WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear emergencies application

  1. The application of the assessment of nuclear accident status in emergency decision-making during nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ling

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear accident assessment is one of the bases for emergency decision-making in the situation of nuclear accident in NPP. Usually, the assessment includes accident status and consequence assessment. It is accident status assessment, and its application in emergency decision-making is introduced here. (author)

  2. How the Nuclear Applications Laboratories Help in Strengthening Emergency Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Safety is one of the most important considerations when engaging in highly advanced scientific and technological activities. In this respect, utilizing the potential of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes also involves risks, and nuclear techniques themselves can be useful in strengthening emergency response measures related to the use of nuclear technology. In the case of a nuclear incident, the rapid measurement and subsequent monitoring of radiation levels are top priorities as they help to determine the degree of risk faced by emergency responders and the general public. Instruments for the remote measurement of radioactivity are particularly important when there are potential health risks associated with entering areas with elevated radiation levels. The Nuclear Science and Instrumentation Laboratory (NSIL) — one of the eight laboratories of the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications (NA) in Seibersdorf, Austria — focuses on developing a variety of specialized analytical and diagnostic instruments and methods, and transferring knowledge to IAEA Member States. These include instruments capable of carrying out remote measurements. This emergency response work carried out by the NA laboratories supports health and safety in Member States and supports the IAEA’s mandate to promote the safe and peaceful use of nuclear energy

  3. The application of geographic information system to radiological and nuclear emergency monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadaniowski, I.V.; Rodriguez, M.; Rojas, C.A.; Jordan, O.D.

    2010-01-01

    The Geographic Information System (GIS) implementation for the preparation and response in case of to radiological and nuclear emergencies is being developed in the Emergency Control Center of the Argentina Nuclear Regulatory Authority, since many years ago. Additionals features have been incorporated such as integration with the results of radiological monitoring, improving and expanding its benefits both in the preparation stage and during the work of emergency response. This paper shows the specific application of GIS to radiological monitoring in case of emergency situations such as during the search of orphan sources and the characterization of geographic context around nuclear power plants and atomic centers. The GIS provides essential data cartographic for the monitoring with sophisticated detectors, to integrate with the information received with infrastructure, urban and rural population maps, physical features of the place, satellite images, etc. The monitoring results are analyzed and compared with relevant information for decision making during the response, like evacuation routes, affected population, security forces in the area, radiological characterization, application of protective actions, hospitals, schools, etc. These two integrated tools improve preparedness and response system in case of radiological or nuclear emergency. (authors) [es

  4. Development and application of emergency operating procedures for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Chengge

    1990-01-01

    The development and application of emergency operating procedures (EOPs) is an important measure to assure the operational safety for nuclear power plants. Event-oriented, symptom-, function- and state-oriented EOPs with their structures, interfaces, development procedures and practical application are described. The ideas and approach can be available for the preparation of EOPs for nuclear power plants which are going to be in service

  5. Application of improved topsis method to accident emergency decision-making at nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jin; Cai Qi; Zhang Fan; Chang Ling

    2009-01-01

    Given the complexity in multi-attribute decision-making on nuclear accident emergency, and by integrating subjective weight and impersonal weight of each evaluating index, a decision-making model for emergency plan at nuclear power stations is established with the application of improved TOPSIS model. The testing results indicated that the improved TOPSIS-based multi-attribute decision-making has a better assessment results. (authors)

  6. Principles of off-site nuclear emergency exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miska, H.

    2011-01-01

    Due to high safety standards at nuclear power plants, no experience exits with nuclear emergencies in Western Europe. Thus, emergency exercises are the only possibility to assure effective protective measures should the very unlikely severe accident occur. The main objectives of exercises are generally the check of response plans for suitability, the test of the equipment's applicability and training of personnel for the unusual task to manage a nuclear emergency. After an introduction into the different types of exercises, this contribution focuses on offsite nuclear emergency exercises, explaining frame conditions to ensure good practice and, finally, reports some experience from exercises. (orig.)

  7. Fusion of Nuclear and Emerging Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahrul Khaer Alang Rashid

    2005-04-01

    The presentation discussed the following subjects: emerging technology; nuclear technology; fusion emerging and nuclear technology; progressive nature of knowledge; optically stimulated luminescence - application of luminescence technology to sediments; Biosystemics technology -convergence nanotechnology, ecological science, biotechnology, cognitive science and IT - prospective impact on materials science, the management of public system for bio-health, eco and food system integrity and disease mitigation

  8. Application research of cloud computing in emergency system platform of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yan; Yue Huiguo; Lin Quanyi; Yue Feng

    2013-01-01

    This paper described the key technology of the concept of cloud computing, service type and implementation methods. Combined with the upgrade demand of nuclear accident emergency system platform, the paper also proposed the application design of private cloud computing platform, analyzed safety of cloud platform and the characteristics of cloud disaster recovery. (authors)

  9. Province of Ontario nuclear emergency plan. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    The Province of Ontario Nuclear Emergency Plan has been developed pursuant to Section 8 of the Emergency Plans Act, 1983. This plan replaces the Province of Ontario Nuclear Contingency Off-Site Plan (June 1980) which is no longer applicable. The wastes plan includes planning, preparation, emergency organization and operational responsibilities and policy

  10. Research on evacuation planning as nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuya

    2007-10-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has introduced new concepts of precautionary action zone (PAZ) and urgent protective action planning zone (UPZ) in 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency' (GS-R-2 (2002)), in order to reduce substantially the risk of severe deterministic health effects. Open literature based research was made to reveal problems on evacuation planning and the preparedness for nuclear emergency arising from introduction of PAZ into Japan that has applied the emergency planning zone (EPZ) concept currently. In regard to application of PAZ, it should be noted that the requirements for preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency are not only dimensional but also timely. The principal issue is implementation of evacuation of precautionary decided area within several hours. The logic of evacuation planning for a nuclear emergency and the methods of advance public education and information in the U.S. is effective for even prompt evacuation to the outside of the EPZ. As concerns evacuation planning for a nuclear emergency in Japan, several important issues to be considered were found, that is, selection of public reception centers which are outside area of the EPZ, an unique reception center assigned to each emergency response planning area, public education and information of practical details about the evacuation plan in advance, and necessity of the evacuation time estimates. To establish a practical evacuation planning guide for nuclear emergencies, further researches on application of traffic simulation technology to evacuation time estimates and on knowledge of actual evacuation experience in natural disasters and chemical plant accidents are required. (author)

  11. Dose monitoring in nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nan Hongjie; Yang Zhongping; Lei Xin

    2012-01-01

    In order to protect people from irradiation sickness and rebuild the radiation filed in nuclear emergency, personal and environmental dose need to be monitored. The application of TLD in dose monitoring is discussed in this paper. (authors)

  12. Nuclear emergency preparedness and management the international nuclear emergency exercise Inex 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundigl, St.

    2003-01-01

    With the initiation of the first international nuclear emergency exercise INEX 1, performed as a table-top exercise in 1993, the international community tested, for the first time, approaches and policies in place to manage a nuclear or radiological emergency. INEX 1 with its related workshops led to a wealth of lessons learned and to an improvement in nuclear emergency management. The INEX 2 exercise series, initiated by the NEA and performed between 1996 and 1999, established an international nuclear emergency 'exercise culture' leading to a clear improvement of the international aspects of nuclear emergency preparedness and management. INEX 2 was a series of four command post exercises based on national nuclear emergency exercises in Switzerland, Finland, Hungary and Canada. Simulated accidents at nuclear power plants were used to test existing procedures in emergency response and management, and to analyse local, regional, national and international emergency plans under realistic conditions. In addition, the exercises allowed the participating countries to gain experience using new concepts and tools. The most significant result of INEX 2 and a major step forward in nuclear emergency management was the development of a new communication and information exchange strategy, which is currently implemented by various NEA member countries as well as by the international community in general. The objective of this new strategy is to assist the decision-maker by improving the selection of the data transmitted, by encouraging the transmission and reception of such data and information using modern communication methods, e.g. secure world wide web technologies, and by defining emergency monitoring and modelling needs. To test the validity and usefulness of the newly-developed strategy, the NEA proposed to organize an international nuclear emergency exercise, INEX 2000, similar in scope to the INEX 2 exercises. In addition, the NEA suggested to include, for the first

  13. Development of nuclear emergency exercise programme (NEEP) in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, H. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, M. K.; Kim, S. H.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear emergency exercise programme (NEEP) is a PC-based application intended for design and planning emergency preparedness and response (EP and R) exercises for a potential nuclear emergency in Korea. The application programme allows EP and R staff to create and edit exercise scenarios based on information customised for a specific nuclear power plant's emergency plans. NEEP includes the following features: (1) step-by-step guide to developing new exercise scenario according to emergency alarm level and potential accident type, (2) database of specific plant's field exercise scenarios that can be easily modified by users, (3) generating master scenario events list and messages of exercise participants and (4) allowing the quantitative evaluation of exercise participants from the view of exercise objectives and evaluator guides. NEEP also features tools for queries, reports and visualisation that can be used to create documentation during the scenario planning and exercise evaluation processes. (authors)

  14. The nuclear emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuertes Menendez, M. J.; Gasco Leonarte, L.; Granada Ferrero, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Planning of the response to emergencies in nuclear plants is regulated by the Basic Nuclear Emergency Plan (PLABEN). This basic Plan is the guidelines for drawing up, implementing and maintaining the effectiveness of the nuclear power plant exterior nuclear emergency plans. The five exterior emergency plans approved as per PLABEN (PENGUA, PENCA, PENBU, PENTA and PENVA) place special emphasis on the preventive issues of emergency planning, such as implementation of advance information programs to the population, as well as on training exercises and drills. (Author)

  15. The emerging nuclear suppliers: some guidelines for policy (U)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Lewis A.

    1988-04-01

    Lewis A. Dunn, a former Assistant Director of the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and now a senior analyst with Science Applications International Corporation, looks to the future to offer "The Emerging Nuclear Suppliers: Some Guidelines for Policy ." Mr. Dunn notes that although most emerging suppliers are cautious, many are not party to existing nonproliferation treaties. He calls upon the nonproliferation community to continue the present policy of not supporting unsafeguarded nuclear activities. He suggests that the nonproliferation community work within existing standards and infrastructures of nuclear suppliers to convince emerging supplier nations of the merits of nuclear export control.

  16. Emerging nuclear suppliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sands, A.

    1990-01-01

    Efforts to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons have usually taken two tracks: The traditional approach has concentrated on a potential proliferant's perceived need for nuclear technology and possibly weapons; a second approach has targeted the supply side of the proliferation equation. The issue being examined in this book---emerging nuclear suppliers---falls between these two approaches. The potential proliferants have emerged as possible unrestrained suppliers of nuclear materials and technology. They threaten the entire nonproliferation regime by their exporting, not their weapons development. Analyzing and understanding the issue of emerging suppliers requires a refined definition of suppliers in general. The simple dichotomy of traditional versus emerging suppliers is no longer an adequate framework for analysis. Suppliers differ significantly in their technical capabilities, experience, and regime involvement, and these distinctions result in different nuclear export policies

  17. General framework and key technologies of national nuclear emergency system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Feng; Li Xudong; Zhu Guangying; Song Yafeng; Zeng Suotian; Shen Lifeng

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear emergency is the important safeguard for the sustainable development of nuclear energy, and is the significant part of national public crisis management. The paper gives the definition of nuclear emergency system explicitly based on the analysis of the characteristics of the nuclear emergency, and through the research of the structure and general framework, the general framework of the national nuclear emergency management system (NNEMS) is obtained, which is constructed in four parts, including one integrative platform, six layers, eight applications and two systems, then the paper indicate that the architecture of national emergency system that should be laid out by three-tiers, i.e. national, provincial and organizations with nuclear facilities, and also describe the functions of the NNEMS on the nuclear emergency's workflow. Finally, the paper discuss the key technology that NNIEMS needed, such as WebGIS, auxiliary decision-making, digitalized preplan and the conformity and usage of resources, and analyze the technical principle in details. (authors)

  18. Application of fuzzy decision-making method in nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhixin; Xi Shuren; Qu Jingyuan

    2005-01-01

    Protective actions such as evacuation, sheltering and iodine administration can be taken to mitigate the radiological consequence in the event of an accidental release. In general, decision-making of countermeasures involves both quantitative and qualitative criteria. The conventional approaches to assessing these criteria tend to be less effective when dealing with those qualitative criteria that are imprecise or vague. In this regard, fuzzy set method is an alternative tool. It can cope with vague assessment in a better way. This paper presents the application of fussy methodology to decision-making of protective actions in nuclear emergencies. In this method linguistic terms and fuzzy triangular numbers are used to represent decision-maker's subjective assessment for different decision criteria considered and decision alternatives versus the decision criteria. Following the assessment performed by specialists, corresponding evaluations can be synthesized and ranked. Finally, the optimal strategy for implementing protective actions can be recommended. (authors)

  19. Nuclear emergency preparedness in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The preparedness of utilities and government agencies at various levels for dealing with nuclear emergencies occurring at nuclear reactors in Canada is reviewed and assessed. The review is centered on power reactors, but selected research reactors are included also. Emergency planning in the U.S.A., Germany and France, and international recommendations on emergency planning are reviewed to provide background and a basis for comparison. The findings are that Canadians are generally well protected by existing nuclear emergency plans at the electric utility and provincial levels but there are improvements that can be made, mainly at the federal level and in federal-provincial coordination. Ten issues of importance are identified: commitment to nuclear emergency planning by the federal government; division of federal and provincial roles and responsibilities; auditing of nuclear emergency preparedness of all levels of government and of electric utilities; the availability of technical guidance appropriate to Canada; protective action levels for public health and safety; communication with the public; planning and response for the later phases of a nuclear emergency; off-site exercises and training; coordination of international assistance; and emergency planning for research reactors. (L.L.) 79 refs., 2 tabs

  20. Planning for nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, J.R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper aims to stimulate discussions between nuclear engineers and the radiological protection professions in order to facilitate planning for nuclear emergencies. A brief review is given of the response to nuclear accidents. Studying accidents can lead to prevention, but some effort must be put into emergency response. Such issues as decontamination and decommissioning, socio-economic consequences, education and training for nuclear personnel and exercises and drills, are raised. (UK)

  1. Preparedness for remote possibility of a nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujishiro, Toshio

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear disaster prevention is fundamentally preparedness for emergency with extremely lower forming probability. In order to establish allowance of nuclear energy application from society, it is essential that it brings relief feelings with preparedness and without anxiety among everything. At a time when use of nuclear energy was begun, a consciousness that a nuclear facility was one highly considered on its safety faster than that in the other industries was large and intense, and then recognition of necessity for nuclear disaster prevention was extremely minute. However, the nuclear emergency of critical accident at the JCO fuel processing facility in Tokai-mura formed on September 30, 1999 gave Japanese extremely large impact so as fundamentally to change actual feelings against conventional nuclear disaster prevention. Here was introduced on efforts onto reinforcement of nuclear disaster prevention together with establishment of the special measure rule nuclear disaster prevention countermeasure as well as its advantages and progress, to investigate on a subject to do it for a preparedness with effectiveness for obtaining real safe feelings. (G.K.)

  2. The Nuclear Emergency Assistance Team, an Institution for Nuclear Emergency Relief

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boldyreff, P.; Kiefer, H.; Krause, H.; Zuehlke, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung mbH, Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1969-10-15

    The design of nuclear facilities is to exclude serious damage to the environment, even in case of the MCA (maximum credible accident). Although the likelihood of accidents exceeding the expected consequences of the MCA is extremely small, it is deemed reasonable to take general precautions against such accidents. Precautions of this type are customary also in the conventional field, and in this case they are to be implemented in part through the Nuclear Emergency Assistance Team. If the internal safety provisions of a nuclear facility are unable to prevent an impermissible leakage of radioactivity as the result of a major accident there is, at present, no possibility of decisively curbing the spread of activity throughout the environment in the first few hours after the accident. Hence the measures taken by the authorities as a result of the emission and immediately following upon it will have to be restricted to the protection of the population: analysis of intensity and pattern of distribution of activity, instructions.to seek closed shelters, or prohibition of the consumption of certain foodstuffs, distribution of blocking agents, etc. It is the purpose of the Nuclear Emergency Assistance Team to bring relief in the phase following the end of the emission. This may comprise the following steps: exact investigation of the external scope of the damage, in particular assessment of the contamination of ground, persons, and material; rapid personnel decontamination; securing and shielding radiation sources; fixing contamination and removing it immediately where this is deemed urgent for reasons of traffic or to keep the drinking water free from contamination; external containment of the source of danger; support in limiting the damage within the facility. In addition to these tasks of emergency protection, the Nuclear Emergency Assistance Team can take action also in disturbances within the facility which have no influence on the environment and where the operator

  3. The emerging nuclear suppliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, a growing amount of attention has been paid to a small group of mostly developing countries that have come to be called the emerging nuclear suppliers. Argentina and Brazil, China and South Korea, India and Pakistan, Spain and Yugoslavia have frequently been mentioned in this category. Their actual and potential nuclear export dealings and policies have been the subject of academic writings and policy papers, of scholarly symposia and exchanges at meetings of the traditional nuclear suppliers. With foundation and other support, UCLA's Center for International and Strategic Affairs has begun a major project to develop a database on the transactions, policies, and export control institutions of the emerging suppliers. This chapter provides some guidelines for policy toward the emerging nuclear suppliers

  4. Uncertainties under emergency conditions and possible application of fuzzy theory for nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Various uncertainties involved in emergency conditions are discussed, and it is pointed out that uncertainties, in many factors, are fuzzy. As a result, it is proposed to use fuzzy theory as an attempt for analysing cause and effects under emergency conditions such as Hiroshima, Nagasaki and other nuclear accidents and, for fuzzy failure analysis and diagnostics of nuclear power plant

  5. Trial application of reliability technology to emergency diesel generators at the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, S.M.; Boccio, J.L.; Karimian, S.; Azarm, M.A.; Carbonaro, J.; DeMoss, G.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, a trial application of reliability technology to the emergency diesel generator system at the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant is presented. An approach for formulating a reliability program plan for this system is being developed. The trial application has shown that a reliability program process, using risk- and reliability-based techniques, can be interwoven into current plant operational activities to help in controlling, analyzing, and predicting faults that can challenge safety systems. With the cooperation of the utility, Portland General Electric Co., this reliability program can eventually be implemented at Trojan to track its effectiveness

  6. Implementation of a geographical information system in nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadaniowski, I.; Telleria, D.; Jordan, O.; Bruno, H.; Boutet, L.; Hernandez, D.

    2006-01-01

    From 2003, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (RNA) has worked in the implementation of a Geographical Information System (SIG) for the planning and the intervention in emergencies, with special emphasis in the nuclear emergencies. The main objective of the SIG developed in the ARN is to give the necessary support for the planning, training and application of the actions of radiological protection necessary in front of a nuclear emergency, offering the geo referenced cartographic base, the readiness of logistical resources in the whole country, incorporating results of models of forecast of consequences and environmental measurements during the emergency, facilitating the analysis of this information in real time and facilitating the presentation of results for the decision making. The cartographic base is constituted of demographic, social, economic data identification of main actors interveners in the emergency, vial infrastructure and natural characteristics of the area in question. In this work the main characteristics of the implemented SIG are presented including the conceptual standards of design that contemplate the international requirements for the planning and answer in the event of nuclear emergencies, the current state of the system and the foreseen evolution. A description of the opposing problems during its implementation that can be common to many countries of the region is also presented, as well as the obtained experience of its use in preparation tasks for emergencies and in mocks. (Author)

  7. A Production-Rule Analysis System for Nuclear Plant monitoring and emergency response applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragheb, M.; Tsoukalas, L.; McDonough, T.; Parker, M.

    1987-01-01

    A Production-Rule Analysis System for Nuclear Power Plant Monitoring is presented. The signals generated by the Zion-1 Plant are considered for emergency Response applications. The integrity of the Plant Radiation, the Reactor Coolant, the Fuel Clad, and the Containment Systems, is monitored. Representation of the system is in the form of a goal-tree generating a Knowledge-Base searched by an Inference Engine functioning in the forward-chaining mode. The Gaol-tree is built from Fault-Trees based on plant operational information. The system is implemented on a VAX-8500 and is programmed in OPS-5

  8. Preparedness of public authorities for emergencies at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The safety guide lays down the requirements for the establishment of suitable procedures to be followed in the event of an emergency situation at a nuclear power plant. Many of the procedures would also be applicable at other nuclear facilities such as fuel manufacturing plants, irradiated fuel processing plants and the like. The guide defines reponsibilities for emergency planning, organization and action, protective measures to be taken, information and instruction of the public, training and cooperation across boundaries

  9. Performing better nuclear emergency management exercises in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohier, A.

    2006-01-01

    The recently revised Royal Decree of 17 October 2003 (the Belgian Monitor of 22 November 2003) stipulating the nuclear emergency plan for radiological risks on the Belgian territory aims at reducing the impact of a radiological or nuclear accident to the population. It describes the organisation, tasks and necessary interactions between the different participating entities at the federal, provincial and communal level. It also foresees that each major nuclear installation holds regularly exercises with the different off-site entities to test and improve the response procedures. Under contract with the Ministry of Interior, and in consortium with AVN and IRE, SCK-CEN has been assigned as co-ordinator for the improvement of the methodology for emergency exercises, and to apply this for the 2005 exercises of the nuclear installations of Doel and Tihange. The main objective of this project is to define a methodology allowing to conduct exercises in a more efficient way. The methodology is based on the IAEA EPR-EXERCISE (2005) publication. This should in turn (1) allow the principal actors to train the different aspects of a nuclear crisis, (2) allow easier detection of deficiencies in the emergency plan and its application, and (3) result in the necessary corrective actions to improve future responses to crises

  10. Emerging nuclear energy systems and nuclear weapon proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gsponer, A.; Sahin, S.; Jasani, B.

    1983-01-01

    Generally when considering problems of proliferation of nuclear weapons, discussions are focused on horizontal proliferation. However, the emerging nuclear energy systems currently have an impact mainly on vertical proliferation. The paper indicates that technologies connected with emerging nuclear energy systems, such as fusion reactors and accelerators, enhance the knowledge of thermonuclear weapon physics and will enable production of military useful nuclear materials (including some rare elements). At present such technologies are enhancing the arsenal of the nuclear weapon states. But one should not forget the future implications for horizontal proliferation of nuclear weapons as some of the techniques will in the near future be within the technological and economic capabilities of non-nuclear weapon states. Some of these systems are not under any international control. (orig.) [de

  11. Application of geographical information system (GIS) for the preparedness for response to nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhury, Probal; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Saindane, S.S.; Suri, M.M.K.; Sharma, D.N.

    2005-01-01

    As recommended by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), preparedness for response to nuclear/radiological emergencies is essential for all nations including those not having nuclear facilities. Methodology and systems for quick assessment of radiological impact following any large scale radioactive release/contamination in the environment are already developed. Efforts are being made to provide Geographical Information System (GIS) support for enhancing the capability of quick decision making on the implementation of countermeasures and to strengthen the Emergency Preparedness Program. This requires development of the database of nuclear facilities, roads, buildings, agriculture land, population density and geolocating using geocoded addresses. GIS helps in the creation of custom maps that spatially show several data layers pertinent to the cities/area around the nuclear power plants. The GIS based software imports and spatially displays the predicted movement of radioactive plume and helps in the revision of emergency plans based on the periodic inputs from various systems and monitoring teams. These tools, allow the Emergency Response Centers to take decisions regarding the progress, success and future direction of response in large cities/complex sites. (author)

  12. Applying radiological emergency planning experience to hazardous materials emergency planning within the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foltman, A.; Newsom, D.; Lerner, K.

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear industry has extensive radiological emergency planning (REP) experience that is directly applicable to hazardous materials emergency planning. Recently, the Feed Materials Production Center near Cincinnati, Ohio, successfully demonstrated such application. The REP experience includes conceptual bases and standards for developing plans that have been tested in hundreds of full-scale exercises. The exercise program itself is also well developed. Systematic consideration of the differences between chemical and radiological hazards shows that relatively minor changes to the REP bases and standards are necessary. Conduct of full-scale, REP-type exercises serves to test the plans, provide training, and engender confidence and credibility

  13. Cambio: a file format translation and analysis application for the nuclear response emergency community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasche, George P.

    2009-01-01

    Cambio is an application intended to automatically read and display any spectrum file of any format in the world that the nuclear emergency response community might encounter. Cambio also provides an analysis capability suitable for HPGe spectra when detector response and scattering environment are not well known. Why is Cambio needed: (1) Cambio solves the following problem - With over 50 types of formats from instruments used in the field and new format variations appearing frequently, it is impractical for every responder to have current versions of the manufacturer's software from every instrument used in the field; (2) Cambio converts field spectra to any one of several common formats that are used for analysis, saving valuable time in an emergency situation; (3) Cambio provides basic tools for comparing spectra, calibrating spectra, and isotope identification with analysis suited especially for HPGe spectra; and (4) Cambio has a batch processing capability to automatically translate a large number of archival spectral files of any format to one of several common formats, such as the IAEA SPE or the DHS N42. Currently over 540 analysts and members of the nuclear emergency response community worldwide are on the distribution list for updates to Cambio. Cambio users come from all levels of government, university, and commercial partners around the world that support efforts to counter terrorist nuclear activities. Cambio is Unclassified Unlimited Release (UUR) and distributed by internet downloads with email notifications whenever a new build of Cambio provides for new formats, bug fixes, or new or improved capabilities. Cambio is also provided as a DLL to the Karlsruhe Institute for Transuranium Elements so that Cambio's automatic file-reading capability can be included at the Nucleonica web site.

  14. Nuclear emergency management procedures in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Emma

    The Chernobyl accident brought to the fore the need for decision-making in nuclear emergency management to be transparent and consistent across Europe. A range of systems to support decision-making in future emergencies have since been developed, but, by and large, with little consultation with potential decision makers and limited understanding of the emergency management procedures across Europe and how they differ. In nuclear emergency management, coordination, communication and information sharing are of paramount importance. There are many key players with their own technical expertise, and several key activities occur in parallel, across different locations. Business process modelling can facilitate understanding through the representation of processes, aid transparency and structure the analysis, comparison and improvement of processes. This work has been conducted as part of a European Fifth Framework Programme project EVATECH, whose aim was to improve decision support methods, models and processes taking into account stakeholder expectations and concerns. It has involved the application of process modelling to document and compare the emergency management processes in four European countries. It has also involved a multidisciplinary approach taking a socio-technical perspective. The use of process modelling did indeed facilitate understanding and provided a common platform, which was not previously available, to consider emergency management processes. This thesis illustrates the structured analysis approach that process modelling enables. Firstly, through an individual analysis for the United Kingdom (UK) model that illustrated the potential benefits for a country. These are for training purposes, to build reflexive shared mental models, to aid coordination and for process improvement. Secondly, through a comparison of the processes in Belgium, Germany, Slovak Republic and the UK. In this comparison of the four processes we observed that the four process

  15. Nuclear emergency preparedness: national organisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Messaoudi, M.; Essadki, H.; Lferde, M.; Moutia, Z. [Faculte des Sciences, Dept. de Physique, Rabat (Morocco)

    2006-07-01

    As in all other industries, the nuclear facilities can be the object of accidents whose consequences go beyond the limits of their site and consequently radioactive releases would be issued in the environment justifying the protection measures of population. Even if all the precautions were taken during the stages from the design to the operation, to reduce the risk of accident in nuclear installations, this risk can not be completely suppressed. For the radiological risk, as for the other major risks, the protection of the public always was taken in consideration by public power. The nuclear emergency plan gives the opportunity to have a quick appropriate reaction to a sudden event, which has (or might have) direct consequences for the population. The Moroccan public authorities had proceeded to reinforce at the national level, the control of nuclear safety and protection against radiation by the set up of a new nuclear safety authority. Evidently, the organization and the management of a nuclear and/or radiological emergency were at centre of this reform. Taking into account the subjective risk of radiological terrorism, the authorities should reinforce measurements guaranteeing radiological safety and security, and elaborate the appropriate emergency plans. The aim of this paper is to give a progress report on nuclear emergency plan aspects and to present a corresponding organization which could be applied by national authority. (authors)

  16. Nuclear emergency preparedness: national organisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Messaoudi, M.; Essadki, H.; Lferde, M.; Moutia, Z.

    2006-01-01

    As in all other industries, the nuclear facilities can be the object of accidents whose consequences go beyond the limits of their site and consequently radioactive releases would be issued in the environment justifying the protection measures of population. Even if all the precautions were taken during the stages from the design to the operation, to reduce the risk of accident in nuclear installations, this risk can not be completely suppressed. For the radiological risk, as for the other major risks, the protection of the public always was taken in consideration by public power. The nuclear emergency plan gives the opportunity to have a quick appropriate reaction to a sudden event, which has (or might have) direct consequences for the population. The Moroccan public authorities had proceeded to reinforce at the national level, the control of nuclear safety and protection against radiation by the set up of a new nuclear safety authority. Evidently, the organization and the management of a nuclear and/or radiological emergency were at centre of this reform. Taking into account the subjective risk of radiological terrorism, the authorities should reinforce measurements guaranteeing radiological safety and security, and elaborate the appropriate emergency plans. The aim of this paper is to give a progress report on nuclear emergency plan aspects and to present a corresponding organization which could be applied by national authority. (authors)

  17. Medical rescue for nuclear or radiologic emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaohua; Nie Suifeng

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear or radiologic emergencies are defined as incidents that are caused by radioactive substance or by other sources of radiation and can pose a serious hazard to public health. In case of nuclear or radiologic emergencies, radioactive rays will damage the human body and bring about psychological and mental stress, resulting in a series of social psychological effects. The key to medical rescue for nuclear or radiologic emergencies is to take effective measures which can minimize the body harm resulting from nuclear or radiologic emergencies and maintain social stability. This article reviews the personnel protection, on-the-spot salvage, treatments of various harm, and prevention of public psychological effect following nuclear or radiologic emergencies. (authors)

  18. Emergency response and nuclear risk governance. Nuclear safety at nuclear power plant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhlen, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The present study entitled ''Emergency Response and Nuclear Risk Governance: nuclear safety at nuclear power plant accidents'' deals with issues of the protection of the population and the environment against hazardous radiation (the hazards of nuclear energy) and the harmful effects of radioactivity during nuclear power plant accidents. The aim of this study is to contribute to both the identification and remediation of shortcomings and deficits in the management of severe nuclear accidents like those that occurred at Chernobyl in 1986 and at Fukushima in 2011 as well as to the improvement and harmonization of plans and measures taken on an international level in nuclear emergency management. This thesis is divided into a theoretical part and an empirical part. The theoretical part focuses on embedding the subject in a specifically global governance concept, which includes, as far as Nuclear Risk Governance is concerned, the global governance of nuclear risks. Due to their characteristic features the following governance concepts can be assigned to these risks: Nuclear Safety Governance is related to safety, Nuclear Security Governance to security and NonProliferation Governance to safeguards. The subject of investigation of the present study is as a special case of the Nuclear Safety Governance, the Nuclear Emergency governance, which refers to off-site emergency response. The global impact of nuclear accidents and the concepts of security, safety culture and residual risk are contemplated in this context. The findings (accident sequences, their consequences and implications) from the analyses of two reactor accidents prior to Fukushima (Three Mile Iceland in 1979, Chernobyl in 1986) are examined from a historical analytical perspective and the state of the Nuclear Emergency governance and international cooperation aimed at improving nuclear safety after Chernobyl is portrayed by discussing, among other topics, examples of &apos

  19. Millstone nuclear power plant emergency system assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmad Khusyairi

    2011-01-01

    U.S.NRC determined an obligation to build a nuclear power plant emergency response organization for both on-site and off-site. Millstone Nuclear Power Plants have 3 nuclear reactors and 2 of 3 still in commercial operation. Reactor unit 1, BWR type has been permanently shut down in 1998, while the two others, units 2 and 3 obtain the extended operating license respectively until 2035 and 2045. As a nuclear installation has the high potential radiological impact, Millstone nuclear power plant emergency response organization must establish both on-site or off-site. Emergency response organization that is formed must involve several state agencies, both state agencies and municipality. They have specific duties and functions in a state of emergency, so that protective measures can be undertaken in accordance with the community that has been planned. Meanwhile, NRC conduct their own independent assessment of nuclear power plant emergencies. (author)

  20. Meteorology and dispersion forecast in nuclear emergency in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunst, Juan J.; Boutet, Luis I.; Jordan, Osvaldo D.; Hernandez, Daniel G.; Guichandut, M.E.; Chiappesoni, H.

