WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear emission spectra

  1. GNASH: a preequilibrium, statistical nuclear-model code for calculation of cross sections and emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, P.G.; Arthur, E.D.

    1977-11-01

    A new multistep Hauser--Feshbach code that includes corrections for preequilibrium effects is described. The code can calculate up to 60 decay reactions (cross sections and energy spectra) in one computation, and thereby provide considerable flexibility for handling processes with complicated reaction chains. Input parameter setup, problem output, and subroutine descriptions are given along with a sample problem calculation. A brief theoretical description is also included. 8 figures, 3 tables

  2. X-ray absorption spectra and emission spectra of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yonglun; Yang Li; Wang Minsheng; Li Jiaming

    2002-01-01

    The author reports a theoretical method to calculate the resolved absorption spectra and emission spectra (optically thin) of hot dense plasmas. Due to its fully relativistic treatment incorporated with the quantum defect theory, it calculates the absorption spectra and emission spectra for single element or multi-element plasmas with little computational efforts. The calculated absorption spectra of LTE gold plasmas agree well with the experimental ones. It also calculates the optical thin emission spectra of LTE gold plasmas, which is helpful to diagnose the plasmas of relevant ICF plasmas. It can also provide the relevant parameters such as population density of various ionic stages, precise radiative properties for ICF studies

  3. Nuclear Neutrino Spectra in Late Stellar Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misch, G. Wendell; Sun, Yang; Fuller, George

    2018-05-01

    Neutrinos are the principle carriers of energy in massive stars, beginning from core carbon burning and continuing through core collapse and after the core bounce. In fact, it may be possible to detect neutrinos from nearby pre-supernova stars. Therefore, it is of great interest to understand the neutrino energy spectra from these stars. Leading up to core collapse, beginning around core silicon burning, nuclei become dominant producers of neutrinos, particularly at high neutrino energy, so a systematic study of nuclear neutrino spectra is desirable. We have done such a study, and we present our sd-shell model calculations of nuclear neutrino energy spectra for nuclei in the mass number range A = 21 - 35. Our study includes neutrinos produced by charged lepton capture, charged lepton emission, and neutral current nuclear deexcitation. Previous authors have tabulated the rates of charged current nuclear weak interactions in astrophysical conditions, but the present work expands on this not only by providing neutrino energy spectra, but also by including the heretofore untabulated neutral current de-excitation neutrino pairs.

  4. Emissive spectra of shock-heated argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Jingyou; Gu Yan; Peng Qixian; Bai Yulin; Li Ping

    2003-01-01

    To study the radiant properties of argon under weak shock compression, an aluminum target filled with gaseous argon at ambient states was impacted by a tungsten alloy projectile which was launched from a two-stage light gun to 2.00 km/s. The radiant signals of single shock-compressed argon were recorded by a six-channel pyrometer and oscilloscopes, which varied with time linearly for the five channels from 405 nm to 700 nm and exponentially for the channel 800 nm, and the corresponding velocity of shock wave was determined to be 4.10 ± 0.09 km/s. By the present experiment, it has been shown that the absorbability of the shock-heated argon is low for visual light and the optical depths of argon gas turn from thin to thick as wavelengths gradually increase. The time-resolved spectra in the rising-front of the radiant signal in the re-shocked argon were recorded by means of an OMA, and strong emissive spectrum bands near 450 nm light-wave length but no linear spectrum were found. The emissive spectrum properties of shock-compression argon were qualitatively explained by the state parameters and ionization degree

  5. Emission Spectra of Hydrogen-Seeded Helium Arcjets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Welle, R

    2000-01-01

    .... This work reports on a recent set of experiments in which emission spectra of the plume of a helium arcjet were acquired and analyzed to obtain information on the internal energy modes of the arcjet...

  6. Cancerous tissue mapping from random lasing emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polson, R C; Vardeny, Z V

    2010-01-01

    Random lasing emission spectra have been collected from both healthy and cancerous tissues. The two types of tissue with optical gain have different light scattering properties as obtained from an average power Fourier transform of their random lasing emission spectra. The difference in the power Fourier transform leads to a contrast between cancerous and benign tissues, which is utilized for tissue mapping of healthy and cancerous regions of patients

  7. Chemical effects in x-ray emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, N.G.

    1982-01-01

    The chemical bond influence in X-ray emission spectra of hafnium, iodine, iron, sulphur, aluminium and magnesium is detected. The position of one X-ray emission line is determined by three methods: parabolic profile; Gaussian distribution and extra-heavy maximum. (author)

  8. GNASH: a preequilibrium, statistical nuclear-model code for calculation of cross sections and emission spectra. [In FORTRAN for CDC 7600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, P.G.; Arthur, E.D.

    1977-11-01

    A new multistep Hauser--Feshbach code that includes corrections for preequilibrium effects is described. The code can calculate up to 60 decay reactions (cross sections and energy spectra) in one computation, and thereby provide considerable flexibility for handling processes with complicated reaction chains. Input parameter setup, problem output, and subroutine descriptions are given along with a sample problem calculation. A brief theoretical description is also included. 8 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Classification spectra of Sanduleak and Stephenson emission-line stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    Low dispersion slit spectra of 89 emission-line stars are described; these stars were originally located and classified by Sanduleak and Stephenson in an objective-prism survey. The new data broadly confirm the classification scheme adopted by Sanduleak and Stephenson. In particular most of the large number of symbiotic stars they classified have been confirmed and others found. Many of these contain strong, broad emission bands in their red spectra. Two new Wolf-Rayet stars, one new planetary nebula and two new bipolar reflection nebulae involving hidden emission-line stars have been found. (author)

  10. Classification spectra of Sanduleak and Stephenson emission-line stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D A [Anglo-Australian Observatory, Epping (Australia)

    1978-09-01

    Low dispersion slit spectra of 89 emission-line stars are described; these stars were originally located and classified by Sanduleak and Stephenson in an objective-prism survey. The new data broadly confirm the classification scheme adopted by Sanduleak and Stephenson. In particular most of the large number of symbiotic stars they classified have been confirmed and others found. Many of these contain strong, broad emission bands in their red spectra. Two new Wolf-Rayet stars, one new planetary nebula and two new bipolar reflection nebulae involving hidden emission-line stars have been found.

  11. Optical emission line spectra of Seyfert galaxies and radio galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterbrock, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    Many radio galaxies have strong emission lines in their optical spectra, similar to the emission lines in the spectra of Seyfert galaxies. The range of ionization extends from [O I] and [N I] through [Ne V] and [Fe VII] to [Fe X]. The emission-line spectra of radio galaxies divide into two types, narrow-line radio galaxies whose spectra are indistinguishable from Seyfert 2 galaxies, and broad-line radio galaxies whose spectra are similar to Seyfert 1 galaxies. However on the average the broad-line radio galaxies have steeper Balmer decrements, stronger [O III] and weaker Fe II emission than the Seyfert 1 galaxies, though at least one Seyfert 1 galaxy not known to be a radio source has a spectrum very similar to typical broad-line radio galaxies. Intermediate-type Seyfert galaxies exist that show various mixtures of the Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 properties, and the narrow-line or Seyfert 2 property seems to be strongly correlated with radio emission. (Auth.)

  12. Gamma-ray emission spectra from spheres with 14 MeV neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Junji; Kanaoka, Takeshi; Murata, Isao; Takahashi, Akito; Sumita, Kenji

    1989-01-01

    Energy spectra of neutron-induced gamma-rays emitted from spherical samples were measured using a 14 MeV neutron source. The samples in use were LiF, Teflon:(CF 2 ) n , Si, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Nb, Mo, W and Pb. A diameter of the sphere was either 40 or 60 cm. The gamma-ray energy in the emission spectra covered the range from 500 keV to 10 MeV. Measured spectra were compared with transport calculations using the nuclear data files of JENDL-3T and ENDF/B-IV. The agreements between the measurements and the JENDL-3T calculations were good in the emission spectra for the low energy gamma-rays from inelastic scattering. (author)

  13. Thermoluminescence emission spectra and optical bleaching of oligoclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, A.J.J.; Piters, T.M.; Ypma, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) spectra of oligoclase samples have been recorded in the temperature range from 300 to 700 K and the wavelength range from 300 to 850 nm. Like other feldspars, oligoclase produces blue (peaking at 460 nm) and red (peaking at 765 nm) emission bands. The maximum of the red emission occurs 20 K lower than that of the blue band. Optical bleaching was performed at wavelengths varying from 360 to 800 nm. Bleaching of artificially irradiated oligoclase causes a decrease of the TL signal. The bleaching efficiency increases with decreasing wavelength. Bleaching does not only influence the height of the glow curve but also the shape. An interesting observation is that the ratio of the blue and red band intensities is not affected by a bleaching procedure. No evidence has been found that bleaching influences the shape of the emission spectra. The correlation between the blue and red bands is discussed. (Author)

  14. Preservation of information in Fourier theory based deconvolved nuclear spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madan, V.K.; Gopalakrishnan, K.R.; Sharma, R.C.; Rattan, S.S.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear spectroscopy is extremely useful to the internal radiation dosimetry for the estimation of body burden due to gamma emitters. Analysis of nuclear spectra is concerned with the extraction of qualitative and quantitative information embedded in the spectra. A spectral deconvolution method based on Fourier theory is probably the simplest method of deconvolving nuclear spectra. It is proved mathematically that the deconvolution method preserves the qualitative information. It is shown by using simulated spectra and an observed gamma ray spectrum that the method preserves the quantitative information. This may provide a novel approach of information extraction from a deconvolved spectrum. The paper discusses the methodology, mathematical analysis, and the results obtained by deconvolving spectra. (author). 6 refs., 2 tabs

  15. Nonclassical polarization effects in fluorescence emission spectra from microdroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, S.; Goddard, N. L.; Hill, S. C.

    1999-12-01

    We report a pronounced nonclassical polarization effect on the shape of fluorescence emission spectra from isolated microdroplets containing a dilute solution of soluble fluors or a dilute layer of surfactant fluors. We see different spectral shapes for 90° scattering when comparing between IVV, IVH, IHH, IHV. However, we measure the largest difference in spectral shape in the surfactant case, with the incident polarization directed toward the detector (IHV vs IHH). Imaging reveals that the emission in this case principally arises from two distinct regions near the surface of the droplet, which are diametrically opposed and along the axis of the incident laser beam. The effect appears to be the direct result of coupling between molecular emission moments and electromagnetic modes of the droplet. It is not the molecule which radiates but the molecule microvessel. Directional emission is sensitive to the polarization of the electromagnetic mode which is stimulated by the coupling.

  16. Theory of X-ray absorption and emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukoyama, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical studies on X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy are discussed. Simple expressions for X-ray emission rate and X-ray absorption cross section are presented in the dipole approximation. Various atomic models to obtain realistic wave functions and theoretical calculations for X-ray absorption cross sections and X-ray emission rates are described. In the case of molecules and solids, molecular orbital methods for electronic structures and molecular wave functions are discussed. The emphasis is on the procedures to obtain the excited-state and continuum wave functions for molecules and to calculate the multi-center dipole matrix elements. The examples of the calculated X-ray absorption and emission spectra are shown and compared with the experimental results

  17. Study of aluminum emission spectra in astrophysical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Zhan; Zhang Jie

    2001-01-01

    High temperature, high density and strong magnetic fields in plasmas produced by ultra-high intensity and ultrashort laser pulses are similar to the main characteristics of astrophysical plasmas. This makes it possible to simulate come astrophysical processes at laboratories. The author presents the theoretic simulation of aluminum emission spectra in astrophysical plasmas. It can be concluded that using laser produced plasmas, the authors can obtain rich information on astrophysical spectroscopy, which is unobservable for astronomer

  18. Emission spectra of dimethoxybenzenes by controlled electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Teiichiro; Imasaka, Totaro; Toyoda, Minoru; Tsuji, Masaharu; Ishibashi, Nobuhiko

    1975-01-01

    The emission spectra of o-, m-, and p-dimethoxybenzenes under controlled electron impact excitation (200 eV) were measured in the 220 - 450 nm region at very low pressures. The photoemissions of the excited parent species and such fragment species as H, CH, CO, and CO + were observed and assigned. The relative intensities of the photoemissions of the parent species were compared with those of the fluorescence spectra (photoexcitation) in an n-hexane solution. The excited parent species, H, and CH were concluded to be produced in one-electron processes; however, the CO + species were assumed to be produced in both one- and two-electron processes, and the relative contributions are evaluated. It was concluded that the rate of the predissociation of o-dimethoxybenzene was faster than those of the other two isomers, and the observed characteristics of o-dimethoxybenzene had something to do with this faster rate. (auth.)

  19. Polarization of electron cyclotron emission spectra in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, P.C. de; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Inagaki, S.; Sasao, H.; Nagasaki, K.

    1999-07-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) can be used to determine the electron temperature profile in magnetized plasmas. The complex structure of the magnetic field configuration in the Large Helical Device (LHD), which has a large shear, complicates the analysis of the ECE spectrum. In a sheared magnetic field the propagation of X and O-mode polarization through the plasma are coupled, causing mode conversion and polarization rotation. Mode scrambling is also caused by wall reflections. In this report, this mode conversion in LHD is numerically analyzed. It was found that at low density mode conversion scrambles the ECE spectra. However, at higher density (n eo > 1.0·10 19 m -3 ) the polarization mode is found to rotate with the sheared magnetic field, yielding only a negligible mode conversion. Wall reflections are found to depolarize the ECE spectrum. Notwithstanding the LHD magnetic configuration, it is shown that temperature profiles could be revealed from the ECE spectra. (author)

  20. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, D.M.; Burns, K.; Campbell, L.W.; Greenfield, B.; Kos, M.S., E-mail: markskos@gmail.com; Orrell, J.L.; Schram, M.; VanDevender, B.; Wood, L.S.; Wootan, D.W.

    2015-03-11

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  1. Emission spectra of gaseous avalanches and their time structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraga, M.M.; Lima, E.P. de; Marques, R.F.; Policarpo, A.J.P.L.; Alves, M.A.F.; Salete, M.; Leite, S.C.P.

    1993-01-01

    Following previous measurements in argon/methane mixtures, the authors now report on the emission spectra of argon/ethane and methane/ethane mixtures, in the region from 120 to 450 nm, for a single wire chamber working in the proportional and/or self-quenching streamer modes. Identification of radicals and fragments is attempted. The time evolution of VUV light, relevant to photon feedback processes, is presented for the CI lines at 156.1 and 165.7nm in argon/methane, argon/ethane and methane/ethane mixtures

  2. Are there nuclear contributions to gamma ray burst spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matz, S.M.; Chupp, E.L.; Forrest, D.J.; Share, G.H.; Nolan, P.L.; Rieger, E.

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the spectra of 38 γ-ray bursts observed by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite for evidence of a nuclear contribution to the high energy flux. A sum of spectra from the nine bursts with detectable flux >4 MeV suggests but does not require a drop-off above 7 MeV. A cutoff between 7 and 8 MeV is consistent with a high energy spectrum dominated by nuclear lines

  3. Nuclear data for neutron emission in the fission process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, S.

    1991-11-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on Nuclear Data for Neutron Emission in the Fission Process, Vienna, 22 - 24 October 1990. Included are the conclusions and recommendations reached at the meeting and the papers presented by the meeting participants. These papers provide a review of the status of experimental and theoretical data on neutron emission in spontaneous and neutron induced fission with reference to the data needs for reactor applications oriented towards actinide burner studies. The specific topics covered are the following: experimental measurements and theoretical predictions and evaluations of fission neutron energy spectra, average prompt fission neutron multiplicity, correlation in neutron emission from complementary fragments, neutron emission during acceleration of fission fragments, statistical properties of neutron rich nuclei by study of emission spectra of neutrons from the excited fission fragments, integral qualification of nu-bar for the major fissile isotopes, nu-bar total of 239 Pu and 235 U, and related problems. Refs figs and tabs

  4. Spontaneous emission spectra from a staggered-array undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Shigeki; Okada, Kouji; Masuda, Kai; Sobajima, Masaaki; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Ohnishi, Masami; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Toku, Hisayuki

    1997-01-01

    A staggered-array undulator set inside the superconducting solenoid coils is shown to be able to provide high undulator fields larger than the longitudinal magnetic fields, a small undulator period, easy tunability through the solenoid coil current, and compact and easy fabrication. The overall performance characteristics of this undulator were studied mainly with respect to iron and aluminum disk widths, and spontaneous emission spectra through the numerical calculations. The maximum undulator field is found to be obtained for the ratio of the aluminum disk width to the undulator period of 0.45. The line widths (FWHM) of the spontaneous emission spectra, however, do not show N w -1 dependence on the number of the undulator period N w for practical beams with a Gaussian distribution, compared with for a single electron. The energy spread among various parameters is seen to play an important role in reducing the FWHM with increase of N w . The large tunability of the wavelength is proved to cover 6-10 mm by changing the solenoid magnetic field from 0.4 T to 1.6 T. (author)

  5. Quantum algebraic description of vibrational and transitional nuclear spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raychev, P.P.; Roussev, R.P.; Inrne, D.

    1995-01-01

    A physically motivated extension of the SU q (2) model of rotational nuclear spectra is introduced, which is applicable in the vibrational and transitional regions as well. The deformation parameter is related to the centrifugal stretching effect, while the new parameter c allows the spectrum to be an expansion in terms of J(J+c) instead of J(J+1), thus describing nuclear anharmonicities in a way similar to the Interacting Boson Model and the Generalized Variable Moment of Inertia model

  6. Sophisticated visualization algorithms for analysis of multidimensional experimental nuclear spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morhac, M.; Kliman, J.; Matousek, V.; Turzo, I.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes graphical models of visualization of 2-, 3-, 4-dimensional scalar data used in nuclear data acquisition, processing and visualization system developed at the Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences. It focuses on presentation of nuclear spectra (histograms). However it can be successfully applied for visualization of arrays of other data types. In the paper we present conventional as well as new developed surface and volume rendering visualization techniques used (Authors)

  7. OSL, TL and IRSL emission spectra of sedimentary quartz and feldspar samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomax, Johanna; Mittelstraß, Dirk; Kreutzer, Sebastian; Fuchs, Markus

    2015-01-01

    This contribution presents a variety of different luminescence emission spectra from sedimentary feldspar and quartz samples under various stimulation modes. These are green stimulated quartz (OSL-) spectra, quartz TL spectra, feldspar IRSL and post-IR IRSL spectra. A focus was set at recording OSL and IRSL spectra at elevated stimulation temperatures such as routinely applied in luminescence dating. This was to test whether optical stimulation at elevated temperatures results in a shift of emission peaks. For OSL emissions of quartz, this has so far not been tested. In case of feldspar emissions, post-IR IRSL conditions, hence IRSL emissions at a low temperature, directly followed by high temperature post-IRSL emissions, are explicitly investigated. All spectra were recorded using a new system incorporated into a Lexsyg luminescence reader. Thus, this study, besides presenting new spectral data, also serves as a feasibility study for this new device. It is shown that (a) the new device is capable of automatically measuring different sorts of spectra, also at elevated temperatures, (b) known thermally and optically stimulated peak emissions of quartz and feldspar are confirmed, (c) obtained IRSL and OSL spectra indicate that there is no significant relation between peak emission and stimulation temperature. - Highlights: • We have measured OSL, IRSL and TL emission spectra of sedimentary quartz and feldspar samples. • Spectral analyses were performed at elevated stimulation temperatures. • Emission spectra show very little variation with stimulation temperatures.

  8. Emission line spectra of Herbig-Haro objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugel, E.W.; Boehm, K.H.; Mannery, E.

    1981-01-01

    Spectrophotometric data have been obtained for 12 Herbig-Haro nebulae with the multichannel spectrometer on the Mt. Palomar 5.08 m telescope and with the image intensified dissector scanner on the Kitt Peak 2.13 m telescope. Optical emission line fluxes are presented for the following Herbig-Haro objects: H-H 1 (NW), H-H 1 (SE), H-H 2A, H-H 2G, H-H 2H, H-H 3, H-H 7, H-H 11, H-H 24A, H-H 30, H-H 32, and H-H 40. Values for the electron temperature and electron density have been determined for 10 of these condensations. Significant inhomogeneities in the line-forming regions of these H-H objects are indicated by the derived N/sub e/-T/sub e/ diagrams. Empirical two-component density models have been constructed to interpret the emission line spectra of the five brightest condensations. Slightly less satisfactory homogeneous models are presented for the remaining five objects

  9. Measurement and analysis of double-differential neutron emission spectra in (P,N) and (α,N) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, K.; Mehta, M.K.

    1988-05-01

    The second IAEA Research Co-ordination Meeting on Measurement and Analysis of Double-Differential Neutron Emission Spectra in (p,n) and (α,n) Reactions was convened by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna during 8-10 February, 1988. The main objectives of the Co-ordinated Research Project for which this meeting was held are (i) to extract systematic information about nuclear level densities as a function of excitation energy by analysing the neutron emission spectra from (p,n) and (α,n) reactions on properly selected targets and bombarding energy range, and (ii) to parametrize this information into appropriate phenomenological models to enable reliable extrapolation for general use of level density information in basic and applied nuclear physics related problems. Detailed conclusions and recommendations, together with a summary of the programme during 1988/1989 are attached in the Appendices

  10. Fluorescence of Bacteria, Pollens, and Naturally Occurring Airborne Particles: Excitation/Emission Spectra

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, Steven C; Mayo, Michael W; Chang, Richard K

    2009-01-01

    The fluorescence intensity as a function of excitation and emission wavelengths (EEM spectra) was measured for different species of bacteria, biochemical constituents of cells, pollens, and vegetation...

  11. Anomalous nuclear enhancement of inclusive spectra at large transverse momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krzywicki, Andre.

    1976-01-01

    A parton model interpretation of the anomalous nuclear enhancement of inclusive spectra, observed by Cronin et al is proposed. It seems that the picture representing a nucleus as a collection of quasi-free nucleons in slow relative motion is incorrect when the nucleus is probed during a very short time. This conjecture rests on an extension to nuclei of the Kuti and Weisskopf parton model. A list of observable predictions concerning both hadronic and leptonic interactions with nuclei is given [fr

  12. Quantitative analysis of directional spontaneous emission spectra from light sources in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; Vos, Willem L.

    2005-01-01

    We have performed angle-resolved measurements of spontaneous-emission spectra from laser dyes and quantum dots in opal and inverse opal photonic crystals. Pronounced directional dependencies of the emission spectra are observed: angular ranges of strongly reduced emission adjoin with angular ranges of enhanced emission. It appears that emission from embedded light sources is affected both by the periodicity and by the structural imperfections of the crystals: the photons are Bragg diffracted by lattice planes and scattered by unavoidable structural disorder. Using a model comprising diffuse light transport and photonic band structure, we quantitatively explain the directional emission spectra. This work provides detailed understanding of the transport of spontaneously emitted light in real photonic crystals, which is essential in the interpretation of quantum optics in photonic-band-gap crystals and for applications wherein directional emission and total emission power are controlled

  13. CO2 emissions of nuclear power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissel, S.; Mayer-Spohn, O.; Fahl, U.; Voss, A.

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, supported by the recent reports of the IPCC (International Panel on Climate Change), political, social and scientific institutions call for the use of atomic energy for reducing CO2 emissions. In Germany, the discussion is highly controversial. A life-cycle balance of nuclear power shows that its CO2 emissions are much lower than those of other technologies, even if changes in the nuclear fuel cycle are taken into account. (orig.)

  14. Classification of hydromagnetic emissions based on frequency--time spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunishi, H.; Toya, T.; Koike, K.; Kuwashima, M.; Kawamura, M.

    1981-01-01

    By using 3035 hydromagnetic emission events observed in the frequency range of 0.1--2.0 Hz at Syowa (Lapprox.6), HM emissions have been classified into eight subtypes based on their spectral structures, i.e., HM whistler, periodic HM emission, HM chorus, HM emission burst, IPDP, morning IPDP, Pc 1--2 band, and irregular HM emission. It is seen that each subtype has a preferential magnetic local time interval and also a frequency range for its occurrence. Morning IPDP events and irregular HM emissions occur in the magnetic morning hours, while dispersive periodic HM emissions and HM emission bursts occur around magnetic local noon, then HM chorus emissions occur in the afternoon hours and IPDP events occur in the evening hours. Furthermore, it is noticed that the mid-frequencies of these emissions vary from high frequencies in the morning hours to low frequencies in the afternoon hours. On the basis of these results, the generation mechanisms of each subtype are discussed

  15. Fragment emission from modestly excited nuclear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Y. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Souza, R.T. de [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Chen, S.L. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Cornell, E.W. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Davin, B. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Fox, D. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Hamilton, T.M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Mcdonald, K. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility; Tsang, M.B. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Glasmacher, T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Dinius, J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Gelbke, C.K. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Handzy, D.O. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Cyclotron Facility]|[Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Hsi, W.C.

    1996-07-08

    Fragment emission patterns occurring in nuclear systems of modest excitation are studied. Exclusive measurement of fragment emission in {sup 14}N+{sup 197}Au reactions at E/A=100, 130 and 156 MeV allows selection of central collisions where a single source dominates the decay. Low threshold measurement of IMF emission for these events allows investigation of the influence of detector threshold effects. The time scale of fragment emission is deduced using fragment-fragment velocity correlations. Comparisons are made to the predictions of a statistical decay model. (orig.).

  16. Study of atomic and molecular emission spectra of Sr by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Chet R; Alfarraj, Bader; Ayyalasomayajula, Krishna K; Ghany, Charles; Yueh, Fang Y; Singh, Jagdish P

    2015-12-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an ideal analytical technique for in situ analysis of elemental composition. We have performed a comparative study of the quantitative and qualitative analysis of atomic and molecular emission from LIBS spectra. In our experiments, a mixture of SrCl2 and Al2O3 in powder form was used as a sample. The atomic emission from Sr and molecular emission from SrCl and SrO observed in LIBS spectra were analyzed. The optimum laser energies, gate delays, and gate widths for selected atomic lines and molecular bands were determined from spectra recorded at various experimental parameters. These optimum experimental conditions were used to collect calibration data, and the calibration curves were used to predict the Sr concentration. Limits of detection (LODs) for selected atomic and molecular emission spectra were determined.

  17. Influence of pure dephasing on emission spectra from single photon sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsby Rasmussen, Andreas; Skovgård, Troels Suhr; Kristensen, Philip Trøst

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the light-matter interaction of a quantum dot with the electromagnetic field in a lossy microcavity and calculate emission spectra for nonzero detuning and dephasing. It is found that dephasing shifts the intensity of the emission peaks for nonzero detuning. We investigate the char......We investigate the light-matter interaction of a quantum dot with the electromagnetic field in a lossy microcavity and calculate emission spectra for nonzero detuning and dephasing. It is found that dephasing shifts the intensity of the emission peaks for nonzero detuning. We investigate...

  18. The NRPB nuclear emission dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, D.T.; Bird, T.V.; Miles, J.C.H.

    1980-03-01

    The NRPB nuclear emulsion dosemeter is designed such that the thermal neutron response is similar to the fast neutron response. This report gives details of the dependence of response on incident neutron energy and on neutron angle of incidence. (author)

  19. Neutron emission spectra of excited 126–140Sn nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta; Rajasekaran, M.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate one-neutron and two-neutron emission from 132 Sn and its neighboring isotopes due to thermal excitation. The rotational states of 132 Sn at different temperatures are investigated. The effects of separation energy and thermal excitation energy on neutron emission probability are studied. (author)

  20. Infrared spectra of peculiar emission-line stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrillat, Yvette; Houziaux, Leo

    1975-01-01

    230A/mm spectra of HD51585, V1016Cyg, HBV475 and XXOph between 8,000 and 11,000A are described. Important spectral variations have been noted between 1974 and 1975. Satisfactory identifications cannot be proposed for lines at 9,180 and 9,204A [fr

  1. Imaging Emission Spectra with Handheld and Cellphone Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitar, David

    2012-01-01

    As point-and-shoot digital camera technology advances it is becoming easier to image spectra in a laboratory setting on a shoestring budget and get immediate results. With this in mind, I wanted to test three cameras to see how their results would differ. Two undergraduate physics students and I used one handheld 7.1 megapixel (MP) digital Cannon…

  2. Emission spectra of alkali-metal (K,Na,Li)-He exciplexes in cold helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enomoto, K.; Hirano, K.; Kumakura, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Yabuzaki, T.

    2004-01-01

    We have observed emission spectra of excimers and exciplexes composed of a light alkali-metal atom in the first excited state and 4 He atoms [K*He n (n=1-6), Na * He n (n=1-4), and Li * He n (n=1,2)] in cryogenic He gas (the temperature 2 K -1 . Differently from exciplexes with heavier alkali-metal atoms, the spectra for the different number of He atoms were well separated, so that their assignment could be made experimentally. Comparing with the spectra of K * He n , we found that the infrared emission spectrum of the K atom excited in liquid He was from K*He 6 . To confirm the assignment, we have also carried out ab initio calculation of adiabatic potential curves and peak positions of the emission spectra of the exciplexes

  3. An experimental investigation on the properties of laser-induced plasma emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xiaoshuan; Li Chunyan; Ji Xuehan; Feng Eryin; Cui Zhifeng

    2004-01-01

    The authors have measured the time-resolved emission spectra produced by Nd: YAG laser induced Al plasma with different kinds of buffer gas (He, Ar, N 2 and Air). The dependence of emission spectra line intensity and Stark broadening on the time delay, kinds and pressure of buffer gas are studied. The results show that the atomic emission line intensity reaches maximum at 3 μs time delay, the Stark broadening increases with increasing the pressure of buffer gas, and decreases with increasing time delay. The Stark broadening in Ar buffer gas is largest among the four different kinds of buffer gas. (author)

  4. Emission spectra of yttrium vanadate doped with bismuth and dysprosium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawar, B.V.; Patil, R.N.

    1975-01-01

    The fluorescence spectra of YVO 4 :Bi and YVO 4 :Bi:Dy phosphors under X-rays and ultra-violet radiation have been studied. The observations on the phosphors with constant Bi 3+ and varying Dy 3+ concentration can be attributed to radiationless transfer of energy from Bi 3+ to Dy 3+ coupled with non-radiative losses due to self-quenching at higher level of Dy 3+ concentration. While the observations on the phosphors with constant Dy 3+ and varying Bi 3+ concentration indicate that there is radiationless transfer from Bi 3+ to Dy 3+ under X-ray or UV irradiation. (author)

  5. Qualitative analysis of the rare earth element by simulation of inductively coupled plasma emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, M.S.; Tobishima, Taeko; Kamitake, Seigo; Yasuda, Kazuo.

    1985-01-01

    The emission lines for qualitative analysis of rare earth elements by a simulation technique of ICP spectra were proposed. The spectra were simulated by employing a Gaussian (or a Lorentzian at high concentrations) profile. The simulated spectra corresponded quite well with the observed ones. The emission lines were selected so that the interference was as small as possible. The present qualitative analysis is based on a pattern recognition method where observed intensity ratios of the emission lines in each element are compared with those of a single analyte element. The qualitative analysis was performed for twelve standard solutions containing a single rare earth element and for eight standard solutions containing an element other than rare earth elements. The selection of the emission lines and the algorithm of the present qualitative analysis were justified. (author)

  6. Coherent manipulation of spontaneous emission spectra in coupled semiconductor quantum well structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aixi

    2014-11-03

    In triple coupled semiconductor quantum well structures (SQWs) interacting with a coherent driving filed, a coherent coupling field and a weak probe field, spontaneous emission spectra are investigated. Our studies show emission spectra can easily be manipulated through changing the intensity of the driving and coupling field, detuning of the driving field. Some interesting physical phenomena such as spectral-line enhancement/suppression, spectral-line narrowing and spontaneous emission quenching may be obtained in our system. The theoretical studies of spontaneous emission spectra in SQWS have potential application in high-precision spectroscopy. Our studies are based on the real physical system [Appl. Phys. Lett.86(20), 201112 (2005)], and this scheme might be realizable with presently available techniques.

  7. CO2 emissions of nuclear electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissel, Steffen; Mayer-Spohn, Oliver; Fahl, Ulrich; Blesl, Markus; Voss, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    A survey of LCA studies on nuclear electricity generation revealed life cycle CO 2 emissions ranging between 3 g/kWhe to 60 g/kWhe and above. Firstly, this paper points out the discrepancies in studies by estimating the CO 2 emissions of nuclear power generation. Secondly, the paper sets out to provide critical review of future developments of the fuel cycle for light water reactors and illustrates the impact of uncertainties on the specific CO 2 emissions of nuclear electricity generation. Each step in the fuel cycle will be considered and with regard to the CO 2 emissions analysed. Thereby different assumptions and uncertainty levels are determined for the nuclear fuel cycle. With the impacts of low uranium ore grades for mining and milling as well as higher burn-up rates future fuel characteristics are considered. Sensitivity analyses are performed for all fuel processing steps, for different technical specifications of light water reactors as well as for further external frame conditions. (authors)

  8. Library of sophisticated functions for analysis of nuclear spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morháč, Miroslav; Matoušek, Vladislav

    2009-10-01

    In the paper we present compact library for analysis of nuclear spectra. The library consists of sophisticated functions for background elimination, smoothing, peak searching, deconvolution, and peak fitting. The functions can process one- and two-dimensional spectra. The software described in the paper comprises a number of conventional as well as newly developed methods needed to analyze experimental data. Program summaryProgram title: SpecAnalysLib 1.1 Catalogue identifier: AEDZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 42 154 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 379 437 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: Pentium 3 PC 2.4 GHz or higher, Borland C++ Builder v. 6. A precompiled Windows version is included in the distribution package Operating system: Windows 32 bit versions RAM: 10 MB Word size: 32 bits Classification: 17.6 Nature of problem: The demand for advanced highly effective experimental data analysis functions is enormous. The library package represents one approach to give the physicists the possibility to use the advanced routines simply by calling them from their own programs. SpecAnalysLib is a collection of functions for analysis of one- and two-parameter γ-ray spectra, but they can be used for other types of data as well. The library consists of sophisticated functions for background elimination, smoothing, peak searching, deconvolution, and peak fitting. Solution method: The algorithms of background estimation are based on Sensitive Non-linear Iterative Peak (SNIP) clipping algorithm. The smoothing algorithms are based on the convolution of the original data with several types of filters and algorithms based on discrete

  9. Neutron emission spectra and level density of hot rotating 132Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta

    2008-01-01

    The neutron emission spectrum of the highly excited compound nuclear system 132 Sn is investigated at high spin. The doubly magic nucleus 132 Sn undergoes a shape transition at high angular momentum which affects the nuclear level density and neutron emission probability considerably. The interplay of temperature, shape, deformation and rotational degrees of freedom and their influence on neutron emission is emphasized. We predict an enhancement of nucleonic emission at those spins where the nucleus suffers a transition from a spherical to deformed shape. (author)

  10. Study of some continuous spectra produced by nuclear reactions with light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, L.

    1966-01-01

    The continuous spectra coming from several nuclear reactions with light nuclei were measured. The spectra can be explained by a two-step reaction mechanism; however, the reactions produced by 6 Li are different. A mechanism was proposed to explain their spectra based on the following assumptions: 6 Li makes a nuclear molecule with the target which subsequently breaks up in such a way that an α particle comes out with the kinetic energy that it has in the molecule. The calculated spectra and those measured are in good agreement. (author) [fr

  11. Comparison of experimental and calculated neutron emission spectra and angular distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruppelaar, H.; Akkermans, J.M.

    1980-06-01

    Experimental and calculated neutron emission spectra and angular distributions have been intercompared for 14.6-MeV neutron-induced reactions. The experimental data, measured by Hermsdorf et al., cover 34 elements in a large mass range. To calculate the differential neutron scattering cross sections a unified model of preequilibrium neutron emission was used, in which the generalized master equation of Mantzouranis et al. was solved with a fast exact matrix method, recently introduced by Akkermans. For the scattering kernel a three-term Legendre polynomial representation was adopted, which was either derived from the differential free nucleon-nucleon scattering cross section or fitted to obtain optimal agreement with the set of experimental data of Hermsdorf et al. The results of the last-mentioned calculation are quite acceptable in view of the fact that only two global parameters have been to describe the angular distributions of all experimental data. The report contains tables and graphs of the calculated Legendre coefficients and graphs of energy-averaged angular distributions for all 34 elements. It is further shown that improvements in the energy and angular distributions could be obtained by means of adjustment of the level-density parameters of the individual residual nuclei. Finally a short discussion is devoted to the problems of fitting angular distributions at backward angles by varying the model parameters or the specification of the initial condition. It is indicated that the so-called preequilibrium phase of the nuclear reaction actually consists of two different stages, the first one generating the forward-peaked angular distributions and the second one showing angular distributions symmetric about 90 0

  12. Emission spectra from super-critical rippled plasma density profiles illuminated by intense laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondarza R, R.; Boyd, T.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    High-order harmonic emission from the interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with super-critical plasmas characterized by a rippled density profile at the vacuum-plasma interface has been observed from particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. A plasma simulation box several laser wavelengths in extent was prepared with a rippled density of a fraction of a laser wavelength. Emission spectra at the very initial stage of the interaction were recorded with spectral characteristics dissimilar to those previously reported in the literature. The reflected light spectra were characterized by a strong emission at the plasma line and by a series of harmonics at multiples of the ripple frequency. Harmonic spectra were obtained for different values of the plasma ripple frequency. In all cases the harmonics were emitted at the precise multiple harmonic number of the ripple frequency. Another important feature apparent from the simulations was that the emission peaks appeared to havea complex structure as compared with those for unrippled plasmas. For the cases when the plasma was rippled the peaks that corresponded to the multiples of the rippled density typically showed a double peak for the first few harmonics. The reflected emission plots for the main laser pulse showed strong emission at the plasma frequency and at multiples of that frequency as reported by the authors in the literature. (Author)

  13. Study of Ultraviolet Emission Spectra in ZnO Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Lu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoluminescence (PL of ZnO thin films prepared on c-Al2O3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD are investigated. For all samples, roomtemperature (RT spectra show a strong band-edge ultraviolet (UV emission with a pronounced low-energy band tail. The origin of this UV emission is analyzed by the temperature dependence of PL spectra. The result shows that the UV emission at RT contains different recombination processes. At low temperature donor-bound exciton (D0X emission plays a major role in PL spectra, while the free exciton transition (FX gradually dominates the spectrum with increasing temperatures. It notes that at low temperature an emission band (FA appears in low energy side of D0X and FX and can survive up to RT. Further confirmation shows that the origin of the band FA can be attributed to the transitions of conduction band electrons to acceptors (e, A0, in which the acceptor binding energy is estimated to be approximately 121 meV. It is concluded that at room temperature UV emission originates from the corporate contributions of the free exciton and free electrons-to-acceptor transitions.

  14. Seismic design spectra for nuclear power plants, state-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalopoulos, A.P.; Shukla, D.K.

    1976-01-01

    The State-of-the-Art of nuclear power plant design involves the use of design response spectra together with a modal analysis of a mathematical idealization of the actual structure. The design response spectra give the maximum response to ground shaking for a family of single degree-of-freedom viscously damped oscillators. These spectra are usually described as an accelerogram giving ground acceleration as a function of time. The definition of a 'standard' design response spectra is reviewed and illustrated by data relevant to 'hard' or rock sites. Finally, the paper recommends a set of design response spectra applicable to rock sites

  15. MID-INFRARED ATOMIC FINE-STRUCTURE EMISSION-LINE SPECTRA OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES: SPITZER/IRS SPECTRA OF THE GOALS SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inami, H. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Armus, L.; Stierwalt, S.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Surace, J.; Howell, J.; Marshall, J. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, CA 91125 (United States); Charmandaris, V. [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Groves, B. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kewley, L. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Petric, A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MS 320-47, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rich, J. [The Observatories, Carnegie Institute of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Haan, S. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Marsfield, NSW 2122 (Australia); Evans, A. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Mazzarella, J.; Lord, S. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Appleton, P. [NASA Herschel Science Center, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Spoon, H. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Frayer, D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Matsuhara, H., E-mail: inami@noao.edu [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); and others

    2013-11-10

    We present the data and our analysis of mid-infrared atomic fine-structure emission lines detected in Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph high-resolution spectra of 202 local Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). We readily detect emission lines of [S IV], [Ne II], [Ne V], [Ne III], [S III]{sub 18.7{sub μm}}, [O IV], [Fe II], [S III]{sub 33.5{sub μm}}, and [Si II]. More than 75% of these galaxies are classified as starburst-dominated sources in the mid-infrared, based on the [Ne V]/[Ne II] line flux ratios and equivalent width of the 6.2 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon feature. We compare ratios of the emission-line fluxes to those predicted from stellar photo-ionization and shock-ionization models to constrain the physical and chemical properties of the gas in the starburst LIRG nuclei. Comparing the [S IV]/[Ne II] and [Ne III]/[Ne II] line ratios to the Starburst99-Mappings III models with an instantaneous burst history, the emission-line ratios suggest that the nuclear starbursts in our LIRGs have ages of 1-4.5 Myr, metallicities of 1-2 Z{sub ☉}, and ionization parameters of 2-8 × 10{sup 7} cm s{sup –1}. Based on the [S III]{sub 33.5{sub μm}}/[S III]{sub 18.7{sub μm}} ratios, the electron density in LIRG nuclei is typically one to a few hundred cm{sup –3}, with a median electron density of ∼300 cm{sup –3}, for those sources above the low density limit for these lines. We also find that strong shocks are likely present in 10 starburst-dominated sources of our sample. A significant fraction of the GOALS sources (80) have resolved neon emission-line profiles (FWHM ≥600 km s{sup –1}) and five show clear differences in the velocities of the [Ne III] or [Ne V] emission lines, relative to [Ne II], of more than 200 km s{sup –1}. Furthermore, six starburst and five active galactic nucleus dominated LIRGs show a clear trend of increasing line width with ionization potential

  16. Fourier transform infrared emission spectra of atomic rubidium: g- and h-states

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Ferus, Martin; Kubelík, Petr; Chernov, Vladislav E.; Zanozina, Ekaterina M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 17 (2012), s. 175002 ISSN 0953-4075 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00100903 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Fourier transform infrared emission spectra * atomic rubidium * physical chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.031, year: 2012

  17. A Spectral Library of Emissivity Spectra for MERTIS on BepiColombo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Varatharajan, I.; D'Amore, M.; Hiesinger, H.

    2018-05-01

    At PSL we measured emissivity spectra in vacuum for a suite of Mercury surface analogues for temperatures from 100°C to >400°C. The spectral library is completed by reflectance on samples fresh and post-heating (0.2 to 200 µm spectral range).

  18. Modification of Optical Properties of Seawater Exposed to Oil Contaminants Based on Excitation-Emission Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baszanowska, E.; Otremba, Z.

    2015-10-01

    The optical behaviour of seawater exposed to a residual amount of oil pollution is presented and a comparison of the fluorescence spectra of oil dissolved in both n-hexane and seawater is discussed based on excitation-emission spectra. Crude oil extracted from the southern part of the Baltic Sea was used to characterise petroleum properties after contact with seawater. The wavelength-independent fluorescence maximum for natural seawater and seawater artificially polluted with oil were determined. Moreover, the specific excitation-emission peaks for natural seawater and polluted water were analysed to identify the natural organic matter composition. It was found that fluorescence spectra identification is a promising method to detect even an extremely low concentration of petroleum residues directly in the seawater. In addition, alien substances disturbing the fluorescence signatures of natural organic substances in a marine environment is also discussed.

  19. A digital processing method for the analysis of complex nuclear spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madan, V.K.; Abani, M.C.; Bairi, B.R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a digital processing method using frequency power spectra for the analysis of complex nuclear spectra. The power spectra were estimated by employing modified discrete Fourier transform. The method was applied to observed spectral envelopes. The results for separating closely-spaced doublets in nuclear spectra of low statistical precision compared favorably with those obtained by using a popular peak fitting program SAMPO. The paper also describes limitations of the peak fitting methods. It describes the advantages of digital processing techniques for type II digital signals including nuclear spectra. A compact computer program occupying less than 2.5 kByte of memory space was written in BASIC for the processing of observed spectral envelopes. (orig.)

  20. VNIR Reflectance and MIR Emissivity Spectra of Ordinary Chondrite Meteorites Under Simulated Asteroid Surface Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemma, M.; Shirley, K.; Glotch, T. D.; Ebel, D. S. S.

    2017-12-01

    Recent missions have revealed much about the nature of many Near-Earth asteroids, including the NEAR-Shoemaker target 433 Eros and Hayabusa target 25142 Itokawa. Both asteroids appear to have mineralogy consistent with ordinary chondrite meteorites. Laboratory spectral analysis of well-constrained meteorite samples can be employed as a reference tool to characterize and constrain data from current and future asteroid studies. A sample set of ordinary chondrite meteorites was chosen from the collection at the American Museum of Natural History. Six meteorites, spanning groups H, L, and LL, were prepared at four different size fractions (25-63 μm, 63-90 μm, 90-125 μm, 125-250 μm) in an attempt to mimic regolith known to exist on asteroids such as 433 Eros and 25142 Itokawa. At the Center for Planetary Exploration at Stony Brook University, spectra of the ordinary chondrite material were measured under simulated asteroid surface conditions ( 10-6 mbar, 150 K chamber temperature, low intensity illumination). The samples were used in two experiments: one measuring visible and near-infrared (VNIR) reflectance spectra at a series of temperatures, and the other measuring mid-infrared (MIR) emissivity spectra. The emissivity measurements require accurate simulation of the thermal environment within asteroid regolith, achieved by inducing a thermal gradient within the sample that results in a surface brightness temperature around 323 K (similar to the surface of 25142 Itokawa). Mid-IR emissivity spectra were collected for each sample at a surface temperature of 323 K, and reflectance spectra were collected in increments of 10 K, over the range 283 K to 373 K. Preliminary VNIR spectra show spreads similar to those seen in Hinrichs and Lucey (2002). Preliminary MIR emissivity spectra suggest that under asteroid surface conditions, the position of the Christiansen feature shifts to shorter wavelengths and emissivity is lower in the Reststrahlen bands when compared to

  1. Study of medical isotope production facility stack emissions and noble gas isotopic signature using automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihua; Hoffmann, Emmy; Ungar, Kurt; Dolinar, George; Miley, Harry; Mekarski, Pawel; Schrom, Brian; Hoffman, Ian; Lawrie, Ryan; Loosz, Tom

    2013-04-01

    The nuclear industry emissions of the four CTBT (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) relevant radioxenon isotopes are unavoidably detected by the IMS along with possible treaty violations. Another civil source of radioxenon emissions which contributes to the global background is radiopharmaceutical production companies. To better understand the source terms of these background emissions, a joint project between HC, ANSTO, PNNL and CRL was formed to install real-time detection systems to support 135Xe, 133Xe, 131mXe and 133mXe measurements at the ANSTO and CRL 99Mo production facility stacks as well as the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) primary coolant monitoring system at CRL. At each site, high resolution gamma spectra were collected every 15 minutes using a HPGe detector to continuously monitor a bypass feed from the stack or CANDU primary coolant system as it passed through a sampling cell. HC also conducted atmospheric monitoring for radioxenon at approximately 200 km distant from CRL. A program was written to transfer each spectrum into a text file format suitable for the automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform and then email the file to a server. Once the email was received by the server, it was automatically analysed with the gamma-spectrum software UniSampo/Shaman to perform radionuclide identification and activity calculation for a large number of gamma-spectra in a short period of time (less than 10 seconds per spectrum). The results of nuclide activity together with other spectrum parameters were saved into the Linssi database. This database contains a large amount of radionuclide information which is a valuable resource for the analysis of radionuclide distribution within the noble gas fission product emissions. The results could be useful to identify the specific mechanisms of the activity release. The isotopic signatures of the various radioxenon species can be determined as a function of release time. Comparison of 133mXe and 133Xe activity

  2. Energy spectra of neutrons accompanying the emission fission of 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirenkin, G.N.; Lovchikova, G.N.; Trufanov, A.M.; Svirin, M.I.; Polyakov, A.V.; Vinogradov, V.A.; Dmitriev, V.D.; Boykov, G.S.

    1996-01-01

    The spectra of fission neutrons emitted from 238U are measured for the first time by the time-of-flight method at incident-neutron energies of 16.0 and 17.7 MeV. Analysis of the neutron spectra shows that experimental results at incident-neutron energies of 14.7, 16.0, and 17.7 MeV (above the threshold of chance fission) differ significantly from those obtained at a neutron energy of 2.9 MeV (below the threshold of chance fission). Owing to the prefission emission of neutrons, the observed spectra of neutrons from emission fission exhibit a characteristic growth of the neutron yield in both hard and soft sections of the spectrum of secondary neutrons. This growth manifests itself as a step in the first case and as a rise in the second case, where it results in a noticeable excess of neutrons over the statistical-model predictions for E<2 MeV. The first feature in the spectra of neutrons from emission fission can be associated with the nonequilibrium decay of an excited fissile nucleus. On the contrary, the origin of the second feature has yet to be clarified. Additional measurements of angular distributions of secondary neutrons may prove helpful in this respect

  3. Energy spectra and asymmetry of charged particle emission in the muon minus capture by nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balandin, M.P.; Grebenyuk, V.M.; Sinov, V.G.; Konin, A.D.

    1978-01-01

    Energy spectra of separated-by-mass single-charged particles at the capture of 130 MeV negative muons by carbon, oxygen, magnesium and sulphur have been measured. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical calculations at the assumption of preequilibrium decay of collective states described by the hydrodynamical model. The measurement of asymmetry of charged particle emission in sulphur and megnesium was carried out by hte method of muon spin precession in a magnetic field. Theoretical curves describe correctly the exponential spectra character, but the yields obtained are 2-3 times less than the experimental results

  4. Photoluminescence emission spectra of Makrofol® DE 1-1 upon irradiation with ultraviolet radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El Ghazaly

    Full Text Available Photoluminescence (PL emission spectra of Makrofol® DE 1-1 (bisphenol-A based polycarbonate upon irradiation with ultraviolet radiation of different wavelengths were investigated. The absorption-and attenuation coefficient measurements revealed that the Makrofol® DE 1-1 is characterized by high absorbance in the energy range 6.53–4.43 eV but for a lower energy than 4.43 eV, it is approximately transparent. Makrofol® DE 1-1 samples were irradiated with ultraviolet radiation of wavelength in the range from 250 (4.28 eV to 400 (3.10 eV nm in step of 10 nm and the corresponding photoluminescence (PL emission spectra were measured with a spectrofluorometer. It is found that the integrated counts and the peak height of the photoluminescence emission (PL bands are strongly correlated with the ultraviolet radiation wavelength. They are increased at the ultraviolet radiation wavelength 280 nm and have maximum at 290 nm, thereafter they decrease and diminish at 360 nm of ultraviolet wavelength. The position of the PL emission band peak was red shifted starting from 300 nm, which increased with the increase the ultraviolet radiation wavelength. The PL bandwidth increases linearly with the increase of the ultraviolet radiation wavelength. When Makrofol® DE 1-1 is irradiated with ultraviolet radiation of short wavelength (UVC, the photoluminescence emission spectra peaks also occur in the UVC but of a relatively longer wavelength. The current new findings should be considered carefully when using Makrofol® DE 1-1 in medical applications related to ultraviolet radiation. Keywords: Photoluminescence spectra, Makrofol® DE 1-1, UV–vis spectrophotometry, Attenuation coefficient, Ultraviolet radiation

  5. Emission of Tc-99 from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxenburger, H.J.; Schuettelkopf, H.; Bohn, B.

    1984-11-01

    No noticeable Tc-activities are emitted from nuclear power stations. The emissions with the gaseous effluents exceed but rarely the detection limit of 25 nCi/h. Likewise, the emission with the liquid effluents remains below the detection limit of about 0.5 nCi/m 3 . Neither can a remarkable emission be recorded from the facilities of the Central Decontamination Services Department (HDB) of KfK. The emissions from the evaporation system for low level solutions and from the evaporation system for low level solutions and from the incineration facility for solid wastes do not exceed or rarely exceed to a minor extent the detection limit of 0.3 pCi/m 3 waste air. Also with the liquid effluents only minor Tc-amounts are discharged of 0.3 nCi/m 3 at the maximum. In the distillate of the medium level solutions discharged from the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant (WAK) to HDB as so-called tritiated water 2 nCi/m 3 Tc-99 at the maximum are contained. Only in the gaseous effluents from the evaporation system for medium level solutions emissions of up to 14 pCi/m 3 can be detected. The detection limits are almost permanently exceeded by the gaseous effluents from WAK. Small amounts of Tc-99 of 7 pCi/m 3 exhaust air at the maximum are released to the environment. However, the amount of Tc accumulated over the sampling period is insignificant from the radioecological point of view. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Contribution of recently measured nuclear data to reactor antineutrino energy spectra predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallot M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to summarize the actual problematic of reactor antineutrino energy spectra in the frame of fundamental and applied neutrino physics. Nuclear physics is an important ingredient of reactor antineutrino experiments. These experiments are motivated by neutrino oscillations, i.e. the measure of the θ13 mixing angle. In 2011, after a new computation of the reactor antineutrino energy spectra, based on the conversion of integral data of the beta spectra from 235U, and 239;241Pu, a deficit of reactor antineutrinos measured by short baseline experiments was pointed out. This is called the “reactor anomaly”, a new puzzle in the neutrino physics area. Since then, numerous new experimental neutrino projects have emerged. In parallel, computations of the antineutrino spectra independant from the ILL data would be desirable. One possibility is the use of the summation method, summing all the contributions of the fission product beta decay branches that can be found in nuclear databases. Studies have shown that in order to obtain reliable summation antineutrino energy spectra, new nuclear physics measurements of selected fission product beta decay properties are required. In these proceedings, we will present the computation methods of reactor antineutrino energy spectra and the impact of recent beta decay measurements on summation method spectra. The link of these nuclear physics studies with short baseline line oscillation search will be drawn and new neutrino physics projects at research reactors will be briefly presented.

  7. Mid-infrared emission and Raman spectra analysis of Er(3+)-doped oxyfluorotellurite glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fangze; Xu, Shaoqiong; Wei, Tao; Wang, Fengchao; Cai, Muzhi; Tian, Ying; Xu, Shiqing

    2015-04-10

    This paper reports on the spectroscopic and structural properties in Er(3+)-doped oxyfluorotellurite glasses. The compositional variation accounts for the evolutions of Raman spectra, Judd-Ofelt parameters, radiative properties, and fluorescent emission. It is found that, when maximum phonon energy changes slightly, phonon density plays a crucial role in quenching the 2.7 μm emission generated by the Er(3+):(4)I11/2→(4)I13/2 transition. The comparative low phonon density contributes strong 2.7 μm emission intensity. The high branching ratio (18.63%) and large emission cross section (0.95×10(-20)  cm(2)) demonstrate that oxyfluorotellurite glass contained with 50 mol.% TeO2 has potential application in the mid-infrared region laser.

  8. Spreadsheet analysis of gamma spectra for nuclear material measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosby, W.R.; Pace, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    A widely available commercial spreadsheet package for personal computers is used to calculate gamma spectra peak areas using both region of interest and peak fitting methods. The gamma peak areas obtained are used for uranium enrichment assays and for isotopic analyses of mixtures of transuranics. The use of spreadsheet software with an internal processing language allows automation of routine analysis procedures increasing ease of use and reducing processing errors while providing great flexibility in addressing unusual measurement problems. 4 refs., 9 figs

  9. Energy spectra of fast neutrons by nuclear emulsion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaresma, A.A.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental method which uses nuclear emulsion plates to determine the energy spectrum of fission neutrons is described. By using this technique, we have obtained the energy distribution of neutrons from spontaneous fission of Cf 2 5 2 . The results are in good agreement with whose obtained previously by others authors who have used different detection techniques, and they are consistent with a Maxwellian distribution as expected by Weisskopf's nuclear evaporation theory. (author)

  10. EMISSION LINES BETWEEN 1 AND 2 keV IN COMETARY X-RAY SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Ian; Christian, Damian J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States); Bodewits, Dennis [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Dennerl, Konrad [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching Germany (Germany); Lisse, Carey M. [Planetary Exploration Group, Space Department, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Rd, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Wolk, Scott J., E-mail: ian.ewing.794@my.csun.edu, E-mail: daman.christian@csun.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-01-20

    We present the detection of new cometary X-ray emission lines in the 1.0-2.0 keV range using a sample of comets observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and ACIS spectrometer. We have selected five comets from the Chandra sample with good signal-to-noise spectra. The surveyed comets are C/1999 S4 (LINEAR), C/1999 T1 (McNaught-Hartley), 153P/2002 (Ikeya-Zhang), 2P/2003 (Encke), and C/2008 8P (Tuttle). We modeled the spectra with an extended version of our solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission model. Above 1 keV, we find Ikeya-Zhang to have strong emission lines at 1340 and 1850 eV which we identify as being created by SWCX lines of Mg XI and Si XIII, respectively, and weaker emission lines at 1470, 1600, and 1950 eV formed by SWCX of Mg XII, Mg XI, and Si XIV, respectively. The Mg XI and XII and Si XIII and XIV lines are detected at a significant level for the other comets in our sample (LS4, MH, Encke, 8P), and these lines promise additional diagnostics to be included in SWCX models. The silicon lines in the 1700-2000 eV range are detected for all comets, but with the rising background and decreasing cometary emission, we caution that these detections need further confirmation with higher resolution instruments.

  11. Physical aspects of electron emission spectra shape for ferroelectrics-electrets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolesnikov, V.V.; Kozakov, A.T.

    2002-01-01

    One introduces a theoretical approach establishing a link between the peculiarities of spectrum of electron emission from ferroelectrics-electrets and the behavior of potential at a specimen surface. From these points of view one analyzes physical nature of the key peculiarities in the experimental spectra. One points out strong effect of electret charge relaxation on their shape due to bifurcation (branching) of peculiarities in a spectrum. A complex shape of spectrum of electron emission from ferroelectrics-electrets results from peculiarities of distribution of electrical field and polarization along their surface [ru

  12. EVIDENCE FOR SECONDARY EMISSION AS THE ORIGIN OF HARD SPECTRA IN TeV BLAZARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Y. G.; Kang, T.

    2013-01-01

    We develop a model for the possible origin of hard, very high energy (VHE) spectra from a distant blazar. In the model, both the primary photons produced in the source and secondary photons produced outside it contribute to the observed high-energy γ-ray emission. That is, the primary photons are produced through the synchrotron self-Compton process, and the secondary photons are produced through high-energy proton interactions with background photons along the line of sight. We apply the model to a characteristic case of VHE γ-ray emission in the distant blazar 1ES 1101-232. Assuming suitable electron and proton spectra, we obtain excellent fits to the observed spectra of this blazar. This indicated that the surprisingly low attenuation of the high-energy γ-rays, especially the shape of the VHE γ-ray tail of the observed spectra, can be explained by secondary γ-rays produced in interactions of cosmic-ray protons with background photons in intergalactic space.

  13. Emission spectra of Rb*Hen exciplexes in a cold 4He gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, K.; Enomoto, K.; Kumakura, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Yabuzaki, T.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the systematic observation of emission spectra of Rb * He n exciplexes (n=1,2,...,6), realized by exciting Rb atoms to the 5 2 P states (Rb * ) in a cold 4 He gas. The observed broad spectral components are assigned to Rb * He n (n=1-6) using theoretical spectra obtained from ab initio potential curves. The dynamics of the exciplex formation is discussed, based on the observed temperature dependence of the spectra. The He gas density dependence of the spectra of Rb * He is understood as a change in the population distribution over the vibrational levels. The present results are compared with our previous work with Cs [K. Enomoto et al., Phys. Rev. A 66, 042505 (2002)], and differences are explained in terms of the difference in the fine-structure splitting. Furthermore, we show the emission spectrum observed after the excitation of Rb in liquid He and conclude that it is the fluorescence from the exciplex Rb * He 6

  14. Electron and nuclear spin interactions in the optical spectra of single GaAs quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, D; Efros, A L; Kennedy, T A; Rosen, M; Katzer, D S; Park, D; Brown, S W; Korenev, V L; Merkulov, I A

    2001-05-28

    Fine and hyperfine splittings arising from electron, hole, and nuclear spin interactions in the magneto-optical spectra of individual localized excitons are studied. We explain the magnetic field dependence of the energy splitting through competition between Zeeman, exchange, and hyperfine interactions. An unexpectedly small hyperfine contribution to the splitting close to zero applied field is described well by the interplay between fluctuations of the hyperfine field experienced by the nuclear spin and nuclear dipole/dipole interactions.

  15. Research on convergence of nuclear rotational spectra formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yongjing; Xu Fuxin

    2001-01-01

    The superdeformed bands in the A-190 region are systematically analyzed using four-parameter rotational spectra formula of Bohr-Mottelson's I(I + 1) expansion. The convergence of two-parameter ab formula is compared with that of three-parameter abc formula by four parameters A, B, C, D. The result shows that the four-parameter value relation does not support the theoretically expected values of ab and abc formulas, but comparatively the four-parameter value relation agrees with the theoretically expected value of ab formula better than that of abc formula

  16. Surface defect assisted broad spectra emission from CdSe quantum dots for white LED application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Boni; Mathew, S.; Anand, V. R.; Correya, Adrine Antony; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Mujeeb, A.

    2018-02-01

    This paper reports, broadband photoluminescence from CdSe quantum dots (QDs) under the excitation of 403 nm using fluorimeter and 403 nm CW laser excitation. The broad spectrum obtained from the colloidal quantum dots was ranges from 450 nm to 800 nm. The broadness of the spectra was attributed to the merging of band edge and defect driven emissions from the QDs. Six different sizes of particles were prepared via kinetic growth method by using CdO and elemental Se as sources of Cd and Se respectively. The particle sizes were measured from TEM images. The size dependent effect on broad emission was also studied and the defect state emission was found to be predominant in very small QDs. The defect driven emission was also observed to be redshifted, similar to the band edge emission, due to quantum confinement effect. The emission corresponding to different laser power was also studied and a linear relation was obtained. In order to study the colour characteristics of the emission, CIE chromaticity coordinate, CRI and CCT of the prepared samples were measured. It is observed that, these values were tunable by the addition of suitable intensity of blue light from the excitation source to yield white light of various colour temperatures. The broad photoluminescence spectrum of the QDs, were compared with that of a commercially available white LED. It was found that the prepared QDs are good alternatives for the phosphor in phosphor converted white LEDs, to provide good spectral tunability.

