeV/nucleon in the FRAGM experiment at ITEP TWA heavy ion accelerator. The fragments were selected by correlated time of flight and dE/dx measurements with a magnetic spectrometer with scintillation counters. The main attention was drawn to the high momentum region where the fragment velocity exceeds the velocity of the projectile nucleus. The momentum spectra of fragments span the region of the fragmentation peak as well as the cumulative region. The differential cross sections cover six orders of magnitude. The distributions measured are compared to the predictions of three ion-ion interaction models: BC, QMD and LAQGSM03.03. The kinetic energy spectra of fragments in the projectile rest frame have an exponential shape with two temperatures, being defined by their slope parameters.

  1. Fragmented Authoritarianism or Integrated Fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brødsgaard, Kjeld Erik

    of these business leaders prompts the question of whether we are seeing the development of distinct interest groups that could challenge Party and state authority and create a fragmented polity. However, through the nomenklatura system the Party has an important instrument of control to wield over business groups...... and the Party-state, I suggest the notion of integrated fragmentation....

  2. EMPIRE: Nuclear Reaction Model Code System for Data Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, M.; Capote, R.; Carlson, B. V.; Obložinský, P.; Sin, M.; Trkov, A.; Wienke, H.; Zerkin, V.

    2007-12-01

    EMPIRE is a modular system of nuclear reaction codes, comprising various nuclear models, and designed for calculations over a broad range of energies and incident particles. A projectile can be a neutron, proton, any ion (including heavy-ions) or a photon. The energy range extends from the beginning of the unresolved resonance region for neutron-induced reactions (∽ keV) and goes up to several hundred MeV for heavy-ion induced reactions. The code accounts for the major nuclear reaction mechanisms, including direct, pre-equilibrium and compound nucleus ones. Direct reactions are described by a generalized optical model (ECIS03) or by the simplified coupled-channels approach (CCFUS). The pre-equilibrium mechanism can be treated by a deformation dependent multi-step direct (ORION + TRISTAN) model, by a NVWY multi-step compound one or by either a pre-equilibrium exciton model with cluster emission (PCROSS) or by another with full angular momentum coupling (DEGAS). Finally, the compound nucleus decay is described by the full featured Hauser-Feshbach model with γ-cascade and width-fluctuations. Advanced treatment of the fission channel takes into account transmission through a multiple-humped fission barrier with absorption in the wells. The fission probability is derived in the WKB approximation within the optical model of fission. Several options for nuclear level densities include the EMPIRE-specific approach, which accounts for the effects of the dynamic deformation of a fast rotating nucleus, the classical Gilbert-Cameron approach and pre-calculated tables obtained with a microscopic model based on HFB single-particle level schemes with collective enhancement. A comprehensive library of input parameters covers nuclear masses, optical model parameters, ground state deformations, discrete levels and decay schemes, level densities, fission barriers, moments of inertia and γ-ray strength functions. The results can be converted into ENDF-6 formatted files using the

  3. Physical modeling of spent-nuclear-fuel container

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Liping

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A new physical simulation model was developed to simulate the casting process of the ductile iron heavy section spent-nuclear-fuel container. In this physical simulation model, a heating unit with DR24 Fe-Cr-Al heating wires was used to compensate the heat loss across the non-natural surfaces of the sample, and a precise and reliable casting temperature controlling/monitoring system was employed to ensure the thermal behavior of the simulated casting to be similar to the actual casting. Also, a mould system was designed, in which changeable mould materials can be used for both the outside and inside moulds for different applications. The casting test was carried out with the designed mould and the cooling curves of central and edge points at different isothermal planes of the casting were obtained. Results show that for most isothermal planes, the temperature control system can keep the temperature differences within 6 ℃ between the edge points and the corresponding center points, indicating that this new physical simulation model has high simulation accuracy, and the mould developed can be used for optimization of casting parameters of spent-nuclear-fuel container, such as composition of ductile iron, the pouring temperature, the selection of mould material and design of cooling system. In addition, to maintain the spheroidalization of the ductile iron, the force-chilling should be used for the current physical simulation to ensure the solidification of casting in less than 2 h.

  4. A polymer, random walk model for the size-distribution of large DNA fragments after high linear energy transfer radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Brenner, D.; Hlatky, L. R.; Sachs, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) produced by densely ionizing radiation are not located randomly in the genome: recent data indicate DSB clustering along chromosomes. Stochastic DSB clustering at large scales, from > 100 Mbp down to energy transfer (LET) radiation, are obtained. They are found to be non-linear when the dose becomes so large that there is a significant probability of overlapping or close juxtaposition, along one chromosome, for different DSB clusters from different tracks. The non-linearity is more evident for large fragments than for small. The DNAbreak results furnish an example of the RLC (randomly located clusters) analytic formalism, which generalizes the broken-stick fragment-size distribution of the random-breakage model that is often applied to low-LET data.

  5. A case study in modeling a nuclear formation evaluation sub

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locke, S. (Teleco Oilfield Services, Inc., Middletown, CT (United States))

    1992-08-01

    This paper reports that constructing an accurate Monte Carlo representation of a complex nuclear formation evaluation tool requires careful matching of computed values to the results of laboratory experiments. The availability of only finite computing resources forces restraint in the step by step addition of complexity to the model. Once confidence in the model has been established, it can be used to predict tool response to many situations not reproducible in a laboratory. High temperatures, high pressures, and pore fluids composed of liquid-gas mixtures are typical of conditions encountered in real oil wells that are difficult to reproduce in a laboratory. Tool design and the effects of design modifications can also be evaluated efficiently using the model.

  6. Fluctuations of fragment observables

    CERN Document Server

    Gulminelli, F

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents a review of our present theoretical as well as experimental knowledge of different fluctuation observables relevant to nuclear multifragmentation. The possible connection between the presence of a fluctuation peak and the occurrence of a phase transition or a critical phenomenon is critically analyzed. Many different phenomena can lead both to the creation and to the suppression of a fluctuation peak. In particular, the role of constraints due to conservation laws and to data sorting is shown to be essential. From the experimental point of view, a comparison of the available fragmentation data reveals that there is a good agreement between different data sets of basic fluctuation observables, if the fragmenting source is of comparable size. This compatibility suggests that the fragmentation process is largely independent of the reaction mechanism (central versus peripheral collisions, symmetric versus asymmetric systems, light ions versus heavy ion induced reactions). Configurationa...

  7. Model of a Nuclear Thermal Test Pipe Using Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    1.2 Problem and Scope .. ............................. 3 1.3 Particle Bed Reactor .. .......................... 3 1.4 Nuclear Thermal Rocket .. ........................ 4...development of both the nuclear thermal rocket and space nuclear power technologies. The nuclear thermal rocket can be used to reduce the travel time to...1991). The manned mission to Mars is not the only use for the nuclear thermal rocket . Ramsthaler and Sulmeisters (1988:21) have determined that among

  8. Modelling of nuclear explosions in hard rock sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunish, W.M.; App, F.N.

    1993-05-01

    This study represents part of a larger effort to systematically model the effects of differing source region properties on ground motion from underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site. In previous work by the authors the primary emphasis was on alluvium and both saturated and unsaturated tuff. We have attempted to model events on Pahute Mesa, where either the working point medium, or some of the layers above the working point, or both, are hard rock. The complex layering at these sites, however, has prevented us from drawing unambiguous conclusions about modelling hard rock. In order to learn more about the response of hard rock to underground nuclear explosions, we have attempted to model the PILEDRIVER event. PILEDRIVER was fired on June 2, 1966 in the granite stock of Area 15 at the Nevada Test Site. The working point was at a depth of 462.7 m and the yield was determined to be 61 kt. Numerous surface, sub-surface and free-field measurements were made and analyzed by SRI. An attempt was made to determine the contribution of spall to the teleseismic signal, but proved unsuccessful because most of the data from below-shot-level gauges was lost. Nonetheless, there is quite a bit of good quality data from a variety of locations. We have been able to obtain relatively good agreement with the experimental PILEDRIVER waveforms. In order to do so, we had to model the granodiorite as being considerably weaker than ``good quality`` granite, and it had to undergo considerable weakening due to shock damage as well. In addition, the near-surface layers had to be modeled as being weak and compressible and as have a much lower sound speed than the material at depth. The is consistent with a fractured and jointed material at depth, and a weathered material near the surface.

  9. Modelling of nuclear explosions in hard rock sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunish, W.M.; App, F.N.

    1993-01-01

    This study represents part of a larger effort to systematically model the effects of differing source region properties on ground motion from underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site. In previous work by the authors the primary emphasis was on alluvium and both saturated and unsaturated tuff. We have attempted to model events on Pahute Mesa, where either the working point medium, or some of the layers above the working point, or both, are hard rock. The complex layering at these sites, however, has prevented us from drawing unambiguous conclusions about modelling hard rock. In order to learn more about the response of hard rock to underground nuclear explosions, we have attempted to model the PILEDRIVER event. PILEDRIVER was fired on June 2, 1966 in the granite stock of Area 15 at the Nevada Test Site. The working point was at a depth of 462.7 m and the yield was determined to be 61 kt. Numerous surface, sub-surface and free-field measurements were made and analyzed by SRI. An attempt was made to determine the contribution of spall to the teleseismic signal, but proved unsuccessful because most of the data from below-shot-level gauges was lost. Nonetheless, there is quite a bit of good quality data from a variety of locations. We have been able to obtain relatively good agreement with the experimental PILEDRIVER waveforms. In order to do so, we had to model the granodiorite as being considerably weaker than good quality'' granite, and it had to undergo considerable weakening due to shock damage as well. In addition, the near-surface layers had to be modeled as being weak and compressible and as have a much lower sound speed than the material at depth. The is consistent with a fractured and jointed material at depth, and a weathered material near the surface.

  10. Use of mathematical modeling in nuclear measurements projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toubon, H.; Menaa, N.; Mirolo, L.; Ducoux, X.; Khalil, R. A. [AREVA/CANBERRA Nuclear Measurements Business Unit, Saint Quentin-en-Yvelines 78182 (France); Chany, P. [AREVA/BE Nuclear Sites Value Development AREVA NC Marcoule, BP 76170, 30206 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Devita, A. [AREVA/BE MELOX, BP 124, 30206 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France)

    2011-07-01

    Mathematical modeling of nuclear measurement systems is not a new concept. The response of the measurement system is described using a pre-defined mathematical model that depends on a set of parameters. These parameters are determined using a limited set of experimental measurement points e.g. efficiency curve, dose rates... etc. The model that agrees with the few experimental points is called an experimentally validated model. Once these models have been validated, we use mathematical interpolation to find the parameters of interest. Sometimes, when measurements are not practical or are impossible extrapolation is implemented but with care. CANBERRA has been extensively using mathematical modeling for the design and calibration of large and sophisticated systems to create and optimize designs that would be prohibitively expensive with only experimental tools. The case studies that will be presented here are primarily performed with MCNP, CANBERRA's MERCURAD/PASCALYS and ISOCS (In Situ Object Counting Software). For benchmarking purposes, both Monte Carlo and ray-tracing based codes are inter-compared to show models consistency and add a degree of reliability to modeling results. (authors)

  11. Thermohydraulic and nuclear modeling of natural fission reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggato, Jason Charles

    Experimental verification of proposed nuclear waste storage schemes in geologic repositories is not possible, however, a natural analog exists in the form of ancient natural reactors that existed in uranium-rich ores. Two billion years ago, the enrichment of natural uranium was high enough to allow a sustained chain reaction in the presence of water as a moderator. Several natural reactors occurred in Gabon, Africa and were discovered in the early 1970's. These reactors operated at low power levels for hundreds of thousands of years. Heated water generated from the reactors also leached uranium from the surrounding rock strata and deposited it in the reactor cores. This increased the concentration of uranium in the core over time and served to "refuel" the reactor. This has strong implications in the design of modern geologic repositories for spent nuclear fuel. The possibility of accidental fission events in man-made repositories exists and the geologic evidence from Oklo suggests how those events may progress and enhance local concentrations of uranium. Based on a review of the literature, a comprehensive code was developed to model the thermohydraulic behavior and criticality conditions that may have existed in the Oklo reactor core. A two-dimensional numerical model that incorporates modeling of fluid flow, temperatures, and nuclear fission and subsequent heat generation was developed for the Oklo natural reactors. The operating temperatures ranged from about 456 K to about 721 K. Critical reactions were observed for a wide range of concentrations and porosity values (9 to 30 percent UO2 and 10 to 20 percent porosity). Periodic operation occurred in the computer model prediction with UO2 concentrations of 30 percent in the core and 5 percent in the surrounding material. For saturated conditions and 30 percent porosity, the model predicted temperature transients with a period of about 5 hours. Kuroda predicted 3 to 4 hour durations for temperature transients

  12. Fragmentation of urban forms and the environmental consequences: results from a high-spatial resolution model system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, U. W.; Wang, Z. S.

    2008-10-01

    Each city has its unique urban form. The importance of urban form on sustainable development has been recognized in recent years. Traditionally, air quality modelling in a city is in a mesoscale with grid resolution of kilometers, regardless of its urban form. This paper introduces a GIS-based air quality and noise model system developed to study the built environment of highly compact urban forms. Compared with traditional mesoscale air quality model system, the present model system has a higher spatial resolution down to individual buildings along both sides of the street. Applying the developed model system in the Macao Peninsula with highly compact urban forms, the average spatial resolution of input and output data is as high as 174 receptor points per km2. Based on this input/output dataset with a high spatial resolution, this study shows that even the highly compact urban forms can be fragmented into a very small geographic scale of less than 3 km2. This is due to the significant temporal variation of urban development. The variation of urban form in each fragment in turn affects air dispersion, traffic condition, and thus air quality and noise in a measurable scale.