    2008-01-01

    The 'Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) (ARN in Spanish)' and the 'National Meteorological Office (NMO) (SMN in Spanish)' of Argentine has been working together on the improvement of both meteorological forecasting and dispersion prediction. In the pre-release phase of a nuclear emergency, it is very important to know the wind direction and the forecast of it, to establish the area, around the installation, where the emergency state is declared and to foresee the modification of this area. Information is also needed about deterministic effects, to begin the evacuation. At this time, meteorological forecast of wind direction and speed, and the real time meteorological information is available in the nuclear power plant (NPP) and in the Nuclear Emergency Control Centre at the ARN headquarters, together with the short-range dose calculation provided by our dispersion code, SEDA. By means of the SEDA code, we can estimate the optimum place to measure the radioactive material concentration in air, needed do to reduce evaluation uncertainties due, among others, to poor knowledge of the source term. The SEDA code allows considering atmospheric condition, and the need to reduced doses of the measuring team in charge of the measurements. For the evaluation in the medium range, we participate in the project IXP, which provides four hours and about 50 kilometres forecast. In the long-range movement of air borne radioactivity, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), whose contact point in Argentina is the SMN, can assist us. We have developed together, with the SMN, a detailed procedure to request assistance from the WMO. In this work, we describe the combined tasks that were carried out with the SMN to define the procedures and the concepts for their application during a real emergency. The results of an application exercise carried out in 2006 are also described. (author)

  1. The handling of nuclear emergencies in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, Daniel; Jordan, Osvaldo; Kunst, Juan; Bruno, Hector

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In 1998, the Executive signed the decree 1390, which defined the scope and the procedures corresponding to the Nuclear Activity Law. In this decree, the new functions of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) are described, being the most important related to preparation and response for a nuclear emergency the following ones: 1) ARN must provide protection from harmful effects of ionizing radiations under normal conditions and emergency situations; 2) ARN must advise the Executive in case of radiological and nuclear emergencies; 3) ARN shall establish the criteria for the emergency plans of the facilities and train the members of neighbor public to the facilities in case of nuclear emergencies; 4) The emergency plans developed by local, provincial and national authorities must be approved by the ARN; 5) ARN shall lead the actions within the area covered by the emergency plans of the facilities. Security Forces and the Representatives of Civil Institutions shall report the designated ARN officer. The ARN recognized immediately the responsibility imposed by this law and, at the same time, the opportunity of improving the handling of emergencies through a centralized direction of the operations. Under this frame, ARN created the Radiological Emergencies Intervention System (SIER) with the goal of taking charge of the preparation and the handling of emergency situations. From the beginning, the purpose of the SIER was to improve the preparation and response to nuclear emergencies in a regular form, bearing in mind the cultural and socioeconomic situation of the country, as well as the local peculiarities. The first steep to achieve such a target was to gain the confidence of other organizations included in the response on the ARN technical and operational aptitude to lead the actions inside the emergency area and, later, to establish the pertinent arrangements. The strategy chosen by ARN to respond to nuclear emergencies consists in establishing an expert

  2. Nuclear emergency planning in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baarli, J.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear emergency planning in Norway is forming a part of the Search and Rescue Service of the country. Due to the fact that Norway do not have any nucleat power reactor, the nuclear emergency planning has not been given high priority. The problems however are a part of the activity of the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene, and the emergency preparedness is at the present time to a large extent based on the availability of professional health physicists and their knowledge, rather than established practices

  3. Nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This leaflet, which is in the form of a fold-up chart, has panels of text which summarize the emergencies that could arise and the countermeasures and emergency plans that have been prepared should nuclear accident occur or affect the United Kingdom. The levels of radiation doses at which various measures would be introduced are outlined. The detection and monitoring programmes that would operate is illustrated. The role of NRPB and the responsible government departments are set out together with an explanation of how the National Arrangements for Incidents involving Radioactivity would be coordinated. (UK)

  4. Emergency control centers for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Guidance is provided for the development and implementation of emergency control centers for nuclear power plants, including nuclear plant control room, nuclear plant company headquarters, emergency control center, and nuclear plant alternate emergency control center. Requirements and recommendations are presented for the mission, communications, instrumentation and equipment associated with each type of control center. Decisional aids, manning requirements and resources are also given; the decision aids cover both the accident assessment and protective action areas. Both normal and alternate means of communications are considered. Off-site emergency control centers, although not covered in the strict sense by this standard, are considered in an appendix

  5. Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putman, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies

  6. Status and developing of nuclear emergency response techniques in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiangang, Zhang; Bing, Zhao; Rongyao, Tang; Xiaoxiao, Xu

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear Emergency preparedness and response in China is consistent with international basic principle of nuclear safety and emergency response. Nuclear emergency response techniques in China developed with nuclear power from 1980s. The status of nuclear emergency techniques in China are: 1) China have plentiful experiences and abilities in the fields of nuclear facility emergency planning and preparedness, nuclear accident consequence assessment, emergency monitoring, and emergency advisory; 2) Emergency assistance ability in China has a foundation, however it cannot satisfy national requirement; 3) Emergency planning and preparedness is not based on hazard assessment; 4) Remote monitoring and robot techniques in not adaptable to the requirements of nuclear emergency response; 5) A consistent emergency assessment system is lack in China. In this paper, it is analyzed what is the developing focal points of nuclear emergency response techniques in China, and it is proposed that the main points are: a) To develop the research of emergency preparedness on the base of hazard analysis; b) To improve remote monitoring and robot ability during nuclear emergency; c) To develop the response technique research with anti-terrorism. (author)

  7. System model for evaluation of an emergency response plan for a nuclear power plant based on an assessment of nuclear emergency exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Marcos Vinicius C.; Medeiros, Jose A.C.C.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power plants are designed and built with systems dedicated to provide a high degree of protection to its workers, the population living in their neighborhoods and the environment. Among the requirements for ensuring safety there are the existence of the nuclear emergency plan. Due to the relationship between the actions contemplated in the emergency plan and the nuclear emergency exercise, it becomes possible to assess the quality of the nuclear emergency plan, by means of emergency exercise evaluation, The techniques used in this work aim at improving the evaluation method of a nuclear emergency exercise through the use of performance indicators in the evaluation of the structures, actions and procedures involved. The proposed model enables comparisons between different moments of an emergency plan directed to a nuclear power plant as well as comparisons between plans dedicated to different facilities. (author)

  8. System model for evaluation of an emergency response plan for a nuclear power plant based on an assessment of nuclear emergency exercises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marcos Vinicius C.; Medeiros, Jose A.C.C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear power plants are designed and built with systems dedicated to provide a high degree of protection to its workers, the population living in their neighborhoods and the environment. Among the requirements for ensuring safety there are the existence of the nuclear emergency plan. Due to the relationship between the actions contemplated in the emergency plan and the nuclear emergency exercise, it becomes possible to assess the quality of the nuclear emergency plan, by means of emergency exercise evaluation, The techniques used in this work aim at improving the evaluation method of a nuclear emergency exercise through the use of performance indicators in the evaluation of the structures, actions and procedures involved. The proposed model enables comparisons between different moments of an emergency plan directed to a nuclear power plant as well as comparisons between plans dedicated to different facilities. (author)

  9. Comparison between Different Power Sources for Emergency Power Supply at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenasson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Currently the Swedish nuclear power plants are using diesel generator sets and to some extent gas turbines as their emergency AC power sources and batteries as their emergency DC power sources. In the laws governing Swedish nuclear activity, no specific power sources are prescribed. On the other hand, diversification of safety functions should be considered, as well as simplicity and reliability in the safety systems. So far the choices of emergency power sources have been similar between different power plants, and therefore this project investigated a number of alternative power sources and if they are suitable for use as emergency power on nuclear power plants. The goals of the project were to: - Define the parameters that are essential for rending a power source suitable for use at a nuclear power plant. - Present the characteristics of a number of power sources regarding the defined parameters. - Compile the suitability of the different power sources. - Make implementation suggestions for the less conventional of the investigated power sources. (unconventional in the investigated application) 10 different power sources in total have been investigated and to various degrees deemed suitable Out of the 10 power sources, diesel generators, batteries and to some extent gas turbines are seen as conventional technology at the nuclear power plants. In relation to them the other power sources have been assessed regarding diversification gains, foremost with regards to external events. The power sources with the largest diversification gains are: Internal steam turbine, Hydro power, Thermoelectric generators. The work should first and foremost put focus on the fact that under the right circumstances there are power sources that can complement conventional power sources and yield substantial diversification gains. This paper is a shortened version of the report 'Comparison between different power sources for emergency power supply at nuclear power plants'. The

  10. Off-site nuclear emergency exercises in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiji, U.; Kiyoshi, T.; Masao, O.; Shigeru, F.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear emergency planning and preparedness in Japan have been organized by both national and local governments based on the Disaster Countermeasures Basic Act. Off-site nuclear emergency exercises are classified into two types: national-government level exercises and local-government level exercises. National-government level exercises are carried out once a year by the competent national authorities. Among these authorities, the Science and Technology Agency (STA) fills a leading position in the Japanese nuclear emergency planning and preparedness. Local-government level exercises are carried out once a year or once in a few years by the local governments of the prefectures where nuclear facilities are located. Most of the off-site nuclear emergency exercises in Japan are performed by local-governments. The aim of these exercises is to reinforce the skills of the emergency staff. The national government (STA etc.) provides advices and assistance including financial support to the local-governments. Emergency exercises with the participation of residents have been carried out in some local-governments. As an example of local-government level exercises, an experience in Shizuoka prefecture (central part of Japan) is presented

  11. Effective nuclear and radiation emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grlicarev, I.

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes how to develop a balanced emergency plan, which realistically reflect the interfaces with various emergency organizations. The use of resources should be optimized with focusing on the most likely accidents. The pitfalls of writing an emergency plan without ''big picture'' in mind should be avoided. It is absolutely essential to have a clear definition of responsibilities and to have proper understanding of the tasks in between all counterparts in the emergency preparedness. Special attention should be paid to off-site part of the nuclear emergency preparedness, because the people involved in it usually receive less training than the on-site personnel and they are not specialized for nuclear emergencies but deal with all sorts of emergencies. (author)

  12. Safety, safeguards and security: three challenges for emerging nuclear countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barretto, P.M.C.

    2009-01-01

    An effective and sustainable national safety and secure regime is a goal and a challenge to countries considering the benefits of power and non-power applications of nuclear energy. This will provide for protection of people and environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. Moreover, this will minimize the possibility of accidents and the occurrence of malicious acts. Such a regime involves the establishment of institutional, legal and technical frameworks to support and sustain the implementation of nuclear applications in a coordinated manner. This paper describes the key constraints and challenges that emerging nuclear countries face in the process of developing such frameworks when preparing themselves to implement the envisaged nuclear activities. The role of the government, the issues involved, the difficulties common to developing countries, the assistance available and the way forward are discussed.(Author)

  13. Nuclear power plant emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The guide sets forth detailed requirements on how the licensee of a nuclear power plant shall plan, implement and maintain emergency response arrangements. The guide is also applied to nuclear material and nuclear waste transport in situations referred to in guide YVL 6.5. Requirements on physical protection are presented in a separate guide of Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK)

  14. Preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This Safety Requirements publication establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State. Their implementation is intended to minimize the consequences for people, property and the environment of any nuclear or radiological emergency. The fulfilment of these requirements will also contribute to the harmonization of arrangements in the event of a transnational emergency. These requirements are intended to be applied by authorities at the national level by means of adopting legislation, establishing regulations and assigning responsibilities. The requirements apply to all those practices and sources that have the potential for causing radiation exposure or environmental radioactive contamination warranting an emergency intervention and that are: (a) Used in a State that chooses to adopt the requirements or that requests any of the sponsoring organizations to provide for the application of the requirements. (B) Used by States with the assistance of the FAO, IAEA, ILO, PAHO, OCHA or WHO in compliance with applicable national rules and regulations. (C) Used by the IAEA or which involve the use of materials, services, equipment, facilities and non-published information made available by the IAEA or at its request or under its control or supervision. Or (d) Used under any bilateral or multilateral arrangement whereby the parties request the IAEA to provide for the application of the requirements. The requirements also apply to the off-site jurisdictions that may need to make an emergency intervention in a State that adopts the requirements. The types of practices and sources covered by these requirements include: fixed and mobile nuclear reactors. Facilities for the mining and processing of radioactive ores. Facilities for fuel reprocessing and other fuel cycle facilities. Facilities for the management of radioactive waste. The transport of radioactive material. Sources of radiation used in

  15. Analysis of emergency response to fukushima nuclear accident in Japan and suggestions for China's nuclear emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wei; Ding Qihua; Wu Haosong

    2014-01-01

    On March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station of the Tokyo Electric Power Company ('TEPCO') was hit and damaged by a magnitude 9 earthquake and accompanying tsunami. The accident is determined to be of the highest rating on the International Nuclear Event Scale. The Government of Japan and TEPCO have taken emergency response actions on-site and off-site at the accident. It became clear through the investigation that the accident had been initiated on the occasion of a natural disaster of an earthquake and tsunami, but there have been various complex problems behind this very serious and large scale accident. For an example, the then-available accident preventive measures and disaster preparedness of TEPCO were insufficient against tsunami and severe accidents; inadequate TEPCO emergency responses to the accident at the site were also identified. The accident rang the alarm for the nuclear safety of nuclear power plants. It also taught us a great of lessons in nuclear emergency management. (authors)

  16. Composition and fundamental requirements of nuclear emergency response monitoring equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Yongfang; Huang Weiqi; Wang Yonghong

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear emergency monitoring equipment is concrete foundation for accomplishing radiation monitoring in nuclear or radiation accidents. Based on technical report: Generic procedures for monitoring in a nuclear or radiological emergency published by IAEA in 1999, this paper presents the main task and composition of nuclear emergency monitoring briefly, and then the basic equipment and trends of nuclear emergency monitoring equipment is put forward in detail, which is useful to construction and reinforcement of our nuclear emergency monitoring. (authors)

  17. Nuclear emergency protection. Today and tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buettner, Jens Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The state of affairs of the nuclear emergency protection at accidents in connection with the use of nuclear power, at incidents with dangerous radiation sources as well as in case of criminal use of radioactive substances is presented. Moreover, the organization and the responsibilities as well as the preparation and realization of emergency training are considered and commented.

  18. Building of communication system for nuclear accident emergency disposal based on IP multimedia subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang; Gao, Guiqing; Qin, Yuanli; He, Xiangyong

    2018-05-01

    The nuclear accident emergency disposal must be supported by an efficient, real-time modularization and standardization communication system. Based on the analysis of communication system for nuclear accident emergency disposal which included many functions such as the internal and external communication, multiply access supporting and command center. Some difficult problems of the communication system were discussed such as variety access device type, complex composition, high mobility, set up quickly, multiply business support, and so on. Taking full advantages of the IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS), a nuclear accident emergency communication system was build based on the IMS. It was studied and implemented that some key unit and module functions of communication system were included the system framework implementation, satellite access, short-wave access, load/vehicle-mounted communication units. The application tests showed that the system could provide effective communication support for the nuclear accident emergency disposal, which was of great practical value.

  19. Emergency management and the nuclear terrorism threat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVito, D.A.; Suiter, L.

    1987-01-01

    Counterterrorism is not the province of the emergency manager. Generally law enforcement has that role. Instead, the emergency manager's role is crisis management; the responsibility is to be the focal point for the chief executive officer (mayor, governor, or national executive) regarding the protection of the population. Managers must be able to gather and synthesize sufficient information, rapidly and accurately, on which to base sound decisions. To do so, they must have a highly efficient, coordinated emergency management organization in place at the state and local levels of government, and there must be a workable plan for emergency operations that integrates all public safety forces into an effective response to all types of emergencies. A major goal of emergency management is to ensure that government is in control and that the public perceives that the system is working. All states have an emergency management organization at the state level, as do most counties and large cities. However, some states and local governments, particularly those that have nuclear power plants within their borders, are better staffed, equipped, and trained than others to deal with nuclear incidents. States with nuclear facilities have an emergency management organization, an emergency plan, and adequate communications, equipment, and trained personnel to handle a nuclear accident or incident at a plant. 21 references

  20. Emerging nuclear suppliers in the Third World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, K.

    1990-01-01

    The emergence of new supplier states of nuclear technology within the Third World has raised concern, if those nuclear supplier states will promote an unrestricted and uncontrolled transfer of nuclear technology to developing countries and augment the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation. The article analyses the nuclear export capacities, nuclear exports and the export policy of Argentina, Brazil and India. Argentina is considered as the most important emerging nuclear supplier state in the Third World. Nuclear exports have to be authorisized by the government in all three states and will be covered by IAEA-safeguards in the recipient country. The three states will exercise restraint in the transfer of sensitive nuclear technology. Nuclear exports of Argentina, Brazil and India so far will not augment the danger of nuclear weapons proliferation. (orig./HSCH) [de

  1. Hungarian system for nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsi, Laszlo; Szabo, Laszlo; Ronaky, Jozsef

    2000-01-01

    The Hungarian Government had established in 1989 on the basis of national and international experience the National System for Nuclear Emergency Preparedness (NSNEP). Its guidance is ad-ministered by the Governmental Commission for Nuclear Emergency Preparedness (GCNEP). The work of the Governmental Commission is designated to be assisted by the Secretariat, the Operational Staff and by the Technical Scientific Council. The leading and guiding duties of the relevant ministries and national agencies are performed by the Sectional Organisations for Nuclear Emergency Preparedness (SONEP), together with those of the Metropolitan Agencies and of the county agencies by the Metropolitan Local Committee (MLCNEP) and by County Local Committees. The chairman of the Governmental Commission is the Minister of the Interior whose authority covers the guidance of the NSNEP's activities. The Secretariat of the Governmental Commission (SGC) co-ordinates the activities of the bodies of the Governmental Commission, the sectional organisations, the local committees for nuclear emergency preparedness and those of the other bodies responsible for implementing action. The Emergency Information Centre (EIC) of GCNEP as the central body of the National Radiation Monitoring, Warning and Surveillance System provides the information needed for preparing decisions at Governmental Commission level. The technical-scientific establishment of the governmental decisions in preparation for nuclear emergency situations and the elimination of their consequences are tasks of the Technical-Scientific Council. The Centre for Emergency Response, Training and Analysis (CERTA) of the Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (HAEA) may be treated as a body of the Governmental Commission as well. The National Radiation Monitoring, Warning and Surveillance System (NRMWSS) is integral part of the NSNEP. The NRMWSS consists of the elements operated by the ministries and the operation of nation-wide measuring network in

  2. Implementation of a geographical information system in nuclear emergencies; Implementacion de un sistema de informacion geografico en emergencias nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadaniowski, I; Telleria, D; Jordan, O; Bruno, H; Boutet, L; Hernandez, D [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. Del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2006-07-01

    From 2003, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (RNA) has worked in the implementation of a Geographical Information System (SIG) for the planning and the intervention in emergencies, with special emphasis in the nuclear emergencies. The main objective of the SIG developed in the ARN is to give the necessary support for the planning, training and application of the actions of radiological protection necessary in front of a nuclear emergency, offering the geo referenced cartographic base, the readiness of logistical resources in the whole country, incorporating results of models of forecast of consequences and environmental measurements during the emergency, facilitating the analysis of this information in real time and facilitating the presentation of results for the decision making. The cartographic base is constituted of demographic, social, economic data identification of main actors interveners in the emergency, vial infrastructure and natural characteristics of the area in question. In this work the main characteristics of the implemented SIG are presented including the conceptual standards of design that contemplate the international requirements for the planning and answer in the event of nuclear emergencies, the current state of the system and the foreseen evolution. A description of the opposing problems during its implementation that can be common to many countries of the region is also presented, as well as the obtained experience of its use in preparation tasks for emergencies and in mocks. (Author)

  3. Application of the methodology of safety probabilistic analysis to the modelling the emergency feedwater system of Juragua nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troncoso, M.; Oliva, G.

    1993-01-01

    The application of the methodology developed in the framework of the national plan of safety probabilistic analysis (APS) to the emergency feed water system for the failures of small LOCAS and external electrical supply loss in the nuclear power plant is illustrated in this work. The facilities created by the ARCON code to model the systems and its documentation are also expounded

  4. A human error analysis methodology, AGAPE-ET, for emergency tasks in nuclear power plants and its application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Whan; Jung, Won Dea [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    This report presents a procedurised human reliability analysis (HRA) methodology, AGAPE-ET (A Guidance And Procedure for Human Error Analysis for Emergency Tasks), for both qualitative error analysis and quantification of human error probability (HEP) of emergency tasks in nuclear power plants. The AGAPE-ET is based on the simplified cognitive model. By each cognitive function, error causes or error-likely situations have been identified considering the characteristics of the performance of each cognitive function and influencing mechanism of PIFs on the cognitive function. Then, error analysis items have been determined from the identified error causes or error-likely situations to help the analysts cue or guide overall human error analysis. A human error analysis procedure based on the error analysis items is organised. The basic scheme for the quantification of HEP consists in the multiplication of the BHEP assigned by the error analysis item and the weight from the influencing factors decision tree (IFDT) constituted by cognitive function. The method can be characterised by the structured identification of the weak points of the task required to perform and the efficient analysis process that the analysts have only to carry out with the necessary cognitive functions. The report also presents the the application of AFAPE-ET to 31 nuclear emergency tasks and its results. 42 refs., 7 figs., 36 tabs. (Author)

  5. Decision support systems in nuclear emergencies: harmonizing domestic and reference tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vamanu, D.; Mateescu, Gh.; Berinde, A.; Slavnicu, D.; Acasandrei, V.; Slavnicu, E.

    2001-01-01

    The paper addresses the issue of securing the compatibility and inter-operability of computer packages designed to perform as decision support tools in the management of radiological emergencies, over the transition times towards the implementation and uniform acceptance and uniform acceptance of internationally-shared reference tools such as the European Union's RODOS (Real Time On-Line Decision Support System for Off-Site Nuclear Emergencies in Europe). One submits that a harmonization between the currently operational, domestic, and the reference tool can be contemplated, based on extensive code comparison and benchmarking. A case in point is presented, paralleling selected RODOS applications on simulated abnormal nuclear events, and the concurrent application of a resident software package, NOTEPAD, developed to emulate RODOS-wise function at IFIH-HH Bucharest. The reproducible similarity may make domestic decision support system (DSS) facilities useful as both practical tools and factors promoting the emergency preparedness awareness, during the interim time laps till the full development and deployment of RODOS as a reference DSS in Europe. (authors)

  6. Some Qualitative Requirements for Testing of Nuclear Emergency Response Robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Heungseop; Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Youngsoo; Jeong, Kyungmin

    2014-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is carrying out the project 'Development of Core Technology for Remote Response in Nuclear Emergency Situation', and as a part of the project, we are studying the reliability and performance requirements of nuclear emergency response robots. In this paper, we described some qualitative requirements for testing of nuclear emergency response robots which are different to general emergency response robots. We briefly introduced test requirements of general emergency response robots and described some qualitative aspects of test requirements for nuclear emergency response robots. When considering an immature field-robot technology and variety of nuclear emergency situations, it seems hard to establish quantitative test requirements of these robots at this time. However, based on studies of nuclear severe accidents and the experience of Fukushima NPP accident, we can expect some test requirements including quantitative ones for nuclear emergency response robots

  7. Review of IAEA documentation on Nuclear and radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhono, P. M.

    2014-10-01

    The project focuses on the review of IAEA documentation on nuclear or radiological emergencies with main focus on methodology for developing and arrangement for nuclear and radiological emergencies. The main objective of this work is to identify limitations in IAEA documentation on emergency preparedness and response (EPR) and provide recommendation on the main actions needed to fill the gaps identified thus aiding in improvement of emergency preparedness and response to nuclear and radiological accidents. The review of IAEA documentation on nuclear and radiological emergency has been carried out by evaluating various emergency response elements. Several elements for EPR were highlighted covering the safety fundamentals, general safety requirements and EPR methods for development of an effective emergence response capability for nuclear or radiological emergencies. From these issues, the limitations of IAEA documentation on EPR were drawn and recommendations suggested as a means of improving EPR methods. Among them was the need for IAEA consider establishment of follow up and inspection programmes to facilitate implementation of EPR requirements in most developing countries, establishment of programmes that provide platforms for the countries to be motivated to update their system in line with the current status of emergency preparedness, review of the international information exchange aspects of nuclear emergencies in order to improve capabilities to communicate reliable data, information and decisions quickly and effectively among national authorities and their emergency and emergency response centres. (au)

  8. The Norwegian nuclear emergency preparedness system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naadland, E.; Stranden, E.

    1995-01-01

    A new national organisation for nuclear emergency preparedness was established in Norway in 1993, based on experiences from the Chernobyl accident. This organisation is based on authorities and research institutions which in a normal situation have responsibilities and knowledge in fields that are also of major importance in a nuclear accident situation. The national emergency preparedness organisation consists of the Ministerial Co-ordination Committee, the Advisory Committee for Nuclear Accidents and their secretariat at the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, and an Information Group. The organisations participating in the Advisory Committee operate measuring networks, stations and laboratories. In an early phase of an accident, a minor group from the Advisory Committee forms a Crisis Committee for Nuclear Accidents. This committee has been delegated the authority to make decisions in this phase. The organisation represented by its secretariat at the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority is responsible for coordinating the emergency planning, the measuring capacities and the professional needs ordinarily. The secretariat is on call 24 hours a day as point of contact according to bilateral and international agreements on early notification. In this paper the features of the emergency preparedness organisation are presented. (Author)

  9. Developments in emergency planning within Scottish nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, A.

    2000-01-01

    Scottish Nuclear has recently completed a major program of improvements to its nuclear emergency facilities. The improvements include the construction of a purpose built Off-Site Emergency Centre for each of its two power stations and the development of a computer based information management system to facilitate the rapid distribution of information on an emergency to local, regional and national agencies. A computer code has also been developed to allow the rapid assessment of the effects of any accidental release on the local population. The improvements to the emergency facilities have been coupled with changes in local and national arrangements for dealing with a civil nuclear emergency. The use of airborne surveying techniques for rapidly determining levels of deposited activity following an accident is also being examined and preliminary airborne surveys have been carried out. (author)

  10. Emergency measures following hypothetical actions against nuclear facilities in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogani, A.; Tabet, E.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: After the Chernobyl accident a national emergency plan of protective measures for radiological emergencies has been set up in Italy to cope with nuclear risks which require actions at national level. Since most of the Italian nuclear installations are, at present, not operational, the most relevant nuclear risk sources identified in the national emergency plan stem from accidents in nuclear power plants near the Italian borders or aboard nuclearpropelled ships, or events related to the fall of nuclear-powered satellites and transportation of radioactive materials. The plan identifies a reference scenario for nation-wide emergency interventions and the proper structures to be involved in the radiological emergency. However, risks related to nuclear terrorism are not taken into account in the plan, whereas nuclear plants as well as nuclear materials and sources (in use in medical, scientific and industrial applications) are known to represent potential targets for hostile acts, potentially giving rise to harmful radioactive releases into the atmosphere. Along with four nuclear power plants, now undergoing a decommissioning procedure, several other nuclear facilities, such as provisional radioactive waste deposits or research centers, are present in Italy. Unfortunately not all of the radioactive waste inventory is conditioned in such a way to make a spread of radioactive contamination, as a consequence of a hostile action, unlikely; moreover, spent fuel elements are still kept, in some cases, inside the plant spent fuel storage pool. In this paper the hypothetical radiological impact of deliberate actions against some reference nuclear installations will be evaluated, together with its amplications for an appropriate profiling of the emergency countermeasures which could be required. Especially the case of a terrorism act against a spent fuel storage pool is worked out in some detail, as this event appears to be one of those with the most severe

  11. The Information Management Platform on Nuclear Emergency Resources of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, L.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Chinese government has always attached great importance to nuclear emergency work, and has invested to form lots of nuclear emergency resources. Meanwhile, there also exist some management problems such as repeated investment, fragmented inventory list, inefficient management, etc. To achieve integrated management on the nuclear emergency resources of China, the Chinese government initiated the project “The Information Management Platform on Nuclear Emergency Resources of China”. The goal of the project is to support a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response while the resources managing process remains economically efficient. The project team firstly completed the nuclear emergency resources classification and encoding. Based on these, the nuclear emergency resources information management software system was developed. The pilot operation in the system was carried out both in Guangxi and Liaoning Province at the same time. Nuclear emergency resources survey was done as the relevant information was put into the database in these regions. The evaluation result on the pilot operation showed that, the information management platform on emergency resources would apparently improve efficiency of nuclear emergency preparedness and response, and it also would increase economical efficiency on inventory list, information management and invest decision. (author

  12. Information for nuclear emergency response: a case study based on ANGRA nuclear power plant emergency simulation exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Paulo V.R. de

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Current nuclear emergency management procedures do not always satisfactorily address issues related to the information availability and to how people in emergency control centres use this information to respond to an nuclear accident. The lack of an adequate and prompt information may lead to a response that can be very different from what authorities recommend and thus create confusion, mistrust, and widespread uncertainty. This is a potentially serious problem for emergency planners. An adequate and prompt access to relevant information is a critical requirement that emergency teams face while they work towards reducing the undesired consequences of the emergency. There are three basic types of knowledge according to a conceptual framework developed to deal with emergency response: Previous Personal, Previous and, Current Contextual knowledge. Most decisions in emergency control centres require a dynamic combination of all types of knowledge, particularly the current contextual that comes from the emergency settings, including all information about the activities of other emergency teams. The aim of this paper is to describe the concepts and the structure of a system that aims at storing and disseminating the previous formal and contextual knowledge to help teams make the correct decisions during the evolution of an emergency. The elicitation of critical requirements are provided by a case study based on Cognitive Work Analysis and Naturalistic Decision Making methods, applied to a nuclear emergency response simulation. The framework and a prototype system were tested in a controlled experiment. The paper reports the results of this experiment. (author)

  13. Explanation of procedure on site medical emergency response for nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yulong; Jiang Zhong

    2012-01-01

    National occupational health standard-Procedure on Site Medical Emergency Response for Nuclear Accident has been approved and issued by the Ministry of Health. This standard is formulated according to the Emergency Response Law of the People's Republic of China, Law of the People 's Republic of China on Prevention and Control of Occupational Diseases, Regulations on Emergency Measures for Nuclear Accidents at Nuclear Power Plants, and Health Emergency Plans for Nuclear and Radiological Accidents of Ministry of Health, supporting the use of On-site Medical Emergency Planning and Preparedness for Nuclear Accidents and Off-site Medical Emergency Planning and Preparedness for Nuclear Accidents. Nuclear accident on-site medical response procedure is a part of the on-site emergency plan. The standard specifies the basic content and requirements of the nuclear accident on-site medical emergency response procedures of nuclear facilities operating units to guide and regulate the work of nuclear accident on-site medical emergency response of nuclear facilities operating units. The criteria-related contents were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  14. Nuclear plant analyzer development and analysis applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laats, E.T.

    1984-10-01

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) is being developed as the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) state of the art safety analysis and engineering tool to address key nuclear plant safety issues. This paper describes four applications of the NPA in assisting reactor safety analyses. Two analyses evaluated reactor operating procedures, during off-normal operation, for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and a boiling water reactor (BWR), respectively. The third analysis was performed in support of a reactor safety experiment conducted in the Semiscale facility. The final application demonstrated the usefulness of atmospheric dispersion computer codes for site emergency planning purposes. An overview of the NPA and how it supported these analyses are the topics of this paper

  15. Current emergency programs for nuclear installations in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chino, Masamichi

    2007-01-01

    Large effort has been taken for nuclear emergency programs in Japan especially after the JCO accident. A special law for nuclear emergency was established after the accident. The law extended the scope of emergency preparedness to fuel cycle facilities, research reactors, etc. and clarified the roles and responsibilities of the national government, local governments and license holders. For initial responses, the action levels and action procedures are defined based on environmental doses and specific initial events of NPPs. A senior specialist was dispatched to each site for nuclear emergency and a facility 'Off-site center' to be used as the local emergency headquator was designated at each site. This paper describes the structure of emergency program, responsibility of related organizations and the definition of unusual events for notification and emergency. Emergency preparedness, emergency radiation monitoring and computer-based prediction of on- and off-site situation are also addressed. (author)

  16. Artificial intelligence and other innovative computer applications in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, M.C.; Majumdar, D.; Sackett, J.I.