  17. VIRTIS on Venus Express thermal emission spectra near 1μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Nils; Tsang, Constantine; Helbert, Joern; Smrekar, Suzanne; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Drossart, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Thermal emission from the surface of Venus is observable through narrow spectral windows close to 1μm. Surface temperature is strongly constrained by surface elevation, due to the thick and dense atmosphere. The data from Visible and InfraRed Thermal Imaging Spectrometer VIRTIS on Venus Express together with altimetry constrain surface emissivity. In VIRTIS observations at 1.02μm, strongly deformed highland plateaus (tesserae) appear to have a lower emissivity consistent with continental crust, an interpretation that implies existence of an early ocean. Comparison between the Magellan stereo digital elevation model (DEM) and altimetry shows that the altimetry height error in rough tesserae greatly exceeds the formal error. In the one tesserae outlier covered by altimetry, DEM, and VIRTIS, the height error could account for the observed emissivity variation. The radiances observed at 1.10 and 1.18μm have a different response to topography, mostly due to spectrally varying absorption in the overlying atmospheric column. Thus if the tesserae have the same emissivity as volcanic plains, its spectrum should be the same as that of plains of the correct surface elevation. In order to investigate this statistically, we create a database of all long exposure duration VIRTIS spectra in the range of 1 - 1.4μm. The spectra are corrected for the ubiquitous straylight from the dayside, based on analysis of spectra showing deep space. Because the 1.10 and 1.18μm peaks are narrow compared to the variation of instrument spectral registration, we fit each spectrum with a synthetic spectrum from an atmospheric radiative transfer model, using wavelength offset and bandwidths as parameters in addition to atmospheric variables. This dataset of ~28 million thermal emission spectra spans a wide range of southern latitudes and night local times, and thus may be useful for studies beyond the question of surface emissivity. A portion of this research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion

  18. Response spectra for nuclear structures on rock sites considering the near-fault directivity effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Longiun; Yang Shengchao; Xie Lili

    2010-01-01

    Near-fault ground motions, potentially with large amplitude and typical velocity pulses, may significantly impact the performance of a wide range of structures. The current study is aimed at evaluating the safety implications of the near-fault effect on nuclear power plant facilities designed according to the Chinese code. To this end, a set of near-fault ground motions at rock sites with typical forward-directivity effect is examined with special emphasis on several key parameters and response spectra. Spectral comparison of the selected records with the Chinese and other code design spectra was conducted. The bi-normalized response spectra in terms of different comer periods are utilized to derive nuclear design spectra. It is concluded that nuclear design spectra on rock sites derived from typical rupture directivity records are significantly influenced both by the earthquake magnitude and the rupture distance. The nuclear design spectra specified in the code needs to be adjusted to reflect the near-fault directivity effect of large earthquakes.

  19. Lifetime-vibrational interference effects in resonantly excited x-ray emission spectra of CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The parity selection rule for resonant X-ray emission as demonstrated for O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} can be seen as an effect of interference between coherently excited degenerate localized core states. One system where the core state degeneracy is not exact but somewhat lifted was previously studied at ALS, namely the resonant X-ray emission of amino-substituted benzene (aniline). It was shown that the X-ray fluorescence spectrum resulting from excitation of the C1s at the site of the {open_quotes}aminocarbon{close_quotes} could be described in a picture separating the excitation and the emission processes, whereas the spectrum corresponding to the quasi-degenerate carbons could not. Thus, in this case it was necessary to take interference effects between the quasi-degenerate intermediate core excited states into account in order to obtain agreement between calculations and experiment. The different vibrational levels of core excited states in molecules have energy splittings which are of the same order of magnitude as the natural lifetime broadening of core excitations in the soft X-ray range. Therefore, lifetime-vibrational interference effects are likely to appear and influence the band shapes in resonant X-ray emission spectra. Lifetime-vibrational interference has been studied in non-resonant X-ray emission, and in Auger spectra. In this report the authors discuss results of selectively excited soft X-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules, where they focus on lifetime-interference effects appearing in the band shapes.

  20. Photoluminescence emission spectra of Makrofol® DE 1-1 upon irradiation with ultraviolet radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghazaly, M.; Aydarous, Abdulkadir

    Photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra of Makrofol® DE 1-1 (bisphenol-A based polycarbonate) upon irradiation with ultraviolet radiation of different wavelengths were investigated. The absorption-and attenuation coefficient measurements revealed that the Makrofol® DE 1-1 is characterized by high absorbance in the energy range 6.53-4.43 eV but for a lower energy than 4.43 eV, it is approximately transparent. Makrofol® DE 1-1 samples were irradiated with ultraviolet radiation of wavelength in the range from 250 (4.28 eV) to 400 (3.10 eV) nm in step of 10 nm and the corresponding photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra were measured with a spectrofluorometer. It is found that the integrated counts and the peak height of the photoluminescence emission (PL) bands are strongly correlated with the ultraviolet radiation wavelength. They are increased at the ultraviolet radiation wavelength 280 nm and have maximum at 290 nm, thereafter they decrease and diminish at 360 nm of ultraviolet wavelength. The position of the PL emission band peak was red shifted starting from 300 nm, which increased with the increase the ultraviolet radiation wavelength. The PL bandwidth increases linearly with the increase of the ultraviolet radiation wavelength. When Makrofol® DE 1-1 is irradiated with ultraviolet radiation of short wavelength (UVC), the photoluminescence emission spectra peaks also occur in the UVC but of a relatively longer wavelength. The current new findings should be considered carefully when using Makrofol® DE 1-1 in medical applications related to ultraviolet radiation.

  1. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  2. Publicly Released Prompt Radiation Spectra Suitable for Nuclear Detonation Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    emission. During the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings , the prompt radiation contributed from 40%-70% of the free-in-air dose depending on distance from...intermediate- and low-yield thermonuclear weapons for initial radiation shielding calculations No Gritzner, et al. 1976 ( EM -1, Low, Henre...DNA 4267F ( EM -1 Fission) Neutron Gritzner, et al. 1976 1.00 x 1023 Glasstone (Thermonuclear) Neutron Glasstone & Dolan 1977 1.445 x 1023 ORNL-TM

  3. Neutrino emission spectra of collapsing degenerate stellar cores - Calculations by the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitan, Iu.L.; Sobol, I.M.; Khlopov, M.Iu.; Chechetkin, V.M.

    1982-01-01

    The variation of the hard part of the neutrino emission spectra of collapsing degenerate stellar cores with matter having a small optical depth to neutrinos is analyzed. The interaction of neutrinos with the degenerate matter is determined by processes of neutrino scattering on nuclei (without a change in neutrino energy) and neutrino scattering on degenerate electrons, in which the neutrino energy can only decrease. The neutrino emission spectrum of a collapsing stellar core in the initial stage of the onset of opacity is calculated by the Monte Carlo method: using a central density of 10 trillion g/cu cm and, in the stage of deep collapse, for a central density of 60 trillion g/cu cm. In the latter case the calculation of the spectrum without allowance for effects of neutrino degeneration in the central part of the collapsing stellar core corresponds to the maximum possible suppression of the hard part of the neutrino emission spectrum

  4. High resolution krypton M/sub 4,5/ x-ray emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Hettrick, M.C.; Lindle, D.W.

    1987-10-01

    High resolution M/sub 4,5/ (3d → 4p) x-ray emission spectra from a krypton plasma were measured using a recently developed grazing-incidence reflection-grating monochromator/spectrometer with very high flux rates at extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray wave lengths. The nominal resolving power of the instrument, E/ΔE, is about 300 in this energy range (∼80 eV). Three dipole-allowed 3d → 4p emission lines were observed at 80.98 eV, 80.35 eV and 79.73 eV. A broad peak at about 82.3 eV is tentatively assigned to transitions resulting from Kr 2+ , and effects of excitation energy on M/sub 4,5/ x-ray emission were observed. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  5. Algebraic descriptions of nuclear and molecular rotation-vibration spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roosmalen, O.S. van.

    1982-01-01

    The application of algebraic models to the description of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of nuclei and molecules are discussed. Simple model Hamiltonians are shown to give good agreement with the energy spectra of diatomic molecules and nuclei. Some formal aspects of path integral methods for many-boson systems are treated. The two representations for the quantum mechanical propagator are compared and appear to be identical in leading order in 1/N (N is the number of bosons). Approximations for both are static and dynamic problems are discussed. Applications of mean field techniques are also treated. A description of tri- and tetra-atomic molecules in terms of a U(4)xU(4) and U(4)xU(4)xU(4) group structure is given. Linear molecules appear to correspond with symmetries of O(4) type. S-matrix elements are calculated to test mean field methods, and the results compared with exact calculations. (Auth.)

  6. Colloquium: Random matrices and chaos in nuclear spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papenbrock, T.; Weidenmueller, H. A.

    2007-01-01

    Chaos occurs in quantum systems if the statistical properties of the eigenvalue spectrum coincide with predictions of random-matrix theory. Chaos is a typical feature of atomic nuclei and other self-bound Fermi systems. How can the existence of chaos be reconciled with the known dynamical features of spherical nuclei? Such nuclei are described by the shell model (a mean-field theory) plus a residual interaction. The question is answered using a statistical approach (the two-body random ensemble): The matrix elements of the residual interaction are taken to be random variables. Chaos is shown to be a generic feature of the ensemble and some of its properties are displayed, emphasizing those which differ from standard random-matrix theory. In particular, the existence of correlations among spectra carrying different quantum numbers is demonstrated. These are subject to experimental verification

  7. Life-time resolved emission spectra in CdCl2 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, S.; Nakagawa, H.; Kitaura, M.

    2005-01-01

    The emission spectrum of CdCl 2 is composed of ultraviolet (UV) and yellow (Y) bands peaking at 3.70 and 2.30 eV, respectively. In order to determine the initial states of the Y-luminescence, decay curves of the Y-emission were measured at 8K by varying emission energy in the range from 1.64 eV to 3.13 eV. The observed decay curves are composed of two or three exponential components. The values of lifetime for them were 900, 460 and 60 μs. The emission spectrum for each decay component, i.e., life-time resolved emission spectrum, was analyzed by the observed decay curves. The emission spectrum for the component of 460 μs lifetime exhibits a dominant band at 2.30 eV and a satellite band at 3.03 eV. The emission spectrum for the component of 60 μs lifetime is reproduced by the three Gaussian bands peaking at 2.21, 2.65 and 2.87 eV. For the component of 900 μs lifetime, only a single band appears at 1.73 eV. The origin of the emission bands in life-time resolved emission spectra is briefly discussed, and the initial states of Y-luminescence are explained by the excited states of a [Cd 2+ Cl - 6 ] 4- complex molecular ion. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Life-time resolved emission spectra in CdI2 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Seiji; Nakagawa, Hideyuki

    2007-01-01

    The emission spectrum of CdI 2 is composed of ultraviolet (UV), green (G) and yellow (Y and Y') bands peaking at 3.38, 2.50, 2.16 and 2.25 eV, respectively. In order to determine the initial states of the Y- and G-luminescence, decay curves have been measured at 6 and 80 K by varying emission energy. The observed decay curves are composed of two or three exponential components. These decay components were named τ 1 , τ 2 , τ 3 , τ 3' and τ 4 . The emission spectrum for each decay component, i.e., the life-time resolved emission spectrum, was constructed from the observed decay curves. At 6 K, three bands at 2.12, 2.49 and 2.64 eV are obtained for τ 1 , τ 2 and τ 3 components, respectively. At 80 K, a dominant band for the τ 4 component and a weak band for the τ 3' component appear on the same energy position at 2.25 eV. The origin of each emission band in the life-time resolved emission spectra will be briefly discussed

  9. Electron-electron correlation, resonant photoemission and X-ray emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parlebas, J.C.; Kotani, Akio; Tanaka, Satoshi.

    1991-01-01

    In this short review paper we essentially focus on the high energy spectroscopies which involve second order quantum processes, i.e., resonance photoemission, Auger and X-ray emission spectroscopies, denoted respectively by RXPS, AES and XES. First, we summarize the main 3p-RXPS and AES results obtained in Cu and Ni metals; especially we recall that the satellite near the 3p-threshold in the spectra, which arises from a d-hole pair bound state, needs a careful treatment of the electron-electron correlation. Then we analyze the RXPS spectra in a few Ce compounds (CeO 2 , Ce 2 O 3 and CeF 3 ) involving 3d or 4d core levels and we interpret the spectra consistently with the other spectroscopies, such as core XPS and XAS which are first order quantum processes. Finally within the same one-impurity model and basically with the same sets of parameters, we review a theory for the Ce 5p→3d XES, as well as for the corresponding RXES, where (1) the incident X-ray is tuned to resonate with the 3d→4f transition and (2) the X-ray emission due to the 5p→3d transition is actually observed. The paper ends with a general discussion. (author) 77 refs

  10. Measurement and analysis of γ-spectra in the research of nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenxin; Sun Tongyu

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of γ-ray spectra and method of data analysis are described for the research of nuclear chemistry. Gamma-ray spectra are collected as a function of time and are analysed by the computer codes GAMA33 or LEONE. Decay curves are constructed by selection of characteristic γ-ray using the computer code SORT. The analysis of half-life and identification of nuclides are performed with the interactive computer code TAU85 and Tektronix graphics terminal. Nuclear reaction cross-sections are calculated on weighted average of all the observed γ-rays for each nuclide after duplicate or erroneous identifications are screened

  11. Emission spectra of photoionized plasmas induced by intense EUV pulses: Experimental and theoretical investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Ismail; Bartnik, Andrzej; Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech; Wachulak, Przemysław; Jarocki, Roman; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2017-03-01

    Experimental measurements and numerical modeling of emission spectra in photoionized plasma in the ultraviolet and visible light (UV/Vis) range for noble gases have been investigated. The photoionized plasmas were created using laser-produced plasma (LPP) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source. The source was based on a gas puff target; irradiated with 10ns/10J/10Hz Nd:YAG laser. The EUV radiation pulses were collected and focused using grazing incidence multifoil EUV collector. The laser pulses were focused on a gas stream, injected into a vacuum chamber synchronously with the EUV pulses. Irradiation of gases resulted in a formation of low temperature photoionized plasmas emitting radiation in the UV/Vis spectral range. Atomic photoionized plasmas produced this way consisted of atomic and ionic with various ionization states. The most dominated observed spectral lines originated from radiative transitions in singly charged ions. To assist in a theoretical interpretation of the measured spectra, an atomic code based on Cowan's programs and a collisional-radiative PrismSPECT code have been used to calculate the theoretical spectra. A comparison of the calculated spectral lines with experimentally obtained results is presented. Electron temperature in plasma is estimated using the Boltzmann plot method, by an assumption that a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) condition in the plasma is validated in the first few ionization states. A brief discussion for the measured and computed spectra is given.

  12. Greenhouse gas emissions from the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, M.

    1996-01-01

    Emissions of carbon dioxide and methane from the whole fuel-cycle of nuclear power generation are discussed. The low-cost, and therefore low-energy-using, uranium resources suffice to provide a large worldwide nuclear programme with fuel without producing substantial carbon dioxide. Very lower emissions of carbon dioxide can be achieved if uranium enrichment is carried out by centrifuging. Methane emissions from uranium mining are negligible or in almost any case virtually zero. (author). 9 refs, 1 tab

  13. Generation of floor response spectra for a model structure of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidyanathan, C.V.; Kamatchi, P.; Ravichandran, R.; Lakshmanan, N.

    2003-01-01

    The importance of Nuclear power plants and the consequences of a nuclear accident require that the nuclear structures be designed for the most severe environmental conditions. Earthquakes constitutes major design consideration for the system, structures and equipment of a nuclear power plant. The design of structures on ground is based on the ground response spectra. Many important parts of a nuclear power plant facility are attached to the principal parts of the structure and respond in a manner determined by the structural response rather than by the general ground motion to which the structure is supported. Hence the seismic response of equipment is generally based on the response spectrum of the floor on which it is mounted. In this paper such floor response spectra have been generated at different nodes of a chosen model structure of a nuclear power plant. In the present study a detailed nonlinear time history analysis has been carried out on the mathematical model of the chosen Nuclear Power Plant model structure with the spectrum compatible time history. The acceleration response results of the time history analysis has been used in the spectral analysis and the response spectra are generated. Further peak broadening has been done to account for uncertainties in the material properties and soil characteristics. (author)

  14. Changes of soft X-ray emission spectra of oxygen and copper in high Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Sei; Gohshi, Yohichi; Kohiki, Shigemi; Saitoh, Naoki

    1989-01-01

    X-ray induced soft X-ray emission spectroscopy is one of the bulk analysis methods used to characterize high-Tc superconductor. In this report, some observations on the changes in O Kα and Cu L spectra of thin layer LnBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (Ln=Er,Gd) samples are presented. From the measurement of O Kα, no discernible difference was found between those of Gd compounds which were composed single phase or not. It may be said that the electronic structure of p state localized on the O is not sensitive to the change of Tc or zero-resistance temperature. From the measurement of Cu L spectra, it was found that Cu Lα of only Gd containing compounds has a low energy shoulder

  15. Emission spectra from AlN and GaN doped with rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Woo; Emura, Shuichi; Kimura, Shigeya; Kim, Moo Seong; Zhou Yikai; Teraguchi, Nobuaki; Suzuki, Akira; Yanase, Akira; Asahi, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    Luminescent properties of GaN and AlN based semiconductors containing rare earth metals of Gd and Dy are studied. Cathodoluminescent spectra from AlGdN show a clear and sharp peak at 318 nm following LO phonon satellites. Photoluminescence spectra from GaDyN by the above-gap excitation also show several peaks in addition to the broad luminescence band emission. For GaGdN, the sharp PL peaks are also observed at 650 and 670 nm, and they are assigned to the intra-f orbital transitions by their time decay measurements. The broad band at around 365 nm for AlGdN, 505 nm for GaGdN and GaDyN are commonly observed. The origin of these broad bands is discussed

  16. Local secondary-electron emission spectra of graphite and gold surfaces obtained using the Scanning Probe Energy Loss Spectrometer (SPELS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, J J; Pulisciano, A; Palmer, R E

    2009-01-01

    Secondary-electron emission (SEE) spectra have been obtained with the Scanning Probe Energy Loss Spectrometer at a tip-sample distance of only 50 nm. Such short working distances are required for the best theoretical spatial resolution (<10 nm). The SEE spectra of graphite, obtained as a function of tip bias voltage, are shown to correspond to unoccupied states in the electronic band structure. The SEE spectra of thin gold films demonstrate the capability of identifying (carbonaceous) surface contamination with this technique.

  17. Local secondary-electron emission spectra of graphite and gold surfaces obtained using the Scanning Probe Energy Loss Spectrometer (SPELS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, J J; Pulisciano, A; Palmer, R E, E-mail: R.E.Palmer@bham.ac.u [Nanoscale Physics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-25

    Secondary-electron emission (SEE) spectra have been obtained with the Scanning Probe Energy Loss Spectrometer at a tip-sample distance of only 50 nm. Such short working distances are required for the best theoretical spatial resolution (<10 nm). The SEE spectra of graphite, obtained as a function of tip bias voltage, are shown to correspond to unoccupied states in the electronic band structure. The SEE spectra of thin gold films demonstrate the capability of identifying (carbonaceous) surface contamination with this technique.

  18. Identifying Student and Teacher Difficulties in Interpreting Atomic Spectra Using a Quantum Model of Emission and Absorption of Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two…

  19. Modeling the complexity of acoustic emission during intermittent plastic deformation: Power laws and multifractal spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jagadish; Ananthakrishna, G

    2018-01-01

    Scale-invariant power-law distributions for acoustic emission signals are ubiquitous in several plastically deforming materials. However, power-law distributions for acoustic emission energies are reported in distinctly different plastically deforming situations such as hcp and fcc single and polycrystalline samples exhibiting smooth stress-strain curves and in dilute metallic alloys exhibiting discontinuous flow. This is surprising since the underlying dislocation mechanisms in these two types of deformations are very different. So far, there have been no models that predict the power-law statistics for discontinuous flow. Furthermore, the statistics of the acoustic emission signals in jerky flow is even more complex, requiring multifractal measures for a proper characterization. There has been no model that explains the complex statistics either. Here we address the problem of statistical characterization of the acoustic emission signals associated with the three types of the Portevin-Le Chatelier bands. Following our recently proposed general framework for calculating acoustic emission, we set up a wave equation for the elastic degrees of freedom with a plastic strain rate as a source term. The energy dissipated during acoustic emission is represented by the Rayleigh-dissipation function. Using the plastic strain rate obtained from the Ananthakrishna model for the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect, we compute the acoustic emission signals associated with the three Portevin-Le Chatelier bands and the Lüders-like band. The so-calculated acoustic emission signals are used for further statistical characterization. Our results show that the model predicts power-law statistics for all the acoustic emission signals associated with the three types of Portevin-Le Chatelier bands with the exponent values increasing with increasing strain rate. The calculated multifractal spectra corresponding to the acoustic emission signals associated with the three band types have a maximum

  20. Time evolution, Lamb shift, and emission spectra of spontaneous emission of two identical atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dawei; Li Zhenghong; Zheng Hang; Zhu Shiyao

    2010-01-01

    A unitary transformation method is used to investigate the dynamic evolution of two multilevel atoms, in the basis of symmetric and antisymmetric states, with one atom being initially prepared in the first excited state and the other in the ground state. The unitary transformation guarantees that our calculations are based on the ground state of the atom-field system and the self-energy is subtracted at the beginning. The total Lamb shifts of the symmetric and antisymmetric states are divided into transformed shift and dynamic shift. The transformed shift is due to emitting and reabsorbing of virtual photons, by a single atom (nondynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (quasi-static shift). The dynamic shift is due to the emitting and reabsorbing of real photons, by a single atom (dynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (dynamic interatomic shift). The emitting and reabsorbing of virtual and real photons between the two atoms result in the interatomic shift, which does not exist for the one-atom case. The spectra at the long-time limit are calculated. If the distance between the two atoms is shorter than or comparable to the wavelength, the strong coupling between the two atoms splits the spectrum into two peaks, one from the symmetric state and the other from the antisymmetric state. The origin of the red or blue shifts for the symmetric and antisymmetric states mainly lies in the negative or positive interaction energy between the two atoms. In the investigation of the short time evolution, we find the modification of the effective density of states by the interaction between two atoms can modulate the quantum Zeno and quantum anti-Zeno effects in the decays of the symmetric and antisymmetric states.

  1. Emission spectra of phosphor MgSO4 doped with Dy and Mn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunxiang; Chen Lixin; Tang Qiang; Luo Daling; Qiu Zhiren

    2001-01-01

    Emission spectra of phosphor MgSO 4 doped with Dy and Dy/Mn were measured with an optical multichannel analyzer and a linear heating system whose temperature was controlled by a microcomputer. The emission spectrum bands at 480 nm and 580 nm of phosphor MgSO 4 doped with Dy were observed in the three dimensional (3D) glow curves. Compared with the 3D spectrum of CaSO 4 :Dy and the spectrum bands of MgSO 4 :Dy shows the same wavelengths which resulted from the quantum transitions among the energy levels of Dy 3 '+ ions. The intensities of the glow peaks in both spectrum bands (480 nm and 580 nm) of phosphor MgSO 4 doped with Dy/Mn were dramatically reduced except the 380 degree C glow peak

  2. Phosphorescent Molecularly Doped Light-Emitting Diodes with Blended Polymer Host and Wide Emission Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stable green light emission and high efficiency organic devices with three polymer layers were fabricated using bis[2-(4′-tert-butylphenyl-1-phenyl-1H-benzoimidazole-N,C2′] iridium(III (acetylacetonate doped in blended host materials. The 1 wt% doping concentration showed maximum luminance of 7841 cd/cm2 at 25.6 V and maximum current efficiency of 9.95 cd/A at 17.2 V. The electroluminescence spectra of devices indicated two main peaks at 522 nm and 554 nm coming from phosphor dye and a full width at half maximum (FWHM of 116 nm. The characteristics of using blended host, doping iridium complex, emission spectrum, and power efficiency of organic devices were investigated.

  3. Bound-bound transitions in the emission spectra of Ba+-He excimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroshkin, P.; Kono, K.

    2016-05-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of the emission and absorption spectra of the Ba+ ions and Ba+*He excimer quasimolecules in the cryogenic Ba-He plasma. We observe several spectral features in the emission spectrum, which we assign to the electronic transitions between bound states of the excimer correlating to the 6 2P3 /2 and 5 2D3 /2 ,5 /2 states of Ba+. The resulting Ba+(5 2DJ) He is a metastable electronically excited complex with orbital angular momentum L =2 , thus expanding the family of known metal-helium quasimolecules. It might be suitable for high-resolution spectroscopic studies and for the search for new polyatomic exciplex structures.

  4. Inferring physical properties of galaxies from their emission-line spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucci, G.; Ferrara, A.; Gallerani, S.; Pallottini, A.

    2017-02-01

    We present a new approach based on Supervised Machine Learning algorithms to infer key physical properties of galaxies (density, metallicity, column density and ionization parameter) from their emission-line spectra. We introduce a numerical code (called GAME, GAlaxy Machine learning for Emission lines) implementing this method and test it extensively. GAME delivers excellent predictive performances, especially for estimates of metallicity and column densities. We compare GAME with the most widely used diagnostics (e.g. R23, [N II] λ6584/Hα indicators) showing that it provides much better accuracy and wider applicability range. GAME is particularly suitable for use in combination with Integral Field Unit spectroscopy, both for rest-frame optical/UV nebular lines and far-infrared/sub-millimeter lines arising from photodissociation regions. Finally, GAME can also be applied to the analysis of synthetic galaxy maps built from numerical simulations.

  5. Global radioxenon emission inventory based on nuclear power reactor reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Martin B; Tuma, Matthias P

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric radioactivity is monitored for the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, with xenon isotopes 131mXe, 133Xe, 133mXe and 135Xe serving as important indicators of nuclear explosions. The treaty-relevant interpretation of atmospheric concentrations of radioxenon is enhanced by quantifying radioxenon emissions released from civilian facilities. This paper presents the first global radioxenon emission inventory for nuclear power plants, based on North American and European emission reports for the years 1995-2005. Estimations were made for all power plant sites for which emission data were unavailable. According to this inventory, a total of 1.3PBq of radioxenon isotopes are released by nuclear power plants as continuous or pulsed emissions in a generic year.

  6. Pairing and deformation effects in nuclear excitation spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repko, A. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics, Bratislava (Slovakia); Kvasil, J. [Charles University, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Nesterenko, V.O. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Dubna (Russian Federation); State University ' ' Dubna' ' , Dubna (Russian Federation); Reinhard, P.G. [Universitaet Erlangen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    We investigate effects of pairing and of quadrupole deformation on two sorts of nuclear excitations, γ-vibrational K{sup π} = 2{sup +} states and dipole resonances (isovector dipole, pygmy, compression, toroidal). The analysis is performed within the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA) based on the Skyrme energy functional using the Skyrme parametrization SLy6. Particular attention is paid to i) the role of the particle-particle (pp) channel in the residual interaction of QRPA, ii) comparison of volume pairing (VP) and surface pairing (SP), iii) peculiarities of deformation splitting in the various resonances. We find that the impact of the pp-channel on the considered excitations is negligible. This conclusion applies also to any other excitation except for the K{sup π} = 0{sup +} states. Furthermore, the difference between VP and SP is found small (with exception of peak height in the toroidal mode). In the low-energy isovector dipole (pygmy) and isoscalar toroidal modes, the branch K{sup π} = 1{sup -} is shown to dominate over the K{sup π} = 0{sup -} one in the range of excitation energy E < 8-10 MeV. The effect becomes impressive for the toroidal resonance whose low-energy part is concentrated in a high peak of almost pure K{sup π} = 1{sup -} nature. This peculiarity may be used as a fingerprint of the toroidal mode in future experiments. The interplay between pygmy, toroidal and compression resonances is discussed, the interpretation of the observed isoscalar giant dipole resonance is partly revised. (orig.)

  7. Measurements of the HEU and LEU in-core spectra at the Ford Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehe, D K [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); King, J S; Lee, J C; Martin, W R [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1985-07-01

    The Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) at the University of Michigan has been serving as the test site for a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel whole-core demonstration. As part of the experimental program, the differential neutron spectrum has been measured in a high-enriched uranium (HEU) core and an LEU core. The HEU and LEU spectra were determined by unfolding the measured activities of foils that were irradiated in the reactor. When the HEU and LEU spectra are compared from meV to 10 MeV, significant differences between the two spectra are apparent below 10 eV. These are probably caused by the additional {sup 238}U resonance absorption in the LEU fuel. No measurable difference occurs in the shape of the spectra above MeV. (author)

  8. Photospheric Emission in the Joint GBM and Konus Prompt Spectra of GRB 120323A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiriec, S.; Kouveliotou, C. [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, 725 21st Street NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Hartmann, D. H., E-mail: sylvain.guiriec@nasa.gov [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Kinard Lab of Physics (United States)

    2017-09-10

    GRB 120323A is a very intense short gamma -ray burst (GRB) detected simultaneously during its prompt γ -ray emission phase with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and the Konus experiment on board the Wind satellite. GBM and Konus operate in the keV–MeV regime; however, the GBM range is broader toward both the low and the high parts of the γ -ray spectrum. Analyses of such bright events provide a unique opportunity to check the consistency of the data analysis as well as cross-calibrate the two instruments. We performed time-integrated and coarse time-resolved spectral analysis of GRB 120323A prompt emission. We conclude that the analyses of GBM and Konus data are only consistent when using a double-hump spectral shape for both data sets; in contrast, the single hump of the empirical Band function, traditionally used to fit GRB prompt emission spectra, leads to significant discrepancies between GBM and Konus analysis results. Our two-hump model is a combination of a thermal-like and a non-thermal component. We interpret the first component as a natural manifestation of the jet photospheric emission.

  9. Observation of soft X-ray spectra from a Seyfert 1 and a narrow emission-line galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, K.P.; Garmire, G.P.; Nousek, J.

    1985-01-01

    The 0.2-40 keV X-ray spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 509 and the narrow emission-line galaxy NGC 2992 are analyzed. The results suggest the presence of a steep soft X-ray component in Mrk 509 in addition to the well-known Gamma = 1.7 component found in other active galactic nuclei in the 2-40 keV energy range. The soft X-ray component is interpreted as due to thermal emission from a hot gas, probably associated with the highly ionized gas observed to be outflowing from the galaxy. The X-ray spectrum of NGC 2992 does not show any steepening in the soft X-ray band and is consistent with a single power law (Gamma = 1.78) with very low absorbing column density of 4 x 10 to the 21st/sq cm. A model with partial covering of the nuclear X-ray source is preferred, however, to a simple model with a single power law and absorption. 34 references

  10. Effects of the background environment on formation, evolution and emission spectra of laser-induced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Giacomo, A.; Dell'Aglio, M.; Gaudiuso, R.; Amoruso, S.; De Pascale, O.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the most important features of Laser Induced Plasma (LIP) evolution were analyzed from the fundamental point of view, in order to point out the effects of background environment on the plasma emission spectra. In particular, the main differences between air and vacuum Laser-Induced Breakdown (LIBS) are discussed, as well as those arising in high-pressure gases and in liquid environment. As can be expected, the dynamics of the plasma is strongly dependent on the environment where the plasma itself expands, which can be exploited for several different applications, ranging from chemical analysis and process diagnostics to materials science. The effect of other experimental conditions, such as the state of aggregation of the irradiated target, and the effect of laser pulse duration are also briefly reviewed. - Highlights: ► General processes involved in laser ablation and plasma generation were reported. ► Effect of number density in the plasma on the spectra features was discussed. ► LIP in gases at different pressures, in liquids and in DP techniques was discussed. ► LIBS spectra in various environments and correlated applications were discussed.

  11. Modeling of aircraft exhaust emissions and infrared spectra for remote measurement of nitrogen oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Beier

    Full Text Available Infrared (IR molecular spectroscopy is proposed to perform remote measurements of NOx concentrations in the exhaust plume and wake of aircraft. The computer model NIRATAM is applied to simulate the physical and chemical properties of the exhaust plume and to generate low resolution IR spectra and synthetical thermal images of the aircraft in its natural surroundings. High-resolution IR spectra of the plume, including atmospheric absorption and emission, are simulated using the molecular line-by-line radiation model FASCODE2. Simulated IR spectra of a Boeing 747-400 at cruising altitude for different axial and radial positions in the jet region of the exhaust plume are presented. A number of spectral lines of NO can be identified that can be discriminated from lines of other exhaust gases and the natural atmospheric background in the region around 5.2 µm. These lines can be used to determine NO concentration profiles in the plume. The possibility of measuring nitrogen dioxide NO2 is also discussed briefly, although measurements turn out to be substantially less likely than those of NO. This feasibility study compiles fundamental data for the optical and radiometric design of an airborne Fourier transform spectrometer and the preparation of in-flight measurements for monitoring of aircraft pollutants.

  12. Modeling of aircraft exhaust emissions and infrared spectra for remote measurement of nitrogen oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Beier

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available Infrared (IR molecular spectroscopy is proposed to perform remote measurements of NOx concentrations in the exhaust plume and wake of aircraft. The computer model NIRATAM is applied to simulate the physical and chemical properties of the exhaust plume and to generate low resolution IR spectra and synthetical thermal images of the aircraft in its natural surroundings. High-resolution IR spectra of the plume, including atmospheric absorption and emission, are simulated using the molecular line-by-line radiation model FASCODE2. Simulated IR spectra of a Boeing 747-400 at cruising altitude for different axial and radial positions in the jet region of the exhaust plume are presented. A number of spectral lines of NO can be identified that can be discriminated from lines of other exhaust gases and the natural atmospheric background in the region around 5.2 µm. These lines can be used to determine NO concentration profiles in the plume. The possibility of measuring nitrogen dioxide NO2 is also discussed briefly, although measurements turn out to be substantially less likely than those of NO. This feasibility study compiles fundamental data for the optical and radiometric design of an airborne Fourier transform spectrometer and the preparation of in-flight measurements for monitoring of aircraft pollutants.

  13. On-the-fly ab initio semiclassical dynamics: Emission spectra of oligothiophenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrle, Marius; Sulc, Miroslav; Vanicek, Jiri

    2014-03-01

    We employ the thawed Gaussian approximation (TGA) [E. J. Heller, J. Chem. Phys. 62, 1544 (1975)] within an on-the-fly ab initio (OTF-AI) scheme to calculate the vibrationally resolved emission spectra of oligothiophenes up to five rings. OTF-AI-TGA is efficient enough to treat all vibrational degrees of freedom on an equal footing even in case of 5-oligothiophene (105 vibrational degrees of freedom), thus obviating the need for the crude global harmonic approximation, popular for large system. The experimental emission spectra have been almost perfectly reproduced. In order to provide a deeper insight into the associated physical and chemical processes, we present a systematic approach to assess the importance and to analyze the mutual coupling of individual vibrational degrees of freedom during the dynamics. This allows us to explain the changes in the vibrational line shapes of the oligothiophenes with increasing number of rings. Furthermore, we observe the dynamical interplay between quinoid and aromatic characters of individual rings in the oligothiophene chain during the dynamics and confirm that the quinoid character prevails in the center of the chain. This research was supported by the Swiss NSF Grant No. 200021_124936/1 and NCCR Molecular Ultrafast Science & Technology (MUST), and by the EPFL.

  14. Spontaneous emission spectra and quantum light-matter interactions from a strongly coupled quantum dot metal-nanoparticle system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Vlack, C.; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Hughes, S.

    2012-01-01

    the dot to the detector, we demonstrate that the strong-coupling regime should be observable in the far-field spontaneous emission spectrum, even at room temperature. The vacuum-induced emission spectra show that the usual vacuum Rabi doublet becomes a rich spectral triplet or quartet with two of the four...

  15. Accounting for many-body correlation effects in the calculation of the valence band photoelectron emission spectra of ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minar, J.; Chadov, S.; Ebert, H.; Chioncel, L.; Lichtenstein, A.; De Nadai, C.; Brookes, N.B.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of dynamical correlation effects on the valence band photoelectron emission of ferromagnetic Fe, Co and Ni has been investigated. Angle-resolved as well as angle-integrated valence band photoelectron emission spectra were calculated on the basis of the one-particle Green's function, which was obtained by using the fully relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method. The correlation effects have been included in terms of the electronic self-energy which was calculated self-consistently within Dynamical Mean-Field Theory (DMFT). In addition a theoretical approach to calculate high-energy angle-resolved valence band photoelectron emission spectra is presented

  16. Correlated relativistic dynamics and nuclear effects in dielectronic and visible spectra of highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harman, Z.; Artemyev, A.N.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Dielectronic recombination and visible emission spectra are investigated theoretically and experimentally. Spectra of x-rays emitted from electron beam ion trap plasmas allow the study of correlation and quantum electrodynamic effects in relativistic few-body systems. In the visible range, exploring the forbidden M1 transitions in Be- and B-like argon ions provides one new insights into the relativistic modelling of isotope shift effects and extend the scope of bound-electron g factor measurements to few-electron ions. (author)

  17. Nuclear energy significantly reduces carbon dioxide emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koprda, V.

    2006-01-01

    This article is devoted to nuclear energy, to its acceptability, compatibility and sustainability. Nuclear energy is non-dispensable part of energy sources with vast innovation potential. The safety of nuclear energy, radioactive waste deposition, and prevention of risk from misuse of nuclear material have to be very seriously adjudged and solved. Nuclear energy is one of the ways how to decrease the contamination of atmosphere with carbon dioxide and it solves partially also the problem of global increase of temperature and climate changes. Given are the main factors responsible for the renaissance of nuclear energy. (author)

  18. Earthquake response spectra for seismic design of nuclear power plants in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bommer, Julian J.; Papaspiliou, Myrto; Price, Warren

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Seismic design of UK nuclear power plants usually based on PML response spectra. → We review derivation of PML spectra in terms of earthquake data used and procedure. → The data include errors and represent a small fraction of what is now available. → Seismic design loads in current practice are derived as mean uniform hazard spectra. → The need to capture epistemic uncertainty makes use of single equation indefensible. - Abstract: Earthquake actions for the seismic design of nuclear power plants in the United Kingdom are generally based on spectral shapes anchored to peak ground acceleration (PGA) values obtained from a single predictive equation. Both the spectra and the PGA prediction equation were derived in the 1980s. The technical bases for these formulations of seismic loading are now very dated if compared with the state-of-the-art in this field. Alternative spectral shapes are explored and the options, and the associated benefits and challenges, for generating uniform hazard response spectra instead of fixed shapes anchored to PGA are discussed.

  19. Publicly Released Prompt Radiation Spectra Suitable for Nuclear Detonation Simulations, Revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    dominates the photon emission. During the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings , the prompt radiation contributed from 40% to 70% of the free-in-air dose...spectra for high-, intermediate- and low-yield thermonuclear weapons for initial radiation shielding calculations No Gritzner, et al. 1976 ( EM -1...Glasstone (Fission) Neutron Glasstone & Dolan 1977 7.760 x 1022 Terrell Neutron Glasstone & Dolan 1977 7.760 x 1022 DNA 4267F ( EM -1 Fission

  20. Interpretation of magnetic circular dichroism of X-ray emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Tetsuo; Nakamura, Satoshi; Sasaki, Naoya; Ishii, Hiroyoshi; Miyahara, Tsuneaki

    2006-01-01

    We have measured the dependence of the magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of the X-ray emission spectra (XES) on the temperature and incident angle for a Gd thin film. The energy of the incident photon for the XES was 138.25eV, which corresponded to the resonant excitation to the 8 D 9/2 intermediate state. The dependence of the observed MCD on the temperature and incident angle was quite different from that of the magnetic moment estimated with a SQUID magnetometer. By considering the reflection, saturation effect, self-absorption effect and magnetic anisotropy of the thin film, the agreement of the two behaviors was considerably improved. This result shows that the revisions of the MCD of the XES are extremely important for the quantitative estimation of the magnetic moment from the MCD of the XES. (author)

  1. Fourier transform infrared emission spectra of MnH and MnD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Iouli E.; Appadoo, Dominique R. T.; Shayesteh, Alireza; Walker, Kaley A.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2005-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared emission spectra of MnH and MnD were observed in the ground X7Σ + electronic state. The vibration-rotation bands from v = 1 → 0 to v = 3 → 2 for MnH and from v = 1 → 0 to v = 4 → 3 for MnD were recorded at an instrumental resolution of 0.0085 cm -1. Spectroscopic constants were determined for each vibrational level and equilibrium constants were found from a Dunham-type fit. The equilibrium vibrational constant ( ωe) for MnH was found to be 1546.84518(65) cm -1, the equilibrium rotational constant ( Be) is 5.6856789(103) cm -1 and the eqilibrium bond distance ( re) was determined to be 1.7308601(47) Å.

  2. Chemical environment effects on the Kβ emission spectra in P compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceppi, S.; Tirao, G.; Stutz, G.; Riveros, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Several clusters of PO 4 3- and P 2 O 7 4- were studied in different chemical environment by measuring the Kβ 1,3 , Kβ x and Kβ' lines from P-Kβ emission spectrum. The Kβ spectrum structures were analyzed from its relation with its chemical environment. In this paper, the cation influence and the cation substitution with H on satellite Kβ' line parameters were also studied. It was found that this line allows the light ligand atom to be identified and also the number of H bonds with the PO 4 3- cluster be characterized. Besides cation influence on the P-Kβ spectrum, it can be shown that this influence is smaller than the ligand atom and cation-H substitution. Theoretical spectra were obtained by using the DV-Xα method in order to compare it with the experimental data and to interpret the Kβ line structure in terms of molecular orbital theory

  3. Atomic Emission Spectra Diagnosis and Electron Density Measurement of Semiconductor Bridge (SCB) Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Hongyan; Zhu Shunguan; Zhang Lin; Wan Xiaoxia; Li Yan; Shen Ruiqi

    2010-01-01

    Emission spectra of a semiconductor bridge (SCB) plasma in a visible range was studied in air. The electron density was measured in a conventional way from the broadening of the A1 I 394.4 nm Stark width. Based on the Saha equation, a system for recording the intensity of Si I 390.5 nm and Si II 413.1 nm was designed. With this technique, the SCB plasma electron density was measured well and accurately. Moreover, the electron density distribution Vs time was acquired from one SCB discharge. The individual result from the broadening of the Al I 394.4 nm Stark width and Saha equation was all in the range of 10 15 cm -3 to 10 16 cm -3 . Finally the presumption of the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) condition was validated.

  4. Time resolved spectra in the infrared absorption and emission from shock heated hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, S. H.; Borchardt, D. B.

    1990-07-01

    We have extended the wavelength range of our previously constructed multichannel, fast recording spectrometer to the mid-infrared. With the initial configuration, using a silicon-diode (photovoltaic) array, we recorded light intensities simultaneously at 20 adjacent wavelengths, each with 20 μs time resolution. For studies in the infrared the silicon diodes are replaced by a 20 element PbSe (photoconducting) array of similar dimensions (1×4 mm/element), cooled by a three-stage thermoelectric device. These elements have useful sensitivities over 1.0-6.7 μm. Three interchangeable gratings in a 1/4 m monochromator cover the following spectral ranges: 1.0-2.5 μm (resolution 33.6 cm-1) 2.5-4.5 μm (16.8 cm-1) 4.0-6.5 μm (16.7 cm-1). Incorporated in the new housing there are individually controlled bias-power sources for each detector, two stages of analogue amplification and a 20-line parallel output to the previously constructed digitizer, and record/hold computer. The immediate application of this system is the study of emission and absorption spectra of shock heated hydrocarbons-C2H2, C4H4 and C6H6-which are possible precursors of species that generate infrared emissions in the interstellar medium. It has been recently proposed that these radiations are due to PAH that emit in the infrared upon relaxation from highly excited states. However, it is possible that such emissions could be due to shock-heated low molecular-weight hydrocarbons, which are known to be present in significant abundances, ejected into the interstellar medium during stellar outer atmospheric eruptions. The full Swan band system appeared in time-integrated emission spectra from shock heated C2H2 (1% in Ar; T5eq~=2500K) no soot was generated. At low resolution the profiles on the high frequency side of the black body maximum show no distinctive features. These could be fitted to Planck curves, with temperatures that declined with time from an initial high that was intermediate between T5 (no

  5. Calculation of nuclear level density parameters of some light deformed medical radionuclides using collective excitation modes of observed nuclear spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuducu, S.; Sarac, H.; Akti, N. N.; Boeluekdemir, M. H.; Tel, E.

    2010-01-01

    In this study the nuclear energy level density based on nuclear collective excitation mechanism has been identified in terms of the low-lying collective level bands at near the neutron binding energy. Nuclear level density parameters of some light deformed medical radionuclides used widely in medical applications have been calculated by using different collective excitation modes of observed nuclear spectra. The calculated parameters have been used successfully in estimation of the neutron-capture cross section basic data for the production of new medical radionuclides. The investigated radionuclides have been considered in the region of mass number 40< A< 100. The method used in the present work assumes equidistance spacing of the collective coupled state bands of the interest radionuclides. The present calculated results have been compared with the compiled values from the literatures for s-wave neutron resonance data.

  6. Streamline processing of discrete nuclear spectra by means of authoregularized iteration process (the KOLOBOK code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadzhokov, V.; Penev, I.; Aleksandrov, L.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of the KOLOBOK computer code designed for streamline processing of discrete nuclear spectra with symmetric Gaussian shape of the single line on computers of the ES series, models 1020 and above, is given. The program solves the stream of discrete-spectrometry generated nonlinear problems by means of authoregularized iteration process. The Fortran-4 text of the code is reported in an Appendix

  7. Developments in acoustic emission for application to nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in acoustic emission are summarised as they relate to the principal applications to nuclear reactors, and light water reactor pressure vessels in particular. Improvement in the understanding of acoustic emission has come from materials tests and these confirm the problems in applying the technique for in-service or periodic proof test monitoring of growing fatique cracks. Applications in LMFBR have confirmed that acoustic emission can be applied in the nuclear environment and the detection of stress corrosion cracking in both BWR and LMFBR seems possible. Some information is included on the developing interest in applying the techniques of acoustic emission for leak detection during shop hydro and in-service monitoring. Acoustic emission is also being developed for weld fabrication monitoring and recently introduced pattern recognition techniques are having a significant impact in this application. (author)

  8. Bidimensional characterization of the emission spectra in a direct current atmospheric pressure glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orejas, Jaime; Pisonero, Jorge; Bordel, Nerea; Nelis, Thomas; Guillot, Philippe; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    An in-house atmospheric pressure glow discharge source, designed to be used as ionization/desorption source for ambient mass spectrometry, has been electrically characterized, and its optical emission spectra evaluated in detail. Electrical characterization showed that the plasma regime can vary from glow discharge to arc discharge depending on operating conditions (i.e. He flow rate and inter electrode distance). Furthermore, bidimensional images of the optical emission of some plasma species using filters as wavelength selectors, were registered from inside and outside the discharge chamber (inner region and afterglow region respectively), showing the spatial distribution of excited species (i.e. He*, N 2 + and O*). These distribution patterns are useful to study the chemistry of the discharge plasma, since different production pathways and different excitation energies affect the presence of these species in the plasma regions. - Highlights: ► An in-house APGD is characterized through electrical and OES measurements. ► Interelectrode distance had more effect on electric regime than He flow rate. ► Internal plume images showed differences on the production pathways for each species. ► Higher interelectrode distances and He flow rates showed better afterglow conditions.

  9. Bidimensional characterization of the emission spectra in a direct current atmospheric pressure glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orejas, Jaime [University of Oviedo, Department of Physics, C/ Gonzazlez Quiros S/N, Mieres (Spain); Pisonero, Jorge, E-mail: pisonerojorge@uniovi.es [University of Oviedo, Department of Physics, C/ Gonzazlez Quiros S/N, Mieres (Spain); Bordel, Nerea [University of Oviedo, Department of Physics, C/ Gonzazlez Quiros S/N, Mieres (Spain); Nelis, Thomas [Bern University of Applied Sciences, Quellgasse 21, 2501 Bienne (Switzerland); Guillot, Philippe [DPHE, CUFR J. F. Champollion, Universite de Toulouse, Place de Verdun, Albi (France); Sanz-Medel, Alfredo, E-mail: asm@uniovi.es [University of Oviedo, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, C/ Julian Claveria 8, Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    An in-house atmospheric pressure glow discharge source, designed to be used as ionization/desorption source for ambient mass spectrometry, has been electrically characterized, and its optical emission spectra evaluated in detail. Electrical characterization showed that the plasma regime can vary from glow discharge to arc discharge depending on operating conditions (i.e. He flow rate and inter electrode distance). Furthermore, bidimensional images of the optical emission of some plasma species using filters as wavelength selectors, were registered from inside and outside the discharge chamber (inner region and afterglow region respectively), showing the spatial distribution of excited species (i.e. He*, N{sub 2}{sup +} and O*). These distribution patterns are useful to study the chemistry of the discharge plasma, since different production pathways and different excitation energies affect the presence of these species in the plasma regions. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An in-house APGD is characterized through electrical and OES measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interelectrode distance had more effect on electric regime than He flow rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Internal plume images showed differences on the production pathways for each species. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher interelectrode distances and He flow rates showed better afterglow conditions.

  10. Time resolved spectra in the infrared absorption and emission from shock heated hydrocarbons. [in interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, S. H.; Borchardt, D. B.

    1990-01-01

    The wavelength range of a previously constructed multichannel fast recording spectrometer was extended to the mid-infrared. With the initial configuration, light intensities were recorded simultaneously with a silicon-diode array simultaneously at 20 adjacent wavelengths, each with a 20-micron time resolution. For studies in the infrared, the silicon diodes were replaced by a 20-element PbSe array of similar dimensions, cooled by a three-stage thermoelectric device. It is proposed that infrared emissions could be due to shock-heated low molecular-weight hydrocarbons. The full Swan band system appeared in time-integrated emission spectra from shock-heated C2H2; no soot was generated. At low resolution, the profiles on the high-frequency side of the black body maximum show no distinctive features. These could be fitted to Planck curves, with temperatures that declined with time from an initial high that was intermediate between T5 (no conversion) and T5(eq).

  11. Spontaneous emission spectra and simulating multiple spontaneous generation coherence in a five-level atomic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiahua; Liu Jibing; Qi Chunchao; Chen Aixi

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the features of the spontaneous emission spectra in a coherently driven cold five-level atomic system by means of a radio frequency (rf) or microwave field driving a hyperfine transition within the ground state. It is shown that a few interesting phenomena such as spectral-line narrowing, spectral-line enhancement, spectral-line suppression, and spontaneous emission quenching can be realized by modulating the frequency and intensity of the rf-driving field in our system. In the dressed-state picture of the coupling and rf-driving fields, we find that this coherently driven atomic system has three close-lying levels so that multiple spontaneously generated coherence (SGC) arises. Our considered atomic model can be found in real atoms, such as rubidium or sodium, so a corresponding experiment can be done to observe the expected phenomena related to SGC reported by Fountoulakis et al. [Phys. Rev. A 73, 033811 (2006)], since no rigorous conditions are required

  12. Assisted Interpretation of Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectra of Egg-Based Binding Media Using Total Emission Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglos, D.; Nevin, A.

    2006-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy can provide nondestructive, qualitative analysis of protein-based binding media found in artworks. Fluorescence emissions from proteins in egg yolk and egg white are due to auto fluorescent aromatic amino acids as well as other native and age-related fluorophores, but the potential of fluorescence spectroscopy for the differentiation between binding media is dependent on the choice of a suitable excitation wavelength and limited by problems in interpretation. However, a better understanding of emission spectra associated with LIF can be achieved following comparisons with total emission fluorescence spectra where a series of consecutive emission spectra are recorded over a specific range. Results using nanosecond UV laser sources for LIF of egg-based binding media are presented which are rationalised following comparisons with total emission spectra. Specifically, fluorescence is assigned to tryptophan and oxidation products of amino acids; in the case of egg yolk, fatty-acid polymerisation and age-related degradation products account for the formation of fluorophores.

  13. Nebular and auroral emission lines of [Cl III] in the optical spectra of planetary nebulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, F P; Aller, L H; Ramsbottom, C A; Bell, K L; Crawford, F L; Hyung, S

    2000-04-25

    Electron impact excitation rates in Cl III, recently determined with the R-matrix code, are used to calculate electron temperature (T(e)) and density (N(e)) emission line ratios involving both the nebular (5517.7, 5537.9 A) and auroral (8433.9, 8480.9, 8500.0 A) transitions. A comparison of these results with observational data for a sample of planetary nebulae, obtained with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph on the 3-m Shane Telescope, reveals that the R(1) = I(5518 A)/I(5538 A) intensity ratio provides estimates of N(e) in excellent agreement with the values derived from other line ratios in the echelle spectra. This agreement indicates that R(1) is a reliable density diagnostic for planetary nebulae, and it also provides observational support for the accuracy of the atomic data adopted in the line ratio calculations. However the [Cl iii] 8433.9 A line is found to be frequently blended with a weak telluric emission feature, although in those instances when the [Cl iii] intensity may be reliably measured, it provides accurate determinations of T(e) when ratioed against the sum of the 5518 and 5538 A line fluxes. Similarly, the 8500.0 A line, previously believed to be free of contamination by the Earth's atmosphere, is also shown to be generally blended with a weak telluric emission feature. The [Cl iii] transition at 8480.9 A is found to be blended with the He i 8480.7 A line, except in planetary nebulae that show a relatively weak He i spectrum, where it also provides reliable estimates of T(e) when ratioed against the nebular lines. Finally, the diagnostic potential of the near-UV [Cl iii] lines at 3344 and 3354 A is briefly discussed.

  14. ELECTROMAGNETIC EMISSION FROM LONG-LIVED BINARY NEUTRON STAR MERGER REMNANTS. II. LIGHT CURVES AND SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Daniel M. [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute), Am Mühlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany); Ciolfi, Riccardo, E-mail: daniel.siegel@aei.mpg.de, E-mail: riccardo.ciolfi@unitn.it [Physics Department, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy)

    2016-03-01

    Recent observations indicate that in a large fraction of binary neutron star (BNS) mergers a long-lived neutron star (NS) may be formed rather than a black hole. Unambiguous electromagnetic (EM) signatures of such a scenario would strongly impact our knowledge on how short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) and their afterglow radiation are generated. Furthermore, such EM signals would have profound implications for multimessenger astronomy with joint EM and gravitational-wave (GW) observations of BNS mergers, which will soon become reality thanks to the ground-based advanced LIGO/Virgo GW detector network. Here we explore such EM signatures based on the model presented in a companion paper, which provides a self-consistent evolution of the post-merger system and its EM emission up to ∼10{sup 7} s. Light curves and spectra are computed for a wide range of post-merger physical properties. We present X-ray afterglow light curves corresponding to the “standard” and the “time-reversal” scenario for SGRBs (prompt emission associated with the merger or with the collapse of the long-lived NS). The light curve morphologies include single and two-plateau features with timescales and luminosities that are in good agreement with Swift observations. Furthermore, we compute the X-ray signal that should precede the SGRB in the time-reversal scenario, the detection of which would represent smoking-gun evidence for this scenario. Finally, we find a bright, highly isotropic EM transient peaking in the X-ray band at ∼10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} s after the BNS merger with luminosities of L{sub X} ∼ 10{sup 46}–10{sup 48} erg s{sup −1}. This signal represents a very promising EM counterpart to the GW emission from BNS mergers.

  15. Secondary emissions during fiber laser cutting of nuclear material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, A., E-mail: beatriz.mendes.lopez@gmail.com [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Assunção, E. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); European Federation for Welding, Joining and Cutting, Porto Salvo 2740-120 (Portugal); Pires, I. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Quintino, L. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); European Federation for Welding, Joining and Cutting, Porto Salvo 2740-120 (Portugal)

    2017-04-15

    The laser process has been studied for dismantling work for more than 10 years, however there is almost no data available concerning secondary emissions generated during the process. These emissions are inevitable during the laser cutting process and can have detrimental effects in human health and in the equipment. In terms of safety, for nuclear decommissioning, is crucial to point out ways of controlling the emissions of the process. This paper gives indications about the parameters to be used in order to reduce these secondary emissions and about the influence of these parameters on the particles size distribution. In general, for producing minimal dross and fume emissions the beam focus should be placed on the surface of the material. The higher percentage of secondary emissions which present higher diameter, increases approximately linearly with the stand-off distance and with the use of low air pressure.

  16. Bayesian electron density inference from JET lithium beam emission spectra using Gaussian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, J.; Brix, M.; Ghim, Y.-C.; Contributors, JET

    2017-03-01

    A Bayesian model to infer edge electron density profiles is developed for the JET lithium beam emission spectroscopy (Li-BES) system, measuring Li I (2p-2s) line radiation using 26 channels with  ∼1 cm spatial resolution and 10∼ 20 ms temporal resolution. The density profile is modelled using a Gaussian process prior, and the uncertainty of the density profile is calculated by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) scheme. From the spectra measured by the transmission grating spectrometer, the Li I line intensities are extracted, and modelled as a function of the plasma density by a multi-state model which describes the relevant processes between neutral lithium beam atoms and plasma particles. The spectral model fully takes into account interference filter and instrument effects, that are separately estimated, again using Gaussian processes. The line intensities are inferred based on a spectral model consistent with the measured spectra within their uncertainties, which includes photon statistics and electronic noise. Our newly developed method to infer JET edge electron density profiles has the following advantages in comparison to the conventional method: (i) providing full posterior distributions of edge density profiles, including their associated uncertainties, (ii) the available radial range for density profiles is increased to the full observation range (∼26 cm), (iii) an assumption of monotonic electron density profile is not necessary, (iv) the absolute calibration factor of the diagnostic system is automatically estimated overcoming the limitation of the conventional technique and allowing us to infer the electron density profiles for all pulses without preprocessing the data or an additional boundary condition, and (v) since the full spectrum is modelled, the procedure of modulating the beam to measure the background signal is only necessary for the case of overlapping of the Li I line with impurity lines.

  17. Synthetic seismograms - II. Synthesis of amplitude spectra and seismograms of P waves from underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banghar, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    As a part of programme of seismic detection of underground nuclear explosions, step by step variations in the amplitude spectra and waveforms of P wave signal, as it propagates from source to receiver region, are investigated. Influences on the amplitude spectra and waveforms of teleseismic p waves due to : (1) variation in the shape of reduced displacement potential, (2) variation of mantle Q values, (3) change in depth, (4) various yields, (5) spalling, and (6) variation of crustal structure at source as well as at receiver are studied. The results show that for a yield of 85 kilotons, the time structure of seismograms is nearly same for four types of reduced displacement potentials considered here. The duration of waveforms is affected both by crustal structure at source as well as due to spalling. In general, effect of receiver crust on seismograms is found to be minor. Synthesized and observed P wave seismograms for Longshot, Milrow and Cannikin underground nuclear explosions are computed at various seismometer array stations of the UKAEA. Computed seismograms compare well with the recorded ones. It is seen that: (1) overburden P wave velocity inferred from seismograms is less as compared to its value obtained from on-site measurements, and (2) the source function, the source crust transfer function, the mantle transfer function and the spalling function are the most important factors that influence shaping of spectra and seismograms. (M.G.B.)

  18. Infrared and near infrared emission spectra of TeH and TeD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shanshan; Shayesteh, Alireza; Fu, Dejian; Bernath, Peter F.

    2005-04-01

    The vibration-rotation emission spectra for the X2Π ground state and the near infrared emission spectra of the X2Π 1/2- X2Π 3/2 system of the TeH and TeD free radicals have been measured at high resolution using a Fourier transform spectrometer. TeH and TeD were generated in a tube furnace with a DC discharge of a flowing mixture of argon, hydrogen (or deuterium), and tellurium vapor. In the infrared region, for the X2Π 3/2 spin component we observed the 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 vibrational bands for most of the eight isotopologues of TeH and the 1-0 and 2-1 bands for three isotopologues of TeD. For the X2Π 1/2- X2Π 3/2 transition, we observed the 0-0 and 1-1 bands for TeH and the 0-0, 1-1, and 2-2 bands for TeD. Except for a few lines, the tellurium isotopic shift was not resolved for the X2Π 1/2- X2Π 3/2 transitions of TeH and TeD. Local perturbations with Δ v = 2 between the two spin components of the X2Π state of TeH were found: X2Π 1/2, v = 0 with X2Π 3/2, v = 2; X2Π 1/2, v = 1 with X2Π 3/2, v = 3. The new data were combined with the previous data from the literature and two kinds of fits (Hund's case (a) and Hund's case (c)) were carried out for each of the 10 observed isotopologues: 130TeD, 128TeD, 126TeD, 130TeH, 128TeH, 126TeH, 125TeH, 124TeH, 123TeH, and 122TeH.

  19. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. III. Exact stochastic path integral evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moix, Jeremy M; Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    A numerically exact path integral treatment of the absorption and emission spectra of open quantum systems is presented that requires only the straightforward solution of a stochastic differential equation. The approach converges rapidly enabling the calculation of spectra of large excitonic systems across the complete range of system parameters and for arbitrary bath spectral densities. With the numerically exact absorption and emission operators, one can also immediately compute energy transfer rates using the multi-chromophoric Förster resonant energy transfer formalism. Benchmark calculations on the emission spectra of two level systems are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the stochastic approach. This is followed by calculations of the energy transfer rates between two weakly coupled dimer systems as a function of temperature and system-bath coupling strength. It is shown that the recently developed hybrid cumulant expansion (see Paper II) is the only perturbative method capable of generating uniformly reliable energy transfer rates and emission spectra across a broad range of system parameters.