  13. Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Transitions: Optimization, Modeling Choices, and Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Robert W.

    Many nuclear fuel cycle simulators have evolved over time to help understan the nuclear industry/ecosystem at a macroscopic level. Cyclus is one of th first fuel cycle simulators to accommodate larger-scale analysis with it liberal open-source licensing and first-class Linux support. Cyclus also ha features that uniquely enable investigating the effects of modeling choices o fuel cycle simulators and scenarios. This work is divided into thre experiments focusing on optimization, effects of modeling choices, and fue cycle uncertainty. Effective optimization techniques are developed for automatically determinin desirable facility deployment schedules with Cyclus. A novel method fo mapping optimization variables to deployment schedules is developed. Thi allows relationships between reactor types and scenario constraints to b represented implicitly in the variable definitions enabling the usage o optimizers lacking constraint support. It also prevents wasting computationa resources evaluating infeasible deployment schedules. Deployed power capacit over time and deployment of non-reactor facilities are also included a optimization variables There are many fuel cycle simulators built with different combinations o modeling choices. Comparing results between them is often difficult. Cyclus flexibility allows comparing effects of many such modeling choices. Reacto refueling cycle synchronization and inter-facility competition among othe effects are compared in four cases each using combinations of fleet of individually modeled reactors with 1-month or 3-month time steps. There are noticeable differences in results for the different cases. The larges differences occur during periods of constrained reactor fuel availability This and similar work can help improve the quality of fuel cycle analysi generally There is significant uncertainty associated deploying new nuclear technologie such as time-frames for technology availability and the cost of buildin advanced reactors

  14. Targeting YAP/TAZ-TEAD protein-protein interactions using fragment-based and computational modeling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaan, Hung Yi Kristal; Sim, Adelene Y L; Tan, Siew Kim Joyce; Verma, Chandra; Song, Haiwei

    2017-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway, which is implicated in the regulation of organ size, has emerged as a potential target for the development of cancer therapeutics. YAP, TAZ (transcription co-activators) and TEAD (transcription factor) are the downstream transcriptional machinery and effectors of the pathway. Formation of the YAP/TAZ-TEAD complex leads to transcription of growth-promoting genes. Conversely, disrupting the interactions of the complex decreases cell proliferation. Herein, we screened a 1000-member fragment library using Thermal Shift Assay and identified a hit fragment. We confirmed its binding at the YAP/TAZ-TEAD interface by X-ray crystallography, and showed that it occupies the same hydrophobic pocket as a conserved phenylalanine of YAP/TAZ. This hit fragment serves as a scaffold for the development of compounds that have the potential to disrupt YAP/TAZ-TEAD interactions. Structure-activity relationship studies and computational modeling were also carried out to identify more potent compounds that may bind at this validated druggable binding site.

  15. Magma Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.

    2015-05-01

    Magma fragmentation is the breakup of a continuous volume of molten rock into discrete pieces, called pyroclasts. Because magma contains bubbles of compressible magmatic volatiles, decompression of low-viscosity magma leads to rapid expansion. The magma is torn into fragments, as it is stretched into hydrodynamically unstable sheets and filaments. If the magma is highly viscous, resistance to bubble growth will instead lead to excess gas pressure and the magma will deform viscoelastically by fracturing like a glassy solid, resulting in the formation of a violently expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. In either case, fragmentation represents the conversion of potential energy into the surface energy of the newly created fragments and the kinetic energy of the expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. If magma comes into contact with external water, the conversion of thermal energy will vaporize water and quench magma at the melt-water interface, thus creating dynamic stresses that cause fragmentation and the release of kinetic energy. Lastly, shear deformation of highly viscous magma may cause brittle fractures and release seismic energy.

  16. EXTENSION OF THE NUCLEAR REACTION MODEL CODE EMPIRE TO ACTINIDES NUCLEAR DATA EVALUATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAPOTE,R.; SIN, M.; TRKOV, A.; HERMAN, M.; CARLSON, B.V.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

    2007-04-22

    Recent extensions and improvements of the EMPIRE code system are outlined. They add new capabilities to the code, such as prompt fission neutron spectra calculations using Hauser-Feshbach plus pre-equilibrium pre-fission spectra, cross section covariance matrix calculations by Monte Carlo method, fitting of optical model parameters, extended set of optical model potentials including new dispersive coupled channel potentials, parity-dependent level densities and transmission through numerically defined fission barriers. These features, along with improved and validated ENDF formatting, exclusive/inclusive spectra, and recoils make the current EMPIRE release a complete and well validated tool for evaluation of nuclear data at incident energies above the resonance region. The current EMPIRE release has been used in evaluations of neutron induced reaction files for {sup 232}Th and {sup 231,233}Pa nuclei in the fast neutron region at IAEA. Triple-humped fission barriers and exclusive pre-fission neutron spectra were considered for the fission data evaluation. Total, fission, capture and neutron emission cross section, average resonance parameters and angular distributions of neutron scattering are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data.

  17. Study of stochastic approaches of the n-bodies problem: application to the nuclear fragmentation; Etude des approches stochastiques du probleme a N corps: application a la multifragmentation nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarnera, A.

    1996-07-09

    In the last decade nuclear physics research has found, with the observation of phenomena such as multifragmentation or vaporization, the possibility to get a deeper insight into the nuclear matter phase diagram. For example, a spinodal decomposition scenario has been proposed to explain the multifragmentation: because of the initial compression, the system may enter a region, the spinodal zone, in which the nuclear matter is no longer stable, and so any fluctuation leads to the formation of fragments. This thesis deals with spinodal decomposition within the theoretical framework of stochastic mean filed approaches, in which the one-body density function may experience a stochastic evolution. We have shown that these approaches are able to describe phenomena, such as first order phase transitions, in which fluctuations and many-body correlations plan an important role. In the framework of stochastic mean-filed approaches we have shown that the fragment production by spinodal decomposition is characterized by typical time scales of the order of 100 fm/c and by typical size scales around the Neon mass. We have also shown that these features are robust and that they are not affected significantly by a possible expansion of the system or by the finite size of nuclei. We have proposed as a signature of the spinodal decomposition some typical partition of the largest fragments. The study and the comparison with experimental data, performed for the reactions Xe + Cu at 45 MeV/A and Xe + Sn at 50 MeV/A, have shown a remarkable agreement. Moreover we would like to stress that the theory does not contain any adjustable parameter. These results seem to give a strong indication of the possibility to observe a spinodal decomposition of nuclei. (author).

  18. Heterogeneous Nuclear Reactor Models for Optimal Xenon Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondal, Ishtiaq Ahmad

    Nuclear reactors are generally modeled as homogeneous mixtures of fuel, control, and other materials while in reality they are heterogeneous-homogeneous configurations comprised of fuel and control rods along with other materials. Similarly, for space-time studies of a nuclear reactor, homogeneous, usually one-group diffusion theory, models are used, and the system equations are solved by either nodal or modal expansion approximations. Study of xenon-induced problems has also been carried out using similar models and with the help of dynamic programming or classical calculus of variations or the minimum principle. In this study a thermal nuclear reactor is modeled as a two-dimensional lattice of fuel and control rods placed in an infinite-moderator in plane geometry. The two-group diffusion theory approximation is used for neutron transport. Space -time neutron balance equations are written for two groups and reduced to one space-time algebraic equation by using the two-dimensional Fourier transform. This equation is written at all fuel and control rod locations. Iodine -xenon and promethium-samarium dynamic equations are also written at fuel rod locations only. These equations are then linearized about an equilibrium point which is determined from the steady-state form of the original nonlinear system equations. After studying poisonless criticality, with and without control, and the stability of the open-loop system and after checking its controllability, a performance criterion is defined for the xenon-induced spatial flux oscillation problem in the form of a functional to be minimized. Linear -quadratic optimal control theory is then applied to solve the problem. To perform a variety of different additional useful studies, this formulation has potential for various extensions and variations; for example, different geometry of the problem, with possible extension to three dimensions, heterogeneous -homogeneous formulation to include, for example, homogeneously

  19. Challenges in spent nuclear fuel final disposal:conceptual design models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mukhtar Ahmed RANA

    2008-01-01

    The disposal of spent nuclear fuel is a long-standing issue in nuclear technology. Mainly, UO2 and metallic U are used as a fuel in nuclear reactors. Spent nuclear fuel contains fission products and transuranium elements, which would remain radioactive for 104 to 108 years. In this brief communication, essential concepts and engineering elements related to high-level nuclear waste disposal are described. Conceptual design models are described and discussed considering the long-time scale activity of spent nuclear fuel or high level waste. Notions of physical and chemical barriers to contain nuclear waste are highlightened. Concerns regarding integrity, self-irradiation induced decomposition and thermal effects of decay heat on the spent nuclear fuel are also discussed. The question of retrievability of spent nuclear fuel after disposal is considered.

  20. Correlations between isospin dynamics and Intermediate Mass Fragments emission time scales: a probe for the symmetry energy in asymmetric nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    De Filippo, E; Auditore, L; Baran, V; Berceanu, I; Cardella, G; Colonna, M; Geraci, E; Gianì, S; Grassi, L; Grzeszczuk, A; Guazzoni, P; Han, J; La Guidara, E; Lanzalone, G; Lombardo, I; Maiolino, C; Minniti, T; Pagano, A; Papa, M; Piasecki, E; Pirrone, S; Politi, G; Pop, A; Porto, F; Rizzo, F; Russotto, P; Santoro, S; Trifirò, A; Trimarchi, M; Verde, G; Vigilante, M; Wilczyński, J; Zetta, L

    2012-01-01

    We show new data from the $^{64}$Ni+$^{124}$Sn and $^{58}$Ni+$^{112}$Sn reactions studied in direct kinematics with the CHIMERA detector at INFN-LNS and compared with the reverse kinematics reactions at the same incident beam energy (35 A MeV). Analyzing the data with the method of relative velocity correlations, fragments coming from statistical decay of an excited projectile-like (PLF) or target-like (TLF) fragments are discriminated from the ones coming from dynamical emission in the early stages of the reaction. By comparing data of the reverse kinematics experiment with a stochastic mean field (SMF) + GEMINI calculations our results show that observables from neck fragmentation mechanism add valuable constraints on the density dependence of symmetry energy. An indication is found for a moderately stiff symmetry energy potential term of EOS.

  1. Singly and Doubly Charged Projectile Fragments in Nucleus-Emulsion Collisions at Dubna Energy in the Framework of the Multi-Source Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Er-Qin; LIU Fu-Hu; Magda A.Rahim; S.Fakhraddin; SUN Jian-Xin

    2011-01-01

    @@ The multiplicity distributions of projectile fragments emitted in interactions of different nuclei with emulsion are studied by using a multi-source model.Our calculated results show that the projectile fragments can be described by the model and each source contributes an exponential distribution.As the weighted sum of the folding result of many exponential distributions,a multi-component Erlang distribution is used to describe the experimental data.The relationship between the height(or width)of the distribution and the mass of the incident projectile,as well as the dependence of projectile fragments on target groups,are investigated too.

  2. Framing Fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    , contain distinctive architectural traits, not only based on rational repetition, but also supporting composition and montage as dynamic concepts. Prefab architecture is an architecture of fragmentation, individualization and changeability, and this sets up new challenges for the architect. This paper...... into separate parts or systems: skeleton, skin, services, internal cladding, etc. Each building part/system is being conceived, produced, delivered and maintained by different construction companies. Basically the building is being fragmented into separate parts living their separate lives. The architect has...... to create architectural meaning and give character to an architecture of fragmentation. Layers are both seen as conceptual as well as material frames which define certain strong properties or meanings in the architectural work. Defining layers is a way of separating and organizing; it both defines...

  3. Study of nuclear clustering using the modern shell model approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volya, Alexander; Tchuvil'Sky, Yury

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear clustering, alpha decays, and multi-particle correlations are important components of nuclear dynamics. In this work we use the modern configuration-interaction approach with most advanced realistic shell-model Hamiltonians to study these questions. We utilize the algebraic many-nucleon structures and the corresponding fractional parentage coefficients to build the translationally invariant wave functions of the alpha-cluster channels. We explore the alpha spectroscopic factors, study the distribution of clustering strength, and discuss the structure of an effective 4-body operator describing the in-medium alpha dynamics in the multi-shell valence configuration space. Sensitivity of alpha clustering to the components of an effective Hamiltonian, which includes its collective and many-body components, as well as isospin symmetry breaking terms, are of interest. We offer effective techniques for evaluation of the cluster spectroscopic factors satisfying the orthogonality conditions of the respective cluster channels. We present a study of clustering phenomena, single-particle dynamics, and electromagnetic transitions for a number of nuclei in p-sd shells and compare our results with the experimentally available data. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-SC0009883.

  4. MODELING ATMOSPHERIC RELEASES OF TRITIUM FROM NUCLEAR INSTALLATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okula, K

    2007-01-17

    Tritium source term analysis and the subsequent dispersion and consequence analyses supporting the safety documentation of Department of Energy nuclear facilities are especially sensitive to the applied software analysis methodology, input data and user assumptions. Three sequential areas in tritium accident analysis are examined in this study to illustrate where the analyst should exercise caution. Included are: (1) the development of a tritium oxide source term; (2) use of a full tritium dispersion model based on site-specific information to determine an appropriate deposition scaling factor for use in more simplified, broader modeling, and (3) derivation of a special tritium compound (STC) dose conversion factor for consequence analysis, consistent with the nature of the originating source material. It is recommended that unless supporting, defensible evidence is available to the contrary, the tritium release analyses should assume tritium oxide as the species released (or chemically transformed under accident's environment). Important exceptions include STC situations and laboratory-scale releases of hydrogen gas. In the modeling of the environmental transport, a full phenomenology model suggests that a deposition velocity of 0.5 cm/s is an appropriate value for environmental features of the Savannah River Site. This value is bounding for certain situations but non-conservative compared to the full model in others. Care should be exercised in choosing other factors such as the exposure time and the resuspension factor.