    1987-01-01

    This book reviews the applications of artificial intelligence and computers in the nuclear industry and chemical plants. The topics discussed are: Robots applications and reliability in maintenance of nuclear power plants; Advanced information technology and expert systems; Knowledge base alarm systems; Emergency planning and response of accidents; and reactor safety assessment

  17. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  18. Research on the organization of equipment of nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoming; Yang Jun

    2012-01-01

    The emergency rescue operation on major accident of nuclear facilities contains four kinds of abilities that are command and control, radiation protection, radiation monitoring and radioactive decontamination, so it needs to organize some equipment of nuclear emergency to enhance the efficiency of nuclear emergency operation. The organization of equipment of nuclear emergency should accord to the reality of the development in our country. It should have extractive structure, brief variety and advance capability, and also should be convenient, useful and adequate. The method of organization can first accord to the organization of group and organize the facilities accord to the organization of group of the emergency rescue force. (authors)

  19. The development of nuclear power and emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear power is a safe, clean energy, which has been evidenced by the history of nuclear power development. Nuclear power is associated with very low risk but not equal to zero. Accident emergency response and preparedness is a final barrier necessary to reduce potential risks that may arise from nuclear power plants, which must be enhanced. In the course of accident emergency response and preparedness, it is highly necessary to draw domestic and foreign experiences and lessons. Lastly, the paper presents the discussions of some issues which merit attention with respect to emergency response and preparedness in China. (authors)

  20. A study on expert system applications for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Young Hwan; Kim, Yeong Jin; Park, Nam Seog; Dong, In Sook; Choi, In Seon

    1987-12-01

    The application of artificial intelligence techniques to nuclear power plants such as expert systems is rapidly emerging. expert systems can contribute significantly to the availability and the improved operation and safety of nuclear power plants. The objective of the project is to develop an expert system in a selected application area in the nuclear power plants. This project will last for 3 years. The first year's tasks are: - Information collection and literature survey on expert systems. - Analysis of several applicable areas for applying AI technologies to the nuclear power plants. - Conceptual design of a few selected domains. - Selection of hardware and software tools for the development of the expert system

  1. Application of Lagrangian puff model in the early stage of a nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qi; Liu Yuanzhong

    2000-01-01

    The effect of changes of intervention levels and meteorological conditions on the early emergency countermeasures is analysed for nuclear power plant emergencies. A Lagrangian puff model RIMPUFF is used to predict dose distributions under stable and unstable meteorological conditions. The release scenario for PWR6 is used as an example to determine emergency areas for different intervention levels. The prediction results show that the evacuation area radius is 5 km and the radii for sheltering and intake-of stable iodine are both 10 km. The difference between the emergency areas determined by the intervention levels given in HAF0703/NEPA9002 and IAEA safety series No. 109 is only in the sheltering area which is much smaller using the IAEA guidelines

  2. Nuclear threats and emergency preparedness in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustonen, R.; Aaltonen, H.; Laaksonen, J.; Lahtinen, J.; Rantavaara, A.; Reponen, H.; Rytoemaa, T.; Suomela, M.; Toivonen, H.; Varjoranta, T.

    1995-10-01

    The political and economic upheavals which have taken place in Eastern Europe have had an impact on radiation and nuclear safety throughout Europe. Emergency preparedness systems for unexpected nuclear events have been developed further in all European countries, and prosperous western nations have invested in improving the safety of East European nuclear power plants. The economic crisis facing countries of the former Soviet Union has also promoted illicit trade in nuclear materials; this has made it necessary for various border guards and police authorities to intensify their collaboration and to tighten border controls. On 3-4 October 1995, Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) arranged a seminar on nuclear threats and emergency preparedness in Finland. In addition to STUK experts, a wide range of rescue and civil defence authorities, environmental health specialists and other persons engaged in emergency preparedness attended the seminar. The publication contains a compilation of reports presented at the seminar. The reports cover a broad spectrum of nuclear threats analyzed at STUK, the impacts of radioactive fallout on human beings and on the environment, and preparedness systems by which the harmful effects of radiation or nuclear accidents can, if necessary, be minimized. (33 figs., 5 tabs.)

  3. Nuclear medicine in emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansi, L.; Rambaldi, P.F.; Cuccurullo, V.; Varetto, T.

    2005-01-01

    The role of a procedure depends not only on its own capabilities but also on a cost/effective comparison with alternative technique giving similar information. Starting from the definition of emergency as a sudden unexpected occurrence demanding immediate action, the role of nuclear medicine (NM) is difficult to identify if it is not possible to respond 24h a day, 365 days a year, to clinical demands. To justify a 24 h NM service it is necessary to reaffirm the role in diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in the spiral CT era, to spread knowledge of the capabilities of nuclear cardiology in reliability diagnosis myocardial infraction (better defining admission and discharge to/from the emergency department), to increase the number of indications. Radionuclide technique could be used as first line, alternative, complementary procedures in a diagnostic tree taking into account not only the diagnosis but also the connections with prognosis and therapy in evaluating cerebral pathologies, acute inflammation/infection, transplants, bleeding, trauma, skeletal, hepatobiliary, renal and endocrine emergencies, acute scrotal pain

  4. How the nuclear safety team conducts emergency exercises at the IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, Antonio C.A.; Silva, Davilson G.; Toyoda, Eduardo Y.; Santia, Paulo S.; Conti, Thadeu N.; Semmler, Renato; Carvalho, Ricardo N.

    2015-01-01

    This work introduces the Diagram of Emergency Exercise Coordination designed by the Nuclear Safety Team for better Emergency Exercise coordination. The Nuclear Safety Team was created with the mission of avoiding, preventing and mitigating the causes and effects of accidents at the IEA-R1. The facility where we conduct our work is located in an area of a huge population, what increases the responsibility of our mission: conducting exercises and training are part of our daily activities. During the Emergency Exercise, accidents ranked 0-4 on INES (International Nuclear Events Scale) are simulated and involve: Police Department, Fire Department, workers, people from the community, and others. In the last exercise held in June 2014, the scenario contemplated a terrorist organization action that infiltrated in a group of students who were visiting the IEA-R1, tried to steal fresh fuel element to fabricate a dirty bomb. Emergency procedures and plans, timeline and metrics of the actions were applied to the Emergency Exercise evaluation. The next exercise will be held in November, with the simulation of the piping of the primary cooling circuit rupture, causing the emptying of the pool and the lack of cooling of the fuel elements in the reactor core: this will be the scenario. The skills acquired and the systems improvement have been very important tools for the reactor operation safety and the Nuclear Safety Team is making technical efforts so that these Emergency Exercises may be applied to other nuclear and radiological facilities. Equally important for the process of improving nuclear safety is the emphasis placed on implementing quality improvements to the human factor in the nuclear safety area, a crucial element that is often not considered by those outside the nuclear sector. Surely, the Diagram of Emergency Exercise Coordination application will improve and facilitate the organization, coordination and evaluation tasks. (author)

  5. How the nuclear safety team conducts emergency exercises at the IEA-R1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaz, Antonio C.A.; Silva, Davilson G.; Toyoda, Eduardo Y.; Santia, Paulo S.; Conti, Thadeu N.; Semmler, Renato; Carvalho, Ricardo N., E-mail: acavaz@ipen.br, E-mail: dgsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: eytoyoda@ipen.br, E-mail: psantia@ipen.br, E-mail: tnconti@ipen.br, E-mail: rsemmler@ipen.b, E-mail: rncarval@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This work introduces the Diagram of Emergency Exercise Coordination designed by the Nuclear Safety Team for better Emergency Exercise coordination. The Nuclear Safety Team was created with the mission of avoiding, preventing and mitigating the causes and effects of accidents at the IEA-R1. The facility where we conduct our work is located in an area of a huge population, what increases the responsibility of our mission: conducting exercises and training are part of our daily activities. During the Emergency Exercise, accidents ranked 0-4 on INES (International Nuclear Events Scale) are simulated and involve: Police Department, Fire Department, workers, people from the community, and others. In the last exercise held in June 2014, the scenario contemplated a terrorist organization action that infiltrated in a group of students who were visiting the IEA-R1, tried to steal fresh fuel element to fabricate a dirty bomb. Emergency procedures and plans, timeline and metrics of the actions were applied to the Emergency Exercise evaluation. The next exercise will be held in November, with the simulation of the piping of the primary cooling circuit rupture, causing the emptying of the pool and the lack of cooling of the fuel elements in the reactor core: this will be the scenario. The skills acquired and the systems improvement have been very important tools for the reactor operation safety and the Nuclear Safety Team is making technical efforts so that these Emergency Exercises may be applied to other nuclear and radiological facilities. Equally important for the process of improving nuclear safety is the emphasis placed on implementing quality improvements to the human factor in the nuclear safety area, a crucial element that is often not considered by those outside the nuclear sector. Surely, the Diagram of Emergency Exercise Coordination application will improve and facilitate the organization, coordination and evaluation tasks. (author)

  6. Brief introduction of nuclear power plant emergency system EmInfoSys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Yuhua; Zhao Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear safety is the lifeline of nuclear energy and nuclear technology, nuclear accident emergency response is the last line of nuclear security defense, and is one of the important measures to ensure the healthy development of the nuclear energy safety. The establishment of complete function, sensitive reaction and efficient emergency management system for operation of nuclear and radiation accidents is an important task of nuclear security. From 2001 China Techenergy Co., Ltd. participated in the Qinshan, Tianwan, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Haiyang, Taishan, Fangchenggang, Sanmen, etc. nuclear emergency projects, and the nuclear emergency EmInfoSys (emergency management information system) platform was developed with independent intellectual property rights. A brief introduction about EmInfoSys system was performed in this paper. (authors)

  7. Studying the emerging nuclear suppliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydell, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    None of these events---nor any of the many others that are cited in the case studies of this book---can be singled out as heralding a revolutionary transformation of the global nuclear marketplace. The cumulative effect of such developments, however, may well be the emergence of a market in the year 2000 that is far less concentrated than today's market for nuclear reactors and fuel cycle technology. If this gradual structural transformation is accompanied by the entry into the market of new buyers and sellers that do not accept the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), safeguards administered by the IAEA, or other international norms directed at preventing the spread of nuclear weapon capabilities, the result may indeed have revolutionary dimensions for the business, diplomacy, and research of nuclear energy. A similar outcome could arise even f these norms are widely accepted but are not matched by an increase in the resources available to national governments and key international agencies that implement these norms. This paper identifies some of the pitfalls that researchers often encounter in researching the emerging suppliers and will outline some basic ground rules to guide the collection and interpretation of empirical evidence on supplier behavior

  8. Radiological criteria in nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo, D.; Diaz de la Cruz, F.

    1985-01-01

    It is pretended to enlighten the way to adopt the recommendations, from supranational organizations or the practices followed in other countries, to the peculiarities existing in Spain for the specific case of Nuclear Emergency Response Planning. The adaptation has been focalized in the criteria given by the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council and has taken into account the radiological protection levels, which have been considered adequate for Spanish population in case of nuclear accidents. (author)

  9. Nuclear emergencies: a GP's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waterston, E.

    1991-01-01

    This booklet is designed for GPs in the event of a nuclear emergency, with answers to questions which people will commonly ask, concerning, for example, sheltering/evacuation, iodine tablets, milk, water; vegetables, meat, baby food and cancer risk. Information is also provided on radiation units, the Department of Environment plans for responding to nuclear accidents overseas, the Department of Energy plans for responding to a civil nuclear accident in the UK and information resources. (UK)

  10. Planning and preparedness for radiological emergencies at nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, R.; Muzzarelli, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Radiological Emergency Preparedness (REP) Program was created after the March 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power station. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) assists state and local governments in reviewing and evaluating state and local REP plans and preparedness for accidents at nuclear power plants, in partnership with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which evaluates safety and emergency preparedness at the power stations themselves. Argonne National Laboratory provides support and technical assistance to FEMA in evaluating nuclear power plant emergency response exercises, radiological emergency plans, and preparedness

  11. Nuclear radiation sensors and monitoring following a nuclear or radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, P.K.

    2009-01-01

    Management of Nuclear and Radiological Emergencies arising from Radiological Dispersive Device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Devices (IND), Nuclear Reactors/Power plants and Nuclear War require measurement of ionizing radiations and radioactivity on an enhanced scale relative to the levels encountered in peaceful uses of ionizing radiations and radioactivity. It is heartening that since Hiroshima, Nagasaki nuclear disaster, the world has been quiet but since early 2000 there has been a fear of certain devices to be used by terrorists, which could lead to panic, and disaster due to dispersal of radioactivity by RDD, IND. Nuclear attack would lead to blast, thermal, initial nuclear radiation, nuclear fall out leading to gamma and neutron dose, dose rates in range from few R, R/h to kR, kR/h, and determinations of k Bq or higher order. Such situations have been visualized at national levels and National Disaster Management Authority NDMA has been established and Disaster Management Act 2005 has come into existence. NDMA has prepared guidelines for Nuclear and radiological emergency management highlighting preparedness, mitigation, response, capacity building, etc. Critical point in all these issues is detection of emergency, quick intimation to the concerned for action in shortest possible time. Upper most requirement by those involved in pursuing action, is radiation sensor based radiation monitors for personnel, area, and to assess contamination due to radioactivity.This presentation briefly describes the Indian scenario in the development of the radiation sensors and the sensor-based radiation monitors. (author)

  12. Nuclear radiation sensors and monitoring following a nuclear or radiological emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, P K [Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (India)

    2009-01-15

    Management of Nuclear and Radiological Emergencies arising from Radiological Dispersive Device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Devices (IND), Nuclear Reactors/Power plants and Nuclear War require measurement of ionizing radiations and radioactivity on an enhanced scale relative to the levels encountered in peaceful uses of ionizing radiations and radioactivity. It is heartening that since Hiroshima, Nagasaki nuclear disaster, the world has been quiet but since early 2000 there has been a fear of certain devices to be used by terrorists, which could lead to panic, and disaster due to dispersal of radioactivity by RDD, IND. Nuclear attack would lead to blast, thermal, initial nuclear radiation, nuclear fall out leading to gamma and neutron dose, dose rates in range from few R, R/h to kR, kR/h, and determinations of k Bq or higher order. Such situations have been visualized at national levels and National Disaster Management Authority NDMA has been established and Disaster Management Act 2005 has come into existence. NDMA has prepared guidelines for Nuclear and radiological emergency management highlighting preparedness, mitigation, response, capacity building, etc. Critical point in all these issues is detection of emergency, quick intimation to the concerned for action in shortest possible time. Upper most requirement by those involved in pursuing action, is radiation sensor based radiation monitors for personnel, area, and to assess contamination due to radioactivity.This presentation briefly describes the Indian scenario in the development of the radiation sensors and the sensor-based radiation monitors. (author)

  13. Online Decision Support System (IRODOS) - an emergency preparedness tool for handling offsite nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinod Kumar, A.; Oza, R.B.; Chaudhury, P.; Suri, M.; Saindane, S.; Singh, K.D.; Bhargava, P.; Sharma, V.K.

    2009-01-01

    A real time online decision support system as a nuclear emergency response system for handling offsite nuclear emergency at the Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) has been developed by Health, Safety and Environment Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) under the frame work of 'Indian Real time Online Decision Support System 'IRODOS'. (author)

  14. Urban meteorological modelling for nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baklanov, Alexander; Sorensen, Jens Havskov; Hoe, Steen Cordt; Amstrup, Bjarne

    2006-01-01

    The main objectives of the current EU project 'Integrated Systems for Forecasting Urban Meteorology, Air Pollution and Population Exposure' (FUMAPEX) are the improvement of meteorological forecasts for urban areas, the connection of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models to urban air pollution and population dose models, the building of improved urban air quality information and forecasting systems, and their application in cities in various European climates. In addition to the forecast of the worst air-pollution episodes in large cities, the potential use of improved weather forecasts for nuclear emergency management in urban areas, in case of hazardous releases from nuclear accidents or terror acts, is considered. Such use of NWP data is tested for the Copenhagen metropolitan area and the Oresund region. The Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) is running an experimental version of the HIRLAM NWP model over Zealand including the Copenhagen metropolitan area with a horizontal resolution of 1.4 km, thus approaching the city-scale. This involves 1-km resolution physiographic data with implications for the urban surface parameters, e.g. surface fluxes, roughness length and albedo. For the city of Copenhagen, the enhanced high-resolution NWP forecasting will be provided to demonstrate the improved dispersion forecasting capabilities of the Danish nuclear emergency preparedness decision-support system, the Accident Reporting and Guidance Operational System (ARGOS), used by the Danish Emergency Management Agency (DEMA). Recently, ARGOS has been extended with a capability of real-time calculation of regional-scale atmospheric dispersion of radioactive material from accidental releases. This is effectuated through on-line interfacing with the Danish Emergency Response Model of the Atmosphere (DERMA), which is run at DMI. For local-scale modelling of atmospheric dispersion, ARGOS utilises the Local-Scale Model Chain (LSMC), which makes use of high-resolution DMI

  15. New Nuclear Emergency Prognosis system in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Ha; Jeong, Seung-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Kwan-Hee

    2016-04-01

    This paper reviews the status of assessment and prognosis system for nuclear emergency response in Korea, especially atmospheric dispersion model. The Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) performs the regulation and radiological emergency preparedness of the nuclear facilities and radiation utilizations. Also, KINS has set up the "Radiological Emergency Technical Advisory Plan" and the associated procedures such as an emergency response manual in consideration of the IAEA Safety Standards GS-R-2, GS-G-2.0, and GS-G-2.1. The Radiological Emergency Technical Advisory Center (RETAC) organized in an emergency situation provides the technical advice on radiological emergency response. The "Atomic Computerized Technical Advisory System for nuclear emergency" (AtomCARE) has been developed to implement assessment and prognosis by RETAC. KINS developed Accident Dose Assessment and Monitoring (ADAMO) system in 2015 to reflect the lessons learned from Fukushima accident. It incorporates (1) the dose assessment on the entire Korean peninsula, Asia region, and global region, (2) multi-units accident assessment (3) applying new methodology of dose rate assessment and the source term estimation with inverse modeling, (4) dose assessment and monitoring with the environmental measurements result. The ADAMO is the renovated version of current FADAS of AtomCARE. The ADAMO increases the accuracy of the radioactive material dispersion with applying the LDAPS(Local Data Assimilation Prediction System, Spatial resolution: 1.5 km) and RDAPS(Regional Data Assimilation Prediction System, Spatial resolution: 12km) of weather prediction data, and performing the data assimilation of automatic weather system (AWS) data from Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) and data from the weather observation tower at NPP site. The prediction model of the radiological material dispersion is based on the set of the Lagrangian Particle model and Lagrangian Puff model. The dose estimation methodology

  16. Emergency preparedness and response plan for nuclear facilities in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Rahmah Hidayati; Pande Made Udiyani

    2009-01-01

    All nuclear facilities in Indonesia are owned and operated by the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN). The programs and activities of emergency planning and preparedness in Indonesia are based on the existing nuclear facilities, i.e. research reactors, research reactor fuel fabrication plant, radioactive waste treatment installation and radioisotopes production installation. The assessment is conducted to learn of status of emergency preparedness and response plan for nuclear facilities in Indonesia and to support the preparation of future Nuclear Power Plant. The assessment is conducted by comparing the emergency preparedness and response system in Indonesia to the system in other countries such as Japan and Republic of Korea, since the countries have many Nuclear Power Plants and other nuclear facilities. As a result, emergency preparedness response plan for existing nuclear facility in Indonesia has been implemented in many activities such as environmental monitoring program, facility monitoring equipment, and the continuous exercise of emergency preparedness and response. However, the implementation need law enforcement for imposing the responsibility of the coordinators in National Emergency Preparedness Plan. It also needs some additional technical support systems which refer to the system in Japan or Republic of Korea. The systems must be completed with some real time monitors which will support the emergency preparedness and response organization. The system should be built in NPP site before the first NPP will be operated. The system should be connected to an Off Site Emergency Center under coordination of BAPETEN as the regulatory body which has responsibility to control of nuclear energy in Indonesia. (Author)

  17. Over a decade of nuclear emergency management at the Nea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahier, B.

    2005-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency has a long tradition of expertise in the area of nuclear emergency policy, planning, preparedness and management. Through its activities in this field, the Agency offers its member countries unbiased assistance on nuclear preparedness matters, with a view to facilitating improvements in nuclear emergency preparedness strategies and response at the international level. The 1986 Chernobyl accident demonstrated that nuclear accidents can have international consequences, highlighting the need for international co-operation, and leading to improvements in the areas of international communication, information exchange and harmonization of response actions between countries. From its inception, the NEA Working Party on Nuclear Emergency Matters has focused on improving the effectiveness of international nuclear emergency preparedness and management. Part of its work programme is set on exploring and developing new concepts and future procedures to enhance national and international preparedness and response management. A central approach to this has been the preparation and conduct of the International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (INEX) series. The role and strategies of exercises and future directions are discussed in this presentation. (A.L.B.)

  18. Assessment and Prognosis for Nuclear Emergency Management in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Seung-Young; Lee, Hyun-Ha; Lee, Young-Min; Park, Sang-Hyun; Nam, Kwang-Woo; Jeong, Sang-Houn; Jin, Sobeom; Kim, Dong-Il; Kim, Wan-Joo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The nuclear accident of Fukushima, March 2011, raised public concerns over the safety of nuclear facilities and emergency preparedness in Korea. Therefore, KINS has enhanced the AtomCARE for assessment and prognosis and environmental monitoring system. The KINS has reinforced the radiological/radioactive environment monitoring system across the country to ensure prompt and effective protective measures for the public. Also, the act of radiological emergency management revised to adopt (PAZ) and the (UPZ) at 2014. All in all, Korea will give comprehensive effort to reflect the lessons learned from Fukushima accident for improvement of the assessment and prognosis system. This paper reviews the status of assessment and prognosis system for nuclear emergency response in Korea. The Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) performs the regulation and radiological emergency preparedness of the nuclear facilities and radiation utilizations.

  19. Proposal optimization in nuclear accident emergency decision based on IAHP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin Jing

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of establishing the multi-layer structure of nuclear accident emergency decision, several decision objectives are synthetically analyzed, and an optimization model of decision proposals for nuclear accident emergency based on interval analytic hierarchy process is proposed in the paper. The model makes comparisons among several emergency decision proposals quantified, and the optimum proposal is selected out, which solved the uncertain and fuzzy decision problem of judgments by experts' experiences in nuclear accidents emergency decision. Case study shows that the optimization result is much more reasonable, objective and reliable than subjective judgments, and it could be decision references for nuclear accident emergency. (authors)

  20. Establishment of a national capability to respond to nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahunsi, S. A.

    2013-04-01

    Establishment of a national capability to respond to nuclear accidents and radiological emergency involves the planning, preparedness, readiness, assurance and response application of the necessary human and material resources to mitigate consequences of an emergency and protect workers, the public, the environment, and national security in the event of such accident. This obligation helps to prepare for the security of lives and properties during such accidents and it is binding and the responsibility of the operator to provide answers to fundamental questions about the nature of radiation, guidance on protecting against the harmful effects, detailed policies, procedures and training. The response to such emergency will involve highly specialized agencies and technical experts. For the Nigerian response capability to be well co-ordinated, the arrangements must be appropriately integrated with those for a conventional emergency. This project will discuss the hazard analysis based on the available inventory of radiation practices, facilities, installations, radiation sources and radioactive materials used in Nigeria. Based upon this analysis, a commensurate nuclear accident and radiological emergency planning and response capabilities has been proposed.(au)

  1. Emergency planning and preparedness for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In order to review the advances made over the past seven years in the area of emergency planning and preparedness supporting nuclear facilities and consider developments which are on the horizon, the IAEA at the invitation of the Government of Italy, organized this International Symposium in co-operation with the Italian Commission for Nuclear and Alternative Energy Sources, Directorate of Nuclear Safety and Health Protection (ENEA-DISP). There were over 250 designated participants and some 70 observers from 37 Member States and four international organizations in attendance at the Symposium. The Symposium presentations were divided into sessions devoted to the following topics: emergency planning (20 papers), accident assessment (30 papers), protective measures and recovery operations (10 papers) and emergency preparedness (16 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  2. Development of radionuclide parameter database on internal contamination in nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Li; Xu Cuihua; Li Wenhong; Su Xu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To develop a radionuclide parameter database on internal contamination in nuclear emergencies. Methods: By researching the radionuclides composition discharged from different nuclear emergencies, the radionuclide parameters were achieved on physical decay, absorption and metabolism in the body from ICRP publications and some other publications. The database on internal contamination for nuclear incidents was developed by using MS Visual Studio 2005 C and MS Access programming language. Results: The radionuclide parameter database on internal contamination in nuclear emergency was established. Conclusions: The database may be very convenient for searching radionuclides and radionuclide parameter data discharged from different nuclear emergencies, which would be helpful to the monitoring and assessment and assessment of internal contamination in nuclear emergencies. (authors)

  3. A conceptualization of a nuclear or radiological emergency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantopoulos, Stasinos [Institute of Informatics and Telecommunications National Center for Scientific Research ‘Demokritos’, Agia Paraskevi 15310, Attiki (Greece); Ikonomopoulos, Andreas, E-mail: anikon@ipta.demokritos.gr [Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Energy and Safety National Center for Scientific Research ‘Demokritos’, Agia Paraskevi 15310, Attiki (Greece)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • Communicating nuclear and radiological safety concepts to the general public. • Multi-lingual semantic indexing of nuclear or radiological emergency content. • Linking informal language to formal nuclear or radiological emergency terms. • Extracting nuclear or radiological emergency terminologies from textual glossaries. • The IAEA Safety Glossary is the core of a cross-linked system of formal terminologies. - Abstract: A novel implementation is presented for NREO, a subject-specific ontology of the Nuclear or Radiological Emergency domain. The ontology design is driven by the requirements of ontology-based, multi-lingual language processing and retrieval use cases, but care is taken to architect the foundations in a way that can be extended to support other use cases in the domain. More specifically, NREO codifies and cross-references existing terminology glossaries and stakeholder lists into machine-processable terminological resources. At the interest of semantic interoperability, the proposed architecture is based on the Simple Knowledge Organization Scheme catalyzing the extensive cross-linking to different ontologies both within the nuclear technology domain and in related domains and disciplines. This and all other core design decisions are presented and discussed under the prism of their adequacy for our use cases and requirements. Both the ontology and terminological data have been made publicly available.

  4. A conceptualization of a nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantopoulos, Stasinos; Ikonomopoulos, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Communicating nuclear and radiological safety concepts to the general public. • Multi-lingual semantic indexing of nuclear or radiological emergency content. • Linking informal language to formal nuclear or radiological emergency terms. • Extracting nuclear or radiological emergency terminologies from textual glossaries. • The IAEA Safety Glossary is the core of a cross-linked system of formal terminologies. - Abstract: A novel implementation is presented for NREO, a subject-specific ontology of the Nuclear or Radiological Emergency domain. The ontology design is driven by the requirements of ontology-based, multi-lingual language processing and retrieval use cases, but care is taken to architect the foundations in a way that can be extended to support other use cases in the domain. More specifically, NREO codifies and cross-references existing terminology glossaries and stakeholder lists into machine-processable terminological resources. At the interest of semantic interoperability, the proposed architecture is based on the Simple Knowledge Organization Scheme catalyzing the extensive cross-linking to different ontologies both within the nuclear technology domain and in related domains and disciplines. This and all other core design decisions are presented and discussed under the prism of their adequacy for our use cases and requirements. Both the ontology and terminological data have been made publicly available

  5. Nuclear emergency management: what is new?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.; Mundigl, S.

    2003-01-01

    Through the use of internationally organised, multinational drills, a wealth of experience and knowledge have been gained at both the national and international levels. The lessons learnt primarily concerned the early, urgent-communication phases of nuclear emergencies, and are currently in the process of being consolidated and incorporated into national structures and approaches. The focus of current works is shifting towards later accident phases, particularly to the mid-term phase, when control has been regained of the emergency situation but the accident consequences have yet to be addressed. In addition to these ''classic'' nuclear emergency response interests, since the 11 september 2001 national authorities have been concerned with accident response capabilities in case of terrorist acts that might involve radiation. (A.L.B.)

  6. Nuclear accident/radiological emergency assistance plan. NAREAP - edition 2000. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the Nuclear Accident/Radiological Emergency Assistance Plan (NAREAP) is to describe the framework for systematic, integrated, co-ordinated, and effective preparedness and response for a nuclear accident or radiological emergency involving facilities or practices that may give rise to a threat to health, the environment or property. The purpose of the NAREAP is: to define the emergency response objectives of the Agency's staff in a nuclear accident or a radiological emergency; to assign responsibilities for performing the tasks and authorities for making the decisions that comprise the Agency staff's response to a nuclear accident or radiological emergency; to guide the Agency managers who must ensure that all necessary tasks are given the necessary support in discharging the Agency staff responsibilities and fulfilling its obligations in response to an emergency; to ensure that the development and maintenance of detailed and coherent response procedures are well founded; to act as a point of reference for individual Agency staff members on their responsibilities (as an individual or a team member) throughout a response; to identify interrelationships with other international intergovernmental Organizations; and to serve as a training aid to maintain readiness of personnel. The NAREAP refers to the arrangements of the International Atomic Energy Agency and of the United Nations Security and Safety Section at the Vienna International Centre (UNSSS-VIC) that may be necessary for the IAEA to respond to a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, as defined in the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions. It covers response arrangements for any situation that may have actual, potential or perceived radiological consequences and that could require a response from the IAEA, as well as the arrangements for developing, maintaining and exercising preparedness. The implementing procedures themselves are not included in the NAREAP, but they are required

  7. Application of the failure modes and effects analysis technique to the emergency cooling system of an experimental nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceicao Junior, Osmar; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e

    2009-01-01

    This study consists on the application of the failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), a hazard identification and a risk assessment technique, to the emergency cooling system (ECS), of an experimental nuclear power plant. The choice of this technique was due to its detailed analysis of each component of the system, enabling the identification of all possible ways of failure and its related consequences (in order of importance), allowing the designer to improve the system, maximizing its security and reliability. Through the application of this methodology, it could be observed that the ECS is an intrinsically safe system, in spite of the modifications proposed. (author)

  8. Individual feature identification method for nuclear accident emergency decision-making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yingfeng; Wang Jianlong; Lin Xiaoling; Yang Yongxin; Lu Xincheng

    2014-01-01

    According to the individual feature identification method and combining with the characteristics of nuclear accident emergency decision-making, the evaluation index system of the nuclear accident emergency decision-making was determined on the basis of investigation and analysis. The effectiveness of the nuclear accident emergency decision-making was evaluated based on the individual standards by solving the individual features of the individual standard identification decisions. The case study shows that the optimization result is reasonable, objective and reliable, and it can provide an effective analysis method and decision-making support for optimization of nuclear accident emergency protective measures. (authors)

  9. Some Reliability Considerations of UGV for Remote-response in Nuclear Emergency Situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Heungseop; Cho, Jaiwan; Jeong, Kyungmin

    2013-01-01

    In Fukushima disaster, a number of different UGVs, such as Packbots, Warriors, Quince, and Survey Runner, are used for monitoring, collecting data, inspection, and cleaning up. In utilizing UGVs in a nuclear emergency situation, one of serious problems is reliability of UGVs which is not sufficient yet for required mission completion. In this paper we surveyed failures and reliability of field UGVs and draw some important reliability considerations of UGVs for remote-response in a nuclear emergency situation. We think that the findings in this study will be helpful for developers or researchers of UGVs for nuclear emergency situations. We studied failures and reliability of UGVs used in search/rescue, military, and nuclear field by literature survey. The results showed that a state of art field UGVs can't be expected to complete an entire mission without failures, which leads to needs of reliability improvement of them. Though part of failure data from the surveyed studies were not enough detailed to get reliability matrix, some meaningful insights were found through analysis. Based on these insights, we draw some important considerations for reliability improvement of UGVs for an NPP emergency situation, and those reliability considerations are classified according to life cycle of a UGV for developers and researchers. Finally, there were not reported failures related to radiation environments in surveyed literature, but radiation tolerant control boards and sensors are easily anticipated in a NPP emergency situation. Therefore studies about the radiation-tolerant design and the use of radiation-tolerant components also should be considered for high reliability of UGVs for a NPP application

  10. Nuclear emergency preparedness in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dal, A.H.; Molhoek, W.; Leest, A.M.M.; Moen, J.E.T.; Sonderen, J.F. van; Aldenkamp, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Dutch organisation for nuclear emergency management has been described in previous papers. Briefly, the Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and Environment (VROM) and the Ministry of the Interior (BIZA) coordinate the input of all other Ministries and agencies at the government level, and provide the general strategy for dealing with the situation at hand. Any indication of a possible nuclear incident may alert the organization. Signals indicating, such incidents are continuously collected by the Emergency Management Department a VROM in the Hague. An expert group is permanently available for the evaluation of serious warnings, either via bilateral or other international contacts (IAEA, EC, neighbouring countries) or through the Dutch early warning monitoring network via the National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM). The chairman of this evaluation group has the authority to decide whether to start up the National Organization for Nuclear Emergency Management. Its start means the installation of a Policy Team of Cabinet Ministers or their representatives, and the involvement of many authorities and organizations at the national, provincial and local levels

  11. Investigation of nuclear safety regulation and emergency preparedness for other countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, Hitoshi; Kakuta, Akio; Yasuda, Makoto [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, Policy Planning and Coordination Department, Tokyo (Japan); Funahashi, Toshihiro [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, Nuclear Emergency Response and Prepardness Department, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    This investigation was carried out on organization and a role of nuclear regulatory body in the U.S., France, Germany, the U.K., Korea and Canada. In addition, nuclear emergency preparedness in these countries was investigated. A summary of this investigation is shown below. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the U.S. and the Nuclear Safety Authority in France have respectively headquarters and regional offices. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has 4 regional offices and the Nuclear Safety Authority has 11 regional office. These regional offices are responsible primarily for the inspection of nuclear facilities. In Germany, the Federal Ministry of the Environment has delegated its regulatory authority to state governments, and the relevant department of each state government is in charge of inspection, oversight and approval of nuclear installations. In addition, in Korea, the U.S., and the U.K., the resident inspectors placed in each nuclear facility have the directed nuclear facilities. Meanwhile, Korea had changed its nuclear regulatory regime during this study period. The Nuclear Safety and Security Commission was newly established and took over from the Nuclear Safety Division of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology. Regarding nuclear emergency preparedness system, it is secured that the public will be protected at the national level. And also the responding scheme and roles of regulatory agencies, operators, and the relevant ministries and agencies are identified. In addition, the licensee's responsibilities are defined. In France, existing organizations such as government organizations, governor who is appointed by the government and licensees respond to nuclear emergency. In Korea and the U.K., an emergency organization which consists of existing organizations are established and coped with nuclear emergency. In the U.S., Germany and Canada that have a federal system, the roles of state governments and the federal government are identified

  12. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  13. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  14. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response (Chinese Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  15. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  16. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  17. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  18. Specification for self contained emergency luminiare and their qualification for a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Shanmugam, T.K.