  20. Two-dimensional spectra of electron collisions with acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile reveal nuclear dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regeta, K., E-mail: khrystyna.regeta@unifr.ch; Allan, M., E-mail: michael.allan@unifr.ch [Department of Chemistry, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 9, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland)

    2015-05-14

    Detailed experimental information on the motion of a nuclear packet on a complex (resonant) anion potential surface is obtained by measuring 2-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra. The cross section is plotted as a function of incident electron energy, which determines which resonant anion state is populated, i.e., along which normal coordinate the wave packet is launched, and of the electron energy loss, which reveals into which final states each specific resonant state decays. The 2D spectra are presented for acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile, at the incident energy range 0.095-1.0 eV, where the incoming electron is temporarily captured in the lowest π{sup ∗} orbital. The 2D spectra reveal selectivity patterns with respect to which vibrations are excited in the attachment and de-excited in the detachment. Further insight is gained by recording 1D spectra measured along horizontal, vertical, and diagonal cuts of the 2D spectrum. The methyl group in methacrylonitrile increases the resonance width 7 times. This converts the sharp resonances of acrylonitrile into boomerang structures but preserves the essence of the selectivity patterns. Selectivity of vibrational excitation by higher-lying shape resonances up to 8 eV is also reported.

  1. Theoretically predicted soft x-ray emission and absorption spectra of graphitic-structured BC2N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    Theoretical B K, C K and N K x-ray emission/absorption spectra of three possible graphitic-structured BC2N clusters are predicted based on the B2p-, C2p-, and N2p- density-of-states (DOS) calculated by discrete variational (DV)-X[alpha] molecular orbital calculations. Several prominent differences in DOS spectral features among BC2Ns, h-BN, and graphite are confirmed from comparison of calculated B2p-, C2p-, and N2p-DOS spectra. These variations in the spectra allow BC2N structures to be positively identified by high-resolution x-ray emission/absorption spectroscopy in the B K, C K, and N K regions.

  2. Line broadening interference for high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra under inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Zhiliang; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong; Chen, Youhe

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy serves as an important tool for analyzing chemicals and biological metabolites. However, its performance is subject to the magnetic-field homogeneity. Under inhomogeneous fields, peaks are broadened to overlap each other, introducing difficulties for assignments. Here, we propose a method termed as line broadening interference (LBI) to provide high-resolution information under inhomogeneous magnetic fields by employing certain gradients in the indirect dimension to interfere the magnetic-field inhomogeneity. The conventional spectral-line broadening is thus interfered to be non-diagonal, avoiding the overlapping among adjacent resonances. Furthermore, an inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to recover the high-resolution information from LBI spectra. Theoretical deductions are performed to offer systematic and detailed analyses on the proposed method. Moreover, experiments are conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed method for yielding high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

  3. Computing the Absorption and Emission Spectra of 5-Methylcytidine in Different Solvents: A Test-Case for Different Solvation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fernández, L; Pepino, A J; Segarra-Martí, J; Banyasz, A; Garavelli, M; Improta, R

    2016-09-13

    The optical spectra of 5-methylcytidine in three different solvents (tetrahydrofuran, acetonitrile, and water) is measured, showing that both the absorption and the emission maximum in water are significantly blue-shifted (0.08 eV). The absorption spectra are simulated based on CAM-B3LYP/TD-DFT calculations but including solvent effects with three different approaches: (i) a hybrid implicit/explicit full quantum mechanical approach, (ii) a mixed QM/MM static approach, and (iii) a QM/MM method exploiting the structures issuing from molecular dynamics classical simulations. Ab-initio Molecular dynamics simulations based on CAM-B3LYP functionals have also been performed. The adopted approaches all reproduce the main features of the experimental spectra, giving insights on the chemical-physical effects responsible for the solvent shifts in the spectra of 5-methylcytidine and providing the basis for discussing advantages and limitations of the adopted solvation models.

  4. Time-space distribution of laser-induced plasma parameters and its influence on emission spectra of the laser plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov-Pavlov, E.A.; Katsalap, K.Yu.; Stepanov, K.L.; Stankevich, Yu.A.

    2008-01-01

    A physical model is developed accounting for dynamics and radiation of plasma plumes induced by nanosecond laser pulses on surface of solid samples. The model has been applied to simulate emission spectra of the laser erosion plasma at the elemental analysis of metals using single- and double-pulse excitation modes. Dynamics of the sample heating and expansion of the erosion products are accounted for by the thermal conductivity and gas dynamic equations, respectively, supposing axial symmetry. Using the resulting time-space distributions of the plasma parameters, emission spectra of the laser plumes are evaluated by solving the radiation transfer equation. Particle concentration in consecutive ionization stages is described by the Saha equation in the Debye approximation. The population of excited levels is determined according to Boltzmann distribution. Local characteristics determining spectral emission and absorption coefficients are obtained point-by-point along an observation line. Voigt spectral line profiles are considered with main broadening mechanisms taken into account. The plasma dynamics and plume emission spectra have been studied experimentally and by the model. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm wavelength has been used to irradiate Al sample with the pulses of 15 ns and 50 mJ duration and energy, respectively. It has resulted in maximum power density of 0.8 MW/cm 2 on the sample surface. The laser plume emission spectra have been recorded at a side-on observation. Problems of the spectra contrast and of the elemental analysis efficiency are considered relying on a comparative study of the measurement and simulation results at the both excitation modes

  5. Monitoring of emissions and immissions from nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, H J [Rheinisch-Westfaelisches Elektrizitaetswerk A.G., Biblis (Germany, F.R.). Betriebsverwaltung

    1977-02-01

    The measurement of the emission and immission of radionuclides from nuclear power stations has already been established with the inception of the peaceful uses of atomic energy. Since then it has been a firm feature of the monitoring of effects of nuclear power plants on the environment. The considerations and procedures on which the measurement programs are based are described. The ecological behaviour of radionuclides is illustrated with the aid of examples.

  6. VUV emission spectra from binary rare gas mixtures near the resonance lines of Xe I and Kr I

    CERN Document Server

    Morozov, A; Gerasimov, G; Arnesen, A; Hallin, R

    2003-01-01

    Emission spectra of Xe-X (X = He, Ne, Ar and Kr) and of Kr-Y (Y = He, Ne and Ar) mixtures with low concentrations of the heavier gases (0.1-1%) and moderate total pressures (50-200 hPa) have been recorded near each of the two resonance lines of Xe and Kr in DC glow capillary discharges. The recorded intense emissions have narrow spectral profiles with FWHM of about 0.1 nm. The profiles are very similar in shape to profiles of known high resolution absorption spectra recorded at comparable gas pressures. A tentative identification of the emission structures is given, which involves transitions in heteronuclear molecules and quasimolecules between weakly-bound states.

  7. Induced γ emission for nuclear isomer long-lived

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tianli; Hao Fanhua

    2007-06-01

    It is pointed that the induced 7 emission for long lived isomer 178m2 Hf by low energy X rays has been a topic subject in the nuclear field recently. The background and development status are described. A principle for T ray transitions induced by X rays and the theoretical about magnificent induced emission have been related. In addition, the possible method of 178m2 Hf produce has been introduced also. Although the argument has existed for the experimental results of induced 7 emission, it can push forward in solving energy crisis and in future military field after controlling effectively the releasing of high excited energy for isomer. (authors)

  8. Spectra calculations in central and wing regions of CO2 IR bands between 10 and 20 μm. III: atmospheric emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niro, F.; Clarmann, T. von; Jucks, K.; Hartmann, J.-M.

    2005-01-01

    A theoretical model for the prediction of CO 2 absorption in both central and wing regions of infrared absorption bands was presented in the companion paper I. It correctly accounts for line-mixing effects and was validated by comparisons with laboratory spectra in the 600-1000 cm -1 region. This quality was confirmed using atmospheric transmissions measured by solar occultation experiments in the second paper. The present work completes these studies by now considering atmospheric emission in the 10-20 μm range. Comparisons are made between computed atmospheric radiances and measurements obtained using four different Fourier transform experiments collecting spectra for nadir, up-looking, as well as limb (from balloon and satellite) geometries. Our results confirm that using a Voigt model can lead to very large errors that affect the spectrum more than 300 cm -1 away from the center of the CO 2 ν 2 band. They also demonstrate the capability of our model to represent accurately the radiances in the entire region for a variety of atmospheric paths. This success opens interesting perspectives for the sounding of pressure and temperature profiles, particularly at low altitudes. Another benefit of the quality of the model should be an increased accuracy in the retrieval of atmospheric state parameters from broad features in the measured spectra (clouds, aerosols, heavy trace gases)

  9. Anisotropy of dilepton emission from nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratkovskaya, E.L.; Teryaev, O.V.; Toneev, V.D.; Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna

    1994-01-01

    Attention is paid to studying the angular characteristics of e + e - pairs created in collisions with nuclear targets at intermediate and relativistic energies. Arising due to general spin and angular momentum constraints, the dilepton anisotropy seems to be quite sensitive to the contribution of different sources and may be used for disentangling these sources (or models) as well as an additional signature of a possible chiral symmetry restoration and phase transition of hadrons into the quark-gluon plasma. An anisotropy estimate for some dilepton sources is given and its relevance to the problems mentioned is discussed

  10. Anisotropy of dilepton emission from nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratkovskaya, E.L.; Teryaev, O.V. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Bogolubov Lab. of Theoretical Physics; Toneev, V.D. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory]|[Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Bogolubov Lab. of Theoretical Physics

    1994-11-07

    Attention is paid to studying the angular characteristics of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} pairs created in collisions with nuclear targets at intermediate and relativistic energies. Arising due to general spin and angular momentum constraints, the dilepton anisotropy seems to be quite sensitive to the contribution of different sources and may be used for disentangling these sources (or models) as well as an additional signature of a possible chiral symmetry restoration and phase transition of hadrons into the quark-gluon plasma. An anisotropy estimate for some dilepton sources is given and its relevance to the problems mentioned is discussed.

  11. Effects of different SSI parameters on the floor response spectra of a nuclear reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, A.F.; Bolourchi, S.; Maryak, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of several critical soil-structure interaction (SSI) parameters on the floor response spectra (FRS) of a typical nuclear reactor building have been examined. These parameters are computation of soil impedance functions using different approaches, scattering effects (reductions in ground motion due to embedment and rigidity of building foundation) and strain dependency of soil dynamic properties. This paper reports that the significant conclusions of the study, which are applicable to a deeply embedded very rigid nuclear reactor building, are as follows: FRS generated without considering scattering effects are highly conservative; differences between FRS, generated considering strain-dependency of soil dynamic properties, and those generated suing low-strain values, are not significant; and the lumped-parameter approach of SSI calculations, which only uses a single value of soil shear modulus in impedance calculations, may not be able to properly compute the soil impedances for a soil deposit with irregularly varying properties with depth

  12. Analysis of the X-ray emission spectra of copper, germanium and rubidium plasmas produced at the Phelix laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comet, M.; Pain, J.-C.; Gilleron, F.; Piron, R.; Denis-Petit, D.; Méot, V.; Gosselin, G.; Morel, P.; Hannachi, F.; Gobet, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.

    2017-03-01

    We present the analysis of X-ray emission spectra of copper, germanium and rubidium plasmas measured at the Phelix laser facility. The laser intensity was around 6×1014 W.cm-2. The analysis is based on the hypothesis of an homogeneous plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium using an effective temperature. This temperature is deduced from hydrodynamic simulations and collisional-radiative computations. Spectra are then calculated using the LTE opacity codes OPAMCDF and SCO-RCG and compared to experimental data.

  13. Fast Neutron Emission Tomography of Used Nuclear Fuel Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausladen, Paul; Iyengar, Anagha; Fabris, Lorenzo; Yang, Jinan; Hu, Jianwei; Blackston, Matthew

    2017-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing a new capability to perform passive fast neutron emission tomography of spent nuclear fuel assemblies for the purpose of verifying their integrity for international safeguards applications. Most of the world's plutonium is contained in spent nuclear fuel, so it is desirable to detect the diversion of irradiated fuel rods from an assembly prior to its transfer to ``difficult to access'' storage, such as a dry cask or permanent repository, where re-verification is practically impossible. Nuclear fuel assemblies typically consist of an array of fuel rods that, depending on exposure in the reactor and consequent ingrowth of 244Cm, are spontaneous sources of as many as 109 neutrons s-1. Neutron emission tomography uses collimation to isolate neutron activity along ``lines of response'' through the assembly and, by combining many collimated views through the object, mathematically extracts the neutron emission from each fuel rod. This technique, by combining the use of fast neutrons -which can penetrate the entire fuel assembly -and computed tomography, is capable of detecting vacancies or substitutions of individual fuel rods. This paper will report on the physics design and component testing of the imaging system. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development within the National Nuclear Security Administration, under Contract Number DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  14. Timescale of particle emission using nuclear interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardouin, D.; Goujdami, D.; Guilbault, F.; Lebrun, C.; Erazmus, B.; Dabrowski, H.; Durand, D.; Lautridou, P.; Boisgard, R.; Quebert, J.; Carjan, N.

    1989-01-01

    A review of meson and baryon correlations at various energies is presented. An attempt, to focus on possible lifetime effects contained in existing data,is made. Data at 94 and 44 MeV/u, where experimental conditions are chosen, trying to study the lifetime of light particle emission using two particle correlations, are discussed. The temperature of a thermalized system is obtained, using the relative population of cluster excited states. It is shown that either quantum statistical fluctuations or Coulomb interactions play an important role in the trends of the correlation-functions at very low relative momenta. In the case of 1 60 and Ar induced reactions on heavy targets, a lifetime of the order of 10 -21 seconds is estimated. Temperature measurements for Ar + Ag system show that part of the excitation energy is not converted into thermal energy

  15. Nuclear power and its role in limiting CO2 emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suparman

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the proper role of nuclear power in the long term energy planning by comparing different type of scenarios in terms of CO2 emission reduction, based on the Business-as-Usual (BAU) scenario. For this purpose, a MESSAGE (Model of Energy Supply Systems and their General Environmental impacts) was used to develop energy planning as well as CO2 emission projection. A sensitivity analysis for CO2 reduction rates of 2.%, 3%, 4% and 5% have been done. From this sensitivity analysis, it can be concluded that nuclear will be a part of optimum solution under CO2 limitation of at least 3% from BAU condition. The more the environmental standards are tightened and enforced the more and the earlier nuclear power becomes part of the optimum generation mix. (author)

  16. Communication: General variational approach to nuclear-quadrupole coupling in rovibrational spectra of polyatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yachmenev, Andrey; Küpper, Jochen

    2017-10-01

    A general algorithm for computing the quadrupole-hyperfine effects in the rovibrational spectra of polyatomic molecules is presented for the case of ammonia (NH3). The method extends the general variational approach TROVE [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 245, 126-140 (2007)] by adding the extra term in the Hamiltonian that describes the nuclear quadrupole coupling, with no inherent limitation on the number of quadrupolar nuclei in a molecule. We applied the new approach to compute the nitrogen-nuclear-quadrupole hyperfine structure in the rovibrational spectrum of NH143. These results agree very well with recent experimental spectroscopic data for the pure rotational transitions in the ground vibrational and ν2 states and the rovibrational transitions in the ν1, ν3, 2ν4, and ν1 + ν3 bands. The computed hyperfine-resolved rovibrational spectrum of ammonia will be beneficial for the assignment of experimental rovibrational spectra, further detection of ammonia in interstellar space, and studies of the proton-to-electron mass variation.

  17. An interferometer experiment to explore the aspect angle dependence of stimulated electromagnetic emission spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isham

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available When the Earth's ionosphere is irradiated by a radiofrequency (RF electromagnetic wave of sufficiently high power density and tuned to match a natural E- or F-region plasma frequency, ionospheric magnetoionic wave modes may be excited and may generate RF electromagnetic sideband waves via nonlinear interactions. These secondary emissions, which may then escape from the ionosphere, have been termed stimulated electromagnetic emission or SEE. The frequency spectra of this radiation has been studied extensively, and a number of characteristic spectral features have been identified and in some cases related to particular plasma processes. The separation in frequency between the RF pump and the harmonics of the local electron gyrofrequency is critical in determining the amount of anomalous absorption suffered by the pump wave and the spectral properties of the stimulated sidebands. The pump can excite electrostatic waves which do not propagate away but can in some cases be observed via radio-wave scattering from the electron density fluctuations associated with them. These enhanced density fluctuations are created by processes commonly referred to as upper-hybrid and Langmuir turbulence. Langmuir turbulence has been the subject of 930-MHz scattering observations with antenna scanning through several pre-selected angles between the geographic and geomagnetic zenith directions, and a preference for pointing angles between the Spitze angle and geomagnetic field-aligned was identified. Other phenomena, such as the generation of enhanced electron temperatures and artificial aurora, have more recently been shown to have special behavior at similar angles, near but apparently not quite at field-aligned. In view of this evidence for angular structure in several pump-induced effects, in light of the rich variety of SEE phenomena strongly dependent on the geomagnetic field via the frequency interval between the pump and the gyrofrequency harmonics, and in

  18. An interferometer experiment to explore the aspect angle dependence of stimulated electromagnetic emission spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isham

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available When the Earth's ionosphere is irradiated by a radiofrequency (RF electromagnetic wave of sufficiently high power density and tuned to match a natural E- or F-region plasma frequency, ionospheric magnetoionic wave modes may be excited and may generate RF electromagnetic sideband waves via nonlinear interactions. These secondary emissions, which may then escape from the ionosphere, have been termed stimulated electromagnetic emission or SEE. The frequency spectra of this radiation has been studied extensively, and a number of characteristic spectral features have been identified and in some cases related to particular plasma processes. The separation in frequency between the RF pump and the harmonics of the local electron gyrofrequency is critical in determining the amount of anomalous absorption suffered by the pump wave and the spectral properties of the stimulated sidebands. The pump can excite electrostatic waves which do not propagate away but can in some cases be observed via radio-wave scattering from the electron density fluctuations associated with them. These enhanced density fluctuations are created by processes commonly referred to as upper-hybrid and Langmuir turbulence. Langmuir turbulence has been the subject of 930-MHz scattering observations with antenna scanning through several pre-selected angles between the geographic and geomagnetic zenith directions, and a preference for pointing angles between the Spitze angle and geomagnetic field-aligned was identified. Other phenomena, such as the generation of enhanced electron temperatures and artificial aurora, have more recently been shown to have special behavior at similar angles, near but apparently not quite at field-aligned. In view of this evidence for angular structure in several pump-induced effects, in light of the rich variety of SEE phenomena strongly dependent on the geomagnetic field via the frequency interval between the pump and the gyrofrequency harmonics, and in view

  19. Calculation of emission and absorption spectra of LTE plasma by the STA method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oreg, A.B.J.; Goldstein, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    Recent improvements in the Super Transition Array (STA) method for calculating Bound-Bound (BB) and Bound-Free (BF) emission and absorption spectra for LTE plasma are described and illustrated. The method accounts for all possible BB and BF radiative transitions in the plasma. Full detailed first order quantum relativistic treatment is used for calculating transition energies and probabilities. The enormous number of configurations are divided into sets of superconfigurations comprised of a collection of energetically grouped configurations to a specific one-electron transition is then represented by a Gaussian whose moments (total intensity, average energy and variance) are calculated accurately using a technique that bypasses the necessity of direct summation over all the levels involved. The calculation of these moments involves the populations of the configurations given by their statistical weights and the Boltzmann factor. For each configuration within the superconfiguration the authors use zeroeth order energies in the Boltzmann factor corrected by a superconfiguration averaged first order term. The structure of the spectrum is increasingly revealed by splitting each STA into a number of smaller STAs. When the spectrum converges it describes the detailed UTA structure, where each configuration-to-configuration array is represented by a separate Gaussian with first order energy in the Boltzmann factor. Convergence is reached with only a few thousand STAs, at most, which makes the calculations practical. It should be pointed out that in this treatment the STA moments are obtained by summing over all level-to-level transitions, rather than configuration-to-configuration average transitions. The authors also take into account orbital relaxation by calculating orbitals and energies for each superconfiguration in its own, optimized potential

  20. Cancer near the Three Mile Island nuclear plant: radiation emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, M C; Beyea, J; Nieves, J W; Susser, M

    1990-09-01

    As a public charge, cancers among the 159,684 residents living within a 10-mile (16-km) radius of the Three Mile Island nuclear plant were studied relative to releases of radiation during the March 28, 1979, accident as well as to routine plant emissions. The principal cancers considered were leukemia and childhood malignancies. Estimates of the emissions delivered to small geographic study tracts were derived from mathematical dispersion models which accounted for modifying factors such as wind and terrain; the model of accident emissions was validated by readings from off-site dosimeters. Incident cancers among area residents for the period 1975-1985 (n = 5,493) were identified by a review of the records at all local and regional hospitals; preaccident and postaccident trends in cancer rates were examined. For accident emissions, the authors failed to find definite effects of exposure on the cancer types and population subgroups thought to be most susceptible to radiation. No associations were seen for leukemia in adults or for childhood cancers as a group. For leukemia in children, the odds ratio was raised, but cases were few (n = 4), and the estimate was highly variable. Moreover, rates of childhood leukemia in the Three Mile Island area are low compared with national and regional rates. For exposure to routine emissions, the odds ratios were raised for childhood cancers as a whole and for childhood leukemia, but confidence intervals were wide and included 1.0. For leukemia in adults, there was a negative trend. Trends for two types of cancer ran counter to expectation. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma showed raised risks relative to both accident and routine emissions; lung cancer (adjusted only indirectly for smoking) showed raised risks relative to accident emissions, routine emissions, and background gamma radiation. Overall, the pattern of results does not provide convincing evidence that radiation releases from the Three Mile Island nuclear facility influenced

  1. Peak-Broadening of Floor Response Spectra for Base Isolated Nuclear Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Heekun; Choun, Young-Sun; Kim, Min-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, uncertainties in developing FRS are explained first. Then FDRS of a fixed structure is computed using a conventional method as an example. Lastly FRS of a base-isolated structure is computed and suitability of current peak-broadening method is examined. Uncertainties in the material property of structure influence FRS of fixed structures significantly, but their effect on FRS of base-isolated structures is negligible. Nuclear structures should be designed to ensure the safety of equipment and components mounted on their floors. However, coupled analysis of a structure and components is complex, so equipment is separately analyzed using floor response spectra (FRS). FRS calculated from dynamic analysis of structural model should be modified to create floor design response spectra (FDRS), the input for seismic design of equipment. For nuclear structures, smoothing and broadening peaks of FRS is required to account for uncertainties owing to material properties of structures, soil, modeling techniques, and others. The peak broadening method proposed for fixed based structures may not be appropriate for base-isolated structures because of additional uncertainties in the property of isolation bearings. For base-isolated structures, mechanical property of isolator plays a dominant role on the change of FRS. As base-isolated nuclear plants should meet the ASCE provisions, uncertainty in the isolation system would be around 10%. For the base isolated 3-storied beam model with 2.5-sec isolation period, 6.9% of broadening ratio was enough for development of FDRS at the required variation condition. Also for the models with various isolation periods, less than 10% of broadening ratio was sufficient

  2. Transition probabilities of Ce I obtained from Boltzmann analysis of visible and near-infrared emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitz, D. E.; Curry, J. J.; Buuck, M.; DeMann, A.; Mitchell, N.; Shull, W.

    2018-02-01

    We report radiative transition probabilities for 5029 emission lines of neutral cerium within the wavelength range 417-1110 nm. Transition probabilities for only 4% of these lines have been previously measured. These results are obtained from a Boltzmann analysis of two high resolution Fourier transform emission spectra used in previous studies of cerium, obtained from the digital archives of the National Solar Observatory at Kitt Peak. The set of transition probabilities used for the Boltzmann analysis are those published by Lawler et al (2010 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43 085701). Comparisons of branching ratios and transition probabilities for lines common to the two spectra provide important self-consistency checks and test for the presence of self-absorption effects. Estimated 1σ uncertainties for our transition probability results range from 10% to 18%.

  3. Spatial-Resolved Measurement and Analysis of Extreme-Ultraviolet Emission Spectra from Laser-Produced Al Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Shi-Quan; Su Mao-Gen; Sun Dui-Xiong; Min Qi; Dong Chen-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet emission from laser-produced Al plasma is experimentally and theoretically investigated. Spatial-evolution emission spectra are measured by using the spatio-temporally resolved laser produced plasma technique. Based on the assumptions of a normalized Boltzmann distribution among the excited states and a steady-state collisional-radiative model, we succeed in reproducing the spectra at different detection positions, which are in good agreement with experiments. The decay curves about the electron temperature and electron density, as well as the fractions of individual Al ions and average ionization stage with increasing the detection distance are obtained by comparison with the experimental measurements. These parameters are critical points for deeply understanding the expanding and cooling of laser produced plasmas in vacuum. (paper)

  4. α particle induced scintillation in dense gaseous argon: emission spectra and temporal behavior of its ionic component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, M.J.; Klein, G.

    1980-01-01

    The scintillation induced by α particles in dense gaseous argon (above 1 atm) has been studied. The electric field dependence of the scintillation, shows that the second continuum (centred around 1270A) stems from the neutral as well as from the ionic species, initially created by the impinging particle. Intensity decay curves and emission spectra of these neutral excitation and ionic components were determined. Time constants suggest that the recombination mechanism is responsible for a delayed formation of the second continuum states, 1 Σ + sub(u) and 3 Σ + sub(u). The third continuum of the emission spectra, which spreads at longer wavelengths, from 1600A to 2800A, is field independent

  5. INTEGRAL hard X-ray spectra of the cosmic X-ray background and Galactic ridge emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türler, M.; Chernyakova, M.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Lubiński, P.; Neronov, A.; Produit, N.; Walter, R.

    2010-03-01

    Aims: We derive the spectra of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) and of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE) in the ~20-200 keV range from the data of the IBIS instrument aboard the INTEGRAL satellite obtained during the four dedicated Earth-occultation observations in early 2006. Methods: We analyze the modulation of the IBIS/ISGRI detector counts induced by the passage of the Earth through the field of view of the instrument. Unlike previous studies, we do not fix the spectral shape of the various contributions, but model instead their spatial distribution and derive for each of them the expected modulation of the detector counts. The spectra of the diffuse emission components are obtained by fitting the normalizations of the model lightcurves to the observed modulation in different energy bins. Because of degeneracy, we guide the fits with a realistic choice of the input parameters and a constraint for spectral smoothness. Results: The obtained CXB spectrum is consistent with the historic HEAO-1 results and falls slightly below the spectrum derived with Swift/BAT. A 10% higher normalization of the CXB cannot be completely excluded, but it would imply an unrealistically high albedo of the Earth. The derived spectrum of the GRXE confirms the presence of a minimum around 80 keV with improved statistics and yields an estimate of ~0.6 M⊙ for the average mass of white dwarfs in the Galaxy. The analysis also provides updated normalizations for the spectra of the Earth's albedo and the cosmic-ray induced atmospheric emission. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential of INTEGRAL Earth-occultation observations to derive the hard X-ray spectra of three fundamental components: the CXB, the GRXE and the Earth emission. Further observations would be extremely valuable to confirm our results with improved statistics.

  6. Experimental and theoretical studies of the VUV emission and absorption spectra of H2, HD and D2 molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roudjane, M.

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this thesis is to carry out an experimental study of the absorption and emission spectra of the D 2 and HD isotopes, with high resolution, in the VUV domain and to supplement it by a theoretical study of the excited electronic states involved in the observed transitions. The emission spectra of HD and D 2 are produced by Penning discharge source operating under low pressure and are recorded in the spectral range 78 - 170 nm. The recorded spectra contains more than 20.000 lines. The analysis of the spectrum consists in identifying and assigning the lines to the electronic transitions between energy levels of the molecule. The present analysis is based on our theoretical calculations of the ro-vibrational energy levels of the excited electronic states and the transition probabilities from these states towards the energy levels of the fundamental state. The theoretical results are obtained by resolving the coupled equations between the excited electronic states B 1 Σ u 1 , B' 1 Σ u 1 , C 1 Π u 1 and D 1 Π u 1 , taking into account the nonadiabatic couplings between these states, and they are obtained in the adiabatic approximation for the excited electronic states B''B-bar 1 Σ u + , D' 1 Π u 1 and D'' 1 Π u 1 . The equations are resolved using a modern method based on the discretization variables representation method. In addition, we have carried out a study of the absorption spectra of the HD and D 2 molecules

  7. Modification of erbium photoluminescence excitation spectra for the emission wavelength 1.54 μm in mesoscopic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponenko, N.V.; Unuchak, D.M.; Mudryi, A.V.; Malyarevich, G.K.; Gusev, O.B.; Stepikhova, M.V.; Krasilnikova, L.V.; Stupak, A.P.; Kleshcheva, S.M.; Samoilovich, M.I.; Tsvetkov, M.Yu.

    2006-01-01

    Photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra for the emission wavelength 1.54 μm were studied for erbium-doped xerogels embedded in artificial opals and porous anodic alumina films. Opals were chosen with photonic stop-band in green spectral range, where excitation of 1.54 μm occurs most efficiently. In comparison to the structure erbium-doped titania xerogel/porous anodic alumina/silicon the photoluminescence excitation spectra for 1.54 μm emission wavelength significantly changes for the same xerogels embedded in artificial opals. Enhancement of erbium-related 1.54 μm emission was observed from the structure Fe 2 O 3 xerogel/porous anodic alumina fabricated on silicon, having some incompletely anodized aluminium, under excitation with either the lasing source at 532 nm or xenon lamp. Evident difference in PLE spectra for erbium doped TiO 2 and Fe 2 O 3 xerogels in porous anodic alumina is observed

  8. Radioactive rare gases emission at underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubasov, Yu.V.

    2016-01-01

    The examples of radioactive rare gases emission at underground nuclear explosions conducted in the USSR on the Novaya Zemlya and Semipalatinsk test sites are considered. It is pointed out that in the case of evasive explosion in vertical wells without apparent radioactive gases emission the samples of subsurface gas must contain the traces of radioactive rare gases. Under the inspection of evasive explosion in horizontal workings of rock massif, one should guided by the analysis of atmospheric air samples in the inspected area [ru

  9. Paradigms and challenges for bioapplication of rare earth upconversion luminescent nanoparticles: small size and tunable emission/excitation spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ling-Dong; Wang, Ye-Fu; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2014-04-15

    Rare earth (RE) materials, which are excited in the ultraviolet and emit in the visible light spectrum, are widely used as phosphors for lamps and displays. In the 1960's, researchers reported an abnormal emission phenomenon where photons emitted from a RE element carried more energy than those absorbed, owing to the sequential energy transfer between two RE ions--Yb(3+)-sensitized Er(3+) or Tm(3+)--in the solid state. After further study, researchers named this abnormal emission phenomenon upconversion (UC) emission. More recent approaches take advantage of solution-based synthesis, which allows creation of homogenous RE nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled size and structure that are capable of UC emission. Such nanoparticles are useful for many applications, especially in biology. For these applications, researchers seek small NPs with high upconversion emission intensity. These UCNPs have the potential to have multicolor and tunable emissions via various activators. A vast potential for future development remains by developing molecular antennas and energy transfer within RE ions. We expect UCNPs with optimized spectra behavior to meet the increasing demand of potential applications in bioimaging, biological detection, and light conversion. This Account focuses on efforts to control the size and modulate the spectra of UCNPs. We first review efforts in size control. One method is careful control of the synthesis conditions to manipulate particle nucleation and growth, but more recently researchers have learned that the doping conditions can affect the size of UCNPs. In addition, constructing homogeneous core/shell structures can control nanoparticle size by adjusting the shell thickness. After reviewing size control, we consider how diverse applications impose different requirements on excitation and/or emission photons and review recent developments on tuning of UC spectral profiles, especially the extension of excitation/emission wavelengths and the adjustment

  10. Inspection of nuclear reactor welding by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prine, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of the work described is to evaluate in-process acoustic emission weld monitoring with the goal of upgrading the inspection techniques for assuring better weld quality in nuclear reactor piping and pressure vessels. To accomplish this overall objective, the following specific goals have been set within a three year program: (1) prove the feasibility of in-process AE under shop conditions and validate the AE findings by currently acceptable NDE techniques; (2) develop and build a prototype monitor for use in Nuclear Fabrication shops; and (3) provide data for NRC/ASME acceptance of the inspection practice

  11. Simultaneous measurement of quantum yield ratio and absorption ratio between acceptor and donor by linearly unmixing excitation-emission spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Lin, F; DU, M; Qu, W; Mai, Z; Qu, J; Chen, T

    2018-02-13

    Quantum yield ratio (Q A /Q D ) and absorption ratio (K A /K D ) in all excitation wavelengths used between acceptor and donor are indispensable to quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurement based on linearly unmixing excitation-emission spectra (ExEm-spFRET). We here describe an approach to simultaneously measure Q A /Q D and K A /K D values by linearly unmixing the excitation-emission spectra of at least two different donor-acceptor tandem constructs with unknown FRET efficiency. To measure the Q A /Q D and K A /K D values of Venus (V) to Cerulean (C), we used a wide-field fluorescence microscope to image living HepG2 cells separately expressing each of four different C-V tandem constructs at different emission wavelengths with 435 nm and 470 nm excitation respectively to obtain the corresponding excitation-emission spectrum (S DA ). Every S DA was linearly unmixed into the contributions (weights) of three excitation-emission spectra of donor (W D ) and acceptor (W A ) as well as donor-acceptor sensitisation (W S ). Plot of W S /W D versus W A /W D for the four C-V plasmids from at least 40 cells indicated a linear relationship with 1.865 of absolute intercept (Q A /Q D ) and 0.273 of the reciprocal of slope (K A /K D ), which was validated by quantitative FRET measurements adopting 1.865 of Q A /Q D and 0.273 of K A /K D for C32V, C5V, CVC and VCV constructs respectively in living HepG2 cells. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2018 Royal Microscopical Society.

  12. A model for neutrino emission from nuclear accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Compact object mergers involving at least one neutron star can produce short-lived black hole accretion engines. Over tens to hundreds of milliseconds such an engine consumes a disk of hot, nuclear-density fluid, and drives changes to its surrounding environment through luminous emission of neutrinos. The neutrino emission may drive an ultrarelativistic jet, may peel off the disk's outer layers as a wind, may irradiate those winds or other forms of ejecta and thereby change their composition, may change the composition and thermodynamic state of the disk itself, and may oscillate in its flavor content. We present the full spatial-, angular-, and energy-dependence of the neutrino distribution function around a realistic model of a nuclear accretion disk, to inform future explorations of these types of behaviors. Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC).

  13. Floor Response Spectra of Nuclear Containment Building with Soil-Structure Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Choon Gyo; Ryu, Jeong Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    This paper presents a seismic analysis technique for a 3D soil-structure interaction(SSI) system in frequency domain, based on the finite element formulation incorporating frequency-dependent dynamic infinite elements for the far field soil region. Earthquake input motions are regarded as traveling SV-wave which is vertically incident from a far-field soil region. In which, the equivalent earthquake forces in the frequency domain are calculated using the exterior rigid boundary method and the free field response analysis. For the application, floor response spectra analyses for nuclear containment building on a soil medium is carried out, the obtained results are compared with the free field response by other solution.

  14. Generation of floor spectra compatible time histories for equipment seismic qualification in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyu, Y.-S.; Luh, Gary G.; Blum, Arie

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a procedure for generating floor response spectra compatible time histories used for equipment seismic qualification in nuclear power plants. From the 84th percentile power spectrum density function of an earthquake ensemble of four randomly generated time history motions, a statistically equivalent time history can be obtained by converting the power spectrum density function from the frequency domain into the time domain. With minor modification, if needed, the converted time history will satisfy both the spectral and the power spectrum density enveloping criteria, as required by the USNRC per Revision 2 of the Standard Review Plan, Section 3.7.1. Step-by-step generating procedures and two numerical examples are presented to illustrate the applications of the methodology. (author)

  15. Experiments on studying solar cosmic radiation nuclear composition and energy spectra on the Prognoz-9 sattelite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, S.A.; Gordeev, Yu.P.; Denisov, Yu.I.; Kolesov, G.Ya; Podorol'skij, A.N.; Nikitin, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Performances of the SKI-1 device installed on board the artificial satellite of the Earth ''Prognoz-9'' and intended for measurements of a nuclear component of solar cosmic radiation are considered. The device permits to determine intensites of proton fluxes in the 10-30, 30-60, 60-90 and 90-120 MeV energy ranges and nuclei with charges z=1-30 and the following energies: 5-20 MeV for 1 H and 4 He nuclei, 10-26 MeV for C nuclei, 12-42 MeV for O nuclei, 23-80 MeV for Fe nuclei. The SKI-1 comprises two similar telescopes. The telescope includes 4 silicon semiconducting detectors. Energy spectra of solar cosmic radiation and data characterizing time dependence of their intensity are given

  16. Processing of liquid scintillation nuclear spectra for unquenched and quenched sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madan, V.K.; Gopalakrishnan, K.R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a nuclear (beta) spectral analysis method for qualitative and quantitative analysis of radioactivity for use in a liquid scintillation counting system. It is based on computing a spectral index number (SIN) for qualitative analysis of an unquenched sample. For quantitative analysis it was proposed that a complementary nonlinear function be estimated between efficiency and SIN from a standard set of samples. It reduces the computational burden. An unknown sample is analyzed by computing its SIN and that is used to calculate efficiency using the function to facilitate quantitative analysis. A software was developed and verified on real spectra of radioisotopes. The paper presents the method and its application with results. (author). 5 refs

  17. Outer atmospheres of cool stars. XII - A survey of IUE ultraviolet emission line spectra of cool dwarf stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsky, J. L.; Bornmann, P. L.; Carpenter, K. G.; Hege, E. K.; Wing, R. F.; Giampapa, M. S.; Worden, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    Quantitative information is obtained on the chromospheres and transition regions of M dwarf stars, in order to determine how the outer atmospheres of dMe stars differ from dM stars and how they compare with the outer atmospheres of quiet and active G and K type dwarfs. IUE spectra of six dMe and four dM stars, together with ground-based photometry and spectroscopy of the Balmer and Ca II H and K lines, show no evidence of flares. It is concluded, regarding the quiescent behavior of these stars, that emission-line spectra resemble that of the sun and contain emission lines formed in regions with 4000-20,000 K temperatures that are presumably analogous to the solar chromosphere, as well as regions with temperatures of 20,000-200,000 K that are presumably analogous to the solar transition region. Emission-line surface fluxes are proportional to the emission measure over the range of temperatures at which the lines are formed.

  18. Steep Hard-X-ray Spectra Indicate Extremely High Accretion Rates in Weak Emission-Line Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlar, Andrea; Shemmer, Ohad; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W. Niel; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Luo, Bin; Plotkin, Richard; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Wu, Jianfeng

    2018-06-01

    We present XMM-Newton imaging spectroscopy of ten weak emission-line quasars (WLQs) at 0.928 ≤ z ≤ 3.767, six of which are radio quiet and four which are radio intermediate. The new X-ray data enabled us to measure the hard-X-ray power-law photon index (Γ) in each source with relatively high accuracy. These measurements allowed us to confirm previous reports that WLQs have steeper X-ray spectra, therefore indicating higher accretion rates with respect to "typical" quasars. A comparison between the Γ values of our radio-quiet WLQs and those of a carefully-selected, uniform sample of 84 quasars shows that the first are significantly higher, at the ≥ 3σ level. Collectively, the four radio-intermediate WLQs have lower Γ values with respect to the six radio-quiet WLQs, as may be expected if the spectra of the first group are contaminated by X-ray emission from a jet. These results suggest that, in the absence of significant jet emission along our line of sight, WLQs constitute the extreme high end of the accretion rate distribution in quasars. We detect soft excess emission in our lowest-redshift radio-quiet WLQ, in agreement with previous findings suggesting that the prominence of this feature is associated with a high accretion rate. We have not detected signatures of Compton reflection, Fe Kα lines, or strong variability between two X-ray epochs in any of our WLQs.

  19. Ab-initio modeling of an iron laser-induced plasma: Comparison between theoretical and experimental atomic emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgan, J.; Judge, E.J.; Kilcrease, D.P.; Barefield, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    We report on efforts to model the Fe emission spectrum generated from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements on samples of pure iron oxide (Fe 2 O 3 ). Our modeling efforts consist of several components. We begin with ab-initio atomic structure calculations performed by solving the Hartree–Fock equations for the neutral and singly ionized stages of Fe. Our energy levels are then adjusted to their experimentally known values. The atomic transition probabilities and atomic collision quantities are also computed in an ab-initio manner. We perform LTE or non-LTE calculations that generate level populations and, subsequently, an emission spectrum for the iron plasma for a range of electron temperatures and electron densities. Such calculations are then compared to the experimental spectrum. We regard our work as a preliminary modeling effort that ultimately strives towards the modeling of emission spectra from even more complex samples where less atomic data are available. - Highlights: • LIBS plasma of iron oxide • Ab-initio theoretical Modeling • Discussion of LTE versus non-LTE criteria and assessment • Boltzmann plots for Fe—determination of when LTE is a valid assumption • Emission spectra for Fe—comparison of theoretical modeling and measurement: good agreement obtained

  20. Energy spectra of vibron and cluster models in molecular and nuclear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalili Majarshin, A.; Sabri, H.; Jafarizadeh, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    The relation of the algebraic cluster model, i.e., of the vibron model and its extension, to the collective structure, is discussed. In the first section of the paper, we study the energy spectra of vibron model, for diatomic molecule then we derive the rotation-vibration spectrum of 2α, 3α and 4α configuration in the low-lying spectrum of 8Be, 12C and 16O nuclei. All vibrational and rotational states with ground and excited A, E and F states appear to have been observed, moreover the transitional descriptions of the vibron model and α-cluster model were considered by using an infinite-dimensional algebraic method based on the affine \\widehat{SU(1,1)} Lie algebra. The calculated energy spectra are compared with experimental data. Applications to the rotation-vibration spectrum for the diatomic molecule and many-body nuclear clusters indicate that there are solvable models and they can be approximated very well using the transitional theory.

  1. Systematics of gamma-ray energy spectra for classification of workplaces around a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urabe, Itsumasa; Tsujimoto, Tadashi; Katsurayama, Kousuke

    1988-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry in workplaces has been carried out both for assurance of the doses complying with the acceptable values and for improvement of protection methods to minimise detriments of the exposed population. This means that it is very important not only to determine dosimetric quantities in workplaces but also to know features of radiation levels because information for radiation protection can often be derived from the radiometric quantities. Classification of workplaces based on the feature of gamma-ray energy spectra is one of the practical ways to realise radiation protection being taken into consideration of the radiometric quantities. Furthermore, demarcation of workplaces based on these radiometric quantities may be effective for improvement of radiation protection practice such as estimation of radiation doses, designing of radiation shields and other activities. From these points of view, gamma-ray energy spectra have been determined in various workplaces in nuclear facilities, and systematics of gamma-ray fields were tried for classification of workplaces on the basis of the feature appeared in health physical quantities such as effective dose equivalents and responses of dosemeters

  2. On the origin of excimer emission in electroluminescence and photoluminescence spectra of polyfluorenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacha, Martin; Ha, Jaekook; Sato, Hisaya

    2007-01-01

    We report a study on the differences in red-shifted excimer band in photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) spectra of thin films of a copolymer of dibutylfluorene and butylphenylphenoxazine. The relative intensity of the excimer band in PL spectra increases with temperature above the polymer glass transition, and with the intensity of the excitation light. In EL spectra, on the other hand, the relative excimer intensity is seen to decrease with increasing driving voltage. These opposite trends originate from the different nature of excitations in PL and EL spectra: photoexcitation directly creates singlet excitons while electric excitation proceeds via interaction of injected electrons and holes. In case of electric excitation, the observed results might be due to trap-assisted excimer formation

  3. Canada's nuclear industry, greenhouse gas emissions, and the Kyoto Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendergast, D.R.; Duffey, R.B.; Tregunno, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate change, dated December 10, 1997 committed Canada to reduce greenhouse gases to 6% below 1990 levels by 2008-2012. Other nations also committed to varying degrees of reduction. The Protocol includes provisions for credit to the 'developed' counties for initiatives which lead to greenhouse gas reduction in the 'developing' countries and for the sharing of credit between 'developed' countries for projects undertaken jointly. The rules and details for implementation of these guidelines remain to be negotiated. We begin our study by establishing the magnitude of greenhouse gas emissions already avoided by the nuclear industry in Canada since the inception of commercial power plants in 1971. We then review projections of energy use in Canada and anticipated increase in electricity use up to the year 2020. These studies have anticipated no (or have 'not permitted') further development of nuclear electricity production in spite of the clear benefit with respect to greenhouse gas emission. The studies also predict a relatively small growth of electricity use. In fact the projections indicate a reversal of a trend toward increased per capita electricity use which is contrary to observations of electricity usage in national economies as they develop. We then provide estimates of the magnitude of greenhouse gas reduction which would result from replacing the projected increase in fossil fuel electricity by nuclear generation through the building of more plants and/or making better use of existing installations. This is followed by an estimate of additional nuclear capacity needed to avoid CO 2 emissions while providing the electricity needed should per capita usage remain constant. Canada's greenhouse gas reduction goal is a small fraction of international commitments. The Kyoto agreement's 'flexibility mechanism' provisions provide some expectation that Canada could obtain some credit for greenhouse gas

  4. Production and analysis of some atomic emission spectra in the vacuum ultraviolet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, F.G.

    1979-01-01

    The development of technical facilities for spectra analysis are described including the design, construction and adjustment of a grazing incidence spectrograph for the extreme ultraviolet and the improvements in light sources. The investigations of the fifth and fourth spectra of tantalum, the analysis of the sixth spectrum of tungsten, the extension of the analysis of the fourth spectrum of hafnium and a start of the analysis of the seventh spectrum of rhenium are presented. (C.F.)

  5. Deconvolution of Thermal Emissivity Spectra of Mercury to their Endmember Counterparts measured in Simulated Mercury Surface Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varatharajan, I.; D'Amore, M.; Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Hiesinger, H.

    2017-12-01

    The Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (MERTIS) payload of ESA/JAXA Bepicolombo mission to Mercury will map the thermal emissivity at wavelength range of 7-14 μm and spatial resolution of 500 m/pixel [1]. Mercury was also imaged at the same wavelength range using the Boston University's Mid-Infrared Spectrometer and Imager (MIRSI) mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii with the minimum spatial coverage of 400-600km/spectra which blends all rocks, minerals, and soil types [2]. Therefore, the study [2] used quantitative deconvolution algorithm developed by [3] for spectral unmixing of this composite thermal emissivity spectrum from telescope to their respective areal fractions of endmember spectra; however, the thermal emissivity of endmembers used in [2] is the inverted reflectance measurements (Kirchhoff's law) of various samples measured at room temperature and pressure. Over a decade, the Planetary Spectroscopy Laboratory (PSL) at the Institute of Planetary Research (PF) at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) facilitates the thermal emissivity measurements under controlled and simulated surface conditions of Mercury by taking emissivity measurements at varying temperatures from 100-500°C under vacuum conditions supporting MERTIS payload. The measured thermal emissivity endmember spectral library therefore includes major silicates such as bytownite, anorthoclase, synthetic glass, olivine, enstatite, nepheline basanite, rocks like komatiite, tektite, Johnson Space Center lunar simulant (1A), and synthetic powdered sulfides which includes MgS, FeS, CaS, CrS, TiS, NaS, and MnS. Using such specialized endmember spectral library created under Mercury's conditions significantly increases the accuracy of the deconvolution model results. In this study, we revisited the available telescope spectra and redeveloped the algorithm by [3] by only choosing the endmember spectral library created at PSL for unbiased model

  6. The Origin of the Extra-nuclear X-ray Emission in the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 2992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, E. J. M.; Strickland, D. K.; Veilleux, S.; Weaver, K. A.

    2004-12-01

    We present an analysis of a Chandra ACIS observation of the edge-on Seyfert galaxy NGC 2992. We find extended X-ray emission with Lx(total) in excess of 10**40 erg/s. The brightest nebula is positioned a few 100 pc from the X-ray core, and is spatially coincident with optical line and radio emission. This emission nebula may be energized by the AGN, as opposed to a nuclear starburst. The expected kpc-scale X-ray emission due to a starburst-driven wind is larger than a few 10**39 erg/s, and we present large-scale X-ray emission that may be associated with such an outflow. The extra-nuclear emission has a very soft spectrum. Chandra and XMM spectra of the total nuclear region show a very prominent ``soft excess'' below 2-3 keV. We shall discuss the spectral properties of this soft excess, and will compare with the results from the spatial analysis, and with AGN and starburst models for extranuclear X-ray nebulae.

  7. Cancer near the Three Mile Island nuclear plant: Radiation emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatch, M.C.; Beyea, J.; Nieves, J.W.; Susser, M.

    1990-01-01

    As a public charge, cancers among the 159,684 residents living within a 10-mile (16-km) radius of the Three Mile Island nuclear plant were studied relative to releases of radiation during the March 28, 1979, accident as well as to routine plant emissions. The principal cancers considered were leukemia and childhood malignancies. Estimates of the emissions delivered to small geographic study tracts were derived from mathematical dispersion models which accounted for modifying factors such as wind and terrain; the model of accident emissions was validated by readings from off-site dosimeters. Incident cancers among area residents for the period 1975-1985 (n = 5,493) were identified by a review of the records at all local and regional hospitals; preaccident and postaccident trends in cancer rates were examined. For accident emissions, the authors failed to find definite effects of exposure on the cancer types and population subgroups thought to be most susceptible to radiation. No associations were seen for leukemia in adults or for childhood cancers as a group. For leukemia in children, the odds ratio was raised, but cases were few (n = 4), and the estimate was highly variable. Moreover, rates of childhood leukemia in the Three Mile Island area are low compared with national and regional rates. For exposure to routine emissions, the odds ratios were raised for childhood cancers as a whole and for childhood leukemia, but confidence intervals were wide and included 1.0. For leukemia in adults, there was a negative trend. Trends for two types of cancer ran counter to expectation. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma showed raised risks relative to both accident and routine emissions; lung cancer (adjusted only indirectly for smoking) showed raised risks relative to accident emissions, routine emissions, and background gamma radiation

  8. The multi-resolution capability of Tchebichef moments and its applications to the analysis of fluorescence excitation-emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao Qiong; Wang, Xue; Li Xu, Min; Zhai, Hong Lin; Chen, Jing; Liu, Jin Jin

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy with an excitation-emission matrix (EEM) is a fast and inexpensive technique and has been applied to the detection of a very wide range of analytes. However, serious scattering and overlapping signals hinder the applications of EEM spectra. In this contribution, the multi-resolution capability of Tchebichef moments was investigated in depth and applied to the analysis of two EEM data sets (data set 1 consisted of valine-tyrosine-valine, tryptophan-glycine and phenylalanine, and data set 2 included vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and vitamin B6) for the first time. By means of the Tchebichef moments with different orders, the different information in the EEM spectra can be represented. It is owing to this multi-resolution capability that the overlapping problem was solved, and the information of chemicals and scatterings were separated. The obtained results demonstrated that the Tchebichef moment method is very effective, which provides a promising tool for the analysis of EEM spectra. It is expected that the applications of Tchebichef moment method could be developed and extended in complex systems such as biological fluids, food, environment and others to deal with the practical problems (overlapped peaks, unknown interferences, baseline drifts, and so on) with other spectra.

  9. Study of the structural characteristics of a group of natural silicates by means of their Kβ emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Deluigi, Maria Torres; Strasser, Edgardo N.; Vasconcellos, Marcos A.Z.; Riveros, Jose A.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the Si Kβ and Al Kβ emission spectra of a group of natural silicates typical of a region in San Luis (Argentina) are described qualitatively within the frame of the Molecular Orbital (MO) theory. Since these spectra come from electron transitions from valence orbitals, they offer information on the chemical bonds that are present and on the molecular orbitals involved. The spectra were obtained by means of an electron microprobe. The energies, intensities and full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the lines that conform the silicon and aluminium Kβ spectra were quantified. It was observed that an increase in the number of oxygen ions shared by the tetrahedra (SiO 4 ) 4- caused a lineal increase in the FWHM of the Si Kβ 1,3 and Al Kβ 1,3 lines. This behavior is caused by the increase of the covalent character of the Si-O and Al-O bonds with the quantity of oxygen ions shared by the adjacent tetrahedra

  10. Lα1 satellites in X-ray emission spectra of higher - Z elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poonia, S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The X-ray satellite spectra arising due to 2p 3/2 -1 3x -1 - 3x -1 3d -1 (x ≡ s, p, d) transition array, in elements with Z 74 to 92, have been calculated. While the energies of various transitions of the array have been determined by using available Hartree-Fock-Slater data on 1s -1 - 2p -1 3x -1 and 2p 3/2 -1 - 3x -1 , 3x' -1 Auger transition energies and their relative intensities have been estimated by considering cross - sections of singly ionized 2x -1 (x ≡ s, p) states and then of subsequent Coster-Kronig and shake off processes. The calculated spectra have been compared with the measured satellite energies in Lα1 spectra. Their intense peaks have been identified as the observed satellite lines. The one to one correspondence between the peaks in calculated spectra and the satellites in measured spectra has been established on the basis of the agreement between the separations in the peak energies and those in the measured satellite energies. It has been established that three satellites observed in the Lα 1 region of the X-ray spectra of various elements and named α', α ix and α x in order of increasing energy are mainly emitted by 2p 3/2 -1 3d -1 - 3d -2 transitions. It is observed that the satellite α' in all these spectra can be assigned to the superposition of 3 F 4 - 3 F 4 transition and that this must be most intense one out of all these satellites, contributing in order of decreasing intensity. The line α ix , has been assigned to mainly the 1 F 3 - 1 G 4 , 1 P 1 - 1 D 2 and 1 F 3 - 1 D 2 transitions. Finally, the satellite α x , reported in the spectra of elements with Z = 74-92, has been associated with the transition 3 D 3 - 3 F 4 . The possible contributions of other transitions of the 2p 3/2 -1 3x -1 - 3x -1 3d -1 (x ≡ s, p, d) array having appreciable intensities, have also been discussed

  11. Computer simulation of ICP spectra: A new tool for the study of excitation, emission, and line overlap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blades, M.W.; Burton, L.L.

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that the relatively high temperature of ICP sources provides an excitation environment relatively free from dissociation and vaporization interferences and, in addition, produces intense analyte line spectra and hence high analytical sensitivity. However, this feature also introduces the potential for spectral overlaps from sample concomitants. The degree to which an analyte spectral line intensity can be corrected for interfering spectral overlaps depends on many factors including spectrometer resolution, sample composition and ICP operating conditions. The authors have been using a computer program to assist them in the study of ICP analyte emission spectra. This program is being used to study the spectral distribution of line intensity information and also to do detailed investigations on spectral overlaps in complex sample mixtures. As input data the program uses tabulated wavelengths, transition probabilities (gA values), partition functions, excitation energies of the transitions, ionization energy, temperature, and Doppler and Stark linewidths

  12. The importance of nuclear quantum effects in spectral line broadening of optical spectra and electrostatic properties in aromatic chromophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Y. K.; Hassanali, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we examine the importance of nuclear quantum effects on capturing the line broadening and vibronic structure of optical spectra. We determine the absorption spectra of three aromatic molecules indole, pyridine, and benzene using time dependent density functional theory with several molecular dynamics sampling protocols: force-field based empirical potentials, ab initio simulations, and finally path-integrals for the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects. We show that the absorption spectrum for all these chromophores are similarly broadened in the presence of nuclear quantum effects regardless of the presence of hydrogen bond donor or acceptor groups. We also show that simulations incorporating nuclear quantum effects are able to reproduce the heterogeneous broadening of the absorption spectra even with empirical force fields. The spectral broadening associated with nuclear quantum effects can be accounted for by the broadened distribution of chromophore size as revealed by a particle in the box model. We also highlight the role that nuclear quantum effects have on the underlying electronic structure of aromatic molecules as probed by various electrostatic properties.

  13. Plasma Emission Spectra of Opuntia Nopalea Obtained with Microsecond Laser Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponce, L.; Flores, T.; Arronte, A.; Flores, A.

    2008-01-01

    Laser-induced Plasma Spectroscopy was performed during the spines ablation of Opuntia by using Nd:YAG microsecond laser pulses. The results show strong absorption in Glochids that causes the intense electronic noise on the spectra. This process is consider suitable for practical elimination of spines in alimentary products like opuntia

  14. Fluorescence of Bacteria, Pollens, and Naturally Occurring Airborne Particles: Excitation/Emission Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    35 Figure 29. EEM spectra of kaolin particles, dry...Warrington, PA. Glass beads were obtained from Peirce Chemical Co., Rockford, IL. Kaolin particles were obtained from Particle Information Services...solution concentration of 1 mg/ml. The samples were vortexed and pipetted vigorously to disperse aggregates. Stock bacteria solutions were diluted to a

  15. Hadronic energy spectra from nuclear collisions: Effects from collective transverse flow and the phase transition to quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, U.

    1988-11-01

    I give an overview of the processes determining the shape of energy spectra of hadrons emitted in relativistic nuclear collisions, and discuss how one can extract from them information on the presence of collective transverse flow and on the transition to quark-gluon matter in such collisions. 6 refs., 3 figs

  16. Optically stimulated luminescence emission spectra from feldspars as a function of sample temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1997-01-01

    samples have been measured at various sample temperatures. A small but consistent shift of the peak emission wavelength to shorter wavelengths at higher temperatures is observed. However, the magnitude of this shift is sufficiently small that it will not affect measurements of the thermal activation...... energy. A systematic difference is observed between the thermal activation energies measured when using different emission wavelengths. In particular, the thermal activation energy of the emission at 400 nm is typically 0.11 eV, while that at 570 nm from the same samples is 0.03-0.05 eV. Several possible...

  17. Spallation Neutron Emission Spectra in Some Amphoter Target Nuclei by Proton Beam Up to 140 MeV Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, G.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, the (p,xn) reaction neutron-emission spectra for some amphoter target nuclei as 27 A l, 64 Z n, 120 S n, and 208 P b were investigated up to 140 MeV incident proton energy. The pre-equilibrium calculations were calculated by using the hybrid model, the geometry dependent hybrid model, the full exciton model and the cascade exciton model. The reaction equilibrium component was calculated with a traditional compound nucleus model developed by Weisskopf Ewing. Calculation results have been discussed and compared with the available experimental data in literature

  18. Development of a BaF2 scintillation spectrometer for evaluation of photon energy spectra in workplaces around nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urabe, Itsumasa; Yoshimoto, Taka-aki; Kobayashi, Katsuhei; Akiyoshi, Tsunekazu; Tsujimoto, Tadashi; Nakashima, Yoshiyuki; Oda, Keiji.

    1997-01-01

    A BaF 2 scintillation spectrometer has been constructed for the determination of photon energy spectra in workplaces around nuclear facilities. Energy absorption spectra by the BaF 2 detector were calculated with the EGS4 Monte Carlo code in the energy region from 0.1 to 100 MeV and a response matrix of the spectrometer was obtained from the energy absorption spectra, of which the energy resolutions were modified to fit to the experimental results. With the irradiation experiments using neutron-capture gamma rays and those from radioactive sources, it became clear that photon energy spectra can be evaluated within an error of about 10% in the energy region 0.1 MeV to a few tens of megaelectronvolts. (author)

  19. Retrieval of Tropospheric Profiles from IR Emission Spectra: Field Experiment and Sensitivity Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Theriault, J

    1993-01-01

    .... The goal of this project was the retrieval of atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles and possibly over relevant information on clouds and aerosol properties from high resolution IR emission...

  20. α and p emission before, during, and after fission of the fusion nucleus 169Ta: Nuclear deformation, field emission, and nuclear shadow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brucker, A.

    1986-01-01

    In the asymmetric system 318 MeV 28 Si + 141 Pr the angular and energy distributions of α particles and protons were measured in coincidence with fission fragments. Identification and separation of the sources of sequential emission before (CN) and after (F) fission of the compound-nucleus 169 Ta yields following multiplicities: M CN α =0.38±0.04, M CN p =0.6±0.15; M F α =0.16±0.03, M F p =0.54±0.15. Measurement of the cross sections δ ER =(608±81) mb and δ F =(679±159) mb for residual nucleus formation respectively fission fixes the mean angular momentum for fission l F =(94±7)ℎ and the maximal angular momentum l F,max =(110±10)ℎ (sharp cut-off model). From the angular correlation relative to the spin direction of the compound-nucleus an anisotropy parameter of A α =6.7±0.8 and A p =1.3±0.2 for α respectively proton emission from the compound-nucleus is measured, and by means of the semiclassical model of Dossing a quadrupole deformation parameter of the compound-nucleus of vertical strokeδvertical stroke=0.43±0.05 consistent within the uncertainties of the analysis determined. Apart from pre-equilibrium emission under small angles to the beam significant deviations from sequential emission are observed only in the α emission and detailedly studied by means of angular correlation and energy spectra: (I) an strong nuclear shadowing of the fragment emission of 1/7 of its sequential value in a narrow angular range (≅40 0 (FWHM)) in the direction of the detected fission fragment. From this a mean lifetime of the compound nucleus τ CN =(140-240).10 -22 s is obtained. (II) A perpendicularly to the scission axis strongly pronounced surplus M SC α =(1.7±0.4).10 -2 and an observed deficit of equal magnitude in direction of the scission axis. (orig./HSI) [de

  1. THE NUCLEAR INFRARED EMISSION OF LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, R. E. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 N. A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Lopez-Rodriguez, E.; Packham, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Alonso-Herrero, A. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-UC, Avenida de los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander (Spain); Levenson, N. A.; Radomski, J. [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, c/o AURA, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Ramos Almeida, C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea, s/n, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Colina, L. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC/INTA), Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial, Crta de Torrejon a Ajalvir, km 4, 28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Elitzur, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Aretxaga, I. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Roche, P. F. [Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, DWB, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Oi, N. [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    We present high-resolution mid-infrared (MIR) imaging, nuclear spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and archival Spitzer spectra for 22 low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs; L{sub bol} {approx}< 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}). Infrared (IR) observations may advance our understanding of the accretion flows in LLAGNs, the fate of the obscuring torus at low accretion rates, and, perhaps, the star formation histories of these objects. However, while comprehensively studied in higher-luminosity Seyferts and quasars, the nuclear IR properties of LLAGNs have not yet been well determined. We separate the present LLAGN sample into three categories depending on their Eddington ratio and radio emission, finding different IR characteristics for each class. (1) At the low-luminosity, low-Eddington-ratio (log L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} < -4.6) end of the sample, we identify 'host-dominated' galaxies with strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bands that may indicate active (circum-)nuclear star formation. (2) Some very radio-loud objects are also present at these low Eddington ratios. The IR emission in these nuclei is dominated by synchrotron radiation, and some are likely to be unobscured type 2 AGNs that genuinely lack a broad-line region. (3) At higher Eddington ratios, strong, compact nuclear sources are visible in the MIR images. The nuclear SEDs of these galaxies are diverse; some resemble typical Seyfert nuclei, while others lack a well-defined MIR 'dust bump'. Strong silicate emission is present in many of these objects. We speculate that this, together with high ratios of silicate strength to hydrogen column density, could suggest optically thin dust and low dust-to-gas ratios, in accordance with model predictions that LLAGNs do not host a Seyfert-like obscuring torus. We anticipate that detailed modeling of the new data and SEDs in terms of accretion disk, jet, radiatively inefficient accretion flow, and torus components will provide further

  2. Automaton for spectra measurement of charged particles detected in nuclear photoemulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauehr, R.; Krzhemenek, Ya.; Piskorzh, Sh.; Svoboda, Z.; Shkaba, V.