  5. Tie Tube Heat Transfer Modeling for Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Joshua A.; Starkey, Ryan P.; Lewis, Mark J.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2007-01-01

    Bimodal nuclear thermal rocket systems have been shown to reduce the weight and cost of space vehicles to Mars and beyond by utilizing the reactor for power generation in the relatively long duration between burns in an interplanetary trajectory. No information, however, is available regarding engine and reactor-level operation of such bimodal systems. The purpose of this project is to generate engine and reactor models with sufficient fidelity and flexibility to accurately study the component-level effects of operating a propulsion-designed reactor at power generation levels. Previous development of a 1-D reactor and tie tube model found that ignoring heat generation inside of the tie tube leads to under-prediction of the temperature change and over-prediction of pressure change across the tie tube. This paper will present the development and results of a tie tube model that has been extended to account for heat generation, specifically in the moderator layer. This model is based on a 1-D distribution of power in the fuel elements and tie tubes, as a precursor to an eventual neutron-driven reactor model.

  6. Sheep: The First Large Animal Model in Nuclear Transfer Research

    OpenAIRE

    Loi, Pasqualino; Czernik, Marta; Zacchini, Federica; Iuso, Domenico; Scapolo, Pier Augusto; Ptak, Grazyna

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this article is not to provide an exhaustive review of nuclear transfer research, because many authoritative reviews exist on the biological issues related to somatic and embryonic cell nuclear transfer. We shall instead provide an overview on the work done specifically on sheep and the value of this work on the greater nuclear transfer landscape.

  7. Okazaki fragment maturation: nucleases take centre stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zheng; Binghui Shen

    2011-01-01

    Completion of lagging strand DNA synthesis requires processing of up to 50 million Okazaki fragments per cell cycle in mammalian cells. Even in yeast, the Okazaki fragment maturation happens approximately a million times during a singte round of DNA replication. Therefore, efficient processing of Okazaki fragments is vital for DNA replication and cell proliferation. During this process,primase-synthesized RNA/DNA primers are removed, and Okazaki fragments are joined into an intact lagging strand DNA. The processing of RNA/DNA primers requires a group of structure-specific nucleases typified by flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1). Here, we summarize the distinct roles of these nucleases in different pathways for removal of RNA/DNA primers. Recent findings reveal that Okazaki fragment maturation is highly coordinated. The dynamic interactions of polymerase δ, FEN1 and DNA ligase I with proliferating cell nuclear antigen allow these enzymes to act sequentially during Okazaki fragment maturation. Such protein-protein interactions may be regulated by post-translational modifications. We also discuss studies using mutant mouse models that suggest two distinct cancer etiological mechanisms arising from defects in different steps of Okazaki fragment maturation.Mutations that affect the efficiency of RNA primer removal may result in accumulation of unligated nicks and DNA double-strand breaks. These DNA strand breaks can cause varying forms of chromosome aberrations, contributing to development of cancer that associates with aneuploidy and gross chromosomal rearrangement. On the other hand, mutations that impair editing out of polymerase o incorporation errors result in cancer displaying a strong mutator phenotype.

  8. Modelling fragmentations of amino-acids after resonant electron attachment: quantum evidence of possible direct -OH detachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panosetti, C.; Sebastianelli, F.; Gianturco, F.A. [Department of Chemistry and CNISM, University of Rome -La Sapienza-, Roma (Italy); Baccarelli, I. [CASPUR, Supercomputing Consortium for University and Research, Roma (Italy)

    2010-10-15

    We investigate some aspects of the radiation damage mechanisms in biomolecules, focusing on the modelling of resonant fragmentation caused by the attachment of low-energy electrons (LEEs) initially ejected by biological tissues when exposed to ionizing radiation. Scattering equations are formulated within a symmetry-adapted, single-center expansion of both continuum and bound electrons, and the interaction forces are obtained from a combination of ab initio calculations and a nonempirical model of exchange and correlation effects developed in our group. We present total elastic scattering cross-sections and resonance features obtained for the equilibrium geometries of glycine, alanine, proline and valine. Our results at those geometries of the target molecules are briefly shown to qualitatively explain some of the fragmentation patterns obtained in experiments. We further carry out a one-dimensional (1D) modeling for the dynamics of intramolecular energy transfers mediated by the vibrational activation of selected bonds: our calculations indicate that resonant electron attachment to glycine can trigger direct, dissociative evolution of the complex into (Gly-OH)- and -OH losses, while they also find that the same process does not occur via a direct, 1D dissociative path in the larger amino acids of the present study. (authors)

  9. Spontaneous current-layer fragmentation and cascading reconnection in solar flares: I. Model and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bárta, Miroslav; Karlický, Marian; Skála, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is commonly considered as a mechanism of solar (eruptive) flares. A deeper study of this scenario reveals, however, a number of open issues. Among them is the fundamental question, how the magnetic energy is transferred from large, accumulation scales to plasma scales where its actual dissipation takes place. In order to investigate this transfer over a broad range of scales we address this question by means of high-resolution MHD simulation. The simulation results indicate, that the magnetic-energy transfer to small scales is realized via a cascade of consecutive smaller and smaller flux-ropes (plasmoids), in analogy with the vortex-tube cascade in (incompressible) fluid dynamics. Both tearing and (driven) coalescence processes are equally important for the consecutive fragmentation of the magnetic field (and associated current density) to smaller elements. At the later stages a dynamic balance between tearing and coalescence processes reveals a steady (power-law) scaling typical for ca...

  10. VISION -- A Dynamic Model of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. J. Jacobson; A. M. Yacout; S. J. Piet; D. E. Shropshire; G. E. Matthern

    2006-02-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative’s (AFCI) fundamental objective is to provide technology options that – if implemented – would enable long-term growth of nuclear power while improving sustainability and energy security. The AFCI organization structure consists of four areas; Systems Analysis, Fuels, Separations and Transmutations. The Systems Analysis Working Group is tasked with bridging the program technical areas and providing the models, tools, and analyses required to assess the feasibility of design and deploy¬ment options and inform key decision makers. An integral part of the Systems Analysis tool set is the development of a system level model that can be used to examine the implications of the different mixes of reactors, implications of fuel reprocessing, impact of deployment technologies, as well as potential “exit” or “off ramp” approaches to phase out technologies, waste management issues and long-term repository needs. The Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) is a computer-based simulation model that allows performing dynamic simulations of fuel cycles to quantify infrastructure requirements and identify key trade-offs between alternatives. VISION is intended to serve as a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies.

  11. Nuclear model calculations on cyclotron production of {sup 51}Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakavand, Tayeb [Imam Khomeini International Univ., Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Physics; Aboudzadeh, Mohammadreza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute/AEOI, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School; Farahani, Zahra; Eslami, Mohammad [Zanjan Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Physics

    2015-12-15

    {sup 51}Cr (T{sub 1/2} = 27.7 d), which decays via electron capture (100 %) with 320 keV gamma emission (9.8 %), is a radionuclide with still a large application in biological studies. In this work, ALICE/ASH and TALYS nuclear model codes along with some adjustments are used to calculate the excitation functions for proton, deuteron, α-particle and neutron induced on various targets leading to the production of {sup 51}Cr radioisotope. The production yields of {sup 51}Cr from various reactions are determined using the excitation function calculations and stopping power data. The results are compared with corresponding experimental data and discussed from point of view of feasibility.

  12. Inhibiting α-synuclein oligomerization by stable cell-penetrating β-synuclein fragments recovers phenotype of Parkinson's disease model flies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronit Shaltiel-Karyo

    Full Text Available The intracellular oligomerization of α-synuclein is associated with Parkinson's disease and appears to be an important target for disease-modifying treatment. Yet, to date, there is no specific inhibitor for this aggregation process. Using unbiased systematic peptide array analysis, we identified molecular interaction domains within the β-synuclein polypeptide that specifically binds α-synuclein. Adding such peptide fragments to α-synuclein significantly reduced both amyloid fibrils and soluble oligomer formation in vitro. A retro-inverso analogue of the best peptide inhibitor was designed to develop the identified molecular recognition module into a drug candidate. While this peptide shows indistinguishable activity as compared to the native peptide, it is stable in mouse serum and penetrates α-synuclein over-expressing cells. The interaction interface between the D-amino acid peptide and α-synuclein was mapped by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. Finally, administering the retro-inverso peptide to a Drosophila model expressing mutant A53T α-synuclein in the nervous system, resulted in a significant recovery of the behavioral abnormalities of the treated flies and in a significant reduction in α-synuclein accumulation in the brains of the flies. The engineered retro-inverso peptide can serve as a lead for developing a novel class of therapeutic agents to treat Parkinson's disease.

  13. Landscape fragmentation and pollinator movement within agricultural environments: a modelling framework for exploring foraging and movement ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean A. Rands

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pollinator decline has been linked to landscape change, through both habitat fragmentation and the loss of habitat suitable for the pollinators to live within. One method for exploring why landscape change should affect pollinator populations is to combine individual-level behavioural ecological techniques with larger-scale landscape ecology. A modelling framework is described that uses spatially-explicit individual-based models to explore the effects of individual behavioural rules within a landscape. The technique described gives a simple method for exploring the effects of the removal of wild corridors, and the creation of wild set-aside fields: interventions that are common to many national agricultural policies. The effects of these manipulations on central-place nesting pollinators are varied, and depend upon the behavioural rules that the pollinators are using to move through the environment. The value of this modelling framework is discussed, and future directions for exploration are identified.

  14. Excessive cytosolic DNA fragments as a potential trigger of Graves’ disease: an encrypted message sent by animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqian Luo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Graves’ hyperthyroidism is caused by autoantibodies directed against the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR that mimic the action of TSH. The establishment of Graves’ hyperthyroidism in experimental animals has proven to be an important approach to dissect the mechanisms of self-tolerance breakdown that lead to the production of thyroid-stimulating TSHR autoantibodies (TSAbs. ‘Shimojo’s model was the first successful Graves’ animal model, wherein immunization with fibroblasts cells expressing TSHR and a major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II molecule, but not either alone, induced TSAb production in AKR/N (H-2k mice. This model highlights the importance of coincident MHC class II expression on TSHR-expressing cells in the development of Graves’ hyperthyroidism. These data are also in agreement with the observation that Graves’ thyrocytes often aberrantly express MHC class II antigens via mechanisms that remain unclear. Our group demonstrated that cytosolic self-genomic DNA fragments derived from sterile injured cells can induce aberrant MHC class II expression and production of multiple inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in thyrocytes in vitro, suggesting that severe cell injury may initiate immune responses in a way that is relevant to thyroid autoimmunity mediated by cytosolic DNA signaling. Furthermore, more recent successful Graves’ animal models were primarily established by immunizing mice with TSHR-expressing plasmids or adenovirus. In these models, double-stranded DNA vaccine contents presumably exert similar immune-activating effect in cells at inoculation sites and thus might pave the way toward successful Graves’ animal models. This review focuses on evidence suggesting that cell injury-derived self-DNA fragments could act as Graves’ disease triggers.

  15. Fragmentation of mitochondrial cardiolipin by copper ions in the Atp7b-/- mouse model of Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkova, Irina L; Arnhold, Juergen; Fitzl, Guenther; Huster, Dominik

    2011-07-01

    Cellular copper overload as found in Wilson's disease may disturb mitochondrial function and integrity. Atp7b(-/-) mice accumulate copper in the liver and serve as an animal model for this inherited disease. The molecular mechanism of copper toxicity in hepatocytes is poorly understood. Total mitochondrial lipids from liver of wild-type mice were subjected to oxidative stress by the Cu(2+)/H(2)O(2)/ascorbate system. Phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidylhydroxyacetone (PHA) were detected as cardiolipin fragmentation products by thin-layer chromatography combined with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry in oxidized samples, but not in unperturbed ones. The formation of PA and PHA in copper-treated model membrane correlated well with the decrease of cardiolipin. Mitochondrial lipids from Atp7b(-/-) mice of different age were analyzed for the presence of PA. While 32-weeks old wild-type (control) and Atp7b(-/-) mice did not show any PA, there was a steady increase in the amount of this lipid in Atp7b(-/-) mice in contrast to control with increasing age. Hepatocytes from elder Atp7b(-/-)mice contained morphologically changed mitochondria unlike cells from wild-type animals of the same age. We concluded that free-radical fragmentation of cardiolipin with the formation of PA is a likely mechanism that damages mitochondria under conditions of oxidative stress due to copper overload. Our findings are relevant for better understanding of molecular mechanisms for liver damage found in Wilson's disease.

  16. HEISHI: A fuel performance model for space nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, M.F.

    1994-08-01

    HEISHI is a Fortran computer model designed to aid in analysis, prediction, and optimization of fuel characteristics for use in Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP). Calculational results include fission product release rate, fuel failure fraction, mode of fuel failure, stress-strain state, and fuel material morphology. HEISHI contains models for decay chain calculations of retained and released fission products, based on an input power history and release coefficients. Decay chain parameters such as direct fission yield, decay rates, and branching fractions are obtained from a database. HEISHI also contains models for stress-strain behavior of multilayered fuel particles with creep and differential thermal expansion effects, transient particle temperature profile, grain growth, and fuel particle failure fraction. Grain growth is treated as a function of temperature; the failure fraction depends on the coating tensile strength, which in turn is a function of grain size. The HEISHI code is intended for use in analysis of coated fuel particles for use in particle bed reactors; however, much of the code is geometry-independent and applicable to fuel geometries other than spherical.