    1999-01-01

    Self contained emergency luminiare (SCEL) for application in a nuclear plant shall meet the illumination level requirement of ANSI/NFPA 101-1988 (Life Safety Code) Section 5.8. The testing shall be done as per IS 9583-1981 requirements. In the selection of self contained emergency luminiare the Sealed Maintenance Free (SMF) battery characteristic and Ampere-Hour ratings are to be carefully evaluated

  19. Arrangements for dealing with emergencies at civil nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.J.; Robinson, I.F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper covers arrangements for dealing with nuclear emergencies at sites licensed by the Health and Safety Executive/Nuclear Installations Inspectorate. Such arrangements are over and above the contingency plans required for radiation incidents as required by the Ionising Radiations Regulations. The statutory position of the NII is described and, although the NII is limited to regulating the activities of the operator, the functions of the other organisations that could be involved in dealing with an emergency are briefly covered in order to give as complete a picture as possible. The basis for emergency planning is given together with the consequences and countermeasures for mitigation of a nuclear emergency, including the use of ERLs. The requirements for emergency exercises are explained. (author)

  20. Decision making process and emergency management in different phases of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duranova, T.

    2005-01-01

    EVATECH, Information Requirements and Countermeasure Evaluation Techniques in Nuclear Emergency Management, was a research project in the key action 'Nuclear Fission' of the fifth EURATOM Framework Programme (FP5). The overall objective of the project was to enhance the quality and coherence of response to nuclear emergencies in Europe by improving the decision support methods, models and processes in ways that take into account the expectations and concern of the many different parties involved - stake holders both in managing the emergency response and those who are affected by the consequences of nuclear emergencies. The project had ten partners from seven European countries. The development of the real-time online decision support system RODOS has been one of the major items in the area of radiation protection within the European Commission's Framework Programmes. The main objectives of the RODOS project have been to develop a comprehensive and integrated decision support system that is generally applicable across Europe and to provide a common framework for incorporating the best features of existing decision support systems and future developments. Furthermore the objective has been to provide greater transparency in the decision process to: improve public understanding and acceptance of off-site emergency measures, to facilitate improved communication between countries of monitoring data, predictions of consequences, etc., in the event of any future accident, and to promote, through the development and use of the system, a more coherent, consistent and harmonised response to any future accident that may affect Europe. (authors)

  1. Measurement strategies for the Dutch Nuclear Emergency Response System of the National Poisons Control Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Oostrum, I.E.A.; Joore, J.C.A.; Meulenbelt, J.; Savelkoul, T.J.F.

    1997-04-01

    The measurement strategy applicable to Public Health in case of a Nuclear Emergency affecting the Netherlands is presented. Within the framework of the Dutch Nuclear Emergency Response System (NPK, abbreviated in Dutch) the National Poisons Control Centre of the RIVM/AZU has an advisory obligation towards the Ministry of Public Health, Welfare and Sports (WVS). This role comprises advice to relevant ministries, coordination of the measurement strategies and advice on persons to be reviewed, i.e. physical, biological and clinical dosimetry. The choice of dosimetric methods and measurements to be achieved in case of a larger scale nuclear emergency in the Netherlands is discussed. An actual plan of handling is presented for this measurement plan. Intervention levels defined in NPK 1991 serve as guidelines for successive actions to be performed by regional health services. 8 figs., 6 tabs., 81 refs

  2. Analysis on functions of mobile nuclear emergency monitoring lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Yongfang; Wang Yonghong; Gao Jing; Sun Jian

    2012-01-01

    According to the fundamental purpose and mission of nuclear emergency monitoring and based on technological aspects, this paper discusses and analyses the functions and basic requirements on equipment in mobile radiation measurement lab in nuclear emergency response. (authors)

  3. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  4. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  5. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  6. Civil emergency preparedness at the Ignalina nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    Workshop was held in the frame of Lithuania's cooperation with NATO on disasters management subject and was concentrated on the preparation of management of nuclear accident at Ignalina NPP. The following topics were covered: emergency preparedness inside Ignalina NPP, preparedness for nuclear accidents at national level, experience in Nordic countries and IAEA activities in harmonization of nuclear emergency preparedness in different countries

  7. Activities of research group on radiological aspects of emergency countermeasures in the nuclear accident of Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urabe, Itsumasa

    2012-01-01

    Radiation effects research group of 'Nuclear safety' investigation committee has been working after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster on evaluating the emission rate and the diffusion of radioactive materials, on collecting, analyzing and evaluating the information on radioactive materials in the environment, on measuring the radiation dose at the state of emergency, on managing the exposure of habitants and disaster-prevention staff, on collaborating with related associations, and on making proposals on information release and actions against the disaster. At the international symposium by the 'Nuclear safety' investigation committee on November, 2011, the following issues were presented: Application of the concept of ICRP, Release of radioactive materials into the air, Evaluation of spatial dose distribution, Diffusion of radioactive materials in the sea, Evaluation of the exposure of the habitants, and Radiation measurement at the state of emergency (J.P.N.)

  8. Recommended criteria for the evaluation of on-site nuclear power plant emergency exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafortune, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    A review of existing Canadian and International emergency exercise evaluation criteria and approaches has been conducted. Based on the results of the review, criteria are proposed for the evaluation of on-site emergency exercises for Canadian nuclear power stations. The proposed criteria are performance-based. They are comprehensive, yet remain adaptable to all stations and accident scenarios. They are primarily aimed at radiological emergency exercises, but are entirely applicable to fire or other conventional exercises. This report also addresses evaluation preparation and methodology. (author). 21 refs., 6 tabs

  9. Future of Nuclear Power: NRC emergency preparedness licensing activities agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essig, T.H.

    1995-01-01

    This talk summary addresses the issue of how future policies of the NRC will affect nuclear power in areas such as construction, emergency preparedness, and licensing. Specific topics covered include the following: Emergent EP licensing issues for operating nuclear Power Plants; 10CFR Part 52 and the process for licensing of Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs); and potential revisions to emergency preparedness programs for future nuclear power plants

  10. A study on the improvement of nuclear emergency countermeasure technology for local government

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khang, Byung Oui; Lee, J. T.; Lee, G. Y.

    2005-01-01

    There were necessities of the establishment of the regional nuclear emergency plan on the nuclear disaster of nuclear facilities according to the 'nuclear facilities physical protection and emergency preparedness act' and the strengthening of the regional nuclear disaster management system to get confidence on the related national policy from the public and the defining and improving the relationship between local government and other organizations on responsibilities, authorities, duties and support. So, the project was started, the Results of the project are the establishment of Regional Nuclear Emergency Plan (Draft) connected to the national safety management basic plan and national radiological emergency plan which contains the description of the emergency preparedness to respond nuclear disaster and the duty description of related organizations to respond a nuclear disaster and several description of nuclear emergency preparedness. And this report describes the regional nuclear disaster countermeasure technology improvement and the emergency training, drill, exercise methodology

  11. Security technology discussion for emergency command system of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhenjun

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear power plant emergency command system can provide valuable data for emergency personnel, such as the unit data, weather data, environmental radiation data. In the course of emergency response, the emergency command system provides decision support to quickly and effectively control and mitigate the consequences of the nuclear accident, to avoid and reduce the dose received by staff and the public, to protect the environment and the public. There are high performance requirements on the security of the system and the data transmission. Based on the previous project and new demand after the Fukushima incident, the security technology design of emergency system in nuclear power plant was discussed. The results show that the introduction of information security technology can effectively ensure the security of emergency systems, and enhance the capacity of nuclear power plant to deal with nuclear accidents. (author)

  12. Emergency protection and nuclear power station remote monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, K.; Wolf, H.

    1986-01-01

    The States of the Federal Republic of Germany are planning emergency protection measures for the environment of nuclear power stations based on their statutory duty of care. In this connection the paper explains to what extent remote monitoring of nuclear power stations practised by the Federal Supervisory Authorities may support the design and implementation of emergency protection measures. (orig.) [de

  13. Biometrics and smart card based applications for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishanth Reddy, J.; Dheeraj Reddy, J.; Narender Reddy, J.

    2004-01-01

    Biometrics has emerged as a convenient, foolproof and well-accepted technology for identification around the globe. Nucleonix has developed innovative solutions based on finger scan biometrics for various industries. This paper closely looks into the application areas for the nuclear industry and how it will benefit this industry, in terms of identification, access control, security of PCs and applications, attendance, machinery usage control and other custom applications. (author)

  14. Application of the selected countermeasures for animal products to a dynamic food chain model in a nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Won Tae; Suh, Kyung Suk; Kim, Eun Han; Choi, Young Gil; Han, Moon Hee; Cho, Gyu Seong

    1998-01-01

    The methodology for the application of the principles of radiation protection on the selected countermeasures in linking with a dynamic food chain model DYNACON was studied using the cost and benefit analysis and its application results were analyzed in terms of net benefit. The considerations focus on the simple and easy countermeasures to carry out in the first harvest after the deposition for animal products, such as the ban of food consumption and the substitution of clean fodder. The net benefit of the selected countermeasures depended on a variety of factors such as foodstuffs, radionuclides, starting time and performing duration of countermeasures. The methodology used in this study may serve as a basis for the planning and preparedness of long-term countermeasures as well as the rapid decision of countermeasures against the contamination of agricultural ecosystems in a nuclear emergency

  15. Application of Robotic System for Emergency Response in NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kyung Min; Seo, Yong Chil; Shin, Ho Chul; Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Jae Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Chang Hoi; Kim, Seung Ho

    2010-01-01

    Increasing energy demand and concerns over climate change make increasing use of nuclear power plant in worldwide. Even though the probability of accident is greatly reduced, safety is the highest priority issue in the nuclear energy industry. Applying highly reliable and conservative 'defense in depth' concepts with the design and construction of NPP, there are very little possibilities with which accidents are occur and radioactive materials are released to environments in NPP. But NPP have prepared with the emergency response procedures and conduct exercises for post-accident circumstance according to the procedures. The application of robots for emergency response task for post-accident in nuclear facilities is not a new concept. Robots have been sent to recover the damaged reactor at Chernobyl where human workers could receive a lifetime dose of radiation in minutes. Based on NRC's TMI-2 Cleanup Program, several robots were built in the 1980s to help gather information and remove debris from a reactor at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant that partially melted down in 1979. The first robot was lowered into the basement through a hatch and human operators monitoring in a control room drove it through mud, water and debris, capturing the initial post-accident images of the reactor's basement. It was used for several years equipped with various tools allowing it to scour surfaces, scoop samples and vacuum sludge. A second version carried a core sampler to determine the intensity and depth of the radiation that had permeated into the walls. To perform cleanup tasks, they built Workhorse that featured system redundancy and had a boom extendable to reach high places, but it was never used because it had too many complexities and to clean and fix. While remote robotics technology has proven to remove the human from the radioactive environment, it is also difficult to make it useful because it may requires skill about remote control and obtaining remote

  16. Application of Robotic System for Emergency Response in NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyung Min; Seo, Yong Chil; Shin, Ho Chul; Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Jae Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Chang Hoi; Kim, Seung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Increasing energy demand and concerns over climate change make increasing use of nuclear power plant in worldwide. Even though the probability of accident is greatly reduced, safety is the highest priority issue in the nuclear energy industry. Applying highly reliable and conservative 'defense in depth' concepts with the design and construction of NPP, there are very little possibilities with which accidents are occur and radioactive materials are released to environments in NPP. But NPP have prepared with the emergency response procedures and conduct exercises for post-accident circumstance according to the procedures. The application of robots for emergency response task for post-accident in nuclear facilities is not a new concept. Robots have been sent to recover the damaged reactor at Chernobyl where human workers could receive a lifetime dose of radiation in minutes. Based on NRC's TMI-2 Cleanup Program, several robots were built in the 1980s to help gather information and remove debris from a reactor at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant that partially melted down in 1979. The first robot was lowered into the basement through a hatch and human operators monitoring in a control room drove it through mud, water and debris, capturing the initial post-accident images of the reactor's basement. It was used for several years equipped with various tools allowing it to scour surfaces, scoop samples and vacuum sludge. A second version carried a core sampler to determine the intensity and depth of the radiation that had permeated into the walls. To perform cleanup tasks, they built Workhorse that featured system redundancy and had a boom extendable to reach high places, but it was never used because it had too many complexities and to clean and fix. While remote robotics technology has proven to remove the human from the radioactive environment, it is also difficult to make it useful because it may requires skill about remote control and

  17. Involvement of the Public Health Authority in emergency planning and preparedness for nuclear facilities in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sztanyik, L.B.

    1986-01-01

    It is required by the Hungarian Atomic Energy Act and its enacting clause of 1980 that facilities established for the application of atomic energy be designed, constructed and operated in such a manner that abnormal operational occurrences can be avoided and unplanned exposures to radiation and radioactive substances can be prevented. The primary responsibility for planning and implementing emergency actions rests with the management of the operating organization. Thus one of the prerequisites of licensing the first nuclear power plant in Hungary was the preparation and submission for approval of an emergency plan by the operating organization. In addition to this, the council of the county where the power plant is located has also been obliged to prepare a complementary emergency plan, in co-operation with other regional and national authorities, for the prevention of consequences from an emergency that may extend beyond the site boundary of the plant. In preparing the complementary plan, the emergency plan of the facility had to be taken into account. Unlike most national authorities involved in nuclear matters, the Public Health Authority is involved in the preparation of plans for every kind of emergency in a nuclear facility, including even those whose consequences can probably be confined to the plant site. The paper discusses in detail the role and responsibility of the Public Health Authority in emergency planning and preparedness for nuclear facilities. (author)

  18. Emergency control center of the nuclear Regulatory Authority: a national, regional and international tool to coordinate the response to radiological and nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, Osvaldo; Hernandez, Daniel; Telleria, Diego; Bruno, Hector; Boutet, Luis; Kunst, Juan; Sadaniowski, Ivana; Rey, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In the year 1998, with the regulation of the Nuclear Law, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) is constituted as the national coordinator of the response in case of nuclear or radiological emergencies. The ARN builds his first operative center installed in his Head quarter in Buenos Aires. Likewise, from the obligations that come with the Convention of Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency, the ARN is the National Warning Point and the National Competent Authority. Therefore, the operative capacity of the center needs to be expanded to cover not only the national territory but also its link with the region and the IAEA, as an access point to the International community, as the conventions demand. For the purpose of giving ARN capacities which reflect the state of art at the international level on Nuclear Emergency Centers and warrant that its equipment and technology will be compatible with those abroad (mainly with IAEA), the ARN made an arrangements with Department of Energy of United States, in the framework of an existing bilateral Argentine Foreign Office/US Government agreement (Joint Standing Committee on Nuclear Cooperation). This agreement allows a deep experience exchange, high level specialists support and last generation equipment access. As a result, the center of ARN can be considerate as the most advanced civil nuclear emergency center in the region. This work describes the implementation process of the emergency center and the technical features, like the physical distribution, hardware and software resources, communication equipment, Geographic Information Systems, etc. (author)

  19. Emergency management in nuclear power plants: a regulatory view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Vikas; Chander, Vipin; Vijayan, P.; Nair, P.S.; Krishnamurthy, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear power plants in India adopts a high level of defence in depth concept in design and operates at highest degree of safety, however the possibility of nuclear accidents cannot be ruled out. The safety and regulatory review of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) in India are carried out by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). Section 33 of Atomic Energy (Radiation Protection) Rules-2004 provides the basic requirements of emergency preparedness aspects for a nuclear facility. Prior to the issuance of a license for the operation of NPPs, AERB ensures that the site specific emergency response manuals are in place and tested. The emergency response plan includes the emergency response organization, their responsibilities, the detailed scheme of emergency preparedness, response, facilities, equipments, coordination and support of various organizations and other technical aspects. These emergency preparedness plans are tested at periodic interval to check the overall effectiveness. The plant and site emergency exercise is handled by the plant authorities as per the site emergency plan. The events with off-site consequences are handled by the district authorities according to the off-site emergency plan. In off-site emergency exercises, observers from AERB and other associated organizations participate. Observations of the participants are discussed in the feedback session of the exercise for their disposition. This paper reviews the current level of emergency planning and preparedness, statistics of emergency exercises conducted and their salient findings. The paper highlights improvement in the emergency management programme over the years including development of advance technical support systems. The major challenges in off-site emergency management programme such as industrial growth and increase in population within the sterilized zone, frequent transfer of district officials and the floating population around the NPPs are outlined. The areas for improvement in

  20. Nigeria status on capabilities for response to nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sambo, I.; Elegba, S.B.; Ogharandukun, M.

    2007-01-01

    The use of nuclear technology has been widely employed and will continue to expand in use in Nigeria particularly in the health, industrial, mining, water resources, agriculture, manufacturing, education and research sectors. Incidents and emergencies cannot therefore be ruled out. Effective national response capabilities are essential to minimize the impacts from nuclear and radiological emergencies, and to build public trust in the safety and security of nuclear technology. The often discussed Nigeria's Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) project cannot occur without enhanced national capabilities to respond to an incidence or emergency. Moreover, increased concern over the use of nuclear or radioactive materials malevolent acts increases the need to broaden response capabilities. This paper examines Nigeria's status on capabilities for response to a nuclear and radiological emergency vis-a-vis international requirements for effective response capabilities

  1. Experience with the use of programmable logic controllers in nuclear safety applications. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, E.M.; Stofko, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    This report describes the implementation and experience with Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) for nuclear safety applications. Two applications are described. The first is an Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) mitigation system provided as a Diverse Auxiliary Feedwater Actuation System (DAFAS). It was implemented at Arizona Public Service's Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station and has been in commercial operation since early 1992. The second system described is an Emergency Diesel Generator Bus Load Sequencer installed at Florida Power and Light's Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant. This system was installed as part of an upgrade to the emergency power system in 1988. The experience gained in the design, development, implementation and qualification of these systems will be beneficial to utilities that are considering the utilization of PLCs for their plant applications

  2. The emerging nuclear suppliers and nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    The number of states capable of exporting nuclear material, technology, equipment, and services is large and growing. Once confined primarily to states party to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the list of actual and potential nuclear suppliers now includes many countries that do not subscribe to the NPT or to other international nuclear export control agreements. Although international control accords---such as the Nuclear Exporters' (Zangger) Committee and the London Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) guidelines---do not prohibit the export of sensitive nuclear materials and equipment, they do reduce the risks of proliferation by imposing international safeguards as a condition for export. The purpose of this book---the culmination of one phase of an ongoing international research project on the emerging nuclear suppliers and nonproliferation---is to remedy, at least in part, this data deficiency

  3. Potential applications of advanced information technology in emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, H.; Holmstrom, C.

    1987-01-01

    Within nuclear-, offshore- and petrochemical industries there is always a potential risk for severe incidents and accidents. It is a commonly shared belief that timely and correct decisions in these situations could either prevent an incident to develop into a severe accident or to mitigate the negative consequences of an accident. It is also a common belief that in those cases where poor decisions have been taken it has been because of insufficient access to information and expert knowledge when the decisions were taken. These are the background experiences for the joint Nordic research program on the use of advanced information technology in emergency preparedness organizations. Important initial research tasks in the program have been to identify and specify the needs for advanced information technology applications in emergency preparedness organizations. So far a couple of studies aiming for a needs assessment of advanced information technologies in nuclear power emergency preparedness organizations in Sweden and Finland have been completed. The conclusions from these studies are presented in this paper

  4. Study on Korean Radiological Emergency System-Care System- and National Nuclear Emergency Preparedness System Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmad Khusyairi; Yudi Pramono

    2008-01-01

    Care system; Radiological Emergency Supporting System. Environmental radiology level is the main aspect that should be concerned deal with the utilization of nuclear energy. The usage of informational technology in nuclear area gives significant contribution to anticipate and to protect human and environment. Since 1960, South Korea has developed environment monitoring system as the effort to protect the human and environment in the radiological emergency condition. Indonesia has possessed several nuclear installations and planned to build and operate nuclear power plants (PLTN) in the future. Therefore, Indonesia has to prepare the integrated system, technically enables to overcome the radiological emergency. Learning from the practice in South Korea, the system on the radiological emergency should be prepared and applied in Indonesia. However, the government regulation draft on National Radiological Emergency System, under construction, only touches the management aspect, not the technical matters. Consequently, when the regulation is implemented, it will need an additional regulation on technical aspect including the consideration on the system (TSS), the organization of operator and the preparation of human resources development of involved institution. For that purpose, BAPETEN should have a typical independence system in regulatory frame work. (author)

  5. Radiation emergency preparedness in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geetha, P.V.; Ramamirtham, B.; Khot, P.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of planning for radiation emergency response is to ensure adequate preparedness for protection of the plant personnel and members of the public from significant radiation exposures in the unlikely event of an accident. With a number of safety features in the reactor design and sound operating procedures, the probability of a major accident resulting in the releases of large quantities of radioactivity is extremely small. However, as an abundant cautious approach a comprehensive radiation emergency response preparedness is in place in all the nuclear power plants (NPPs). Radiation Emergency in NPPs is broadly categorized into three types; plant emergency, site emergency and off-site emergency. During off site emergency conditions, based on levels of radiation in the environment, Civil Authorities may impose several counter measures such as sheltering, administering prophylaxis (stable iodine for thyroid blocking) and evacuation of people from the affected area. Environmental Survey Laboratory (ESL) carries out environmental survey extensively in the affected sector identified by the meteorological survey laboratory. To handle emergency situations, Emergency Control Centre with all communication facility and Emergency Equipment Centre having radiation measuring instruments and protective equipment are functional at all NPPs. AERB stipulates certain periodicity for conducting the exercises on plant, site and off site emergency. These exercises are conducted and deficiencies corrected for strengthening the emergency preparedness system. In the case of off site emergency exercise, observers are invited from AERB and Crisis Management Group of Department of Atomic Energy (DAE). The emergency exercises conducted by Nuclear Power Plant Sites have been very satisfactory. (author)

  6. Computer based virtual reality approach towards its application in an accidental emergency at nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Jun; Yao Qingshan

    1999-01-01

    Virtual reality is a computer based system for creating and receiving virtual world. As an emerging branch of computer discipline, this approach is extensively expanding and widely used in variety of industries such as national defence, research, engineering, medicine and air navigation. The author intends to present the fundamentals of virtual reality, in attempt to study some interested aspects for use in nuclear power emergency planning

  7. Generalized concepts for measures in case of nuclear and radiological emergencies; Generalisierte Konzepte fuer Massnahmen bei nuklearen und radiologischen Notfaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sogalla, Martin; Buettner, Uwe; Schnadt, Horst

    2015-05-15

    In the frame of the project 3610S60014 GRS has developed a generalized concept of measures for an improved availability of support and information systems for emergency purposes and the planning of press and public relations that shall be applicable for the complete spectrum of nuclear end radiological emergencies. The concept allows the derivation of criteria and clear procedures for the situation evaluation and decision making. The project is aimed to integrate all available measure concepts from external emergency preparedness, prevention of ABD hazards and specific nuclear emergency plans.

  8. Consequence Management and International Nuclear Emergency Exercises: Lessons from INEX 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wim Molhoek; Vince McClelland; Amanda Stegen; Brian Ahier; Ted Lazo

    2006-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (Nea) has a long tradition of expertise in the area of nuclear emergency policy, preparedness, and management. The 1986 Chernobyl accident demonstrated that nuclear accidents may have consequences over wide areas, highlighting the need for international cooperation, coordination and communication. From the beginning, the Nea focus of work, as carried out by the Working Party on Nuclear Emergency Matters, has been on improving the effectiveness of international nuclear emergency preparedness and management. A major pillar of this work has been the preparation and organisation of the International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (I.N.E.X.) series. Beginning in 1993, the Nea I.N.E.X. series has proved successful in testing and developing arrangements for nuclear emergency response. The I.N.E.X.-1,-2 and -2000 series, which focussed on the early-phase of an emergency, provided a unique forum for testing existing as well as new arrangements and concepts for international nuclear emergency management, and succeeded in establishing a recognised international nuclear emergency exercise culture. In response to international interest in the longer term consequence management issues that will arise after an emergency, the Nea developed a third generation of exercises, I.N.E.X. 3. The I.N.E.X. 3 series of national level table-top exercises focused on the response to widespread radiological contamination of the environment and the issues likely to be raised in the medium to longer term period after such an event. Exercise objectives included an investigation of decisions on agricultural countermeasures and food restrictions, countermeasures such as travel and trade, recovery management and public information. The evaluation aimed to identify aspects of national decision-making which would benefit from international co-ordination, compare national approaches and identify 'best' practices in these circumstances. An International Evaluation Workshop will

  9. Institutional reforms of nuclear emergency preparedness in Japan and its challenges. Case studies on stakeholder involvement in establishing nuclear emergency preparedness in France and its implications for Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Shin-etsu

    2013-01-01

    Based upon the experiences with the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, Japan is now making a comprehensive review of nuclear emergency preparedness. The Nuclear Regulation Authority of Japan has changed drastically its basic concept of nuclear emergency arrangements from their dependence on the prediction methods to advance planning-oriented arrangements. In order to implement such changes in an effective enough manner, this report examines how to improve stakeholder involvement focusing on the French cases, where the Local Information Commissions (CLI) plays a critical role, and thereby derives concrete lessons for Japan. Case studies on CLI's involvement in French nuclear emergency preparedness revealed the following implications for Japan; 1. Improving continuously the disaster prevention plans of local governments and of nuclear utilities thorough recursive cycles of disaster-preparedness drill and its evaluation for the benefits of local inhabitants, 2. Setting appropriate ranges wherein local stakeholders involve constantly in establishing nuclear emergency preparedness without alienating completely other stakeholders, 3. Utilizing the prediction systems not as a means to support decision-making in emergency situations but as a tool for facilitating stakeholder involvement in the phase of advance planning, and 4. Integrating nuclear emergency preparedness into other disaster preventions for reducing complex and unrecognized risks. (author)

  10. Monitoring and data management strategies for nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Since the accident at Chernobyl in 1986, many countries have intensified their efforts in nuclear emergency planning, preparedness and management. Experience from the NEA nuclear emergency exercises (INEX 1 and INEX 2) indicated a need to improve the international system of communication and information in case of a radiological emergency. To address this need, research was carried out by three NEA working groups, the findings of which are synthesised in the present report. This report defines emergency monitoring and modelling needs, and proposes strategies which will assist decision makers by improving the selection of data that is transmitted, and the way in which data and information are transmitted and received. Modern communication methods, such as the Internet, are a key part of the strategies described. (author)

  11. State of practice and emerging application of analytical techniques of nuclear forensic analysis: highlights from the 4th Collaborative Materials Exercise of the Nuclear Forensics International Technical Working Group (ITWG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwantes, J.M.; Pellegrini, K.L.; Marsden, Oliva

    2017-01-01

    The Nuclear Forensics International Technical Working Group (ITWG) recently completed its fourth Collaborative Materials Exercise (CMX-4) in the 21 year history of the Group. This was also the largest materials exercise to date, with participating laboratories from 16 countries or international organizations. Exercise samples (including three separate samples of low enriched uranium oxide) were shipped as part of an illicit trafficking scenario, for which each laboratory was asked to conduct nuclear forensic analyses in support of a fictitious criminal investigation. In all, over 30 analytical techniques were applied to characterize exercise materials, for which ten of those techniques were applied to ITWG exercises for the first time. An objective review of the state of practice and emerging application of analytical techniques of nuclear forensic analysis based upon the outcome of this most recent exercise is provided. (author)

  12. State of practice and emerging application of analytical techniques of nuclear forensic analysis: highlights from the 4th Collaborative Materials Exercise of the Nuclear Forensics International Technical Working Group (ITWG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Marsden, Oliva; Pellegrini, Kristi L.

    2016-01-01

    The Nuclear Forensics International Technical Working Group (ITWG) recently completed its fourth Collaborative Materials Exercise (CMX-4) in the 21 year history of the Group. This was also the largest materials exercise to date, with participating laboratories from 16 countries or international organizations. Moreover, exercise samples (including three separate samples of low enriched uranium oxide) were shipped as part of an illicit trafficking scenario, for which each laboratory was asked to conduct nuclear forensic analyses in support of a fictitious criminal investigation. In all, over 30 analytical techniques were applied to characterize exercise materials, for which ten of those techniques were applied to ITWG exercises for the first time. We performed an objective review of the state of practice and emerging application of analytical techniques of nuclear forensic analysis based upon the outcome of this most recent exercise is provided.

  13. Need for capacity building and knowledge management in nuclear applications, an IAEA perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossbach, M.

    2004-01-01

    In view of an aging workforce and an increasing lack of students interested in nuclear technology and sciences many reports have pinpointed to the crucial situation in loosing valuable expertise and urged for the initiation of capable programmes to revitalize training opportunities and public interests in nuclear subjects. Several international and national initiatives emerged to support education and training in nuclear engineering and radiochemistry but it appears that money alone is not sufficient to reverse the trend. Nuclear knowledge management concepts and strategies have been discussed at various levels but a clear picture how to attract more interest in nuclear activities in the young generation did not emerge so far. It seems that only concerted action including social, political, scientific and technical components can positively change public perception of nuclear applications and, hence, result in an increased interest of students to take up this subject and embark in a professional life as a nuclear scientist or engineer. The Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications (NA) of the IAEA is trying to support - through many different mechanisms - training and education in the nuclear sector and enhance the dissemination of nuclear knowledge from advanced to less advanced countries. Some of the more recent activities of the Department will be described in this communication. (author)

  14. Emergency planning and preparedness for a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahe, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    Based on current regulations, FEMA approves each site-specific plan of state and local governments for each power reactor site after 1) formal review offsite preparedness, 2) holding a public meeting at which the preparedness status has been reviewed, and 3) a satisfactory joint exercise has been conducted with both utility and local participation. Annually, each state, within any position of the 10-mile emergency planning zone, must conduct a joint exercise with the utility to demonstrate its preparedness for a nuclear accident. While it is unlikely that these extreme measures will be needed as a result of an accident at a nuclear power station, the fact that these plans have been well thought out and implemented have already proven their benefit to society. The preparedness for a nuclear accident can be of great advantage in other types of emergencies. For example, on December 11, 1982, a non-nuclear chemical storage tank exploded at a Union Carbide plant in Louisiana shortly after midnight. More than 20,000 people were evacuated from their homes. They were evacuated under the emergency response plan formulated for use in the event of a nuclear accident at the nearby Waterford Nuclear plants. Clearly, this illustrates how a plan conceived for one purpose is appropriate to handle other types of accidents that occur in a modern industrial society

  15. Evaluating the effectiveness of warning systems for nuclear power plant emergencies: criteria and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorensen, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant in 1979 was an emergency management disaster. Chief among the problems was ineffective public warning and communications. While it is difficult to assign blame for that condition to any given party or determine if it was due to unique situational factors, the failure led to fairly significant regulatory changes in the arena of public warning and notification. These changes are intended to avoid the problems that arose during the TMI accident. This chapter reviews these regulations and suggests an alternative set of criteria for evaluating warning systems. The criteria are used to assess the effectiveness of the warning system at the Ft. St. Vrain nuclear power plant in Colorado. The paper concludes with some discussion of the lessons learned from the TMI experience as they apply to warning systems for all nuclear generating stations

  16. National emergency plan for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    The national emergency plan for nuclear accidents is a plan of action designed to provide a response to accidents involving the release or potential release of radioactive substances into the environment, which could give rise to radiation exposure to the public. The plan outlines the measures which are in place to assess and mitigate the effects of nuclear accidents which might pose a radiological hazard in ireland. It shows how accident management will operate, how technical information and monitoring data will be collected, how public information will be provided and what measures may be taken for the protection of the public in the short and long term. The plan can be integrated with the Department of Defence arrangements for wartime emergencies

  17. CEGB nuclear power stations basic emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    The introduction states that this is a typical emergency plan for a nuclear power station employing about 500 people, having two reactors and a total electrical output of 500 Megawatts in an intensively farmed rural area. The document has the following headings: definitions ('site incident', etc); functions of the site emergency organization; conditions for taking emergency action; persons empowered to declare or cancel a site incident or an emergency; emergency actions by staff; control centres; communication; collaboration with other bodies; warnings; transport; house rules; public information centre. (U.K.)