    1978-01-01

    The electronic equipment is described for measuring the spectra of charged particles detected in nuclear photoemulsions. With regard to function, the electronic equipment may be classified as follows: unit for analog processing of signals, logic for track recognition and device for controlling and recording measurement results. The analog processing unit incorporates eight identical channels, each of which consists of a flexible light pipe, a photomultiplier, an amplifier, an amplitude analyzer, and a marker. Eight memory shift registers forming a data field are used for determining the presence of a track in an emulsion area being analyzed. The following track recognition criteria are used: (a) trace image in a logical form forms a continuous path in the register field; (b) the length of the continuous image should constitute at least five channels; and (c) tracks longer than five channels are recorded only once. The scanning plates of 700 mm long takes three hours. Accuracy of determination of the longitudinal coordinate is 25 μm

  3. Emission from water vapor and absorption from other gases at 5-7.5 μm in Spitzer-IRS Spectra Of Protoplanetary Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargent, B. A. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Forrest, W.; Watson, Dan M.; Kim, K. H.; Richter, I.; Tayrien, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); D' Alessio, P.; Calvet, N. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Furlan, E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Green, J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Pontoppidan, K., E-mail: baspci@rit.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We present spectra of 13 T Tauri stars in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region showing emission in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph 5-7.5 μm spectra from water vapor and absorption from other gases in these stars' protoplanetary disks. Seven stars' spectra show an emission feature at 6.6 μm due to the ν{sub 2} = 1-0 bending mode of water vapor, with the shape of the spectrum suggesting water vapor temperatures >500 K, though some of these spectra also show indications of an absorption band, likely from another molecule. This water vapor emission contrasts with the absorption from warm water vapor seen in the spectrum of the FU Orionis star V1057 Cyg. The other 6 of the 13 stars have spectra showing a strong absorption band, peaking in strength at 5.6-5.7 μm, which for some is consistent with gaseous formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) and for others is consistent with gaseous formic acid (HCOOH). There are indications that some of these six stars may also have weak water vapor emission. Modeling of these stars' spectra suggests these gases are present in the inner few AU of their host disks, consistent with recent studies of infrared spectra showing gas in protoplanetary disks.

  4. Anatomy of the AGN in NGC 5548. IX. Photoionized emission features in the soft X-ray spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Junjie; Kaastra, J. S.; Mehdipour, M.; Gu, Liyi; Costantini, E.; Kriss, G. A.; Bianchi, S.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Behar, E.; Di Gesu, L.; Ponti, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Ebrero, J.

    2018-04-01

    The X-ray narrow emission line region (NELR) of the archetypal Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 has been interpreted as a single-phase photoionized plasma that is absorbed by some of the warm absorber components. This scenario requires those overlaying warm absorber components to have larger distance (to the central engine) than the X-ray NELR, which is not fully consistent with the distance estimates found in the literature. Therefore, we reanalyze the high-resolution spectra obtained in 2013-2014 with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) aboard XMM-Newton to provide an alternative interpretation of the X-ray narrow emission features. We find that the X-ray narrow emission features in NGC 5548 can be described by a two-phase photoionized plasma with different ionization parameters (logξ = 1.3 and 0.1) and kinematics (vout = -50 and -400 km s-1), and no further absorption by the warm absorber components. The X-ray and optical NELR might be the same multi-phase photoionized plasma. Both X-ray and optical NELR have comparable distances, asymmetric line profiles, and the underlying photoionized plasma is turbulent and compact in size. The X-ray NELR is not the counterpart of the UV/X-ray absorber outside the line of sight because their distances and kinematics are not consistent. In addition, X-ray broad emission features that we find in the spectrum can be accounted for by a third photoionized emission component. The RGS spectrum obtained in 2016 is analyzed as well, where the luminosity of most prominent emission lines (the O VII forbidden line and O VIII Lyα line) are the same (at a 1σ confidence level) as in 2013-2014.

  5. Emission Lines in the Near-infrared Spectra of the Infrared Quintuplet Stars in the Galactic Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najarro, F. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Ctra. Torrejón a Ajalvir km 4, E-28850 Torrejón de Ardoz (Spain); Geballe, T. R. [Gemini Observatory, 670 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Figer, D. F. [Center for Detectors, Rochester Institute of Technology, 74 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Fuente, D. de la [Instituto de Astronomía, Unidad Académica en Ensenada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ensenada 22860, México (Mexico)

    2017-08-20

    We report the detection of a number of emission lines in the 1.0–2.4 μ m spectra of four of the five bright-infrared dust-embedded stars at the center of the Galactic center’s (GC) Quintuplet Cluster. Spectroscopy of the central stars of these objects is hampered not only by the large interstellar extinction that obscures all of the objects in the GC, but also by the large amounts of warm circumstellar dust surrounding each of the five stars. The pinwheel morphologies of the dust observed previously around two of them are indicative of Wolf–Rayet colliding wind binaries; however, infrared spectra of each of the five have until now revealed only dust continua steeply rising to long wavelengths and absorption lines and bands from interstellar gas and dust. The emission lines detected, from ionized carbon and from helium, are broad and confirm that the objects are dusty late-type carbon Wolf–Rayet stars.

  6. Experimental and theoretical study on emission spectra of a nitrogen photoionized plasma induced by intense EUV pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Ismail

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectral lines of low-temperature nitrogen photoionized plasma were investigated. The photoionized plasma was created in the result of irradiation N2 gas using laser plasma EUV radiation pulses. The source was based on a 10J/10ns Nd:YAG (λ = 1064 nm laser system and a gas puff target. The EUV radiation pulses were collected and focused using a grazing incidence multifoil EUV collector. The emission spectra were measured in the ultraviolet and visible (UV/Vis range. It was found that the plasma emission lines in the lower region of the UV range are relativley weak. Nonetheless, a part of the spectra contains strong molecular band in the 300 - 430 nm originated from second positive and first negative systems band transitions of nitrogen. These molecular band transitions were identified using a code for study the diatomic molecules, LIFBASE. The vibrational band of Δv = 0 and ±1 transitions were significantly populated than of that with Δv = ±2 and 3 transitions. A comparison of the calculated and measured spectrum is presented. With an assumption of a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE, the vibrational temperature was determined from the integrated band intensities with the help of the Boltzmann plot method and compared to the temperature predicted by SPECAIR and LIFBASE simulations. A summary of the results and the variations in the vibrational temperatures was discussed.

  7. Experimental and theoretical study on emission spectra of a nitrogen photoionized plasma induced by intense EUV pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Ismail; Bartnik, Andrzej; Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Jarocki, Roman; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Limpouch, Jiri

    2018-01-01

    Spectral lines of low-temperature nitrogen photoionized plasma were investigated. The photoionized plasma was created in the result of irradiation N2 gas using laser plasma EUV radiation pulses. The source was based on a 10J/10ns Nd:YAG (λ = 1064 nm) laser system and a gas puff target. The EUV radiation pulses were collected and focused using a grazing incidence multifoil EUV collector. The emission spectra were measured in the ultraviolet and visible (UV/Vis) range. It was found that the plasma emission lines in the lower region of the UV range are relativley weak. Nonetheless, a part of the spectra contains strong molecular band in the 300 - 430 nm originated from second positive and first negative systems band transitions of nitrogen. These molecular band transitions were identified using a code for study the diatomic molecules, LIFBASE. The vibrational band of Δv = 0 and ±1 transitions were significantly populated than of that with Δv = ±2 and 3 transitions. A comparison of the calculated and measured spectrum is presented. With an assumption of a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), the vibrational temperature was determined from the integrated band intensities with the help of the Boltzmann plot method and compared to the temperature predicted by SPECAIR and LIFBASE simulations. A summary of the results and the variations in the vibrational temperatures was discussed.

  8. Nuclear size effects in rotational spectra: A tale with a twist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knecht, Stefan; Saue, Trond

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Molecular field shift: 4-Component relativistic calibration calculations show a coincidence of errors in previous theoretical and experimental studies of nuclear volume effects in the rotational spectra of diatomics. The central quantity for the calculation of corrections to the rotational Dunham coefficient Y 01 is the derivative of the electron density with respect to internuclear distance, here shown for the TlI molecule. Abstract: We report a 4-component relativistic benchmark study of the isotopic field shift in the rotational spectrum of three diatomic molecules: TlI, PbTe and PtSi. A central quantity in the theory is the derivative with respect to internuclear distance of an effective electron density associated with a given nucleus, calculated at the equilibrium distance. The effective density, which is related to the mean electron density within the nuclear volume, is usually replaced with the contact density, that is, the electron density at the origin of the nucleus. Our computational study shows that for the chosen systems this induces errors on the order of 10%, which is not acceptable for high-precision work. On the other hand, the systematic nature of the error suggests that it can be handled by an atom-specific correction factor. Our calibration study reveals that relativistic effects increase the contact density gradient by about an order of magnitude, and that the proper transformation of the associated property operator is mandatory in 1- and 2-component relativistic calculations. Our results show very good agreement with the experimental data presented by Schlembach and Tiemann [Chem. Phys. 68 (1982) 21], but disagree completely with the revised results given by the same group in a later paper [Chem. Phys. 93 (1985) 349]. We have carefully re-derived the relevant formulas and cannot see that the rescaling of results is justified. Curiously previous DFT calculations agree quite well with the revised results for TlI and Pb

  9. Nuclear size effects in rotational spectra: A tale with a twist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, Stefan, E-mail: knecht@ifk.sdu.dk [Department of Physics and Chemistry, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M (Denmark); Saue, Trond, E-mail: trond.saue@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique (CNRS UMR 5626), IRSAMC, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex (France)

    2012-06-05

    Graphical abstract: Molecular field shift: 4-Component relativistic calibration calculations show a coincidence of errors in previous theoretical and experimental studies of nuclear volume effects in the rotational spectra of diatomics. The central quantity for the calculation of corrections to the rotational Dunham coefficient Y{sub 01} is the derivative of the electron density with respect to internuclear distance, here shown for the TlI molecule. Abstract: We report a 4-component relativistic benchmark study of the isotopic field shift in the rotational spectrum of three diatomic molecules: TlI, PbTe and PtSi. A central quantity in the theory is the derivative with respect to internuclear distance of an effective electron density associated with a given nucleus, calculated at the equilibrium distance. The effective density, which is related to the mean electron density within the nuclear volume, is usually replaced with the contact density, that is, the electron density at the origin of the nucleus. Our computational study shows that for the chosen systems this induces errors on the order of 10%, which is not acceptable for high-precision work. On the other hand, the systematic nature of the error suggests that it can be handled by an atom-specific correction factor. Our calibration study reveals that relativistic effects increase the contact density gradient by about an order of magnitude, and that the proper transformation of the associated property operator is mandatory in 1- and 2-component relativistic calculations. Our results show very good agreement with the experimental data presented by Schlembach and Tiemann [Chem. Phys. 68 (1982) 21], but disagree completely with the revised results given by the same group in a later paper [Chem. Phys. 93 (1985) 349]. We have carefully re-derived the relevant formulas and cannot see that the rescaling of results is justified. Curiously previous DFT calculations agree quite well with the revised results for TlI and Pb

  10. Comparisons of experimental beta-ray spectra important to decay heat predictions with ENSDF [Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File] evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.

    1990-03-01

    Graphical comparisons of recently obtained experimental beta-ray spectra with predicted beta-ray spectra based on the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File are exhibited for 77 fission products having masses 79--99 and 130--146 and lifetimes between 0.17 and 23650 sec. The comparisons range from very poor to excellent. For beta decay of 47 nuclides, estimates are made of ground-state transition intensities. For 14 cases the value in ENSDF gives results in very good agreement with the experimental data. 12 refs., 77 figs., 1 tab

  11. Dynamics of hot spots in the DPF-78 plasma focus from x-ray spectra and REB emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.; Wang, X.X.

    1995-01-01

    The X-ray emission from hot spots in the plasma focus DPF-78 was investigated with the help of two X-ray quartz crystal spectrometers of the Johann type and a 4 fold magnifying X-ray pinhole camera. In the experiments the working gas was chosen to be 300 Pa deuterium with 20 Pa argon admixture. X-ray spectra in the wavelength range from 3.55 angstrom to 4.0 angstrom, including H-like and He-like Argon lines, were recorded on Kodak DEF-2 film. From the spatially resolved spectra recorded side-on, a relative spectral shift between different hot spots of the same shot was often observed. The shift could be attributed to the Doppler shift. From spectral characteristics such as intensities and FWHM of Ar resonant and intercombination lines electron densities of up to 3 x 10 27 m -3 were determined. Radial dimensions of the hot spots ranging from about 140 microm to 300 microm were found from pinhole pictures applying the penumbra method. Usually two pulses of relativistic electron beams were observed using Cherenkov detectors in a magnetic spectrometer. The energy of the first pulse, which was emitted at the time of maximum compression, was higher than that of the second pulse. The measured FWHM of the REB pulses ranges from 3 ns to about 10 ns. The characteristics of the time-integrated X-ray spectra and the time resolved REB spectra and their dependence on the composition of the filling gas are discussed

  12. Determining misorientation of graphite grains from the angular dependence of X-ray emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belavin, V. V.; Okotrub, A. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Kotosonov, A. S.; Vyalykh, D. V.; Molodtsov, S. L.

    2006-01-01

    Angular-resolved X-ray absorption spectra were measured for pyrolytic graphite samples of various quality. A new approach to determining the misorientation of graphite grains in polycrystalline samples is proposed, which is based on calculations of the angular dependence of the relative intensity of a peak corresponding to the π* state for a normal distribution of grains. The experimental values are used to construct theoretical angular dependences using partial densities of the π* and σ* states determined from the nonempirical calculations for graphite

  13. Measurement of leakage neutron spectra from silicon carbide cylinders with D–T neutrons and validation of evaluated nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, F.; Han, R.; Nie, Y.; Chen, Z.; Zhang, S.; Shi, F.; Lin, W.; Ren, P.; Tian, G.; Sun, Q.; Gou, B.; Ruan, X.; Ren, J.; Ye, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Evaluated data for SiC are validated by a high precision benchmark experiment. • Leakage neutron spectra from SiC cylinders are measured at 60° and 120° using time-of-flight method. • The experimental results are compared with the MCNP-4C calculations with ENDF-BVII.1, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries. • The SiC evaluated nuclear data from CENDL-3.1 library was checked for the first time and proved to be reliable. - Abstract: Benchmarking of evaluated nuclear data libraries was performed for 14 MeV neutrons on silicon carbide samples. The experiments were carried out by using the benchmark experimental facility at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The leakage neutron spectra from SiC (Φ13 cm × 20 cm) at 60° and 120° and SiC (Φ13 cm × 2 cm) at 60° were measured by the TOF method. The measured spectra are well reproduced by MCNP-4C calculations with the CENDL-3.1, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 evaluated nuclear data libraries, except 5–8 MeV range for 20 cm thickness. The discrepancies are mostly considered as caused by the improper evaluation of the angular distribution and secondary neutron energy distribution of the elastic scattering and inelastic scattering in evaluated nuclear data libraries.

  14. Measurement of leakage neutron spectra from silicon carbide cylinders with D–T neutrons and validation of evaluated nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, F. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Han, R. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Data, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Nie, Y. [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Data, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Chen, Z., E-mail: zqchen@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, S. [College of Physics Electronic Information, Inner Mongolia University for the Nationalities, Tongliao 028000 (China); Shi, F.; Lin, W.; Ren, P.; Tian, G.; Sun, Q.; Gou, B. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Ruan, X.; Ren, J. [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Data, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Ye, M. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Evaluated data for SiC are validated by a high precision benchmark experiment. • Leakage neutron spectra from SiC cylinders are measured at 60° and 120° using time-of-flight method. • The experimental results are compared with the MCNP-4C calculations with ENDF-BVII.1, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries. • The SiC evaluated nuclear data from CENDL-3.1 library was checked for the first time and proved to be reliable. - Abstract: Benchmarking of evaluated nuclear data libraries was performed for 14 MeV neutrons on silicon carbide samples. The experiments were carried out by using the benchmark experimental facility at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The leakage neutron spectra from SiC (Φ13 cm × 20 cm) at 60° and 120° and SiC (Φ13 cm × 2 cm) at 60° were measured by the TOF method. The measured spectra are well reproduced by MCNP-4C calculations with the CENDL-3.1, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 evaluated nuclear data libraries, except 5–8 MeV range for 20 cm thickness. The discrepancies are mostly considered as caused by the improper evaluation of the angular distribution and secondary neutron energy distribution of the elastic scattering and inelastic scattering in evaluated nuclear data libraries.

  15. A panel cointegration analysis of CO2 emissions, nuclear energy and income in major nuclear generating countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jungho

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This study revisits the nuclear-energy-growth-CO 2 emissions nexus. • A panel cointegration analysis is employed. • Nuclear energy has a beneficial effect on reducing CO 2 emissions. • CO 2 emissions decrease with economic growth. - Abstract: A number of studies have examined the effect of nuclear energy on CO 2 emissions, and a lot has been learned from these studies. Due to their weaknesses in modeling approaches and variable uses, however, properly constructed and comprehensive analyses are limited. The main objective of this study is thus to contribute to the debate over nuclear energy and the environment with an enhanced model and variables. For this, a panel cointegration analysis is applied to quantify the effects of nuclear energy, energy consumption and income on CO 2 emissions in 12 major nuclear generating countries. The results show that nuclear energy tends to reduce CO 2 emissions. It is also found that CO 2 emissions tend to decrease monotonically with income growth, providing no evidence in support of the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) for CO 2 emissions

  16. CO2 emissions, nuclear energy, renewable energy and economic growth in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menyah, Kojo; Wolde-Rufael, Yemane

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the causal relationship between carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, renewable and nuclear energy consumption and real GDP for the US for the period 1960-2007. Using a modified version of the Granger causality test, we found a unidirectional causality running from nuclear energy consumption to CO 2 emissions without feedback but no causality running from renewable energy to CO 2 emissions. The econometric evidence seems to suggest that nuclear energy consumption can help to mitigate CO 2 emissions, but so far, renewable energy consumption has not reached a level where it can make a significant contribution to emissions reduction.

  17. Studying the complex spectral line profiles in the spectra of hot emission stars and quasars .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danezis, E.; Lyratzi, E.; Antoniou, A.; Popović, L. Č.; Dimitrijević, M. S.

    Some Hot Emission Stars and AGNs present peculiar spectral line profiles which are due to DACs and SACs phenomena. The origin and the mechanisms which are responsible for the creation of DACs/SACs is an important problem that has been studied by many researchers. This paper is a review of our efforts to study the origin and the mechanisms of these phenomena. At first we present a theoretic ad hoc picture for the structure of the plasma that surrounds the specific category of hot emission stars that present DACs or SACs. Then we present the mathematical model that we constructed, which is based on the properties of the above ad hoc theoretical structure. Finally, we present some results from our statistical studies that prove the consistency of our model with the classical physical theory.

  18. Investigation on the spatial evolution of the emission spectra in laser-induced Ni plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Chuanmei; Xu Ying; Zhang Mingxu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the spatial resolved emission spectrum of Ni atom in laser induced Ni plasma is measured in the wavelength region from 350 nm to 600 nm. The spatial evolution of the relative intensities and the Stark broadening of the 385.83 nm emission spectrum lines are also obtained. It is shown that Stark broadening and intensity of the spectrum lines increases firstly to its maximum and then de- creases along the direction of laser beam when the distance from the target surface is in the range from 0 to 2.5 mm. The maximum value of Stark broadening and relative intensity of the spectrum lines appear at 1.5 mm from the target surface. (authors)

  19. Theory of emission spectra from metal films irradiated by low energy electrons near normal incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretschmann, E.; Callcott, T.A.; Arakawa, E.T.

    1980-01-01

    The emission spectrum produced by low energy electrons incident on a rough metal surface has been calculated for a roughness auto-correlation function containing a prominent peak at a high wave vector. For low energy electrons near normal incidence, the high wavevector peak dominates the roughness coupled surface plasmon radiation (RCSPR) process. The calculation yields estimates of the ratio of RCSPR to transition radiation, the dependence of emission intensity on electron energy and the shape and position of the RCSPR peak. The most interesting result is that the high-wavevector roughness can split the RCSPR radiation into peaks lying above and below the asymptotic surface plasma frequency. The results are compared with data from Ag in the following paper. (orig.)

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectra of 7 Hα emission line stars in MBM 18 (Brand+ 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, J.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.; Magnani, L.

    2012-10-01

    Data in tabular form (wavelength and flux) are presented of the spectra of seven candidate Hα emission line stars in the direction of translucent cloud MBM 18. The data were obtained on 5 different nights in 2009 and 2010 with the 3.58-m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG; La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain). The spectra are shown in the appendix of the paper, only visible in the on line version. The spectra were taken with the low-resolution spectrograph DOLORES on the TNG, using long-slit spectroscopy. We used grism VHR-R, which covers a wavelength range of 6240-7720 Angstrom with a dispersion of 0.80Å/pix. The scale of the CCD detector is 0.252 arcsec/pixel. The observations were carried out with a slit width of 1 or 1.5 arcsec, depending on the seeing, resulting in a spectral resolution of 3.2Å and 4.8Å, respectively. To avoid problems with cosmic rays, 2 to 4 separate spectra per star were obtained. Two of the stars (Ha4 and Ha6) were observed simultaneously with another target (Ha1 and Ha5, respectively) by positioning the slit at an appropriate angle. The integration time was based on the brighter star in the slit, thus the signal-to-noise ratio for the other target is smaller than for the primary one. To allow absolute flux calibration the standard star Feige24 or Feige34 (for Ha5-Ha6) was observed immediately before or after the target observations, using the same instrumental setup as for the target observations. Flat-fielding was performed using 10 (5 for Ha5-Ha6) frames, which were uniformly illuminated by a halogen lamp. Wavelength calibration was performed using an arc-spectrum of an Ar, Ne+Hg, and Kr lamp, or a Ne+Hg (for Ha7) comparison lamp. A bias frame, to be subtracted from the other frames before analysis, was constructed from ten individual bias frames. Flat-, arc-, and bias-frames were obtained on the same day as the science observations and with the same instrumental setup. Data were reduced with the IRAF package. From all science frames a

  1. Dominant role of dielectron satellites in emission spectra of laser plasma near target surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozmej, F.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that satellite structures of resonance lines may become more intensive than resonance lines themselves. The experimental and theoretical studies show that the conditions whereby the satellite structures become predominant in the plasma emission spectrum, are sufficiently easily realized in the experiment and moreover they obviously will present typical cases by studies on the plasma condensed areas in the experiments on inertial thermonuclear synthesis and by investigation of plasma, created through pico- and femtosecond laser pulses of high contrast

  2. Dynamical and many-body correlation effects in the kinetic energy spectra of isotopes produced in nuclear multifragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, S. R.; Donangelo, R.; Lynch, W. G.; Tsang, M. B.

    2018-03-01

    The properties of the kinetic energy spectra of light isotopes produced in the breakup of a nuclear source and during the de-excitation of its products are examined. The initial stage, at which the hot fragments are created, is modeled by the statistical multifragmentation model, whereas the Weisskopf-Ewing evaporation treatment is adopted to describe the subsequent fragment de-excitation, as they follow their classical trajectories dictated by the Coulomb repulsion among them. The energy spectra obtained are compared to available experimental data. The influence of the fusion cross section entering into the evaporation treatment is investigated and its influence on the qualitative aspects of the energy spectra turns out to be small. Although these aspects can be fairly well described by the model, the underlying physics associated with the quantitative discrepancies remains to be understood.

  3. Neutron spectra calculation and doses in a subcritical nuclear reactor based on thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina C, D.; Hernandez A, P. L.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R.; Sajo B, L.

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes a heterogeneous subcritical nuclear reactor with molten salts based on thorium, with graphite moderator and a source of 252 Cf, whose dose levels in the periphery allows its use in teaching and research activities. The design was done by the Monte Carlo method with the code MCNP5 where the geometry, dimensions and fuel was varied in order to obtain the best design. The result is a cubic reactor of 110 cm side with graphite moderator and reflector. In the central part they have 9 ducts that were placed in the direction of axis Y. The central duct contains the source of 252 Cf, of 8 other ducts, are two irradiation ducts and the other six contain a molten salt ( 7 LiF - BeF 2 - ThF 4 - UF 4 ) as fuel. For design the k eff , neutron spectra and ambient dose equivalent was calculated. In the first instance the above calculation for a virgin fuel was called case 1, then a percentage of 233 U was used and the percentage of Th was decreased and was called case 2. This with the purpose to compare two different fuels working inside the reactor. In the case 1 a value was obtained for the k eff of 0.13 and case 2 of 0.28, maintaining the subcriticality in both cases. In the dose levels the higher value is in case 2 in the axis Y with a value of 3.31 e-3 ±1.6% p Sv/Q this value is reported in for one. With this we can calculate the exposure time of personnel working in the reactor. (Author)

  4. New method for measuring time-resolved spectra of lanthanide emission using square-wave excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Cai, Wei; Duan, Qianqian; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-01-01

    A method using modulated continuous wave (CW) visible laser to measure time-resolved fluorescence spectra of trivalent rare-earth ions has been developed. Electro-optic modulator was used to modulate the CW pumping laser with a rise time of 2 μs. CW Nd 3+ lasers were used as examples to present the method. Upconversion dynamic process of Ho 3+ was studied utilizing a 532 nm CW laser. Quantum cutting dynamic process from Tb 3+ to Yb 3+ was analyzed by a 473 nm CW laser. This method can be applied to any CW laser such as He-Ne laser, Ar + laser, Kr + laser, Ti:sapphire laser, etc

  5. High resolution emission spectra of H2 and D2 near 80 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larzilliere, M.; Roncin, J.-Y.; Launay, F.

    1980-01-01

    A few lines have been observed in the far ultraviolet emission spectrum of molecular hydrogen and deuterium. They are assigned to transitions from levels of the 3pπD 1 PIsub(u)sup(-) state, lying above the dissociation limit into H(ls) + H(n=2), near 84.5 nm, and, for some of them, above the first ionization limit near 80.4 nm, the lower state being X 1 Σsub(g)sup(+) (v''=1). This is in fair agreement with measured predissociation and preionization yields. Accurate line position measurements lead to molecular constants in very good agreement with theoretical calculations

  6. A comparison of experiment, CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, and TIGER net electron emission coefficients for various bremsstrahlung spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, W.P.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Snowden, D.P.; Van Lint, V.A.J.; Beale, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    This work compares a carefully designed experiment to measure photoemission with the predictions of three different codes (CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, and TIGER) for the complex bremsstrahlung spectra typical of very intense pulsed power x-ray generators. The Monte Carlo codes TIGER and TIGERP can calculate the net photon-induced electron emission but accurate results may require that statistical error be minimized. CEPXS/ONETRAN is a new deterministic coupled electron/photon transport code that is faster than Monte Carlo and is not subject to statistical error. The comparison of net yields is a sensitive test of the relative accuracy and efficiency of these various codes. The authors find that all of the codes substantially agree with the experiments for the forward net yields. However, for reverse net yields from high-Z materials, the codes overpredict relative to measurements

  7. Theoretical emission line ratios for [Fe III] and [Fe VII] applicable to the optical and infrared spectra of gaseous nebulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, F P; Aller, L H; Ryans, R S; Hyung, S

    2001-08-14

    Recent calculations of electron impact excitation rates and Einstein A-coefficients for transitions among the 3d(6) levels of Fe III and among the 3d(2) levels of Fe VII are used to derive theoretical emission line ratios applicable to the optical and infrared spectra of gaseous nebulae. Results for [Fe III] are generated for electron temperatures T(e) = 7,000-20,000 K and densities N(e) = 10(2)-10(8) cm(-3), whereas those for [Fe VII] are provided for T(e) = 10,000-30,000 K and N(e) = 10(2)-10(8) cm(-3). The theoretical line ratios are significantly different in some instances from earlier calculations and resolve discrepancies between theory and observation found for the planetary nebulae IC 4997 and NGC 7027.

  8. The x-ray emission spectra of multicharged xenon ions in a gas puff laser-produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skobelev, I.Yu.; Dyakin, V.M.; Faenov, A.Ya. [Multicharged Ion Spectra Data Center, VNIIFTRI, Mendeleevo (Russian Federation); Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Biemont, E. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire Experimentale, Universite de Liege, Liege (Belgium); Astrophysique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Mons-Hainaut, Mons (Belgium); Quinet, P. [Astrophysique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Mons-Hainaut, Mons (Belgium); Nilsen, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Behar, E.; Doron, R.; Mandelbaum, P.; Schwob, J.L. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem (Israel)

    1999-01-14

    Emission spectra of multicharged xenon ions produced by a laser gas puff are observed with high spectral resolution in the 8.5-9.5 and 17-19 A wavelength ranges. Three different theoretical methods are employed to obtain 3l-n'l'(n' = 4 to 10) wavelengths and Einstein coefficients for Ni-like Xe{sup 26+}. For the 3d-4p transitions, very good agreement is found between the experimental wavelengths and the various theoretical wavelengths. These accurate energy level measurements can be useful for studying the Ni-like xenon x-ray laser scheme. On the other hand, several intense spectral lines could not be identified as 3l-n'l' lines of Ni-like xenon, despite the very good agreement between the wavelengths and Einstein coefficients calculated for these transitions using the three different methods. (author)

  9. Emission lines of [K V] in the optical spectra of gaseous nebulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Francis P; Aller, Lawrence H; Espey, Brian R; Exter, Katrina M; Hyung, Siek; Keenan, Michael T C; Pollacco, Don L; Ryans, Robert S I

    2002-04-02

    Recent R-matrix calculations of electron impact excitation rates in K v are used to derive the nebular emission line ratio R = I(4122.6 A)/I(4163.3 A) as a function of electron density (N(e)). This ratio is found to be very sensitive to changes in N(e) over the density range 10(3) to 10(6) cm(-3), but does not vary significantly with electron temperature, and hence in principle should provide an excellent optical N(e) diagnostic for the high-excitation zones of nebulae. The observed value of R for the planetary nebula NGC 7027, measured from a spectrum obtained with the Hamilton Echelle spectrograph on the 3-m Shane Telescope, implies a density in excellent agreement with that derived from [Ne iv], formed in the same region of the nebula as [K v]. This observation provides observational support for the accuracy of the theoretical [K v] line ratios, and hence the atomic data on which they are based. However, the analysis of a high-resolution spectrum of the symbiotic star RR Telescopii, obtained with the University College London Echelle Spectrograph on the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope, reveals that the [K v] 4122.6 A line in this object is badly blended with Fe ii 4122.6 A. Hence, the [K v] diagnostic may not be used for astrophysical sources that show a strong Fe ii emission line spectrum.

  10. Position Dependent Spontaneous Emission Spectra of a Λ-Type Atomic System Embedded in a Defective Photonic Crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entezar, S. Roshan

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the position dependent spontaneous emission spectra of a Λ-type three-level atom with one transition coupled to the free vacuum reservoir and the other one coupled to a double-band photonic band gap reservoir with a defect mode in the band gap. It is shown that, for the atom at the defect location, we have a two-peak spectrum with a wide dark line due to the strong coupling between the atom and the defect mode. While, when the atom is far from the defect location (or in the absence of the defect mode), the spectrum has three peaks with two dark lines due to the coupling between the atom and the photonic band gap reservoir with the largest density of states near the band edges. On the other hand, we have a four-peak spectrum for the atom at the space in between. Moreover, the average spontaneous emission spectra of the atoms uniformly embedded in high dielectric or low dielectric regions are described. It is shown that the atoms embedded in high (low) dielectric regions far from the defect location, effectively couple to the modes of the lower (upper) photonic band. However, the atoms embedded in high dielectric or low dielectric regions at the defect location, are coupled mainly to the defect modes. While, the atoms uniformly embedded in high (low) dielectric regions with a normal distance from the defect location, are coupled to both of defect and lower (upper) photonic band modes. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  11. Using violet laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra for crop yield assessment of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp) varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K.; Tetteh, Jonathan P.

    2004-07-01

    The use of violet laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) emission spectra to monitor the growth of five varieties of cowpea in the University of Cape Coast Botanical Garden is presented. Radiation from a continuous-wave violet laser diode emitting at 396 nm through a fibre is closely incident on in vivo leaves of cowpea to excite chlorophyll fluorescence, which is detected by an integrated spectrometer with CCD readout. The chlorophyll fluorescence spectra with peaks at 683 and 731 nm were used for growth monitoring of the cowpea plants over three weeks and analysed using Gaussian spectral functions with curve fitted parameters to determine the peak positions, area under the spectral curve and the intensity ratio F683/F731. The variation in the intensity ratio of the chlorophyll bands showed sensitive changes indicating the photosynthetic activity of the cowpea varieties. A discussion of the fluorescence result as compared to conventional assessment is presented with regard to discrimination between the cowpea varieties in terms of crop yield performance.

  12. Anomaly in the P- and R- branches in the spectra of hydrogen Fulcher band emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kado, Shinichiro; Yamasaki, Daisuke; Iida, Yohei; Xiao Bingjia

    2004-01-01

    Anomalies in the Fulcher-band (d 3 Π u -a 3 Σ g + ) spectra, which are widely used for the purpose of measuring ro-vibronic structure of the hydrogen molecule, are investigated using the hollow cathode glow discharge of 230 V-70 mA at 30 Pa. By making use of the recently developed analyzing scheme and experimentally determined life-time of the state involved, the historical data in the Ginsburg and Dieke's publication are reanalyzed and compared with our present data. Populations of the vibronic state v' ≥ 4 in the Q branch can be corrected to a considerable extend by taking into account the lifetime of the states, while those of any v' in the P and R branches cannot. However, the average values of the upper-Fulcher populations deduced from the P and R branches coincide with those from Q branch by taking into consideration the difference in the excitation from the ground electronic state. (author)

  13. An assessment of acoustic emission for nuclear pressure vessel monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scruby, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    Recent research has greatly improved our understanding of the basic mechanisms of deformation and fracture that generate detectable acoustic emission signals in structural steels. A critical review of the application of acoustic emission (AE) to the fabrication, proof testing and in-service monitoring of nuclear pressure vessels is presented in the light of this improved understanding. The detectability of deformation and fracture processes in pressure vessel steels is discussed, and recommendations made for improving source location accuracy and the development of quantitative source assessment techniques. Published data suggest that AE can make an important contribution to fabrication monitoring, and to the detection of defects in lower toughness materials during vessel proof testing. In high toughness materials, however, the signals generated during ductile crack growth may frequently be too weak for reliable detection. The feasibility of AE for continuous monitoring has not yet been adequately demonstrated because of high background noise levels and uncertainty about AE signal strengths from the defect growth processes that occur in service. In-service leak detection by AE shows considerable promise. It is recommended that further tests are carried out with realistic defects, and under realistic conditions of loading (including thermal shock and fatigue) and of environment. (author)

  14. Nuclear medicine and positron emission tomography: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, T.J.; Schwarz, S.W.; Welch, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is the field of medical practice that involves the oral or intravenous administration of radioactive materials for use in diagnosis and therapy. The majority of radiopharmaceutical available are used for diagnostic purposes. These involve the determination of organ function, shape, or position from an image of the radioactivity distribution within an organ or at a location within the body. After administration, the radiopharmaceutical localizes within an organ or target tissue due to its biological or physiologic characteristics. This diagnostic capability is usually the result of the emission of gamma radiation from the radiopharmaceutical localized within an organ. This allows for external detection and imaging using a special type of camera known as a gamma camera. When a positron-emitting radionuclide decays, a positron (positive electron) is emitted from the nucleus. The positron then annihilates with an electron, resulting in the release of energy in the form of two 511-KeV γ-rays at 180 degree to one another. The energy of these photons is sufficient to pass through tissue. Thus, placing a series of detectors around the patient allows technicians to monitor the emission of both of the photons that result from a single positron annihilation. this ultimately allows an accurate quantification of the distribution of radioactivity in the body not possible when only a single γ-ray is emitted

  15. Investigation of the neutron emission spectra of some deformed nuclei for (n, xn) reactions up to 26 MeV energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, A.; Bueyuekuslu, H.; Tel, E.; Aydin, A.; Boeluekdemir, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, neutron-emission spectra produced by (n, xn) reactions up to 26 MeV for some deformed target nuclei as 165 Ho, 181 Ta, 184 W, 232 Th and 238 U have been investigated. Also, the mean free path parameter's effect for 9n, xn) neutron-emission spectra has been examined. In the calculations, pre-equilibrium neutron-emission spectra have been calculated by using new evaluated hybrid model and geometry dependent hybrid model, full exciton model and cascade exciton model. The reaction equilibrium component has been calculated by Weisskopf-Ewing model. The obtained results have been discussed and compared with the available experimental data and found agreement with each other. (author)

  16. Cosmic ray and neutrino emission from gamma-ray bursts with a nuclear cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, D.; Boncioli, D.; Fedynitch, A.; Winter, W.

    2018-04-01

    Aim. We discuss neutrino and cosmic ray emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the injection of nuclei, where we take into account that a nuclear cascade from photodisintegration can fully develop in the source. Our main objective is to test whether recent results from the IceCube and the Pierre Auger Observatory can be accommodated within the paradigm that GRBs are the sources of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). Methods: We simulate this scenario in a combined source-propagation model. While our key results are obtained using an internal shock model of the source, we discuss how the secondary emission from a GRB shell can be interpreted in terms of other astrophysical models. Results: We demonstrate that the expected neutrino flux from GRBs weakly depends on the injection composition for the same injection spectra and luminosities, which implies that prompt neutrinos from GRBs can efficiently test the GRB-UHECR paradigm even if the UHECRs are nuclei. We show that the UHECR spectrum and composition, as measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory, can be self-consistently reproduced. In an attempt to describe the energy range including the ankle, we find tension with the IceCube bounds from the GRB stacking analyses. In an alternative scenario, where only the UHECRs beyond the ankle originate from GRBs, the requirement for a joint description of cosmic ray and neutrino observations favors lower luminosities, which does not correspond to the typical expectation from γ-ray observations.

  17. Ion temperatures in HIP-1 and SUMMA from charge-exchange neutral optical emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patch, R. W.; Lauver, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Ion temperatures were obtained from observations of the H sub alpha, D sub alpha, and He 587.6 nm lines emitted from hydrogen, deuterium, and helium plasmas in the SUMMA and HIP-1 mirror devices at Lewis Research Center. Steady state discharges were formed by applying a radially inward dc electric field between cylindrical or annular anodes and hollow cathodes located at the peaks of the mirrors. The ion temperatures were found from the Doppler broadening of the charge-exchange components of spectral lines. A statistical method was developed for obtaining scaling relations of ion temperature as a function of current, voltage, and magnetic flux density. Derivations are given that take into account triangular monochromator slit functions, loss cones, and superimposed charge-exchange processes. In addition, the Doppler broadening was found to be sensitive to the influence of drift on charge-exchange cross section. The effects of finite ion-cyclotron radius, cascading, and delayed emission are reviewed.

  18. Optical emission spectra of a copper plasma produced by a metal vapour vacuum arc plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yotsombat, B.; Poolcharuansin, P.; Vilaithong, T.; Davydov, S.; Brown, I.G.

    2001-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy in the range 200-800 nm was applied for investigation of the copper plasma produced by a metal vapour vacuum arc plasma source. The experiments were conducted for the cases when the plasma was guided by straight and Ω-shaped curved solenoids as well as without solenoids, and also for different vacuum conditions. It was found that, besides singly- and doubly-charged ions, a relatively high concentration of excited neutral copper atoms was present in the plasma. The relative fraction of excited atoms was much higher in the region close to the cathode surface than in the plasma column inside the solenoid. The concentration of excited neutral, singly- and doubly-ionized atoms increased proportionally when the arc current was increased to 400 A. Some weak lines were attributed to more highly ionized copper species and impurities in the cathode material. (author)

  19. THE LOCAL DUST FOREGROUNDS IN THE MICROWAVE SKY. I. THERMAL EMISSION SPECTRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikarev, Valeri; Preuss, Oliver; Solanki, Sami; Krueger, Harald; Krivov, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Analyses of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation maps made by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) have revealed anomalies not predicted by the standard inflationary cosmology. In particular, the power of the quadrupole moment of the CMB fluctuations is remarkably low, and the quadrupole and octopole moments are aligned mutually and with the geometry of the solar system. It has been suggested in the literature that microwave sky pollution by an unidentified dust cloud in the vicinity of the solar system may be the cause for these anomalies. In this paper, we simulate the thermal emission by clouds of spherical homogeneous particles of several materials. Spectral constraints from the WMAP multi-wavelength data and earlier infrared observations on the hypothetical dust cloud are used to determine the dust cloud's physical characteristics. In order for its emissivity to demonstrate a flat, CMB-like wavelength dependence over the WMAP wavelengths (3 through 14 mm), and to be invisible in the infrared light, its particles must be macroscopic. Silicate spheres of several millimeters in size and carbonaceous particles an order of magnitude smaller will suffice. According to our estimates of the abundance of such particles in the zodiacal cloud and trans-Neptunian belt, yielding the optical depths of the order of 10 -7 for each cloud, the solar system dust can well contribute 10 μK (within an order of magnitude) in the microwaves. This is not only intriguingly close to the magnitude of the anomalies (about 30 μK), but also alarmingly above the presently believed magnitude of systematic biases of the WMAP results (below 5 μK) and, to an even greater degree, of the future missions with higher sensitivities, e.g., Planck.

  20. X-ray emission spectra of the plasma produced by an ultrashort laser pulse in cluster targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenz, C; Bagnoud, V; Blasco, F; Roche, J R; Salin, F; Faenov, A Ya; Skobelev, I Yu; Magunov, A I; Pikuz, T A

    2000-01-01

    The first observation of x-ray emission spectra of multiply charged ions in the plasma produced by a 35-fs laser pulse with an intensity up to 10 17 W cm -2 in CO 2 and Kr gas jet targets is reported. The emission in the wavelength ranges of the 1snp-1s 2 (n=3-6) transitions of O VII ions and the Ly α line of O VIII ions, as well as of the (2s 1/2 2p 6 3p 3/2 ) 1 -2s 2 2p 6 1 S 0 and (2s 1/2 2p 6 3p 1/2 ) 1 -2s 2 2p 6 1 S 0 lines of Ne-like KrXXVII ions testifies that the highly ionised plasma is formed by collision processes in clusters. Modelling the shape of the spectral lines of oxygen ions by including the principal mechanisms of broadening and absorption in optically dense plasmas reveals that the main contribution to the time-integrated intensity is made by the plasma with the parameters N e =(2-20)x10 20 cm -3 and T e =100 - 115 eV. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  1. Measurement of leakage neutron spectra for Tungsten with D-T neutrons and validation of evaluated nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.; Chen, Z.; Nie, Y.; Wada, R.; Ruan, X.; Han, R.; Liu, X.; Lin, W.; Liu, J.; Shi, F.; Ren, P.; Tian, G.; Luo, F.; Ren, J.; Bao, J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Evaluated data for Tungsten are validated by integral experiment. • Leakage neutron spectra from the irradiation of D-T neutrons on Tungsten are measured at 60° and 120° by using a time-of-flight method. • The measured results are compared to the MCNP-4C calculated ones with evaluated data of the different libraries. - Abstract: Integral neutronics experiments have been investigated at Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMP, CAS) in order to validate evaluated nuclear data related to the design of Chinese Initiative Accelerator Driven Systems (CIADS). In the present paper, the accuracy of evaluated nuclear data for Tungsten has been examined by comparing measured leakage neutron spectra with calculated ones. Leakage neutron spectra from the irradiation of D-T neutrons on Tungsten slab sample were experimentally measured at 60° and 120° by using a time-of-flight method. Theoretical calculations are carried out by Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP-4C with evaluated nuclear data of the ADS-2.0, ENDF/B-VII.0, ENDF/B-VII.1, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries. From the comparisons, it is found that the calculations with ADS-2.0 and ENDF/B-VII.1 give good agreements with the experiments in the whole energy regions at 60°, while a large discrepancy is observed at 120° in the elastic scattering peak, caused by a slight difference in the oscillation pattern of the elastic angular distribution at angles larger than 20°. However, the calculated spectra using data from ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries showed larger discrepancies with the measured ones, especially around 8.5–13.5 MeV. Further studies are presented for these disagreements

  2. Abatement of CO2 emissions by way of enhancing the efficiency of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienle, F.

    1995-01-01

    Contributing about one third of the overall electricity supplied by the public utilities in 1994, nuclear power as in the previous years has been one of the major pillars of electricity supply in Germany. The approx. 150 billion kWh generated by the nuclear power plants represent reliable electricity supply around the clock, and free of CO 2 emissions, or SO 2 emissions, or NO x . Comparing nuclear generation with the electricity output contributed by conventional power plants in Germany, nuclear generation can also be expressed in terms of emissions avoided, which in 1994 meant: almost 150 million tons of CO 2 , equivalent to about 16 % of the aggregate annual CO 2 emissions; 110.000 tons of SO 2 , equivalent to about 11 % of aggregate annual SO 2 emissions; 125.000 tons of NO x , equivalent to 5 % of aggregate, annual NO x emissions. (orig.) [de

  3. Energy levels of 4f3 in the Nd3+ free ion from emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyart, Jean-Francois; Meftah, Ali; Bachelier, Annik; Sinzelle, Jocelyne; Tchang-Brillet, Wan-Ue Lydia; Champion, Norbert; Spector, Nissan; Sugar, Jack

    2006-01-01

    The emission spectrum of neodymium produced by vacuum spark sources was observed in the vacuum ultraviolet on two normal-incidence spectrographs. In an initial result, more than 550 lines have been identified as transitions from 85 4f 2 5d levels to 37 levels of the 4f 3 ground configuration in the free ion Nd 3+ . The levels 4f 34 F 3/2 and 4 I 11/2 , responsible for the well-known 1064 nm laser line, have respective positions of 11 698.57 ±0.1 cm -1 and 1897.07 ±0.1 cm -1 above the ground level 4 I 9/2 . The newly found levels of 4f 3 constitute the first isolated 4f N configuration (N > 2) and therefore enable checks of effective parameters that represent far configuration interaction. Slater parameters F k (4f, 4f) derived from Nd 3+ :LaCl 3 are 3% to 5% smaller than in the free ion. (letter to the editor)

  4. Local moments and electronic correlations in Fe-based Heusler alloys: Kα x-ray emission spectra measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svyazhin, Artem; Kurmaev, Ernst; Shreder, Elena; Shamin, Sergey; Sahle, Christoph J.

    2016-01-01

    Heusler alloys are a property-rich class of materials, intensively investigated today from both theoretical and real-world application points of view. In this paper, we attempt to shed light on the role of electronic correlations in the Fe_2MeAl group (where Me represents all 3d elements from Ti to Ni) of Heusler alloys. For this purpose, we have investigated the local moments of iron by means of the x-ray emission spectroscopy technique. To obtain numerical values of local moments, the Kα-FWHM method has been employed for the first time. In every compound of the group, the presence of a local moment on the Fe atom was detected. As has been revealed, the values of these moments are temperature-independent, pointing to an insufficiency of a pure itinerant approach to magnetism in these alloys. We also comprehensively compare the usage of Kβ main lines and Kα spectra as tools for the probing of local moments and point out the significant advantages of the latter. - Highlights: • Local spin moments of iron in Fe_2MeAl (Me = Ti … Ni) Heusler alloys were investigated by means of x-ray emission spectroscopy. • Independence of the local moments from temperature confirms their localized nature. • A local moment value of iron in Fe_2MeAl raises with the atomic number of element Me. • The applicability of the Kα x-ray emission line for extracting local moment values of 3d elements was established.

  5. Dose estimation for nuclear power plant 4 accident in Taiwan at Fukushima nuclear meltdown emission level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mei-Ling; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Kuo, Pei-Hsuan

    2016-05-01

    An advanced Gaussian trajectory dispersion model is used to evaluate the evacuation zone due to a nuclear meltdown at the Nuclear Power Plant 4 (NPP4) in Taiwan, with the same emission level as that occurred at Fukushima nuclear meltdown (FNM) in 2011. Our study demonstrates that a FNM emission level would pollute 9% of the island's land area with annual effective dose ≥50 mSv using the meteorological data on 11 March 2011 in Taiwan. This high dose area is also called permanent evacuation zone (denoted as PEZ). The PEZ as well as the emergency-planning zone (EPZ) are found to be sensitive to meteorological conditions on the event. In a sunny day under the dominated NE wind conditions, the EPZ can be as far as 100 km with the first 7-day dose ≥20 mSv. Three hundred sixty-five daily events using the meteorological data from 11 March 2011 to 9 March 2012 are evaluated. It is found that the mean land area of Taiwan in becoming the PEZ is 11%. Especially, the probabilities of the northern counties/cities (Keelung, New Taipei, Taipei, Taoyuan, Hsinchu City, Hsinchu County and Ilan County) to be PEZs are high, ranging from 15% in Ilan County to 51% in Keelung City. Note that the total population of the above cities/counties is as high as 10 million people. Moreover, the western valleys of the Central Mountain Range are also found to be probable being PEZs, where all of the reservoirs in western Taiwan are located. For example, the probability can be as high as 3% in the far southern-most tip of Taiwan Island in Pingtung County. This shows that the entire populations in western Taiwan can be at risk due to the shortage of clean water sources under an event at FNM emission level, especially during the NE monsoon period. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Production of beta-gamma coincidence spectra of individual radioxenon isotopes for improved analysis of nuclear explosion monitoring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Derek Anderson

    Radioactive xenon gas is a fission product released in the detonation of nuclear devices that can be detected in atmospheric samples far from the detonation site. In order to improve the capabilities of radioxenon detection systems, this work produces beta-gamma coincidence spectra of individual isotopes of radioxenon. Previous methods of radioxenon production consisted of the removal of mixed isotope samples of radioxenon gas released from fission of contained fissile materials such as 235U. In order to produce individual samples of the gas, isotopically enriched stable xenon gas is irradiated with neutrons. The detection of the individual isotopes is also modeled using Monte Carlo simulations to produce spectra. The experiment shows that samples of 131mXe, 133 Xe, and 135Xe with a purity greater than 99% can be produced, and that a sample of 133mXe can be produced with a relatively low amount of 133Xe background. These spectra are compared to models and used as essential library data for the Spectral Deconvolution Analysis Tool (SDAT) to analyze atmospheric samples of radioxenon for evidence of nuclear events.

  7. On the income–nuclear energy–CO2 emissions nexus revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jungho; Pride, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    This paper seeks to contribute to the debate over the income–nuclear enery–CO 2 emissions nexus by taking specific account of the possible endogeneity of income, which has been largely ignored by early studies. A multivariate cointegrated vector autoregression (CVAR) is applied to top six nuclear generating countries. We find that nuclear energy tends to reduce CO 2 emission for all countries. It is also found that income has a beneficial effect on the environment only in some countries. Finally, we find that CO 2 emissions and income are indeed determined simultaneously, while nuclear energy acts exogenously, indicating that nuclear energy is the driving variable, which significantly influences the long-run movements of CO 2 emissions and income, but is not affected by CO 2 emissions and income in the model. - Highlights: • We examine the income–nuclear energy–CO 2 emissions nexus in top six nuclear generating countries. • The model pays special attention to the possible endogeneity of income. • Nuclear energy is found to have a beneficial effect on the environment in all countries. • Income has a favorable effect on the environment only in some countries. • CO 2 emissions and income are indeed found to be determined simultaneously

  8. BATMAN--an R package for the automated quantification of metabolites from nuclear magnetic resonance spectra using a Bayesian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jie; Astle, William; De Iorio, Maria; Ebbels, Timothy M D

    2012-08-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra are widely used in metabolomics to obtain metabolite profiles in complex biological mixtures. Common methods used to assign and estimate concentrations of metabolites involve either an expert manual peak fitting or extra pre-processing steps, such as peak alignment and binning. Peak fitting is very time consuming and is subject to human error. Conversely, alignment and binning can introduce artefacts and limit immediate biological interpretation of models. We present the Bayesian automated metabolite analyser for NMR spectra (BATMAN), an R package that deconvolutes peaks from one-dimensional NMR spectra, automatically assigns them to specific metabolites from a target list and obtains concentration estimates. The Bayesian model incorporates information on characteristic peak patterns of metabolites and is able to account for shifts in the position of peaks commonly seen in NMR spectra of biological samples. It applies a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to sample from a joint posterior distribution of the model parameters and obtains concentration estimates with reduced error compared with conventional numerical integration and comparable to manual deconvolution by experienced spectroscopists. http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/people/t.ebbels/ t.ebbels@imperial.ac.uk.

  9. Study of greenhouse gases emission factor for nuclear power chain of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Zhonghai; Pan Ziqiang; Xie Jianlun; Xiu Binglin

    2001-01-01

    The Greenhouse Gases Emission Factor (GGEF) for nuclear power chain of China is calculated based on Life Cycle Analysis method and the definition of full energy chain. There is no greenhouse gases released directly from nuclear power plant. The greenhouse gases emission from nuclear power plant is mainly from coal-fired electricity supply to nuclear power plant for its normal operation and the production of construction materials those are used in the nuclear power plant. The total GGEF of nuclear power chain in China is 13.71 g-co 2 /kWh. It is necessary to regulate un-rational power source mix and to use the energy sources in rational way for reducing the greenhouse gas effect. Nuclear power for electricity generation is one of effective ways to reduce greenhouse gases emission and retard the greenhouse effect

  10. A systematic study of acoustic emission from nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; McEnaney, B.

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring has been identified as a possible method to determine internal stresses in nuclear graphites using the Kaiser effect, i.e., on stressing a graphite that has been subject to a prior stress, the onset of AE occurs at the previous peak stress. For three nuclear graphites (PGA, IM1-24 and VNEC), AE was monitored during both monotonic and cyclic loading to failure in tensile, compressive and flexural test modes. For unirradiated graphites, the Kaiser effect was not found in cyclic loading, but a Felicity effect was observed, i.e., the onset of AE occurred below the previously applied peak stress. The Felicity effect was attributed to time-dependent relaxation and recovery processes and was characterized using a new parameter, the Recovery ratio. It was shown that AE can be used to monitor creep strain and creep recovery in graphites at zero load. The AE-time responses from these experiments were fitted to equations similar to those used for creep strain-time at elevated temperatures. The number of AE counts from irradiated graphites were greater than those from unirradiated graphites, subject to similar stresses, due to increases in porosity caused by radiolytic oxidation. A Felicity effect was also observed on cyclic loading of irradiated graphites, but no evidence for a Kaiser effect was found for irradiated graphites loaded monotonically to failure. Thus internal stresses in irradiated graphites could not be measured using AE. This was attributed to relaxation and recovery processes that occur between removing the irradiated graphite from the reactor and AE testing. This work indicated that AE monitoring is not a suitable technique for measuring internal stresses in irradiated graphite. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs, 6 tabs

  11. Pre-equilibrium emission and nuclear level densities in neutron induced reactions on Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivascu, M.; Avrigeanu, M.; Ivascu, I.; Avrigeanu, V.

    1989-01-01

    The experimentally well known (n,p), (n,α) and (n,2n) reaction excitation functions, from threshold to 20 MeV incident energy, and neutron, proton and alpha-particle emission spectra at 14.8 MeV from Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes are calculated in the frame of a generalized Geometry-Dependent-Hybrid pre-equilibrium emission model, including angular momentum and parity conservation and alpha-particle emission, and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Use of a consistent statistical model parameter set enables the validation of the pre-equilibrium emission model. Moreover, an enhanced pre-equilibrium emission from higher spin composite system states, associated with higher incident orbital momenta, has been evidenced. Higher orbital momenta involved also in the emergent channels of this process are suggested by calculations of the residual nuclei level populations. Finally, the unitary account of the (n, p) and (n, 2n) reaction excitation functions for Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes has allowed the proper establishment of the limits of the transition excitation range between the two different nuclear level density models used at medium and higher excitation energies, respectively. (author). 83 refs, 15 figs

  12. Inclusive spectra of mesons with large transverse momenta in proton-nuclear collisions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lykasov, G.I.; Sherkhonov, B.Kh.

    1982-01-01

    Basing on the proposed earlier quark model of hadron-nucleus processes with large transverse momenta psub(perpendicular) the spectra of π +- , K +- meson production with large psub(perpendicular) in proton-nucleus collisions at high energies are calculated. The performed comparison of their dependence of the nucleus-target atomic number A with experimental data shows a good agreement. Theoretical and experimental ratios of inclusive spectra of K +- and π +- mesons in the are compared. Results of calculations show a rather good description of experimental data on large psub(perpendicular) meson production at high energies

  13. Nuclear material enrichment identification method based on cross-correlation and high order spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Fan; Wei Biao; Feng Peng; Mi Deling; Ren Yong

    2013-01-01

    In order to enhance the sensitivity of nuclear material identification system (NMIS) against the change of nuclear material enrichment, the principle of high order statistic feature is introduced and applied to traditional NMIS. We present a new enrichment identification method based on cross-correlation and high order spectrum algorithm. By applying the identification method to NMIS, the 3D graphs with nuclear material character are presented and can be used as new signatures to identify the enrichment of nuclear materials. The simulation result shows that the identification method could suppress the background noises, electronic system noises, and improve the sensitivity against enrichment change to exponential order with no system structure modification. (authors)

  14. Signature of intermittent behavior in the emission spectra of target associated particles from 84Kr-AgBr interactions at 0.95 GeV/A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, B.; Sengupta, S.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Singh, V.

    2004-01-01

    In this report an attempt has been made to study, by studying the fluctuation in spatial distribution in χ(cosθ) space, the intermittent behaviour and fractal properties of emission spectra of fast and slow target associated particles from 84 Kr-AgBr interactions at 0.95 GeV/A

  15. Charged particle spectra in 32S + 32S interactions at 200 GeV/nucleon from CCD-imaged nuclear collisions in a streamer chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teitelbaum, L.P.

    1992-04-01

    We have measured the transverse momentum spectra 1/p T dN/dp T and rapidity distributions dN/dy of negatively charged hadrons and protons for central 32 S + 32 S interactions at 200 GeV/nucleon incident energy. The negative hadron dN/dy distribution is too broad to be accounted for by thermal models which demand isotropic particle emission. It is compatible with models which emphasize longitudinal dynamics, by either a particle production mechanism, as in the Lund fragmentation model, or by introducing one-dimensional hydrodynamic expansion, as in the Landau model. The proton dN/dy distribution, although showing no evidence for a peak in the target fragmentation region, exhibits limited nuclear stopping power. We estimate the mean rapidity shift of participant target protons to be Δy ∼ 1.5, greater than observed for pp collisions, less than measured in central pA collisions, and much less than would be observed for a single equilibrated fireball at midrapidity. Both the negative hadron and proton dN/dy distributions can be fit by a symmetric Landau two-fireball model. Although the spectrum possesses a two-component structure, a comparison to pp data at comparable center-of-mass energy shows no evidence for enhanced production at low p T . The two-component structure can be explained by a thermal and chemical equilibrium model which takes into account the kinematics of resonance decay. Using an expression motivated by longitudinal expansion we find the same temperature for both the protons and negative hadrons at freezeout, T f ∼ 170 MeV. We conclude that the charged particle spectra of negative hadrons and protons can be accommodated in a simple collision picture of limited nuclear stopping, evolution through a state of thermal equilibrium, followed by longitudinal hydrodynamic expansion until freezeout

  16. Charged particle spectra in [sup 32]S + [sup 32]S interactions at 200 GeV/nucleon from CCD-imaged nuclear collisions in a streamer chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teitelbaum, L.P.

    1992-04-01

    We have measured the transverse momentum spectra 1/p[sub T] dN/dp[sub T] and rapidity distributions dN/dy of negatively charged hadrons and protons for central [sup 32]S + [sup 32]S interactions at 200 GeV/nucleon incident energy. The negative hadron dN/dy distribution is too broad to be accounted for by thermal models which demand isotropic particle emission. It is compatible with models which emphasize longitudinal dynamics, by either a particle production mechanism, as in the Lund fragmentation model, or by introducing one-dimensional hydrodynamic expansion, as in the Landau model. The proton dN/dy distribution, although showing no evidence for a peak in the target fragmentation region, exhibits limited nuclear stopping power. We estimate the mean rapidity shift of participant target protons to be [Delta]y [approximately] 1.5, greater than observed for pp collisions, less than measured in central pA collisions, and much less than would be observed for a single equilibrated fireball at midrapidity. Both the negative hadron and proton dN/dy distributions can be fit by a symmetric Landau two-fireball model. Although the spectrum possesses a two-component structure, a comparison to pp data at comparable center-of-mass energy shows no evidence for enhanced production at low p[sub T]. The two-component structure can be explained by a thermal and chemical equilibrium model which takes into account the kinematics of resonance decay. Using an expression motivated by longitudinal expansion we find the same temperature for both the protons and negative hadrons at freezeout, T[sub f] [approximately] 170 MeV. We conclude that the charged particle spectra of negative hadrons and protons can be accommodated in a simple collision picture of limited nuclear stopping, evolution through a state of thermal equilibrium, followed by longitudinal hydrodynamic expansion until freezeout.