  17. Mixed-Symmetry Shell-Model Calculations in Nuclear Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gueorguiev, V G

    2010-01-01

    We consider a novel approach to the nuclear shell model. The one-dimensional harmonic oscillator in a box is used to introduce the concept of an oblique-basis shell-model theory. By implementing the Lanczos method for diagonalization of large matrices, and the Cholesky algorithm for solving generalized eigenvalue problems, the method is applied to nuclei. The mixed-symmetry basis combines traditional spherical shell-model states with SU(3) collective configurations. We test the validity of this mixed-symmetry scheme on 24Mg and 44Ti. Results for 24Mg, obtained using the Wilthental USD intersection in a space that spans less than 10% of the full-space, reproduce the binding energy within 2% as well as an accurate reproduction of the low-energy spectrum and the structure of the states - 90% overlap with the exact eigenstates. In contrast, for an m-scheme calculation, one needs about 60% of the full space to obtain compatible results. Calculations for 44Ti support the mixed-mode scheme although the pure SU(3) ca...

  18. Fragmentation in Biaxial Tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, G H; Archbold, G C; Hurricane, O A; Miller, P L

    2006-06-13

    We have carried out an experiment that places a ductile stainless steel in a state of biaxial tension at a high rate of strain. The loading of the ductile metal spherical cap is performed by the detonation of a high explosive layer with a conforming geometry to expand the metal radially outwards. Simulations of the loading and expansion of the metal predict strain rates that compare well with experimental observations. A high percentage of the HE loaded material was recovered through a soft capture process and characterization of the recovered fragments provided high quality data, including uniform strain prior to failure and fragment size. These data were used with a modified fragmentation model to determine a fragmentation energy.

  19. Integrated propulsion and power modeling for bimodal nuclear thermal rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Joshua

    Bimodal nuclear thermal rocket (BNTR) engines have been shown to reduce the weight of space vehicles to the Moon, Mars, and beyond by utilizing a common reactor for propulsion and power generation. These savings lead to reduced launch vehicle costs and/or increased mission safety and capability. Experimental work of the Rover/NERVA program demonstrated the feasibility of NTR systems for trajectories to Mars. Numerous recent studies have demonstrated the economic and performance benefits of BNTR operation. Relatively little, however, is known about the reactor-level operation of a BNTR engine. The objective of this dissertation is to develop a numerical BNTR engine model in order to study the feasibility and component-level impact of utilizing a NERVA-derived reactor as a heat source for both propulsion and power. The primary contribution is to provide the first-of-its-kind model and analysis of a NERVA-derived BNTR engine. Numerical component models have been modified and created for the NERVA reactor fuel elements and tie tubes, including 1-D coolant thermodynamics and radial thermal conduction with heat generation. A BNTR engine system model has been created in order to design and analyze an engine employing an expander-cycle nuclear rocket and Brayton cycle power generator using the same reactor. Design point results show that a 316 MWt reactor produces a thrust and specific impulse of 66.6 kN and 917 s, respectively. The same reactor can be run at 73.8 kWt to produce the necessary 16.7 kW electric power with a Brayton cycle generator. This demonstrates the feasibility of BNTR operation with a NERVA-derived reactor but also indicates that the reactor control system must be able to operate with precision across a wide power range, and that the transient analysis of reactor decay heat merits future investigation. Results also identify a significant reactor pressure-drop limitation during propulsion and power-generation operation that is caused by poor tie tube

  20. Analysis of proteolytic processes and enzymatic activities in the generation of huntingtin n-terminal fragments in an HEK293 cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebbenkamp, Andrew T N; Crosby, Keith W; Siemienski, Zoe B; Brown, Hilda H; Golde, Todd E; Borchelt, David R

    2012-01-01

    N-terminal fragments of mutant huntingtin (htt) that terminate between residues 90-115, termed cleavage product A or 1 (cp-A/1), form intracellular and intranuclear inclusion bodies in the brains of patients with Huntington's disease (HD). These fragments appear to be proteolytic products of the full-length protein. Here, we use an HEK293 cell culture model to investigate huntingtin proteolytic processing; previous studies of these cells have demonstrated cleavage of htt to cp-A/1 like htt fragments. Recombinant N-terminal htt fragments, terminating at residue 171 (also referred to as cp-B/2 like), were efficiently cleaved to produce cp-A/1 whereas fragments representing endogenous caspase, calpain, and metalloproteinase cleavage products, terminating between residues 400-600, were inefficiently cleaved. Using cysteine-labeling techniques and antibody binding mapping, we localized the C-terminus of the cp-A/1 fragments produced by HEK293 cells to sequences minimally limited by cysteine 105 and an antibody epitope composed of residues 115-124. A combination of genetic and pharmacologic approaches to inhibit potential proteases, including γ-secretase and calpain, proved ineffective in preventing production of cp-A/1. Our findings indicate that HEK293 cells express a protease that is capable of efficiently cleaving cp-B/2 like fragments of htt with normal or expanded glutamine repeats. For reasons that remain unclear, this protease cleaves longer htt fragments, with normal or expanded glutamine expansions, much less efficiently. The protease in HEK293 cells that is capable of generating a cp-A/1 like htt fragment may be a novel protease with a high preference for a cp-B/2-like htt fragment as substrate.

  1. Generic behaviours in impact fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sator, N.; Mechkov, S.; Sausset, F. [Paris-6 Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Lab. de Physique Theorique de la Matiere Condensee, UMR CNRS 7600, 75 - Paris (France); Mechkov, S. [Ecole Normale Superieure, Lab. de Physique Statistique, 75 - Paris (France)

    2008-02-15

    From atomic nuclei to supernovae, including plates and rocks, every cohesive system can be broken into fragments, provided that the deposited energy is sufficiently large compared to its cohesive energy. We present a simple numerical model for investigating the general properties of fragmentation. By use of molecular dynamics simulations, we study the impact fragmentation of a solid disk of interacting particles with a wall. Regardless of the particular form of the interaction potential, the fragment size distribution exhibits a power law behaviour with an exponent that increases logarithmically with the energy deposited in the system, in agreement with experiments. We expect this behaviour to be generic in fragmentation phenomena. (authors)

  2. Embedding Fragment ab Initio Model Potentials in CASSCF/CASPT2 Calculations of Doped Solids: Implementation and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swerts, Ben; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Lindh, Roland; Seijo, Luis; Barandiaran, Zoila; Clima, Sergiu; Pierloot, Kristin; Hendrickx, Marc F A

    2008-04-01

    In this article, we present a fragment model potential approach for the description of the crystalline environment as an extension of the use of embedding ab initio model potentials (AIMPs). The biggest limitation of the embedding AIMP method is the spherical nature of its model potentials. This poses problems as soon as the method is applied to crystals containing strongly covalently bonded structures with highly nonspherical electron densities. The newly proposed method addresses this problem by keeping the full electron density as its model potential, thus allowing one to group sets of covalently bonded atoms into fragments. The implementation in the MOLCAS 7.0 quantum chemistry package of the new method, which we call the embedding fragment ab inito model potential method (embedding FAIMP), is reported here, together with results of CASSCF/CASPT2 calculations. The developed methodology is applied for two test problems: (i) the investigation of the lowest ligand field states (2)A1 and (2)B1 of the Cr(V) defect in the YVO4 crystal and (ii) the investigation of the lowest ligand field and ligand-metal charge transfer (LMCT) states at the Mn(II) substitutional impurity doped into CaCO3. Comparison with similar calculations involving AIMPs for all environmental atoms, including those from covalently bounded units, shows that the FAIMP treatment of the YVO4 units surrounding the CrO4(3-) cluster increases the excitation energy (2)B1 → (2)A1 by ca. 1000 cm(-1) at the CASSCF level of calculation. In the case of the Mn(CO3)6(10-) cluster, the FAIMP treatment of the CO3(2-) units of the environment give smaller corrections, of ca. 100 cm(-1), for the ligand-field excitation energies, which is explained by the larger ligands of this cluster. However, the correction for the energy of the lowest LMCT transition is found to be ca. 600 cm(-1) for the CASSCF and ca. 1300 cm(-1) for the CASPT2 calculation.

  3. Monte Carlo Numerical Models for Nuclear Logging Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Fusheng Li; Xiaogang Han

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear logging is one of most important logging services provided by many oil service companies. The main parameters of interest are formation porosity, bulk density, and natural radiation. Other services are also provided from using complex nuclear logging tools, such as formation lithology/mineralogy, etc. Some parameters can be measured by using neutron logging tools and some can only be measured by using a gamma ray tool. To understand the response of nuclear logging tools, the neutron t...

  4. Modeling the fallout from stabilized nuclear clouds using the HYSPLIT atmospheric dispersion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolph, G D; Ngan, F; Draxler, R R

    2014-10-01

    The Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model, developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Air Resources Laboratory, has been configured to simulate the dispersion and deposition of nuclear materials from a surface-based nuclear detonation using publicly available information on nuclear explosions. Much of the information was obtained from "The Effects of Nuclear Weapons" by Glasstone and Dolan (1977). The model was evaluated against the measurements of nuclear fallout from six nuclear tests conducted between 1951 and 1957 at the Nevada Test Site using the global NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis Project (NNRP) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) meteorological data as input. The model was able to reproduce the general direction and deposition patterns using the coarse NNRP data with Figure of Merit in Space (FMS - the percent overlap between predicted and measured deposition patterns) scores in excess of 50% for four of six simulations for the smallest dose rate contour, with FMS scores declining for higher dose rate contours. When WRF meteorological data were used the FMS scores were 5-20% higher in five of the six simulations, especially at the higher dose rate contours. The one WRF simulation where the scores declined slightly (10-30%) was also the best scoring simulation when using the NNRP data. When compared with measurements of dose rate and time of arrival from the Town Data Base (Thompson et al., 1994), similar results were found with the WRF simulations providing better results for four of six simulations. The overall result was that the different plume simulations using WRF data had more consistent performance than the plume simulations using NNRP data fields.

  5. String fragmentation; La fragmentation des cordes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, H.J.; Werner, K. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees - SUBATECH, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France)

    1997-10-01

    The classical string model is used in VENUS as a fragmentation model. For the soft domain simple 2-parton strings were sufficient, whereas for higher energies up to LHC, the perturbative regime of the QCD gives additional soft gluons, which are mapped on the string as so called kinks, energy singularities between the leading partons. The kinky string model is chosen to handle fragmentation of these strings by application of the Lorentz invariant area law. The `kinky strings` model, corresponding to the perturbative gluons coming from pQCD, takes into consideration this effect by treating the partons and gluons on the same footing. The decay law is always the Artru-Menessier area law which is the most realistic since it is invariant to the Lorentz and gauge transformations. For low mass strings a manipulation of the rupture point is necessary if the string corresponds already to an elementary particle determined by the mass and the flavor content. By means of the fragmentation model it will be possible to simulate the data from future experiments at LHC and RHIC 3 refs.

  6. PREFACE: 11th International Spring Seminar on Nuclear Physics: Shell Model and Nuclear Structure - achievements of the past two decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The 11th International Seminar on Nuclear Physics was held in Ischia from May 12 to May 16, 2014. This Seminar was dedicated to Aldo Covello, who has been the promoter of this series of meetings, which started in Sorrento in 1986 and continued with meetings held every two or three years in the Naples area. Aldo's idea was to offer to a group of researchers, actively working in selected fields of Nuclear Physics, the opportunity to confront their points of view in a lively and informal way. The choice for the period of the year, Spring, as well as the sites chosen reflected this intent. The first meeting was of a purely theoretical nature, but it was immediately clear that the scope of these conferences needed to be enlarged calling into play the experimental community. Then, starting from the second meeting, all the following ones have been characterized by fruitful discussion between theoretical and experimental researchers on current achievements and future developments of nuclear structure. This may be read, in fact, as one of the motivating factors for Aldo's election as Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2008 "... for his outstanding contributions to the international nuclear physics community by providing, for over two decades, a venue for theorists and experimentalists to share their latest ideas." The present meeting, organized by Aldo's former students and with the benefit of his suggestions, has maintained this tradition. The title "Shell model and nuclear structure: achievements of the past two decades" recalls that of the 2nd International Spring Seminar "Shell Model and Nuclear Structure: where do we stand?". The main aim of this 11th Seminar was, in fact, to discuss the changes of the past two decades on our view of nuclei in terms of shell structure as well as the perspectives of the shell model, which has been one of the key points in Aldo's research. This point is well accounted by the Opening Speech of Igal Talmi, one of the fathers of the

  7. The shell model. Towards a unified description of nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poves, Alfredo [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma Cantoblanco, 28049 - Madrid (Spain); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    In this series of lectures we present the foundations of the spherical shell model that we treat as an approximation to the exact solution of the full secular problem. We introduce the notions of valence space, effective interaction and effective operator. We analyse the structure of the realistic effective interactions, identifying their monopole part with the spherical mean field. The multipole Hamiltonian is shown to have a universal (simple) form that includes pairing (isovector and isoscalar), quadrupole, octupole, deca-pole, and ({sigma}{center_dot}{tau})({sigma}{center_dot}{tau}). We describe the methods of resolution of the secular problem, in particular the Lanczos method. The model is applied to the description of nuclear deformation and its relationship with the deformed mean field theories is studied. We propose a new symmetry, `quasi`-SU3, to understand deformation in the spherical basis. Finally, we discuss the domain of nuclei very far from the valley of {beta} stability, addressing the vanishing of some magic closures that can be explained in terms of intruder states. (author) 53 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Models of neutron star atmospheres enriched with nuclear burning ashes

    CERN Document Server

    Nättilä, Joonas; Kajava, Jari J E; Poutanen, Juri

    2015-01-01

    Low-mass X-ray binaries hosting neutron stars (NS) exhibit thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts, which are powered by unstable nuclear burning of helium and/or hydrogen into heavier elements deep in the NS "ocean". In some cases the burning ashes may rise from the burning depths up to the NS photosphere by convection, leading to the appearance of the metal absorption edges in the spectra, which then force the emergent X-ray burst spectra to shift toward lower energies. These effects may have a substantial impact on the color correction factor $f_c$ and the dilution factor $w$, the parameters of the diluted blackbody model $F_E \\approx w B_E(f_c T_{eff})$ that is commonly used to describe the emergent spectra from NSs. The aim of this paper is to quantify how much the metal enrichment can change these factors. We have developed a new NS atmosphere modeling code, which has a few important improvements compared to our previous code required by inclusion of the metals. The opacities and the internal partition func...