  18. A prototype nuclear emergency response decision making expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.; Shih, C.; Hong, M.; Yu, W.; Su, M.; Wang, S.

    1990-01-01

    A prototype of emergency response expert system developed for nuclear power plants, has been fulfilled by Institute of Nuclear Energy Research. Key elements that have been implemented for emergency response include radioactive material dispersion assessment, dynamic transportation evacuation assessment, and meteorological parametric forecasting. A network system consists of five 80386 Personal Computers (PCs) has been installed to perform the system functions above. A further project is still continuing to achieve a more complicated and fanciful computer aid integral emergency response expert system

  19. Emergency Preparedness and Response at Nuclear Power Plants in Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, L. A.; Qamar, M. A.; Liaquat, M.R., E-mail: samasl@yahoo.com [Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-10-15

    Emergency preparedness and response arrangements at Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) in Pakistan have been reevaluated in the light of Fukushima Daiichi accident. Appropriate measures have been taken to strengthen and effectively implement the on-site and off-site emergency plans. Verification of these plans is conducted through regulatory review and by witnessing periodic emergency drills and exercises conducted by the NPPs in the fulfilment of the regulatory requirements. Emergency Planning Zones (EPZs) have been revised at NPPs. A multi discipline reserve force has been formed for assistance during severe accidents. Nuclear Emergency Management System (NEMS) has been established at the national level in order to make necessary arrangements for responding to nuclear and radiological emergencies. Training programs for first responders and medical professionals have been launched. Emergencies coordination centres have been established at national and corporate levels. Public awareness program has been initiated to ensure that the surrounding population is provided with appropriate information on emergency planning and response. To share national and international operational experience, Pakistan has arranged various workshops and developed a strong link with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (author)

  20. Study of arcview GIS application in the nuclear power plant emergency response decision support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Peng; Chen Lin; Dong Binjiang

    2003-01-01

    It is very significant to apply the technique of GIS to the development of the Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Decision Support System. On the basis of the software system ArcView. This paper investigate the framework, the function and the development methods of the system. (authors)

  1. Legislation for nuclear disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Shozo

    2012-01-01

    Fukushima nuclear disaster accident clarified problems on nuclear-related legislation and its application. Legislation for nuclear disaster (LNA) could not respond to severe accident because assumed size of accident was not enough. After emergency event corresponding to the article 15 of LNA, was reported by the operator, more than two hours passed by the issuance of Emergency State Declaration. Off-site center could not work at all. This article reviewed outline of LNA and introduced discussion on the reform of legislation and its application. Reform discussion should be focused on swift and effective response readiness to emergency: 1) operator's substantial nuclear emergency drilling, (2) reinforcement of government's headquarters for emergency response, (3) after nuclear emergency, government's headquarters remained to enhance resident's safety from radiation hazard and (4) enactment of nuclear emergency preparedness guidelines for local communities. (T. Tanaka)

  2. Application of Fuzzy Theory to Radiological Emergency Preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Moon Hee; Jeong, Hyo Joon; Kim, Eun Han; Suh, Kyung Suk; Hwang, Won Tae

    2005-01-01

    Emergency preparedness for nuclear facility is considered as an important part for public health and safety. In an emergency, it is not easy to get the information which is needed for the operation of an emergency system. Even though the lack of the information, decision-maker should make an early decision for the public. And the real situation is often not crisp and deterministic. The concept of fuzzy set provides the mathematical formulations which can characterize the uncertain variables in the models related to radiological emergency preparedness. And it provides a method which can describe the characteristics of uncertain variables represented by the fuzzy membership functions, and the effects of distribution can be handled with the fuzzy relation and the fuzzy reasoning. By the application of linguistic variables and fuzzy algorithms, it is possible to provide an approximate and effective tool to describe the system which is too complex or ill defined to use precise mathematical analysis

  3. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme. Publication Date: August 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-15

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  4. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme. Publication Date: August 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  5. Communication in nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozawa, Masao

    1996-01-01

    In order to take protection measures smoothly at the time of emergency in nuclear power stations and others, it is necessary to prepare information communication facilities mutually among disaster prevention organizations including the state and information transmission network for residents in surrounding areas. The matters decided in ''the measures to be taken for the time being for the countermeasures to prevent disaster in nuclear power stations and others'' are shown. In order to avoid the congestion of communication, the exclusively used communication systems are adopted for disaster prevention organizations, in which facsimile is used to transmit graphic information. The data communication circuits for distributing SPEEDI are installed between Science and Technology Agency, Nuclear Power Safety Technology Center and respective prefectures. The routes, means and order of notices must be confirmed beforehand mutually among the related organizations. As to the general communication for disaster countermeasures, the communication systems in ministries and agencies are described. (K.I.)

  6. Comparison of nuclear plant emergency plans of PBNCC members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, W.Y.; Hopwood, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Working Group (NSWG) of the Pacific Basin Nuclear Cooperation Committee initiated cooperation among Pacific Basin areas based primarily around emergency planning. The NSWG conducted a review of the emergency response plans of members. This paper briefly reviews and makes a comparison of the emergency response plans, with particular attention on the response organization, the planning zone, and the protective action guidelines for emergencies. Although all areas have adopted the same basic elements of emergency planning and are similar, there are also variances due to different governmental structures, population densities, and available resources. It is found that the most significant difference is in the size of the emergency planning zone. The paper concludes with a discussion on possible future cooperative activities of the working group. (author)

  7. Generic procedures for medical response during a nuclear or radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this publication is to serve as a practical resource for planning the medical response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. It fulfils in part functions assigned to the IAEA under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), namely, to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. Effective medical response is a necessary component of the overall response to nuclear or radiological (radiation) emergencies. In general, the medical response may represent a difficult challenge for the authorities due to the complexity of the situation, often requiring specialized expertise, and special organizational arrangements and materials. To be effective, adequate planning and preparedness are needed. This manual, if implemented, should help to contribute to coherent international response. The manual provides the practical tools and generic procedures for use by emergency medical personnel during an emergency situation. It also provides guidance to be used at the stage of preparedness for development of medical response capabilities. The manual also addresses mass casualty emergencies resulting from malicious acts involving radioactive material. This part was supported by the Nuclear Security Fund. The manual was developed based on a number of assumptions about national and local capabilities. Therefore, it must be reviewed and revised as part of the planning process to match the potential accidents, threats, local conditions and other unique characteristics of the facility where it may be used

  8. Development of CSA N1600-14: general requirements for nuclear emergency management programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellar, C. [Canadian Standards Association Group, Mississauga, ON (Canada); Coles, J. [Ontario Power Generation, Darlington, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    CSA Group has published a new standard on General requirements for nuclear emergency management programs (CSA N1600-14). The standard establishes criteria for the emergency management programs of on- and off-site organizations to address nuclear emergencies at Canadian nuclear power plants (NPPs). It provides the requirements to develop, implement, evaluate, maintain, and continuously improve a nuclear emergency management program for prevention and mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery from a nuclear emergency at a NPP. This paper discusses the development of the standard, and provides the key drivers, structure, scope, and outline of the standard, while highlighting key features, impacts, and benefits. (author)

  9. Emergency response and nuclear risk governance. Nuclear safety at nuclear power plant accidents; Notfallschutz und Risk Governance. Zur nuklearen Sicherheit bei Kernkraftwerksunfaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlen, Johannes

    2014-07-01

    The present study entitled ''Emergency Response and Nuclear Risk Governance: nuclear safety at nuclear power plant accidents'' deals with issues of the protection of the population and the environment against hazardous radiation (the hazards of nuclear energy) and the harmful effects of radioactivity during nuclear power plant accidents. The aim of this study is to contribute to both the identification and remediation of shortcomings and deficits in the management of severe nuclear accidents like those that occurred at Chernobyl in 1986 and at Fukushima in 2011 as well as to the improvement and harmonization of plans and measures taken on an international level in nuclear emergency management. This thesis is divided into a theoretical part and an empirical part. The theoretical part focuses on embedding the subject in a specifically global governance concept, which includes, as far as Nuclear Risk Governance is concerned, the global governance of nuclear risks. Due to their characteristic features the following governance concepts can be assigned to these risks: Nuclear Safety Governance is related to safety, Nuclear Security Governance to security and NonProliferation Governance to safeguards. The subject of investigation of the present study is as a special case of the Nuclear Safety Governance, the Nuclear Emergency governance, which refers to off-site emergency response. The global impact of nuclear accidents and the concepts of security, safety culture and residual risk are contemplated in this context. The findings (accident sequences, their consequences and implications) from the analyses of two reactor accidents prior to Fukushima (Three Mile Iceland in 1979, Chernobyl in 1986) are examined from a historical analytical perspective and the state of the Nuclear Emergency governance and international cooperation aimed at improving nuclear safety after Chernobyl is portrayed by discussing, among other topics, examples of &apos

  10. Elements of a national emergency response system for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to suggest elements for a general emergency response system, employed at a national level, to detect, evaluate and assess the consequences of a radiological atmospheric release occurring within or outside of national boundaries. These elements are focused on the total aspect of emergency response ranging from providing an initial alarm to a total assessment of the environmental and health effects. Elements of the emergency response system are described in such a way that existing resources can be directly applied if appropriate; if not, newly developed or an expansion of existing resources can be employed. The major thrust of this paper is toward a philosophical discussion and general description of resources that would be required to implementation. If the major features of this proposal system are judged desirable for implementation, then the next level of detail can be added. The philosophy underlying this paper is preparedness - preparedness through planning, awareness and the application of technology. More specifically, it is establishment of reasonable guidelines including the definition of reference and protective action levels for public exposure to accidents involving nuclear material; education of the public, government officials and the news media; and the application of models and measurements coupled to computer systems to address a series of questions related to emergency planning, response and assessment. It is the role of a proven national emergency response system to provide reliable, quality-controlled information to decision makers for the management of environmental crises

  11. NDMA guidelines on management of nuclear and radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abani, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    The National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA), ever since it's formation as an apex policy making body for the country in the field of disaster management, has formulated a set of guidelines to assist the various ministries, states and stakeholders in preparing their plans to handle different types of disasters. The guidelines on management of nuclear and radiological emergencies assume great importance in the present context, as our country has very ambitious programme to exploit nuclear energy for peaceful uses. Though, we have an enviable and impeccable record of safety and virtually fail-safe operations in all our nuclear establishments, the possibility, however, remote it may be, of human error, systems failure, sabotage, earthquake, floods, terrorist attacks etc leading to the release of radioactive material in the public domain, cannot be entirely ruled out. With this view, it was decided to prepare the national guidelines by NDMA to manage any nuclear/radiological emergency in public domain. Through these guidelines, we aim to further strengthen our existing nuclear/radiological emergency management framework and generate public awareness, which will go a long way in allaying misapprehensions, if any, amongst the public about the country's nuclear programme. Like in all our guidelines for handling of different types of the disasters, in these Guidelines also, maximum emphasis has been laid on the prevention of nuclear and radiological emergencies, along with a detailed consideration of all other elements of the disaster management continuum. The national guidelines have been prepared and a consensus was arrived on various issues, after widespread consultations and elaborates discussions amongst experts as well as stakeholders. It is assumed that once these guidelines are implemented by the stakeholders and converted into action plans followed by SOPs that will further reduce the chances of accidents in the nuclear arena. (author)

  12. Change in perception of people towards a nuclear emergency plan for a nuclear power station after being presented

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouzen, Hideharu

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a group interview survey for 24 persons living in urban areas of the Kansai region to understand the change in their perception of information about nuclear emergency plans for nuclear power stations. The participants were given descriptions about a nuclear emergency plan based on plans that had been prepared by the national government and local government. Before hearing the explanation about the nuclear emergency plan, we found that only a few participants were concerned about it, but no one knew the detailed contents. For the question 'Do you think the nuclear emergency plan is being improved after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident?', we found 6 persons among the 24 held opinions saying that the plan was 'improved' or 'somewhat improved'. However, after hearing the explanation and a brief Q and A session about it, 18 persons held opinions saying the plan was 'improved' or 'somewhat improved'. As the reason for such answers, the most common opinion shared by 13 persons was that 'a nuclear emergency plan is being made'. There is a possibility that urban residents had not known the facts about specific disaster prevention plans for each nuclear power station that have been formulated. (author)

  13. Emergency preparedness and response: compensating victims of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, Julia

    2004-01-01

    The 1986 tragedy at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine motivated the entire international nuclear community to ensure that countries would, in the future, be well prepared to manage the physical, psychological and financial consequences of a serious nuclear accident. Since that event, numerous nuclear emergency preparedness and post-emergency management programmes have been established at national and international levels to ensure that appropriate mechanisms will respond to the threat, and the aftermath, of a nuclear accident. The INEX 2000 Workshop on the Indemnification of Nuclear Damage, jointly organised by the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency and the French Government, was the first ever international programme to address the manner in which victims of a nuclear accident with trans-boundary consequences would be compensated for damage suffered before, during and after the accident. The Workshop results revealed striking differences in the compensation principles and practices implemented in the 30 participating countries, in the co-ordination measures between different public authorities within an affected state, and in the co-operative procedures between the accident state and its neighbours. All participants agreed on the need for improvement in these areas, particularly for maintaining public confidence in governments' ability to properly manage nuclear emergencies

  14. Nuclear emergency buildings of Asco and Vandellos II nuclear power plants; Centros alternativos de emergencias de las centrales nucleares de Asco y Vandellos II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massuet, J.; Sabater, J.; Mirallas Esteban, S.

    2016-08-01

    The Nuclear Emergency Buildings sited at Asco and Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) are designed to safety manage emergencies in extreme situations, beyond the design basis of the Nuclear Power Plants. Designed in accordance with the requirements of the Spanish Nuclear Regulator (Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear-CSN) these buildings are ready to operate over a period of 72 hours without external assistance and ensure habitability for crews of 120 and 70 people respectively. This article describes the architectural conception, features and major systems of the Nuclear Emergency Buildings sited at Asco and Vandellos II. (Author)

  15. Small nuclear power reactor emergency electric power supply system reliability comparative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonfietti, Gerson

    2003-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of the reliability of the emergency power supply system, of a small size nuclear power reactor. Three different configurations are investigated and their reliability analyzed. The fault tree method is used as the main tool of analysis. The work includes a bibliographic review of emergency diesel generator reliability and a discussion of the design requirements applicable to emergency electrical systems. The influence of common cause failure influences is considered using the beta factor model. The operator action is considered using human failure probabilities. A parametric analysis shows the strong dependence between the reactor safety and the loss of offsite electric power supply. It is also shown that common cause failures can be a major contributor to the system reliability. (author)

  16. WSPEEDI-II system user's manual for a nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Chika; Sato, Sohei; Muto, Shigeo; Furuno, Akiko; Terada, Hiroaki; Nagai, Haruyasu

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) has developed the response system to evaluate the radiological consequences of an accident on a nuclear power plant or nuclear weapons testing around Japan and to support prediction of radioactive material distributions by using an atmospheric dispersion model on the framework of the Response Assistance Network (RANET) which is established by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). For the enhancement of assistance capability to external organizations at a nuclear or radiological emergency, NEAT will introduce a computer-based emergency response system, 'Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information: WSPEEDI 2nd version (WSPEEDI-II)' developed by Division of Environmental and Radiation Sciences. This manual covers the overview of the system and configuration parameters as the basic knowledge needed for operating the systems. (author)

  17. Nuclear emergency preparedness. Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research Project BOK-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, B.

    2002-01-01

    Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-1. The BOK-1 project, “Nuclear Emergency Preparedness”, was carried out in 1998-2001 with participants from the Nordic and Baltic Sea regions. The project consists of six sub-projects:Laboratory measurements and quality assurance (BOK-1.......1); Mobile measurements and measurement strategies (BOK-1.2); Field measurements and data assimilation (BOK-1.3); Countermeasures in agriculture and forestry (BOK-1.4); Emergency monitoring in theNordic and Baltic Sea countries (BOK-1.5); and Nuclear exercises (BOK-1.6). For each sub-project, the project...

  18. Development of the efficient emergency preparedness system for the nuclear critical infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, V.; Marn, J.; Petelin, S.

    2007-01-01

    The evaluation of the critical nuclear infrastructure vulnerability to threats like human occurrences, terrorist attacks and natural disasters and the preparation of emergency response plans with the estimation of optimized costs are of the vital importance for the assurance of a safe nuclear facilities operation and the national security. In the past national emergency systems did not include vulnerability assessments of the critical nuclear infrastructure as the important part of the comprehensive preparedness framework. The fundamental aims of the efficient emergency preparedness and response system are to provide a sustained emergency readiness and to prevent an emergency situation and accidents. But when an event happens the mission is to mitigate consequences and to protect the people and environment against the nuclear and radiological damage. The efficient emergency response system, which would be activated in the case of the nuclear and/or radiological emergency and release of the radioactivity to the environment, is an important element of a comprehensive system of the nuclear and radiation safety. In the article the new methodology for the critical nuclear infrastructure vulnerability assessment as a missing part of an efficient emergency preparedness system is presented. It can help the overall national energy sectors to identify and better understand the terrorist threats and vulnerabilities of their critical infrastructure. The presented methodology could also facilitate national agencies to develop and implement a vulnerability awareness and education programs for their critical assets to enhance the security, reliability and safe operation of the whole energy infrastructure. The vulnerability assessment methodology will also assist nuclear power plants to develop, validate, and disseminate the assessment and survey of new efficient countermeasures. The significant benefits of the new vulnerability assessment research are to increase nuclear power

  19. The Emergency Action Plan of the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council (CSN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvin Cuarteto, M.; Camarma, J. R.; Martin Calvarro, J. M

    2007-01-01

    The Spanish Nuclear safety Council (CSN) has assigned by law among others the function to coordinate the measures of support and answer to nuclear emergency situations for all the aspects related with nuclear safety and radiological protection. Integrating and coordinating the different organisations public and private companies whose aid is necessary for the fulfilment of the functions attributed to the Regulatory Body. In order to suitable perform this function, CSN has equipped itself with an Emergency Action Plan that structures the response organization, establishes responsibility levels, incorporates basic performance procedures and includes capabilities to face the nuclear and radiological emergencies considering the external supports, resulting from the collaboration agreements with public institutions and private companies. To accomplish the above mentioned Emergency Action Plan, CSN has established and implanted a formation and training and re-training program for the organization response for emergencies and has update an operative centre (Emergency Room called Salem), equipped with infrastructures, tools and communication and operative systems that incorporate the more advanced technologies available to date. (Author)

  20. The IAEAs incident and emergency centre: the global focal point for nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buglova, E.

    2016-08-01

    The continuous use of nuclear power to generate electricity and the continued threat of radioactive materials being used for nefarious reasons reminds us of the importance to stay prepared to respond to nuclear or radiological emergencies. Stringent nuclear safety and nuclear security requirements, the training of personnel, operational checks and legal frameworks cannot always prevent radiation-related emergencies. Though these events can range in severity, each has the potential to cause harm to the public, employees, patients, property and the environment. Until the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, there was no international information exchange system. Immediately following that accident, the international community negotiated the so-called Emergency Conventions to ensure that the country suffering an accident with an international transboundary release of radioactive material would issue timely, authenticated information, while the States that could field technical support, would do so in a coordinated fashion. The Conventions also place specific legal obligations on the International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA) with regard to emergency preparedness and response. (Author)

  1. Nuclear emergency planning in Spain. The PLABEN review project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentijo Lentijo, J. C.; Vila Pena, M.

    2002-01-01

    The international rules and recommendations for nuclear emergency planning and the Spanish experience gained in the management of event with radiological risk have noticed that is necessary to review the planning radiological bases for emergencies in nuclear power plants and to define the planning radiological bases for radiological emergencies that could happen in radioactive facilities or in activities out of the regulatory framework. The paper focuses on CSN actions concerning the Plaben review project related to define the new radiological principles taking into account the current international recommendations for interventions, make a proposal about the organisation and operation of the provincial radiological action group and the national support level for radiological emergency response. (Author) 7 refs

  2. Applications of Nuclear Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, Anna C.

    2017-01-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that und...

  3. Development of incident progress prediction technologies for nuclear emergency preparedness. Current status and future subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Yamamoto, Yasunori; Kusunoki, Takayoshi; Kawasaki, Ikuo; Yanagi, Chihiro; Kinoshita, Ikuo; Iwasaki, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear licensees are required to maintain a prediction system during normal condition for using a nuclear emergency by the Basic Plan for Disaster Prevention of government. With prediction of the incident progress, if the present condition of nuclear power plant is understood appropriately and it grows more serious with keeping the present situation, it is in predicting what kind of situation will be occurred in the near future, choosing the effective countermeasures against the coming threat, and understanding the time available of intervention time. Following the accident on September 30 1999 in the nuclear fuel fabrication facility in Tokai Village of Ibaraki Prefecture, the Institute of Nuclear Safety System started development of incident progress prediction technologies for nuclear emergency preparedness. We have performed technical applications and made improvements in nuclear emergency exercises and verified the developed systems using the observed values of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. As a result, our developed Incident Progress Prediction System was applied to nuclear emergency exercises and we accumulated knowledge and experience by which we improved the system to make predictions more rapidly and more precisely, including for example, the development of a prediction method for leak size of reactor coolant. On the other hand, if a rapidly progressing incident occurs, since end users need simple and quick predictions about the public's protection and evacuation areas, we developed the Radioactive Materials Release, Radiation Dose and Radiological Protection Area Prediction System which changed solving an inverse problem into a forward problem solution. In view of the water-level-decline incident of the spent fuel storage facility at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, the spent fuel storage facility water level and the water temperature evaluation tool were improved. Such incident progress prediction technologies were

  4. Safety assessment of emergency electric power systems for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    This paper is intended to assist the safety assessor within a regulatory body, or one working as a consultant, in assessing a given design of the Emergency Electrical Power System. Those non-electric power systems which may be used in a plant design to serve as emergency energy sources are addressed only in their general safety aspects. The paper thus relates closely to Safety Series 50-SG-D7 ''Emergency Power Systems at Nuclear Power Plants'' (1982), as far as it addresses emergency electric power systems. Several aspects are dealt with: the information the assessor may expect from the applicant to fulfill his task of safety review; the main questions the reviewer has to answer in order to determine the compliance with requirements of the NUSS documents; the national or international standards which give further guidance on a certain system or piece of equipment; comments and suggestions which may help to judge a variety of possible solutions

  5. Concept for the Emergency Protection in the Vicinity of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    In 1991, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (HSK) issued a concept of the regulations for the cloud phase 1 of an nuclear power plant accident in Switzerland valid at that time in co-operation with the Federal Commission for AC Protection (KOMAC) and the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Commission (KSA). This concept replaced the version of 1977, which then formed the basis for emergency preparedness in Switzerland. Legal changes, such as the civil protection legislation and the ordinance on the distribution of iodine tablets to the population, as well as experience gained from the emergency exercises necessitated a revision of the existing concept. The present concept is issued by the Federal Commission for AC Protection (KOMAC) and deals with all phases of an accident sequence in a Swiss nuclear power plant focussing on the pre- and cloud phase. It also gives an overview of responsibilities and alert procedures for accidents at foreign nuclear power plants and other nuclear installations, as well as of accidents in connection with transportation of radioactive materials. The concept is designed to help the federal and cantonal authorities in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in charge of emergency protection in preparing their emergency procedure specifications, and in the realisation of the readiness for emergencies. Furthermore, it shall serve the cantons as a guideline for the preparation of emergency specifications for the communities. The concept is based on the assumption that the executive bodies and emergency forces provided for the general civil protection are employed in case of an accident at a nuclear power plant. (authors)

  6. Planning of emergency medical treatment in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Tomoko

    1989-01-01

    Medical staffs and health physicists have shown deep concerning at the emergency plans of nuclear power plants after the TMI nuclear accident. The most important and basic countermeasure for accidents was preparing appropriate and concrete organization and plans for treatment. We have planed emergency medical treatment for radiation workers in a nuclear power plant institute. The emergency medical treatment at institute consisted of two stages, that is on-site emergency treatment at facility medical service. In first step of planning in each stage, we selected and treatment at facility medical service. In first step of planning in each stage, we selected and analyzed all possible accidents in the institute and discussed on practical treatments for some possible accidents. The manuals of concrete procedure of emergency treatment for some accidents were prepared following discussion and facilities and equipment for medical treatment and decontamination were provided. All workers in the institute had periodical training and drilling of on-site emergency treatment and mastered technique of first aid. Decontamination and operation rooms were provided in the facillity medical service. The main functions at the facility medical service have been carried out by industrial nurses. Industrial nurses have been in close co-operation with radiation safety officers and medical doctors in regional hospital. (author)

  7. Brief on nuclear emergency planning and preparedness in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Ontario has an excellent conceptual plan to ensure the safety of its inhabitants in the event of a nuclear accident anywhere in the world. This plan still needs to be translated into tangible preparedness to deal with such an emergency. The province is confident that, with the assistance of Ontario Hydro, a high level of nuclear emergency preparedness will soon be established for the people of the province

  8. Study of developing nuclear fabrication facility's integrated emergency response manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taeh Yeong; Cho, Nam Chan; Han, Seung Hoon; Moon, Jong Han; Lee, Jin Hang; Min, Guem Young; Han, Ji Ah

    2016-01-01

    Public begin to pay attention to emergency management. Thus, public's consensus on having high level of emergency management system up to advanced country's is reached. In this social atmosphere, manual is considered as key factor to prevent accident or secure business continuity. Therefore, we first define possible crisis at KEPCO Nuclear Fuel (hereinafter KNF) and also make a 'Reaction List' for each crisis situation at the view of information-design. To achieve it, we analyze several country's crisis response manual and then derive component, indicate duties and roles at the information-design point of view. From this, we suggested guideline to make 'Integrated emergency response manual(IERM)'. The manual we used before have following few problems; difficult to applicate at the site, difficult to deliver information. To complement these problems, we searched manual elements from the view of information-design. As a result, we develop administrative manual. Although, this manual could be thought as fragmentary manual because it confined specific several agency/organization and disaster type

  9. Nuclear plant analyzer development and analysis applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laats, E.T.

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) is being developed as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) state of the art safety analysis and engineering tool to address key nuclear plant safety issues. The NPA integrates the NRC's computerized reactor behavior simulation codes such as RELAP5 and TRAC-BWR, both of which are well-developed computer graphics programs, and large repositories of reactor design and experimental data. Utilizing the complex reactor behavior codes as well as the experiment data repositories enables simulation applications of the NPA that are generally not possible with more simplistic, less mechanistic reactor behavior codes. These latter codes are used in training simulators or with other NPA-type software packages and are limited to displaying calculated data only. This paper describes four applications of the NPA in assisting reactor safety analyses. Two analyses evaluated reactor operating procedures, during off-normal operation, for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and a boiling water reactor (BWR), respectively. The third analysis was performed in support of a reactor safety experiment conducted in the Semiscale facility. The final application demonstrated the usefulness of atmospheric dispersion computer codes for site emergency planning purposes. An overview of the NPA and how it supported these analyses are the topics of this paper

  10. Implementation of new policy and principles of harmonisation of nuclear emergency preparedness in conditions of emergency Response Centre of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janko, K.; Zatlkajova, H.; Sladek, V.

    2003-01-01

    With respect to Chernobyl accident the changes in understanding of nuclear emergency preparedness have initiated a developing process resulting in an effective enhancement of conditions ensuring adequate response to nuclear or radiological accidents of emergency situations in many countries. The Slovak Nuclear Regulatory Authority (UJD) in frame of co-operations with IAEA, EC, OECD/NEA and other international organisations has actively participated in this challenging work targeting implementation of international experience and best practices in the country. The new international policy (principles declared e.g. in 'Memorandum of Understanding', IAEA, Vienna, 1997) based on experiences propagating importance of regional co-operation, harmonised approach and clear strategy for protective measures implementation in case of a nuclear or radiological accident has influenced the development also in Slovakia. The implementation process in the country was supported by changes in legal conditions regulating peaceful use of nuclear energy [1,2] including basic rules for emergency preparedness published in the second half of 1990 years. The principles of emergency preparedness in Slovakia fully support regional harmonisation and co-operation. Effective implementation of international practice and sharing of experience substantially contributed to the level of emergency response in the country and to the harmonisation of emergency response preparedness creating also conditions for an efficient regional integration. (authors)

  11. Nuclear threats and emergency preparedness in Finland; Ydinuhkat ja varautuminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustonen, R; Aaltonen, H; Laaksonen, J; Lahtinen, J; Rantavaara, A; Reponen, H; Rytoemaa, T; Suomela, M; Toivonen, H; Varjoranta, T

    1995-10-01

    The political and economic upheavals which have taken place in Eastern Europe have had an impact on radiation and nuclear safety throughout Europe. Emergency preparedness systems for unexpected nuclear events have been developed further in all European countries, and prosperous western nations have invested in improving the safety of East European nuclear power plants. The economic crisis facing countries of the former Soviet Union has also promoted illicit trade in nuclear materials; this has made it necessary for various border guards and police authorities to intensify their collaboration and to tighten border controls. On 3-4 October 1995, Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) arranged a seminar on nuclear threats and emergency preparedness in Finland. In addition to STUK experts, a wide range of rescue and civil defence authorities, environmental health specialists and other persons engaged in emergency preparedness attended the seminar. The publication contains a compilation of reports presented at the seminar. The reports cover a broad spectrum of nuclear threats analyzed at STUK, the impacts of radioactive fallout on human beings and on the environment, and preparedness systems by which the harmful effects of radiation or nuclear accidents can, if necessary, be minimized. (33 figs., 5 tabs.).

  12. A study on emergency preparedness for nuclear power plant/ Establishment of emergency communication network system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y. K.; Jung, Y. D.; Kim, S. Y.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an emergency database search system for nuclear power plants during nuclear incidents / accidents. Image data reported from nuclear power plants to the regulatory body and other related data will be stored systematically in the computer. The data will be utilized during nuclear emergency to prevent the accident from spreading out and to minimize its effect. It will also be used in exchanging information on accident or incidents with the foreign countries. The operational documents in the Kori-4 nuclear power plant are used as the major source for the categorization and analysis in performing this research. It was not easy to access the detailed operational data due to its unique characteric for the security. Therefore, we strongly suggest to increase manpower for this project in Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) and archive involvement from Korea Electric Power Company to establish better database retrieval system

  13. A study on emergency preparedness for nuclear power plant/ Establishment of emergency communication network system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y K; Jung, Y D; Kim, S Y [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-12-15

    The objective of this study was to develop an emergency database search system for nuclear power plants during nuclear incidents / accidents. Image data reported from nuclear power plants to the regulatory body and other related data will be stored systematically in the computer. The data will be utilized during nuclear emergency to prevent the accident from spreading out and to minimize its effect. It will also be used in exchanging information on accident or incidents with the foreign countries. The operational documents in the Kori-4 nuclear power plant are used as the major source for the categorization and analysis in performing this research. It was not easy to access the detailed operational data due to its unique characteric for the security. Therefore, we strongly suggest to increase manpower for this project in Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) and archive involvement from Korea Electric Power Company to establish better database retrieval system.

  14. Guidelines for attendance and registration for radiological emergencies of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Today in Brazil the use of nuclear energy is becoming an usual practice in various activities. Thus, must be a matter of great weight, directions for attendance and registration for radiological emergencies or nuclear accidents. This work shows the planning elaborated by the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (Brazilian CNEN) for nuclear plants, aiming avoid the injurious effects from the ionizing radiation exposure, radionuclides release or the direct or indirect exposure of ionizing radiation, that proceeding from a radiological emergencies or a nuclear accidents. (J.A.M.M.)