  17. Effect of nuclear power on CO₂ emission from power plant sector in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargari, Nargess; Mastouri, Reza

    2011-01-01

    It is predicted that demand for electricity in Islamic Republic of Iran will continue to increase dramatically in the future due to the rapid pace of economic development leading to construction of new power plants. At the present time, most of electricity is generated by burning fossil fuels which result in emission of great deal of pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHG) such as SO₂, NOx, and CO₂. The power industry is the largest contributor to these emissions. Due to minimal emission of GHG by renewable and nuclear power plants, they are most suitable replacements for the fossil-fueled power plants. However, the nuclear power plants are more suitable than renewable power plants in providing baseload electricity. The Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant, the only nuclear power plant of Iran, is expected to start operation in 2010. This paper attempts to interpret the role of Bushehr nuclear power plant (BNPP) in CO₂ emission trend of power plant sector in Iran. In order to calculate CO₂ emissions from power plants, National CO₂ coefficients have been used. The National CO₂ emission coefficients are according to different fuels (natural gas, fuels gas, fuel oil). By operating Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant in 2010, nominal capacity of electricity generation in Iran will increase by about 1,000 MW, which increases the electricity generation by almost 7,000 MWh/year (it is calculated according to availability factor and nominal capacity of BNPP). Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant will decrease the CO₂ emission in Iran power sector, by about 3% in 2010.

  18. Dose estimation for nuclear power plant 4 accident in Taiwan at Fukushima nuclear meltdown emission level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Mei-Ling; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Kuo, Pei-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    An advanced Gaussian trajectory dispersion model is used to evaluate the evacuation zone due to a nuclear meltdown at the Nuclear Power Plant 4 (NPP4) in Taiwan, with the same emission level as that occurred at Fukushima nuclear meltdown (FNM) in 2011. Our study demonstrates that a FNM emission level would pollute 9% of the island's land area with annual effective dose ≥50 mSv using the meteorological data on 11 March 2011 in Taiwan. This high dose area is also called permanent evacuation zone (denoted as PEZ). The PEZ as well as the emergency-planning zone (EPZ) are found to be sensitive to meteorological conditions on the event. In a sunny day under the dominated NE wind conditions, the EPZ can be as far as 100 km with the first 7-day dose ≥20 mSv. Three hundred sixty-five daily events using the meteorological data from 11 March 2011 to 9 March 2012 are evaluated. It is found that the mean land area of Taiwan in becoming the PEZ is 11%. Especially, the probabilities of the northern counties/cities (Keelung, New Taipei, Taipei, Taoyuan, Hsinchu City, Hsinchu County and Ilan County) to be PEZs are high, ranging from 15% in Ilan County to 51% in Keelung City. Note that the total population of the above cities/counties is as high as 10 million people. Moreover, the western valleys of the Central Mountain Range are also found to be probable being PEZs, where all of the reservoirs in western Taiwan are located. For example, the probability can be as high as 3% in the far southern-most tip of Taiwan Island in Pingtung County. This shows that the entire populations in western Taiwan can be at risk due to the shortage of clean water sources under an event at FNM emission level, especially during the NE monsoon period. - Highlights: • An advanced Gaussian-type trajectory model to evaluate the evacuation zone at Nuclear Power Plant 4 in Taiwan. • Mean land area of Taiwan in becoming the permanent evacuation zone is 11%. • The probabilities of the northern

  19. On the causal dynamics between emissions, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and economic growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apergis, Nicholas; Payne, James E.; Menyah, Kojo; Wolde-Rufael, Yemane

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the causal relationship between CO 2 emissions, nuclear energy consumption, renewable energy consumption, and economic growth for a group of 19 developed and developing countries for the period 1984-2007 using a panel error correction model. The long-run estimates indicate that there is a statistically significant negative association between nuclear energy consumption and emissions, but a statistically significant positive relationship between emissions and renewable energy consumption. The results from the panel Granger causality tests suggest that in the short-run nuclear energy consumption plays an important role in reducing CO 2 emissions whereas renewable energy consumption does not contribute to reductions in emissions. This may be due to the lack of adequate storage technology to overcome intermittent supply problems as a result electricity producers have to rely on emission generating energy sources to meet peak load demand. (author)

  20. On the causal dynamics between emissions, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and economic growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apergis, Nicholas [Department of Banking and Financial Management, University of Piraeus, Karaoli and Dimitriou 80, Piraeus, ATTIKI 18534 (Greece); Payne, James E. [Department of Economics, Illinois State University, Normal, IL 61790-4200 (United States); Menyah, Kojo [London Metropolitan Business School, London Metropolitan University, 84 Moorgate, London, EC2M 6SQ (United Kingdom); Wolde-Rufael, Yemane

    2010-09-15

    This paper examines the causal relationship between CO{sub 2} emissions, nuclear energy consumption, renewable energy consumption, and economic growth for a group of 19 developed and developing countries for the period 1984-2007 using a panel error correction model. The long-run estimates indicate that there is a statistically significant negative association between nuclear energy consumption and emissions, but a statistically significant positive relationship between emissions and renewable energy consumption. The results from the panel Granger causality tests suggest that in the short-run nuclear energy consumption plays an important role in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions whereas renewable energy consumption does not contribute to reductions in emissions. This may be due to the lack of adequate storage technology to overcome intermittent supply problems as a result electricity producers have to rely on emission generating energy sources to meet peak load demand. (author)

  1. [Study on Square Super-Lattice Pattern with Surface Discharge in Dielectric Barrier Discharge by Optical Emission Spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xue-jiao; Dong, Li-fang; Liu, Ying; Wang, Qian; Feng, Jian-yu

    2016-02-01

    Square super-lattice pattern with surface discharge consisting of central spots and dim spots is firstly observed in the mixture of argon and air by using a dielectric barrier discharge device with water electrodes. By observing the image, it is found that the central spot is located at the centriod of its surrounding four dim spots. The short-exposure image recorded by a high speed video camera shows that the dim spot results from the surface discharges (SDs). The brightness of the central spot and is quite different from that of the dim spot, which indicates that the plasma states of the central spot and the dim spot may be differentiated. The optical emission spectrum method is used to further study the several plasma parameters of the central spot and the dim spot in different argon content. The emission spectra of the N₂ second positive band (C³IIu --> B³ IIg) are measured, from which the molecule vibration temperatures of the central spot and the dim spot are calculated respectively. The broadening of spectral line 696.57 nm (2P₂-->1S₅) is used to study the electron densities of the central spot and the dim spot. It is found that the molecule vibration temperature and electron density of the dim spot are higher than those of the central spot in the same argon content The molecule vibration temperature and electron density of the central spot and the dim spot increase with the argon content increasing from 90% to 99.9%. The surface discharge induced by the volume discharge (VD) has the determinative effect on the formation of the dim spot The experimental results above play an important role in studying the formation mechanism of surface discharg&of square super-lattice pattern with surface discharge. In addition, the studies exert an influence on the application of surface discharge and volume discharge in different fields.

  2. Synthesis and purification of some alkyl phenanthrenes and presentation of their infrared, ultraviolet, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persaud, K.

    1965-01-01

    We have carried out the synthesis of: - phenanthrene - its five monomethyl derivatives - three dimethyl derivatives - two trimethyl derivatives. We have then purified these products as well as a certain number of others obtained from various sources. We have been able to obtain in the majority of cases, a purity of 99.5 per cent or over, these figures being obtained by low voltage mass spectrometry. Finally we have recorded the infrared, ultraviolet, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectra of these products for which an atlas has been drawn up. (author) [fr

  3. Isotopic perturbation of degeneracy. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of dimethylcyclopentyl and dimethylnorbornyl cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, M.; Telkowski, L.; Kates, M.R.

    1977-01-01

    The large chemical shifts in 13 C NMR were used to measure the deuterium induced splittings and shifts in the 1 H NMR spectra of dimethylcyclopentyl and dimethylnorbornyl cations, where the deuterium perturbs the degenerate equilibrium. The isotope splitting obtained are tabulated

  4. A comparison of experiment, CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, and QUICKE2 net electron emission coefficients for various bremsstrahlung spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, W.P.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Snowden, D.P.; van Lint, V.A.J.; Beale, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    This work compares a carefully designed experiment with the predictions of four different codes (CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, TIGER and QUICKE2) for the complex bremsstrahlung spectra typical of very intense pulsed power x-ray generators. Accurate calculation of net photon-induced electron emission yields at material interfaces using Monte Carlo codes can be particularly difficult if the forward and reverse partial yields are of similar magnitudes. In such a circumstance, the statistical error in the Monte Carlo solution (TIGER or TIGERP) must be kept to a minimum to accurately resolve the difference. CEPXS/ONETRAN is a new deterministic coupled electron/photon transport code that is faster than Monte Carlo and is not subject to statistical error. QUICKE2 evaluates an analytical approximation and is also much less expensive to run than the Monte Carlo codes. The comparison of net yields is a sensitive test of the relative accuracy and efficiency of these various codes. We find that all of the codes except QUICKE2 substantially agree with the experiments for the forward net yields. Howver, for reverse net yields from high-Z materials, all the codes overpredict relative to measurements

  5. Absolute, time-resolved emission of non-LTE L-shell spectra from Ti-doped aerogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, C.A.; Feldman, U.; Weaver, J.L.; Seely, J.F.; Constantin, C.; Holland, G.; Lee, R.W.; Chung, H.-K.; Scott, H.A.

    2006-01-01

    Outstanding discrepancies between data and calculations of laser-produced plasmas in recombination have been observed since the 1980s. Although improvements in hydrodynamic modeling may reduce the discrepancies, there are indications that non-LTE atomic kinetics may be the dominant cause. Experiments to investigate non-LTE effects were recently performed at the NIKE KrF laser on low-density Ti-doped aerogels. The laser irradiated a 2mm diameter, cylindrical sample of various lengths with a 4-ns square pulse to create a volumetrically heated plasma. Ti L-shell spectra spanning a range of 0.47-3keV were obtained with a transmission grating coupled to Si photodiodes. The diagnostic can be configured to provide 1-dimensional spatial resolution at a single photon energy, or 18 discrete energies with a resolving power, λ/δλ of 3-20. The data are examined and compared to calculations to develop absolute emission measurements that can provide new tests of the non-LTE physics

  6. Absolute, time-resolved emission of non-LTE L-shell spectra from Ti-doped aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, C.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-21, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)]. E-mail: tinaback@llnl.gov; Feldman, U. [Artep Inc. 2922 Excelsior Ct., Ellicott City, MD 21042 (United States); Weaver, J.L. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Drive, SW, Washington DC 20375 (United States); Seely, J.F. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Drive, SW, Washington DC 20375 (United States); Constantin, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-21, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Holland, G. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Drive, SW, Washington DC 20375 (United States); Lee, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-21, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Chung, H.-K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-21, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Scott, H.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-21, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    Outstanding discrepancies between data and calculations of laser-produced plasmas in recombination have been observed since the 1980s. Although improvements in hydrodynamic modeling may reduce the discrepancies, there are indications that non-LTE atomic kinetics may be the dominant cause. Experiments to investigate non-LTE effects were recently performed at the NIKE KrF laser on low-density Ti-doped aerogels. The laser irradiated a 2mm diameter, cylindrical sample of various lengths with a 4-ns square pulse to create a volumetrically heated plasma. Ti L-shell spectra spanning a range of 0.47-3keV were obtained with a transmission grating coupled to Si photodiodes. The diagnostic can be configured to provide 1-dimensional spatial resolution at a single photon energy, or 18 discrete energies with a resolving power, {lambda}/{delta}{lambda} of 3-20. The data are examined and compared to calculations to develop absolute emission measurements that can provide new tests of the non-LTE physics.

  7. Plasma parameter diagnosis using hydrogen emission spectra of a quartz-chamber 2.45 GHz ECRIS at Peking University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, WenBin; Ren, HaiTao; Peng, ShiXiang; Xu, Yuan; Wen, JiaMei; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, JingFeng; Zhang, AiLin; Sun, Jiang; Guo, ZhiYu; Chen, JiaEr

    2018-04-01

    A quartz-chamber 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) was designed for diagnostic purposes at Peking University [Patent Number: ZL 201110026605.4]. This ion source can produce a maximum 84 mA hydrogen ion beam at 50 kV with a duty factor of 10%. The root-mean-square (RMS) emittance of this beam is less than 0.12π mm mrad. In our initial work, the electron temperature and electron density inside the plasma chamber had been measured with the line intensity ratio of noble gases. Based on these results, the atomic and molecular emission spectra of hydrogen were applied to determine the dissociation degree of hydrogen and the vibrational temperature of hydrogen molecules in the ground state, respectively. Measurements were performed at gas pressures from 4×10-4 to 1×10-3 Pa and at input peak RF power ranging from 1000 to 1800 W. The dissociation degree of hydrogen in the range of 0.5%-10% and the vibrational temperature of hydrogen molecules in the ground state in the range of 3500-8500 K were obtained. The plasma processes inside this ECRIS chamber were discussed based on these results.

  8. Diagnosis of lubricating oil by evaluating cyanide and carbon molecular emission lines in laser induced breakdown spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnasharty, I. Y.; Kassem, A. K.; Sabsabi, M.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-08-01

    To prevent engine failure it is essential to change lubricating oil regularly before it loses its protective properties. It is also necessary to monitor the physical and chemical conditions of the oil to reliably determine the optimum oil-change intervals. The present work focuses on studying evolution of the cyanide (CN) and carbon (C 2) molecular spectral emission lines in the laser induced breakdown spectra of lubricating oil as a function of its consumption. The intensities of these molecular bands have been taken as indicator of engine oil degradation at certain mileage. Furthermore, the percentage of decay of CN and C 2 integral intensity values at the corresponding mileage was calculated in order to relate it to the degree of consumption of the motor oil. Such percentage decay of the CN and C 2 integral intensities have been found to increase gradually with increasing mileage which is accompanied with increasing depletion of engine oil. The results of using LIBS technique in the present measurements proved that it is possible to have a direct, straightforward and easy method for prediction of lubricating oil degree of consumption. This may facilitate scheduling the proper time and/or mileage intervals for changing the oil to avoid any possibility of engine failure.

  9. Diagnosis of lubricating oil by evaluating cyanide and carbon molecular emission lines in laser induced breakdown spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elnasharty, I.Y.; Kassem, A.K. [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Science, Cairo University (Egypt); Sabsabi, M. [National Research Council, Industrial Material Institute, Quebec (Canada); Harith, M.A., E-mail: mharithm@niles.edu.eg [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Science, Cairo University (Egypt)

    2011-08-15

    To prevent engine failure it is essential to change lubricating oil regularly before it loses its protective properties. It is also necessary to monitor the physical and chemical conditions of the oil to reliably determine the optimum oil-change intervals. The present work focuses on studying evolution of the cyanide (CN) and carbon (C{sub 2}) molecular spectral emission lines in the laser induced breakdown spectra of lubricating oil as a function of its consumption. The intensities of these molecular bands have been taken as indicator of engine oil degradation at certain mileage. Furthermore, the percentage of decay of CN and C{sub 2} integral intensity values at the corresponding mileage was calculated in order to relate it to the degree of consumption of the motor oil. Such percentage decay of the CN and C{sub 2} integral intensities have been found to increase gradually with increasing mileage which is accompanied with increasing depletion of engine oil. The results of using LIBS technique in the present measurements proved that it is possible to have a direct, straightforward and easy method for prediction of lubricating oil degree of consumption. This may facilitate scheduling the proper time and/or mileage intervals for changing the oil to avoid any possibility of engine failure.

  10. Diagnosis of lubricating oil by evaluating cyanide and carbon molecular emission lines in laser induced breakdown spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elnasharty, I.Y.; Kassem, A.K.; Sabsabi, M.; Harith, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    To prevent engine failure it is essential to change lubricating oil regularly before it loses its protective properties. It is also necessary to monitor the physical and chemical conditions of the oil to reliably determine the optimum oil-change intervals. The present work focuses on studying evolution of the cyanide (CN) and carbon (C 2 ) molecular spectral emission lines in the laser induced breakdown spectra of lubricating oil as a function of its consumption. The intensities of these molecular bands have been taken as indicator of engine oil degradation at certain mileage. Furthermore, the percentage of decay of CN and C 2 integral intensity values at the corresponding mileage was calculated in order to relate it to the degree of consumption of the motor oil. Such percentage decay of the CN and C 2 integral intensities have been found to increase gradually with increasing mileage which is accompanied with increasing depletion of engine oil. The results of using LIBS technique in the present measurements proved that it is possible to have a direct, straightforward and easy method for prediction of lubricating oil degree of consumption. This may facilitate scheduling the proper time and/or mileage intervals for changing the oil to avoid any possibility of engine failure.

  11. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. II. Addressing student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-02-01

    This is the second of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. Paper I describes how several conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among university students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. This second article (Paper II) illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  12. DETECTION OF BROAD Hα EMISSION LINES IN THE LATE-TIME SPECTRA OF A HYDROGEN-POOR SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Lin; Masci, F. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Quimby, R. [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); Ofek, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Leloudas, G.; Cia, A. de; Yaron, O. [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Physics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Mazzali, P. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, IC2, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Perley, D. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cenko, S. B. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S. R. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Nugent, P. E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rebbapragada, Umaa D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Woźniak, P. R., E-mail: lyan@ipac.caltech.edu [Space and Remote Sensing, ISR-2, MS-B244 Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    iPTF13ehe is a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.3434, with a slow-evolving light curve and spectral features similar to SN2007bi. It rises in 83–148 days to reach a peak bolometric luminosity of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup −1}, then decays slowly at 0.015 mag day{sup −1}. The measured ejecta velocity is ∼ 13,000 km s{sup −1}. The inferred explosion characteristics, such as the ejecta mass (70–220 M{sub ⊙}), and the total radiative and kinetic energy (E{sub rad} ∼ 10{sup 51} erg, E{sub kin} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 53} erg), are typical of slow-evolving H-poor SLSN events. However, the late-time spectrum taken at +251 days (rest, post-peak) reveals a Balmer Hα emission feature with broad and narrow components, which has never been detected before among other H-poor SLSNe. The broad component has a velocity width of ∼4500 km s{sup −1} and a ∼300 km s{sup −1} blueward shift relative to the narrow component. We interpret this broad Hα emission with a luminosity of ∼2 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup −1} as resulting from the interaction between the supernova ejecta and a discrete H-rich shell, located at a distance of ∼4 × 10{sup 16} cm from the explosion site. This interaction causes the rest-frame r-band LC to brighten at late times. The fact that the late-time spectra are not completely absorbed by the shock-ionized H-shell implies that its Thomson scattering optical depth is likely ≤1, thus setting upper limits on the shell mass ≤30 M{sub ⊙}. Of the existing models, a Pulsational Pair Instability supernova model can naturally explain the observed 30 M{sub ⊙} H-shell, ejected from a progenitor star with an initial mass of (95–150) M{sub ⊙} about 40 years ago. We estimate that at least ∼15% of all SLSNe-I may have late-time Balmer emission lines.

  13. Methods for surveillance of noise signals from nuclear power plants using auto power spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streich, M.

    1988-01-01

    A survey of methods for noise diagnostics applied in the nuclear power plant 'Bruno Leuschner' for surveillance of primary circuit is given. Considering a special example concept of surveillance of standard deviations is explained. (author)

  14. Method to generate generic floor response spectra for operating nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curreri, J.; Costantino, C.; Subudhi, M.; Reich, M.

    1985-01-01

    The general approach in the development of the response spectra was to study the effects on the dynamic characteristics of each of the elements in the chain of events that goes between the loads and the responses. This includes the loads, the soils and the structures. A free-field earthquake response spectra was used to generate horizontal earthquake time histories. The excitation was applied through the soil and into the various structures to produce responses in equipment. An entire range of soil conditions was used with each structure, from soft soil to solid rock. Actual PWR and BWR - Mark I structural models were used as representative of a class of structures. For each model, the stiffness properties were varied, with the same mass, so as to extend the fundamental base structure natural frequency from 2 cps to 36 cps. This resulted in fundamental mode coupled natural frequencies as low as 0.86 cps and as high as 30 cps. From all of these models of soils and structures, floor response spectra were generated at each floor level. The natural frequencies of the structures were varied to obtain maximum response conditions. The actual properties were first used to locate the natural frequencies. The stiffness properties were then varied, with the same mass, to extend the range of the fundamental base structure natural frequency. The intention was to have the coupled structural material frequencies in the vicinity of the peak amplitude frequency content of the excitation spectrum. Particular attention was therefore given to the frequency band between 2 Hz and 4 Hz. A horizontal generic floor response spectra is proposed for the top level of a generic structure. Reduction factors are applied to the peak acceleration for equipment at lower levels

  15. A method to generate generic floor response spectra for operating nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curreri, J.; Costantino, C.; Subudhi, M.; Reich, M.

    1985-01-01

    A free-field earthquake response spectra was used to generate horizontal earthquake time histories. The excitation was applied through the soil and into the various structures to produce responses in equipment. An entire range of soil conditions was used with each structure, from soft soil to solid rock. Actual PWR and BWR - Mark I structural models were used as representative of a class of structures. For each model, the stiffness properties were varied, with the same mass, so as to extend the fundamental base structure natural frequency from 2 cps to 36 cps. This resulted in fundamental mode coupled natural frequencies as low as 0.86 cps and as high as 30 cps. From all of these models of soils and structures, floor response spectra were generated at each floor level. The natural frequencies of the structures were varied to obtain maximum response conditions. The actual properties were first used to locate the natural frequencies. The stiffness properties were than varied, with the same mass, to extend the range of the fundamental base structure natural frequency. The intention was to have the coupled structural material frequencies in the vicinity of the peak amplitude frequency content of the excitation spectrum. Particular attention was therefore given to the frequency band between 2 Hz and 4 Hz. A horizontal generic floor response spectra is proposed for the top level of a generic structure. Reduction factors are applied to the peak acceleration for equipment at lower levels. (orig./HP)

  16. Characterization of nuclear physics targets using Rutherford backscattering and particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubehn, T.; Wozniak, G.J.; Phair, L.; Moretto, L.G.; Yu, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering and particle induced X-ray emission have been utilized to precisely characterize targets used in nuclear fission experiments. The method allows for a fast and non-destructive determination of target thickness, homogeneity and element composition. (orig.)

  17. State-of-the art comparability of corrected emission spectra. 2. Field laboratory assessment of calibration performance using spectral fluorescence standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch-Genger, Ute; Bremser, Wolfram; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Spieles, Monika; Hoffmann, Angelika; DeRose, Paul C; Zwinkels, Joanne C; Gauthier, François; Ebert, Bernd; Taubert, R Dieter; Voigt, Jan; Hollandt, Jörg; Macdonald, Rainer

    2012-05-01

    In the second part of this two-part series on the state-of-the-art comparability of corrected emission spectra, we have extended this assessment to the broader community of fluorescence spectroscopists by involving 12 field laboratories that were randomly selected on the basis of their fluorescence measuring equipment. These laboratories performed a reference material (RM)-based fluorometer calibration with commercially available spectral fluorescence standards following a standard operating procedure that involved routine measurement conditions and the data evaluation software LINKCORR developed and provided by the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM). This instrument-specific emission correction curve was subsequently used for the determination of the corrected emission spectra of three test dyes, X, QS, and Y, revealing an average accuracy of 6.8% for the corrected emission spectra. This compares well with the relative standard uncertainties of 4.2% for physical standard-based spectral corrections demonstrated in the first part of this study (previous paper in this issue) involving an international group of four expert laboratories. The excellent comparability of the measurements of the field laboratories also demonstrates the effectiveness of RM-based correction procedures.

  18. DISCOVERY OF RUBIDIUM, CADMIUM, AND GERMANIUM EMISSION LINES IN THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRA OF PLANETARY NEBULAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterling, N. C. [Department of Physics, University of West Georgia, 1601 Maple Street, Carrollton, GA 30118 (United States); Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Kaplan, Kyle F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 2515 Speedway, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Bautista, Manuel A., E-mail: nsterlin@westga.edu, E-mail: harriet@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: kfkaplan@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: manuel.bautista@wmich.edu [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    We identify [Rb iv] 1.5973 and [Cd iv] 1.7204 μm emission lines in high-resolution (R = 40,000) near-infrared spectra of the planetary nebulae (PNe) NGC 7027 and IC 5117, obtained with the Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) on the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald Observatory. We also identify [Ge vi] 2.1930 μm in NGC 7027. Alternate identifications for these features are ruled out based on the absence of other multiplet members and/or transitions with the same upper levels. Ge, Rb, and Cd can be enriched in PNe by s-process nucleosynthesis during the asymptotic giant branch stage of evolution. To determine ionic abundances, we calculate [Rb iv] collision strengths and use approximations for those of [Cd iv] and [Ge vi]. Our identification of [Rb iv] 1.5973 μm is supported by the agreement between Rb{sup 3+}/H{sup +} abundances found from this line and the 5759.55 Å feature in NGC 7027. Elemental Rb, Cd, and Ge abundances are derived with ionization corrections based on similarities in ionization potential ranges between the detected ions and O and Ne ionization states. Our analysis indicates abundances 2–4 times solar for Rb and Cd in both nebulae. Ge is subsolar in NGC 7027, but its abundance is uncertain due to the large and uncertain ionization correction. The general consistency of the measured relative s-process enrichments with predictions from models appropriate for these PNe (2.0–2.5 M{sub ⊙}, [Fe/H] = −0.37) demonstrates the potential of using PN compositions to test s-process nucleosynthesis models.

  19. Inspection of nuclear power plant piping welds by in-process acoustic emission monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prine, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    The results of using in-process acoustic emission monitoring on nuclear power plant piping welds are discussed. The technique was applied to good and intentionally flawed test welds as well as production welds, and the acoustic emission results are compared to standard NDT methods and selected metallographic cross-sections

  20. Availability of nuclear decay data in electronic form, including beta spectra not previously published

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Westfall, R.J.; Ryman, J.C.; Cristy, M.

    1994-01-01

    The unabridged data used in preparing ICRP Publication 38 (1983) and a monograph of the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee are now available in electronic form. The open-quotes ICRP38 collectionclose quotes contains data on the energies and intensities of radiations emitted by 825 radionuclides (those in ICRP Publication 38 plus 13 from the MIRD monograph), and the open-quotes MIRD collectionclose quotes contains data on 242 radionuclides. Each collection consists of a radiations data file and a beta spectra data file. The radiations data file contains the complete listing of the emitted radiations, their types, mean or unique energies, and absolute intensities for each radionuclide, the probability that a beta particle will be emitted with kinetic energies defined by a standard energy grid. Although summary information from the radiation data files has been published, neither the unabridged data nor the beta spectra have been published. These data files and a data extraction utility, which runs on a personal computer, are available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 13 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs

  1. Relationship between 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and pulmonary vasomotor tone in hypoxic pig lobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, P.; Pillain, R.; Pearse, D.; Eichhorn, G.; Sylvester, J.

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between lung tissue energy state and vasomotor tone, the authors measured 31 P NMR spectra during repeated exposures to hypoxia in 5 isolated degassed left lower lobes perfused with blood at a constant flow (500ml/min) and left atrial pressure ( 2 tension (PpO 2 ) was changed by varying the gas mixtures (40, 7, 0% O 2 ) flowing through a bubble oxygenator in the perfusion circuit. 31 P spectra obtained after stabilization of pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa) at each PpO 2 revealed peaks for ATP, inorganic phosphate (Pi) phosphomono and diesters (PME and PDE). During 7% O 2 , Ppa and ATP increased but Pi did not change suggesting that lung tissue energy state improved during hypoxic vasoconstriction. During 0% O 2 , there was a reversible deterioration of energy state (high Pi, low ATP). Thus, it appears that lung tissue energy state and vasomotor tone were related, but the precise nature of the relationship remains to be determined

  2. Calculational tools for the evaluation of nuclear cross-section and spectra data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    A technique based on discrete energy levels rather than energy level densities is presented for nuclear reaction calculations. The validity of the technique is demonstrated via theoretical and experimental agreement for cross sections, isomer-ratios and gamma-ray strength functions. 50 refs., 7 figs

  3. Non-intrusive measurement of emission indices. A new approach to the evaluation of infrared spectra emitted by aircraft engine exhaust gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindermeir, E.; Haschberger, P.; Tank, V. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Optoelektronik

    1997-12-31

    A non-intrusive method is used to determine the emission indices of a research aircraft`s engine in-flight. The principle is based on the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer MIROR which was specifically designed and built for operation aboard aircrafts. This device measures the spectrum of the infrared radiation emitted by the hot exhaust gas under cruise conditions. From these spectra mixing ratios and emission indices can be derived. An extension to previously applied evaluation schemes is proposed: Whereas formerly the plume was assumed a homogeneous layer of gas, temperature and concentration profiles are now introduced to the evaluation procedure. (author) 5 refs.

  4. Revealing discriminating power of the elements in edible sea salts: Line-intensity correlation analysis from laser-induced plasma emission spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yonghoon, E-mail: yhlee@mokpo.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Mokpo National University, Jeonnam 534-729 (Korea, Republic of); Ham, Kyung-Sik [Department of Food Engineering, Mokpo National University, Jeonnam 534-729 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Song-Hee [Division of Maritime Transportation System, Mokpo National Maritime University, Jeonnam 530-729 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jonghyun, E-mail: jyoo@appliedspectra.com [Applied Spectra, Inc., 46665 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Jeong, Sungho [School of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    We have investigated the discriminating power of the elements in edible sea salts using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). For the ten different sea salts from South Korea, China, Japan, France, Mexico and New Zealand, LIBS spectra were recorded in the spectral range between 190 and 1040 nm, identifying the presence of Na, Cl, K, Ca, Mg, Li, Sr, Al, Si, Ti, Fe, C, O, N, and H. Intensity correlation analysis of the observed emission lines provided a valuable insight into the discriminating power of the different elements in the sea salts. The correlation analysis suggests that the elements with independent discrimination power can be categorized into three groups; those that represent dissolved ions in seawater (K, Li, and Mg), those that are associated with calcified particles (Ca and Sr), and those that are present in soils contained in the sea salts (Al, Si, Ti, and Fe). Classification models using a few emission lines selected based on the results from intensity correlation analysis and full broadband LIBS spectra were developed based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) and their performances were compared. Our results indicate that effective combination of a few emission lines can provide a dependable model for discriminating the edible sea salts and the performance is not much degraded from that based on the full broadband spectra. This can be rationalized by the intensity correlation results. - Highlights: • Broadband LIBS spectra of various edible sea salts were obtained. • Intensity correlation of emission lines of the elements in edible sea salts was analyzed. • The elements were categorized into three groups with independent discriminating power. • The effective combination of a few lines can provide dependable classification models.

  5. Signature of intermittent behavior in the emission spectra of target associated particles from 84Kr-AgBr interactions at 0.95 GeV/A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, B.

    2005-01-01

    Intermittency and fractal behavior have been studied for emission spectra of target associated fast and slow particles from 84 Kr-AgBr interactions at 0.95 GeV/A. Intermittent behavior is observed for both knocked out and slow target fragments. In both the cases anomalous dimensions are seen to increase with the order of moments thereby indicating the association of multifractility with production mechanism of both fast and slow target associated particles

  6. Spectra of alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoso, Budi; Arumbinang, Haryono.

    1981-01-01

    Emission spectra of alkali atoms has been determined by using spectrometer at the ultraviolet to infra red waves range. The spectra emission can be obtained by absorption spectrophotometric analysis. Comparative evaluations between experimental data and data handbook obtained by spark method were also presented. (author tr.)

  7. DFT study of electron absorption and emission spectra of pyramidal LnPc(OAc) complexes of some lanthanide ions in the solid state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanuza, J.; Godlewska, P.; Lisiecki, R.; Ryba-Romanowski, W.; Kadłubański, P.; Lorenc, J.; Łukowiak, A.; Macalik, L.; Gerasymchuk, Yu.; Legendziewicz, J.

    2018-05-01

    The electron absorption and emission spectra were measured for the pyramidal LnPc(OAc) complexes in the solid state and co-doped in silica glass, where Ln = Er, Eu and Ho. The theoretical electron spectra were determined from the quantum chemical DFT calculation using four approximations CAM-B3LYP/LANL2DZ, CAM-B3LYP/CC-PVDZ, B3LYP/LANL2DZ and B3LYP/CC-PVDZ. It was shown that the best agreement between the calculated and experimental structural parameters and spectroscopic data was reached for the CAM-B3LYP/LANL2DZ model. The emission spectra were measured using the excitations both in the ligand and lanthanide absorption ranges. The possibility of energy transfer between the phthalocyanine ligand and excited states of lanthanide ions was discussed. It was shown that the back energy transfer from metal states to phthalocyanine state is responsible for the observed emission of the studied complexes both in the polycrystalline state and silica glass.

  8. Particle emission in the hydrodynamical description of relativistic nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, F.; Hama, Y.; Kodama, T.

    1994-09-01

    Continuous particle emission during the whole expansion of thermalized matter is studied and a new formula for the observed transverse mass spectrum is derived. In some limit, the usual emission at freeze out scenario (Cooper-Frye formula) may be recovered. In a simplified description of expansion, it is shown that continuous particle emission can lead to a sizable curvature in the pion transverse mass spectrum and parallel slopes for the various particles. These results are compared to experimental data. (author). 26 refs, 3 figs

  9. The potential role of nuclear energy in mitigating CO2 emissions in the United Arab Emirates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlFarra, Hasan Jamil; Abu-Hijleh, Bassam

    2012-01-01

    The annual CO 2 emissions have more than doubled in the UAE since 1990. Electricity generated by fossil fuels is responsible for almost half of the country's emissions. Keeping with the Kyoto Protocol, the UAE decided to integrate nuclear energy into the electricity scheme to mitigate CO 2 emissions as declared by the government. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the UAE's proposed nuclear energy strategy in mitigating CO 2 emissions from the built environment up to year 2050. The IAEA's simulation model “MESSAGE” is used to estimate the energy demand and CO 2 emissions in the UAE up to year 2050. Several energy supply/fuels scenarios are modeled and simulated including the following: Business as Usual (BaU), the UAE proposed nuclear strategy (APR1400) as well as 12 more aggressive Clean Energy Era (CEE) proposed scenarios. Nuclear energy, especially in its extreme CEE scenario (8NPPs), was found to be more practical option in mitigating CO 2 than renewable energy and carbon capture and sequestration among the simulated scenarios. Nuclear energy also demonstrated an economic viability. The cost of electricity produced from nuclear energy was calculated to be 3.2 cents/kWh, significantly less than the current cost of 8.15 cents/kWh for electricity generation from fossil fuels in the UAE. - Highlights: ► Effectiveness of the UAE's proposed nuclear energy strategy in mitigating CO 2 emissions. ► Simulation is used to estimate the energy demand and CO 2 emissions in the UAE. ► Tested several energy supply/fuels scenarios on mitigating CO 2 .

  10. Correcting for variable laser-target distances of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements with ChemCam using emission lines of Martian dust spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melikechi, N.; Mezzacappa, A. [Optical Science Center for Applied Research, Delaware State University, Dover, DE (United States); Cousin, A.; Lanza, N.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lasue, J. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Clegg, S.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berger, G. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Wiens, R.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maurice, S. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Tokar, R.L.; Bender, S. [Planetary Science Institute, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Forni, O. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Breves, E.A.; Dyar, M.D. [Dept. of Astronomy, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA (United States); Frydenvang, J. [The Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Delapp, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gasnault, O. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Newsom, H.; Ollila, A.M. [Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Alburquerque, NM (United States); Lewin, E. [Institut des Sciences de la Terre, Universite Grenoble l-CNRS, Grenoble (France); and others

    2014-06-01

    As part of the Mars Science Laboratory, the ChemCam instrument acquires remote laser induced breakdown spectra at distances that vary between 1.56 m and 7 m. This variation in distance affects the intensities of the measured LIBS emission lines in non-trivial ways. To determine the behavior of a LIBS emission line with distance, it is necessary to separate the effects of many parameters such as laser energy, laser spot size, target homogeneity, and optical collection efficiency. These parameters may be controlled in a laboratory on Earth but for field applications or in space this is a challenge. In this paper, we show that carefully selected ChemCam LIBS emission lines acquired from the Martian dust can be used to build an internal proxy spectroscopic standard. This in turn, allows for a direct measurement of the effects of the distance of various LIBS emission lines and hence can be used to correct ChemCam LIBS spectra for distance variations. When tested on pre-launch LIBS calibration data acquired under Martian-like conditions and with controlled and well-calibrated targets, this approach yields much improved agreement between targets observed at various distances. This work lays the foundation for future implementation of automated routines to correct ChemCam spectra for differences caused by variable distance. - Highlights: • Selected Martian dust emission lines are used to correct for variable laser-target distances. • The correction model yields improved agreement between targets observed at various distances. • The impact of the model reduces the bias between predicted and actual compositions by as much as 70%. • When implemented, the model will yield spectral corrections for various ChemCam measurements. • This work is a foundation to perform novel stand-off LIBS measurements on Earth and other planets.

  11. Degradation of quantum dots and change of their energy spectra in semimagnetic semiconductors under nuclear irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Vertsimakha

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Spreading of the potential profile for the charge carriers in quantum dots in binary semiconductors and the shift of the quantum levels for electrons, holes and excitons under the nuclear irradiation has been investigated. The spreading occurs because of the redistribution of atoms of different kinds between the barrier and quantum dot due to radiationenhanced diffusion. It is shown that in semimagnetic semiconductors (e.g. CdTe/(Cd, MnTe, in which a giant magnetic splitting of exciton levels exists, the redistribution of magnetic ions under irradiation causes significant increase in the splitting of exciton levels in a magnetic field in a quantum dot.

  12. Extracting ion emission lines from femtosecond-laser plasma x-ray spectra heavily contaminated by spikes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasilov, S. V.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T. A.; Villoresi, P.; Poletto, L.; Stagira, S.; Calegari, F.; Vozzi, C.; Nisoli, M.

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays charged-coupled device (CCD) detectors are widely used for the registration of multicharged ions x-ray spectra. These spectra are generated in a plasma during interaction of ultrashort, ultraintense laser pulses with solid targets. Strong parasitic radiation from the plasma affects CCD detectors and contaminates resulting spectra, so that spectral features can be completely covered by noise even during measurements with a very short accumulation time. In this work we propose a ''mean to median'' (M2M) algorithm for noise suppression in femtosecond laser plasma x-ray spectra. Series of spectra is necessary for the identification of corrupted data points by the developed method. The algorithm was tested with model spectra which reflect main features of experimental data. In practice we used it for extracting information about spectral lines of Ne-like Fe ions and He-like Al ions which allowed us to calculate plasma parameters. It is demonstrated that M2M method is able to clean spectra with more than 10% of corrupted pixels. Fluctuations in intensity of spectral lines induced by laser instability do not affect validity of the proposed method

  13. Nuclear composition and energy spectra in the 1969 April 12 solar-particle event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Reames, D. V.

    1972-01-01

    Measurement of the charge composition for several of the multicharged nuclei and the energy spectra for hydrogen, helium, and medium (6 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 9) nuclei in the Apr. 12, 1969, solar-particle event. The energy/nucleon spectral shape of the medium nuclei was again the same as that of the helium nuclei, and the ratio of these two species was consistent with the present best average of 58 plus or minus 5. By combining the results obtained here with previous work, improved estimates of the Ne/O and Mg/O values of 0.16 plus or minus 0.03 and 0.056 plus or minus 0.014, respectively, were obtained. Silicon and sulfur abundances relative to O were determined to be 0.208 plus or minus 0.008 plus or minus 0.006, respectively, and 85% confidence upper limits for Ar and Ca relative to O of 0.017 and 0.010 were obtained. Previously, these last four nuclei had only been listed as a group.

  14. Simulation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of liquid crystals, polymers liquid crystals and conventional polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, H.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study is the simulation and the exploitation of NMR spectra of nematic liquid crystals and of polymers. The NMR forms of lines are analysed owing to two complementary models. The first (single conformation model) describes the purely molecular contribution (geometry and internal movements in the molecule), the second the contribution of collective movements (visco elastic modes). Recallings on the NMR method and the orientational order notion within the nematic phase, are given in the first part, where these two models are also described. In a second part these models are applied to data relative to nematic molecules of weak molecular mass and to nematic polymers. This application allows to obtain informations on the structure and the internal movements of the molecule, the orientational order prevailing within the phase and the visco-elastic properties of the studied material. At last it is demonstrated that extension of these models to NMR data of polymers which don't present nematic phase in pure phase allows to obtain similar informations if we consider that their amorphous phase presents locally a nematic order. 136 refs., 46 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Neutron Energy Spectra and Yields from the 7Li(p,n) Reaction for Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessler, M.; Friedman, M.; Schmidt, S.; Shor, A.; Berkovits, D.; Cohen, D.; Feinberg, G.; Fiebiger, S.; Krása, A.; Paul, M.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Reifarth, R.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrons produced by the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction close to threshold are widely used to measure the cross section of s-process nucleosynthesis reactions. While experiments have been performed so far with Van de Graaff accelerators, the use of RF accelerators with higher intensities is planned to enable investigations on radioactive isotopes. In parallel, high-power Li targets for the production of high-intensity neutrons at stellar energies are developed at Goethe University (Frankfurt, Germany) and SARAF (Soreq NRC, Israel). However, such setups pose severe challenges for the measurement of the proton beam intensity or the neutron fluence. In order to develop appropriate methods, we studied in detail the neutron energy distribution and intensity produced by the thick-target 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction and compared them to state-of- the-art simulation codes. Measurements were performed with the bunched and chopped proton beam at the Van de Graaff facility of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) using the time-of-flight (TOF) technique with thin (1/8") and thick (1") detectors. The importance of detailed simulations of the detector structure and geometry for the conversion of TOF to a neutron energy is stressed. The measured neutron spectra are consistent with those previously reported and agree well with Monte Carlo simulations that include experimentally determined 7Li(p,n) cross sections, two-body kinematics and proton energy loss in the Li-target.

  16. Atmospheric emission of 137Cs82 from Beloyarsk nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolotkov, G. A.

    2018-01-01

    Citing Beloyarsk nuclear power plant (Russia) as an example, the problem of remote detection of radioactivity in the atmospheric pollution is examined. The comparative analysis of injected radionuclides into the atmosphere from the nuclear power plant with advanced fast neutron reactor is carried out. The main radionuclides throw out into the atmosphere from the nuclear power plant are beta-radionuclides. The secondary and tertiary spectra of beta-electrons decay for artificial radionuclide 137Cs82 is calculated, using Spencer-Fano’s equation. The averaged parameters of initial beta - electrons generated by 137Cs82 decay in the atmosphere is calculated.

  17. Change impact analysis on the life cycle carbon emissions of energy systems – The nuclear example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nian, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper evaluates the life cycle carbon emission of nuclear power in a scenario based approach. • It quantifies the impacts to the LCA results from the change in design parameters. • The methodology can give indications towards preferred or favorable designs. • The findings contribute to the life cycle inventories of energy systems. - Abstract: The life cycle carbon emission factor (measured by t-CO 2 /GW h) of nuclear power is much lower than those of fossil fueled power generation technologies. However, the fact of nuclear energy being a low carbon power source comes with many assumptions. These assumptions range from system and process definitions, to input–output definitions, to system boundary and cut-off criteria selections, and life cycle inventory dataset. However, there is a somewhat neglected but critical aspect – the design aspect. This refers to the impacts on the life cycle carbon emissions from the change in design parameters related to nuclear power. The design parameters identified in this paper include: (1) the uranium ore grade, (2) the critical process technologies, represented by the average initial enrichment concentration of 235 U in the reactor fuel, and (3) the size of the nuclear power reactor (measured by the generating capacity). If not properly tested, assumptions in the design aspect can lead to an erroneous estimation on the life cycle carbon emission factor of nuclear power. In this paper, a methodology is developed using the Process Chain Analysis (PCA) approach to quantify the impacts of the changes in the selected design parameters on the life cycle carbon emission factor of nuclear power. The concept of doing so broadens the scope of PCAs on energy systems from “one-off” calculation to analysis towards favorable/preferred designs. The findings from the analyses can serve as addition to the life cycle inventory database for nuclear power as well as provide indications for the sustainability of

  18. The control of emissions from nuclear power reactors in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, D.J.; Neil, B.C.J.; Chatterjee, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power reactors in Canada are of the CANDU pressurised heavy water design. These are located in the provinces of Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick. Most of the nuclear generating capacity is in the province of Ontario which has 16 commissioned reactors with a total capacity of 11,500 MWe. There are four reactors under construction with an additional capacity of 3400 MWe. Nuclear power currently accounts for approximately 50% of the electrical power generation of Ontario. Regulation of the reactors is a Federal Government responsibility administered by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) which licenses the reactors and sets occupational and public dose limits

  19. Life cycle analysis on carbon emissions from power generation – The nuclear energy example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nian, Victor; Chou, S.K.; Su, Bin; Bauly, John

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper discusses about a methodology on the life cycle analysis of power generation using nuclear as an example. • The methodology encompasses generic system, input–output, and boundaries definitions. • The boundaries facilitate the use of Kaya Identity and decomposition technique to identify carbon emission streams. - Abstract: A common value of carbon emission factor, t-CO 2 /GWh, in nuclear power generation reported in the literature varies by more than a factor of 100. Such a variation suggests a margin of uncertainty and reliability. In this study, we employ a bottom-up approach to better define the system, its input and output, and boundaries. This approach offers improved granularity at the process level and consistency in the results. Based on this approach, we have developed a methodology to enable comparison of carbon emissions from nuclear power generation. The proposed methodology employs the principle of energy balance on a defined power generation system. The resulting system boundary facilitates the use of the “Kaya Identity” and the decomposition technique to identify the carbon emission streams. Using nuclear power as a case study, we obtained a carbon emission factor of 22.80 t-CO 2 /GWh, which falls to within 2.5% of the median of globally reported LCA results. We demonstrate that the resulting methodology could be used as a generic tool for life cycle analysis of carbon emissions from other power generation technologies and systems

  20. Economics of the Nuclear Energy Considered CO2 Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Su Jin; Kim, Yong Min

    2011-01-01

    The energy consumption in Korea has greatly increased along with its rapid economic growth and industrialization since the 1970s. Total energy consumption increased at an average annual growth rate. Due to the lack of domestic energy resources, however, the overseas dependence rate of energy consumption has continuously increased. Also Climate change, resulting from increases in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), is considered one of the biggest environmental dangers facing the world today. The objective and approach of this study are to compare the different types of scenarios in terms of the power plant type and CO 2 emission from each power plant. We estimated cost of electricity generation using fuel cost, O and M cost(Operation and Maintenance Cost) and CO 2 emission

  1. Climate effects of a hypothetical regional nuclear war: Sensitivity to emission duration and particle composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Lindvall, Jenny; Ekman, Annica M. L.; Svensson, Gunilla

    2016-11-01

    Here, we use a coupled atmospheric-ocean-aerosol model to investigate the plume development and climate effects of the smoke generated by fires following a regional nuclear war between emerging third-world nuclear powers. We simulate a standard scenario where 5 Tg of black carbon (BC) is emitted over 1 day in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere. However, it is likely that the emissions from the fires ignited by bomb detonations include a substantial amount of particulate organic matter (POM) and that they last more than 1 day. We therefore test the sensitivity of the aerosol plume and climate system to the BC/POM ratio (1:3, 1:9) and to the emission length (1 day, 1 week, 1 month). We find that in general, an emission length of 1 month substantially reduces the cooling compared to the 1-day case, whereas taking into account POM emissions notably increases the cooling and the reduction of precipitation associated with the nuclear war during the first year following the detonation. Accounting for POM emissions increases the particle size in the short-emission-length scenarios (1 day/1 week), reducing the residence time of the injected particle. While the initial cooling is more intense when including POM emission, the long-lasting effects, while still large, may be less extreme compared to the BC-only case. Our study highlights that the emission altitude reached by the plume is sensitive to both the particle type emitted by the fires and the emission duration. Consequently, the climate effects of a nuclear war are strongly dependent on these parameters.

  2. Study of nuclear heat application systems for arresting CO2 emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumizawa, Motoo; Inaba, Yoshitomo; Hishida, Makoto; Ogata, Kan; Yamada, Seiya.

    1996-11-01

    The objective of the paper is to investigate the systems for arresting CO 2 emission and for the effective utilization of fossil fuel. We studied the fossil fuel reforming systems to decrease the CO 2 emission rate per unit amount of heat generation by fossil fuel. Feed materials for reforming system were natural gas, crude oil, oil sand, oil shale and coal. Products by reforming were hydrogen, methane, methanol and gasoline. We examined CO 2 emission ratio of ten systems with different feed material and product. The CO 2 emission ratio was the ratio of CO 2 emission rate per unit amount of heat generation between the products and the feed materials, and was the important index. As the results, the CO 2 emission ratio for the coal to methane reforming system using steam gasifier had the lowest value of 51%. It means that the CO 2 emission rate of the product from the coal to methane reforming system was 51% of the emission rate of the feed material, that is, the system is very effective to arrest the CO 2 emission. The CO 2 emission ratio increases in the following order: the reforming systems from coal to methanol, heavy oil to hydrogen and natural gas to hydrogen. It was clarified that the system of coal to methane reforming was very effective for arresting CO 2 emission compared to the other systems, moreover the nuclear heat using rate and thermal efficiency of the plant of the system were the highest. (author)

  3. Role of nuclear energy in CO2 emissions reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, H.

    1995-01-01

    Between 1675 and 1992 worldwide primary energy consumption has been multiplied by about 100 and has reached about 11 billions of tons of equivalent weight of coal, while human population has been multiplied by 8 and will probably reach 9 billions in 2030. The increase of atmospheric CO 2 production due to fossil fuel burn up will become a critical pollution and climatic problem which can be significantly reduced by a more widely use of nuclear energy in replacement of primary energies. However, perspectives of nuclear energy depend principally on the safety improvements of nuclear plants and on the solutions found to solve the management of radioactive waste. Renewable energies sources such as photovoltaic plants, wind engines, hydraulic plants have not yet been used at a large scale because they require large surfaces for their installation. To avoid any monolithic solution to solve the energy and environmental problems, a combination of renewable and nuclear energies seems to be a good compromise. For instance, the conception of a safety non-refueling nuclear reactor with an overheating hybrid system combining solar and fossil fuel energies should be conceivable. (J.S.)

  4. FTIR spectra and properties of iron borophosphate glasses containing simulated nuclear wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Qilong; Wang, Fu; Chen, Kuiru; Pan, Sheqi; Zhu, Hanzhen; Lu, Mingwei; Qin, Jianfa

    2015-07-01

    30 wt.% simulated nuclear wastes were successfully immobilized by B2O3-doped iron phosphate base glasses. The structure and thermal stability of the prepared wasteforms were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential thermal analysis, respectively. The subtle structural variations attributed to different B2O3 doping modes have been discussed in detail. The results show that the thermal stability and glass forming tendency of the iron borophosphate glass wasteforms are faintly affected by different B2O3 doping modes. The main structural networks of iron borophosphate glass wasteforms are PO43-, P2O74-, [BO4] groups. Furthermore, for the wasteform prepared by using 10B2O3-36Fe2O3-54P2O5 as base glass, the distributions of Fe-O-P bonds, [BO4], PO43- and P2O74- groups are optimal. In general, the dissolution rate (DR) values of the studied iron borophosphate wasteforms are about 10-8 g cm-2 min-1. The obtained conclusions can offer some useful information for the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes using boron contained phosphate glasses.

  5. Potential Fuel Loadings, Fire Ignitions, and Smoke Emissions from Nuclear Bursts in Megacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Robock, A.; Bardeen, C.; Oman, L.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2006-12-01

    We consider the effects of "small" nuclear detonations in modern "megacities," focusing on the possible extent of fire ignitions, and the properties of corresponding smoke emissions. Explosive devices in the multi-kiloton yield range are being produced by a growing number of nuclear states (Toon et al., 2006), and such weapons may eventually fall into the hands of terrorists. The numbers of nuclear weapons that might be used in a regional conflict, and their potential impacts on population and infrastructure, are discussed elsewhere. Here, we estimate the smoke emissions that could lead to widespread environmental effects, including large-scale climate anomalies. We find that low-yield weapons, which emerging nuclear states have been stockpiling, and which are likely to be targeted against cities in a regional war, can generate up to 100 times as much smoke per kiloton of yield as the high-yield weapons once associated with a superpower nuclear exchange. The fuel loadings in modern cities are estimated using a variety of data, including extrapolations from earlier detailed studies. The probability of ignition and combustion of fuels, smoke emission factors and radiative properties, and prompt scavenging and dispersion of the smoke are summarized. We conclude that a small regional nuclear war might generate up to 5 teragrams of highly absorbing particles in urban firestorms, and that this smoke could initially be injected into the middle and upper troposphere. These results are used to develop smoke emission scenarios for a climate impact analysis reported by Oman et al. (2006). Uncertainties in the present smoke estimates are outlined. Oman, L., A. Robock, G. L. Stenchikov, O. B. Toon, C. Bardeen and R. P. Turco, "Climatic consequences of regional nuclear conflicts," AGU, Fall 2006. Toon, O. B., R. P. Turco, A. Robock, C. Bardeen, L. Oman and G. L. Stenchikov, "Consequences of regional scale nuclear conflicts and acts of individual nuclear terrorism," AGU, Fall

  6. Application of acoustic emission, as non destructive testing technique, to nuclear components inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Miro, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    A panorama of actual state of acoustic emission as non destructive testing technique, from stand point of its safety applications to nuclear reactor is offered. In first place the physic grounds of acoustic emission phenomenon is briefly exposed. After we speak about the experimental methods for detection, and overall is made an explanation of the problems which are found during the application of this technology to on-line inspection of nuclear oower plants. It is hoped that this repport makes a contribution in the sense of to create a favourable atmosphere toward the introduction in our country of this important technique, and concretely within the nuclear power industry. In this last field the employ of acoustic emission is overcoming the experimental stage. (author)

  7. CO2 emission reduction strategy and roles of nuclear energy in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Osamu; Shimoda, Makoto; Takematsu, Kenji; Tadokoro, Yoshihiro

    1999-03-01

    An analysis was made on the potential and cost of reducing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from Japan's long-term energy systems by using the MARKAL model, developed in the Energy Technology Systems Analysis Programme (ETSAP) of International Energy Agency (IEA). Assuming future growths of GDP, the demand for energy services was estimated for the analytical time horizon 1990-2050. Assumptions were made also on prices and availability of fossil fuels, and on availability of nuclear and renewable energy. CO 2 emissions and system costs were compared between energy demand and supply scenarios defined with different assumptions on nuclear energy, a CO 2 disposal option, and natural gas imports. Main results were as follows. Without nuclear energy, the CO 2 emissions will hardly be reduced because of the increases of coal utilization. CO 2 disposal will be effective in reducing the emissions, however at much higher costs than the case with nuclear energy. The expansion of natural gas imports alone will not reduce the emissions at enough low levels. (author)

  8. CO{sub 2} emission reduction strategy and roles of nuclear energy in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Osamu; Shimoda, Makoto; Takematsu, Kenji; Tadokoro, Yoshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-03-01

    An analysis was made on the potential and cost of reducing carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from Japan`s long-term energy systems by using the MARKAL model, developed in the Energy Technology Systems Analysis Programme (ETSAP) of International Energy Agency (IEA). Assuming future growths of GDP, the demand for energy services was estimated for the analytical time horizon 1990-2050. Assumptions were made also on prices and availability of fossil fuels, and on availability of nuclear and renewable energy. CO{sub 2} emissions and system costs were compared between energy demand and supply scenarios defined with different assumptions on nuclear energy, a CO{sub 2} disposal option, and natural gas imports. Main results were as follows. Without nuclear energy, the CO{sub 2} emissions will hardly be reduced because of the increases of coal utilization. CO{sub 2} disposal will be effective in reducing the emissions, however at much higher costs than the case with nuclear energy. The expansion of natural gas imports alone will not reduce the emissions at enough low levels. (author)

  9. Nuclear power: An overview in the context of alleviating greenhouse gas emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The document gives a brief overview of the current development of nuclear power worldwide, covering essentially technical, economic and environmental aspects. Policy issues related to implementation instruments and potential barriers to nuclear power deployment are also touched upon. Views are given on the possible medium and long term development of nuclear power, as a means for alleviating greenhouse gas emissions from the electricity sector. Advanced technologies for the reactors and their associated fuel cycles are described, including advanced fission reactors and fusion energy. Direct cost and externalities are given for the present generation of nuclear power plants as well as for power plants to be commissioned in the coming decades. Environmental burdens and risks are analysed with emphasis on potential risks of accident, radioactive waste, and atmospheric emission in routine operation, focusing on greenhouse gases. 77 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  10. Nuclear power: An overview in the context of alleviating greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The document gives a brief overview of the current development of nuclear power worldwide, covering essentially technical, economic and environmental aspects. Policy issues related to implementation instruments and potential barriers to nuclear power deployment are also touched upon. Views are given on the possible medium and long term development of nuclear power, as a means for alleviating greenhouse gas emissions from the electricity sector. Advanced technologies for the reactors and their associated fuel cycles are described, including advanced fission reactors and fusion energy. Direct cost and externalities are given for the present generation of nuclear power plants as well as for power plants to be commissioned in the coming decades. Environmental burdens and risks are analysed with emphasis on potential risks of accident, radioactive waste, and atmospheric emission in routine operation, focusing on greenhouse gases. 77 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs

  11. Blind intercomparison of nuclear models for predicting charged particle emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, K.; Cierjacks, S.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron activation data are important for dosimetry, radiation-damage and production of long-lived activities. For fusion energy applications, it is required to develop 'low-activation materials' from the viewpoints of safety, maintenance and waste disposal. Existing evaluated activation cross-section libraries are to a large extent based on nuclear-model calculations. The former Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Data Committee, NEANDC, (presently replaced by the NEA Nuclear Science Committee) organized the working group on activation cross sections. The first meeting of the group was held in 1989, and it was then agreed that a blind intercomparison of nuclear-model calculations should be undertaken in order to test the predictive power of the theoretical calculations. As a first stage the working group selected the reactions 60g Co(n,p) 60 Fe and 60m Co(n,p) 60 Fe, for which no experimental data were available, in the energy range from 1 to 20 MeV. The preliminary results compiled at the NEA Data Bank were sent to each participant and a meeting was held during the International Conference on Nuclear Data for Science and Technology in Julich 1991 to discuss the results. Following the outcome of the discussion in Julich, it was decided to extend this intercomparison. In the second-stage calculation, the same optical-model parameters were employed for neutrons, protons and α-particles, i.e., V = 50 MeV, W = 10 MeV, r = 1.25 fm and a = 0.6 fm with the Woods-Saxon volume-type form factors. No spin-orbit interaction was considered. Concerning the level density, the Fermi gas model with a = A/8 MeV -1 was assumed without pairing corrections. Moreover, gamma-ray competition was neglected to simplify the calculation. This report describes the final results of the blind comparison. Section 2 deals with a survey of the received contributions. The final results are graphically presented in section 3. 67 figs., 1 tab., 12 refs

  12. The characteristics of the IR emission features in the spectra of Herbig Ae stars : evidence for chemical evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, C.; Bouwman, J.; Lahuis, F.; van Kerckhoven, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Henning, T.

    Context. Infrared ( IR) spectra provide a prime tool to study the characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ( PAH) molecules in regions of star formation. Herbig Ae/Be stars are a class of young pre-main sequence stellar objects of intermediate mass. They are known to have varying amounts

  13. Downwelling Far-Infrared Emission Spectra Measured By First at Cerro Toco, Chile and Table Mountain, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, J. C.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Cageao, R.; Kratz, D. P.; Johnson, D. G.; Mlawer, E. J.; Turner, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument is a Fourier transform spectrometer developed to measure the important far-infrared spectrum between 100 and 650 cm-1. Presented here are measurements made by FIRST during two successful deployments in a ground-based configuration to measure downwelling longwave radiation at Earth's surface. The initial deployment was to Cerro Toco, Chile, where FIRST operated from August to October, 2009 as part of the Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC-II) campaign. After recalibration, FIRST was deployed to the Table Mountain Facility from September through October, 2012. Spectra observed at each location are substantially different, due in large part to the order of magnitude difference in integrated precipitable water vapor (0.3 cm at Table Mountain, 0.03 cm at Cerro Toco). Dry days for both campaigns are chosen for analysis - 09/24/2009 and 10/19/2012. Also available during both deployments are coincident radiosonde temperature and water vapor vertical profiles which are used as inputs a line-by-line radiative transfer program. Comparisons between measured and modeled spectra are presented over the 200 to 800 cm-1 range. An extensive error analysis of both the measured and modeled spectra is presented. In general, the differences between the measured and modeled spectra are within their combined uncertainties.

  14. Pattern recognition analysis of proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of brain tissue extracts from rats anesthetized with propofol or isoflurane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kawaguchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: General anesthesia is routinely used as a surgical procedure and its safety has been endorsed by clinical outcomes; however, its effects at the molecular level have not been elucidated. General anesthetics influence glucose metabolism in the brain. However, the effects of anesthetics on brain metabolites other than those related to glucose have not been well characterized. We used a pattern recognition analysis of proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra to visualize the changes in holistic brain metabolic phenotypes in response to the widely used intravenous anesthetic propofol and the volatile anesthetic isoflurane. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Rats were randomized into five groups (n = 7 each group. Propofol and isoflurane were administered to two groups each, for 2 or 6 h. The control group received no anesthesia. Brains were removed directly after anesthesia. Hydrophilic compounds were extracted from excised whole brains and measured by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All spectral data were processed and analyzed by principal component analysis for comparison of the metabolite profiles. Data were visualized by plotting principal component (PC scores. In the plots, each point represents an individual sample. The propofol and isoflurane groups were clustered separately on the plots, and this separation was especially pronounced when comparing the 6-h groups. The PC scores of the propofol group were clearly distinct from those of the control group, particularly in the 6-h group, whereas the difference in PC scores was more subtle in the isoflurane group and control groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of the present study showed that propofol and isoflurane exerted differential effects on holistic brain metabolism under anesthesia.