  9. Active microrheology of a model of the nuclear micromechanical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Henry; Kilfoil, Maria

    2014-03-01

    In order to successfully complete the final stages of chromosome segregation, eukaryotic cells require the motor enzyme topoisomerase II, which can resolve topological constraints between entangled strands of duplex DNA. We created an in vitro model of a close approximation of the nuclear micromechanical environment in terms of DNA mass and entanglement density, and investigated the influence of this motor enzyme on the DNA mechanics. Topoisomerase II is a non-processive ATPase which we found significantly increases the motions of embedded microspheres in the DNA network. Because of this activity, we study the mechanical properties of our model system by active microrheology by optical trapping. We test the limits of fluctuation dissipation theorem (FDT) under this type of activity by comparing the active microrheology to passive measurements, where thermal motion alone drives the beads. We can relate any departure from FDT to the timescale of topoisomerase II activity in the DNA network. These experiments provide insight into the physical necessity of this motor enzyme in the cell.

  10. Multiphysics modeling of porous CRUD deposits in nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, M. P.; Hussey, D.; Kendrick, B. K.; Besmann, T. M.; Stanek, C. R.; Yip, S.

    2013-11-01

    The formation of porous CRUD deposits on nuclear reactor fuel rods, a longstanding problem in the operation of pressurized water reactors (PWRs), is a significant challenge to science-based multiscale modeling and simulation. While existing, published studies have focused on individual or loosely coupled processes, such as heat transfer, fluid flow, and compound dissolution/precipitation, none have addressed their coupled effects sufficiently to enable a comprehensive, scientific understanding of CRUD. Here we present the formulation and results of a model, MAMBA-BDM, which begins to incorporate mechanistic details in describing CRUD in PWRs. CRUD is treated as a chemical deposition process in an environment of variable concentration, an arbitrary level of heating, and a complex fractal-based flow geometry. We present results on spatial distributions of temperature, pressure, velocity, and concentration that give insight into the interplay between these physical properties and geometrical parameters. We show the role of heat convection which has not been discussed previously. Furthermore, we suggest that the assumption of liquid saturation in the CRUD deserves scrutiny, as a result of our attempt to determine an effective CRUD thermal conductivity.

  11. Nuclear Wavepacket Propogation Model for the Retinal Chromophore in Rhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn, Brittany; Malinovskaya, Svetlana

    2009-05-01

    Rhodopsin, consisting of a retinal chromophore and a protein opsin, is responsible for the first steps in the vision process through a cis to trans photoisomerization, which is completed within 200 fs[1]. Efforts to control the ultrafast dynamics of this molecule have been carried out experimentally[2] as well as through quantum mechanical modeling of nuclear wave packet propagation[3]. We propose a two state model in which the ground electronic Potential Energy Surface (PES) is made up of two adjacent harmonic potentials, representing the cis and trans retinal saddle points, as well as an excited PES, characterized by the Morse potential, which meets the ground PES at a conical intersection. We explore the achievement of a high quantum yield of the trans retinal configuration by varying parameters of the external field and choosing the most adequate shape. Another investigation is presented in which we compare the charge distribution of cis and trans retinal in order to reveal a charge transfer mechanism behind the isomerization of rhodopsin. The results of the Lowdin and Natural Population Analyses demonstrate a significant transfer of charge in and around the isomerization region. [1] RW Schoenlein, LA Peteanu, RA Mathies, CV Shank, Science 254, 412 (1991) [2] VI Prokhorenko, AM Nagy, SA Waschuk, LS Brown, RR Birge, RJD Miller, Science 313, 1257 (2006) [3] S Hahn, G Stock, Chem Phys 259, 297-312 (2000)

  12. Detergent-type membrane fragmentation by MSI-78, MSI-367, MSI-594, and MSI-843 antimicrobial peptides and inhibition by cholesterol: a solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Kuk; Bhunia, Anirban; Kotler, Samuel A; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-03-17

    Multidrug resistance against the existing antibiotics is becoming a global threat, and any potential drug that can be designed using cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMP) could be an alternate solution to alleviate this existing problem. The mechanism of action of killing bacteria by an AMP differs drastically in comparison to that of small molecule antibiotics. The main target of AMPs is to interact with the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane and disrupt it to kill bacteria. Consequently, the modes of membrane interaction that lead to the selectivity of an AMP are very important to understand. Here, we have used different membrane compositions, such as negatively charged, zwitterionic, or mixed large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs), to study the interaction of four different synthetically designed cationic, linear antimicrobial peptides: MSI-78 (commercially known as pexiganan), MSI-367, MSI-594, and MSI-843. Our solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments confirmed that the MSI peptides fragmented LUVs through a detergent-like carpet mechanism depending on the amino acid sequence of the MSI peptide and/or the membrane composition of LUVs. Interestingly, the fragmented lipid aggregates such as SUVs or micelles are sufficiently small to produce an isotropic peak in the (31)P NMR spectrum. These fragmented lipid aggregates contain only MSI peptides bestowed with lipid molecules as confirmed by NMR in conjunction with circular dichroism spectroscopy. Our results also demonstrate that cholesterol, which is present only in the eukaryotic cell membrane, inhibits the MSI-induced fragmentation of LUVs, suggesting that the MSI peptides can discriminate the bacteria and the eukaryotic cell membranes, and this selectivity could be used for further development of novel antibiotics.

  13. Verification and Uncertainty Reduction of Amchitka Underground Nuclear Testing Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed Hassan; Jenny Chapman

    2006-02-01

    The modeling of Amchitka underground nuclear tests conducted in 2002 is verified and uncertainty in model input parameters, as well as predictions, has been reduced using newly collected data obtained by the summer 2004 field expedition of CRESP. Newly collected data that pertain to the groundwater model include magnetotelluric (MT) surveys conducted on the island to determine the subsurface salinity and porosity structure of the subsurface, and bathymetric surveys to determine the bathymetric maps of the areas offshore from the Long Shot and Cannikin Sites. Analysis and interpretation of the MT data yielded information on the location of the transition zone, and porosity profiles showing porosity values decaying with depth. These new data sets are used to verify the original model in terms of model parameters, model structure, and model output verification. In addition, by using the new data along with the existing data (chemistry and head data), the uncertainty in model input and output is decreased by conditioning on all the available data. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is adapted for developing new input parameter distributions conditioned on prior knowledge and new data. The MCMC approach is a form of Bayesian conditioning that is constructed in such a way that it produces samples of the model parameters that eventually converge to a stationary posterior distribution. The Bayesian MCMC approach enhances probabilistic assessment. Instead of simply propagating uncertainty forward from input parameters into model predictions (i.e., traditional Monte Carlo approach), MCMC propagates uncertainty backward from data onto parameters, and then forward from parameters into predictions. Comparisons between new data and the original model, and conditioning on all available data using MCMC method, yield the following results and conclusions: (1) Model structure is verified at Long Shot and Cannikin where the high-resolution bathymetric data collected by CRESP

  14. Energy Dependence of String Fragmentation Function and φ Meson Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SA Ben-Hao; CAI Xu; Chinorat Kobdaj; WANG Zhong-Qi; YAN Yu-Peng; ZHOU Dai-Mei

    2004-01-01

    The φ meson productions in A u+A u and/or P b+Pb collisions at AGS, SPS, RHIC, and LHC energies have been studied systematically with a hadron and string cascade model LUCIAE.After considering the energy dependence of the model parameter α in string fragmentation function and adjusting it to the experimental data of charged multiplicity to a certain extent, the model predictions for φ meson yield, rapidity, and transverse mass distributions are compatible with the experimental data at AGS, SPS and RHIC energies. A calculation for Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energy is given as well. The obtained fractional variable in string fragmentation function shows a saturation in energy dependence. It is discussed that the saturation of fractional variable in string fragmentation function might be a qualitative representation of the energy dependence of nuclear transparency.

  15. Production of fragments and hyperfragments in antiproton-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-04-01

    The formation mechanism of fragments with strangeness in collisions of antiprotons on nuclei has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport model. Production of strange particles in the antiproton-induced nuclear reactions is modeled within the LQMD model, in which all possible reaction channels such as elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange, and inelastic scattering in antibaryon-baryon, baryon-baryon, and meson-baryon collisions have been included. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing hyperfragments in phase space. The hyperfragments are formed within the narrower rapidities. It has the advantage of producing heavier hyperfragments and hypernuclides with strangeness s =-2 (double-Λ fragments) and s =1 (Λ ¯ fragments) in antiproton-induced reactions.

  16. Model development for quantitative evaluation of proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Won Il; Kim, Ho Dong; Yang, Myung Seung

    2000-07-01

    This study addresses the quantitative evaluation of the proliferation resistance which is important factor of the alternative nuclear fuel cycle system. In this study, model was developed to quantitatively evaluate the proliferation resistance of the nuclear fuel cycles. The proposed models were then applied to Korean environment as a sample study to provide better references for the determination of future nuclear fuel cycle system in Korea. In order to quantify the proliferation resistance of the nuclear fuel cycle, the proliferation resistance index was defined in imitation of an electrical circuit with an electromotive force and various electrical resistance components. The analysis on the proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel cycles has shown that the resistance index as defined herein can be used as an international measure of the relative risk of the nuclear proliferation if the motivation index is appropriately defined. It has also shown that the proposed model can include political issues as well as technical ones relevant to the proliferation resistance, and consider all facilities and activities in a specific nuclear fuel cycle (from mining to disposal). In addition, sensitivity analyses on the sample study indicate that the direct disposal option in a country with high nuclear propensity may give rise to a high risk of the nuclear proliferation than the reprocessing option in a country with low nuclear propensity.

  17. Validation of Geant4 fragmentation for Heavy Ion Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolst, David; Cirrone, Giuseppe A. P.; Cuttone, Giacomo; Folger, Gunter; Incerti, Sebastien; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Koi, Tatsumi; Mancusi, Davide; Pandola, Luciano; Romano, Francesco; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Guatelli, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    12C ion therapy has had growing interest in recent years for its excellent dose conformity. However at therapeutic energies, which can be as high as 400 MeV/u, carbon ions produce secondary fragments. For an incident 400 MeV/u 12C ion beam, ∼ 70 % of the beam will undergo fragmentation before the Bragg Peak. The dosimetric and radiobiological impact of these fragments must be accurately characterised, as it can result in increasing the risk of secondary cancer for the patient as well as altering the relative biological effectiveness. This work investigates the accuracy of three different nuclear fragmentation models available in the Monte Carlo Toolkit Geant4, the Binary Intranuclear Cascade (BIC), the Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) and the Liege Intranuclear Cascade (INCL++). The models were benchmarked against experimental data for a pristine 400 MeV/u 12C beam incident upon a water phantom, including fragment yield, angular and energy distribution. For fragment yields the three alternative models agreed between ∼ 5 and ∼ 35 % with experimental measurements, the QMD using the ;Frag; option gave the best agreement for lighter fragments but had reduced agreement for larger fragments. For angular distributions INCL++ was seen to provide the best agreement among the models for all elements with the exception of Hydrogen, while BIC and QMD was seen to produce broader distributions compared to experiment. BIC and QMD performed similar to one another for kinetic energy distributions while INCL++ suffered from producing lower energy distributions compared to the other models and experiment.

  18. Development of an automated core model for nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop an automated package of computer codes that can model the steady-state behavior of nuclear-reactor cores of various designs. As an added benefit, data produced for steady-state analysis also can be used as input to the TRAC transient-analysis code for subsequent safety analysis of the reactor at any point in its operating lifetime. The basic capability to perform steady-state reactor-core analysis already existed in the combination of the HELIOS lattice-physics code and the NESTLE advanced nodal code. In this project, the automated package was completed by (1) obtaining cross-section libraries for HELIOS, (2) validating HELIOS by comparing its predictions to results from critical experiments and from the MCNP Monte Carlo code, (3) validating NESTLE by comparing its predictions to results from numerical benchmarks and to measured data from operating reactors, and (4) developing a linkage code to transform HELIOS output into NESTLE input.

  19. Bespoke Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The Ph.D. -project Bespoke Fragments seeks to explore and utilise the space emerging between the potentials of digital drawing and fabrication and the field of materials and their properties and capacities. Within this span, the project is situated in a shuttling between the virtual and the actual......, the emergence of virtual space is no longer limited to the computer's digital world, but extends into the materials' world. Creation and uncertainty are allowed as virtual parameters in both the digital and reality. Based on this notion the project suggests utilising that exact potential to develop...