  15. Measuring strategy of Support Centre RIVM for nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruppers, M.J.M.; Smetsers, R.C.G.M.

    1994-11-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in April 1986 and its consequences were reason for the Dutch government to evaluate and improve the facilities and the preparedness for nuclear emergency management in the Netherlands. The results of the evaluation have been elaborated in operational terms in the National Plan for Nuclear Emergency Planning and Response (EPR). During an accident with radioactive material the Technical Information Group (TIG) coordinates the measuring activities of the so-called Support Centres. According to the EPR, measuring activities of Support Centre RIVM are focussed on the collection and processing of data on emissions, concentrations, depositions and radiation doses from soil and air. This report describes the measuring strategy of RIVM for nuclear emergencies. The measuring strategy and the measuring plan, the latter deduced from the measuring strategy, concentrate on explicit answers to the following central questions: what has to be measured, by whom, where, when and how, and why? The demands of the TIG and the specification of tasks and operational facilities of Support Centre RIVM are considered as starting-points, limiting conditions and constraints for the measuring strategy. These items are converted to explicit choices for the measuring strategy and the default measuring plan. This report further includes a list of contacts of Support Centre RIVM with other (research) institutes, inside and outside the Netherlands, which may be relevant during a nuclear emergency. 3 figs., 2 tabs., 22 refs

  16. Plan for national nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The responsibility for Denmark's preparedness for nuclear emergencies lies with the Ministry of the Interior and the Civil Defense administration. The latter is particularly responsible for the presented plan which clarifies the organization and the measures to be taken in order to protect the public where, in the event of such an emergency, it could be in danger of radiation from radioactive materials. The main specifications of the plan, the activation of which covers the whole country, are that daily monitoring should be carried out so that warnings of nuclear accidents can be immediately conveyed to the relevant parties and that immediate action can be taken. These actions should result in the best possible protection against nuclear radiation so that acute and chronic damage to the health of members of the public can be restricted. The public, and relevant authorities should be informed of the situation and it should be attempted to regulate the reactions of individuals and of the society in general in such a way that damage to health, or social and economical conditions, can be restricted as much as possible. Denmark has not itself any atomic power plants, but some are located in neighbour countries and there are other sources such as nuclear research reactors, passing nuclear-driven ships etc. The detailed plan also covers possible sources of radiation, the nature of related damage to health, international cooperation, legal aspects, and a very detailed description of the overall administration and of the responsibilities of the organizations involved. (AB)

  17. Emergency plans for civil nuclear installations in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronow, W.S.

    1984-01-01

    The operators of nuclear installations in the United Kingdom have plans to deal with accidents or emergencies at their nuclear sites. These plans provide for any necessary action, both on and off the nuclear site, to protect members of the public and are regularly exercised. The off-site actions involve the emergency services and other authorities which may be called upon to implement measures to protect the public in any civil emergency. In a recent review of these plans by Government Departments and agencies and the nuclear site operators, a number of possible improvements were identified. These improvements are concerned mainly with the provisions made for liaison with local and national authorities and for public information and have been incorporated into existing plans. An outline is given of the most likely consequences of an accidental release of radioactive material and the scope of emergency plans. Details are also provided on the responsibilities and functions of the operator and other organizations with duties under the plans and the arrangements made for public information. (author)

  18. 76 FR 75771 - Emergency Planning Guidance for Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Guidance for Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Issuance of NUREG... Support of Nuclear Power Plants;'' NSIR/DPR-ISG-01, ``Interim Staff Guidance Emergency Planning for Nuclear Power Plants;'' and NUREG/CR-7002, ``Criteria for Development of Evacuation Time Estimate Studies...

  19. Applications of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission nuclear plant analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laats, E.T.

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) is being developed as the US NRC's state of the art safety analysis and engineering tool to address key nuclear plant safety issues. The NPA integrates the NRC's computerized reactor behavior codes such as RELAP5 and TRAC-BWR, both of which are well-developed computer graphics programs and large repositories of reactor design and experimental data. Utilizing these complex reactor behavior codes, as well as the experiment data repositories, enables simulation applications of the NPA that are generally not possible with more simplistic, less mechanistic reactor behavior codes used in training simulators or with simulators that are limited to displaying calculated data only. This paper describes four applications of the NPA simulation capabilities in assisting reactor safety analyses. Two analyses evaluated reactor operating procedures, during off-normal operation, for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and a boiling water reactor (BWR), respectively. The third analysis was performed in support of a reactor safety experiment conducted in the Semiscale facility. The final application demonstrated the usefulness of atmospheric dispersion computer codes for site emergency planning purposes. An overview of the NPA simulation capabilities and how it supported these analyses are the topics of this paper

  20. Nuclear emergency preparedness. Final report of the Nordic nuclear safety research project BOK-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, Bent [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2002-02-01

    Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-1. The BOK-1 project, 'Nuclear Emergency Preparedness', was carried out in 1998-2001 with participants from the Nordic and Baltic Sea regions. The project consists of six sub-projects: Laboratory measurements and quality assurance (BOK-1.1); Mobile measurements and measurement strategies (BOK-1.2); Field measurement and data assimilation (BOK-1.3); Countermeasures in agriculture and forestry (BOK-1.4); Emergency monitoring in the Nordic and Baltic Sea countries (BOK-1.5); and Nuclear exercises (BOK-1.6). For each sub-project, the project outline, objectives and organization are described and main results presented. (au)

  1. Nuclear emergency preparedness. Final report of the Nordic nuclear safety research project BOK-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, Bent

    2002-02-01

    Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-1. The BOK-1 project, 'Nuclear Emergency Preparedness', was carried out in 1998-2001 with participants from the Nordic and Baltic Sea regions. The project consists of six sub-projects: Laboratory measurements and quality assurance (BOK-1.1); Mobile measurements and measurement strategies (BOK-1.2); Field measurement and data assimilation (BOK-1.3); Countermeasures in agriculture and forestry (BOK-1.4); Emergency monitoring in the Nordic and Baltic Sea countries (BOK-1.5); and Nuclear exercises (BOK-1.6). For each sub-project, the project outline, objectives and organization are described and main results presented. (au)

  2. Some issues on nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear emergency preparedness and response have comprehensively been developed over ten years in China. In order to promote the sound development of emergency preparedness and response, it is useful to retrospect the process of emergency preparedness and response, to summarize the experiences and absorb the experiences from foreign countries. The main issues are as follows: 1) The preparedness and response to nuclear and radiological accident is basically the same as the response to any accident involving hazardous material. 2) The classification of emergency planning, not only for nuclear facilities, but also irradiation installation, etc. 3) The hazard assessment-- a top priority. 4) The emergency planning zones. 5) Psychological impact

  3. Police procedures in civil nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, F.H.

    1989-01-01

    The responsibilities of the police in the event of a nuclear emergency are summarized. Preparation and planning is needed with site operators and other organisations who would also be involved in the event of an accident. Several points in particular are discussed; shelter and evacuation, the issue of potassium iodate tablets, protection of police officers, the police involvement in the operation support centres, public education and further discussion on the integration and development of the organisation of emergency procedures. (U.K.)

  4. International nuclear emergency exercises: lessons learned from the I.N.E.X. series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahier, B.

    2008-01-01

    Since the early 1990's, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has offered its member countries a forum for improving efficiency and effectiveness in nuclear emergency management, with a particular focus on international aspects. A central approach to this has been the International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (INEXI series. Since 1993, the INEX series has proved successful in testing and advancing arrangements for nuclear emergency response. INEX 1, 2 and 2000, which focused on early-phase issues, provided a unique forum to test arrangements and concepts for international nuclear emergency management, particularly international communications, coordination and decision-making. Importantly, these exercises established a recognised international nuclear emergency exercise culture. The most recent exercise, INEX 3, was developed in response to international interest in longer term post-emergency issues. Conducted in 2005-2006, INEX 3 focused on later-phase consequence management issues following discovery of serious radio-logical contamination in the environment. The post-exercise evaluation identified several aspects of national consequence management which would benefit from international cooperation, and to which the international community could usefully contribute as part of planning and preparedness. (author)

  5. High-risk facilities. Emergency management in nuclear, chemical and hazardous waste facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloepfer, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The book on emergency management in high-risk facilities covers the following topics: Change in the nuclear policy, risk management of high-risk facilities as a constitutional problem - emergency management in nuclear facilities, operational mechanisms of risk control in nuclear facilities, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for nuclear facilities, operational mechanism of the risk control in chemical plants, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for chemical facilities, operational mechanisms of the risk control in hazardous waste facilities, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for hazardous waste facilities, civil law consequences in case of accidents in high-risk facilities, criminal prosecution in case of accidents in high-risk facilities, safety margins as site risk for emission protection facilities, national emergency management - strategic emergency management structures, warning and self-protection of the public in case of CBRN hazards including aspects of the psych-social emergency management.

  6. Semantic Technologies for Nuclear Knowledge Modelling and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraha, D.; Gladyshev, M.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA has been engaged in working with Member States to preserve and enhance nuclear knowledge, and in supporting wide dissemination of safety related technical and technological information enhancing nuclear safety. The knowledge organization systems (ontologies, taxonomies, thesauri, etc.) provide one of the means to model and structure a given knowledge domain. The significance of knowledge organization systems (KOS) has been greatly enhanced by the evolution of the semantic technologies, enabling machines to “understand” the concepts described in a KOS, and to use them in a variety of applications. Over recent years semantic technologies have emerged as efficient means to improve access to information and knowledge. The Semantic Web Standards play an important role in creating an infrastructure of interoperable data sources based on principles of Linked Data. The status of utilizing semantic technologies in the nuclear domain is shortly reviewed, noting that such technologies are in their early stage of adoption, and considering some aspects which are specific to nuclear knowledge management. Several areas are described where semantic technologies are already deployed, and other areas are indicated where applications based on semantic technologies will have a strong impact on nuclear knowledge management in the near future. (author

  7. Nuclear emergency planning and response in the Netherlands after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, L.J.W.M.; Kerkhoven, I.P.

    1989-01-01

    After Chernobyl an extensive project on nuclear emergency planning and response was started in the Netherlands. The objective of this project was to develop a (governmental) structure to cope with accidents with radioactive materials, that can threaten the Dutch community and neighbouring countries. The project has resulted in a new organizational structure for nuclear emergency response, that differs on major points from the existing plans and procedures. In this paper an outline of the new structure is given. Emphasis is placed on accidents with nuclear power plants

  8. R and D strategy on remote response technology for emergency situations of nuclear facilities in KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kyung Min; Cho, Jae Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Eom, Heung Seup; Seo, Yong Chil; Shin, Hoch Ul; Lee, Sung Uk; Kim, Chang Hoi; Jeong, Seung Ho; Kim, Seung Ho

    2012-01-01

    Generally speaking, robotic technologies are anticipated to be very useful for hazardous works in nuclear facilities because robotic systems are relatively immune to radiation exposure. But the application of robotic systems for such environments has not been increasing during past 20 years. Applying highly reliable and conservative 'defense in depth' concepts in the design and construction of NPPs, there is very little probability of accidents occurring or radioactive materials being released into the environments. As a precaution, however NPPs are prepared with emergency response procedures and routinely conduct exercises for post accident circumstances based on these procedures. The last year's accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant promotes the needs for remote response technologies based on mobile robotic system to recognize the internal status and mitigate the unanticipated events of nuclear power plants in emergency situations. For initial observation of reactor buildings two robots named 'PackBot' were used because the internal conditions were unknown so as to allow human workers for entrance into the reactor building. But there were severe limitations for the robots to perform the given tasks from various obstacles and poor visibility inside though they provided crucial information such as views of internal structures, dose level and temperature that supported the decision for human worker's entrance. The application of robots for emergency response tasks for post accidents in nuclear facilities is not a new concept. Robots were sent to recover the damaged reactor at Chernobyl where human workers could have received a lifetime dose of radiation in minutes. Based on NRC's TMI 2 Cleanup Program, several robots were built in the 1980s to help gather information and remove debris from a reactor at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant that partially melted down in 1979. A robot was used for several years equipped with various tools allowing

  9. R and D strategy on remote response technology for emergency situations of nuclear facilities in KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyung Min; Cho, Jae Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Eom, Heung Seup; Seo, Yong Chil; Shin, Hoch Ul; Lee, Sung Uk; Kim, Chang Hoi; Jeong, Seung Ho; Kim, Seung Ho [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Generally speaking, robotic technologies are anticipated to be very useful for hazardous works in nuclear facilities because robotic systems are relatively immune to radiation exposure. But the application of robotic systems for such environments has not been increasing during past 20 years. Applying highly reliable and conservative 'defense in depth' concepts in the design and construction of NPPs, there is very little probability of accidents occurring or radioactive materials being released into the environments. As a precaution, however NPPs are prepared with emergency response procedures and routinely conduct exercises for post accident circumstances based on these procedures. The last year's accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant promotes the needs for remote response technologies based on mobile robotic system to recognize the internal status and mitigate the unanticipated events of nuclear power plants in emergency situations. For initial observation of reactor buildings two robots named 'PackBot' were used because the internal conditions were unknown so as to allow human workers for entrance into the reactor building. But there were severe limitations for the robots to perform the given tasks from various obstacles and poor visibility inside though they provided crucial information such as views of internal structures, dose level and temperature that supported the decision for human worker's entrance. The application of robots for emergency response tasks for post accidents in nuclear facilities is not a new concept. Robots were sent to recover the damaged reactor at Chernobyl where human workers could have received a lifetime dose of radiation in minutes. Based on NRC's TMI 2 Cleanup Program, several robots were built in the 1980s to help gather information and remove debris from a reactor at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant that partially melted down in 1979. A robot was used for several years

  10. Applications of nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A. C.

    2017-02-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.

  11. Applications of nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Lastly, each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.

  12. Basic principles for intervention after a nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Per Hedemann Jensen

    1996-01-01

    The current status of internationally agreed principles for intervention after a nuclear accident or radiological emergency and the international development of intervention guidance since the Chernobyl accident are reviewed. The experience gained after the Chernobyl accident indicates that the international advice on intervention existing at the time of the Chernobyl accident was not fully understood by decision makers neither in Western Europe nor in the former USSR and that the guidance failed to address adequately the difficult social problems which can arise after a serious nuclear accident. The radiation protection philosophy of today distinguishes between practices and interventions. The radiological protection system of intervention includes justification of the protective action and optimization of the level of protection achieved by that action. Dose limits do not apply in intervention situations. The inputs to justification and optimization studies include factors that are related to radiological protection, whereas the final decisions on introduction of countermeasures would also depend on other factors. The basic principles for intervention as recommended by international organisations are discussed in detail and the application of the principles on a generic basis is illustrated for long-term protective actions. The concepts of intervention level, operational intervention level and action level are presented and the relation between these quantities is illustrated. The numerical guidance on intervention in a nuclear accident or radiological emergency or a chronic exposure situation given by ICRP, IAEA and in the Basic Safety Standards is presented. (author)

  13. The optimization of nuclear power plants operation modes in emergency situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrebayev, A. M.; Trifonenkov, A. V.; Ramazanov, R. N.

    2018-01-01

    An emergency situations resulting in the necessity for temporary reactor trip may occur at the nuclear power plant while normal operating mode. The paper deals with some of the operation c aspects of nuclear power plant operation in emergency situations and during threatened period. The xenon poisoning causes limitations on the variety of statements of the problem of calculating characteristics of a set of optimal reactor power off controls. The article show a possibility and feasibility of new sets of optimization tasks for the operation of nuclear power plants under conditions of xenon poisoning in emergency circumstances.

  14. An emergency response centre (ERC) for the preparedness and response to nuclear and radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.; Abani, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the requirement for a state of the art Emergency Response Centre (ERC) to be developed and kept in readiness for the quick response to any nuclear or radiological emergencies. For an effective response to any major nuclear emergency an ERC having the facilities of i) environmental dose rate monitoring network established using both mobile and fixed units ii) on-line meteorological data collection and information station iii) on-line computation and prediction of isodose curves in real time and iv) properly developed and tested monitoring methodologies are essential. Vehicles with on-line data transfer facility to the ERC and equipped with different type of monitoring systems can function as Mobile Monitoring Laboratories (MMLs) and can help in quick decision making even during a radiological emergency far away from the ERC. (author)

  15. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme. Publication Date: June 2013 (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  16. Nuclear emergency response exercises and decision support systems - integrating domestic experience with international reference systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavnicu, D.S.; Vamanu, D.V.; Gheorghiu, D.; Acasandrei, V.T.; Slavnicu, E.

    2010-01-01

    The paper glosses on the experience of a research-oriented team routinely involved in emergency preparedness and response management activities, with the assimilation, implementation, and application of decision support systems (DSS) of continental reference in Europe, and the development of supportive, domestic radiological assessment tools. Two exemplary nuclear alert exercises are discussed, along with solutions that emerged during drill planning and execution, to make decision support tools of various origins and strength to work synergistically and complement each other. (authors)

  17. Experience and lessons learned from emergency disposal of Fukushima nuclear power station accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiegu; Zhen Bei; Yang Xiaoming; Chen Xiaohua

    2012-01-01

    After Fukushima nuclear accident, we visited the related medical aid agencies for nuclear accidents and conducted investigations in disaster-affected areas in Japan. This article summarizes the problems with emergency disposal of Fukushima nuclear accident while disclosing problems should be solved during the emergency force construction for nuclear accidents. (authors)

  18. Enhancing nuclear emergency response through international co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugletveit, F.; Aaltonen, H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A large number of different national plans and procedures have been established and substantial resources allocated world wide with varying comprehensiveness and quality depending an the national requirements and the possible threat scenarios considered. These national plans are only to a small degree harmonized. It is clear that it is the responsibility of the authorities in the respective countries or utilities under their jurisdiction, to decide upon and implement appropriate response actions to a nuclear emergency. The basic needs for responding properly are: infrastructure in terms of plans, procedures etc.; information regarding the accident, its development and consequences; resources in terms of expertise, man power and tools for acquiring and processing information, making assessments and decisions and carry out the actions. When a large number of countries are making assessments and decisions for their own country and providing the public with information, it is important that assessments, decisions and public information become correct, complete and consistent across boarders. In order to achieve this, they should all have access to the same information as basis for their actions. Lack of information or wrong information could easily lead to wrong assessments, wrong decisions and misleading information to the public. If there is a serious nuclear emergency somewhere that could potentially affect several or many States in one way or another, 'everyone' would like to know 'everything' that happens 'everywhere'. In this case, all States should have the obligation to share with the international community the relevant information they have available themselves and that could be of interest for other States responding to the situation. During a serious nuclear or radiological emergency, the demand for different kinds of resources is huge and could, in many countries, probably exceed national capabilities. Looking at the situation in a global

  19. Emerging nuclear energy systems: Economic challenge: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Future nuclear energy systems may achieve substantially lower energy costs than those of existing fossil energy systems and comparable capital costs. Such low cost nuclear energy would provide a strong economic incentive to minimize the use of fossil fuels. If these low cost nuclear energy systems emerge in the next few decades, 21st century civilization may be able to avert potentially disastrous CO 2 induced global climate changes. 12 refs., 1 fig

  20. Off-site nuclear emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miska, H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Urgent protective measures for the possibly affected population are the main items to be addressed here, that means actions to be planned and taken in the pre-release and release phase of a nuclear accident. Since we will focus an off-site nuclear emergency management, the utility or licensee only plays a subordinate role, but nevertheless may be the potential cause of all actions. At the other end, there is the possible affected population, the environment, and also economic values. Emergency preparedness and response aims at minimizing adverse effects from the power plant to the values to protect. In the early phase of an accident under consideration here, prompt and sharp actions are necessary to ensure efficacy. On the other hand, the available information on the situation is most limited in this phase such that pre-determined actions based on simple criteria are indispensable. The responsibility for early response actions normally rest with a regional authority which may have some county administrations at subordinate level. The leader of the regional staff has to decide upon protective measures to be implemented at county or municipal level; thus, coherence of the response is ensured at least at a regional level. The decision will be governed at the one side by the existing or predicted radiological situation, on the other side an practical limitations like availability of teams and means. The radiological situation has to be assessed by an advisory team that compiles all information from the utility, the weather conditions, and monitoring results. While the staff leader is experienced through response to major non-nuclear events, the advisors mainly come from the environmental side, having no experience in taking swift decisions in an emergency, but are used to control and prevent. This might be the source of conflicts as observed in several exercises. The radiation protection advisors collect information from the utility, especially about time

  1. Conceptual design of the national nuclear emergency management information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xingyu; Shi Zhongqi

    2003-01-01

    A Conceptual Design of the National Nuclear Emergency Management Information System was brought forward in this paper, based on the summarization of some emergency management information systems used in China and some other countries. The conceptual system should have four basic characteristics, that are (1) a graphic displaying and querying interface based on GIS (2) data and results shared with the assessment software of nuclear accident (3) a complete set of databases and (4) the capability of on-line data receiving or real-time distributing of the commands and information for emergency response

  2. Emergency Response Resources guide for nuclear power plant emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    On August 28 and September 18, 1990, the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, Gulf States Utilities, five local parishes, six Federal agencies, and the American Nuclear Insurers participated in a post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. One of the products developed from that experience was this guide for understanding the responsibilities and obtaining resources for specific needs from the various participants, particularly from those organizations within the Federal Government. This first revision of that guide broadens the focus of the original document. Also, new information defines the major Federal response facilities. This guide should assist State and local government organizations with identifying and obtaining those resources for the post-emergency response when their resources have been exhausted

  3. Training to the Nuclear emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera Navascues, I.

    2003-01-01

    In 1994 the Civil Protection Directorate outlined a formation plan related to the Nuclear emergency plans with the purpose of guaranteeing for the communities involved in this material a basic and homogeneous formation. In the preparation of this Plan the following phases had been developed: 1. Study of formative needs of the different participant communities involved in nuclear plans. This has been done throw the information collected by: nuclear emergency plans and procedures that develop them, questionnaires, observation list, exercise, drills, etc. 2. With all the needs detected and in function of them was designed the objectives to teach in relation with the knowledge and the abilities that the formation can give to the participants. 3. Definition of thematic areas related with the different matters to teach, derived from the different objectives. 4. Organization: The development of the formative activities through a specific material with orientations for the professors (content of material to impart, didactic resources, etc.) and a short summary of the Didactic Units imparted to the students. The methodology is based in short theoretical classes and in the active implication through practice activities exercises and drills to train its functions and the coordination of the different implied organizations. 5. Evaluation: the implantation of the formation plan contributes new formative needs. (Author)

  4. Laser applications in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murnick, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    A large fraction of the International Workshop on Hyperfine Interactions was devoted to various aspects of 'laser applications in nuclear physics'. This panel discussion took place before all of the relevant formal presentations on the subject were complete. Nevertheless, there had been sufficient discussions for the significance of this emerging area of hyperfine interaction research to be made clear. An attempt was made to identify critical and controversial aspects of the subject in order to critically evaluate past successes and indicate important future directions of research. Each of the panelists made a short statement on one phase of laser-nuclear physics research, which was followed by general discussions with the other panelists and the audience. In this report, a few areas which were not covered in the formal presentations are summarized: extensions of laser spectroscopy to shorter lifetimes; extension of laser techniques to nuclei far off stability; interpretation of laser spectroscopic data; sensitivity and spectral resolution; polarized beams and targets. (Auth.)

  5. Method for Developing a Communication Strategy and Plan for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response. Publication Date: July 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical resource for emergency planning in the area of public communication in the development of a radiation emergency communication plan (RECP). The term 'public communication' is defined as any activity that communicates information to the public and the media during a nuclear or radiological emergency. To avoid confusion, the term public communication has been used in this publication rather than public information, which may be used in other IAEA publications and documents to ensure consistency with the terminology used in describing the command and control system. This publication also aims to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(11) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research with regard to the response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. This publication is intended to provide guidance to national and local authorities on developing an RECP which incorporates the specific functions, arrangements and capabilities that will be required for public communication during a nuclear or radiological emergency. The two main features of this publication are the template provided to develop an RECP and detailed guidance on developing a communication strategy for emergency preparedness and response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The template is consistent with the outline of the national radiation emergency plan proposed in Method for Developing Arrangements for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (EPR-Method 2003). This publication is part of the IAEA

  6. Strategic aspects of nuclear and radiological emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahier, B.

    2010-01-01

    Emergency situations demand that actions be taken by responsible organisations in a timely and effective manner to mitigate consequences for the population, infrastructure and the environment, and to support the return of affected areas to normal social and economic activity to the extent possible. To deliver an effective response over the emergency management time-line, it is necessary to make, maintain and exercise adequate plans and arrangements in advance of an emergency situation. These must contain appropriate elements and resources for preparedness, response and assistance to identified threats, recognize and include all implicated partners, and take account of international interfaces. Effective management of complex emergency situations that can lead to a wide range of consequences and involve multiple organisations at the local, national and international levels also requires anticipation of the range of decision-making needs, an understanding of the interactions between response organisations and a model for their co-ordination. Experience from managing emergency situations has shown that the integration of these factors into emergency preparedness and response arrangements should be based on a guiding strategic vision. Emergency response is a dynamic process that develops in time from a situation of little information to one of potentially overwhelming information. Within this context, emergency response organisations must be able to respond in an appropriate and timely manner at any point along the emergency management time-line. This will be facilitated by an overarching framework to guide the decision-making process. To contribute to work in this area, the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) Working Party on Nuclear Emergency Matters (WPNEM) reviewed its collective experience to extract key themes that could form a strategy for improving decision-making in emergency management. This focused on the NEA International Nuclear

  7. Relation between source term and emergency planning for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Zhongqi; Yang Ling

    1992-01-01

    Some background information of the severe accidents and source terms related to the nuclear power plant emergency planning are presented. The new source term information in NUREG-0956 and NUREG-1150, and possible changes in emergency planning requirements in U.S.A. are briefly provided. It is suggested that a principle is used in selecting source terms for establishing the emergency planning policy and a method is used in determining the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) size in China. Based on the research results of (1) EPZ size of PWR nuclear power plants being built in China, and (2) impact of reactor size and selected source terms on the EPZ size, it is concluded that the suggested principle and the method are suitable and feasible for PWR nuclear power plants in China

  8. Nuclear regulatory policy concept on safety, security, safeguards and emergency preparedness (3S+EP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyas, Zurias

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory Policy is formulated in regulations that stipulate the assurance of workers and public safety and environmental protection. Legislation and regulations on nuclear energy should consider nuclear safety, security and safeguards, as well as nuclear emergency preparedness (3S+EP) and liability for nuclear damage. Specific requirements stipulated in international conventions and agreements should also be taken into account. Regulatory Policy is formulated in regulations that stipulate the assurance of workers and public safety and environmental protection. Legislation and regulations on nuclear energy should consider nuclear safety, security and safeguards, as well as nuclear emergency preparedness (3S+EP) and liability for nuclear damage. Specific requirements stipulated in international conventions and agreements should also be taken into account. By undertaking proper regulatory oversight on Safety, Security and Emergency Preparedness (3S+EP) as an integrated and comprehensive system, safe and secure use of nuclear energy can be assured. Licence requirements and conditions should fulfil regulatory requirements pertaining to 3S+EP for nuclear installation as an integrated system. An effective emergency capacity that can be immediately mobilized is important. The capacity in protecting the personnel before, during and after the disaster should also be planned. Thus, proper emergency preparedness should be supported by adequate resources. The interface between safety, security, safeguards and emergency preparedness has to be set forth in nuclear regulations, such as regulatory requirements; 3S+EP; components, systems and structures of nuclear installations and human resources. Licensing regulations should stipulate, among others, DIQ, installations security system, safety analysis report, emergency preparedness requirements and necessary human resources that meet the 3S+EP requirements.