  15. DISSECTING THE POWER SOURCES OF LOW-LUMINOSITY EMISSION-LINE GALAXY NUCLEI VIA COMPARISON OF HST-STIS AND GROUND-BASED SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, Anca; Castillo, Christopher A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA 22807 (United States); Shields, Joseph C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Ho, Luis C. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Barth, Aaron J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Using a sample of ∼100 nearby line-emitting galaxy nuclei, we have built the currently definitive atlas of spectroscopic measurements of Hα and neighboring emission lines at subarcsecond scales. We employ these data in a quantitative comparison of the nebular emission in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based apertures, which offer an order-of-magnitude difference in contrast, and provide new statistical constraints on the degree to which transition objects and low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) are powered by an accreting black hole at ≲10 pc. We show that while the small-aperture observations clearly resolve the nebular emission, the aperture dependence in the line ratios is generally weak, and this can be explained by gradients in the density of the line-emitting gas: the higher densities in the more nuclear regions potentially flatten the excitation gradients, suppressing the forbidden emission. The transition objects show a threefold increase in the incidence of broad Hα emission in the high-resolution data, as well as the strongest density gradients, supporting the composite model for these systems as accreting sources surrounded by star-forming activity. The narrow-line LINERs appear to be the weaker counterparts of the Type 1 LINERs, where the low accretion rates cause the disappearance of the broad-line component. The enhanced sensitivity of the HST observations reveals a 30% increase in the incidence of accretion-powered systems at z ≈ 0. A comparison of the strength of the broad-line emission detected at different epochs implies potential broad-line variability on a decade-long timescale, with at least a factor of three in amplitude.

  16. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, E.S.; Heath, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO 2 -eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO 2 -eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO 2 -eq/kWh by 2050.

  17. Observation of forbidden (E2) lines in the ultraviolet spectra of Ca II, Sr II, and Ba II by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doidge, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Forbidden (electric quadrupole, E2) transitions of the type ns 2 S 1/2 –nd 2 D 3/2 and ns 2 S 1/2 –nd 2 D 5/2 in the ultraviolet spectra of singly ionized Ca, Sr, and Ba (with n = 4, 5 or 6 for Ca, Sr, and Ba, respectively) have been observed in the emission spectrum of an inductively coupled argon plasma. Wavelengths and wavenumbers of the six lines are reported and the values are in good agreement with those expected from literature data for the energy levels involved. - Highlights: • Wavelengths measured using commercially available ICP emission spectrometer • First wavelength and wavenumber measurements of some E2 lines of Ba +, Ca +, Sr + • Evidence for small plasma shifts in the wavenumbers of Ba + and Sr +

  18. The Equilibrium and Pre-equilibrium Triton Emission Spectra of Some Target Nuclei for ( n, xt) Reactions up to 45 MeV Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tel, E.; Kaplan, A.; Aydın, A.; Özkorucuklu, S.; Büyükuslu, H.; Yıldırım, G.

    2010-08-01

    Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, there is still a long way to go to penetrate commercial fusion reactors to the energy market. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. So, working out the systematics of ( n,t) reaction cross sections and triton emission differential data are important for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. In this study, ( n,xt) reactions for some target nuclei as 16O, 27Al, 59Co and 209Bi have been investigated up to 45 MeV incident neutron energy. In the calculations of the triton emission spectra, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been used. The calculated results have been compared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  19. The influence of visible light and inorganic pigments on fluorescence excitation emission spectra of egg-, casein- and collagen-based painting media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, A.; Anglos, D.; Cather, S.; Burnstock, A.

    2008-07-01

    Spectrofluorimetric analysis of proteinaceous binding media is particularly promising because proteins employed in paintings are often fluorescent and media from different sources have significantly different fluorescence spectral profiles. Protein-based binding media derived from eggs, milk and animal tissue have been used for painting and for conservation, but their analysis using non-destructive techniques is complicated by interferences with pigments, their degradation and their low concentration. Changes in the fluorescence excitation emission spectra of films of binding media following artificial ageing to an equivalent of 50 and 100 years of museum lighting include the reduction of bands ascribed to tyrosine, tryptophan and Maillard reaction products and an increase in fluorescent photodegradation. Fluorescence of naturally aged paint is dependent on the nature of the pigment present and, with egg-based media, in comparison with un-pigmented films, emissions ascribed to amino acids are more pronounced.

  20. The effect of nuclear structure in the emission of reaction products in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-05

    Apr 5, 2014 ... Abstract. Study of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs) and light charged particles (LCPs) emis- sion has been carried out for a few reactions involving α-cluster and non-α-cluster systems to see how the emission processes are affected by nuclear clustering. Li, Be, B and α-particles have been studied from ...

  1. The emission of activity and professional exposure by the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The compilation is made for the period October - December 1985 and for the whole year. It is presented in standard emissivity and as an index of collective dose equivalent. A survey of doses of the personnel at nuclear power plants is included. (G.B.)

  2. Inspection of nuclear reactor welding by acoustic emission, May 1976--March 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prine, D.W.; Mathieson, T.A.

    1977-03-01

    Evaluation of acoustic emission monitoring of welds in heavy section steel under pressure vessel shop conditions is described for a nuclear pressure vessel inlet nozzle weld and a repair weld on a test pressure vessel (V-7) for ORNL. On-line analysis of the AE results indicates that both welds should be free of code rejectable flaws

  3. Comparative study of Monte Carlo particle transport code PHITS and nuclear data processing code NJOY for recoil cross section spectra under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Yosuke, E-mail: iwamoto.yosuke@jaea.go.jp; Ogawa, Tatsuhiko

    2017-04-01

    Because primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) create point defects and clusters in materials that are irradiated with neutrons, it is important to validate the calculations of recoil cross section spectra that are used to estimate radiation damage in materials. Here, the recoil cross section spectra of fission- and fusion-relevant materials were calculated using the Event Generator Mode (EGM) of the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) and also using the data processing code NJOY2012 with the nuclear data libraries TENDL2015, ENDF/BVII.1, and JEFF3.2. The heating number, which is the integral of the recoil cross section spectra, was also calculated using PHITS-EGM and compared with data extracted from the ACE files of TENDL2015, ENDF/BVII.1, and JENDL4.0. In general, only a small difference was found between the PKA spectra of PHITS + TENDL2015 and NJOY + TENDL2015. From analyzing the recoil cross section spectra extracted from the nuclear data libraries using NJOY2012, we found that the recoil cross section spectra were incorrect for {sup 72}Ge, {sup 75}As, {sup 89}Y, and {sup 109}Ag in the ENDF/B-VII.1 library, and for {sup 90}Zr and {sup 55}Mn in the JEFF3.2 library. From analyzing the heating number, we found that the data extracted from the ACE file of TENDL2015 for all nuclides were problematic in the neutron capture region because of incorrect data regarding the emitted gamma energy. However, PHITS + TENDL2015 can calculate PKA spectra and heating numbers correctly.

  4. Possibilities for Carbon Dioxide Emission Reduction Resulting from Nuclear Power Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozicevic, M.; Tomsic, Z.; Kovacevic, T.

    1998-01-01

    Each energy resource is connected to certain environmental impacts and risks which must be taken into account. In recent years attention has been focused on the climate change effects of the burning fossil fuels, especially coal, due to the carbon dioxide which this releases into the atmosphere. If the electric energy produced in nuclear power plants were produced in coal-fired plants, global CO 2 emissions would rise for more than 2000 million tons, a significant value in comparison with 4000 million tons which is recommended as a target for emission reduction by the year 2005 at the Toronto Conference on the Changing Atmosphere. Possibilities for carbon dioxide emission reduction which would be the result of the nuclear option acceptance are discussed in this paper. (author)

  5. Nuclear spectroscopy with Geant4: Proton and neutron emission & radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmiento, L. G., E-mail: Luis.Sarmiento@nuclear.lu.se; Rudolph, D. [Department of Physics, Lund University, 22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2016-07-07

    With the aid of a novel combination of existing equipment – JYFLTRAP and the TASISpec decay station – it is possible to perform very clean quantum-state selective, high-resolution particle-γ decay spectroscopy. We intend to study the determination of the branching ratio of the ℓ = 9 proton emission from the I{sup π} = 19/2{sup −}, 3174-keV isomer in the N = Z − 1 nucleus {sup 53}Co. The study aims to initiate a series of similar experiments along the proton dripline, thereby providing unique insights into “open quantum systems”. The technique has been pioneered in case studies using SHIPTRAP and TASISpec at GSI. Newly available radioactive decay modes in Geant4 simulations are going to corroborate the anticipated experimental results.

  6. Nuclear spectroscopy with Geant4: Proton and neutron emission & radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, L. G.; Rudolph, D.

    2016-07-01

    With the aid of a novel combination of existing equipment - JYFLTRAP and the TASISpec decay station - it is possible to perform very clean quantum-state selective, high-resolution particle-γ decay spectroscopy. We intend to study the determination of the branching ratio of the ℓ = 9 proton emission from the Iπ = 19/2-, 3174-keV isomer in the N = Z - 1 nucleus 53Co. The study aims to initiate a series of similar experiments along the proton dripline, thereby providing unique insights into "open quantum systems". The technique has been pioneered in case studies using SHIPTRAP and TASISpec at GSI. Newly available radioactive decay modes in Geant4 simulations are going to corroborate the anticipated experimental results.

  7. Nuclear energy contribution to restraining greenhouse gas emissions and long-term energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoda-Bakhsh, R.

    2004-01-01

    An important source of greenhouse gases, in particular Co 2 , is fossil fuel combustion for energy applications. Since nuclear power is an energy source that does not produce Co 2 , nuclear energy is already making a contribution to restraining greenhouse gas emissions. Because it has been internationally decided to reduce carbon dioxide emission before the year 2005 in order to avoid the green house catastrophy of the earth's atmosphere, and since there is an urgent need of energy especially in the developing countries, there is now a strong demand for alternative energy sources. While the established low cost energy production by light water nuclear fission reactors could be a solution for a period of transition (limited by resources of the light Uranium isotope), fusion energy is of interest for long- term and large scale energy production to provide the increased energy demand

  8. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234,236,238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullmann, John Leonard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kawano, Toshihiko [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bredeweg, Todd Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Couture, Aaron Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Haight, Robert Cameron [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jandel, Marian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mosby, Shea Morgan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); O' Donnell, John M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rundberg, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vieira, David J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wilhelmy, Jerry B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Becker, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wu, Ching-Yen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Krticka, Milan [Charles Univ., Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-28

    Neutron capture cross sections in the “continuum” region (>≈1 keV) and gamma-emission spectra are of importance to basic science and many applied fields. Careful measurements have been made on most common stable nuclides, but physicists must rely on calculations (or “surrogate” reactions) for rare or unstable nuclides. Calculations must be benchmarked against measurements (cross sections, gamma-ray spectra, and <Γγ>). Gamma-ray spectrum measurements from resolved resonances were made with 1 - 2 mg/cm2 thick targets; cross sections at >1 keV were measured using thicker targets. The results show that the shape of capture cross section vs neutron energy is not sensitive to the form of the strength function (although the magnitude is); the generalized Lorentzian E1 strength function is not sufficient to describe the shape of observed gamma-ray spectra; MGLO + “Oslo M1” parameters produces quantitative agreement with the measured 238U(n,γ) cross section; additional strength at low energies (~ 3 MeV) -- likely M1-- is required; and careful study of complementary results on low-lying giant resonance strength is needed to consistently describe observations.

  9. Using Lava Tube Skylight Thermal Emission Spectra to Determine Lava Composition on Io: Quantitative Constraints for Observations by Future Missions to the Jovian System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A. G.

    2008-12-01

    Deriving the composition of Io's dominant lavas (mafic or ultramafic?) is a major objective of the next missions to the jovian system. The best opportunities for making this determination are from observations of thermal emission from skylights, holes in the roof of a lava tube through which incandescent lava radiates, and Io thermal outbursts, where lava fountaining is taking place [1]. Allowing for lava cooling across the skylight, the expected thermal emission spectra from skylights of different sizes have been calculated for laminar and turbulent tube flow and for mafic and ultramafic composition lavas. The difference between the resulting mafic and ultramafic lava spectra has been quantified, as has the instrument sensitivity needed to acquire the necessary data to determine lava eruption temperature, both from Europa orbit and during an Io flyby. A skylight is an excellent target to observe lava that has cooled very little since eruption (California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. AGD is supported by a grant from the NASA OPR Program. References: [1] Davies, A. G., 1996, Icarus, 124, 45-61. [2] Keszthelyi, L., et al., 2006, JGS, 163, 253-264. [3] Davies, A. G., 2007, Volcanism on Io, Cambridge University Press. [4] Keszthelyi, L., et al., 2007, Icarus, 192, 491-502. [5] Davies, A. G., et al., 2006, Icarus, 184, 460-477.

  10. Estimating HAPs and radionuclide emissions from a laboratory complex at a nuclear processing site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, R.A.; Faugl, T.

    1993-01-01

    A unique methodology was developed for conducting an air emission inventory (AEI) at a DOE nuclear processing facility. This methodology involved the use of computer-assisted design (CAD) drawings to document emission points, computerized process drawings to document industrial processes leading to emissions, and a computerized data base of AEI forms to document emission estimates and related process data. A detailed air emissions inventory for operating years 1985--1991 was recently implemented for the entire site using this methodology. One industrial area at the DOE Site is comprised of laboratory facilities that provide direct support to the nuclear reactor and recovery operations, developmental studies to support reactor and separation operations, and developmental studies to support waste handling and storage. The majority of the functions are conducted in a single large building complex wherein bench scale and pilot scale experiments are carried out involving radionuclides, hazardous air pollutants (HAP), and other chemicals reportable under the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) and Superfund Amendments and Re-authorization Act (SARA) Title 111. The results of the inventory showed that HAP and radionuclide emissions from the laboratory complex were relatively minor

  11. Soil humic-like organic compounds in prescribed fire emissions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalbot, M.-C.; Nikolich, G.; Etyemezian, V.; Dubois, D.W.; King, J.; Shafer, D.; Gamboa da Costa, G.; Hinton, J.F.; Kavouras, I.G.

    2013-01-01

    Here we present the chemical characterization of the water-soluble organic carbon fraction of atmospheric aerosol collected during a prescribed fire burn in relation to soil organic matter and biomass combustion. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we observed that humic-like substances in fire emissions have been associated with soil organic matter rather than biomass. Using a chemical mass balance model, we estimated that soil organic matter may contribute up to 41% of organic hydrogen and up to 27% of water-soluble organic carbon in fire emissions. Dust particles, when mixed with fresh combustion emissions, substantially enhances the atmospheric oxidative capacity, particle formation and microphysical properties of clouds influencing the climatic responses of atmospheric aeroso. Owing to the large emissions of combustion aerosol during fires, the release of dust particles from soil surfaces that are subjected to intense heating and shear stress has, so far, been lacking. -- Highlights: •We characterized the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) of fire emissions by NMR. •Distinct patterns were observed for soil dust and vegetation combustion emissions. •Soil organic matter accounted for most of WSOC in early prescribed burn emissions. -- Humic-like soil organic matter may be an important component of particulate emissions in the early stages of wildfires

  12. Detailed analysis of hollow ions spectra from dense matter pumped by X-ray emission of relativistic laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, S. B.; Colgan, J.; Abdallah, J.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Wagenaars, E.; Culfa, O.; Dance, R. J.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Woolsey, N. C.; Booth, N.; Lancaster, K. L.; Evans, R. G.; Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P.; Kaempfer, T.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray emission from hollow ions offers new diagnostic opportunities for dense, strongly coupled plasma. We present extended modeling of the x-ray emission spectrum reported by Colgan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 125001 (2013)] based on two collisional-radiative codes: the hybrid-structure Spectroscopic Collisional-Radiative Atomic Model (SCRAM) and the mixed-unresolved transition arrays (MUTA) ATOMIC model. We show that both accuracy and completeness in the modeled energy level structure are critical for reliable diagnostics, investigate how emission changes with different treatments of ionization potential depression, and discuss two approaches to handling the extensive structure required for hollow-ion models with many multiply excited configurations

  13. Detecting special nuclear material using muon-induced neutron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardincerri, Elena; Bacon, Jeffrey; Borozdin, Konstantin; Matthew Durham, J.; Fabritius II, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hecht, Adam [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Milner, Edward C. [Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75205 (United States); Miyadera, Haruo; Morris, Christopher L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Perry, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Poulson, Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    The penetrating ability of cosmic ray muons makes them an attractive probe for imaging dense materials. Here, we describe experimental results from a new technique that uses neutrons generated by cosmic-ray muons to identify the presence of special nuclear material (SNM). Neutrons emitted from SNM are used to tag muon-induced fission events in actinides and laminography is used to form images of the stopping material. This technique allows the imaging of SNM-bearing objects tagged using muon tracking detectors located above or to the side of the objects, and may have potential applications in warhead verification scenarios. During the experiment described here we did not attempt to distinguish the type or grade of the SNM.

  14. The 3D-HST Survey: Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/G141 Grism Spectra, Redshifts, and Emission Line Measurements for ~ 100,000 Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Nelson, Erica J.; Fumagalli, Mattia; Maseda, Michael V.; Leja, Joel; Franx, Marijn; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bezanson, Rachel; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Dickey, Claire; Förster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Illingworth, Garth; Kriek, Mariska; Labbé, Ivo; Ulf Lange, Johannes; Lundgren, Britt F.; Magee, Daniel; Marchesini, Danilo; Oesch, Pascal; Pacifici, Camilla; Patel, Shannon G.; Price, Sedona; Tal, Tomer; Wake, David A.; van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn

    2016-08-01

    We present reduced data and data products from the 3D-HST survey, a 248-orbit HST Treasury program. The survey obtained WFC3 G141 grism spectroscopy in four of the five CANDELS fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-S, and UDS, along with WFC3 H 140 imaging, parallel ACS G800L spectroscopy, and parallel I 814 imaging. In a previous paper, we presented photometric catalogs in these four fields and in GOODS-N, the fifth CANDELS field. Here we describe and present the WFC3 G141 spectroscopic data, again augmented with data from GO-1600 in GOODS-N (PI: B. Weiner). We developed software to automatically and optimally extract interlaced two-dimensional (2D) and one-dimensional (1D) spectra for all objects in the Skelton et al. (2014) photometric catalogs. The 2D spectra and the multi-band photometry were fit simultaneously to determine redshifts and emission line strengths, taking the morphology of the galaxies explicitly into account. The resulting catalog has redshifts and line strengths (where available) for 22,548 unique objects down to {{JH}}{IR}≤slant 24 (79,609 unique objects down to {{JH}}{IR}≤slant 26). Of these, 5459 galaxies are at z\\gt 1.5 and 9621 are at 0.7\\lt z\\lt 1.5, where Hα falls in the G141 wavelength coverage. The typical redshift error for {{JH}}{IR}≤slant 24 galaxies is {σ }z≈ 0.003× (1+z), I.e., one native WFC3 pixel. The 3σ limit for emission line fluxes of point sources is 2.1× {10}-17 erg s-1 cm-2. All 2D and 1D spectra, as well as redshifts, line fluxes, and other derived parameters, are publicly available.18

  15. Prevented Mortality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Historical and Projected Nuclear Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharecha, Pushker A.; Hansen, James E.

    2013-01-01

    In the aftermath of the March 2011 accident at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the future contribution of nuclear power to the global energy supply has become somewhat uncertain. Because nuclear power is an abundant, low-carbon source of base-load power, it could make a large contribution to mitigation of global climate change and air pollution. Using historical production data, we calculate that global nuclear power has prevented an average of 1.84 million air pollution-related deaths and 64 gigatonnes of CO2-equivalent (GtCO2-eq) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that would have resulted from fossil fuel burning. On the basis of global projection data that take into account the effects of the Fukushima accident, we find that nuclear power could additionally prevent an average of 420 000-7.04 million deaths and 80-240 GtCO2-eq emissions due to fossil fuels by midcentury, depending on which fuel it replaces. By contrast, we assess that large-scale expansion of unconstrained natural gas use would not mitigate the climate problem and would cause far more deaths than expansion of nuclear power.

  16. Investigating the flow dynamics and chemistry of an expanding thermal plasma through CH(A-X) emission spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, T. A. R.; Colsters, P. G. J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Engeln, R.

    2011-01-01

    The gas flow in a linear plasma reactor and the plasma chemistry during hydrogenated amorphous carbon and graphite etching are investigated via time and spatially resolved measurements of the ion density and CH emission. A convolution of the ion and hydrocarbon density shows the importance of charge

  17. Analysis of energy transfer process based emission spectra of erbium doped germanate glasses for mid-infrared laser materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Muzhi; Wei, Tao; Zhou, Beier; Tian, Ying; Zhou, Jiajia; Xu, Shiqing, E-mail: shiqingxu@cjlu.edu.cn; Zhang, Junjie, E-mail: jjzhang@cjlu.edu.cn

    2015-03-25

    Highlights: • Er{sup 3+} doped germanate glass with good thermal stability were prepared. • Ionic boding nature was proved by bonding parameter calculation. • Mid-infrared fluorescent behaviors and energy transfer were investigated. • Rate equation and Dexter’s theory were utilized to elucidate 2.7 μm emission. - Abstract: Er{sup 3+} activated germanate glass with good thermal stability was prepared. Bonding parameters have been calculated and the nature of ionic bonding of the germanate glass has been determined. Mid-infrared fluorescence was observed and corresponding radiative properties were investigated. For Er{sup 3+}:{sup 4}I{sub 11/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 13/2} transition, high spontaneous radiative transition probability (30.09 s{sup −1}), large emission cross section ((14.84 ± 0.10) × 10{sup −21} cm{sup 2}) and superior gain performance were obtained from the prepared glass. Besides, energy transfer processes concerning the 2.7 μm emission were also discussed in detail. According to simplified rate equation and Dexter’s theory, energy transfer microscopic parameters were computed to elucidate observed 2.7 μm emissions. Results demonstrate that the prepared germanate glass possessing excellent spectroscopic properties might be an attractive candidate for mid-infrared laser or amplifier.

  18. Analysis of energy transfer process based emission spectra of erbium doped germanate glasses for mid-infrared laser materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Muzhi; Wei, Tao; Zhou, Beier; Tian, Ying; Zhou, Jiajia; Xu, Shiqing; Zhang, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Er 3+ doped germanate glass with good thermal stability were prepared. • Ionic boding nature was proved by bonding parameter calculation. • Mid-infrared fluorescent behaviors and energy transfer were investigated. • Rate equation and Dexter’s theory were utilized to elucidate 2.7 μm emission. - Abstract: Er 3+ activated germanate glass with good thermal stability was prepared. Bonding parameters have been calculated and the nature of ionic bonding of the germanate glass has been determined. Mid-infrared fluorescence was observed and corresponding radiative properties were investigated. For Er 3+ : 4 I 11/2 → 4 I 13/2 transition, high spontaneous radiative transition probability (30.09 s −1 ), large emission cross section ((14.84 ± 0.10) × 10 −21 cm 2 ) and superior gain performance were obtained from the prepared glass. Besides, energy transfer processes concerning the 2.7 μm emission were also discussed in detail. According to simplified rate equation and Dexter’s theory, energy transfer microscopic parameters were computed to elucidate observed 2.7 μm emissions. Results demonstrate that the prepared germanate glass possessing excellent spectroscopic properties might be an attractive candidate for mid-infrared laser or amplifier

  19. Radioactive emission data from Canadian nuclear generating stations 1986 to 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    All nuclear generating station (NGSs) release small quantities of radioactivity in a controlled manner into both the atmosphere (as gaseous effluents) and adjoining water bodies (as liquid effluents). The purpose of this document is to report on the magnitude of these emissions for each operating NGS in Canada and to indicate how these emissions compare with the relevant limitations imposed by the AECB as part of its regulatory and licensing program. The data show that the levels of emissions of gaseous and liquid effluents from all currently operating NGSs are well below the values mandated by the AECB. In fact, since 1987 no emissions have exceeded 1% of those values. 3 tabs., 46 figs

  20. Studies of neutron emission from relativistic nuclear interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, S L; Wang, Y L; Guo, H Y; Sá Ben-Hao; Zheng, Y M; Brandt, R; Vater, P; Wan, J S; Ochs, M; Kulakov, B A; Sosnin, A N; Krivopustov, M I; Butsev, V S; Bradnova, V

    1999-01-01

    Studies were carried out on the yields and spatial distributions of secondary neutrons produced in the relativistic nuclear interactions of 1.5 GeV to 14.4 GeV projectiles p, d and alpha-particles with targets Pb and U/Pb. CR-39 track detectors were used to measure the neutrons. It shows that: (1) Secondary neutrons are produced in the whole length of Pb or U targets having a thickness of 20 cm. The neutron intensities produced by proton bombardments are reduced along the proton beam direction in the targets. The higher the energy of protons, the lower the reduction rate of the neutrons. The reduction rate of neutrons in U target is higher than in Pb target for the same energy of protons. (2) The radial intensities of neutrons decrease as the distance increases from the target central line. (3) The neutron yield in U target by proton bombardments is approx 55% higher than in Pb target. (4) The ratio of neutron yield by 14.4 GeV alpha to 7.3 GeV d bombardment in Pb target is 1.74+-0.20.

  1. Quantitative emission tomography by coded aperture imaging in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilhem, J.B.

    1982-06-01

    The coded aperture imaging is applied to nuclear medicine, since ten years. However no satisfactory clinical results have been obtained thus for. The reason is that digital reconstruction methods which have been implemented, in particular the method which use deconvolution filtering are not appropriate for quantification. Indeed these methods which all based on the assumption of shift invariance of the coding procedure, which is contradictory to the geometrical recording conditions giving the best depth resolution, do not take into account gamma rays attenuation by tissues and in most cases give tomograms with artefacts from blurred structures. A method is proposed which has not these limitations and considers the reconstruction problem as the ill-conditioned problem of solving a Fredholm integral equation. The main advantage of this method lies in fact that the transmission kernel of the integral equation is obtained experimentally, and the approximate solution of this equation, close enough to the original 3-D radioactive object, can be obtained in spite of the ill-conditioned nature of the problem, by use of singular values decomposition (S. V. D.) of the kernel [fr

  2. Detector design issues for compact nuclear emission cameras dedicated to breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Craig S.

    2003-01-01

    Certain gamma ray and positron emitting radiotracers have shown great promise for use in the detection, diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Unfortunately, standard nuclear emission cameras (SPECT, PET) found in the clinic are not practical for breast imaging of these emissions due to inadequate spatial and energy resolutions and sensitivity, large and awkward size, and relatively high cost per study. High spatial and energy resolutions and sensitivity are needed for good lesion detectability. Due to these limitations of standard cameras, there has been recent research into the development of small, compact nuclear emission imagers dedicated for close-proximity breast imaging. The small detector head size means a variety of exotic detectors or collimators may be implemented to improve spatial and energy resolution and sensitivity performances at a reasonable cost. In this paper, we will present some of the compact gamma ray and annihilation photon imaging detector designs that have been proposed and/or developed for dedicated breast imaging. We will review the physics and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various detector configurations. Finally we will estimate the fundamental spatial resolution potential available with close-proximity nuclear emission imaging and discuss how one may approach those limits through proper detector design

  3. Pre-equilibrium gamma emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sudip

    1993-01-01

    Together with the direct reaction and the compound nuclear emissions the pre-equilibrium (PEQ) or pre-compound processes give a fairly complete picture of nuclear reactions induced by light ions at energies of some tens of MeV. PEQ particle emissions covering the higher energy continuum spectra have been investigated in detail both experimentally and theoretically. In contrast, very little work has been done on PEQ γ- emissions. The reason is that in spite of extensive work done on PEQ particle emissions, the mechanism is not yet fully understood. Also, the PEQ γ-emission cross-sections (∼ micro barns) are very small compared to the PEQ particle emission cross-sections (∼ milli barns). Yet apart from the academic interest the understanding of PEQ γ-emissions is important for applied fusion research etc. In this paper the PEQ γ-emissions is discussed and the work done in this field is reviewed. (author). 14 refs

  4. Study of some continuous spectra produced by nuclear reactions with light nuclei; Etude de quelques spectres continus produits par reactions nucleaires avec des noyaux legers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez, L

    1966-07-01

    The continuous spectra coming from several nuclear reactions with light nuclei were measured. The spectra can be explained by a two-step reaction mechanism; however, the reactions produced by {sup 6}Li are different. A mechanism was proposed to explain their spectra based on the following assumptions: {sup 6}Li makes a nuclear molecule with the target which subsequently breaks up in such a way that an {alpha} particle comes out with the kinetic energy that it has in the molecule. The calculated spectra and those measured are in good agreement. (author) [French] Nous avons mesure les spectres continus produits dans plusieurs reactions nucleaires avec des noyaux legers. A l'exception des spectres produits par {sup 6}Li, on a trouve qu'on pouvait expliquer ces spectres par le mecanisme des reactions en deux etapes. Nous avons propose un mecanisme pour expliquer les spectres produits par {sup 6}Li. On suppose que {sup 6}Li forme une molecule nucleaire avec la cible qui eclate ensuite de facon telle qu'une particule alpha de la molecule sort avec l'energie cinetique de son mouvement propre dans la molecule. Les spectres calcules avec ces hypotheses et les spectres mesures sont en bon accord. (auteur)

  5. Study of the impact of atmospheric emissions (41AR) during operation of a nuclear reactor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Simone F.; Barreto, Alberto A.; Jacomino, Vanusa Maria F.; Rodrigues, Paulo Cesar H.

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge of the atmosphere dispersion of radionuclides, resulting from a nuclear reactor emissions during normal operation, is an important step in the process of nuclear licensing and environmental. This step requires a study to evaluate the radiological environmental impact. The results of this study are used by radiation protection agents to control the exposure of public to radiation during the operation of nuclear facilities. The elaboration of environmental impact assessment due to atmospheric emissions is based on a study of atmospheric dispersion. The aim of this study is estimate the concentrations of radionuclides in different compartments of the ecosystem and calculate the dose received by man as a result of radiation exposure in different scenarios of interest. This paper deals with the case study of the impact of atmospheric emissions of 41 Ar during operation of a nuclear research reactor. This study was accomplished with the application of the dispersion model ARTM (Radionuclide Transport Atmospheric Model), along with the geoprocessing resources. Among the results are: the spatial distribution of population by age; topography of the region, local wind rose, atmospheric stability and the estimate of the concentration of radionuclide 41 Ar and of dose. The results indicate that the dose, by external irradiation due to immersion in the cloud, was below the limits established by regulatory agencies. (author)

  6. The Kyoto Protocol Emissions Trading Mechanisms - A Model for financing future nuclear development in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purica, Ionut; John Saroudis

    2001-01-01

    At the beginning of 2001 Romania ratified the Kyoto Protocol (Law 3/2001) thus becoming the first European country to do so. The mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol are now opening new ways to sponsor the financing of nuclear projects. In May 2001 Societatea Nationala Nuclearoelectrica S.S. (SNN) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and ANSALDO of Italy signed a contract to complete the second CANDU unit at Cernavoda thus giving a new momentum to the nuclear program in Romania. The Government of Romania has indicated its desire to proceed with the completion of the other units on the Cernavoda site and is open to explore every potential financing mechanism to make this a reality. Although the Kyoto Protocol was not ratified by those countries that have the greatest need to reduce emissions, a market for emissions trading has developed, Canada being one of the important players in this market. Since the emission reduction per dollar invested in the Romanian nuclear program would bring much more reduction than the marginal reduction per dollar invested in environmental protection programs in Canada, where the saturation effect is already taking place, we consider that the application of the Kyoto Protocol mechanisms represents a realistic source for a sustainable cooperation of the two countries. This trend is in line with the latest activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This paper analyzes the impact that the use of emissions credits would have on a typical financing scheme for a future CANDU project in Romania given the present situation and also proposes a model for the structure of the emissions trade that would generate a source of funding for the project. The conclusion is that there is real potential in using Kyoto Protocol mechanisms for financing nuclear development with benefits for both Romania and Canada. (authors)

  7. DISCOVERY OF NUCLEAR WATER MASER EMISSION IN CENTAURUS A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Juergen; Meier, David S.; Walter, Fabian; Mao, Minnie Y., E-mail: jott@nrao.edu, E-mail: dmeier@nmt.edu, E-mail: walter@mpia.de, E-mail: mmao@nrao.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); and others

    2013-07-10

    We report the detection of a 22 GHz water maser line in the nearest (D {approx} 3.8 Mpc) radio galaxy Centaurus A (Cen A) using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The line is centered at a velocity of {approx}960 km s{sup -1}, which is redshifted by about 415 km s{sup -1} from the systemic velocity. Such an offset, as well as the width of {approx}120 km s{sup -1}, could be consistent with either a nuclear maser arising from an accretion disk of the central supermassive black hole (SMBH), or with a jet maser that is emitted from the material that is shocked near the base of the jet in Cen A. The best spatial resolution of our ATCA data constrains the origin of the maser feature within <3 pc of the SMBH. The maser exhibits an isotropic luminosity of {approx}1 L{sub Sun }, which classifies it as a kilomaser, and appears to be variable on timescales of months. A kilomaser can also be emitted by shocked gas in star-forming regions. Given the small projected distance from the core, the large offset from systemic velocity, and the smoothness of the line feature, we conclude that a jet maser line emitted by shocked gas around the base of the active galactic nucleus is the most likely explanation. For this scenario we can infer a minimum density of the radio jet of {approx}> 10 cm{sup -3}, which indicates substantial mass entrainment of surrounding gas into the propagating jet material.

  8. High resolution γ spectra of 40-44 MeV γ photon activation products: Part 3 - a summary of γ rays, radionuclides and nuclear interferences observed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.R.; Hislop, J.S.

    1980-09-01

    A table of γ rays observed in the high resolution γ ray spectra of 40 to 44 MeV γ photon activation products is presented. This table is arranged in order of increasing γ ray energy and the parent isotopes, their half-lives and their inactive precursors are identified. Nuclear interferences caused by production of an active isotope from different parent elements have been identified and evaluated quantitatively. These are also tabulated. (author)

  9. Nuclear energy. Choice for GHG emission reduction and sustainable energy development in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Rui; Zou Lin; Wang Yongping

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the sustainability of China's energy development and the major challenges in four energy priorities are discussed by establishing and applying of Indicators of Sustainable Energy Development (ISED) with consideration of nuclear power as one viable option. On this basis, China's Energy Strategy to 2020 is discussed in detail. On the other hand, the crucial role that nuclear energy will play in the fields of emission reduction and climate change is discussed by analyzing illustrative models under different energy development scenarios. An assessment on what could look like in a fast developing country like China when an equivalent fund was invested in five different energy options of hydro-power, coal-fired power, nuclear power, wind power and gas-fired power would be presented with a discussion about possible future international climate protection regimes and the methodologies to evaluate the potential roles of those energy options, especially, the nuclear energy. (author)

  10. Stable angular emission spectra in white organic light-emitting diodes using graphene/PEDOT:PSS composite electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyunsu; Lee, Hyunkoo; Lee, Jonghee; Sung, Woo Jin; Kwon, Byoung-Hwa; Joo, Chul-Woong; Shin, Jin-Wook; Han, Jun-Han; Moon, Jaehyun; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Cho, Seungmin; Cho, Nam Sung

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we suggest a graphene/ poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) composite as a transparent electrode for stabilizing white emission of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Graphene/PEDOT:PSS composite electrodes have increased reflectance when compared to graphene itself, but their reflectance is still lower than that of ITO itself. Changes in the reflectance of the composite electrode have the advantage of suppressing the angular spectral distortion of white emission OLEDs and achieving an efficiency of 16.6% for white OLEDs, comparable to that achieved by graphene-only electrodes. By controlling the OLED structure to compensate for the two-beam interference effect, the CIE color coordinate change (Δxy) of OLEDs based on graphene/PEDOT:PSS composite electrodes is 0.018, less than that based on graphene-only electrode, i.e.,0.027.

  11. Emission spectra of a pulse needle-to-plane corona-like discharge in conductive aqueous solution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimek, Milan; Člupek, Martin; Babický, Václav; Lukeš, Petr; Šunka, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 5 (2012), 055031-055031 ISSN 0963-0252 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00430802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Water * pulsed electrical breakdown * point-plane geometry * streamer propagation * corona discharge * emission spectroscopy Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.515, year: 2012 http://iopscience.iop.org/0963-0252/21/5/055031/pdf/0963-0252_21_5_055031.pdf

  12. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. II. Hybrid cumulant expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Moix, Jeremy; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    We develop a hybrid cumulant expansion method to account for the system-bath entanglement in the emission spectrum in the multi-chromophoric Förster transfer rate. In traditional perturbative treatments, the emission spectrum is usually expanded with respect to the system-bath coupling term in both real and imaginary time. This perturbative treatment gives a reliable absorption spectrum, where the bath is Gaussian and only the real-time expansion is involved. For the emission spectrum, the initial state is an entangled state of the system plus bath. Traditional perturbative methods are problematic when the excitations are delocalized and the energy gap is larger than the thermal energy, since the second-order expansion cannot predict the displacement of the bath. In the present method, the real-time dynamics is carried out by using the 2nd-order cumulant expansion method, while the displacement of the bath is treated more accurately by utilizing the exact reduced density matrix of the system. In a sense, the hybrid cumulant expansion is based on a generalized version of linear response theory with entangled initial states.

  13. Theoretical modeling and analysis of the emission spectra of a ChemCam standard: Basalt BIR-1A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, J. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Judge, E.J. [Chemical Diagnostics and Engineering, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Johns, H.M.; Kilcrease, D.P. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Barefield, J.E. [Chemical Diagnostics and Engineering, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); McInroy, R. [Physical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hakel, P. [Computational Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wiens, R.C. [Space and Remote Sensing Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Clegg, S.M. [Physical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-08-01

    We report on efforts to perform theoretical modeling of the emission spectrum measured from a basalt sample. We compare our calculations with measurements that were made to provide standards for the ChemCam instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory. We find that to obtain good agreement between modeling and the measurement, it is necessary to determine atomic and ionic level populations via a multi-element approach in which the free electron density that is created influences all the species within the plasma. Calculations that consider each element separately are found to be in poorer agreement with the measured spectrum, indicating that the ‘matrix effect’ term often used to describe the influence of other species on the emission spectrum from a given element is due to the influence of the global electron density of the plasma. We explore the emission features in both the visible and near-infrared wavelength ranges, and also examine radiation transport effects for some of the most intense features found in the basalt spectrum. Finally, we also provide comparisons of the ChemCam measurement with new high-resolution spectral measurements. - Highlights: • LIBS basalt spectrum • Ab-initio theoretical modeling • Discussion of matrix effects • Discussion of radiation transport effects • High-resolution measurements of Basalt.

  14. The potential role of nuclear power in controlling CO2 emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulkerson, W.; Jones, J.E.; Delene, J.G.; Perry, A.M.; Cantor, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear power currently reduces CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel burning worldwide by about 8% (0.4 Gt(C)/yr). It can continue to play an important role only if it can grow substantially in the next 50 years. For such growth to occur public confidence will need to improve throughout the world. That might happen if (a) other non-fossil alternatives are inadequate to meet electricity demand growth, (b) the risks to society from global warming are perceived to be very high, (c) nuclear technology improves substantially, and (d) an international institutional setting is devised to manage the nuclear enterprise so that the technology is available to all nations while catastrophic accidents and proliferation of nuclear weapon capabilities are avoided. It seems feasible that the necessary technological and institutional advances can be devised and tested over the next 20 years. It is also plausible that the direct costs of electricity produced by the system would be in the range of 50-100 mills/kWhr (1990 dollars) delivered to the grid. In other words, the direct costs of nuclear power should not be greater than they are today. Achieving such an outcome will require aggressive technical and institutional RD ampersand D performed in a cooperative international setting. If rapid growth of nuclear power can begin again in 15-20 years it could supply 30-50% of world electricity in 50 years and cut CO 2 emission rates by up to 2.5 Gt(C)/yr. This would be a substantial contribution to controlling greenhouse gases, but it is not sufficient. Improved efficiency and various renewable energy sources must also grow rapidly if CO 2 emission rates from electricity generation are to be reduced from the current value of about 2 Gt(C)/yr. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  15. The potential role of nuclear power in controlling CO sub 2 emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulkerson, W.; Jones, J.E.; Delene, J.G.; Perry, A.M.; Cantor, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear power currently reduces CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel burning worldwide by about 8% (0.4 Gt(C)/yr). It can continue to play an important role only if it can grow substantially in the next 50 years. For such growth to occur public confidence will need to improve throughout the world. That might happen if (a) other non-fossil alternatives are inadequate to meet electricity demand growth, (b) the risks to society from global warming are perceived to be very high, (c) nuclear technology improves substantially, and (d) an international institutional setting is devised to manage the nuclear enterprise so that the technology is available to all nations while catastrophic accidents and proliferation of nuclear weapon capabilities are avoided. It seems feasible that the necessary technological and institutional advances can be devised and tested over the next 20 years. It is also plausible that the direct costs of electricity produced by the system would be in the range of 50-100 mills/kWhr (1990 dollars) delivered to the grid. In other words, the direct costs of nuclear power should not be greater than they are today. Achieving such an outcome will require aggressive technical and institutional RD D performed in a cooperative international setting. If rapid growth of nuclear power can begin again in 15-20 years it could supply 30-50% of world electricity in 50 years and cut CO{sub 2} emission rates by up to 2.5 Gt(C)/yr. This would be a substantial contribution to controlling greenhouse gases, but it is not sufficient. Improved efficiency and various renewable energy sources must also grow rapidly if CO{sub 2} emission rates from electricity generation are to be reduced from the current value of about 2 Gt(C)/yr. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. A case study of HF radar spectra and 630.0 nm auroral emission in the pre-midnight sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lester

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of HF radar backscatter observed by the CUTLASS Finland radar, meridian scanning photometer data from Longyearbyen, magnetic field variations from IMAGE stations, and particle precipitation measured by the DMSP F12 spacecraft is presented. The interval under discussion occurred in the pre-midnight local time sector, during a period of weakly northward interplanetary magnetic field. A region of HF backscatter, typically 8 degrees wide, occurred in the field of view of the CUTLASS Finland radar. A well defined gradient in the spectral width parameter was present, with mainly low (< 200 m s - 1 spectral widths in the lower latitude part of the scatter and predominantly large (> 200 ms - 1 spectral widths in the higher latitude part. The relationship between the spectral width and the red line (630.0 nm emission measured by the meridian scanning photometer is considered. The poleward border of the red line emission, which has, in the past, been proposed as being representative of the polar cap boundary, was co-located to within 1° of magnetic latitude with the gradient in spectral width for part of the interval. Statistically, large spectral widths occurred poleward of the red line emission, while small spectral widths occurred within or equatorward of the red line emission. Near simultaneous DMSP particle observations in the 20 eV to 20 keV range indicate that the poleward border of the red line emission and the gradient in spectral width occurred at the same latitude as the transition from auroral oval to polar rain particle energies. We conclude that the large spectral widths were not caused by particle precipitation associated with the auroral oval. There were two periods of special interest when the relationship between the red line and the spectral width broke down. The first of these happened during enhanced red line and green line (557.7 nm emission, with a drop out of the radar scatter and an enhanced, narrow westward

  17. Particle induced X-ray emission and complementary nuclear methods for trace element determination; Plenary lecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, S A.E. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1992-03-01

    In this review the state-of-the-art of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) methods for the determination of trace elements is described. The developmental work has mostly been carried out in nuclear physics laboratories, where accelerators are available, but now the increased interest has led to the establishment of other dedicated PIXE facilities. The reason for this interest is the versatility, high sensitivity and multi-element capability of PIXE analysis. A further very important advantage is that PIXE can be combined with the microbeam technique, which makes elemental mapping with a spatial resolution of about 1 {mu}m possible. As a technique, PIXE can also be combined with other nuclear reactions such as elastic scattering and particle-induced gamma emission, so that light elements can be determined. The usefulness of PIXE is illustrated by a number of typical applications in biology, medicine, geology, air pollution research, archaeology and the arts. (author).

  18. Emission spectra of the species ablated from a solid target submerged in liquid: vibrational temperature of C2 molecules in water-confined geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakka, Tetsuo; Saito, Kotaro; Ogata, Yukio H.

    2002-01-01

    Emission spectra of C 2 molecules produced at the water-graphite interface by pulsed laser irradiation were obtained at various delay times from the irradiation. Vibrational temperature was determined by the Boltzmann plot based on the vibrational bands in Δν=-1 branch of the Swan system. The results show that it was ca. 5000 K and did not change significantly with the delay time. With increasing the delay time up to ca. 500 ns the signal from the Swan band disappeared before the decrease of the vibrational temperature. The results were explained by the formation of a gas cavity and its collapse at several hundreds of nanoseconds from the laser pulse

  19. Development of a non-radiological air emissions inventory for a nuclear industrial facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patnoe, C.A.; Porter, G.V.; Almquist, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the major issues that impacted the organization and structure of a project for developing a comprehensive non- radiological air emissions inventory for a nuclear weapons facility. The major issues addressed paralleled the development of the inventory project and fall into the following categories: (1) defining the scope of work, (2) developing and managing the air emission inventory project, and (3) field investigations and evaluating operations for air emissions. This paper also describes the lines of communication that were established with state regulators to resolve problems and develop a successful working relationship. This paper illustrates a means to complete a complex air emission inventory with proper organization and cooperation with regulatory agencies. Further, it indicates the need of critical evaluation of project tasks to evaluate their impact on project schedule; it provides a method for implementing a quality assurance program that audits all phases of the emission survey; and it demonstrates a way of effectively managing outside contractors to meet schedule requirements and assure a high quality product. This paper is of value to those undertaking a similar complex air emission survey. 2 refs

  20. Detection of organic compound signatures in infra-red, limb emission spectra observed by the MIPAS-B2 balloon instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Remedios

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic compounds play a central role in troposphere chemistry and increasingly are a viable target for remote sensing observations. In this paper, infra-red spectral features of three organic compounds are investigated in thermal emission spectra recorded on a flight on 8 May 1998 near Aire sur l'Adour by a balloon-borne instrument, MIPAS-B2, operating at high spectral resolution. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that PAN and acetone can be detected in infra-red remote sensing spectra of the upper troposphere; detection results are presented at tangent altitudes of 10.4 km and 7.5 km (not acetone. In addition, the results provide the first observation of spectral features of formic acid in thermal emission, as opposed to solar occultation, and confirm that concentrations of this gas are measurable in the mid-latitude upper troposphere, given accurate spectroscopic data. For PAN, two bands are observed centred at 794 cm−1 and 1163 cm−1. For acetone and formic acid, one band has been detected for each so far with band centres at 1218 cm−1 and 1105 cm−1 respectively. Mixing ratios inferred at 10.4 km tangent altitude are 180 pptv and 530 pptv for PAN and acetone respectively, and 200 pptv for formic acid with HITRAN 2000 spectroscopy. Accuracies are on the order of 15 to 40%. The detection technique applied here is verified by examining weak but known signatures of CFC-12 and HCFC-22 in the same spectral regions as those of the organic compounds, with results confirming the quality of both the instrument and the radiative transfer model. The results suggest the possibility of global sensing of the organic compounds studied here which would be a major step forward in verifying and interpreting global tropospheric model calculations.

  1. The reduction of atmospheric emissions after the implementation of first Polish nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewiński, Maciej

    2018-04-01

    In this work the environmental benefits in the atmospheric emissions after the implementation of 3,000 MW nuclear power plants were assessed and presented. To determine the quantity of avoided emissions of CO2, NOx, SO2 and Hg compounds, harmonised stoichiometric combustion model dedicated to solid fuel fired power plant was created. To increase the credibility of the studies, future strict emission standards (Directive 2010/75/EU, BAT documents for LCP) were included as well. In conducted studies, representative samples of 3 different Polish solid fuels were examined (by comprehensive proximate and ultimate analysis) and used in assessment. It was proven that by the replacement of thermal solid fuel power plant by nuclear unit (with annual production rate of 22.4 TWh net) up to 16.4 million tonnes of lignite, 8.9 million tonnes of hard coal or 13.1 million tonnes of solid biomass can be saved. Further, for the case of lignite, the emission, at least, of 21.29 million tonnes of CO2 (6.9% of all Polish emission in 2015), 1,610 tonnes of dust (0.4%), 16,102 tonnes of NOx (2.2%), 16,102 tonnes of SO2 (2.0%) and 564 kg of mercury (5.9%) can be avoided. For selected hard coal, calculated emission savings were equal to 17.60 million tonnes of CO2 (5.7%), 1,357 tonnes of dust (0.4%), 13,566 tonnes of NOx (1.9%), 13,566 tonnes of SO2 (1.7%), 271 kg of mercury (2.9%), and for biomass - equal to 20.04 million tonnes of CO2 (6.5%), 1,471 tonnes of dust (0.4%), 14,712 tonnes of NOx (2.0%), 14,712 tonnes of SO2 (1.8%) and 294 kg of mercury (3.1%).

  2. The reduction of atmospheric emissions after the implementation of first Polish nuclear power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cholewiński Maciej

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work the environmental benefits in the atmospheric emissions after the implementation of 3,000 MW nuclear power plants were assessed and presented. To determine the quantity of avoided emissions of CO2, NOx, SO2 and Hg compounds, harmonised stoichiometric combustion model dedicated to solid fuel fired power plant was created. To increase the credibility of the studies, future strict emission standards (Directive 2010/75/EU, BAT documents for LCP were included as well. In conducted studies, representative samples of 3 different Polish solid fuels were examined (by comprehensive proximate and ultimate analysis and used in assessment. It was proven that by the replacement of thermal solid fuel power plant by nuclear unit (with annual production rate of 22.4 TWh net up to 16.4 million tonnes of lignite, 8.9 million tonnes of hard coal or 13.1 million tonnes of solid biomass can be saved. Further, for the case of lignite, the emission, at least, of 21.29 million tonnes of CO2 (6.9% of all Polish emission in 2015, 1,610 tonnes of dust (0.4%, 16,102 tonnes of NOx (2.2%, 16,102 tonnes of SO2 (2.0% and 564 kg of mercury (5.9% can be avoided. For selected hard coal, calculated emission savings were equal to 17.60 million tonnes of CO2 (5.7%, 1,357 tonnes of dust (0.4%, 13,566 tonnes of NOx (1.9%, 13,566 tonnes of SO2 (1.7%, 271 kg of mercury (2.9%, and for biomass - equal to 20.04 million tonnes of CO2 (6.5%, 1,471 tonnes of dust (0.4%, 14,712 tonnes of NOx (2.0%, 14,712 tonnes of SO2 (1.8% and 294 kg of mercury (3.1%.

  3. Dominant superiority of nuclear power in the reduction of CO2 emissions. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kase, Susumu

    2011-01-01

    Soon after the oil crisis in 1973, then French president Giscard d'Estaing and his administration very strongly persuaded the French people to make the nation's electrical power consist mainly of nuclear power. As a result, by the beginning of 1990's, as high as 80% of electric power generated in France became nuclear (30% in Japan). Add the share 9% of hydroelectric power, 89% of electric power generated in France is now free of fossil fuel, and emission of green house gases per capita in France is now 42% less than in Japan. What Japan should do first of all in the coming future is to emulate the French experience. That should result in a 35% reduction in green house gas emission by 2030 at an acceptable cost. To put that in practice we first must overcome the now considerably weakened but still stubbornly remaining national sentiment against nuclear power. It will take a very strong top to bottom persuasion by the leading sector of the society. As to this matter the author stressed in a separate paper that mankind, like in the instinctive language capability, possesses a born instinctive way of life to believe in and live by the dominant spirit of the time. And unfortunately the current spirit of the time still is tainted with irrational dislike of nuclear power which can be weakened by strong and persistent persuasion. (author)

  4. Development of Nuclear Renewable Oil Shale Systems for Flexible Electricity and Reduced Fossil Fuel Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel Curtis; Charles Forsberg; Humberto Garcia

    2015-05-01

    We propose the development of Nuclear Renewable Oil Shale Systems (NROSS) in northern Europe, China, and the western United States to provide large supplies of flexible, dispatchable, very-low-carbon electricity and fossil fuel production with reduced CO2 emissions. NROSS are a class of large hybrid energy systems in which base-load nuclear reactors provide the primary energy used to produce shale oil from kerogen deposits and simultaneously provide flexible, dispatchable, very-low-carbon electricity to the grid. Kerogen is solid organic matter trapped in sedimentary shale, and large reserves of this resource, called oil shale, are found in northern Europe, China, and the western United States. NROSS couples electricity generation and transportation fuel production in a single operation, reduces lifecycle carbon emissions from the fuel produced, improves revenue for the nuclear plant, and enables a major shift toward a very-low-carbon electricity grid. NROSS will require a significant development effort in the United States, where kerogen resources have never been developed on a large scale. In Europe, however, nuclear plants have been used for process heat delivery (district heating), and kerogen use is familiar in certain countries. Europe, China, and the United States all have the opportunity to use large scale NROSS development to enable major growth in renewable generation and either substantially reduce or eliminate their dependence on foreign fossil fuel supplies, accelerating their transitions to cleaner, more efficient, and more reliable energy systems.

  5. Effects of varying environmental conditions on emissivity spectra of bulk lunar soils: Application to Diviner thermal infrared observations of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Patterson, W. R.; Pieters, C. M.; Mustard, J. F.; Bowles, N. E.; Paige, D. A.; Glotch, T. D.; Thompson, C.

    2017-02-01

    Currently, few thermal infrared measurements exist of fine particulate (samples (e.g. minerals, mineral mixtures, rocks, meteorites, and lunar soils) measured under simulated lunar conditions. Such measurements are fundamental for interpreting thermal infrared (TIR) observations by the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (Diviner) onboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter as well as future TIR observations of the Moon and other airless bodies. In this work, we present thermal infrared emissivity measurements of a suite of well-characterized Apollo lunar soils and a fine particulate (sample as we systematically vary parameters that control the near-surface environment in our vacuum chamber (atmospheric pressure, incident solar-like radiation, and sample cup temperature). The atmospheric pressure is varied between ambient (1000 mbar) and vacuum (radiation is varied between 52 and 146 mW/cm2, and the sample cup temperature is varied between 325 and 405 K. Spectral changes are characterized as each parameter is varied, which highlight the sensitivity of thermal infrared emissivity spectra to the atmospheric pressure and the incident solar-like radiation. Finally spectral measurements of Apollo 15 and 16 bulk lunar soils are compared with Diviner thermal infrared observations of the Apollo 15 and 16 sampling sites. This comparison allows us to constrain the temperature and pressure conditions that best simulate the near-surface environment of the Moon for future laboratory measurements and to better interpret lunar surface compositions as observed by Diviner.

  6. Effects of the application of different window functions and projection methods on processing of 1H J-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for metabolomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiziani, Stefano; Lodi, Alessia; Ludwig, Christian; Parsons, Helen M.; Viant, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    Two dimensional (2D) homonuclear 1 H J-resolved (JRES) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is increasingly used in metabolomics. This approach visualises metabolite chemical shifts and scalar couplings along different spectral dimensions, thereby increasing peak dispersion and facilitating spectral assignments and accurate quantification. Here, we optimise the processing of 2D JRES spectra by evaluating different window functions, a traditional sine-bell (SINE) and a combined sine-bell-exponential (SEM) function. Furthermore, we evaluate different projection methods for generating 1D projected spectra (pJRES). Spectra were recorded from three disparate types of biological samples and evaluated in terms of sensitivity, reproducibility and resolution. Overall, the SEM window function yielded considerably higher sensitivity and comparable spectral reproducibility and resolution compared to SINE, for both 1D pJRES and 2D JRES datasets. Furthermore, for pJRES spectra, the highest spectral quality was obtained using SEM combined with skyline projection. These improvements lend further support to utilising 2D J-resolved spectroscopy in metabolomics

  7. Compressed shell conditions extracted from spectroscopic analysis of Ti K-shell absorption spectra with evaluation of line self-emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johns, H. M.; Mancini, R. C.; Hakel, P.; Nagayama, T. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Delettrez, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Ti-doped tracer layers embedded in the shell at varying distances from the fuel-shell interface serve as a spectroscopic diagnostic for direct-drive experiments conducted at OMEGA. Detailed modeling of Ti K-shell absorption spectra produced in the tracer layer considers n = 1–2 transitions in F- through Li-like Ti ions in the 4400–4800 eV range, both including and excluding line self-emission. Testing the model on synthetic spectra generated from 1-D LILAC hydrodynamic simulations reveals that the model including self-emission best reproduces the simulation, while the model excluding self-emission overestimates electron temperature T{sub e} and density N{sub e} to a higher degree for layers closer to the core. The prediction of the simulation that the magnitude of T{sub e} and duration of Ti absorption will be strongly tied to the distance of the layer from the core is consistent with the idea that regions of the shell close to the core are more significantly heated by thermal transport out of the hot dense core, but more distant regions are less affected by it. The simulation predicts more time variation in the observed T{sub e}, N{sub e} conditions in the compressed shell than is observed in the experiment, analysis of which reveals conditions remain in the range T{sub e} = 400–600 eV and N{sub e} = 3.0–10.0 × 10{sup 24} cm{sup −3} for all but the most distant Ti-doped layer, with error bars ∼5% T{sub e} value and ∼10% N{sub e} on average. The T{sub e}, N{sub e} conditions of the simulation lead to a greater degree of ionization for zones close to the core than occurs experimentally, and less ionization for zones far from the core.

  8. Neutrino-pair emission from nuclear de-excitation in core-collapse supernova simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, T.; Langanke, K.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.

    2013-12-01

    We study the impact of neutrino-pair production from the de-excitation of highly excited heavy nuclei on core-collapse supernova simulations, following the evolution up to several 100 ms after core bounce. Our study is based on the agile-boltztransupernova code, which features general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics and accurate three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport in spherical symmetry. In our simulations the nuclear de-excitation process is described in two different ways. At first we follow the approach proposed by Fuller and Meyer [Astrophys. J.AJLEEY0004-637X10.1086/170317 376, 701 (1991)], which is based on strength functions derived in the framework of the nuclear Fermi-gas model of noninteracting nucleons. Second, we parametrize the allowed and forbidden strength distributions in accordance with measurements for selected nuclear ground states. We determine the de-excitation strength by applying the Brink hypothesis and detailed balance. For both approaches, we find that nuclear de-excitation has no effect on the supernova dynamics. However, we find that nuclear de-excitation is the leading source for the production of electron antineutrinos as well as heavy-lepton-flavor (anti)neutrinos during the collapse phase. At sufficiently high densities, the associated neutrino spectra are influenced by interactions with the surrounding matter, making proper simulations of neutrino transport important for the determination of the neutrino-energy loss rate. We find that, even including nuclear de-excitations, the energy loss during the collapse phase is overwhelmingly dominated by electron neutrinos produced by electron capture.

  9. The role of nuclear power in the option zero emission technologies for fossil fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corak, Z.

    2006-01-01

    The energy sector is one of the main sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions particularly carbon dioxide (CO2) increasing concerns due to their potential risk to induce global warming and climate change. The Parties having signed the Kyoto Protocol in December 1997, committed to decrease their GHG emissions. The Protocol states that countries shall undertake promotion, research, development and increased use of new and renewable forms of energy, of carbon dioxide sequestration technologies and of advanced and innovative environmentally sound technologies. The one significant option that is not specifically mentioned is nuclear energy which is essentially carbon-free. There are a number of technical options that could help reducing, or at least slowing the increase of, GHG emissions from the energy sector. The list of options includes: improving the efficiency of energy conversion and end-use processes; shifting to less carbon intensive energy sources (e.g. shifting from coal to natural gas); developing carbon-free or low-carbon energy sources; and carbon sequestration (e.g. planting forests or capturing and storing carbon dioxide). It must be pointed out that nuclear power is one of the few options that are currently available on the market, competitive in a number of countries, especially if global costs to society of alternative options are considered; practically carbon-free; and sustainable at large-scale deployment. The nuclear power could play significant role in alleviating the risk of global climate change. The main objective of the article is to present sequestration options, their cost evaluation as well as comparation with alternative possibilities of nuclear energy production. (author)

  10. CO LINE EMISSION FROM COMPACT NUCLEAR STARBURST DISKS AROUND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armour, J. N.; Ballantyne, D. R., E-mail: jarmour3@gatech.edu [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State Street, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430 (United States)

    2012-06-20

    There is substantial evidence for a connection between star formation in the nuclear region of a galaxy and growth of the central supermassive black hole. Furthermore, starburst activity in the region around an active galactic nucleus (AGN) may provide the obscuration required by the unified model of AGNs. Molecular line emission is one of the best observational avenues to detect and characterize dense, star-forming gas in galactic nuclei over a range of redshift. This paper presents predictions for the carbon monoxide (CO) line features from models of nuclear starburst disks around AGNs. These small-scale ({approx}< 100 pc), dense and hot starbursts have CO luminosities similar to scaled-down ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and quasar host galaxies. Nuclear starburst disks that exhibit a pc-scale starburst and could potentially act as the obscuring torus show more efficient CO excitation and higher brightness temperature ratios than those without such a compact starburst. In addition, the compact starburst models predict strong absorption when J{sub Upper} {approx}> 10, a unique observational signature of these objects. These findings allow for the possibility that CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) could be used to determine if starburst disks are responsible for the obscuration in z {approx}< 1 AGNs. Directly isolating the nuclear CO line emission of such compact regions around AGNs from galactic-scale emission will require high-resolution imaging or selecting AGN host galaxies with weak galactic-scale star formation. Stacking individual CO SLEDs will also be useful in detecting the predicted high-J features.

  11. Prediction of Pseudo relative velocity response spectra at Yucca Mountain for underground nuclear explosions conducted in the Pahute Mesa testing area at the Nevada testing site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.S.