  20. Individual-Based Spatially-Explicit Model of an Herbivore and Its Resource: The Effect of Habitat Reduction and Fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostova, T; Carlsen, T; Kercher, J

    2002-06-17

    We present an individual-based, spatially-explicit model of the dynamics of a small mammal and its resource. The life histories of each individual animal are modeled separately. The individuals can have the status of residents or wanderers and belong to behaviorally differing groups of juveniles or adults and males or females. Their territory defending and monogamous behavior is taken into consideration. The resource, green vegetation, grows depending on seasonal climatic characteristics and is diminished due to the herbivore's grazing. Other specifics such as a varying personal energetic level due to feeding and starvation of the individuals, mating preferences, avoidance of competitors, dispersal of juveniles, as a result of site overgrazing, etc. are included in the model. We determined model parameters from real data for the species Microtus ochrogaster (prairie vole). The simulations are done for a case of an enclosed habitat without predators or other species competitors. The goal of the study is to find the relation between size of habitat and population persistence. The experiments with the model show the populations go extinct due to severe overgrazing, but that the length of population persistence depends on the area of the habitat as well as on the presence of fragmentation. Additionally, the total population size of the vole population obtained during the simulations exhibits yearly fluctuations as well as multi-yearly peaks of fluctuations. This dynamics is similar to the one observed in prairie vole field studies.

  1. Two source emission behaviour of alpha fragments of projectile having energy around 1 GeV per nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, V; Pathak, Ramji

    2010-01-01

    The emission of projectile fragments alpha has been studied in ^{84}Kr interactions with nuclei of the nuclear emulsion detector composition at relativistic energy below 2 GeV per nucleon. The angular distribution of projectile fragments alpha in terms of transverse momentum could not be explained by a straight and clean-cut collision geometry hypothesis of Participant - Spectator (PS) Model. Therefore, it is assumed that projectile fragments alpha were produced from two separate sources that belong to the projectile spectator region differing drastically in their temperatures. It has been clearly observed that the emission of projectile fragments alpha are from two different sources. The contribution of projectile fragments alpha from contact layer or hot source is a few percent of the total emission of projectile fragments alphas. Most of the projectile fragments alphas are emitted from the cold source. It has been noticed that the temperature of hot and cold regions are dependent on the projectile mass num...

  2. Multi-solid and multi-fluid diffuse interface model: Applications to dynamic fracture and fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndanou, S., E-mail: serge.ndanou@univ-amu.fr; Favrie, N., E-mail: nicolas.favrie@univ-amu.fr; Gavrilyuk, S., E-mail: sergey.gavrilyuk@univ-amu.fr

    2015-08-15

    We extend the model of diffuse solid–fluid interfaces developed earlier by authors of this paper to the case of arbitrary number of interacting hyperelastic solids. Plastic transformations of solids are taken into account through a Maxwell type model. The specific energy of each solid is given in separable form: it is the sum of a hydrodynamic part of the energy depending only on the density and the entropy, and an elastic part of the energy which is unaffected by the volume change. It allows us to naturally pass to the fluid description in the limit of vanishing shear modulus. In spite of a large number of governing equations, the model has a quite simple mathematical structure: it is a duplication of a single visco-elastic model. The model is well posed both mathematically and thermodynamically: it is hyperbolic and compatible with the second law of thermodynamics. The resulting model can be applied in the situations involving an arbitrary number of fluids and solids. In particular, we show the ability of the model to describe spallation and penetration phenomena occurring during high velocity impacts.

  3. Mechanistic modeling of fingering, nonmonotonicity, fragmentation, and pulsation within gravity/buoyant destabilized two-phase/unsaturated flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Robert J.; Yarrington, Lane

    2003-03-01

    Fingering, nonmonotonicity, fragmentation, and pulsation within gravity/buoyant destabilized two-phase/unsaturated flow systems has been widely observed with examples in homogeneous to heterogeneous porous media, in single fractures to fracture networks, and for both wetting and nonwetting invasion. To model this phenomena, we consider a mechanistic approach based on forms of modified invasion percolation (MIP) that include gravity, the influence of the local interfacial curvature along the phase-phase interface, and the simultaneous invasion and reinvasion of both wetting and nonwetting fluids. We present example simulations and compare them to experimental data for three very different situations: (1) downward gravity-driven fingering of water into a dry, homogeneous, water-wettable, porous medium; (2) upward buoyancy-driven migration of gas within a water saturated, heterogeneous, water-wettable, porous medium; and (3) downward gravity-driven fingering of water into a dry, water-wettable, rough-walled fracture.

  4. Accountability and non-proliferation nuclear regime: a review of the mutual surveillance Brazilian-Argentine model for nuclear safeguards; Accountability e regime de nao proliferacao nuclear: uma avaliacao do modelo de vigilancia mutua brasileiro-argentina de salvaguardas nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, Roberto Salles

    2014-08-01

    The regimes of accountability, the organizations of global governance and institutional arrangements of global governance of nuclear non-proliferation and of Mutual Vigilance Brazilian-Argentine of Nuclear Safeguards are the subject of research. The starting point is the importance of the institutional model of global governance for the effective control of non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. In this context, the research investigates how to structure the current arrangements of the international nuclear non-proliferation and what is the performance of model Mutual Vigilance Brazilian-Argentine of Nuclear Safeguards in relation to accountability regimes of global governance. For that, was searched the current literature of three theoretical dimensions: accountability, global governance and global governance organizations. In relation to the research method was used the case study and the treatment technique of data the analysis of content. The results allowed: to establish an evaluation model based on accountability mechanisms; to assess how behaves the model Mutual Vigilance Brazilian-Argentine Nuclear Safeguards front of the proposed accountability regime; and to measure the degree to which regional arrangements that work with systems of global governance can strengthen these international systems. (author)

  5. Heterogeneous world model and collaborative scenarios of transition to globally sustainable nuclear energy systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The International Atomic Energy Agency's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO is to help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute to meeting global energy needs of the 21st century in a sustainable manner. The INPRO task titled “Global scenarios” is to develop global and regional nuclear energy scenarios that lead to a global vision of sustainable nuclear energy in the 21st century. Results of multiple studies show that the criteria for developing sustainable nuclear energy cannot be met without innovations in reactor and nuclear fuel cycle technologies. Combining different reactor types and associated fuel chains creates a multiplicity of nuclear energy system arrangements potentially contributing to global sustainability of nuclear energy. In this, cooperation among countries having different policy regarding fuel cycle back end would be essential to bring sustainability benefits from innovations in technology to all interested users. INPRO has developed heterogeneous global model to capture countries’ different policies regarding the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle in regional and global scenarios of nuclear energy evolution and applied in a number of studies performed by participants of the project. This paper will highlight the model and major conclusions obtained in the studies.

  6. A mathematical model of the dynamics of prion aggregates with chaperone-mediated fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jason K; Sindi, Suzanne S

    2016-05-01

    Prions are proteins most commonly associated with fatal neurodegenerative diseases in mammals but are also responsible for a number of harmless heritable phenotypes in yeast. These states arise when a misfolded form of a protein appears and, rather than be removed by cellular quality control mechanisms, persists. The misfolded prion protein forms aggregates and is capable of converting normally folded protein to the misfolded state through direct interaction between the two forms. The dominant mathematical model for prion aggregate dynamics has been the nucleated polymerization model (NPM) which considers the dynamics of only the normal protein and the aggregates. However, for yeast prions the molecular chaperone Hsp104 is essential for prion propagation. Further, although mammals do not express Hsp104, experimental assays have shown Hsp104 also interacts with mammalian prion aggregates. In this study, we generalize the NPM to account for molecular chaperones and develop what we call the enzyme-limited nucleated polymerization model (ELNPM). We discuss existence, uniqueness and stability of solutions to our model and demonstrate that the NPM represents a quasi-steady-state reduction of our model. We validate the ELNPM by demonstrating agreement with experimental results on the yeast prion PSI(+) that could not be supported by the NPM. Finally, we demonstrate that, in contrast to the NPM, the ELNPM permits the coexistence of multiple prion strains.

  7. The canonical and grand canonical models for nuclear multifragmentation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Chaudhuri; S Das Gupta

    2010-08-01

    Many observables seen in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions can be explained on the basis of statistical equilibrium. Calculations based on statistical equilibrium can be implemented in microcanonical ensemble, canonical ensemble or grand canonical ensemble. This paper deals with calculations with canonical and grand canonical ensembles. A recursive relation developed recently allows calculations with arbitrary precision for many nuclear problems. Calculations are done to study the nature of phase transition in nuclear matter.

  8. Fragmentation cross-sections and model uncertainties in Cosmic Ray propagation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tomassetti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Abundances and energy spectra of cosmic ray nuclei are being measured with high accuracy by the AMS experiment. These observations can provide tight constraints to the propagation models of galactic cosmic rays. In the view of the release of these data, I present an evaluation of the model uncertainties associated to the cross-sections for secondary production of Li-Be-B nuclei in cosmic rays. I discuss the role of cross section uncertainties in the calculation of the boron-to-carbon and beryllium-to-boron ratios, as well as their impact in the determination of the cosmic-ray transport parameters.

  9. Utility of Social Modeling in Assessment of a State’s Propensity for Nuclear Proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Whitney, Paul D.; Dalton, Angela C.; Olson, Jarrod; White, Amanda M.; Cooley, Scott K.; Youchak, Paul M.; Stafford, Samuel V.

    2011-06-01

    This report is the third and final report out of a set of three reports documenting research for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Security Administration (NASA) Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development NA-22 Simulations, Algorithms, and Modeling program that investigates how social modeling can be used to improve proliferation assessment for informing nuclear security, policy, safeguards, design of nuclear systems and research decisions. Social modeling has not to have been used to any significant extent in a proliferation studies. This report focuses on the utility of social modeling as applied to the assessment of a State's propensity to develop a nuclear weapons program.

  10. FALSTAFF: a novel apparatus for fission fragment characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panebianco Stefano

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of nuclear fission and in particular the correlation between the produced fragments and the associated neutrons is encountering renewed interest since new models are available on the market and a large set of applications show a rather stringent demand on high quality nuclear data. The future Neutrons For Science installation, being presently built at GANIL (Caen, France in the framework of the SPIRAL2 project, will produce high intensity neutron beams from hundreds of keV up to 40 MeV. In view of this opportunity, the development of an experimental setup called FALSTAFF (Four Arm cLover for the Study of Actinide Fission Fragments has been undertaken since 2011. This novel apparatus is meant to provide a full characterization of fission fragments in terms of mass, nuclear charge and kinetic energy. Moreover, it will provide a measurement of the mass before and after neutron evaporation, leading to the determination of the neutron multiplicity as a function of the fragmentation. The FALSTAFF setup is presently in its R&D phase in order to achieve the required specifications, especially in terms of time, space and energy resolution of the different detectors.

  11. FALSTAFF: a novel apparatus for fission fragment characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panebianco, Stefano; Dore, Diane; Materna, Thomas; Papaevangelou, Thomas [CEA Centre de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Farget, Fanny; Pancin, Julien [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Caen (France); Locolley, Francois-Rene; Lehaut, Gregory [LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, Caen (France)

    2014-07-01

    The study of nuclear fission and in particular the correlation between the produced fragments and the associated neutrons is encountering renewed interest since new models are available on the market and a large set of applications show a rather stringent demand on high quality nuclear data. The future Neutrons For Science installation, being presently built at GANIL (Caen, France) in the framework of the SPIRAL2 project, will produce high intensity neutron beams from hundreds of keV up to 40 MeV. In view of this opportunity, the development of an experimental setup called FALSTAFF (Four Arm cLover for the Study of Actinide Fission Fragments) has been undertaken since 2011. This novel apparatus is meant to provide a full characterization of fission fragments in terms of mass, nuclear charge and kinetic energy. Moreover, it will provide a measurement of the mass before and after neutron evaporation, leading to the determination of the neutron multiplicity as a function of the fragmentation. The FALSTAFF setup is presently in its R and D phase in order to achieve the required specifications, especially in terms of time, space and energy resolution of the different detectors. (author)

  12. Evaluation of the nuclear cross section variance-covariance matrices issued from the nuclear optical model; Evaluation des matrices de variance-covariance des sections efficaces nucleaires issues du modele optique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brassart, M. [Ecole Nationale Superieure Ingenieurs de Bourges, 18 - Bourges (France); Mounier, C. [CEA Saclay, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire DEN, Service d' Etudes des Reacteurs et de Modelisation Avancee, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Dossantos-Uzarralde, P. [CEA Bruyeres le Chatel, 91 (France). Dept. de Physique Theorique et Appliquee

    2004-07-01

    Nuclear reaction models play an important role in today's nuclear data evaluations. There are, however, difficulties associated with evaluating data uncertainties, both while performing the experimental measurements as well as constructing them by nuclear models. In this general context, our interest is particularly targeted towards the study of the propagation uncertainties within nuclear models. In this report we discuss two distinct ways of calculating the nuclear cross section variance-covariance matrices and then show these can be applied to the nuclear spherical optical model. (authors)

  13. Coherent fragmentation of 12C nuclei of momentum 4.5 GeV/ c per nucleon through the 8Beg.s.+4He channel in a nuclear photoemulsion containing lead nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaga, V. V.; Gerasimov, S. G.; Dronov, V. A.; Peresadko, N. G.; Pisetskaya, A. V.; Rusakova, V. V.; Fetisov, V. N.; Kharlamov, S. P.; Shesterkina, L. N.

    2017-07-01

    A two-particle channel in which an unbound nucleus of 8Be in the ground state (8Beg.s.) was one of the fragments was selected among events where 12C nuclei of momentum 4.5 GeV/c per nucleon undergo coherent dissociation into three alpha particles. The events in question were detected in a track nuclear photoemulsion containing lead nuclei, which was irradiated at the synchrophasotron of the Laboratory of High Energies at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna). The average transverse momentum of alpha particles produced upon the decay of 8Beg.s. nuclei was 87±6 MeV/ c, while that for "single" alpha (αs) particles was 123±15 MeV/ c. The average value of the transverse-momentum transfer in the reaction being considered, Pt(12C), was 223 ± 20 MeV/ c. The average value of the cross section for this channel involving Ag and Br target nuclei was 13 ± 4 mb, while the cross section for the reaction on the Pb nucleus was 40 ± 15 mb. The Coulomb dissociation contribution evaluated on the basis of the number of events where the momentum P t(12C) did not exceed 0.1 GeV/c saturated about 20%. In nine events, the measured total transverse energy of the fragments in the reference frame comoving with the decaying carbon nucleus did not exceed 0.45 MeV, which did not contradict the excitation of the participant 12C nucleus to the level at 7.65 MeV. The average value of the transverse momentum in those events was 234 ± 25 MeV/ c.