  9. The systematics of emerging nuclear energy concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, A.A.; Ligou, J.

    1980-01-01

    The basic systematics pertaining to emerging nuclear energy concepts are examined from a historical and categorical perspective. For this purpose a complementary formulation of the interdependence of the vital fission-fusion-acceleration processes is established and then developed to accommodate explicitly recent developments for advanced synergetic nuclear energy proposals. The papers presented at the conference which form these proceeding are shown to integrate well and thus ecluidate the generalized systematics of this formulation. (orig.) [de

  10. Emergency power systems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This Guide applies to nuclear power plants for which the total power supply comprises normal power supply (which is electric) and emergency power supply (which may be electric or a combination of electric and non-electric). In its present form the Guide provides general guidance for all types of emergency power systems (EPS) - electric and non-electric, and specific guidance (see Appendix A) on the design principles and the features of the emergency electric power system (EEPS). Future editions will include a second appendix giving specific guidance on non-electric power systems. Section 3 of this Safety Guide covers information on considerations that should be taken into account relative to the electric grid, the transmission lines, the on-site electrical supply system, and other alternative power sources, in order to provide high overall reliability of the power supply to the EPS. Since the nuclear power plant operator does not usually control off-site facilities, the discussion of methods of improving off-site reliability does not include requirements for facilities not under the operator's control. Sections 4 to 11 of this Guide provide information, recommendations and requirements that would apply to any emergency power system, be it electric or non-electric

  11. Critical examination of emergency plans for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catsaros, Nicolas.

    1986-08-01

    An analysis of emergency plans of various countries for nuclear installations on- and off-site emergency preparedness is presented. The analysis is focused on the off-site organization and countermeasures to protect public health and safety. A critical examination of the different approaches is performed and recommendations for effectiveness improvement and optimization are formulated. (author)

  12. Radiological aerial monitoring in a nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyeongki; Kim, Juyoul; Jung, Gunhyo

    2008-01-01

    Since North Korea announced the underground nuclear test on last October 9th, 2006, many countries around the world have worried about the atmospheric dispersion and pollution of radioactive materials crossing the border by the clandestine nuclear test. After that time, verifying the existence of nuclear test by detecting radioactive materials such as xenon, I-131, and Cs-134 at the early stage of radiological emergency, locating the position of test site by backward trajectory analysis, and chasing the moving path of airborne radionuclide have been heavily issued. And collection of airborne radioactivity and gamma radiation monitoring technology using an aircraft have been recently examined by an authority concerned in South Korea. Although various techniques of radiological aerial monitoring have been developed and operated around the world, the relevant technical development or research is still required. In order to decide potential measuring location and time within the framework of radiological monitoring system, we use HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model developed by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of U.S. Department of Commerce. The model is validated and assessed against North Korea's nuclear test. Calculation results of radionuclide trajectory show a good agreement with measured values. Backward trajectory analysis is useful to track the radiological source term, possible time and place of nuclear accidents and/or activities. Nationwide early warning system using aircraft and atmospheric dispersion model can help a nearly real-time forecasting and warning in preparation for radiological emergencies. (author)

  13. National radiological emergency response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dela Rosa, Alumanda M.

    2011-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear power plant accident occurred on March 11, 2011, when two natural disasters of unprecedented strengths, an earthquake with magnitude 9 followed one hour later by a powerful tsunami struck northeastern Japan and felled the external power supply and the emergency diesel generators of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, resulting in a loss of coolant accident. There were core meltdowns in three nuclear reactors with the release of radioactivity estimated to be 1/10 of what was released to the environment during the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in April 1986. The Fukushima nuclear accident tested the capability of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) and the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) in responding to such radiological emergency as a nuclear power plant accident. The PNRI and NDRRMC activated the RADPLAN for possible radiological emergency. The emergency response was calibrated to the status of the nuclear reactors on site and the environmental monitoring undertaken around the site and off-site, including the marine environment. This orchestrated effort enabled the PNRI and the national agencies concerned to reassure the public that the nuclear accident does not have a significant impact on the Philippines, both on the health and safety of the people and on the safety of the environment. National actions taken during the accident will be presented. The role played by the International Atomic Energy Agency as the central UN agency for nuclear matters will be discussed. (author)

  14. Method for Developing a Communication Strategy and Plan for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical resource for emergency planning in the area of public communication in the development of a radiation emergency communication plan (RECP). The term 'public communication' is defined as any activity that communicates information to the public and the media during a nuclear or radiological emergency. To avoid confusion, the term public communication has been used in this publication rather than public information, which may be used in other IAEA publications and documents to ensure consistency with the terminology used in describing the command and control system. This publication also aims to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(11) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research with regard to the response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. This publication is intended to provide guidance to national and local authorities on developing an RECP which incorporates the specific functions, arrangements and capabilities that will be required for public communication during a nuclear or radiological emergency. The two main features of this publication are the template provided to develop an RECP and detailed guidance on developing a communication strategy for emergency preparedness and response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The template is consistent with the outline of the national radiation emergency plan proposed in Method for Developing Arrangements for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (EPR-Method 2003). This publication is part of the IAEA

  15. 54 countries and 5 international organizations join in a worldwide exercise in nuclear emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    As part of ongoing international cooperation to deal with possible nuclear emergencies, on 22-23 May 2001, an extensive international nuclear emergency exercise will be carried out at the Gravelines NPP. The main objectives of the exercise are to test existing national and international procedures and arrangements for responding to nuclear emergency, co-ordinate the release of information and assess the effectiveness of advisory and decision making mechanism. The IAEA has specific responsibilities under two international conventions related to emergencies involving ionizing radiation - the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency

  16. PREFACE: EPS Euroconference XIX Nuclear Physics Divisional Conference: New Trends in Nuclear Physics Applications and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    It was with great pleasure that the Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics of the University of Pavia and the INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) Structure of Pavia organised the XIX Nuclear Physics Divisional Conference of the European Physical Society, which was held in the historical buildings of the University of Pavia from 5-9 September 2005. The Conference was devoted to the discussion of the most recent experimental and theoretical achievements in the field of Nuclear Physics applications, as well as of the latest developments in technological tools related to Nuclear Physics research. The University of Pavia has a long tradition in Physics and in Applied Physics, being the site where Alessandro Volta developed his "pila", the precursor of the modern battery. This is the place where the first experiments with electricity were conducted and where the term "capacitance" used for capacitors was invented. Today the University hosts a Triga Mark II nuclear reactor, which is used by the Departments of the University of Pavia and by other Universities and private companies as well. Moreover, Pavia is the site selected for the construction of the CNAO complex "Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica" (National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy), planned for 2005-2008 which represents a unique facility in Italy and will be among the first complexes of this type in Europe. The Conference has gathered together experts in various fields from different countries and has been the occasion to review the present status and to discuss the new emerging trends in Nuclear Physics and its applications to multidisciplinary researches and the development of new technologies. The following topics were treated: Nuclear Techniques in Medicine and Life Sciences (Cancer Therapy, new Imaging and Diagnostics Tools, Radioisotope production, Radiation Protection and Dosimetry). Applications of Nuclear Techniques in Art, Archaeometry and other Interdisciplinary fields

  17. Major issues on establishing an emergency plan in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhu-zhou

    1988-03-01

    Several major issues on emergency planning and preparation in nuclear facilities were discussed -- such as the importance of emergency planning and preparation, basic principles of intervention and implementation of emergency plan and emergency training and drills to insure the effectiveness of the emergency plan. It is emphasized that the major key point of emergency planning and response is to avoid the occurrence of serious nonrandom effect. 12 refs., 3 tabs

  18. Improved nuclear emergency management system reflecting lessons learned from the emergency response at Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station after the Great East Japan Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Shinichi; Narabayashi, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Three nuclear reactors at Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station lost all their ultimate heat sinks owing to damage from the tsunami caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011. Water was injected into the reactors by alternate measures, damaged cooling systems were restored with promptly supplied substitute materials, and all the reactors were brought to a cold shutdown state within four days. Lessons learned from this experience were identified to improve emergency management, especially in the areas of strategic response planning, logistics, and functions supporting response activities continuing over a long period. It was found that continuous planning activities reflecting information from plant parameters and response action results were important, and that relevant functions in emergency response organizations should be integrated. Logistics were handled successfully but many difficulties were experienced. Therefore, their functions should be clearly established and improved by emergency response organizations. Supporting emergency responders in the aspects of their physical and mental conditions was important for sustaining continuous response. As a platform for improvement, the concept of the Incident Command System was applied for the first time to a nuclear emergency management system, with specific improvement ideas such as a phased approach in response planning and common operation pictures. (author)

  19. Preparation of site emergency preparedness plans for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    Safety of public, occupational workers and the protection of environment should be assured while activities for economic and social progress are pursued. These activities include the establishment and utilisation of nuclear facilities and use of radioactive sources. This safety guidelines is issued as a lead document to facilitate preparation of specific site manuals by the responsible organisation for emergency response plans at each site to ensure their preparedness to meet any eventuality due to site emergency in order to mitigate its consequences on the health and safety of site personnel. It takes cognizance of an earlier AERB publications on the subject: Safety manual on site emergency plan on nuclear installations. AERB/SM/NISD-1, 1986 and also takes into consideration the urgent need for promoting public awareness and drawing up revised emergency response plans, which has come about in a significant manner after the accidents at Chernobyl and Bhopal

  20. Nuclear emergency protection. Today and tomorrow; Nuklearer Notfallschutz. Heute und morgen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buettner, Jens Uwe [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Koeln (Germany). Abt. Strahlenschutz; Flury, Christoph [Bundesamt fuer Bevoelkerungsschutz BABS, Bern (Switzerland). Eidgenoessisches Departement fuer Verteidigung Bevoelkerungsschutz und Sport VBS; Gellermann, Rainer [Nuclear Control and Consulting GmbH, Braunschweig (Germany); and others

    2016-07-01

    The state of affairs of the nuclear emergency protection at accidents in connection with the use of nuclear power, at incidents with dangerous radiation sources as well as in case of criminal use of radioactive substances is presented. Moreover, the organization and the responsibilities as well as the preparation and realization of emergency training are considered and commented.

  1. Cooperation in Nuclear Waste Management, Radiation Protection, Emergency Preparedness, Reactor Safety and Nuclear Non-Proliferation in Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dassen, Lars van; Delalic, Zlatan; Ekblad, Christer; Keyser, Peter; Turner, Roland; Rosengaard, Ulf; German, Olga; Grapengiesser, Sten; Andersson, Sarmite; Sandberg, Viviana; Olsson, Kjell; Stenberg, Tor

    2009-10-01

    Global Partnership and the UNSC Resolution 1540. However, this is only partially true as there is a growing realisation that radiation protection as well as emergency preparedness is part and parcel of the objectives that the international community is striving towards. Some of the projects have a genuinely humanitarian or civilian nature in the sense that they aim at alleviating for instance natural radiation such as from radon. But on the other hand, certain activities that concern radiation protection in terms of reducing the emissions of radiation from radioactive materials also become a security component with regard to the physical protection measures that in most cases will have to be in place. The projects in this field are implemented in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus. There are a total of 22 projects in the field of radiation protection and emergency preparedness. In the field of nuclear non-proliferation and security, the geographical scope of SSM's activities is broad and stretching beyond the nearest parts of Russia and other neighbouring states. This has to do with the fact that the spread of nuclear weapons, materials and technologies relies on human will and therefore an amount of irradiated nuclear fuel in Siberia may be just as dangerous as a similar or smaller amount much closer to Sweden. It all depends on the people involved and their intentions. Sweden cooperates with Russia, Ukraine, Georgia and Armenia in this particular field. The projects include the installation of physical protection at facilities with nuclear and radioactive materials; the application of safeguards or nuclear materials accountancy on nuclear materials; assistance to the improvement of national export control systems as well as education in the field of nuclear non-proliferation. SSM participates in a number of projects that are financed by the EU. The projects were initiated in the framework of TACIS and soon to be formulated in the framework of INSC. TACIS focussed on the

  2. Cooperation in Nuclear Waste Management, Radiation Protection, Emergency Preparedness, Reactor Safety and Nuclear Non-Proliferation in Eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dassen, Lars van; Delalic, Zlatan; Ekblad, Christer; Keyser, Peter; Turner, Roland; Rosengaard, Ulf; German, Olga; Grapengiesser, Sten; Andersson, Sarmite; Sandberg, Viviana; Olsson, Kjell; Stenberg, Tor

    2009-10-15

    foreseen by for instance the Global Partnership and the UNSC Resolution 1540. However, this is only partially true as there is a growing realisation that radiation protection as well as emergency preparedness is part and parcel of the objectives that the international community is striving towards. Some of the projects have a genuinely humanitarian or civilian nature in the sense that they aim at alleviating for instance natural radiation such as from radon. But on the other hand, certain activities that concern radiation protection in terms of reducing the emissions of radiation from radioactive materials also become a security component with regard to the physical protection measures that in most cases will have to be in place. The projects in this field are implemented in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus. There are a total of 22 projects in the field of radiation protection and emergency preparedness. In the field of nuclear non-proliferation and security, the geographical scope of SSM's activities is broad and stretching beyond the nearest parts of Russia and other neighbouring states. This has to do with the fact that the spread of nuclear weapons, materials and technologies relies on human will and therefore an amount of irradiated nuclear fuel in Siberia may be just as dangerous as a similar or smaller amount much closer to Sweden. It all depends on the people involved and their intentions. Sweden cooperates with Russia, Ukraine, Georgia and Armenia in this particular field. The projects include the installation of physical protection at facilities with nuclear and radioactive materials; the application of safeguards or nuclear materials accountancy on nuclear materials; assistance to the improvement of national export control systems as well as education in the field of nuclear non-proliferation. SSM participates in a number of projects that are financed by the EU. The projects were initiated in the framework of TACIS and soon to be formulated in the framework of

  3. Development of graphic display program of reactor operating parameters for emergency exercise at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Yasunori; Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Gotou, Kazuko

    2001-01-01

    A scenario of nuclear emergency exercise based on the result of accident progress analysis is expected to ensure effective training. Thereupon a new graphic display program for reactor operating parameters has been developed to present real-time of plant process values (parameters), released radioactivities from the plant, and dose rate data around the site calculated by using the accident analysis code MAAP4 and other codes. This system has a trend graph screen displaying reactor operating parameters, an environmental dose rate summary screen indicating dose rate distribution around the site on the map, and a plant parameters summary screen showing important plant parameters on a simplified plant system diagram. One screen can be switched to another any time. It also has a jump-function easily accessing any stage during the exercise scenario in accordance with progress of the exercise. As a result of the application of this system to a real nuclear emergency exercise, it has been verified that this system is quite useful for confirming the parameters when the nuclear emergency exercise starts and the licensee reports the plant conditions to related bodied. (author)

  4. Development of graphic display program of reactor operating parameters for emergency exercise at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, Yasunori; Yoshida, Yoshitaka [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan); Gotou, Kazuko [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    A scenario of nuclear emergency exercise based on the result of accident progress analysis is expected to ensure effective training. Thereupon a new graphic display program for reactor operating parameters has been developed to present real-time of plant process values (parameters), released radioactivities from the plant, and dose rate data around the site calculated by using the accident analysis code MAAP4 and other codes. This system has a trend graph screen displaying reactor operating parameters, an environmental dose rate summary screen indicating dose rate distribution around the site on the map, and a plant parameters summary screen showing important plant parameters on a simplified plant system diagram. One screen can be switched to another any time. It also has a jump-function easily accessing any stage during the exercise scenario in accordance with progress of the exercise. As a result of the application of this system to a real nuclear emergency exercise, it has been verified that this system is quite useful for confirming the parameters when the nuclear emergency exercise starts and the licensee reports the plant conditions to related bodied. (author)

  5. Learning, innovation and communication: evolving dynamics of a nuclear emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadros, Andre Luiz Lopes

    2014-01-01

    The technological development inherent to modern societies has placed human beings in situations of choice from a wide variety of possible risks. As a way to protect people and the environment, actions need to be developed in order to reduce possible consequences of the materialisation of these risks. The thermonuclear power generation demand planning in order to prepare answers to possible emergency situations, as even being considered of low probability of occurrence, when they happen have a significant impact on populations and regions of its surroundings. Considering the relevance of this issue, this thesis aimed to identify and analyze the dynamics of preparedness and response to emergency situations in a Nuclear Power Plant, trying to understand its evolution over the time and systematizing it, considering the actors involved, processes of organizational learning, innovation and risk communication, considered as crucial for the development and improvement of emergency plans. Concerning preparedness and response to possible emergency situations in this nuclear plant, it was possible not only to confirm the importance of the three processes studied, but also observe that they can be treated and evaluated in an integrated and systematic way. So, it was presented a model that aims to facilitate the understanding of this perspective and enhance the importance of participation and cooperation between all stakeholders (organizations and the local population) within a socio-participatory perspective. To this end, this exploratory research sought for evidences in documents, participation in planning meetings, direct observation of the general exercises of the CNAAA External Emergency Plan of 2013, interviews with some of the actors involved and through the application of a questionnaire among the population of the Praia Vermelha, in Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro. (author)

  6. Planning and exercise experiences related to an off-site nuclear emergency in Canada: the federal component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The Canadian Government's Federal Nuclear Emergency Response Plan (off-site) (FNERP) was issued in 1984. In this plan, a nuclear emergency is defined as an emergency involving the release of radionuclides but does not include the use of nuclear weapons against North America. Because of the federal nature of Canada and its large area, special considerations are required for the plan to cover both the response to nuclear emergencies where the national government has primary responsibility and to provincial requests for assistance where the federal response becomes secondary to the provincial. The nuclear emergencies requiring the implementation of this plan are: (a) an accident in the nuclear energy cycle in Canada with off-site implications; (b) an accident in the nuclear energy cycle in another country which may affect Canada; (c) nuclear weapons testing with off-site implications which may affect Canada; and (d) nuclear-powered devices impacting on Canadian territory. Each emergency requires a separate sub-plan and usually requires different organizations to respond. Some scenarios are described. The Department of National Health and Welfare has established a Federal Nuclear Emergency Control Centre (FNECC). The FNECC participated in September 1985 in an exercise involving a nuclear reactor facility in the Province of Ontario and the experience gained from this activity is presented. The FNECC co-operates with its counterparts in the United States of America through a nuclear emergency information system and this network is also described. (author)

  7. Peaceful applications of nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, L.B.

    1975-12-01

    The intension of this report is to give a survey of the field of peaceful applications of nuclear explosions. As an introduction some examples of possibilities of application are given together with a simple description of nuclear explosions under ground. After a summary of what has been done and will be done in this field nationally and internationally, a short discussion of advantages and problems with peaceful application of nuclear explosions follows. The risks of spreading nuclear weapons due to this applications are also touched before the report is finished with an attempt to judge the future development in this field. (M.S.)

  8. Scenario guidance handbook for emergency-preparedness exercises at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughlin, G.J.; Martin, G.F.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1983-01-01

    As part of the Emergency Preparedness Implementation Appraisal Program conducted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with the technical assistance of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), emergency preparedness exercises are observed on an annual basis at all licensed reactor facilities. One of the significant findings to arise from these observations was that a large number of the commonly observed problems originated in the design of the scenarios used as a basis for each exercise. In an effort to help eliminate some of these problems a scenario guidance handbook has been generated by PNL for the NRC to assist nuclear power plant licensees in developing scenarios for emergency preparedness exercises

  9. Reliability of emergency ac power systems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battle, R.E.; Campbell, D.J.

    1983-07-01

    Reliability of emergency onsite ac power systems at nuclear power plants has been questioned within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) because of the number of diesel generator failures reported by nuclear plant licensees and the reactor core damage that could result from diesel failure during an emergency. This report contains the results of a reliability analysis of the onsite ac power system, and it uses the results of a separate analysis of offsite power systems to calculate the expected frequency of station blackout. Included is a design and operating experience review. Eighteen plants representative of typical onsite ac power systems and ten generic designs were selected to be modeled by fault trees. Operating experience data were collected from the NRC files and from nuclear plant licensee responses to a questionnaire sent out for this project

  10. Reliability of the emergency AC power system at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battle, R.E.; Campbell, D.J.; Baranowsky, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    The reliability of the emergency ac power systems typical of most nuclear power plants was estimated, and the cost and increase in reliability for several improvements were estimated. Fault trees were constructed based on a detailed design review of the emergency ac power systems of 18 nuclear plants. The failure probabilities used in the fault trees were calculated from extensive historical data collected from Licensee Event Reports (LERs) and from operating experience information obtained from nuclear plant licensees. No one or two improvements can be made at all plants to significantly increase the industry-average emergency ac power system reliability; rather the most beneficial improvements are varied and plant specific. Improvements in reliability and the associated costs are estimated using plant specific designs and failure probabilities

  11. Annual report of Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center. April 1, 2008 - March 31, 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamori, Masashi; Hashimoto, Kazuichiro; Terunuma, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Takeshi; Ohmura, Akiko; Terakado, Naoya; Nagakura, Tomohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Watanabe, Fumitaka; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Abe, Minako; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Sumiya, Akihiro; Matsusaka, Masaru

    2009-09-01

    When a nuclear emergency occurs in Japan, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) provides technical support to the National government, local governments, police, fire station and license holder etc. They are Designated Public Organizations conforming to the Basic Law on Emergency Preparedness and the Basic Plan for Disaster Countermeasures. The Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) of JAEA provides a comprehensive range of technical support activities to an Off-Site Center in case of a nuclear emergency. Specifically, NEAT gives technical advice and information, provides for the dispatch of specialist as required, supplies emergency equipments and materials to the Joint Council of Nuclear Disaster Countermeasures, which meets at the Off-Site Center. NEAT provide various lectures and training course concerning nuclear disaster prevention for those personnel taking an active part in emergency response organizations at normal time. And NEAT researches on nuclear disaster prevention and also cooperate with international organizations. This annual report summarized the activities of JAEA/NEAT in the fiscal year 2008. (author)

  12. Emergency planning and response: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knuth, D.; Boyd, R.

    1981-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has formed a Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee to assess the implications of the recommendations contained in the President's Commission Report on the Three Mile Island (TMI) Accident (the Kemeny Commission report) that are applicable to DOE's nuclear reactor operations. Thirteen DOE nuclear reactors have been reviewed. The assessments of the 13 facilities are based on information provided by the individual operator organizations and/or cognizant DOE Field Offices. Additional clarifying information was supplied in some, but not all, instances. This report indicates how these 13 reactor facilities measure up in light of the Kemeny and other TMI-related studies and recommendations, particularly those that have resulted in upgraded Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements in the area of emergency planning and response

  13. Emergency procedures of nuclear power plants-Evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atalla, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    During the TMI event the operators had some difficulties to accurately diagnose the accident, causing delay to recover the plant, and allowing the conditions to deteriorate. Further analysis concluded that the plant emergency procedures were incomplete, and did not cover the possibility of multiple and simultaneous failures. This paper covers a new approach for developing emergency procedures to create a new general strategy by providing valid instructions for all kinds of possible incidents in a nuclear power plant. (author) [pt

  14. Generic Procedures for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency at Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The IAEA publishes the Emergency Preparedness and Response Series to fulfil that function. This publication is part of that series. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency, contains the following requirement: 'To ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene...'. The IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(53)/RES/10, continues to encourage Member States '...to enhance, where necessary, their own preparedness and response capabilities for nuclear and radiological incidents and emergencies, by improving capabilities to prevent accidents, to respond to emergencies and to mitigate any harmful consequences...'. This publication is intended to assist Member States meet the requirements of GS-R-2 and enhance their preparedness by providing guidance on the response by facility personnel to emergencies at research reactor facilities.

  15. Province of Ontario nuclear emergency plan part V - Chalk River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The aim of Part 5 of the Provincial Nuclear Emergency Plan is to describe the measures that shall be undertaken to deal with a nuclear emergency caused by the Chalk River Laboratories. This plan deals mainly with actions at the Provincial level and shall by supplemented by the appropriate Municipal Plan. The Townships of Rolph, Buchanan, Wylie, and McKay, the Town of Deep River and the Village of Chalk River are the designated municipalities with respect to CRL. 2 tabs., 5 figs

  16. Province of Ontario nuclear emergency plan part V - Chalk River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-10-01

    The aim of Part 5 of the Provincial Nuclear Emergency Plan is to describe the measures that shall be undertaken to deal with a nuclear emergency caused by the Chalk River Laboratories. This plan deals mainly with actions at the Provincial level and shall by supplemented by the appropriate Municipal Plan. The Townships of Rolph, Buchanan, Wylie, and McKay, the Town of Deep River and the Village of Chalk River are the designated municipalities with respect to CRL. 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  17. Nuclear battery materials and application of nuclear batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Shaochang; Lu Zhenming; Fu Xiaoming; Liang Tongxiang

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear battery has lots of advantages such as small volume, longevity, environal stability and so on, therefore, it was widely used in aerospace, deep-sea, polar region, heart pacemaker, micro-electromotor and other fields etc. The application of nuclear battery and the development of its materials promote each other. In this paper the development and the latest research progress of nuclear battery materials has been introduced from the view of radioisotope, electric energy conversion and encapsulation. And the current and potential applications of the nuclear battery are also summarized. (authors)

  18. Preparation, conduct and evaluation of exercises to test preparedness for a nuclear or radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this publication is to serve as a practical tool for the preparation, conduct and evaluation of exercises to test preparedness for response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. It fulfils in part the functions assigned to the IAEA under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), namely, to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning the methodologies, techniques and available results of research on such emergencies. To ensure effective response to radiation emergencies when needed, provisions should be made for regular training of emergency response personnel. As stated in Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (Safety Requirements, Safety Standard Series No. GS-R-2), 'The operator and the response organizations shall make arrangements for the selection of personnel and training to ensure that the personnel have the requisite knowledge, skills, abilities, equipment, procedures and other arrangements to perform their assigned response functions'. A further requirement is that 'Exercise programmes shall be conducted to ensure that all specified functions required to be performed for emergency response and all organizational interfaces for facilities in threat category I, II or III and the national level programmes for threat category IV or V are tested at suitable intervals'. In 2004 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(48)/RES/10 encouraged Member States to 'implement the Safety Requirements for Preparedness and Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency'. This document is published as part of the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series to assist in meeting these requirements and to fulfil Article 5 of the Assistance Convention. It was developed based on a number of assumptions about national and local capabilities. Therefore, the exercise structure, terms and scenarios must be

  19. Basic concept of the nuclear emergency preparedness and response in Japan after the accident of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station. The plain explanation for regional officials and emergency workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Sohei; Yamamoto, Kazuya

    2013-07-01

    After the accident of TEPCO's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station occurred on March 11, 2011, actions for controlling the accident and protective actions for the residents like evacuation were taken. In parallel with this, it has been developed to reform the nuclear regulatory systems and the emergency preparedness and response systems in Japan. Especially the Nuclear Regulation Authority's Nuclear Emergency Preparedness and Response Guidelines were adopted with the introducing the basic concepts and the criteria on the basis of the IAEA's safety standards and differed greatly from the prior guidelines. Thus the arrangement of emergency response systems, resources and the operational procedures will be developed complying with according to the guidelines in municipalities around the nuclear power station sites. This work attempts to provide a plain explanation as possible for the regional officials and emergency workers about the basic concepts of the new guidelines. (author)

  20. Reliability of the emergency ac-power system at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battle, R.E.; Campbell, D.J.; Baranowsky, P.W.

    1982-01-01

    The reliability of the emergency ac-power systems typical of several nuclear power plants was estimated, the costs of several possible improvements was estimated. Fault trees were constructed based on a detailed design review of the emergency ac-power systems of 18 nuclear plants. The failure probabilities used in the fault trees were calculated from extensive historical data collected from Licensee Event Reports (LERs) and from operating experience information obtained from nuclear plant licensees. It was found that there are not one or two improvements that can be made at all plants to significantly increase the industry-average emergency ac-power-system reliability, but the improvements are varied and plant-specific. Estimates of the improvements in reliability and the associated cost are estimated using plant-specific designs and failure probabilities

  1. Emerging nuclear security issues for transit countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabulov, I.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Tragic events of September eleventh have made nuclear terrorism dangers more evident. In the light of increased terrorism preventing the spread of nuclear and nuclear related items as well as radioactive materials that can be used for production so-called 'dirty bomb'is an urgent global claim. Nuclear Security issues cover multiple aspects of the security and first of all the threat from nuclear terrorism, detection and protection of illicit trafficking of nuclear materials and other radioactive sources, legal shipment of such type materials as well as nuclear related dual use items. In the face of emerging threats the prevention of proliferation by the development of effective national system of nuclear export controls is hugely important for transit countries like Azerbaijan with underdeveloped export controls and strategic locations along trade and smuggling routes between nuclear suppliers States and countries attempting to develop nuclear weapons or any nuclear explosive devices. Thus, in the face of increasing international threat from nuclear terrorism the role and place of Azerbaijan Republic in the struggle against terrorism increases. In this context it is very important to establish effective national capabilities for detection and prevention of illicit trafficking of radioactive and nuclear materials as well as nuclear related dual use items across Azerbaijan's borders. One of the ways for enhancing and strengthening existing activities in this field is carrying out joint actions between scientists and enforcement officials in order to improve knowledge of the front-line customs and border guard inspectors concerning multiple aspects of Nuclear Security

  2. Nuclear radiation application to nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakarvarti, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    Out of the numerous uses and applications of nuclear radiation, in particular heavy ions, the interaction of radiation with materials have culminated into a gamut of fine tools and technologies for taming the synergetic potential of the interaction. One such field of the immense importance is nanotechnology through nuclear radiation via use of ion-crafted polymeric membranes- so called 'Template Synthesis'. This talk will be addressed to the users of membranes - organic (polymeric) in general, formed through irradiation of polymeric foils with heavy and energetic ions followed by chemical processing leading finally to what is known as 'Track Etch Membranes (TEMs)', and present the review of the innovative uses of these membranes from filtration to electro-kinetic based applications and nano-/micro fabrication of devices- the potent aspect of emerging technologies. The emphasis would be on the dependence of useful and novel usages including applications in nano devices' fabrication. A membrane, with its most comprehensive and clear definition, is an intervening phase separating two phases and/or acting as an active or passive barrier to the transport of matter between phases. The very existence of a membrane relies upon the functionality domain of the pores contained therein. The geometrical traits and morphology of the pore ensembles dictate the applications, which any membrane can serve to. There are variety of membranes being developed and used in myriad of applications in diverse fields of science and technology. The range of commercially available membrane materials is quiet diverse and varies widely in terms of composition, and physical structure. The creation of pores, whether through natural self-assembling phenomenon or man-made processes, might itself be an issue of interest but these are the pore-traits which are fundamentally more important, whether the membrane is being used for sieving-one of the ever most important applications the mankind has been

  3. Annual report of Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center. April 1, 2006 - March 31, 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-12-01

    When a nuclear emergency occurs in Japan, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) provides technical support to the National government, local governments, police, fire station and license holder etc. They are Designated Public Organizations conforming to the Basic Law on Emergency Preparedness and the Basic Plan for Disaster Countermeasures. The Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) of JAEA provides a comprehensive range of technical support activities to an off-site center in case of a nuclear emergency. Specifically, NEAT gives technical advice and information, provides for the dispatch of specialist as required, supplies emergency equipments and materials to the Joint Council of Nuclear Disaster Countermeasures, which meets at the off-site center. NEAT provide various lectures and training course concerning nuclear disaster prevention for those personnel taking an active part in emergency response organizations at normal time. And NEAT researches on nuclear disaster prevention and also cooperate with international organizations. This annual report summarized the activities of JAEA/NEAT in the fiscal year 2006 and 2007. (author)

  4. Prototyping and validating requirements of radiation and nuclear emergency plan simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid, AHA., E-mail: amyhamijah@nm.gov.my [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NM), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Faculty of Computing, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Skudai, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Rozan, MZA.; Ibrahim, R.; Deris, S.; Selamat, A. [Faculty of Computing, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Skudai, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Organizational incapability in developing unrealistic, impractical, inadequate and ambiguous mechanisms of radiological and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan (EPR) causing emergency plan disorder and severe disasters. These situations resulting from 65.6% of poor definition and unidentified roles and duties of the disaster coordinator. Those unexpected conditions brought huge aftermath to the first responders, operators, workers, patients and community at large. Hence, in this report, we discuss prototyping and validating of Malaysia radiation and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan simulation model (EPRM). A prototyping technique was required to formalize the simulation model requirements. Prototyping as systems requirements validation was carried on to endorse the correctness of the model itself against the stakeholder’s intensions in resolving those organizational incapability. We have made assumptions for the proposed emergency preparedness and response model (EPRM) through the simulation software. Those assumptions provided a twofold of expected mechanisms, planning and handling of the respective emergency plan as well as in bringing off the hazard involved. This model called RANEPF (Radiation and Nuclear Emergency Planning Framework) simulator demonstrated the training emergency response perquisites rather than the intervention principles alone. The demonstrations involved the determination of the casualties’ absorbed dose range screening and the coordination of the capacity planning of the expected trauma triage. Through user-centred design and sociotechnical approach, RANEPF simulator was strategized and simplified, though certainly it is equally complex.

  5. Prototyping and validating requirements of radiation and nuclear emergency plan simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, AHA.; Rozan, MZA.; Ibrahim, R.; Deris, S.; Selamat, A.

    2015-04-01

    Organizational incapability in developing unrealistic, impractical, inadequate and ambiguous mechanisms of radiological and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan (EPR) causing emergency plan disorder and severe disasters. These situations resulting from 65.6% of poor definition and unidentified roles and duties of the disaster coordinator. Those unexpected conditions brought huge aftermath to the first responders, operators, workers, patients and community at large. Hence, in this report, we discuss prototyping and validating of Malaysia radiation and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan simulation model (EPRM). A prototyping technique was required to formalize the simulation model requirements. Prototyping as systems requirements validation was carried on to endorse the correctness of the model itself against the stakeholder's intensions in resolving those organizational incapability. We have made assumptions for the proposed emergency preparedness and response model (EPRM) through the simulation software. Those assumptions provided a twofold of expected mechanisms, planning and handling of the respective emergency plan as well as in bringing off the hazard involved. This model called RANEPF (Radiation and Nuclear Emergency Planning Framework) simulator demonstrated the training emergency response perquisites rather than the intervention principles alone. The demonstrations involved the determination of the casualties' absorbed dose range screening and the coordination of the capacity planning of the expected trauma triage. Through user-centred design and sociotechnical approach, RANEPF simulator was strategized and simplified, though certainly it is equally complex.

  6. Prototyping and validating requirements of radiation and nuclear emergency plan simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, AHA.; Rozan, MZA.; Ibrahim, R.; Deris, S.; Selamat, A.

    2015-01-01

    Organizational incapability in developing unrealistic, impractical, inadequate and ambiguous mechanisms of radiological and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan (EPR) causing emergency plan disorder and severe disasters. These situations resulting from 65.6% of poor definition and unidentified roles and duties of the disaster coordinator. Those unexpected conditions brought huge aftermath to the first responders, operators, workers, patients and community at large. Hence, in this report, we discuss prototyping and validating of Malaysia radiation and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan simulation model (EPRM). A prototyping technique was required to formalize the simulation model requirements. Prototyping as systems requirements validation was carried on to endorse the correctness of the model itself against the stakeholder’s intensions in resolving those organizational incapability. We have made assumptions for the proposed emergency preparedness and response model (EPRM) through the simulation software. Those assumptions provided a twofold of expected mechanisms, planning and handling of the respective emergency plan as well as in bringing off the hazard involved. This model called RANEPF (Radiation and Nuclear Emergency Planning Framework) simulator demonstrated the training emergency response perquisites rather than the intervention principles alone. The demonstrations involved the determination of the casualties’ absorbed dose range screening and the coordination of the capacity planning of the expected trauma triage. Through user-centred design and sociotechnical approach, RANEPF simulator was strategized and simplified, though certainly it is equally complex

  7. Nuclear Technology applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cibils Machado, W. E- mail: wrcibils@adinet.com.uy

    2002-01-01

    The present work tries on the applications of the nuclear technology in the life daily, such as agriculture and feeding, human health, industry, non destructive essays, isotopic hydrology, and the nuclear power stations for electricity production and radioisotopes production

  8. Ar-41 measurements and nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunst, J.J.; Rodriguez, M.; Ugarte, R.; Vigile, R.S.; Boutet, L.I.; Jordan, O.D.; Hernandez, D.G.