    1991-12-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP), managed by the Office of Geologic Disposal of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy, is examining the feasibility of siting a repository for commercial, high-level nuclear wastes at Yucca Mountain on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This work, intended to extend our understanding of the ground motion at Yucca Mountain resulting from testing of nuclear weapons on the NTS, was funded by the Yucca Mountain project and the Military Applications Weapons Test Program. This report summarizes one aspect of the weapons test seismic investigations conducted in FY88. Pseudo relative velocity response spectra (PSRV) have been calculated for a large body of surface ground motions generated by underground nuclear explosions. These spectra have been analyzed and fit using multiple linear regression techniques to develop a credible prediction technique for surface PSRVs. In addition, a technique for estimating downhole PSRVs at specific stations is included. A data summary, data analysis, prediction development, prediction evaluation, software summary and FORTRAN listing of the prediction technique are included in this report

  12. Charged particle spectra in 32S + 32S interactions at 200 GeV/nucleon from CCD-imaged nuclear collisions in a streamer chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teitelbaum, Lawrence Paul [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-04-01

    We have measured the transverse momentum spectra 1/pT dN/dpT and rapidity distributions dN/dy of negatively charged hadrons and protons for central 32S + 32S interactions at 200 GeV/nucleon incident energy. The negative hadron dN/dy distribution is too broad to be accounted for by thermal models which demand isotropic particle emission. It is compatible with models which emphasize longitudinal dynamics, by either a particle production mechanism, as in the Lund fragmentation model, or by introducing one-dimensional hydrodynamic expansion, as in the Landau model. The proton dN/dy distribution, although showing no evidence for a peak in the target fragmentation region, exhibits limited nuclear stopping power. We estimate the mean rapidity shift of participant target protons to be Δy ~ 1.5, greater than observed for pp collisions, less than measured in central pA collisions, and much less than would be observed for a single equilibrated fireball at midrapidity. Both the negative hadron and proton dN/dy distributions can be fit by a symmetric Landau two-fireball model. Although the spectrum possesses a two-component structure, a comparison to pp data at comparable center-of-mass energy shows no evidence for enhanced production at low pT. The two-component structure can be explained by a thermal and chemical equilibrium model which takes into account the kinematics of resonance decay. Using an expression motivated by longitudinal expansion we find the same temperature for both the protons and negative hadrons at freezeout, Tf ~ 170 MeV. We conclude that the charged particle spectra of negative hadrons and protons can be accommodated in a simple collision picture of limited nuclear stopping, evolution through a state of thermal equilibrium, followed by longitudinal hydrodynamic expansion until freezeout.

  13. Acoustic emission during tensile deformation and fracture of nuclear grade AISI type 304 stainless steel specimens with notches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, C.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission generated during tensile deformation and fracture of nuclear grade AISI type 304 stainless steel specimens with notches has been studied. The extent of acoustic activity generated depends on notch tip severity, notch tip blunting and tearing of the notches. The equation N=AK m applied to the acoustic emission data of the notched specimens has shown good correlation. Acoustic emission technique can be used to estimate the size of an unknown notch. (author)

  14. Comparative study of Monte Carlo particle transport code PHITS and nuclear data processing code NJOY for PKA energy spectra and heating number under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Y.; Ogawa, T.

    2016-01-01

    The modelling of the damage in materials irradiated by neutrons is needed for understanding the mechanism of radiation damage in fission and fusion reactor facilities. The molecular dynamics simulations of damage cascades with full atomic interactions require information about the energy distribution of the Primary Knock on Atoms (PKAs). The most common process to calculate PKA energy spectra under low-energy neutron irradiation is to use the nuclear data processing code NJOY2012. It calculates group-to-group recoil cross section matrices using nuclear data libraries in ENDF data format, which is energy and angular recoil distributions for many reactions. After the NJOY2012 process, SPKA6C is employed to produce PKA energy spectra combining recoil cross section matrices with an incident neutron energy spectrum. However, intercomparison with different processes and nuclear data libraries has not been studied yet. Especially, the higher energy (~5 MeV) of the incident neutrons, compared to fission, leads to many reaction channels, which produces a complex distribution of PKAs in energy and type. Recently, we have developed the event generator mode (EGM) in the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System PHITS for neutron incident reactions in the energy region below 20 MeV. The main feature of EGM is to produce PKA with keeping energy and momentum conservation in a reaction. It is used for event-by-event analysis in application fields such as soft error analysis in semiconductors, micro dosimetry in human body, and estimation of Displacement per Atoms (DPA) value in metals and so on. The purpose of this work is to specify differences of PKA spectra and heating number related with kerma between different calculation method using PHITS-EGM and NJOY2012+SPKA6C with different libraries TENDL-2015, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 for fusion relevant materials

  15. Biological hazards of radioactivity and the biological consequences of radionuclide emissions from routine operation of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stendig-Lindberg, G.

    1978-01-01

    The biological hazards of radioactivity and the biological consequences of radionuclide emissions from the routine operation of nuclear power reactors are reviewed. ICRP and Scandinavian recommendations for the limitation of annual radiation doses are presented. The contribution of environmental conditions to radiation hazard is also discussed. It is concluded that a review of the justification of nuclear power is urgently needed. (H.K.)

  16. Seismic and dynamic qualification of safety-related electrical and mechanical equipment in operating nuclear power plants: development of a method to generate generic floor-response spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curreri, J.; Costantino, C.; Subudhi, M.; Reich, M.

    1983-09-01

    Generic floor response spectra were developed for use in the qualification of electrical and mechanical equipment in operating nuclear power plants. The characteristics of 1000 floor response spectra were studied to determine the generic spectra. The procedure developed uses as much or as little information that currently exists at the plant relating to the question of equipment qualification. The general approach was to study the effects on the dynamic characteristics of each of the elements in the chain of events that goes between the loads and the responses. This includes the loads, the soils and the structures. A free-field earthquake response spectra was used to generate horizontal earthquake time histories. The excitation was applied through the soil and into the various structures to produce responses in equipment. An entire range of soil conditions was used with each structure. Actual PWR and BWR - Mark I structural models were used. For each model, the stiffness properties were varied, with the same mass, so as to extend the fundamental base structure natural frequency from 2 cps to 36 cps. The natural frequencies of the structures were varied to obtain maximum response conditions. The actual properties were first used to locate the natural frequencies. The stiffness properties were than varied, with the same mass, to extend the range of the fundamental base structure natural frequency. The intention was to have the coupled structural material frequencies in the vicinity of the peak amplitude frequency content of the excitation spectrum. Particular attention was therefore given to the frequency band between 2 Hz and 4 Hz. A horizontal generic floor response spectra is proposed for the top level of a generic structure. Reduction factors are applied to the peak acceleration for equipment at lower levels

  17. Influence of increasing nuclear charge on the Rydberg spectra of Xe, Cs+, and Ba++: Correlation, term dependence, and autoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, W.T. III; Cheng, K.T.; Johnson, W.R.; Lucatorto, T.B.; McIlrath, T.J.; Sugar, J.

    1982-01-01

    The first experimental-theoretical study of Rydberg autoionizing resonances along an isoelectronic sequence is presented. This analysis demonstrates the intimate connection between electron-electron correlation, term-dependence, and autoionization and underscores the power of multichannel quantum defect theory in analyzing complex spectra

  18. Theoretical and Experimental Research in Neutron Spectra and Nuclear Waste Transmutation on Fast Subcritical Assembly with MOX Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipkin, D. A.; Buttsev, V. S.; Chigrinov, S. E.; Kutuev, R. Kh.; Polanski, A.; Rakhno, I. L.; Sissakian, A.; Zulkarneev, R. Ya.; Zulkarneeva, Yu. R.

    2003-07-01

    The paper deals with theoretical and experimental investigation of transmutation rates for a number of long-lived fission products and minor actinides, as well as with neutron spectra formed in a subcritical assembly driven with the following monodirectional beams: 660-MeV protons and 14-MeV neutrons. In this work, the main objective is the comparison of neutron spectra in the MOX assembly for different external driving sources: a 660-MeV proton accelerator and a 14-MeV neutron generator. The SAD project (JINR, Russia) has being discussed. In the context of this project, a subcritical assembly consisting of a cylindrical lead target surrounded by a cylindrical MOX fuel layer will be constructed. Present conceptual design of the subcritical assembly is based on the core with a nominal unit capacity of 15 kW (thermal). This corresponds to a multiplication coefficient, keff= 0.945, and an accelerator beam power of 0.5 kW. The results of theoretical investigations on the possibility of incinerating long-lived fission products and minor actinides in fast neutron spectrum and formation of neutron spectra with different hardness in subcritical systems based on the MOX subcritical assembly are discussed. Calculated neutron spectra emitted from a lead target irradiated by a 660-MeV protons are also presented.

  19. Chemical analysis of industrial scale deposits by combined use of correlation coefficients with emission line detection of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siozos, P.; Philippidis, A.; Hadjistefanou, M.; Gounarakis, C.; Anglos, D.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to determine the mineral composition of various industrial scale samples. The aim of the study has been to investigate the capacity of LIBS to provide a fast, reliable analytical tool for carrying out routine analysis of inorganic scales, potentially on site, as a means to facilitate decision making concerning scale removal procedures. LIBS spectra collected in the range of 200–660 nm conveyed information about the metal content of the minerals. Via a straightforward analysis based on linear correlation of LIBS spectra it was possible to successfully discriminate scale samples into three main groups, Fe-rich, Ca-rich and Ba-rich, on the basis of correlation coefficients. By combining correlation coefficients with spectral data collected in the NIR, 860–960 nm, where sulfur emissions are detected, it became further possible to discriminate sulfates from carbonates as confirmed by independent analysis based on Raman spectroscopy. It is emphasized that the proposed LIBS-based method successfully identifies the major mineral or minerals present in the samples classifying the scales into relevant groups hence enabling process engineers to select appropriate scale dissolution strategies. - Highlights: • LIBS was used to determine the mineral composition of industrial scale samples. • Three groups of inorganic scales were identified: Ca rich, Ba rich and Fe rich. • A method that combines correlation coefficients and line detection is proposed. • The method successfully identifies the main mineral, or minerals, in the samples. • The results were compared with results obtained by use of Raman analysis

  20. Greenhouse gas emission factor for coal power chain in China and the comparison with nuclear power chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Zhonghai; Pan Ziqiang; He Huimin

    1999-01-01

    The Greenhouse Gas Emission for coal power chain in China is analyzed in detail and comprehensively by using the Life Cycle Analysis method. The Greenhouse Gas Emission Factors (GGEF) in each link and for the total power chain are calculated. The total GGEF for coal power chain is 1302.3 gCO 2 /kWh, about 40 times more than that for nuclear power chain. And consequently greenhouse effect could not be aggravated further by nuclear power. The energy strategy for nuclear power development is one of reality ways to retard the greenhouse effect, put resources into rational use and protect environment

  1. The role of advanced nuclear plants in reducing the environmental and economic impact of greenhouse emissions on electrical generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redding, J.; Veitch, C.

    1995-01-01

    The paper discusses the potential impact of imposing economic penalties (externalities) in an effort to reduce emission levels and environmental effect of existing and newly constructed electric facilities, on the selection of generation technology and fuel type, and how the nuclear industry's efforts to develop the next generation of nuclear power facilities will provide an economic, low emission generating option to meet the expanding global electrical needs. The efforts of the US nuclear industry to improve the performance and economics of the existing and next generation facilities are presented, focusing on General Electric's Advanced Boiling Water Reactor and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Development of an acoustic emission equipment for valves of the Nuclear Power Station Atucha 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaccheta, R.; Lopez Pumarega, I.; Straus, A.; Ruzzante, J.; Herzovich, P.

    1994-01-01

    A four channel Acoustic Emission was developed by the Acoustic Emission Group, INEND Department, of the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina, for the detection of leaks in valves of the pressurized air system: ''Sistema de desconexion de emergencias por acido deuteroborico''. Basically, the system consists of four piezoelectric transducers with their corresponding preamplifiers coupled to the piping close to the valves. The following stages: amplifiers, threshold levels, channel identifications and visual alarm system are gathered in a box. The system was installed in the controlled zone of the Nuclear Power Stations Atucha I. It was calibrated and works on line. The values shown on the display are registered daily in order to separate the normal values from the leak ones. (author). 4 refs, 9 figs

  3. Improved Simulation of the Pre-equilibrium Triton Emission in Nuclear Reactions Induced by Nucleons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konobeyev, A. Yu.; Fischer, U.; Pereslavtsev, P. E.; Blann, M.

    2014-04-01

    A new approach is proposed for the calculation of non-equilibrium triton energy distributions in nuclear reactions induced by nucleons of intermediate energies. It combines models describing the nucleon pick-up, the coalescence and the triton knock-out processes. Emission and absorption rates for excited particles are represented by the pre-equilibrium hybrid model. The model of Sato, Iwamoto, Harada is used to describe the nucleon pick-up and the coalescence of nucleons from exciton configurations starting from (2p,1h) states. The contribution of the direct nucleon pick-up is described phenomenologically. Multiple pre-equilibrium emission of tritons is accounted for. The calculated triton energy distributions are compared with available experimental data.

  4. Predicting enteric methane emission of dairy cows with milk Fourier-transform infrared spectra and gas chromatography-based milk fatty acid profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gastelen, S; Mollenhorst, H; Antunes-Fernandes, E C; Hettinga, K A; van Burgsteden, G G; Dijkstra, J; Rademaker, J L W

    2018-06-01

    FTIR-based models. The cross validation results indicate that all CH 4 prediction models (both GC-determined MFA-based and FTIR-based models) are robust; the difference between the coefficient of determination and the coefficient of determination of cross validation ranged from 0.01 to 0.07. The results indicate that GC-determined MFA have a greater potential than FTIR spectra to estimate CH 4 production, yield, and intensity. Both techniques hold potential but may not yet be ready to predict CH 4 emission of dairy cows in practice. Additional CH 4 measurements are needed to improve the accuracy and robustness of GC-determined MFA and FTIR spectra for CH 4 prediction. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. THE OFF-CENTERED SEYFERT-LIKE COMPACT EMISSION IN THE NUCLEAR REGION OF NGC 3621

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.; Silva, Patricia da, E-mail: robertobm@astro.iag.usp.br [Instituto de Astronomia Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão 1226, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, SP CEP 05508-090 (Brazil)

    2016-02-01

    We analyze an optical data cube of the nuclear region of NGC 3621, taken with the integral field unit of the Gemini Multi-object Spectrograph. We found that the previously detected central line emission in this galaxy actually comes from a blob, located at a projected distance of 2.″14 ± 0.″08 (70.1 ± 2.6 pc) from the stellar nucleus. Only diffuse emission was detected in the rest of the field of view, with a deficit of emission at the position of the stellar nucleus. Diagnostic diagram analysis reveals that the off-centered emitting blob has a Seyfert 2 spectrum. We propose that the line-emitting blob may be a “fossil” emission-line region or a light “echo” from an active galactic nucleus (AGN), which was significantly brighter in the past. Our estimates indicate that the bolometric luminosity of the AGN must have decreased by a factor of ∼13–500 during the past ∼230 yr. A second scenario to explain the morphology of the line-emitting areas in the nuclear region of NGC 3621 involves no decrease of the AGN bolometric luminosity and establishes that the AGN is highly obscured toward the observer but not toward the line-emitting blob. The third scenario proposed here assumes that the off-centered line-emitting blob is a recoiling supermassive black hole, after the coalescence of two black holes. Finally, an additional hypothesis is that the central X-ray source is not an AGN, but an X-ray binary. This idea is consistent with all the scenarios we proposed.

  6. Acoustic emission monitoring of preservice testing at Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Pappas, R.A.; Friesel, M.A.

    1985-02-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Plant in the US during hot functional preservice testing is described. Background, methodology, and results are included. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by the US NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing to AE monitoring during reactor operation. 3 refs., 6 figs

  7. Condition monitoring of a check valve for nuclear power plants by means of acoustic emission technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M. R.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, J. T.; Kim, J. S.; Luk, V. K.

    2003-01-01

    This work performed in support of the International Nuclear Energy Research Institute (INERI) program, which was to develop and demonstrate advanced sensor and computational technology for on-line monitoring of the condition of components, structures, and systems in advanced and next-generation nuclear power plants (NPPs). This primary object of this work is to investigate advanced condition monitoring systems based on acoustic emission detection that can provide timely detection of check valve degeneration and service aging so that maintenance/replacement could be preformed prior to loss safety function. The research is focused on the capability of AE technique to provide diagnostic information useful in determining check valve aging and degradation check valve failure and undesirable operating modes. This work also includes the investigation and adaptation of several advanced sensor technologies such as accelerometer and advanced ultrasonic technique. In addition, this work will develop advanced sophisticated signal processing, noise reduction, and pattern recognition techniques and algorithms from check valve degradation.

  8. Proton, deuteron, and triton emission at target rapidity in Au+Au collisions at 10.20A GeV: Spectra and directed flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashktorab, K.; Beavis, D.; Chasman, C.; Chen, Z.; Chu, Y.Y.; Cumming, J.B.; Debbe, R.; Gonin, M.; Gushue, S.; Levine, M.; Moskowitz, B.; Olness, J.; Remsberg, L.P.; Tannenbaum, M.J.; Videbaek, F.; Zhu, F.; Crawford, H.J.; Engelage, J.; Judd, E.; Chang, J.; Eldredge, W.; Fung, S.Y.; Seto, R.; Xu, G.; Zhu, Q.; Chi, C.; Cole, B.A.; Moulson, M.; Nagamiya, S.; Nayak, T.K.; Wang, F.Q.; Wang, Y.; Wu, Y.; Zajc, W.A.; Akiba, Y.; Hamagaki, H.; Homma, S.; Sako, H.; Kaneko, H.; Britt, H.C.; Cianciolo, V.; Luke, J.; Namboodiri, M.N.; Sangster, T.C.; Soltz, R.; Thomas, J.H.; Tonse, S.R.; Ahle, L.; Baker, M.D.; Heintzelman, G.; Ogilvie, C.A.; Steadman, S.G.; Stephans, G.S.; Sung, T.; Woodruff, D.S.; Zachary, D.; Hayano, R.S.; Shigaki, K.; Kumagai, A.; Kurita, K.; Miake, Y.; Ueno-Hayashi, S.; Yagi, K.; Kang, J.H.; Gaardhoje, J.J.; Hansen, A.G.; Hansen, L.

    1998-01-01

    Systematic results are presented on proton, deuteron, and triton emission from the target spectator region in collisions of 10.20A GeV gold projectiles with a gold target. A forward hodoscope utilizes detection of projectile spectator fragments to determine the orientation of the reaction plane, event by event. The directed flow left-angle p x right-angle is determined as a function of pseudorapidity. Projectile spectator energy is used to estimate impact parameters. Results are compared to current theoretical models ARC, ART, and RQMD. In all cases good agreement with theory is obtained for calculations utilizing a pure cascade without nuclear potential contributions. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  9. The Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Excess Peripheral H Atoms (H(sub n)-PAHs) and their Relation to the 3.4 and 6.9 Micrometer PAH Emission Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Materese, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    A population of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and related materials are thought to be responsible for the family of infrared emission features that are seen towards a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A potentially important subclass of these materials are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons whose edges contain excess H atoms (H(sub n)-PAHs). While it has been suggested that this type of compound may be present in the interstellar population, it has been difficult to properly assess this possibility because of a lack of suitable infrared laboratory spectra to assist with analysis of the astronomical data. We present the 4000-500 cm(exp -1) (2.5-20 micrometers) infrared spectra of 23 H(sub n)-PAHs and related molecules isolated in argon matrices, under conditions suitable for use in the interpretation of astronomical data. The spectra of molecules with mixed aromatic and aliphatic domains show unique characteristics that distinguish them from their fully aromatic PAH equivalents. We discuss the changes to the spectra of these types of molecules as they transition from fully aromatic to fully aliphatic forms. The implications for the interpretation of astronomical spectra are discussed with specific emphasis on the 3.4 and 6.9 micrometer features. Laboratory data is compared with emission spectra from IRAS 21282+5050, an object with normal PAH emission features, in addition to IRAS 22272+5435 and IRAS 0496+3429, two protoplanetary nebulae with abnormally large 3.4 micrometer features. We show that 'normal' PAH emission objects contain relatively few H(sub n)-PAHs in their emitter populations, but less evolved protoplanetary nebulae may contain significant abundances of these molecules.

  10. Automated analysis for large amount gaseous fission product gamma-scanning spectra from nuclear power plant and its data mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weihua Zhang; Kurt Ungar; Ian Hoffman; Ryan Lawrie; Jarmo Ala-Heikkila

    2010-01-01

    Based on the Linssi database and UniSampo/Shaman software, an automated analysis platform has been setup for the analysis of large amounts of gamma-spectra from the primary coolant monitoring systems of a CANDU reactor. Thus, a database inventory of gaseous and volatile fission products in the primary coolant of a CANDU reactor has been established. This database is comprised of 15,000 spectra of radioisotope analysis records. Records from the database inventory were retrieved by a specifically designed data-mining module and subjected to further analysis. Results from the analysis were subsequently used to identify the reactor coolant half-life of 135 Xe and 133 Xe, as well as the correlations of 135 Xe and 88 Kr activities. (author)

  11. X-Ray Emission from the Nuclear Region of Arp 220

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paggi, Alessandro; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Risaliti, Guido; Wang, Junfeng; Karovska, Margarita; Elvis, Martin; Maksym, W. Peter; McDowell, Jonathan; Gallagher, Jay

    2017-05-01

    We present an imaging and spectral analysis of the nuclear region of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy merger of Arp 220, using deep Chandra-ACIS observations summing up to ˜ 300 {{ks}}. Narrowband imaging with subpixel resolution of the innermost nuclear region reveals two distinct Fe-K emitting sources, coincident with the infrared and radio nuclear clusters. These sources are separated by 1‧ (˜380 pc). The X-ray emission is extended and elongated in the eastern (E) nucleus, like the disk emission observed in millimeter radio images, suggesting a starburst dominance in this region. We estimate an Fe-K equivalent width of ≳ 1 {keV} for both sources and observe 2-10 keV luminosities of ˜ 2× {10}40 {{erg}} {{{s}}}-1 (western, W) and ˜ 3× {10}40 {{erg}} {{{s}}}-1 (E). In the 6-7 keV band the emission from these regions is dominated by the 6.7 keV Fe xxv line, suggesting a contribution from collisionally ionized gas. The thermal energy content of this gas is consistent with the kinetic energy injection in the interstellar medium by SNe II. However, nuclear winds from a hidden active galactic nucleus (AGN) (\\upsilon ˜ 2000 {{km}} {{{s}}}-1) cannot be excluded. The 3σ upper limits on the neutral Fe-Kα flux of the nuclear regions correspond to the intrinsic AGN 2-10 keV luminosities of < 1× {10}42 {{erg}} {{{s}}}-1 (W) and < 0.4× {10}42 {{erg}} {{{s}}}-1 (E). For typical AGN spectral energy distributions the bolometric luminosities are < 3× {10}43 {{erg}} {{{s}}}-1 (W) and < 8× {10}43 {{erg}} {{{s}}}-1 (E), and black hole masses of < 1× {10}5 {M}⊙ (W) and < 5× {10}5 {M}⊙ (E) are evaluated for Eddington limited AGNs with a standard 10% efficiency.

  12. Recent research directions in Fribourg: nuclear dynamics in resonances revealed by 2-dimensional EEL spectra, electron collisions with ionic liquids and electronic excitation of pyrimidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, M.; Regeta, K.; Gorfinkiel, J.D.; Masin, Z.; Grimme, S.; Bannwarth, C.

    2016-01-01

    The article briefly reviews three subjects recently investigated in Fribourg: 1) electron collisions with surfaces of ionic liquids, 2) two-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra and 3) resonances in absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of unsaturated compounds. Electron energy loss spectra of four ionic liquids revealed a number of excited states, including triplet states. A solution of a dye in an ionic liquid showed an energy-loss band of the solute, but not in all ionic liquids. 2D spectra reveal state-to-state information (given resonance to given final state) and are shown to be an interesting means to gain insight into dynamics of nuclear motion in resonances. Absolute cross sections for pyrimidine are reported as a function of scattering angle and as a function of electron energy. They reveal resonant structure which was reproduced very nicely by R-matrix calculations. The calculation provided an assignment of the resonances which reveals common patterns in compounds containing double bonds. (authors)

  13. Analysis on heavy quarkonia transitions with pion emission in terms of the QCD multipole expansion and determination of mass spectra of hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, Hong-Wei; Tang, Jian; Hao, Xi-Qing; Li, Xue-Qian

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important tasks in high energy physics is the search for the exotic states, such as glueball, hybrid, and multiquark states. The transitions ψ(ns)→ψ(ms)+ππ and Υ(ns)→Υ(ms)+ππ attract great attention because they may reveal characteristics of hybrids. In this work, we analyze those transition modes in terms of the theoretical framework established by Yan and Kuang. It is interesting to notice that the intermediate states between the two gluon emissions are hybrids, therefore by fitting the data, we are able to determine the mass spectra of hybrids. The ground hybrid states are predicted as 4.23 GeV (for charmonium) and 10.79 GeV (for bottonium) which do not correspond to any states measured in recent experiments, thus it may imply that, very possibly, hybrids mix with regular quarkonia to constitute physical states. Comprehensive comparisons of the potentials for hybrids whose parameters are obtained in this scenario with the lattice results are presented

  14. Use of details in secondary emission spectra in order to take into account element composition in the radioisotopic, x-ray-fluorescence method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanyukovich, G A; Meier, V A; Nakhabtsev, V S

    1974-01-01

    A study is made of secondary emission spectra applicable to the conditions of determining tin in complex iron ores. Use is made of recorders having an intermediate target of samarium oxide, which assure measurement under geometry of a direct field of vision. It is shown that the integral count rate with a definite selection of the initial condition of discrimination or the count rate in the 32 to 34 keV interval of energies characterizes mainly the composition of the filler. With the purpose of increasing the accuracy and decreasing the effect of equipment factors it is more suitable to estimate the filler composition from the integral count rate. Methods are considered for taking into account the effect of composition of the medium on the measurement results according to the method of spectral ratios by means of a nomogram and analytical expressions. With measurements on models the error of determining the tin content was +- 5 percent in effective atomic number range of 13 to 20, while the error was 50 percent without the introduction of corrections. 10 refs. (tr-auth)

  15. Detection of Copper (II) and Cadmium (II) binding to dissolved organic matter from macrophyte decomposition by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectra combined with parallel factor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Dong-hai; Guo, Xu-jing; Wen, Li; He, Lian-sheng; Wang, Jing-gang; Li, Jun-qi

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) was used to characterize dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from macrophyte decomposition, and to study its complexation with Cu (II) and Cd (II). Both the protein-like and the humic-like components showed a marked quenching effect by Cu (II). Negligible quenching effects were found for Cd (II) by components 1, 5 and 6. The stability constants and the fraction of the binding fluorophores for humic-like components and Cu (II) can be influenced by macrophyte decomposition of various weight gradients in aquatic plants. Macrophyte decomposition within the scope of the appropriate aquatic phytomass can maximize the stability constant of DOM-metal complexes. A large amount of organic matter was introduced into the aquatic environment by macrophyte decomposition, suggesting that the potential risk of DOM as a carrier of heavy metal contamination in macrophytic lakes should not be ignored. - Highlights: • Macrophyte decomposition increases fluorescent DOM components in the upper sediment. • Protein-like components are quenched or enhanced by adding Cu (II) and Cd (II). • Macrophyte decomposition DOM can impact the affinity of Cu (II) and Cd (II). • The log K M and f values showed a marked change due to macrophyte decomposition. • Macrophyte decomposition can maximize the stability constant of DOM-Cu (II) complexes. - Macrophyte decomposition DOM can influence on the binding affinity of metal ions in macrophytic lakes

  16. Thermoluminescence spectra of amethyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q. [Suzhou Railway Teachers College (China). Dept. of Physics; Yang, B. [Beijing Normal University (China). Dept. of Physics; Wood, R.A.; White, D.R.R.; Townsend, P.D.; Luff, B.J. [Sussex Univ., Brighton (United Kingdom). School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

    1994-04-01

    Thermoluminescence and cathodoluminescence data from natural and synthetic amethyst and synthetic quartz samples are compared. The spectra include features from the quartz host lattice and from impurity-generated recombination sites. Emission features exist throughout the wavelength range studied, 250-800 nm. The near infrared emission at 740-750 nm appears to be characteristic of the amethyst and is proposed to be due to Fe ion impurity. (Author).

  17. A new approach to nuclear microscopy: The ion-electron emission microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, B.L.; Vizkelethy, G.; Walsh, D.S.; Senftinger, B.; Mellon, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new multidimensional high lateral resolution ion beam analysis technique, Ion-Electron Emission Microscopy or IEEM is described. Using MeV energy ions, IEEM is shown to be capable of Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) measurements in semiconductors. IEEM should also be capable of microscopically and multidimensionally mapping the surface and bulk composition of solids. As such, IIEM has nearly identical capabilities as traditional nuclear microprobe analysis, with the advantage that the ion beam does not have to be focused. The technique is based on determining the position where an individual ion enters the surface of the sample by projection secondary electron emission microscopy. The x-y origination point of a secondary electron, and hence the impact coordinates of the corresponding incident ion, is recorded with a position sensitive detector connected to a standard photoemission electron microscope (PEEM). These signals are then used to establish coincidence with IBICC, atomic, or nuclear reaction induced ion beam analysis signals simultaneously caused by the incident ion

  18. Design response spectra-compliant real and synthetic GMS for seismic analysis of seismically isolated nuclear reactor containment building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmer Ali

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the severe impacts of recent earthquakes, the use of seismic isolation is paramount for the safety of nuclear structures. The diversity observed in seismic events demands ongoing research to analyze the devastating attributes involved, and hence to enhance the sustainability of base-isolated nuclear power plants. This study reports the seismic performance of a seismically-isolated nuclear reactor containment building (NRCB under strong short-period ground motions (SPGMs and long-period ground motions (LPGMs. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission-based design response spectrum for the seismic design of nuclear power plants is stipulated as the reference spectrum for ground motion selection. Within the period range(s of interest, the spectral matching of selected records with the target spectrum is ensured using the spectral-compatibility approach. NRC-compliant SPGMs and LPGMs from the mega-thrust Tohoku earthquake are used to obtain the structural response of the base-isolated NRCB. To account for the lack of earthquakes in low-to-moderate seismicity zones and the gap in the artificial synthesis of long-period records, wavelet-decomposition based autoregressive moving average modeling for artificial generation of real ground motions is performed. Based on analysis results from real and simulated SPGMs versus LPGMs, the performance of NRCBs is discussed with suggestions for future research and seismic provisions.

  19. Design response spectra-compliant real and synthetic GMS for seismic analysis of seismically isolated nuclear reactor containment building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmer [ENVICO Consultants Co. Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Abu-Hayah, Nadin; Kim, Doo Kie [Civil and Environmental Engineering, Kunsan National University, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung Gook [Innose Tech Co., Ltd., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Due to the severe impacts of recent earthquakes, the use of seismic isolation is paramount for the safety of nuclear structures. The diversity observed in seismic events demands ongoing research to analyze the devastating attributes involved, and hence to enhance the sustainability of base-isolated nuclear power plants. This study reports the seismic performance of a seismically-isolated nuclear reactor containment building (NRCB) under strong short-period ground motions (SPGMs) and long-period ground motions (LPGMs). The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission-based design response spectrum for the seismic design of nuclear power plants is stipulated as the reference spectrum for ground motion selection. Within the period range(s) of interest, the spectral matching of selected records with the target spectrum is ensured using the spectral-compatibility approach. NRC-compliant SPGMs and LPGMs from the mega-thrust Tohoku earthquake are used to obtain the structural response of the base-isolated NRCB. To account for the lack of earthquakes in low-to-moderate seismicity zones and the gap in the artificial synthesis of long-period records, wavelet-decomposition based autoregressive moving average modeling for artificial generation of real ground motions is performed. Based on analysis results from real and simulated SPGMs versus LPGMs, the performance of NRCBs is discussed with suggestions for future research and seismic provisions.

  20. Computing the cross sections of nuclear reactions with nuclear clusters emission for proton energies between 30 MeV and 2.6 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korovin, Yu. A.; Maksimushkina, A. V., E-mail: AVMaksimushkina@mephi.ru; Frolova, T. A. [Obninsk Institute for Nuclear Power Engineering, National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The cross sections of nuclear reactions involving emission of clusters of light nuclei in proton collisions with a heavy-metal target are computed for incident-proton energies between 30 MeV and 2.6 GeV. The calculation relies on the ALICE/ASH and CASCADE/INPE computer codes. The parameters determining the pre-equilibrium cluster emission are varied in the computation.

  1. Effect of high frequency content of uniform hazard response spectra on nuclear power plant structures, systems and components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usmani, A. [Amec Foster Wheeler, Toronto, ON (Canada); Baughman, P.D. [Paul D. Baughman Consulting, Exeter, NH (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The Uniform Hazard Spectrum (UHS) is developed from a probabilistic seismic hazard assessment and represents a response spectrum for which the amplitude at each frequency has a specified and uniform (equal) probability of exceedance. The high spectral acceleration at high frequencies in the UHS can result mainly from small non-damaging low energy earthquakes. Historically Canadian and U.S. nuclear power plants have been designed using the standard shape spectrum given in CSA N289.3 or USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.60, which have maximum spectral accelerations in the lower (2-10 Hz.) frequency range. The impact of the high frequency content of UHS on the nuclear power plant SSCs is required to be assessed. This paper briefly describes the methodologies used for screening and evaluation of the effects of UHS high frequency content on the nuclear power SSCs that have been designed using the CSA N289.3 standard shape spectrum. (author)

  2. FIER: Software for analytical modeling of delayed gamma-ray spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, E. F.; Goldblum, B. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Quiter, B. J.; Brown, J. A.; Younes, W.; Burke, J. T.; Padgett, S. W.; Ressler, J. J.; Tonchev, A. P.

    2018-05-01

    A new software package, the Fission Induced Electromagnetic Response (FIER) code, has been developed to analytically predict delayed γ-ray spectra following fission. FIER uses evaluated nuclear data and solutions to the Bateman equations to calculate the time-dependent populations of fission products and their decay daughters resulting from irradiation of a fissionable isotope. These populations are then used in the calculation of γ-ray emission rates to obtain the corresponding delayed γ-ray spectra. FIER output was compared to experimental data obtained by irradiation of a 235U sample in the Godiva critical assembly. This investigation illuminated discrepancies in the input nuclear data libraries, showcasing the usefulness of FIER as a tool to address nuclear data deficiencies through comparison with experimental data. FIER provides traceability between γ-ray emissions and their contributing nuclear species, decay chains, and parent fission fragments, yielding a new capability for the nuclear science community.

  3. Classification of spectra and search for bio-makers in prostate tumours form proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parfait, S.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men over 50 years. Current detection methods either lack sensitivity or specificity or are unpleasant for the patient. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy allows the study of metabolism in vivo. The use of a high field machine (>3 T) has allowed us to dispense with the use of an endorectal coil, which is particularly uncomfortable for the patient. The objective of this work is to create an automatic method to detect cancer by processing data obtained through magnetic resonance spectroscopy. MRS is a complex phenomenon, very sensitive to acquisition conditions. First, we have studied how to improve and optimise signal acquisition. However, even with a very good quality signal, it must still undergo further post-processing to be analysed automatically by a classification method. Further work was therefore needed to investigate which post-processing steps were required in order to optimize the spectra for classification. We then investigated the optimal classification method for this problem. A particular set of steps (signal acquisition, processing and spectral classification data) allows us to highlight the presence of prostate tumors with an overall error rate of less than 12%. In a second step, we searched for new bio-markers within the spectra. These bio-markers could be a metabolite or a specific frequency range corresponding to several metabolites. We did not find any additional significant attributes other than choline and citrate, however, some frequency bands seem to participate in improving the error rate. Finally, we expanded our investigation by attempting to apply these techniques to the rat. Technical constraints related to acquisition did not allow us to obtain a sufficient number of spectra in the pre-clinical cases. Nonetheless, we have validated the feasibility of MRS in rodents and its relevance in the brain. The technique, however, must be improved in order to be validated in the case of prostate cancer in

  4. Interaction of 4p54dN+1 and 4p64dN-14f configurations and its influence on the photoexcitation and emission spectra in the isoelectronic and isonuclear sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucas, S; Karazija, R; Jonauskas, V; Momkauskaite, A

    2009-01-01

    The strong interaction of 4p 5 4d N+1 + 4p 6 4d N-1 4f configurations and its influence on the photoexcitation and emission spectra corresponding to the excitations from the ground level of 4p 6 4d N have been considered. The results are presented for the isoelectronic sequences from the ionization degree q = 5 up to q = 29-37 as well as for the isonuclear sequences of Sn q+ and W q+ . It is shown that depending on the number of 4d electrons, the variation of spectra in the isoelectronic sequences corresponds to three different types. At N = 4 and N = 6-9, the strong concentration of lines takes place in the whole isoelectronic sequence, except for small ionization degrees. At N ≤ 3, the width of photoexcitation and emission spectra also obtains a relatively larger value at small ionization degrees, decreases with ionization degree rising, but tends to increase again at large ionization degrees. In the whole isoelectronic sequence, a very narrow group of a few intense lines is obtained for N = 5. The transitions from the excited levels mainly proceed to the lowest level of the ground configuration; it is the reason for the similarity of photoexcitation and emission spectra. The quenching of many lines and the concentration of line strengths in a few transitions indicate the existence of some wavefunction basis with strict selection rules for dipole transitions.

  5. Effects of nuclear power plant shutdowns on electricity consumption and greenhouse gas emissions after the Tohoku Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seong-Hoon; Tanaka, Katsuya; Wu, Junjie; Robert, Roland K.; Kim, Taeyoung

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes how the substitution of fossil fuels for nuclear power due to the shutdown of nuclear power plants after the Tohoku Earthquake affects electricity consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Japan. Results indicate that Japan generated 4.3 million metric tons (or 0.3%, with a 95% confidence interval) of additional CO_2 emissions in 2011 following the earthquake. The increase in CO_2 emissions stemmed from the combined effects of decreased electricity consumption due to energy conservation efforts and the substitution of fossil fuels for nuclear power following the Tohoku Earthquake. Results also show considerable spatial variation in the impacts of the earthquake on net CO_2 emissions. A majority of the prefectures (40 of 47 prefectures, or 85%) were predicted to experience higher CO_2 emissions after the Tohoku Earthquake while the remaining (7 prefectures) were predicted to experience lower CO_2 emissions. Our findings suggest that Japan and countries under similar risks may want to reformulate energy policy by emphasizing utilization of diverse power and energy sources, including more renewable energy production and electricity conservation. The policy reform should also consider spatial variation in the combined effects of reduced reliance on nuclear power and increased CO_2 conversion factors. - Highlights: • Analyzed effects of Tohoku Earthquake on greenhouse gas emissions in Japan. • Estimated effects on reduced electricity consumption and increased fossil fuel use. • Generated 4.3 million metric tons (or 0.3%) of additional CO_2 emissions in 2011. • Showed spatial variation in the impacts of the earthquake on CO_2 emissions.

  6. NO/sub x/ emissions from Hanford nuclear fuels reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajunen, A.L.; Dirkes, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Operation of the existing Hanford nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities will increase the release of nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) to the atmosphere over present emission rates. Stack emissions from two reprocessing facilities, one waste storage facility and two coal burning power plants will contain increased concentrations of NO/sub x/. The opacity of the reprocessing facilities' emissions is predicted to periodically exceed the State and local opacity limit of twenty percent. Past measurements failed to detect differences in the ambient air NO/sub x/ concentration with and without reprocessing plant operations. Since the facilities are not presently operating, increases in the non-occupational ambient air NO/sub x/ concentration were predicted from theoretical diffusion models. Based on the calculations, the annual average ambient air NO/sub x/ concentration will increase from the present level of less than 0.004 ppM to less than 0.006 ppM at the Hanford site boundaries. The national standard for the annual mean ambient air NO 2 concentration is 0.05 ppM. Therefore, the non-occupational ambient air NO/sub x/ concentration will not be increased to significant levels by reprocessing operations in the Hanford 200 Areas

  7. Statistical nature of cluster emission in nuclear liquid-vapour phase coexistence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Y G; Han, D D; Shen, W Q; Cai, X Z; Chen, J G; He, Z J; Long, J L; Ma, G L; Wang, K; Wei, Y B; Yu, L P; Zhang, H Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, X F; Zhu, Z Y

    2004-01-01

    The emission of nuclear clusters is investigated within the framework of the isospin-dependent lattice gas model and the classical molecular dynamics model. It is found that the emission of an individual cluster which is heavier than proton is almost Poissonian except near the transition temperature at which the system is leaving the liquid-vapour phase coexistence and thermal scaling is observed by the linear Arrhenius plots which are made from the average multiplicity of each cluster versus the inverse of temperature in the liquid-vapour phase coexistence. The slopes of the Arrhenius plots, i.e. the 'emission barriers', are extracted as a function of the mass or charge number and fitted by the formula embodied with the contributions of the surface energy and Coulomb interaction. Good agreements are obtained in comparison with the data for low-energy conditional barriers. In addition, the possible influences of the source size, Coulomb interaction and 'freeze-out' density and related physical implications are discussed

  8. Franck-Condon Simulations including Anharmonicity of the Ã(1)A''-X̃(1)A' Absorption and Single Vibronic Level Emission Spectra of HSiCl and DSiCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Daniel W K; Lee, Edmond P F; Chau, Foo-Tim; Dyke, John M

    2009-03-10

    RCCSD(T) and/or CASSCF/MRCI calculations have been carried out on the X̃(1)A' and Ã(1)A'' states of HSiCl employing basis sets of up to the aug-cc-pV5Z quality. Contributions from core correlation and extrapolation to the complete basis set limit were included in determining the computed equilibrium geometrical parameters and relative electronic energy of these two states of HSiCl. Franck-Condon factors which include allowance for anharmonicity and Duschinsky rotation between these two states of HSiCl and DSiCl were calculated employing RCCSD(T) and CASSCF/MRCI potential energy functions, and were used to simulate the Ã(1)A'' ← X̃(1)A' absorption and Ã(1)A'' → X̃(1)A' single vibronic level (SVL) emission spectra of HSiCl and DSiCl. Simulated absorption and experimental LIF spectra, and simulated and observed Ã(1)A''(0,0,0) → X̃(1)A' SVL emission spectra, of HSiCl and DSiCl are in very good agreement. However, agreement between simulated and observed Ã(1)A''(0,1,0) → X̃(1)A' and Ã(1)A''(0,2,1) → X̃(1)A' SVL emission spectra of DSiCl is not as good. Preliminary calculations on low-lying excited states of HSiCl suggest that vibronic interaction between low-lying vibrational levels of the Ã(1)A'' state and highly excited vibrational levels of the ã(3)A'' is possible. Such vibronic interaction may change the character of the low-lying vibrational levels of the Ã(1)A'' state, which would lead to perturbation in the SVL emission spectra from these vibrational levels.

  9. Boson and fermion degrees of freedom in the orthosymplectic extension of the IVBM: Odd-odd nuclear spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganev, H. G.; Georgieva, A. I.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamical symmetry group Sp(12, R) of the Interacting Vector Boson Model (IVBM) is extended to the orthosymplectic group OSp(2Ω/12, R) in order to incorporate fermion degrees of freedom. The structure of even-even nuclei is used as a core on which the collective excitations of the neighboring odd-mass and odd-odd nuclei are build on. Hence, the spectra of odd-mass and odd-odd nuclei arise as a result of the coupling of the fermion degrees of freedom, specified by the fermion sector SOF (2Ω) to the boson core, whose states belong to an Sp(12, R) irreducible representation. The orthosymplectic dynamical symmetry is applied for the simultaneous description of the spectra of some neighboring nuclei from rare earth region. The theoretical predictions for different low-lying collective bands with positive and negative parity are compared with the experiment. The obtained results reveal the applicability of the model and its boson-fermion extension.

  10. Automated method of phasing difficult nuclear magnetic resonance spectra with application to the unsaturated carbon analysis of oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterna, L.L.; Tong, V.P. (Shell Development Company, Houston, TX (USA). Westhollow Research Center)

    1991-08-01

    A new method for the automated phasing of n.m.r. spectra is described. The basis of the automation is that the software performs the phasing in the same fashion as a trained n.m.r. operator rather than using mathematical relationships between absorptive and dispersive spectra. The method is illustrated with processing of the {sup 13}C n.m.r. spectrum of a catalytic cracking feedstock. The software readily phased the spectrum even though the spectrum had very broad features and a significant baseline correction. The software performed well even when the time-domain data was left-shifted to introduce a large first-order phase error. The method was applied to measure the percentage of unsaturated carbon in hydrocarbons. Extensive tests were performed to compare automated processing with manual processing for this application; the automated method was found to give both better precision and accuracy. The method can be easily tailored to many other types of analyses. 9 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics: an approach for computing dynamically averaged vibrational spectra including critical nuclear quantum effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2007-10-18

    We have introduced a computational methodology to study vibrational spectroscopy in clusters inclusive of critical nuclear quantum effects. This approach is based on the recently developed quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics method that combines quantum wavepacket dynamics with ab initio molecular dynamics. The computational efficiency of the dynamical procedure is drastically improved (by several orders of magnitude) through the utilization of wavelet-based techniques combined with the previously introduced time-dependent deterministic sampling procedure measure to achieve stable, picosecond length, quantum-classical dynamics of electrons and nuclei in clusters. The dynamical information is employed to construct a novel cumulative flux/velocity correlation function, where the wavepacket flux from the quantized particle is combined with classical nuclear velocities to obtain the vibrational density of states. The approach is demonstrated by computing the vibrational density of states of [Cl-H-Cl]-, inclusive of critical quantum nuclear effects, and our results are in good agreement with experiment. A general hierarchical procedure is also provided, based on electronic structure harmonic frequencies, classical ab initio molecular dynamics, computation of nuclear quantum-mechanical eigenstates, and employing quantum wavepacket ab initio dynamics to understand vibrational spectroscopy in hydrogen-bonded clusters that display large degrees of anharmonicities.

  12. [Study on Hexagonal Super-Lattice Pattern with Light Spot and Dim Spot in Dielectric Barrier Discharge by Optical Emission Spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Dong, Li-fang; Niu, Xue-jiao; Zhang, Chao

    2016-02-01

    The hexagonal super-lattice pattern composed of the light spot and the dim spot is firstly observed and investigated in the discharge of gas mixture of air and argon by using the dielectric barrier discharge device with double water electrodes. It is found that the dim spot is located at the center of its surrounding three light spots by observing the discharge image. Obviously, the brightness of the light spot and the dim spot are different, which indicates that the plasma states of the light spot and the dim spot may be different. The optical emission spectrum method is used to further study the several plasma parameters of the light spot and the dim spot in different argon content. The emission spectra of the N₂ second positive band (C³IIu --> B³IIg) are measured, from which the molecule vibration temperatures of the light spot and the dim spot are calculated. Based on the relative intensity ratio of the line at 391.4 nm and the N₂ line at 394.1 nm, the average electron energies of the light spot and the dim spot are investigated. The broadening of spectral line 696.57 nm (2P₂-1S₅) is used to study the electron densities of the light spot and the dim spot. The experiment shows that the molecule vibration temperature, average electron energy and the electron density of the dim spot are higher than those of the light spot in the same argon content. The molecule vibration temperature and electron density of the light spot and dim spot increase with the argon content increasing from 70% to 95%, while average electron energies of the light spot and dim spot decrease gradually. The short-exposure image recorded by a high speed video camera shows that the dim spot results from the surface discharges (SDs). The surface discharge induced by the volume discharge (VD) has the decisive effect on the formation of the dim spot. The experiment above plays an important role in studying the formation mechanism of the hexagonal super-lattice pattern with light spot and

  13. Process for testing noise emission from containers or pipelines made of steel, particularly for nuclear reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Votava, E.; Stipsits, G.; Sommer, R.

    1982-01-01

    In a process for noise emission testing of steel containers or pipelines, particularly for testing primary circuit components of nuclear reactor plants, measuring sensors and/or associated electronic amplifiers are used, which are tuned for receiving the frequency band of the sound emission spectrum above a limiting frequency f G , but are limited or non-resonant for frequency bands less than f G . (orig./HP) [de

  14. Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of a solid in water: Effect of hydrostatic pressure on laser induced plasma, cavitation bubble and emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Claros, M.; Dell'Aglio, M.; Gaudiuso, R.; Santagata, A.; De Giacomo, A.; Fortes, F. J.; Laserna, J. J.

    2017-07-01

    There is a growing interest in the development of sensors use in exploration of the deep ocean. Techniques for the chemical analysis of submerged solids are of special interest, as they show promise for subsea mining applications where a rapid sorting of materials found in the sea bottom would improve efficiency. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) has demonstrated potential for this application thanks to its unique capability of providing the atomic composition of submerged solids. Here we present a study on the parameters that affect the spectral response of metallic targets in an oceanic pressure environment. Following laser excitation of the solid, the plasma persistence and the cavitation bubble size are considerably reduced as the hydrostatic pressure increases. These effects are of particular concern in dual pulse excitation as reported here, where a careful choice of the interpulse timing is required. Shadowgraphic images of the plasma demonstrate that cavitation bubbles are formed early after the plasma onset and that the effect of hydrostatic pressure is negligible during the early stage of plasma expansion. Contrarily to what is observed at atmospheric pressure, emission spectra observed at high pressures are characterized by self-absorbed atomic lines on continuum radiation resulting from strong radiative recombination in the electron-rich confined environment. This effect is much less evident with ionic lines due to the much higher energy of the levels involved and ionization energy of ions, as well as to the lower extent of absorption effects occurring in the inner part of the plasma, where ionized species are more abundant. As a result of the smaller shorter-lived cavitation bubble, the LIBS intensity enhancement resulting from dual pulse excitation is reduced when the applied pressure increases.

  15. New investigation of the ν3 C-H stretching region of 12CH4 through the analysis of high temperature infrared emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyay, Badr; Gardez, Aline; Georges, Robert; Biennier, Ludovic; Vander Auwera, Jean; Richard, Cyril; Boudon, Vincent

    2018-04-01

    The ν3 C-H stretching region of methane was reinvestigated in this work using high temperature (620-1715 K) emission spectra recorded in Rennes at Doppler limited resolution. This work follows our recent global analysis of the Dyad system Δn = ±1 (1000-1500 cm-1), with n being the polyad number [B. Amyay et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 24312 (2016)]. Thanks to the high temperature, new assignments of vibration-rotation methane line positions have been achieved successfully in the Pentad system and some associated hot bands (Δn = ±2) observed in the spectral region 2600-3300 cm-1. In particular, rotational assignments in the cold band [Pentad-ground state (GS)] and in the first related hot band (Octad-Dyad) were extended up to J = 30 and 27, respectively. In addition, 1525 new transitions belonging to the Tetradecad-Pentad hot band system were assigned for the first time, up to J = 20. The effective global model used to deal with the new assignments was developed to the 6th order for the first three polyads (Monad, Dyad, and Pentad), and to the 5th order for both the Octad and the Tetradecad. 1306 effective parameters were fitted with a dimensionless standard deviation σ = 2.64. The root mean square deviations dRMS obtained are 4.18 × 10-3 cm-1 for the Pentad-GS cold band, 2.48 × 10-3 cm-1 for the Octad-Dyad, and 1.43 × 10-3 cm-1 for the Tetradecad-Pentad hot bands.

  16. Procedures to analyse γ-ray spectra obtained from the ORTEC or nuclear data ND-680 system by ORTEC's analysis software packages incorporated into a separate IBM-PC computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiu Zhen.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed description is presented for processing γ-spectra produced by means of Ortec or Nuclear Data spectrometry systems on an off-line IBM-PC. The ORTEC analysis software packages were transferred to and implemented on the PC A/T, and the different spectra were recorded on discs and subsequently brought into the format required by the program for the calculation of photo peak areas. (author)

  17. Characterization of low-energy nuclear reactions involving emission of few non-relativistic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Heimann, D.; Pacheco, A.J.; Capurro, O.A.

    2010-01-01

    We present a general procedure and the associated computational tool for the kinematical description and characterization of nuclear reactions with several fragments in the exit channel. For such processes the emphasis is placed on the purely experimental extraction of the most physically relevant magnitudes and their distributions, which can eventually be compared with the results of generic model calculations. The general capabilities of the approach are illustrated through the results of the application to selected examples, for which various aspects related to inclusive and exclusive measurements are discussed. For the particular case of sequential emission or non-capture breakup we analyze the general problem involved in the determination of intrinsic angular distributions in the rest frame of the decaying nucleus and the design of a specific experiment for a full and uniform coverage of the whole solid angle.

  18. Estimation of the self-attenuation correction factor for gamma rays emission from nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawy, A.; El-Gammal, W.A.

    2001-01-01

    This work presents an investigation of the self-attenuation of gamma-rays emission from nuclear materials (NMs) for measuring the U-235 enrichment, U-235 mass content and isotopic composition of NMs by non-destructive assay technique [NDA]. The measurements then would not need the use of suitable NM Standards which may not be available in many situations. The self-attenuation correction factor (F) may be estimated by the use of the linear attenuation factor of the assayed sample, the geometrical configuration of the assay set-up and the position of the assayed sample relative to the detector. A developed mathematical analysis makes use of specific parameters which affect the estimation of the self-attenuation of the source-detector system which emits passive gamma-rays at certain prominent signatures

  19. Acoustic emission condition monitoring of a nuclear power plant check valve using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Hyun; Lee, Min Rae; Kim, Jung Teak

    2005-01-01

    In this study, an advanced condition monitoring technique based on acoustic emission (AE) detection and artificial neural networks was applied to a check valve, one of the components being used extensively in a safety system of a nuclear power plant (Npp). AE testing for a check valve under controlled flow loop conditions was performed to detect and evaluate disk movement for valve degradation such as wear and leakage due to foreign object interference in a check valve. It is clearly demonstrated that the evaluation of different types of failure modes such as disk wear and check valve leakage were successful by systematically analyzing the characteristics of various AE parameters. It is also shown that the leak size can be determined with an artificial neural network

  20. Light particle emission as a probe of reaction mechanism and nuclear excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1989-01-01

    The central part of these lectures will be dealing with the problem of energy dissipation. A good understanding of the mechanisms for the dissipation requires to study both peripheral and central collisions or, in other words, to look at the impact paramenter dependence. This should also provide valuable information on the time scale. In order to probe the reaction mechanism and nuclear excitation, one of the most powerful tool is unquestionably the observation of light particle emission, including neutrons and charged particles. Several examples will be discussed related to peripheral collisions (the fate of transfer reactions, the excitation energy generation, the production of projectile-like fragments) as well as inner collisions for which extensive studies have demonstrated the strength of intermediate energy heavy ions for the production of very hot nuclei and detailed study of their decay properties

  1. Use of neural network based auto-associative memory as a data compressor for pre-processing optical emission spectra in gas thermometry with the help of neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolenko, S.A.; Filippov, A.V.; Pal, A.F.; Persiantsev, I.G.; Serov, A.O.

    2003-01-01

    Determination of temperature from optical emission spectra is an inverse problem that is often very difficult to solve, especially when substantial noise is present. One of the means that can be used to solve such a problem is a neural network trained on the results of modeling of spectra at different temperatures (Dolenko, et al., in: I.C. Parmee (Ed.), Adaptive Computing in Design and Manufacture, Springer, London, 1998, p. 345). Reducing the dimensionality of the input data prior to application of neural network can increase the accuracy and stability of temperature determination. In this study, such pre-processing is performed with another neural network working as an auto-associative memory with a narrow bottleneck in the hidden layer. The improvement in the accuracy and stability of temperature determination in presence of noise is demonstrated on model spectra similar to those recorded in a DC-discharge CVD reactor

  2. Average Nuclear Level Densities and Radiative Strength Functions in 56,57FE from Primary (Gamma)-Ray Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavukcu, E.; Becker, J.A.; Bernstein, L.A.; Garrett, P.E.; Guttormsen, M.; Mitchell, G.E.; Rekstad, J.; Schiller, A.; Siem, S.; Voinov, A.; Younes, W.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental primary γ-ray spectrum vs. excitation-energy bin (P(E x , E γ ) matrix) in a light-ion reaction is obtained for 56,57 Fe isotopes using a subtraction method. By factorizing the P(E x , E γ ) matrix according to the Axel-Brink hypothesis the nuclear level density and the radiative strength function (RSF) in 56,57 Fe are extracted simultaneously. A step structure is observed in the level density for both isotopes, and is interpreted as the breaking of Cooper pairs. The RSFs for 56,57 Fe reveal an anomalous enhancement at low γ-ray energies

  3. NUCLEAR PHYSICS: Judd Ofelt analysis of spectra and experimental evaluation of laser performance of Tm3+ doped Lu2SiO5 crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bao-Quan; Zheng, Liang-Liang; Duan, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Guang-Jun; Zong, Yan-Hua

    2008-10-01

    This paper reports that the Tm3+:Lu2SiO5 (Tm:LSO) crystal is grown by Czochralski technique. The room-temperature absorption spectra of Tm:LSO crystal are measured on a b-cut sample with 4 at.% thulium. According to the obtained Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters Ω2 = 9.3155 × 10-20 cm2, Ω4 = 8.4103 × 10-20 cm2,Ω6 = 1.5908 × 10-20 cm2, the fluorescence lifetime is calculated to be 2.03 ms for 3F4 → 3H6 transition, and the integrated emission cross section is 5.81 × 10-18 cm2. Room-temperature laser action near 2μm under diode pumping is experimentally evaluated in Tm:LSO. An optical-optical conversion efficiency of 9.1% and a slope efficiency of 16.2% are obtained with continuous-wave maximum output power of 0.67 W. The emission wavelengths of Tm:LSO laser are centred around 2.06 μm with spectral bandwidth of ~13.6 nm.

  4. BETA SPECTRA. I. Negatrons spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Malonda, A.; Garcia-Torano, E.

    1978-01-01

    Using the Fermi theory of beta decay, the beta spectra for 62 negatrons emitters have been computed introducing a correction factor for unique forbidden transitions. These spectra are plotted vs. energy, once normal i sed, and tabulated with the related Fermi functions. The average and median energies are calculated. (Author)

  5. Cosmic-ray and neutrino emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with a nuclear cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biehl, Daniel; Boncioli, Denise; Fedynitch, Anatoli; Winter, Walter

    2017-05-24

    We discuss neutrino and cosmic-ray emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) with the injection of nuclei, where we take into account that a nuclear cascade from photo-disintegration can fully develop in the source. One of our main objectives is to test if recent results from the IceCube and the Pierre Auger Observatory can be accommodated with the paradigm that GRBs are the sources of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs). While our key results are obtained using an internal shock model, we discuss how the secondary emission from a GRB shell can be interpreted in terms of other astrophysical models. It is demonstrated that the expected neutrino flux from GRBs weakly depends on the injection composition, which implies that prompt neutrinos from GRBs can efficiently test the GRB-UHECR paradigm even if the UHECRs are nuclei. We show that the UHECR spectrum and composition, as measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory, can be self-consistently reproduced in a combined source-propagation model. In an attempt to describe the energy range including the ankle, we find tension with the IceCube bounds from the GRB stacking analyses. In an alternative scenario, where only the UHECRs beyond the ankle originate from GRBs, the requirement for a joint description of cosmic-ray and neutrino observations favors lower luminosities, which does not correspond to the typical expectation from γ-ray observations.

  6. Cosmic-ray and neutrino emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with a nuclear cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biehl, Daniel; Boncioli, Denise; Fedynitch, Anatoli; Winter, Walter

    2017-01-01

    We discuss neutrino and cosmic-ray emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) with the injection of nuclei, where we take into account that a nuclear cascade from photo-disintegration can fully develop in the source. One of our main objectives is to test if recent results from the IceCube and the Pierre Auger Observatory can be accommodated with the paradigm that GRBs are the sources of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs). While our key results are obtained using an internal shock model, we discuss how the secondary emission from a GRB shell can be interpreted in terms of other astrophysical models. It is demonstrated that the expected neutrino flux from GRBs weakly depends on the injection composition, which implies that prompt neutrinos from GRBs can efficiently test the GRB-UHECR paradigm even if the UHECRs are nuclei. We show that the UHECR spectrum and composition, as measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory, can be self-consistently reproduced in a combined source-propagation model. In an attempt to describe the energy range including the ankle, we find tension with the IceCube bounds from the GRB stacking analyses. In an alternative scenario, where only the UHECRs beyond the ankle originate from GRBs, the requirement for a joint description of cosmic-ray and neutrino observations favors lower luminosities, which does not correspond to the typical expectation from γ-ray observations.

  7. Condition monitoring of a check valve for nuclear power plants by means of acoustic emission technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Rae; Leee, Jun Hyun; Kim, Jung Tack; Kim, Jung Soo; Luk, V. K.

    2003-01-01

    This work performed in support of the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative(INERI) program, which was to develop and demonstrate advanced sensor and computational technology for on-line monitoring of the condition of components, structures, and systems in advanced and next-generation nuclear power plants (NPPs). The primary object of this work is to investigate advanced condition monitoring systems based on acoustic emission detection that can provide timely detection of check valve degradation and service aging so that maintenance/replacement could be preformed prior to loss of safety function. The research is focused on the capability of AE technique to provide diagnostic information useful in determining check valve aging and degradation, check valve failures and undesirable operating modes. This work also includes the investigation and adaptation of several advanced sensor technologies such as accelerometer and advanced ultrasonic technique. In addition, this work will develop advanced sophisticated signal processing, noise reduction, and pattern recognition techniques and algorithms from check valve degradation.

  8. Blue emission in photoluminescence spectra of the red phosphor CaAlSiN3:Eu2+ at low Eu2+ concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Yoriko; Kamigaki, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Hajime

    2018-04-01

    In red phosphor CaAlSiN3:Eu2+, unintentional blue emission occurs with increasing intensity at low Eu2+ concentrations and also at low measurement temperatures. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements were used to confirm the decrease in red emission and increase in blue emission with the decreasing Eu2+ concentration. The peak timing of blue emission occurred faster than that of red emission, and long lasting luminescence of red emission was observed as well as that of blue emission. The Eu2+ concentration dependences of the red and blue emissions were similar to those of the g values 4.75 (Eu2+) and 2.0025 (nitrogen vacancies), respectively, which were observed from electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. The origin of the blue emission is proposed to be nitrogen vacancy defects, which had about the same ESR signal intensity as that of Eu2+ ions in CaAlSiN3:Eu2+ containing 0.01 at. % Eu2+. The possibility of red emission also arising from excited electron tunneling or thermal pathways via nitrogen vacancies is discussed. Long lasting red emission was observed, which is proposed to involve trapped electrons remaining at nitrogen vacancies, yielding blue emission and inducing red emission from Eu2+ ions.

  9. Spectral intensities: The emission spectra for the Cs2NaScCl6: MoCl63- system in the Fm3m space group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevedo, R.; Meruane, T.; Navarro, G.