  14. Multi-Scale Particle Size Distributions of Mars, Moon and Itokawa based on a time-maturation dependent fragmentation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, C. A.; Pike, W. T.

    2013-12-01

    We present the development of a soil evolution framework and multiscale modelling of the surface of Mars, Moon and Itokawa thus providing an atlas of extra-terrestrial Particle Size Distributions (PSD). These PSDs are profoundly based on a tailoring method which interconnects several datasets from different sites captured by the various missions. The final integrated product is then fully justified through a soil evolution analysis model mathematically constructed via fundamental physical principles (Charalambous, 2013). The construction of the PSD takes into account the macroscale fresh primary impacts and their products, the mesoscale distributions obtained by the in-situ data of surface missions (Golombek et al., 1997, 2012) and finally the microscopic scale distributions provided by Curiosity and Phoenix Lander (Pike, 2011). The distribution naturally extends at the magnitudinal scales at which current data does not exist due to the lack of scientific instruments capturing the populations at these data absent scales. The extension is based on the model distribution (Charalambous, 2013) which takes as parameters known values of material specific probabilities of fragmentation and grinding limits. Additionally, the establishment of a closed-form statistical distribution provides a quantitative description of the soil's structure. Consequently, reverse engineering of the model distribution allows the synthesis of soil that faithfully represents the particle population at the studied sites (Charalambous, 2011). Such representation essentially delivers a virtual soil environment to work with for numerous applications. A specific application demonstrated here will be the information that can directly be extracted for the successful drilling probability as a function of distance in an effort to aid the HP3 instrument of the 2016 Insight Mission to Mars. Pike, W. T., et al. "Quantification of the dry history of the Martian soil inferred from in situ microscopy

  15. $^{12}$C nuclear reaction measurements for hadrontherapy.

    CERN Document Server

    B. Braunn, B; G. Ban, G; J.Colin, J; D. Cussol, D; J.M. Fontbonne, J M; F.R.. Lecolley, F R; C. Pautard, C; Haas, F; Lebhertz, D; Rousseau, M; Stuttge, L; Chevallier, M; Dauvergne, D; Le Foulher, F; Ray, C; Testa, E; Testa, M; Salsac, M D

    2010-01-01

    Hadrontherapy treatments require a very high precision on the dose deposition ( 2.5% and 1-2mm) in order to keep the benefits of the precise ions’ ballistic. The largest uncertainty on the physical dose deposition is due to ion fragmentation. Up to now, the simulation codes are not able to reproduce the fragmentation process with the required precision. To constraint the nuclear models and complete fragmentation cross sections databases; our collaboration has performed an experiment on May 2008 at GANIL with a 95 MeV/u 12C beam. We have measured the fluence, energy and angular distributions of charged fragments and neutrons coming from nuclear reactions of incident 12C on thick water-like PMMA targets. Preliminary comparisons between GEANT4 (G4BinaryLightIonReaction) simulations and experimental data show huge discrepancies.

  16. Quantum statistical model of nuclear multifragmentation in the canonical ensemble method 24.60.-k; 24.60.Ky; 25.70.Pq; 25.70.-z; Nuclear multifragmentation; First-order phase transition; Quantum statistics; Canonical ensemble

    CERN Document Server

    Parvan, A S; Ploszajczak, M

    2000-01-01

    A quantum statistical model of nuclear multifragmentation is proposed. The recurrence equation method used within the canonical ensemble makes the model solvable and transparent to physical assumptions and allows to get results without involving the Monte Carlo technique. The model exhibits the first-order phase transition. Quantum statistics effects are clearly seen on the microscopic level of occupation numbers but are almost washed out for global thermodynamic variables and the averaged observables studied. In the latter case, the recurrence relations for multiplicity distributions of both intermediate-mass and all fragments are derived and the specific changes in the shape of multiplicity distributions in the narrow region of the transition temperature is stressed. The temperature domain favorable to search for the HBT effect is noted.

  17. Comparison of experimental data with predictions of various models for silicon and aluminum fragmentation under the effect of high-energy cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chechenin, N. G., E-mail: chechenin@sinp.msu.ru; Chuvilskaya, T. V.; Shirokova, A. A.; Kadmenskii, A. G. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    The accuracy attained in theoretically estimating the yields of isotopes and isobars and their energy, charge, and mass distributions in silicon fragmentation that occurs in spacecraft electronics under the effect of cosmic-ray protons is an important factor in forecasting the probability for single-event upsets in the electronics and the reliability of spacecraft operation in general. In previous studies of our group, it was shown that the results of the calculations are highly sensitive to the choice of parameters for opticalmodel potentials. In addition to cross sections for elastic and inelastic proton scattering and charge, mass, and energy distributions of heavy nuclear-reaction products, the results of our calculations for doubledifferential spectra of protons originating from the interaction of highly energetic (30-400 MeV) protons with aluminum and double-differential spectra of other particles (neutrons and alpha particles) arising in competing channels of the p + {sup 27}Al reaction are also described in the present article. The calculations in question were performed on the basis of the EMPIRE-II-19 code by using various optical-model potentials, including the Becchetti-Greenlees potential for the (p, n) channel, the Wilmore-Hodgson potential for the (p, n) channel, the Madland potential for the (p, p) channel, the Koning-Delaroche potential for the (p, p) channel, and the McFadden-Satchler potential for the (p, {alpha}) channel. A comparative analysis of the double-differential spectra obtained for outgoing protons, neutrons, and alpha particles experimentally and in the calculations of various authors was performed.

  18. Discrete fragment model for apparent formation constants of actinide ions with humic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Takayuki; Yoshida, Hatsumi; Aoyama, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Taishi; Takagi, Ikuji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Moriyama, Hirotake [Kyoto Univ., Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    2015-09-01

    A semi-empirical thermodynamic model was applied to estimate the apparent formation constants of actinide ions, i.e., Th(IV), Pu(IV) and Np(V), with humic substances (HSs), including humic and fulvic acids, over a wide range of solution conditions, i.e., pH, ionic strength, and HS and metal concentrations. The hypothetical HSs consist of humic and fulvic acids with nine types of simple organic ligands, which include aromatic and aliphatic carboxyl groups and phenol groups, as binding sites. The abundance of each binding site in the hypothetical HSs was determined via a fitting analysis using an acid-dissociation dataset for several HSs. To determine the apparent formation constant of a given metal ion with HSs, 54 specific binding sites were considered, including nine monodentate sites (1:1 metal/ligand complexes) and 45 bidentate sites (1:2 metal/ligand complexes). The formation constant of each monodentate binding was determined from the experimental data, while those of the bidentate bindings were determined by considering two monodentate bindings and the chelating effect, for which one of the adjustable parameters was introduced in the model. Introduction of the other parameter, which is related to the fraction of monodentate to bidentate sites (i.e., the heterogeneity), afforded the parameter values with good correlation with the apparent formation constant data. The present model with adjusted parameter values well reproduced the experimental apparent complex formation constants for actinide ion interaction with HSs in a wide range of solution conditions except for those obtained at trace concentrations.

  19. Jaguars on the move: modeling movement to mitigate fragmentation from road expansion in the Mayan Forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colchero, Fernando; Conde, Dalia Amor; Manterola, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    -telemetry and GPS data to infer the movement behavior of jaguars Panthera onca as a response to vegetation, roads and human population density in the Mayan Forests of Mexico and Guatemala. We used the results of the model to simulate jaguars moving along a road that bisects the major reserve system in the area....... The aim of the simulations was to identify suitable locations for wildlife passes. We found that jaguars move preferentially to undisturbed forests and that females avoid moving close to roads and to areas with even low levels of human occupation. Males also avoid roads, but to a lesser degree, and appear...

  20. A modular perspective of protein structures; application to fragment based loop modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Fiser, Andras

    2013-01-01

    Summary Proteins can be decomposed into supersecondary structure modules. We used a generic definition of supersecondary structure elements, so-called Smotifs, which are composed of two flanking regular secondary structures connected by a loop, to explore the evolution and current variety of structure building blocks. Here, we discuss recent observations about the saturation of Smotif geometries in protein structures and how it opens new avenues in protein structure modeling and design. As a first application of these observations we describe our loop conformation modeling algorithm, ArchPred that takes advantage of Smotifs classification. In this application, instead of focusing on specific loop properties the method narrows down possible template conformations in other, often not homologous structures, by identifying the most likely supersecondary structure environment that cradles the loop. Beyond identifying the correct starting supersecondary structure geometry, it takes into account information of fit of anchor residues, sterical clashes, match of predicted and observed dihedral angle preferences, and local sequence signal. PMID:22987351

  1. Developing a Hierarchical Decision Model to Evaluate Nuclear Power Plant Alternative Siting Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingga, Marwan Mossa

    A strong trend of returning to nuclear power is evident in different places in the world. Forty-five countries are planning to add nuclear power to their grids and more than 66 nuclear power plants are under construction. Nuclear power plants that generate electricity and steam need to improve safety to become more acceptable to governments and the public. One novel practical solution to increase nuclear power plants' safety factor is to build them away from urban areas, such as offshore or underground. To date, Land-Based siting is the dominant option for siting all commercial operational nuclear power plants. However, the literature reveals several options for building nuclear power plants in safer sitings than Land-Based sitings. The alternatives are several and each has advantages and disadvantages, and it is difficult to distinguish among them and choose the best for a specific project. In this research, we recall the old idea of using the alternatives of offshore and underground sitings for new nuclear power plants and propose a tool to help in choosing the best siting technology. This research involved the development of a decision model for evaluating several potential nuclear power plant siting technologies, both those that are currently available and future ones. The decision model was developed based on the Hierarchical Decision Modeling (HDM) methodology. The model considers five major dimensions, social, technical, economic, environmental, and political (STEEP), and their related criteria and sub-criteria. The model was designed and developed by the author, and its elements' validation and evaluation were done by a large number of experts in the field of nuclear energy. The decision model was applied in evaluating five potential siting technologies and ranked the Natural Island as the best in comparison to Land-Based, Floating Plant, Artificial Island, and Semi-Embedded plant.

  2. Reconversion of nuclear weapons

    CERN Document Server

    Kapitza, Sergei P

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear predicament or nuclear option. Synopsis of three lectures : 1- The physical basis of nuclear technology. Physics of fission. Chain reaction in reactors and weapons. Fission fragments. Separration of isotopes. Radiochemistry.2- Nuclear reactors with slow and fast neutrons. Power, size, fuel and waste. Plutonium production. Dose rate, shielding and health hazard. The lessons of Chernobyl3- Nuclear weapons. Types, energy, blast and fallout. Fusion and hydrogen bombs. What to do with nuclear weapons when you cannot use them? Testing. Nonmilittary use. Can we get rid of the nuclear weapon? Nuclear proliferation. Is there a nuclear future?

  3. The Fragmentation of Heavy Nuclei by 13.8 GeV/c Protons as a Contribution to the Study of the Interaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure; Fragmentacion de nucleos pesados por protones de 13'8 GeV/c, como contribucion al estudio del mecanismo de interaccion y estructura nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil Perez, D.

    1967-07-01

    We present here an global study of the interaction between high- energy particles and heavy nuclei, an interaction which holds obvious interest in relation to the problems of nuclear fragmentation and which, up lo now has only been studied piecemeal. We have used three stacks of photographic emulsions which were irradiated by 13.8 GeV/c protons, 17 GeV/c negative pions and 24 GeV/c protons. All three irradiations took place in a 180 K.G. magnetic field using CERN beams. (Author) 20 refs.

  4. 76 FR 46330 - NUREG-1934, Nuclear Power Plant Fire Modeling Application Guide (NPP FIRE MAG); Second Draft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ... COMMISSION NUREG-1934, Nuclear Power Plant Fire Modeling Application Guide (NPP FIRE MAG); Second Draft... for public comment a document entitled, NUREG-1934 (EPRI 1023259), ``Nuclear Power Plant Fire Modeling... pdr.resource@nrc.gov . NUREG-1934 (EPRI 1023259), ``Nuclear Power Plant Fire Modeling...

  5. Modeling and Testing of Non-Nuclear, Highpower Simulated Nuclear Thermal Rocket Reactor Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Daniel R.

    2005-01-01

    When the President offered his new vision for space exploration in January of 2004, he said, "Our third goal is to return to the moon by 2020, as the launching point for missions beyond," and, "With the experience and knowledge gained on the moon, we will then be ready to take the next steps of space exploration: human missions to Mars and to worlds beyond." A human mission to Mars implies the need to move large payloads as rapidly as possible, in an efficient and cost-effective manner. Furthermore, with the scientific advancements possible with Project Prometheus and its Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), (these use electric propulsion), there is a renewed interest in deep space exploration propulsion systems. According to many mission analyses, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP), with its relatively high thrust and high specific impulse, is a serious candidate for such missions. Nuclear rockets utilize fission energy to heat a reactor core to very high temperatures. Hydrogen gas flowing through the core then becomes superheated and exits the engine at very high exhaust velocities. The combination of temperature and low molecular weight results in an engine with specific impulses above 900 seconds. This is almost twice the performance of the LOX/LH2 space shuttle engines, and the impact of this performance would be to reduce the trip time of a manned Mars mission from the 2.5 years, possible with chemical engines, to about 12-14 months.