    2000-01-01

    Taking advantage of the data reported by Flint and Paulusz, we have undertaken a theoretical investigation of the intensity mechanism for the various emissions; Γ 8 ( 2 T 2g ) → Γ 8 ( 4 A 2g ), Γ 8 ( 2 E g ), Γ 8 ( 2 T 1g ), Γ 6 ( 2 T 1g ) for the Cs 2 NaScCl 6 :MoCl 6 3- system in the Fm3m-space group. The experimental data reported by these authors, refer to the visible and near infrared luminescence spectra of MoCl 3- 6 complex ion in different host, such as Cs 2 NaMCl 6 (M = Sc, Y, In), measured between 15,000 cm -1 and 3,000 cm -1 at liquid helium temperatures. At least, five luminescence transitions have been identified and assigned and each of them show extensive vibronic structure, which was analyzed to yield the vibrational frequencies of the MoX 3- 6 (X -1 = Cl -1 Br -1 ) ion in each excitation. A careful analysis of the experimental data reported shows that for the various observed electronic transitions, the vibration frequencies do change only slightly, and therefore there is no indication that the system undergoes a Jahn-Teller distortion (along an active coordinate) of some importance to be taken into account in the current work. There is, though clear evidence that for the chloro-elpasolites, there is a strong resonance interaction between ν 3 (τ 1u : stretching) of the MoX 6 3- , complex ion and that of the host when M = In, Y. Thus for M = Sc, the slighter higher host ν 3 , wavenumber is likely to minimizes the effect of this coupling. This experimental evidence, will allow us for the Cs 2 NaScCl 6 3- system to neglect to first order approximation, the coupling among the internal and the external vibrations and to proceed using a both a molecular model and the independent system model (ISM)

  10. Radioactive Emissions from Fission-Based Medical Isotope Production and Their Effect on Global Nuclear Explosion Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowyer, T.; Saey, P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of medical isotopes, such as Tc-99m, is widespread with over 30 million procedures being performed every year, but the fission-based production of isotopes used for medical procedures causes emissions into the environment. This paper will show that gaseous radioactive isotopes of xenon, such as Xe-133, are released in high quantities, because they have a high fission cross section and they are difficult to scrub from the processes used to produce the medical isotopes due to their largely unreactive nature. Unfortunately, the reasons that large amounts of radioactive xenon isotopes are emitted from isotope production are the same as those that make these isotopes the most useful isotopes for the detection of underground nuclear explosions. Relatively recently, the nuclear explosion monitoring community has established a provisional monitoring network for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) that includes radioactive xenon monitoring as a major component. This community has discovered that emissions from medical isotope production present a more serious problem to nuclear explosion monitoring than thought when the network was first conceived. To address the growing problem, a group of scientists in both the monitoring and the isotope production communities have come together to attempt to find scientific and pragmatic ways to address the emissions problems, recognizing that medical isotope production should not be adversely affected, while monitoring for nuclear explosions should remain effective as isotope production grows, changes, and spreads globally. (author)

  11. Pr:Ca1-xRxF2+x (R=Y or Gd) crystals: Modulated blue, orange and red emission spectra with the proportion of R3+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Qian, Xiaobo; Guo, Linyang; Jiang, Dapeng; Wu, Qinghui; Tang, Fei; Su, Liangbi; Ju, Qiangwen; Wang, Jingya; Xu, Jun

    2018-04-01

    The spectroscopic properties of 0.6at.%:Pr:Ca1-xRxF2+x (R = Y, Gd; x = 0,0.006, 0.012, 0.03, 0.06) crystals were investigated and compared. The XRD tests were conducted and the cell dimensions of the crystals were calculated. Room temperature absorption spectra have been registered and analyzed. The emission spectra and decay curves of the crystals were obtained at room temperature. Increasing the proportion of the lattice regulators of Y3+ or Gd3+ ions could significantly enhance the luminescence intensity of all visible emission bands with different ratios. Particularly, the emission intensity ratio of orange to red increased from 0.15 to 1.9 in Pr:Ca1-xYxF2+x crystals and to 1.02 in Pr:Ca1-xGdxF2+x crystals, respectively. Furthermore, Pr:Ca1-xGdxF2+x crystals have substantially strong emission at orange and red region of 580-660 nm, comparable with blue light at 482 nm. The quantum efficiency of the crystals increased rapidly with the increment of R3+ concentration, and finally tend to be 100%.

  12. Statistical theory for calculating energy spectra of β-delayed neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Moeller, Peter; Wilson, William B.

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical β-delayed neutron spectra are calculated based on the Quasi-particle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA) and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Neutron emissions from an excited daughter nucleus after β-decay to the granddaughter residual are more accurately calculated than previous evaluations, including all the microscopic nuclear structure information, such as a Gamow-Teller strength distribution and discrete states in the granddaughter. The calculated delayed-neutron spectra reasonably agree with those evaluations in the ENDF decay library, which are based on experimental data. The model was adopted to generate the delayed-neutron spectra for all 271 precursors. (authors)

  13. Calculation of Spectra of Neutrons and Charged Particles Produced in a Target of a Neutron Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaganov, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    An algorithm for calculating the spectra of neutrons and associated charged particles produced in the target of a neutron generator is detailed. The products of four nuclear reactions 3H( d, n)4He, 2H( d, n)3He, 2H( d, p)3H, and 3He( d, p)4He are analyzed. The results of calculations are presented in the form of neutron spectra for several emission angles and spectra of associated charged particles emitted at an angle of 180° for a deuteron initial energy of 0.13 MeV.

  14. X-RAY ABSORPTION, NUCLEAR INFRARED EMISSION, AND DUST COVERING FACTORS OF AGNs: TESTING UNIFICATION SCHEMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateos, S.; Carrera, F. J.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Barcons, X. [Instituto de Física de Cantabria (CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria), E-39005, Santander (Spain); Ramos, A. Asensio; Almeida, C. Ramos [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Watson, M. G.; Blain, A. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Caccianiga, A.; Ballo, L. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Brera 28, I-20121 Milano (Italy); Braito, V., E-mail: mateos@ifca.unican.es [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)

    2016-03-10

    We present the distributions of the geometrical covering factors of the dusty tori (f{sub 2}) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using an X-ray selected complete sample of 227 AGNs drawn from the Bright Ultra-hard XMM-Newton Survey. The AGNs have z from 0.05 to 1.7, 2–10 keV luminosities between 10{sup 42} and 10{sup 46} erg s{sup −1}, and Compton-thin X-ray absorption. Employing data from UKIDSS, 2MASS, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer in a previous work, we determined the rest-frame 1–20 μm continuum emission from the torus, which we model here with the clumpy torus models of Nenkova et al. Optically classified type 1 and type 2 AGNs are intrinsically different, with type 2 AGNs having, on average, tori with higher f{sub 2} than type 1 AGNs. Nevertheless, ∼20% of type 1 AGNs have tori with large covering factors, while ∼23%–28% of type 2 AGNs have tori with small covering factors. Low f{sub 2} are preferred at high AGN luminosities, as postulated by simple receding torus models, although for type 2 AGNs the effect is certainly small. f{sub 2} increases with the X-ray column density, which implies that dust extinction and X-ray absorption take place in material that share an overall geometry and most likely belong to the same structure, the putative torus. Based on our results, the viewing angle, AGN luminosity, and also f{sub 2} determine the optical appearance of an AGN and control the shape of the rest-frame ∼1–20 μm nuclear continuum emission. Thus, the torus geometrical covering factor is a key ingredient of unification schemes.

  15. Future research program on prompt γ-ray emission in nuclear fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberstedt, S.; Billnert, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Lebois, M.; Oberstedt, A.; Wilson, J. N.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years the measurement of prompt fission γ-ray spectra (PFGS) has gained renewed interest, after about forty years since the first comprehensive studies of the reactions 235U(n th , f), 239Pu(n th ,f) and 252Cf(sf). The renaissance was initiated by requests for new values especially for γ-ray multiplicity and average total energy release per fission in neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu. Both isotopes are considered the most important ones with respect to the modeling of innovative cores required for the Generation-IV reactors, the majority working with fast neutrons. During the last 5 years we have conducted a systematic study of spectral data for thermal-neutron-induced fission on 235U and 241Pu as well as for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf with unprecedented accuracy. From the new data we conclude that those reactions do not considerably contribute to the observed heat excess and suspect other reactions playing a significant role. Possible contributions may originate from fast-neutron-induced reactions on 238U, which is largely present in the fuel, or from γ-induced fission from neutron capture in the construction material. A first experiment campaign on prompt γ-ray emission from fast-neutron-induced fission on 235,238U was successfully performed in order to test our assumptions. In the following we attempt to summarize, what has been done in the field to date, and to motivate future measurement campaigns exploiting dedicated neutron and photon beams as well as upcoming highly efficient detector assemblies.

  16. Future research program on prompt γ-ray emission in nuclear fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberstedt, S.; Hambsch, F.J. [Joint Research Centre IRMM, European Commission, Geel (Belgium); Billnert, R. [Joint Research Centre IRMM, European Commission, Geel (Belgium); Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, Fundamental Fysik, Goeteborg (Sweden); Lebois, M.; Wilson, J.N. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire Orsay, Orsay (France); Oberstedt, A. [Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, Fundamental Fysik, Goeteborg (Sweden); Ossolution Consulting, Oerebro (Sweden)

    2015-12-15

    In recent years the measurement of prompt fission γ-ray spectra (PFGS) has gained renewed interest, after about forty years since the first comprehensive studies of the reactions {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f), {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th},f) and {sup 252}Cf(sf). The renaissance was initiated by requests for new values especially for γ-ray multiplicity and average total energy release per fission in neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. Both isotopes are considered the most important ones with respect to the modeling of innovative cores required for the Generation-IV reactors, the majority working with fast neutrons. During the last 5 years we have conducted a systematic study of spectral data for thermal-neutron-induced fission on {sup 235}U and {sup 241}Pu as well as for the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf with unprecedented accuracy. From the new data we conclude that those reactions do not considerably contribute to the observed heat excess and suspect other reactions playing a significant role. Possible contributions may originate from fast-neutron-induced reactions on {sup 238}U, which is largely present in the fuel, or from γ-induced fission from neutron capture in the construction material. A first experiment campaign on prompt γ-ray emission from fast-neutron-induced fission on {sup 235,238}U was successfully performed in order to test our assumptions. In the following we attempt to summarize, what has been done in the field to date, and to motivate future measurement campaigns exploiting dedicated neutron and photon beams as well as upcoming highly efficient detector assemblies. (orig.)

  17. Fast Biological Modeling for Voxel-based Heavy Ion Treatment Planning Using the Mechanistic Repair-Misrepair-Fixation Model and Nuclear Fragment Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamp, Florian [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Technische Universität München, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, München (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Cabal, Gonzalo [Experimental Physics–Medical Physics, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Garching (Germany); Mairani, Andrea [Medical Physics Unit, Centro Nazionale Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Pavia (Italy); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Parodi, Katia [Experimental Physics–Medical Physics, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Garching (Germany); Wilkens, Jan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Technische Universität München, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, München (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Carlson, David J., E-mail: david.j.carlson@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: The physical and biological differences between heavy ions and photons have not been fully exploited and could improve treatment outcomes. In carbon ion therapy, treatment planning must account for physical properties, such as the absorbed dose and nuclear fragmentation, and for differences in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ions compared with photons. We combined the mechanistic repair-misrepair-fixation (RMF) model with Monte Carlo-generated fragmentation spectra for biological optimization of carbon ion treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Relative changes in double-strand break yields and radiosensitivity parameters with particle type and energy were determined using the independently benchmarked Monte Carlo damage simulation and the RMF model to estimate the RBE values for primary carbon ions and secondary fragments. Depth-dependent energy spectra were generated with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA for clinically relevant initial carbon ion energies. The predicted trends in RBE were compared with the published experimental data. Biological optimization for carbon ions was implemented in a 3-dimensional research treatment planning tool. Results: We compared the RBE and RBE-weighted dose (RWD) distributions of different carbon ion treatment scenarios with and without nuclear fragments. The inclusion of fragments in the simulations led to smaller RBE predictions. A validation of RMF against measured cell survival data reported in published studies showed reasonable agreement. We calculated and optimized the RWD distributions on patient data and compared the RMF predictions with those from other biological models. The RBE values in an astrocytoma tumor ranged from 2.2 to 4.9 (mean 2.8) for a RWD of 3 Gy(RBE) assuming (α/β){sub X} = 2 Gy. Conclusions: These studies provide new information to quantify and assess uncertainties in the clinically relevant RBE values for carbon ion therapy based on biophysical mechanisms. We present results from

  18. XMM-Newton Observations of NGC 253: Resolving the Emission Components in the Disk and Nuclear Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, W.; Borozdin, K. N.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Cappi, M.; Ehle, M.; Ferrando, P.; Freyberg, M. J.; Kahn, S. M.; Ponman, T. J.; Ptak, A.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the first XMM-Newton observations of the starburst galaxy NGC 253. As known from previous X-ray observations, NGC 253 shows a mixture of extended (disk and halo) and point-source emission. The high XMM-Newton throughput allows for the first time a detailed investigation of the spatial, spectral and variability properties of these components simultaneously. We detect a bright X-ray transient approx. 70 sec SSW of the nucleus and show the spectrum and light curve of the brightest point source (approx. 30 sec S of the nucleus, most likely a black-hole X-ray binary, BHXRB). The unprecedented combination of RGS and EPIC also sheds new light on the emission of the complex nuclear region, the X-ray plume and the disk diffuse emission. In particular, EPIC images reveal that the limb-brightening of the plume is mostly seen in higher ionization emission lines, while in the lower ionization lines, and below 0.5 keV, the plume is more homo- geneously structured, pointing to new interpretations as to the make up of the starburst-driven outflow. Assuming that type IIa supernova remnants (SNRs) are mostly responsible for the E greater than 4 keV emission, the detection with EPIC of the 6.7 keV line allows us to estimate a supernova rate within the nuclear starburst of 0.2 /yr.

  19. Why nuclear energy is essential to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, A. [Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Brook, B.W. [Univ. of Tasmania, Hobart TAS (Australia); Meneley, D.A. [Candu Energy Inc., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Misak, J. [UJV-Rez, Prague (Czech Republic); Blees, T. [Science Council for Global Initiatives, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Van Erp, J.B. [Illinois Commission on Atomic Energy, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Reduction of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions is advocated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. To achieve this target, countries have opted for renewable energy sources, primarily wind and solar. These renewables will be unable to supply the needed large quantities of energy to run industrial societies sustainably, economically and reliably because they are inherently intermittent, depending on flexible backup power or on energy storage for delivery of base-load quantities of electrical energy. The backup power is derived in most cases from combustion of natural gas. Intermittent energy sources, if used in this way, do not meet the requirements of sustainability, nor are they economically viable because they require redundant, under- utilized investment in capacity both for generation and for transmission. Because methane is a potent greenhouse gas, the equivalent carbon dioxide value of methane may cause gas-fired stations to emit more greenhouse gas than coal-fired plants of the same power for currently reported leakage rates of the natural gas. Likewise, intermittent wind/solar photovoltaic systems backed up by gas-fu:ed power plants also release substantial amounts of carbon-dioxide- equivalent greenhouse gas to make such a combination environmentally unacceptable. In the long term, nuclear fission technology is the only known energy source that is capable of delivering the needed large quantities of energy safely, economically, reliably and in a sustainable way, both environmentally and as regards the available resource-base. (author)

  20. Why nuclear energy is essential to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, A.; Brook, B.W.; Meneley, D.A.; Misak, J.; Blees, T.; Van Erp, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions is advocated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. To achieve this target, countries have opted for renewable energy sources, primarily wind and solar. These renewables will be unable to supply the needed large quantities of energy to run industrial societies sustainably, economically and reliably because they are inherently intermittent, depending on flexible backup power or on energy storage for delivery of base-load quantities of electrical energy. The backup power is derived in most cases from combustion of natural gas. Intermittent energy sources, if used in this way, do not meet the requirements of sustainability, nor are they economically viable because they require redundant, under- utilized investment in capacity both for generation and for transmission. Because methane is a potent greenhouse gas, the equivalent carbon dioxide value of methane may cause gas-fired stations to emit more greenhouse gas than coal-fired plants of the same power for currently reported leakage rates of the natural gas. Likewise, intermittent wind/solar photovoltaic systems backed up by gas-fu:ed power plants also release substantial amounts of carbon-dioxide- equivalent greenhouse gas to make such a combination environmentally unacceptable. In the long term, nuclear fission technology is the only known energy source that is capable of delivering the needed large quantities of energy safely, economically, reliably and in a sustainable way, both environmentally and as regards the available resource-base. (author)

  1. Comprehensive evaluation and study on energy saving and emission reduction of nuclear power based on the osculation value method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhihui; Wei Fangxin; Liu Xiaomin

    2014-01-01

    By means of osculation value method, several provinces are selected to study the energy saving and emission reduction effect of nuclear power from provincial range according to the statistic data in 2010. Theoretically, nuclear power effect is reducing the consumption of non-renewable energy such as coal and reducing the release of pollutants such as CO 2 . The result shows that the comprehensive evaluation of energy saving and emission reduction effect in Zhejiang and Jiangsu provinces are the best. In comparison, Guangdong province falls behind Hubei and Fujian provinces. Total consumption of coal per unit of GDP in Guangdong, Zhejiang, and Jiangsu provinces is apparently lower than that of Hebei, Shanxi, Liaoning, and Hubei provinces. However, total release of SO 2 and NOx, etc. is apparently reduced in provinces with nuclear power, compared with provinces without nuclear power. But total release of CO 2 from thermal power generation (coal) per unit of GDP is not apparently reduced in provinces with nuclear power than those without. (authors)

  2. Evaluation of lifecycle CO2 emissions from the Japanese electric power sector in the 21st century under various nuclear scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokimatsu, Koji; Kosugi, Takanobu; Asami, Takayoshi; Williams, Eric; Kaya, Yoichi

    2006-01-01

    The status and prospects of the development of Japanese nuclear power are controversial and uncertain. Many deem that nuclear power can play key roles in both supplying energy and abating CO 2 emissions; however, due to severe nuclear accidents, public acceptance of nuclear power in Japan has not been fully obtained. Moreover, deregulation and liberalization of the electricity market impose pressure on large Japanese electric power companies with regard to both the operation of nuclear power plants and the development of the nuclear fuel cycle. Long-term Japanese CO 2 reduction strategies up to 2100 are of environmental concern and are socially demanded under the circumstances described above. Taking these factors into account, we set the following two objectives for this study. One is to estimate lifecycle CO 2 (LCCO 2 ) emissions from Japanese nuclear power, and the other is to evaluate CO 2 emissions from the Japanese electric power sector in the 21st century by quantifying the relationship between LCCO 2 emissions and scenarios for the adoption of nuclear power. In the pursuit of the above objectives, we first create four scenarios of Japanese adoption of nuclear power, that range from nuclear power promotion to phase-out. Next, we formulate four scenarios describing the mix of the total electricity supply in Japan till the year 2100 corresponding to each of these nuclear power scenarios. CO 2 emissions from the electric power sector in Japan till the year 2100 are estimated by summing those generated by each respective electric power technology and LCCO 2 emission intensity. The LCCO 2 emission intensity of nuclear power for both light water reactors (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) includes the uranium fuel production chain, facility construction/operation/decommission, and spent fuel processing/disposal. From our investigations, we conclude that the promotion of nuclear power is clearly a strong option for reducing CO 2 emissions by the electric power

  3. Nuclear effects on the transverse momentum spectra of charged particles in pPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}$ = 5.02 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferretti, Roberta; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gonella, Franco; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Montecassiano, Fabio; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ortona, Giacomo; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Kim, Jae Yool; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michał; Wolszczak, Weronika; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Demiyanov, Andrey; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kodolova, Olga; Korotkikh, Vladimir; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Vardanyan, Irina; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Musella, Pasquale; Nägeli, Christoph; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Taroni, Silvia; Verzetti, Mauro; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Kao, Kai-Yi; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Sekmen, Sezen; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Krohn, Michael; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kaadze, Ketino; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; Moon, Dong Ho; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Bauer, Gerry; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Meier, Frank; Ratnikov, Fedor; Snow, Gregory R; Zvada, Marian; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Hunt, Adam; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Malik, Sudhir; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Zablocki, Jakub; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Korjenevski, Sergey; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Kaplan, Steven; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-05-29

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged particles are measured by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC in pPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}$ = 5.02 TeV, in the range of $p_\\mathrm{T}$ between 0.4 and 120 GeV/$c$ and pseudorapidity $|\\eta_\\mathrm{CM}|$ lower than 1.8 in the proton-nucleon center-of-mass frame. For $p_\\mathrm{T}$ lower than 10 GeV/$c$, the charged-particle production is asymmetric about $|\\eta_\\mathrm{CM}|$ = 0, with smaller yield observed in the direction of the proton beam, qualitatively consistent with expectations from shadowing in nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDF). A pp reference spectrum at $\\sqrt{s}$ =5.02 TeV is obtained by interpolation from previous measurements at higher and lower center-of-mass energies. The $p_\\mathrm{T}$ distribution measured in pPb collisions shows an enhancement of charged particles with $p_\\mathrm{T}$ larger than 20 GeV/$c$ compared to expectations from the pp reference. The enhancement is larger than predicted by perturbative quantum chromodyna...

  4. Measurement of leakage neutron spectra from a spherical pile of zirconium irradiated with 14MeV neutrons and validation of its nuclear data

    CERN Document Server

    Ichihara, C; Hayashi, S A; Yamamoto, J; Takahashi, A

    2003-01-01

    In order to make a benchmark validation of the nuclear data for Zr, the leakage neutron spectrum from a Zr sphere of a 61-cm diameter was measured between 0.1 and 16MeV using a time-of-flight technique with a 14MeV neutron source facility, OKTAVIAN. The result was compared with the calculation using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A. To investigate the spectrum dependence on the individual neutron reactions, test calculations were carried out with the MCNP-4A code using the JENDL-3.2-based libraries, in which partial cross section values were reduced from the original values. From the comparison between the measured and the calculated spectra, it was found that each of the results could predict well the experiment in general. However, in detail, both ENDF/B-VI and EFF-2.4 gave considerable overestimation above 1 MeV. The JENDL-3.2 predicts the spectrum almost satisfactorily except below 0.8 MeV and around 10 MeV. The discrepancy found in JENDL-3.2 calculation is considered due to the cross section values of the (n...

  5. Large Charge-Transfer Energy in LiFePO4 Revealed by Full-Multiplet Calculation for the Fe L3 -edge Soft X-ray Emission Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Daisuke; Nanba, Yusuke; Makinose, Yuki; Matsuda, Hirofumi; Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Hosono, Eiji

    2018-04-17

    We analyzed the Fe 3d electronic structure in LiFePO 4 /FePO 4 (LFP/FP) nanowire with a high cyclability by using soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) combined with configuration-interaction full-multiplet (CIFM) calculation. The ex situ Fe L 2,3 -edge resonant XES (RXES) spectra for LFP and FP are ascribed to oxidation states of Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ , respectively. CIFM calculations for Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ states reproduced the Fe L 3 RXES spectra for LFP and FP, respectively. In the calculations for both states, the charge-transfer energy was considerably larger than those for typical iron oxides, indicating very little electron transfer from the O 2p to Fe 3d orbitals and a weak hybridization on the Fe-O bond during the charge-discharge reactions. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Espectros de duas formas de lignina obtidos por ressonância magnética nuclear Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of two types of lignin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romualdo Shigueo Fukushima

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available O conteúdo de lignina pode ser útil na estimativa da digestão da fibra de plantas forrageiras. A determinação quantitativa da lignina pelo método espectrofotométrico pressupõe a existência de um padrão de referência satisfatório. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar, por meio da ressonância magnética nuclear (RMN, duas ligninas, uma extraída com brometo de acetila (LBrAc e outra com solução ácida de dioxano (LDiox, para utilização como padrão de referência em análises espectrofotométricas. A ressonância de próton acusou altos teores de carboidratos contaminantes nas amostras de LBrAc. Como a cromatografia líquida já havia indicado menor presença de carboidratos contaminantes na LDiox, os espectros por ressonância de carbono, mais rica em detalhes do que a espectroscopia anterior, porém mais demorada, foram realizados somente nas ligninas LDiox. Este espectro revelou picos típicos, comuns à maioria das ligninas. Os achados da RMN foram condizentes com a análise química, a qual identificou que o carboidrato da parede celular que acompanha a LBrAc seria possivelmente a celulose, ao passo que a pequena contaminação da LDiox teria origem nas pentosanas. A LDiox pode ser considerada melhor padrão de referência para as análises espectrofotométricas do que a LBrAc.Lignin content can be useful to estimate fiber digestion of forage plants. Quantitative determination of lignin by the spectrophotometric method presumes an efficient standard. The objective of this work was to evaluate, by the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, two lignins, one extracted with acetyl bromide (AcBrL and another with acidic dioxane solution (DL, as standards in spectrophotometric analysis. Proton resonance revealed high presence of carbohydrates in the AcBrL residues. Because liquid chromatograph had already shown low contamination with carbohydrates in the DL samples, only carbon resonance, which is lengthier, but richer in details than

  7. Assessment and prediction of the scales of radioactive contamination of the environment by emissions from a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elokhin, A.P.; Solovei, A.F.

    1995-01-01

    The assessment of radioactive contamination of the air basin and underlying surface in the direction of emission reduces to determining the volume activity of the radioactive impurity in air, the surface activity on the underlying surface of the radioactive impurity is known at least approximately (for example, it can be set on the basis of the technological regulations at the nuclear power plant or according to the criterion of levels during an accident), by using exposure-dose-rate sensors in a network of posts of the automatic system for monitoring the radiation environment (ASMRE), which are placed on the industrial area of the nuclear power plant, in the shielded zone and in the observation zone, it is possible to determine more accurately the magnitude of the emission and, therefore, to estimate the scale of the radioactive contamination of the medium

  8. Cluster emission at pre-equilibrium stage in Heavy Nuclear Reactions. A Model considering the Thermodynamics of Small Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermudez Martinez, A.; Damiani, D.; Guzman Martinez, F.; Rodriguez Hoyos, O.; Rodriguez Manso, A.

    2015-01-01

    Cluster emission at pre-equilibrium stage, in heavy ion fusion reactions of 12 C and 16 O nuclei with 116 Sn, 208 Pb, 238 U are studied. the energy of the projectile nuclei was chosen at 0.25GeV, 0.5GeV and 1GeV. A cluster formation model is developed in order to calculate the cluster size. Thermodynamics of small systems was used in order to examine the cluster behavior inside the nuclear media. This model is based on considering two phases inside the compound nucleus, on one hand the nuclear media phase, and on the other hand the cluster itself. The cluster acts like an instability inside the compound nucleus, provoking an exchange of nucleons with the nuclear media through its surface. The processes were simulated using Monte Carlo methods. We obtained that the cluster emission probability shows great dependence on the cluster size. This project is aimed to implement cluster emission processes, during the pre-equilibrium stage, in the frame of CRISP code (Collaboration Rio-Sao Paulo). (Author)

  9. The relationship between pollutant emissions, renewable energy, nuclear energy and GDP: empirical evidence from 18 developed and developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mbarek, Mounir; Saidi, Kais; Amamri, Mounira

    2018-07-01

    This document investigates the causal relationship between nuclear energy (NE), pollutant emissions (CO2 emissions), gross domestic product (GDP) and renewable energy (RE) using dynamic panel data models for a global panel consisting of 18 countries (developed and developing) covering the 1990-2013 period. Our results indicate that there is a co-integration between variables. The unit root test suggests that all the variables are stationary in first differences. The paper further examines the link using the Granger causality analysis of vector error correction model, which indicates a unidirectional relationship running from GDP per capita to pollutant emissions for the developed and developing countries. However, there is a unidirectional causality from GDP per capita to RE in the short and long run. This finding confirms the conservation hypothesis. Similarly, there is no causality between NE and GDP per capita.

  10. The competitiveness of nuclear energy in an era of liberalized markets and restrictions on greenhouse-gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Paoli, L.; Gulli, F.

    2008-01-01

    The debate on the benefits of nuclear energy revolves around the very competitiveness of this energy source. This article tries to show why it is not easy to answer unambiguously the question whether or not it is convenient to resort to nuclear power in a given country. After listing the factors on which the cost of electricity generation rests and discussing the range of probability of their value, the levelized cost of electricity generation from nuclear, coal and gas-fired plants is calculated using the Monte Carlo method. The results show that nuclear power is likely to be competitive, especially if policies to combat Co2 emissions will continue in the coming decades. There are, however, some margins of uncertainty, mainly related, to the one hand, to the cost of nuclear plants, that depends on the socio-institutional context, and on the other, to the fossil fuels cost, that are inherently difficult to anticipate even on average. Finally it is noted that the context of liberalized electricity markets may make it more difficult for investors to accept the risk of investing in nuclear power plants and for the community to socialize some of the costs associated with this technology. [it

  11. Light charged particle emission in heavy-ion reactions – What have ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    coincidence with gamma rays, fission products, evaporation residues have yielded interesting results which bring out the influence of nuclear structure, nuclear mean field and dynamics on the emission of these particles. Keywords. Light charged particles; heavy-ion induced reactions; particle spectra and angular distri-.

  12. Systematic evaluation of prompt neutron spectra in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osawa, Takaaki

    1995-01-01

    To create the nuclear data fail JEND-32, the prompt fission neutron spectra X(E) of 233 U, 235 U, 238 U and 239 Pu were reevaluated and some improvement were added to the calculation models. We tried to extend the calculation method of fission spectra of nuclides with poor measurement data in consideration of increasing the importance of nuclear data of minor actinoids. We improved and extended the following five points. (1) On JENDL-3.1, the fission spectra of principal fissible materials had been calculated by the Modland-Nix model which the neutron emissions of fragments were calculated under the approximation of the constant inverse process cross section. In the paper, the spectra were calculated by the use of the inverse process cross section depend on the energy obtained by the calculation of the optical model. The result showed the increase of low energy components and the softening effect of spectra (2) On JENDL-3.1, the all fission processes were assumed to undergo (n,f) reaction. In the paper, they were calculated by the multi-chance fission such as (n, n'f), (n, 2nf) and (n, 3nf) etc. Softening of the spectra (En > 6 MeV) was obtained by this method. (3) The level density parameter (LDP) has been assumed as a = A/C in either case of light fragment (LF) and heavy fragment (HF) in the original Madland-Nix model. But we used LDP based on the Ignatyuk model under consideration of the shell effects of nuclear fragments, hence the neutron spectra of heavy fragments were hardening. (4) Nuclear temperature of both fragments had been assumed to be the same at original model, but now R T = Tm/TmH was derived to calculate them. The ratio of middle/both side components of spectra was changed. (5) Unknown neutron fission spectra of minor actinide were able to the assumed on the basis of Moriyama-Ohnishi model. (S.Y.)

  13. Angular Spectra of Polarized Galactic Foregrounds

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Jung; Lazarian, A.

    2003-01-01

    It is believed that magnetic field lines are twisted and bend by turbulent motions in the Galaxy. Therefore, both Galactic synchrotron emission and thermal emission from dust reflects statistics of Galactic turbulence. Our simple model of Galactic turbulence, motivated by results of our simulations, predicts that Galactic disk and halo exhibit different angular power spectra. We show that observed angular spectra of synchrotron emission are compatible with our model. We also show that our mod...

  14. Main component analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C quantitative spectra of hydrogenation products of tars from Kansk-Achinsk Achinsk and Cheremkhovsk coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushnarev, D.F.; Polonov, V.M.; Donskikh, V.I.; Rokhina, E.F.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1986-03-01

    Possibility is discussed of examining nuclear magnetic resonance /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C quantitative spectra of coal tar hydrogenation products using main component factorial analysis and applying special mathematical methods of processing experimental data. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of hydrogenation products of low temperature Cheremkhovsk coal carbonization tar and rapid pyrolysis Kansk-Achinsk coal tar were obtained on a WP-200SY (Bruker) spectrometer at 50.3 and 200.1 MHz, respectively. Data processing was carried out on an ODRA-1304 computer. Comparative correlation of parameters are given of tars and hydrogenation products which consist of hydrogenation of aromatic cycles and destruction of alkyl substituents, and factorial loads on structural parameters of tar hydrogenation products. 11 references.

  15. Detection of special nuclear material from delayed neutron emission induced by a dual-particle monoenergetic source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, M. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I., E-mail: ijov@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2016-06-27

    Detection of unique signatures of special nuclear materials is critical for their interdiction in a variety of nuclear security and nonproliferation scenarios. We report on the observation of delayed neutrons from fission of uranium induced in dual-particle active interrogation based on the {sup 11}B(d,n γ){sup 12}C nuclear reaction. Majority of the fissions are attributed to fast fission induced by the incident quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. A Li-doped glass–polymer composite scintillation neutron detector, which displays excellent neutron/γ discrimination at low energies, was used in the measurements, along with a recoil-based liquid scintillation detector. Time-dependent buildup and decay of delayed neutron emission from {sup 238}U were measured between the interrogating beam pulses and after the interrogating beam was turned off, respectively. Characteristic buildup and decay time profiles were compared to the common parametrization into six delayed neutron groups, finding a good agreement between the measurement and nuclear data. This method is promising for detecting fissile and fissionable materials in cargo scanning applications and can be readily integrated with transmission radiography using low-energy nuclear reaction sources.

  16. Land and Water Use, CO2 Emissions, and Worker Radiological Exposure Factors for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brett W Carlsen; Brent W Dixon; Urairisa Pathanapirom; Eric Schneider; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. AUlt; Allen G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn

    2013-08-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies program is preparing to evaluate several proposed nuclear fuel cycle options to help guide and prioritize Fuel Cycle Technology research and development. Metrics are being developed to assess performance against nine evaluation criteria that will be used to assess relevant impacts resulting from all phases of the fuel cycle. This report focuses on four specific environmental metrics. • land use • water use • CO2 emissions • radiological Dose to workers Impacts associated with the processes in the front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, mining through enrichment and deconversion of DUF6 are summarized from FCRD-FCO-2012-000124, Revision 1. Impact estimates are developed within this report for the remaining phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. These phases include fuel fabrication, reactor construction and operations, fuel reprocessing, and storage, transport, and disposal of associated used fuel and radioactive wastes. Impact estimates for each of the phases of the nuclear fuel cycle are given as impact factors normalized per unit process throughput or output. These impact factors can then be re-scaled against the appropriate mass flows to provide estimates for a wide range of potential fuel cycles. A companion report, FCRD-FCO-2013-000213, applies the impact factors to estimate and provide a comparative evaluation of 40 fuel cycles under consideration relative to these four environmental metrics.

  17. Transverse-momentum spectra and nuclear modification factor using Boltzmann Transport Equation with flow in Pb+Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN}) = 2.76 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathy, Sushanta; Khuntia, Arvind; Tiwari, Swatantra Kumar; Sahoo, Raghunath [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Discipline of Physics, School of Basic Sciences, Indore (India)

    2017-05-15

    In the continuation of our previous work, the transverse-momentum (p{sub T}) spectra and nuclear modification factor (R{sub AA}) are derived using the relaxation time approximation of Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE). The initial p{sub T}-distribution used to describe p + p collisions has been studied with the perturbative-Quantum Chromodynamics (pQCD) inspired power-law distribution, Hagedorn's empirical formula and with the Tsallis non-extensive statistical distribution. The non-extensive Tsallis distribution is observed to describe the complete range of the transverse-momentum spectra. The Boltzmann-Gibbs Blast Wave (BGBW) distribution is used as the equilibrium distribution in the present formalism, to describe the p{sub T}-distribution and nuclear modification factor in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The experimental data for Pb+Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN}) = 2.76 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN have been analyzed for pions, kaons, protons, K{sup *0} and φ. It is observed that the present formalism while explaining the transverse-momentum spectra up to 5 GeV/c, explains the nuclear modification factor very well up to 8 GeV/c in p{sub T} for all these particles except for protons. R{sub AA} is found to be independent of the degree of non-extensivity, q{sub pp} after p{sub T} ∝ 8 GeV/c. (orig.)

  18. The use of the acoustic emission for the components of the primary circuit of the nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, V.

    1992-01-01

    Full text: The Modrany Engineering Works (Modranske strojirny) is a producer and a final supplier of the main connecting piping circuit systems and valves for the nuclear power plants (type VVER 440 and VVER 1000) built in Czechoslovakia. Besides the delivery and assembly of valves and components methods there were developed for a monitoring of the stated equipment ability of a service in the Material and Diagnostic Laboratory, which is a part of the company. An important object of this work is to obtain a sufficient set of data and to work out suitable methods, on the basis of which it would be possible to perform a serious estimation of residual service life of the main piping components after certain service operation of the nuclear power plant. During the operation of a nuclear power station a failure of the main piping circuit could happen in either of two possible modes: 1.) A sudden break - by an unstable defect propagation leading to a. final fracture of the piping; 2) A fatigue failure - which is characterised by a gradual subcritical growth of defect in relation to the loading parameters. This process is frequently accelerated by further processes, e.g. corrosion. It is therefore suitable to use such physical and mechanical quantities, which characterize the material damage. Acoustic emission signals belongs to these quantities. A knowledge of the response of these signals in relation to the damage of the material gives us the possibility to evaluate the residual life of the piping containing defects. The importance of this is increasing mainly after a long period of service. She paper deals in details with experience gained in application of acoustic emission, during pressure tests of primary circuit components (elbow, welds, T- junction etc) in laboratory conditions which imitate those in service. There are shown some results of cyclic fatigue tests by internal pressure on prototypes models and specimen. Acoustic emission method represents the

  19. On the Potential of Nuclear Fission Energy for Effective Reduction of Carbon Emission under the Constraint of Uranium Resources Use without Spent Fuel Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, V.; Pevec, D.; Matijevic, M.

    2010-01-01

    Urgency to stop further increase of greenhouse gases emissions and reverse the trends, as stated in the Fourth Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPPC) Report and in Copenhagen discussions, limits the realistic choice of energy technologies to those available now or in the near future of few decades. In the coming fifty years neither nuclear fusion nor carbon capture and storage (CCS) can be expected to give a significant contribution to world energy production. Two perspective intermittent sources such as wind and solar together with nuclear fission energy covering the base load consumption appears to be a combination with a potential to produce a large share of carbon free energy in the total world energy production. This contribution considers the issues, associated with required large scale deployment of nuclear fission energy. A serious question associated with nuclear energy is nuclear proliferation. Spread of uranium enrichment and spent fuel reprocessing installations in many new countries constructing nuclear reactors would be a major concern in present political environment. We investigate whether uranium resources would be sufficient to support nuclear build-up in next 50-60 years sufficiently large to significantly reduce carbon emission without reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. A positive answer would mean that 50-60 years can be available to develop effective international control of nuclear fuel cycle installations. Our results show that a maximum nuclear build-up which would consume currently estimated uranium resources by 2065 without reprocessing could reduce by 2065 carbon emission by 39.6% of the total reduction needed to bring the WEO 2009 Reference Scenario prediction of total GHG emissions in 2065 to the level of the WEO 450 Scenario limiting global temperature increase to 2 degrees of C. The less demanding strategy of the nuclear replacement of all non-CCS coal power plants retiring during the 2025-2065 period would reduce emission

  20. Measurements of neutron emission spectra and 7Be production in Li(d, n) and Be(d, n) reactions for 25 and 40 MeV deuterons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, Masayuki; Baba, Mamoru; Aoki, Takao; Kawata, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Naoya; Itoga, Toshiro

    2003-01-01

    The neutron spectra in Li(d, n) and Be(d, n) reactions for Ed = 25, 40 MeV were measured from ∼1 MeV to highest energy of secondary neutrons at ten laboratory angles between 0- and 110-deg with the time-of-flight (TOF) method. In addition, the number of 7 Be accumulated in the targets was also measured by counting the γ-rays from 7 Be using a pure Ge detector to obtain 7 Be production cross-section and yields. (author)

  1. Is There a Future for Nuclear Power? Wind and Emission Reduction Targets in Fossil-Fuel Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kooten, G Cornelis; Duan, Jun; Lynch, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the viability of relying on wind power to replace upwards of 60% of electricity generation in Alberta that would be lost if coal-fired generation is phased out. Using hourly wind data from 17 locations across Alberta, we are able to simulate the potential wind power output available to the Alberta grid when modern, 3.5 MW-capacity wind turbines are spread across the province. Using wind regimes for the years 2006 through 2015, we find that available wind power is less than 60% of installed capacity 98% of the time, and below 30% of capacity 74% of the time. There is only a small amount of correlation between wind speeds at different locations, but yet it remains necessary to rely on fossil fuel generation. Then, based on the results from a grid allocation model, we find that CO2 emissions can be reduced by about 30%, but only through a combination of investment in wind energy and reliance on purchases of hydropower from British Columbia. Only if nuclear energy is permitted into the generation mix would Alberta be able to meet its CO2-emissions reduction target in the electricity sector. With nuclear power, emissions can be reduced by upwards of 85%.

  2. Is There a Future for Nuclear Power? Wind and Emission Reduction Targets in Fossil-Fuel Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jun; Lynch, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the viability of relying on wind power to replace upwards of 60% of electricity generation in Alberta that would be lost if coal-fired generation is phased out. Using hourly wind data from 17 locations across Alberta, we are able to simulate the potential wind power output available to the Alberta grid when modern, 3.5 MW-capacity wind turbines are spread across the province. Using wind regimes for the years 2006 through 2015, we find that available wind power is less than 60% of installed capacity 98% of the time, and below 30% of capacity 74% of the time. There is only a small amount of correlation between wind speeds at different locations, but yet it remains necessary to rely on fossil fuel generation. Then, based on the results from a grid allocation model, we find that CO2 emissions can be reduced by about 30%, but only through a combination of investment in wind energy and reliance on purchases of hydropower from British Columbia. Only if nuclear energy is permitted into the generation mix would Alberta be able to meet its CO2-emissions reduction target in the electricity sector. With nuclear power, emissions can be reduced by upwards of 85%. PMID:27902712

  3. Use of real options in nuclear power plant valuation in the presence of uncertainty with CO2 emission credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiriyama, Eriko; Suzuki, Atsuyuki

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the value of an investment in power generation assets that do not emit CO 2 , by using a real option model. This study evaluates the effects of future uncertainty on investment decision-making, by focusing on the uncertainty of CO 2 emission credits [yen/t-CO 2 ] in the fairly near future in Japan. Electric utilities are required to keep plans to prepare for various future uncertainties such as the price of CO 2 emission credits. The real option approach can evaluate the option value of decision-making under uncertainty. This study examined the option value of a power plant [yen/KW] to evaluate the effects of an externality under uncertainty. The results showed that nuclear power would have the most value under the forthcoming CO 2 emission limitations. In order to secure the effectiveness of measures against global warming, we should reconsider the roles of nuclear power plants in Japan. Finally, the real option model is shown to be an effective candidate for a decision-making support tool to deal with problems in energy environmental policy. (author)

  4. Photobleaching Response of Different Sources of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Exposed to Natural Solar Radiation Using Absorption and Excitation?Emission Matrix Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yunlin; Liu, Xiaohan; Osburn, Christopher L.; Wang, Mingzhu; Qin, Boqiang; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2013-01-01

    CDOM biogeochemical cycle is driven by several physical and biological processes such as river input, biogeneration and photobleaching that act as primary sinks and sources of CDOM. Watershed-derived allochthonous (WDA) and phytoplankton-derived autochthonous (PDA) CDOM were exposed to 9 days of natural solar radiation to assess the photobleaching response of different CDOM sources, using absorption and fluorescence (excitation-emission matrix) spectroscopy. Our results showed a marked decrea...

  5. Carbon emission and mitigation cost comparisons between fossil fuel, nuclear and renewable energy resources for electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, R.E.H.; Rogner, H.-H.; Gregory, Ken

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to compare the electricity generation costs of a number of current commercial technologies with technologies expected to become commercially available within the coming decade or so. The amount of greenhouse gas emissions resulting per kWh of electricity generated were evaluated. A range of fossil fuel alternatives (with and without physical carbon sequestration), were compared with the baseline case of a pulverised coal, steam cycle power plant. Nuclear, hydro, wind, bioenergy and solar generating plants were also evaluated. The objectives were to assess the comparative costs of mitigation per tonne of carbon emissions avoided, and to estimate the total amount of carbon mitigation that could result from the global electricity sector by 2010 and 2020 as a result of fuel switching, carbon dioxide sequestration and the greater uptake of renewable energy. Most technologies showed potential to reduce both generating costs and carbon emission avoidance by 2020 with the exception of solar power and carbon dioxide sequestration. The global electricity industry has potential to reduce its carbon emissions by over 15% by 2020 together with cost saving benefits compared with existing generation

  6. Fluorescence-excitation and emission spectra from LH2 antenna complexes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila as a function of the sample preparation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Ralf; Timpmann, Kõu; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Köhler, Jürgen; Freiberg, Arvi

    2013-10-10

    The high sensitivity of optical spectra of pigment-protein complexes to temperature and pressure is well known. In the present study, we have demonstrated the significant influence of the environments commonly used in bulk and single-molecule spectroscopic studies at low temperatures on the LH2 photosynthetic antenna complex from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. A transfer of this LH2 complex from a bulk-buffer solution into a spin-coated polymer film results in a 189 cm(-1) blue shift of the B850 excitonic absorption band at 5 K. Within the molecular exciton model, the origin of this shift could be disentangled into three parts, namely to an increase of the local site energies, a contraction of the exciton band, and a decrease of the displacement energy.

  7. Prospects for power generation to 2010: the impact of growth on CO2 emissions and the role of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dell, S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the International Energy Agency's World Energy Outlook to 2010, published in 1995. First the underlying macroeconomic and population assumptions are presented. Then the two cases analysed in the report, defined on the basis of different views of how energy markets might develop over the projection period to 2010, are discussed. This is followed by projections for total primary energy demand, the demand for energy by fuel and, lastly, projected demand for electricity. The implications of energy use on carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions are discussed, with particular reference to the role of nuclear generated electricity over the past 20 years and over the next 15. (author)

  8. Prospects for power generation to 2010: the impact of growth on CO2 emissions and the role of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dell, S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the International Agency's World Energy Outlook to 2010, published earlier in 1995. First the underlying macroeconomic and population assumptions are presented. Then the two cases analysed in the report, defined on the basis of different views of how energy markets might develop over the projection period to 2010, are discussed. This is followed by projections for total primary energy demand, the demand for energy by fuel and, lastly, projected demand for electricity. The implications of energy use on carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions are discussed, with particular reference to the role of nuclear-generated electricity over the past 20 years and over the next 15. (author)

  9. Analysis of energy transfer based emission spectra of (Sm{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}): Li{sub 2}O–LiF–B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–CdO glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naresh, V., E-mail: varna.naresh@gmail.com; Buddhudu, S., E-mail: profsb_svuniv@hotmail.com

    2014-03-15

    The present paper brings out the results concerning the preparation and optical properties of Sm{sup 3+} and Dy{sup 3+} each ion separately in four different concentrations (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mol%) and also together doped (1 mol% Dy{sup 3+}+x mol% Sm{sup 3+}): Li{sub 2}O–LiF–B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–CdO (where x=0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mol%) glasses by a melt quenching method. Sm{sup 3+} doped base glasses have displayed an intense orange emission at 602 nm ({sup 4}G{sub 5/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 7/2}) with an excitation at 403 nm and Dy{sup 3+} doped glasses have shown two emissions located at 486 nm ({sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 15/2}; blue) and 577 nm ({sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 13/2}; yellow) with λ{sub exci}=387 nm. The co-doped (Dy{sup 3+}+Sm{sup 3+}) lithium fluoro-boro cadmium glasses have been excited with an excitation at 387 nm of Dy{sup 3+} which has resulted in with a significant reduction in Dy{sup 3+} emission, at the same time there exists an increase in the reddish-orange emission of Sm{sup 3+} due to an energy transfer from Dy{sup 3+} to Sm{sup 3+}. The non-radiative energy transfer from Dy{sup 3+} to Sm{sup 3+} is governed by dipole–quadrupole interactions as is explained in terms of their emission spectra, donor lifetime, energy level diagram and energy transfer characteristic factors. -- Highlights: • In co-doped (Dy{sup 3+}+Sm{sup 3+}): LFBCd glass, reddish-orange emission due to Sm{sup 3+} ({sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 6}H{sub J}) has been enhanced due to an energy transfer from Dy{sup 3+} ions in the glass. • This has been evidenced from a lowering trend in the emission transition lifetimes of donor (Dy{sup 3+}) ions with increasing acceptor (Sm{sup 3+}) concentration. • Energy transfer mechanism involved in Dy{sup 3+}→Sm{sup 3+} has been explained in terms of I–H luminescence decay curve analysis.

  10. The azimuthally anisotropic emission of unstable light nuclear in the heavy ion collisions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhiyong; Jin Genming; Li Zuyu; Duan Limin; Dai Guangxi; Zhang Baoguo; Wu Heyu; Wen Wanxin; Qi Yujin; Luo Qingzheng

    1996-01-01

    The unstable light nuclei emitted in the interaction of 40 Ar on 197 Au have been detected at energy of 25 MeV/u by using particle-particle correlation measurement at small relative angle. Their in-plane and out-of-plane emission were measured for three bins of experimentally estimated impact parameter. The enhanced in-plane emission for mid-rapidity unstable nuclei is observed. This enhanced in-plane emission becomes stronger with increasing of impact parameter, but changes small with the mass of unstable nuclei. The in-plane enhancement decreases slightly with the energy of excited state of unstable nuclei. For projectile-like unstable nuclei, the in-plane emission dominates as expected

  11. Nustar and Chandra Insight into the Nature of the 3-40 Kev Nuclear Emission in Ngc 253

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmer, Bret D.; Wik, Daniel R.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Ptak, Andrew; Antoniu, V.; Argo, M.K.; Bechtol, K.; Boggs, S.; Christensen, F.E.; Craig, W.W.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We present results from three nearly simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Chandra monitoring observations between 2012 September 2 and 2012 November 16 of the local star-forming galaxy NGC 253. The 3-40 kiloelectron volt intensity of the inner approximately 20 arcsec (approximately 400 parsec) nuclear region, as measured by NuSTAR, varied by a factor of approximately 2 across the three monitoring observations. The Chandra data reveal that the nuclear region contains three bright X-ray sources, including a luminous (L (sub 2-10 kiloelectron volt) approximately few × 10 (exp 39) erg per s) point source located approximately 1 arcsec from the dynamical center of the galaxy (within the sigma 3 positional uncertainty of the dynamical center); this source drives the overall variability of the nuclear region at energies greater than or approximately equal to 3 kiloelectron volts. We make use of the variability to measure the spectra of this single hard X-ray source when it was in bright states. The spectra are well described by an absorbed (power-law model spectral fit value, N(sub H), approximately equal to 1.6 x 10 (exp 23) per square centimeter) broken power-law model with spectral slopes and break energies that are typical of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), but not active galactic nuclei (AGNs). A previous Chandra observation in 2003 showed a hard X-ray point source of similar luminosity to the 2012 source that was also near the dynamical center (Phi is approximately equal to 0.4 arcsec); however, this source was offset from the 2012 source position by approximately 1 arcsec. We show that the probability of the 2003 and 2012 hard X-ray sources being unrelated is much greater than 99.99% based on the Chandra spatial localizations. Interestingly, the Chandra spectrum of the 2003 source (3-8 kiloelectron volts) is shallower in slope than that of the 2012 hard X-ray source. Its proximity to the dynamical center and harder Chandra spectrum

  12. Proton and electron impact on molecular and atomic oxygen: I. High resolution fluorescence spectra in the visible and VUV spectral range and emission cross-sections for dissociative ionisation and excitation of O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmi, O.; Schartner, K.H.

    2000-01-01

    For pt.II see ibid., vol.11, p.45-58, 2000. Molecular oxygen O 2 was dissociated in collisions with protons and electrons in the intermediate velocity range (p + -energies: 17-800 keV, e - -energies: 0.2-2 keV). Fluorescence from excited atomic and singly ionised fragments and from singly ionised molecules was detected in the VUV and in the visible and near UV spectral range. Highly resolved spectra are presented for the VUV (46-131 nm) and the near UV/visible (340-605 nm) spectral range. Absolute emission cross-sections have been determined for dissociative ionisation and excitation leading to fluorescence in the VUV. Results are compared with published data. (orig.)

  13. Ab Initio Potential Energy Surfaces for Both the Ground (X̃1A′ and Excited (A∼1A′′ Electronic States of HSiBr and the Absorption and Emission Spectra of HSiBr/DSiBr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anyang Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio potential energy surfaces for the ground (X̃1A′ and excited (A˜A′′1 electronic states of HSiBr were obtained by using the single and double excitation coupled-cluster theory with a noniterative perturbation treatment of triple excitations and the multireference configuration interaction with Davidson correction, respectively, employing an augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence quadruple zeta basis set. The calculated vibrational energy levels of HSiBr and DSiBr of the ground and excited electronic states are in excellent agreement with the available experimental band origins. In addition, the absorption and emission spectra of HSiBr and DSiBr were calculated using an efficient single Lanczos propagation method and are in good agreement with the available experimental observations.

  14. 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM)-doping density dependence of luminescence spectra and white emission in polymer light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Akinori; Hosokawa, Takeshi; Haishi, Motoki; Ohtani, Naoki [Department of Electronics, Doshisha University, Tatara-Miyakodani, Kyotanabe-shi, Kyoto (Japan)

    2009-01-15

    We fabricated white polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs), in which the active region is doped with a low-weight molecule. The host polymer material is Poly(9,9-didodecyl-fluorenyl-2,7-yleneethylnylene) (PFO), while the guest luminescent low-weight-molecule is 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM). The photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) spectra strongly depend on DCM-doping-density. However, the most suitable DCM-doping-densities for white emissions in PL and EL are slightly different. This discrepancy is caused by the difference in excitation efficiencies. The photo-excitation system for PL measurement is better than the current injection for generating carriers efficiently. Thus, the realization of the white EL signal requires the larger DCM-doping-density than that of the white PL signal. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Multidimensional Models of Type Ia Supernova Nebular Spectra: Strong Emission Lines from Stripped Companion Gas Rule Out Classic Single-degenerate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botyánszki, János; Kasen, Daniel; Plewa, Tomasz

    2018-01-01

    The classic single-degenerate model for the progenitors of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) predicts that the supernova ejecta should be enriched with solar-like abundance material stripped from the companion star. Spectroscopic observations of normal SNe Ia at late times, however, have not resulted in definite detection of hydrogen. In this Letter, we study line formation in SNe Ia at nebular times using non-LTE spectral modeling. We present, for the first time, multidimensional radiative transfer calculations of SNe Ia with stripped material mixed in the ejecta core, based on hydrodynamical simulations of ejecta–companion interaction. We find that interaction models with main-sequence companions produce significant Hα emission at late times, ruling out these types of binaries being viable progenitors of SNe Ia. We also predict significant He I line emission at optical and near-infrared wavelengths for both hydrogen-rich or helium-rich material, providing an additional observational probe of stripped ejecta. We produce models with reduced stripped masses and find a more stringent mass limit of M st ≲ 1 × 10‑4 M ⊙ of stripped companion material for SN 2011fe.

  16. Air pollution emission from the Swedish energy system 1970-1990. What influence should a nuclear power phaseout have had on the emissions?. An analysis of actual outcome and phaseout alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostroem, C.Aa.; Grennfelt, P.; Johansson, M.; Loevblad, G.

    1994-09-01

    If the Swedish nuclear power plants had been phased out during the 1980s according to any of the two alternatives presented in 1978, the energy sectors emission of sulfur dioxide to air should have been four times greater today. For nitrogen oxides and carbon oxides the emission figures should now have been two to three times higher than the actual present values. The continued operation of nuclear power during 1980-1990 have resulted in a total reduction of sulfur dioxide emission of 500.000 tonnes, which corresponds to four years of the present total yearly emission in Sweden. For nitrogen oxides the difference is 200.000 tonnes and for carbon dioxide approximately 150 million tonnes. 17 refs

  17. A study of radiative Auger emission, satellites and hypersatellites in photon-induced K x-ray spectra of some elements in the range 20≤Z≤32

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, H.R.

    2000-01-01

    Photon-induced K x-ray spectra of Ca, Ti, Fe, Zn and Ge have been investigated. The measurements have been made using a crystal spectrometer combined with a thin scintillation detector. Excited by the collimated photon beam from an Rh-anode x-ray tube, the spectra of all these elements reveal the existence of radiative Auger emission (RAE) structure and the satellite and hypersatellite lines along with the diagram lines. The energies and intensities of the Kα 2 , Kα 1 , Kβ 1,3 and Kβ 5 diagram lines and the Kα satellites and hypersatellite transitions are presented. The intensity of the RAE structure corresponding to the Kβ 1,3 x-ray transition and the energy of the RAE edge for each element is also reported. The measured results have been compared with the values from other sources such as electron/heavy-ion excitation and theoretical values. From the intensities of the satellite lines of these elements, the average L-vacancy fraction P L has been deduced in each case. (author)

  18. Evaluation of secondary and prompt fission neutron spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porodzinskij, Yu.V.; Sukhovitskij, E.Sh. [Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Inst., Minsk-Sosny (Belarus)

    1997-03-01

    A simple model allowing to split neutron emission spectra into reaction partials is suggested. Predicted spectra of (n,n`{gamma}), (n,n`f), etc appear to be much harder than usually evaluated. (author)

  19. Nuclear moments

    CERN Document Server

    Kopferman, H; Massey, H S W

    1958-01-01

    Nuclear Moments focuses on the processes, methodologies, reactions, and transformations of molecules and atoms, including magnetic resonance and nuclear moments. The book first offers information on nuclear moments in free atoms and molecules, including theoretical foundations of hyperfine structure, isotope shift, spectra of diatomic molecules, and vector model of molecules. The manuscript then takes a look at nuclear moments in liquids and crystals. Discussions focus on nuclear paramagnetic and magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance. The text discusses nuclear moments and nucl

  20. The role of nuclear power in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baratta, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy is a low greenhouse gas emitter and is capable of providing large amounts of power using proven technology. In the immediate future, it can contribute to greenhouse gas reduction but only on a modest scale, replacing a portion of the electricity produced by coal fired power plants. While it has the potential to do more, there are significant resource issues that must be addressed if nuclear power is to replace coal or natural gas as a source of electricity

  1. Comparison of (alpha, n) thick-target neutron yields and spectra from ORIGEN-S and SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.H.; Wilson, W.B.; Perry, R.T.; Charlton, W.S.

    1998-01-01

    Both ORIGEN-S and SOURCES generate thick-target neutron yields and energy spectra from (α,n) reactions in homogeneous materials. SOURCES calculates yield and spectra for any material containing α-emitting and (α,n) target elements by simulating reaction physics, using α-emission energy spectra, elemental stopping cross sections, (α,n) cross sections for target nuclei, and branching fractions to produce-nuclide energy levels. This methodology results in accurate yield and spectra. ORIGEN-S has two options for calculating yields and spectra. The UO 2 option (default) estimates yields and spectra assuming the input α-emitters to be infinitely dilute in UO 2 . The borosilicate-glass option estimates yields from the total input material composition and generates spectra purportedly representative of spectra generated by 238 Pu, 241 Am, 242 Cm, and 244 Cm infinitely dilute in borosilicate glass, even if none of these four α-emitters are present in the input material composition. Because yields from the borosilicate-glass option in ORIGEN-S are based on entire input material composition and are reasonably accurate, the same is often assumed to be true for spectra. The input/output functionality of the borosilicate-glass option, along with ambiguity in ORIGEN-S documentation, gives the incorrect impression that spectra representative of input compositions are generated. This impression is reinforced by wide usage of the SCALE code system and its ORIGEN-S module and their sponsorship by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  2. Observational and theoretical spectra of supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Swartz, Douglas A.; Harkness, Robert P.

    1993-05-01

    Progress in nuclear astrophysics by means of quantitative supernova spectroscopy is discussed with special concentration on type Ia, Ib and Ic and on SN 1987A. Spectral calculations continue to support an exploding C/O white dwarf as the best model of a SN Ia. Deflagration model W7 produces good maximum light spectra of SN Ia and seems to have a better composition distribution compared to delayed detonation models, but proper treatment of opacity remains a problem and the physical basis of SN Ia explosions is still not completely understood. All models for SN Ia predict large quantities of 56Co in the ejecta, but it is not clear that observations confirm this. Although the evolutionary origin of SN Ia remains uncertain, there is recent evidence that transfer of hydrogen in a binary system may be involved, as long suspected. There has been progress in comparing dynamical models with the optical/IR spectra of SN 1987A. The evolution of the [OI] λλ6300, 6364 feature and the presence of strong persistent HeI λ10 830 indicate that both the envelope and core material contribute substantially to the formation of emission lines in the nebular phase and that neither the core nor the envelope can be neglected. Blending with nearby hydrogen lines may affect both of these spectral features, thereby complicating the analysis of the lines. The effects of continuum transfer and photoionization have been included and are under study. The discrepancies between theoretical and observed spectra are due primarily to the one-dimensional hydrodynamic models. The spectral data are not consistent with the high density ``spike'' (in radial coordinate) of the core material that is predicted by all such models. Analysis of the light curves of SN Ib and SN Ic supernovae implies that there are significant differences in their physical properties. Some SN Ib have considerably more ejecta mass than SN Ic events. SN Ib require He-rich atmospheres to produce the observed strong optical lines of

  3. High resolution emission Fourier transform infrared spectra of the 4p-5s and 5p-6s bands of ArH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskakov, O I; Civis, S; Kawaguchi, K

    2005-03-15

    In the 2500-8500 cm(-1) region several strong emission bands of (40)ArH were observed by Fourier transform spectroscopy through a dc glow discharge in a mixture of argon and hydrogen. Rotational-electronic transitions of the two previously unstudied 4p-5s and 5p-6s,v = 0-0, bands of (40)ArH were measured and assigned in the 6060 and 3770 cm(-1) regions, respectively. A simultaneous fit of the emission transitions of the 4p-5s and 5p-6s bands and an extended set of transitions of the 6s-4p band observed by Dabrowski, Tokaryk, and Watson [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 189, 95 (1998)] and remeasured in the present work yielded consistent values of the spectroscopic parameters of the electronic states under investigation. In the branch of the 4p-5s band with transitions of type (Q)Q(f(3)e) we observed a narrowing in the linewidths with increasing rotational quantum number N. The rotational dependence of the linewidth is caused by predissociation of the 5s state by the repulsive ground 4s state through homogeneous coupling and ch