  6. Information model for management and preservation of scientific digital memory of the Institute of Nuclear Engineering, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sales, Luana Farias, E-mail: lsales@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Sayao, Luis Fernando, E-mail: isayao@cnen.gov.br [Centro de Informacoes Nucleares (CIN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In the context of the data-oriented science (eScience), a considerable part of the results of research activities has been created in digital formats. This means that the memory of the scientific institutions involved in this new scientific paradigm may be at risk of being lost by rapid technological obsolescence, the known fragility of digital media and also by the fragmentation of information and knowledge scattered across multiples repositories. Thus, management of research data in a digital networked and distributed environment becomes an increasing challenge for the research world and the whole area of information: information science, librarianship, knowledge management, archival science and information technology; moreover, in the dynamic environment featuring eScience, there is a need for novel concepts of documents establishing a linkage between traditional documents - printed or digital - stored in repositories, with the data sets stored in data repositories. In this new research environment, an important issue is how to preserve these new complex documents so that they maintain their structure, meaning and authenticity and also its ability to be retrieved, accessed and reused through time and space. In this sense, this paper proposes an information model focused on the curation of scientific memory of the Institute of Nuclear Engineering of the Brazilian Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN/IEN). The model considers the traditional scientific documents (theses, articles, books, etc.) in digital formats and all other relevant data and information related to them, such as: scientific data, software, simulations, photos, videos, historical facts, news, etc., compounding an enhanced publication type oriented to the nuclear area. (author)

  7. Using Direct Sub-Level Entity Access to Improve Nuclear Stockpile Simulation Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Y. Parker

    1999-08-01

    Direct sub-level entity access is a seldom-used technique in discrete-event simulation modeling that addresses the accessibility of sub-level entity information. The technique has significant advantages over more common, alternative modeling methods--especially where hierarchical entity structures are modeled. As such, direct sub-level entity access is often preferable in modeling nuclear stockpile, life-extension issues, an area to which it has not been previously applied. Current nuclear stockpile, life-extension models were demonstrated to benefit greatly from the advantages of direct sub-level entity access. In specific cases, the application of the technique resulted in models that were up to 10 times faster than functionally equivalent models where alternative techniques were applied. Furthermore, specific implementations of direct sub-level entity access were observed to be more flexible, efficient, functional, and scalable than corresponding implementations using common modeling techniques. Common modeling techniques (''unbatch/batch'' and ''attribute-copying'') proved inefficient and cumbersome in handling many nuclear stockpile modeling complexities, including multiple weapon sites, true defect analysis, and large numbers of weapon and subsystem types. While significant effort was required to enable direct sub-level entity access in the nuclear stockpile simulation models, the enhancements were worth the effort--resulting in more efficient, more capable, and more informative models that effectively addressed the complexities of the nuclear stockpile.

  8. Using Direct Sub-Level Entity Access to Improve Nuclear Stockpile Simulation Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Robert Y. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Direct sub-level entity access is a seldom-used technique in discrete-event simulation modeling that addresses the accessibility of sub-level entity information. The technique has significant advantages over more common, alternative modeling methods--especially where hierarchical entity structures are modeled. As such, direct sub-level entity access is often preferable in modeling nuclear stockpile, life-extension issues, an area to which it has not been previously applied. Current nuclear stockpile, life-extension models were demonstrated to benefit greatly from the advantages of direct sub-level entity access. In specific cases, the application of the technique resulted in models that were up to 10 times faster than functionally equivalent models where alternative techniques were applied. Furthermore, specific implementations of direct sub-level entity access were observed to be more flexible, efficient, functional, and scalable than corresponding implementations using common modeling techniques. Common modeling techniques (''unbatch/batch'' and ''attribute-copying'') proved inefficient and cumbersome in handling many nuclear stockpile modeling complexities, including multiple weapon sites, true defect analysis, and large numbers of weapon and subsystem types. While significant effort was required to enable direct sub-level entity access in the nuclear stockpile simulation models, the enhancements were worth the effort--resulting in more efficient, more capable, and more informative models that effectively addressed the complexities of the nuclear stockpile.

  9. A source term estimation method for a nuclear accident using atmospheric dispersion models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Minsik; Ohba, Ryohji; Oura, Masamichi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an operational source term estimation (STE) method applicable for a nuclear accident like the incident that occurred at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station in 2011. The new STE method presented here is based on data from atmospheric dispersion...... models and short-range observational data around the nuclear power plants.The accuracy of this method is validated with data from a wind tunnel study that involved a tracer gas release from a scaled model experiment at Tokai Daini nuclear power station in Japan. We then use the methodology developed...... and validated through the effort described in this manuscript to estimate the release rate of radioactive material from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station....

  10. Folding angle and excitation energy of fragments from 235U(n th,f) and 252Cf(sf) reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haninger, T.; Hartmann, F. J.; Hofmann, P.; Kim, Y. S.; Lotfranaei, M. S.; von Egidy, T.; Märten, H.; Ruben, A.

    1994-05-01

    Coincident fragments from 235U(n th,f) and 252Cf(sf) reactions were investigated with a doublearm fission-fragment spectrometer and PIN-diode arrays. Based on the measurement of kinetic energy, velocity and direction of complementary fragments the total kinetic energy, the total mass, the individual fragment masses, the total number of emitted neutrons as well as the folding angle were deduced event by event. A nearly linear correlation between average folding angle and average total excitation energy of the fragments (and, consequently, the average number of neutrons) was found. Fragment deflection by prompt neutron emission is accordingly described by a complex statistical evaporation model in connection with a semi-empirical calculation of energy partition in nuclear fission. In addition, the folding-angle distribution due to ternary fission is estimated. All experimental fragment distributions and correlations are well repro- duced by the model calculations.

  11. Dependence of X-Ray Burst Models on Nuclear Reaction Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyburt, R. H.; Amthor, A. M.; Heger, A.; Johnson, E.; Keek, L.; Meisel, Z.; Schatz, H.; Smith, K.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear flashes on the surface of accreting neutron stars, and reliable burst models are needed to interpret observations in terms of properties of the neutron star and the binary system. We investigate the dependence of X-ray burst models on uncertainties in (p, γ), (α, γ), and (α, p) nuclear reaction rates using fully self-consistent burst models that account for the feedbacks between changes in nuclear energy generation and changes in astrophysical conditions. A two-step approach first identified sensitive nuclear reaction rates in a single-zone model with ignition conditions chosen to match calculations with a state-of-the-art 1D multi-zone model based on the Kepler stellar evolution code. All relevant reaction rates on neutron-deficient isotopes up to mass 106 were individually varied by a factor of 100 up and down. Calculations of the 84 changes in reaction rate with the highest impact were then repeated in the 1D multi-zone model. We find a number of uncertain reaction rates that affect predictions of light curves and burst ashes significantly. The results provide insights into the nuclear processes that shape observables from X-ray bursts, and guidance for future nuclear physics work to reduce nuclear uncertainties in X-ray burst models.

  12. Modeling of the mechano-chemical behaviour of the nuclear pore complex: current research and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Alberto; Rodriguez Matas, Jose F; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-10-10

    Recent evidence suggests that mechanical deformation of the cell nucleus regulates the nuclear import of the transcriptional activators of genes involved in primary physiological cell responses such as stem cell differentiation. In addition, this nuclear mechanosensing response is de-regulated in pathological states, such as cancer and neurodegeneration. One hypothesis that could greatly advance the field is that the deformation of the nuclear envelope activates nuclear pore complexes through a direct mechanical link. The understanding of this possible mechanism for nuclear pore complex stretch-activation entails studying the mechanical connection of this complex to the nuclear envelope at the nanoscale. The nanomechanics of the nuclear pore complex is thus emerging as a novel research field, bridging nanoscience with nanotechnology. This review examines the frontier of research methodologies that are potentially useful for building a computational model of this interaction. This includes, for example, electron tomography to assess the geometrical features of the nuclear pore complex and nanoindentation to estimate its mechanical properties and that of the nuclear envelope. In order to summarize the state-of-the-art and perspectives in the field of NPC nanomechanics, this review covers highly interdisciplinary experimental and theoretical research methodologies pertaining to the fields of physics, chemistry, biology, materials and mechanics.

  13. Nonlinear Fuzzy Model Predictive Control for a PWR Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangjie Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable power and temperature control in pressurized water reactor (PWR nuclear power plant is necessary to guarantee high efficiency and plant safety. Since the nuclear plants are quite nonlinear, the paper presents nonlinear fuzzy model predictive control (MPC, by incorporating the realistic constraints, to realize the plant optimization. T-S fuzzy modeling on nuclear power plant is utilized to approximate the nonlinear plant, based on which the nonlinear MPC controller is devised via parallel distributed compensation (PDC scheme in order to solve the nonlinear constraint optimization problem. Improved performance compared to the traditional PID controller for a TMI-type PWR is obtained in the simulation.

  14. Documentation of a Model Action Plan to Deter Illicit Nuclear Trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D; Kristo, M; Niemeyer, S; Dudder, G

    2006-07-28

    Theft, illegal possession, smuggling, or attempted unauthorized sale of nuclear and radiological materials remains a worldwide problem. The Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group (ITWG) has adopted a model action plan to guide investigation of these cases through a systematic approach to nuclear forensics. The model action plan was recently documented and provides recommendations concerning incident response, collection of evidence in conformance with required legal standards, laboratory sampling and distribution of samples, radioactive materials analysis, including categorization and characterization of samples, forensics analysis of conventional evidence, and case development including interpretation of forensic signatures.

  15. Virtual enterprise model for the electronic components business in the Nuclear Weapons Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, T.J.; Long, K.S.; Sayre, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hull, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Carey, D.A.; Sim, J.R.; Smith, M.G. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Kansas City, MO (United States). Kansas City Div.

    1994-08-01

    The electronic components business within the Nuclear Weapons Complex spans organizational and Department of Energy contractor boundaries. An assessment of the current processes indicates a need for fundamentally changing the way electronic components are developed, procured, and manufactured. A model is provided based on a virtual enterprise that recognizes distinctive competencies within the Nuclear Weapons Complex and at the vendors. The model incorporates changes that reduce component delivery cycle time and improve cost effectiveness while delivering components of the appropriate quality.

  16. Virtual enterprise model for the electronic components business in the Nuclear Weapons Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, T.J.; Long, K.S.; Sayre, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hull, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Carey, D.A.; Sim, J.R.; Smith, M.G. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Kansas City, MO (United States). Kansas City Div.

    1994-08-01

    The electronic components business within the Nuclear Weapons Complex spans organizational and Department of Energy contractor boundaries. An assessment of the current processes indicates a need for fundamentally changing the way electronic components are developed, procured, and manufactured. A model is provided based on a virtual enterprise that recognizes distinctive competencies within the Nuclear Weapons Complex and at the vendors. The model incorporates changes that reduce component delivery cycle time and improve cost effectiveness while delivering components of the appropriate quality.

  17. Liquid-Gas Phase Transition for Asymmetric Nuclear Matter in the Zimanyi-Moszkowski Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xu-Ming; QIAN Wei-Liang; SU Ru-Keng

    2004-01-01

    By using the improved Zimanyi-Moszkowski (ZM) model including the freedom of nucleons, σ mesons, ω mesons and ρ mesons, we investigate the liquid-gas phase transition for asymmetric nuclear matter. It is found that the phase transition for asymmetric nuclear matter in the improved ZM model with the isospin vector ρ meson degree of freedom is well defined. The binodal surface, which is essential in the study of the phase transition process, is addressed.

  18. Equation of State of Nuclear Matter in Chiral σ-ω Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wei; DONG Dong-Qiao; WEN De-Hua; LIU Guo-Tao; LIU Liang-Gang

    2004-01-01

    The equation of state of nuclear matter is studied in the 1-loop approximation of chiral linear σ-ω model.By introducing the density-dependent coupling constants, the problem of tachyon pole in the chiral σ-ω model is resolved.The 1-loop contributions ofσ and π mesons to the nucleon's binding energy are included, while the empirical properties of nuclear matter such as saturation density, binding energy, and incompressibility are well reproduced.

  19. Stochastic estimation of level density in nuclear shell-model calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu Noritaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An estimation method of the nuclear level density stochastically based on nuclear shell-model calculations is introduced. In order to count the number of the eigen-values of the shell-model Hamiltonian matrix, we perform the contour integral of the matrix element of a resolvent. The shifted block Krylov subspace method enables us its efficient computation. Utilizing this method, the contamination of center-of-mass motion is clearly removed.

  20. Crystal structure of the amyloid-β p3 fragment provides a model for oligomer formation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsov, Victor A; Varghese, Joseph N; Masters, Colin L; Nuttall, Stewart D

    2011-01-26

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with the presence of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide fibrillar plaques in the brain. However, current evidence suggests that soluble nonfibrillar Aβ oligomers may be the major drivers of Aβ-mediated synaptic dysfunction. Structural information on these Aβ species has been very limited because of their noncrystalline and unstable nature. Here, we describe a crystal structure of amylogenic residues 18-41 of the Aβ peptide (equivalent to the p3 α/γ-secretase fragment of amyloid precursor protein) presented within the CDR3 loop region of a shark Ig new antigen receptor (IgNAR) single variable domain antibody. The predominant oligomeric species is a tightly associated Aβ dimer, with paired dimers forming a tetramer in the crystal caged within four IgNAR domains, preventing uncontrolled amyloid formation. Our structure correlates with independently observed features of small nonfibrillar Aβ oligomers and reveals conserved elements consistent with residues and motifs predicted as critical in Aβ folding and oligomerization, thus potentially providing a model system for nonfibrillar oligomer formation in Alzheimer's disease.