    2010-01-01

    During the early phase of an emergency is necessary to confirm the release of radioactivity predictions made by the operator of the nuclear plant. In this context, it has begun measuring Ar-41 in the vicinity of a research reactor. Since the Ar-41 is produced in the reactor, it has been studied as a good way to validate the air dispersion model used in nuclear emergencies and to develop a method to improve the characterization of the release. For this latter purpose a pilot experiment was conducted to determine computational and experimental methods, the flux of 1.29 MeV of Ar-41 and compared to evaluate the accuracy of the assessments made. This paper describes meteorological forecasting systems used in the experiment, the estimate of the stability class and the concentration of nuclides using a calculation code developed by the ARN, as well as the methodology and equipment used for measurement in the field. (authors) [es

  9. Guidelines for mutual emergency assistance arrangements in connection with a nuclear accident or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The document contains the recommendations of a group of experts from 22 Member States and three international organizations which met in April 1983. These recommendations may serve as guidelines for use by states for the negotiation of bilateral or regional agreements relating to emergency assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency

  10. Mobile Unit and Its Role in the Case of Nuclear Emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franic, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Emergency response mobile units play a significant role in the case of nuclear emergencies. The functioning and practice of such teams depend on the nature and phase of the nuclear emergency. In the acute phase, several teams with good navigational and communication abilities performing simple measurements can provide essential data for characterization of plume location and its magnitude. Therefore, such activities are complemental with the network of telemetric radiation monitors. However, in the late phase of an accident, in order to gather reliable data needed for utilization of remedial and recovery measures, a better equipped mobile units are necessary. (author)

  11. The human contribution to nuclear power plant emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reason, J.

    1987-01-01

    The safety of present and future nuclear power plants is considered, with particular reference to the human components of these plants. The approach by the United Kingdom Nuclear Installations Inspectorate is particularly criticised. In particular, objections are made to the use of event and fault tree analyses. The UK NII have also decided that comprehensive quantification of human reliability is not feasible. However, figures presented show that the human contribution to monitored power plant emergencies is high, by far the greatest proportion of root causes of emergencies were attributable to human performance. The origins of, and problems with, 'principle 124' are discussed. Automatic safety systems are also distrusted. Current probabilistic risk assessment and probabilistic safety analysis is seen as an unsatisfactory basis for the setting of safety targets. (UK)

  12. Emergency core cooling systems in CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    This report contains the responses by the Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety to three questions posed by the Atomic Energy Control Board concerning the need for Emergency Core Cooling Systems (ECCS) in CANDU nuclear power plants, the effectiveness requirement for such systems, and the extent to which experimental evidence should be available to demonstrate compliance with effectiveness standards

  13. Nuclear cratering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, M M [U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1969-07-01

    The development of nuclear excavation technology is based on the promise that the relatively inexpensive energy available from thermonuclear explosives can be used to simultaneously break and move age quantities of rock and earth economically and safety. This paper discusses the economic and other advantages of using nuclear excavation for large engineering projects. A brief description of the phenomenology of nuclear excavation is given. Each of the several proposed general applications of nuclear excavation is discussed to include a few specific example of possible nuclear excavation projects. The discussion includes nuclear excavation for harbors, canals, terrain transits, aggregate production, mining and water resource development and conservation. (author)

  14. Nuclear cratering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, M.M.

    1969-01-01

    The development of nuclear excavation technology is based on the promise that the relatively inexpensive energy available from thermonuclear explosives can be used to simultaneously break and move age quantities of rock and earth economically and safety. This paper discusses the economic and other advantages of using nuclear excavation for large engineering projects. A brief description of the phenomenology of nuclear excavation is given. Each of the several proposed general applications of nuclear excavation is discussed to include a few specific example of possible nuclear excavation projects. The discussion includes nuclear excavation for harbors, canals, terrain transits, aggregate production, mining and water resource development and conservation. (author)

  15. Radiation technology in emerging industrial applications. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In many industrial applications radiation processing has proven to be a technology of choice either because of its economic competitiveness or its technical superiority. Although the chemical effects of ionizing radiation have been known for more than a century, its industrial applications became possible only after the availability of reliable gamma sources and powerful electron accelerators during the last couple of decades.The programmes of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in radiation processing are implemented through the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications and the Department of Technical Co-operation. The IAEA has been active in this field for many years, contributing to new developments, training, promotion and transfer of technology. In September 1997, the IAEA held an international symposium in Zakopane, Poland on the 'Use of radiation technology for the conservation of environment' where the status of current developments and of applications of radiation processing in the control of environmental pollution was reviewed (IAEA-TECDOC-1023, 1998). Recent developments and achievements in various aspects of radiation processing have been assessed continuously through the organization of consultants meetings, advisory group meetings and research co-ordination meetings. Worldwide growing interest in the use of radiation technology in various new industrial applications, as exemplified by the reports and presentations made at these meetings, has led the IAEA to organize a symposium to cover every aspect of radiation processing and, exclusively, the emerging industrial applications of radiation technology. The International Symposium on Radiation Technology in Emerging Industrial Applications was convened in November 2000 in Beijing, China. Its main purpose was to bring scientists,technologists, industrialists and regulatory authorities together with a view of exchanging information and reviewing the status of current developments and

  16. Radiation technology in emerging industrial applications. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-09-01

    In many industrial applications radiation processing has proven to be a technology of choice either because of its economic competitiveness or its technical superiority. Although the chemical effects of ionizing radiation have been known for more than a century, its industrial applications became possible only after the availability of reliable gamma sources and powerful electron accelerators during the last couple of decades.The programmes of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in radiation processing are implemented through the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications and the Department of Technical Co-operation. The IAEA has been active in this field for many years, contributing to new developments, training, promotion and transfer of technology. In September 1997, the IAEA held an international symposium in Zakopane, Poland on the 'Use of radiation technology for the conservation of environment' where the status of current developments and of applications of radiation processing in the control of environmental pollution was reviewed (IAEA-TECDOC-1023, 1998). Recent developments and achievements in various aspects of radiation processing have been assessed continuously through the organization of consultants meetings, advisory group meetings and research co-ordination meetings. Worldwide growing interest in the use of radiation technology in various new industrial applications, as exemplified by the reports and presentations made at these meetings, has led the IAEA to organize a symposium to cover every aspect of radiation processing and, exclusively, the emerging industrial applications of radiation technology. The International Symposium on Radiation Technology in Emerging Industrial Applications was convened in November 2000 in Beijing, China. Its main purpose was to bring scientists,technologists, industrialists and regulatory authorities together with a view of exchanging information and reviewing the status of current developments and

  17. Emergency Planning and Preparedness in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, D.; Maris, M.

    1998-01-01

    The present Belgian nuclear emergency planning and preparedness is based on experience cumulated since the early eighties. This paper describes the organisation, actuation process, the emergency planning zones and the applicable intervention guidance levels. The role of AVN as on-site inspector, nuclear emergency adviser and emergency assessor is explained as well as its human and technical resources. Finally the paper presents briefly the experience feedback on emergency exercises and training in Belgium as well as AVN's views on some debatable topics. (author)

  18. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response (Spanish Edition); Comunicacion con el publico en caso de emergencia nuclear o radiologica. Preparacion y respuesta en caso de emergenicia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  19. Study on the action guidelines for medical support team for nuclear and radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chang'an; Liu Ying; Geng Xiusheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the action guidelines for medical support team for nuclear and radiological emergency. Methods: It is based on the experience and lessons learned in the course of meeting the emergencies preparedness and response of nuclear and radiological emergencies in China and abroad with the reference of the relevant reports of International Atomic Energy Agency. Results: Essential requirements and practical recommendations for the roles, responsibilities, emergency preparedness, principles and procedures of medical assistance at the scene, as well as the radiological protection of medical support team were provided. Conclusion: The document mentioned above can be applied to direct the establishment, effective medical preparedness and response of the medical support team for nuclear and radiological emergency. (authors)

  20. Preparation of off-site emergency preparedness plans for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    Safety of public, occupational workers and the protection of environment should be assured while activities for economic and social progress are pursued. These activities include the establishment and utilisation of nuclear facilities and use of radioactive sources. This document is issued as a lead document to facilitate preparation of specific site manuals by the Responsible Organisation for emergency response plans at each site to ensure their preparedness to meet any eventuality due to site emergency in order to mitigate its consequences on the health and safety of site personnel. It takes cognizance of an earlier AERB publication on the subject: Safety Manual on Off-Site Emergency Plan for Nuclear Installations, AERB/SM/NISD-2, 1988 and also takes into consideration the urgent need for promoting public awareness and drawing up revised emergency response plans, which has come out in a significant manner after the accidents at Chernobyl and Bhopal

  1. Evaluating nuclear power plant crew performance during emergency response drills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) is responsible for the regulation of the health, safety and environmental consequences of nuclear activities in Canada. Recently, the Human Factors Specialists of the AECB have become involved in the assessment of emergency preparedness and emergency response at nuclear facilities. One key contribution to existing AECB methodology is the introduction of Behaviourally Anchored Rating Scales (BARS) to measure crew interaction skills during emergency response drills. This report presents results of an on-going pilot study to determine if the BARS provide a reliable and valid means of rating the key dimensions of communications, openness, task coordination and adaptability under simulated emergency circumstances. To date, the objectivity of the BARS is supported by good inter-rater reliability while the validity of the BARS is supported by the agreement between ratings of crew interaction and qualitative and quantitative observations of crew performance. (author)

  2. Engineering simulator applications to emergency preparedness at DOE reactor sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beelman, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that since 1984 the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has conducted twenty-seven comprehensive emergency preparedness exercises at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Headquarters Operations Center and Regional Incident Response Centers using the NRC's Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA), developed at the INEL, as an engineering simulator. The objective of these exercises has been to assist the NRC in upgrading its preparedness to provide technical support backup and oversight to U.S. commercial nuclear plant licensees during emergencies. With the current focus on Department of Energy (DOE) reactor operational safety and emergency preparedness, this capability is envisioned as a means of upgrading emergency preparedness at DOE production and test reactor sites such as the K-Reactor at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INEL

  3. Recommended numerical nuclear physics data for cutting-edge nuclear technology applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, S.; Srivenkatesan, R.; Anek Kumar; Murthy, C.S.R.C.; Dhekne, P.S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces some aspects of online nuclear data services at Mumbai as part of today's technology of sharing knowledge of the recommended numerical nuclear physics data for nuclear applications. The physics foundation for cutting-edge technology applications is significantly strengthened by such knowledge generation and sharing techniques. A BARC server is presently mirroring the nuclear data services of the IAEA, Vienna. The users can get all the nuclear data information much faster from the BARC nuclear data mirror website that is now fully operational. The nuclear community is encouraged to develop the habit of accessing the website for recommended values of nuclear data for use in research and applications. The URL is: www-nds.indcentre.org.in (author)

  4. The Enhancement of Nuclear Control and Emergency Preparedness Systems in KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Goan Yup; Lee, B. D.; Kim, J. S.; Park, H. J.

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study is to foster international environment for peaceful nuclear technology based on the international transparency with respect to the control, management and surveillance system. In this regards, this study establishes, operates and upgrades the nuclear control and management information system of the KAERI that assumed the prerequisite means for Integrated Safeguards systems of the IAEA which is implemented from the July of 2008. It is also included the radiological emergency system that contains the safety information surveillance system in KAERI to meet the national legislative requirements. The nuclear control and management information system of the KAERI could be controlled and managed the accounting information of the nuclear facility with on-line manner. This system enhances transparency of accounting management of the KAERI in terms of effective ways for the Agency inspectors and national inspectors to implement the no-notice inspection under the Integrated Safeguards system. To complete the nuclear safety information collecting and monitoring system at EOF for KAERI, the real-time remote monitoring systems for RIPF, IMEF, PIEF were established. In addition, after the review of the abnormal condition of RMS data, the notification system for a radiation abnormal condition at nuclear facilities was operated. And also, the server of emergency management system was improved, the emergency situation notification system to all KAERI and KNF site was established

  5. Chemical and nuclear emergencies: Interchanging lessons learned from planning and accident experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, V.; Sorensen, J.H.; Rogers, G.O.

    1989-01-01

    Because the goal of emergency preparedness for both chemical and nuclear hazards is to reduce human exposure to hazardous materials, this paper examines the interchange of lessons learned from emergency planning and accident experience in both industries. While the concerns are slightly different, sufficient similarity is found for each to draw implications from the others experience. Principally the chemical industry can learn from the dominant planning experience associated with nuclear power plants, while the nuclear industry can chiefly learn from the chemical industry's accident experience. 23 refs

  6. A simulator-based nuclear reactor emergency response training exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Edward; Bereznai, George; Shaw, John; Chaput, Joseph; Lafortune, Jean-Francois

    Training offsite emergency response personnel basic awareness of onsite control room operations during nuclear power plant emergency conditions was the primary objective of a week-long workshop conducted on a CANDU® virtual nuclear reactor simulator available at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Canada. The workshop was designed to examine both normal and abnormal reactor operating conditions, and to observe the conditions in the control room that may have impact on the subsequent offsite emergency response. The workshop was attended by participants from a number of countries encompassing diverse job functions related to nuclear emergency response. Objectives of the workshop were to provide opportunities for participants to act in the roles of control room personnel under different reactor operating scenarios, providing a unique experience for participants to interact with the simulator in real-time, and providing increased awareness of control room operations during accident conditions. The ability to "pause" the simulator during exercises allowed the instructors to evaluate and critique the performance of participants, and to provide context with respect to potential offsite emergency actions. Feedback from the participants highlighted (i) advantages of observing and participating "hands-on" with operational exercises, (ii) their general unfamiliarity with control room operational procedures and arrangements prior to the workshop, (iii) awareness of the vast quantity of detailed control room procedures for both normal and transient conditions, and (iv) appreciation of the increased workload for the operators in the control room during a transient from normal operations. Based upon participant feedback, it was determined that the objectives of the training had been met, and that future workshops should be conducted.

  7. Ireland's Agricultural Preparedness for Nuclear Emergencies - Application to the Dairy Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Organo, Catherine [Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Radiological Protection, 3 Clonskeagh Square, Clonskeagh Road, Dublin 14 (Ireland); Darcy, Marie [Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Grattan Business Centre, Portlaoise, Co. Laois (Ireland)

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear Accident Abroad. Based on the generic EURANOS Food Handbook (2009) which advises on the management of a radiological emergency in Europe, the Irish Food Handbook is a living document developed by a multi-agency working group set up to specifically address potential Irish scenarios and their possible consequences for the Irish agriculture and agri-food sectors. Contributors include the RPII, the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI), the DECLG and the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM). The presentation will specifically look at the example of the dairy sector because of its importance to the Irish economy (second largest share of Ireland's gross agriculture output with 80-85% of dairy products exported) and also due to the fact that milk is particularly vulnerable to nuclear fallout/contamination and can be considered a key food group. (authors)

  8. Considering nuclear emergency preparedness from realities after Fukushima nuclear disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idokawa, Katsutaka

    2013-01-01

    As an ex-chief of affected town of Fukushima nuclear disaster, basic ideas were enumerated as no more accident occurring, necessity of early evacuation, all budget and right belonging to end administrator, appropriate response of government's emergency countermeasure headquarter on proposal of end administrator, failure of evacuation lead coming from government's information concealment, no more secondary damage of affected refuge, public disclosure of information, safety as the top priority with no compromise or preferred profit, new mechanism of resident's direct participation in preventing accidents, and fair review system of inspection based on checklist. Nuclear-related regulatory organizations and electric utilities should be reformed as open and transparent organization and responsible for following results of accidents. Public trust on government was completely lost after the Fukushima nuclear disaster and people should not rely on some organizations and be respective expert and foster self-defense capability so as to establish government by the people. (T. Tanaka)

  9. Applications of noise analysis to nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar Martinez, Omar

    2000-01-01

    Noise Analysis techniques (analysis of the fluctuation of physical parameters) have been successfully applied to the operational vigilance of the technical equipment that plays a decisive role in the production cycle of a very complex industry. Although fluctuation measurements in nuclear installations started almost at the start of the nuclear era (see works by Feynman and Rossi on the development of neutron methodology), only recently have neutron noise diagnostic applications begun to be a part of the standard procedures for the performance of some modern nuclear installations. Following the relevant technical advances made in information sciences and analogical electronics, measuring the fluctuation of physical parameters has become a very effective tool for detecting, guarding and following up possible defects in a nuclear system. As the processing techniques for the fluctuation of a nuclear reactor's physical-neutron parameters have evolved (temporal and frequency analysis, multi-parameter self -regression analysis, etc.), the applications of the theory of non-lineal dynamics and chaos theory have progressed by focusing on the problem from another perspective. This work reports on those nuclear applications of noise analysis that increase nuclear safety in all types of nuclear facilities and that have been carried out by the author over the last decade, such as: -Void Force Critical Set Applications (Zero Power Reactor Applications, Central Institute of Physical Research, Budapest, Hungary); -Research Reactor Applications (Triga Mark III Reactor, National Institute of Nuclear Research, ININ, Mexico); -Power Reactor Applications in a Nuclear Power Plant (First Circuit of Block II, Paks Nuclear Center, Hungary); -Second Loop applications in a Nuclear Power Plant (Block I Paks Nuclear Center, Hungary; Block II Kalinin Nuclear Center, Russia); -Shield System Applications for the Transport of Radioisotopes (Nuclear Technology Center, Havana, Cuba) New trends in

  10. Identifying and training non-technical skills of nuclear emergency response teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crichton, M.T.; Flin, R.

    2004-01-01

    Training of the non-technical (social and cognitive) skills that are crucial to safe and effective management by teams in emergency situations is an issue that is receiving increasing emphasis in many organisations, particularly in the nuclear power industry. As teams play a major role in emergency response organisations (ERO), effective functioning and interactions within, between and across teams is crucial, particularly as the management of an emergency situation often requires that teams are extended by members from various other sections and strategic groups throughout the company, as well as members of external agencies. A series of interviews was recently conducted with members of a UK nuclear emergency response organisation to identify the non-technical skills required by team members that would be required for managing an emergency. Critical skills have been identified as decision making and situation assessment, as well as communication, teamwork, and stress management. A number of training strategies are discussed which can be tailored to the roles and responsibilities of the team members and the team leader, based on the roles within the team being defined as either Decision Maker, Evaluator, or Implementor, according to Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) classifications. It is anticipated that enhanced learning of the necessary non-technical skills, through experience and directed practice, will improve the skills of members of emergency response teams

  11. Identifying and training non-technical skills of nuclear emergency response teams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crichton, M.T. E-mail: m.crichton@abdn.ac.uk; Flin, R

    2004-08-01

    Training of the non-technical (social and cognitive) skills that are crucial to safe and effective management by teams in emergency situations is an issue that is receiving increasing emphasis in many organisations, particularly in the nuclear power industry. As teams play a major role in emergency response organisations (ERO), effective functioning and interactions within, between and across teams is crucial, particularly as the management of an emergency situation often requires that teams are extended by members from various other sections and strategic groups throughout the company, as well as members of external agencies. A series of interviews was recently conducted with members of a UK nuclear emergency response organisation to identify the non-technical skills required by team members that would be required for managing an emergency. Critical skills have been identified as decision making and situation assessment, as well as communication, teamwork, and stress management. A number of training strategies are discussed which can be tailored to the roles and responsibilities of the team members and the team leader, based on the roles within the team being defined as either Decision Maker, Evaluator, or Implementor, according to Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) classifications. It is anticipated that enhanced learning of the necessary non-technical skills, through experience and directed practice, will improve the skills of members of emergency response teams.

  12. Emergency preparedness post-9/11 enhancements at US nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In the wake of the terrorist attacks of 9-11, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) took several actions to improve the security profile and emergency response of its licensees. In early 2002 the commission issued orders to its nuclear power plant licensees which included changes to emergency plans, the performance of staffing adequacy reviews, changes to augmentation practices and the establishment of alternative facilities. Since that time NRC has implemented a force-on-force exercise program that includes emergency response. This program has helped licensees improve their response by testing procedures under simulated attack conditions. More recently, licensees have begun a program to enhance drills and exercises through the use of security event based scenarios. These drills will enhance previous practice and focus on two emerging issues: improving the interface between emergency response, security response and operations during security events and recovery from the loss of plant equipment due to terrorist acts. Additional areas of enhancement such as protective actions for plant personnel will also be discussed and the status of actions to date will be provided. (author)

  13. 'Nuclear emergency preparedness' for local residents. Support of on-site training of many kinds of places and people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameda, Kazuhisa

    2005-01-01

    In order to support and ensure the nuclear emergency preparedness system and safety of residents in cities, towns and villages, NPO Nuclear Emergency Preparedness Support Center was established in May, 2003. 130 on-site training and education classes were held and above 2,000 participants attended to them for two years. Objects of the countermeasure of nuclear emergency preparedness in local area and residents, what is nuclear emergency for inhabitants, what is use of Table of International Nuclear Event Scale (INES)?, a use of INES, relation between INES level and the nuclear emergency preparedness system are discussed. (S.Y.)

  14. A new series of international nuclear emergency exercises (INEX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halil-Burcin Okyar; Lazo, Edward; Siemann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The INEX series of international nuclear emergency exercises, organised under the auspices of the NEA Working Party on Nuclear Emergency Matters (WPNEM), has proven successful in testing, investigating and improving national and international response arrangements for nuclear accidents and radiological emergencies. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) accident occurred during INEX-4 and had a direct impact on NEA technical standing committees' work programmes. The WPNEM played an important role during the emergency, following and studying the insights and ideas that drive nuclear emergency management decision making. It collected crucial information on governmental decisions and recommendations with respect to the accident situation, and implemented a framework study to assist in the collection of NEA member country experiences that would facilitate the identification of commonalities in national assessment approaches and results. The findings triggered the INEX-5 exercise, which will build upon the experiences and lessons learnt from past nuclear accidents/incidents, and the success of previous INEX exercises. This exercise is intended to test mechanisms for decision making at the national level, particularly in uncertain circumstances or in the absence of data, to examine arrangements for international co-operation and coordination of data and information exchange among countries and arrangements for practical support and assistance between groups of countries or geographical regions. It will also investigate the long-term issues beyond the early response phase. The WPNEM agreed on a tightly focused scope, which will consist of a tabletop exercise or moderated workshop that is not based on a real time test. The exercise will be a common scenario based on a re-enactment of a nuclear power plant accident, although not the Fukushima accident. It will consider coincident impacts on multiple units and include impacts on other critical national

  15. Selection and construction of nuclear and radiation emergency medical center in a region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guojun; He Xu; Liao Li; Gao Dong

    2014-01-01

    Three level of first-class comprehensive hospital is an important force of nuclear and radiation accident rescue, has a very rich experience in response to nuclear and radiation accidents and deal with large quantities of the sick and wounded. With the foundation and the ability of the construction and operation of medical emergency rescue center. This paper according to the median model location theory of emergency center, combined with the specific situation of the nuclear and radiation accident in Hunan Province, reference location, rescue experience, emergency allocation of resources, teaching and research capacity, establish regional medical emergency center of nuclear and radiation accidents based on three level of first-class comprehensive hospital, break the traditional concept that the center must be provincial capital,form a multi-level, three-dimensional, network of emergency hospital rescue system. The main duties of the center are accident emergency response, on-site treatment and technical guidance of accident, psychological grooming. The author propose building measures according to the duties of the center: increase national and provincial financial investment, carry out training, drills and first aid knowledge missionaries regularly, innovative materials management, speed up the construction of information platform, establish and improve the hospital rescue system, improve organization institution and system of plans, reengineering rescue process. (authors)

  16. The feature of emergency diesel generator relaying protection in Tianwan nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xiaopeng; Shi Yan; Li Cong

    2014-01-01

    This paper mainly introduces the function and feature of emergency diesel generator in nuclear power plant, which plays an important role in nuclear accident. It minutely tells about the feature and configuration of relay protection and discusses the rationality of protection scheme, which shows that it can be completely contented all kinds of operation states. It is an analysis and argument about the principle of relay protection in detail, that would operate correctly when emergency diesel generator be in abnormal operating and serious fault conditions, such as cut off emergency diesel generator in order to avoid more harm to emergency diesel generator. It analyzes how the relay responses quickly and locks up the protection action under perturbations in the external power, so it can avoid unnecessary resection of emergency diesel generator to emergency power supply loss and effect of nuclear safety. It also analyzes the flexible use of protection setting of the protective relay to meet various operating status. It elaborates the particularity of relay protection which is due to the particularity of nuclear safety. It analyses the possibility of relay protection which has to be applied to other equipment and the protection setting that was provided by design institute, and puts forward the author's viewpoints. (authors)

  17. Risk Informed Optimization of Nuclear Instrumentation for Emergency Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    Emergency conditions after a nuclear accident are different in each case and cannot be predicted accurately. The accident at TMI did not contaminate the environment. The accident at Chernobyl had a large, early release of nuclear contamination, widely dispersed over many countries. Although there was no large, early release of contamination at Fukushima Daiichi, the timeline of the accident included days of later contamination of various degrees of severity. A large amount of the contamination has been released to the ocean and an exclusion zone still exists around the station. In all of these accidents there were no adequate radiation monitoring systems distant from the origin point that could provide accurate status to the authorities and the local population. In the recent years a number of new nuclear monitoring systems have been implemented or are under development to be installed in areas that might be exposed to nuclear contamination in emergencies. Based on the risk informed optimization methodology, this paper provides recommendations for selecting the quantity and type of instrumentation, the location and sampling of data, and the real-time processing of information. (authors)

  18. Just war and nuclear weapons : just war theory and its application to the Korean nuclear weapons issue in Korean Christianity

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Changwan

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is primarily an application of the Christian tradition of Just War to the problems arising from the basing of US nuclear weapons in South Korea and the development of nuclear weapons by the regime in the North. The Christian theology of Just War has developed over the last two thousand years, adapting as first Christianity became the state religion of the Roman Empire, through the break down of any enforceable norms in Europe‘s 'Dark Ages‘, to the emergence of the concept of th...

  19. Management of Large Volumes of Waste Arising in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-10-01

    This publication, prepared in light of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety developed after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, addresses the management of large volumes of radioactive waste arising in a nuclear or radiological emergency, as part of overall emergency preparedness. The management of large volumes of waste will be one of many efforts to be dealt with to allow recovery of affected areas, to support return of evacuated or relocated populations and preparations for normal social and economic activities, and/or to mitigate additional environmental impacts. The publication is intended to be of use to national planners and policy makers, facility and programme managers, and other professionals responsible for developing and implementing national plans and strategies to manage radioactive waste arising from nuclear or radiological emergencies.

  20. Nuclear applications in life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenak, P.

    2009-01-01

    Radioactivity has revolutionized life sciences during the last century, and it is still an indispensable tool. Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy, Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics, Nutrition and Environmental Problems Relevant Health are significant application fields of Nuclear Sciences. Nuclear medicine today is a well established branch of medicine. Radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals play a key role both in diagnostic investigations and therapy-Both cyclotron and reactor produced radionuclides find application, the former more in diagnostic studies and the latter in therapy. New therapy applications such as bor neutron therapy are increasing by time together with the technological improvements in imaging systems such as PET and SPECT. Radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals play important role in both therapy and imaging. However cyclotron produced radionuclides have been using generally in imaging purposes while reactor produced radionuclides have also therapeutic applications. With the advent of emission tomography, new vistas for probing biochemistry in vivo have been opened. The radio chemist faces an ever-increasing challenge of designing new tracers for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Rapid, efficient and automated methods of radionuclide and precursor production, labeling of biomolecules, and quality control need to be developed. The purpose of this article is a short interface from Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy, Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics Applications of Nuclear Sciences.

  1. How to Manage Public Information in Case of Nuclear Emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldarovic, O.

    2000-01-01

    In the paper the problem of efficient, adequate and full information and education of the population as one of the most important aspects of nuclear emergency situations si discussed. It is shown that information and education in these situation must follow major principles of democratic information, that all decisions must be made in advance and in full co-ordination as well as with a full responsibility of the development of the situation. Furthermore, effective information is seen as a missing link in different nuclear emergency situation so far. A model of effective information is discussed and proposed. (author)

  2. GIS Application in Atucha I Nuclear Power Plant Exercise Argentina, 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadaniowski, I.V.; Telleria, D.M.; Jordan, O.D.; Boutet, L.I.; Kunst, J.J.; Bruno, H.A.; Hernandez, D.G.; Rodriguez, M.; Cateriano, M.A.; Rey, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are tools applied to assist in the assessment and solution of many geographical related issues. Recently, their applications have been extended to the areas of disasters and environmental emergencies. GIS not only could be used as a diagnostic tool. Combined with adequate information and other tools capable to predict the transfer of pollutants in the environment and the associated impacts to the public, GIS could be used to support emergency planning and response. The Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of Argentina has incorporated in 2003 the GIS technology like an innovative resource for its preparation and response activities in emergencies. For this, the NRA acquired the necessary technology (hardware and software) and the technical specialist who were joined to expert's team in the nuclear and radiological emergencies field. The GIS stays operative as support tool in the Emergencies Control Center of NRA. In this paper, the use of GIS as a tool for analysis and advice is presented. The GIS is being used for preparation and development of nuclear emergencies trials and exercises, carried out on-site and off-site at the Nuclear Power Plant Atucha I Buenos Aires, Argentina, in cooperation with civil defense, national and state security and army forces and intensive public involvement. The databases were conformed with information from different sources, including the result of interviews to different actors, as well as other local and national government agencies and forces. Also, educational institutions, local medical centers, etc., were consulted. The information was enriched with outings to field in the surroundings of nuclear power plant. The scope and the detail of the information for this exercise covers 30 kilometers surroundings the nuclear power plant, with a range of significantly different geographical and population conditions. When loading the information in the GIS, a classification scheme is applied and

  3. GIS application in Atucha I nuclear power plant exercise Argentina, 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadaniowski, Ivana; Jordan, Osvaldo; Boutet, Luis; Kunst, Juan; Bruno, Hector; Hernandez, Daniel; Rodriguez, Monica; Cateriano, Miguel; Rey, Hugo; Telleria, Diego

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are tools applied to assist in the assessment and solution of many geographical related issues. Recently, their applications have been extended to the areas of disasters and environmental emergencies. GIS not only could be used as a diagnostic tool. Combined with adequate information and other tools capable to predict the transfer of pollutants in the environment and the associated impacts to the public, GIS could be used to support emergency planning and response. The Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of Argentina has incorporated in 2003 the GIS technology like an innovative resource for its preparation and response activities in emergencies. For this, the NRA acquired the necessary technology (hardware and software) and the technical specialist who were joined to expert's team in the nuclear and radiological emergencies field. The GIS stays operative as support tool in the Emergencies Control Center of NRA. In this paper, the use of GIS as a tool for analysis and advice is presented. The GIS is being used for preparation and development of nuclear emergencies trials and exercises, carried out on-site and off-site at the Nuclear Power Plant Atucha I Buenos Aires, Argentina, in cooperation with civil defense, national and state security and army forces and intensive public involvement. The databases were conformed with information from different sources, including the result of interviews to different actors, as well as other local and national government agencies and forces. Also, educational institutions, local medical centers, etc., were consulted. The information was enriched with outings to field in the surroundings of nuclear power plant. The scope and the detail of the information for this exercise covers 30 kilometers surroundings the nuclear power plant, with a range of significantly different geographical and population conditions. When loading the information in the GIS, a classification scheme is applied

  4. Application of meteorology to safety at nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    This report was prepared on behalf of the International Atomic Energy Agency by an international panel of experts who met at the Agency's headquarters from 10 to 14 April 1967. The application of meteorology to safety at nuclear plants is discussed in connection with site selection, design and construction, operation, and emergency planning and action. The final chapter considers the training to be given to operators and health and safety personnel on meteorology problems. The appendix gives a simple method for computing air concentration values at ground level. An extensive bibliography is also included.

  5. Initial operations in local nuclear emergency response headquarter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    As a result of the Fukushima nuclear accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake and the tsunami that occurred thereafter, local nuclear emergency response headquarters (local headquarters) was set up at off-site center (OFC). However, several obstacles such as the collapse of means of communication resulting from severed communication lines, food and fuel shortage resulting from stagnant physical distribution, and increasing radiation dose around the center significantly restricted originally intended operation of local headquarters. In such severe situation, the personnel gathered at the OFC from the government, local public bodies and electric companies from March 11 to 15 acted without sufficient food, sleep or rest and did all they could against successively occurring unexpected challenges by using limited means of communication. However, issues requiring further consideration were activities of each functional group, location of OFC and the functions of equipment, machines and materials and reflecting the consideration results into future protective measures and revision of the manual for nuclear emergency response were greatly important. This report described investigated results on initial operations in local headquarters such as situation of activities conducted by local headquarters and operations at functional groups. (T. Tanaka)

  6. Annual report of Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center. April 1, 2010 - March 31, 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Hiromi; Okuno, Hiroshi; Sawahata, Masayoshi; Ikeda, Takeshi; Sato, Sohei; Terakado, Naoya; Nagakura, Tomohiro; Nakanishi, Chika; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Abe, Minako; Kawakami, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Sumiya, Akihiro; Matsusaka, Masaru

    2011-12-01

    When a nuclear emergency occurs in Japan, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has the responsibility of providing technical support to the National government, local governments, police, fire station and license holders etc., because the JAEA is designated a Public Organization conforming to the Basic Law on Emergency Preparedness and the Basic Plan for Disaster Countermeasures. The Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) of JAEA provides a comprehensive range of technical support activities to an Off-Site Center in case of a nuclear emergency. Specifically, NEAT gives technical advice and information, dispatch specialists as required, supplies emergency equipment and materials to the National Government and local governments. NEAT provides various lectures and training courses concerning nuclear disaster prevention for those personnel taking an active part in emergency response organizations at normal time. NEAT also researches on nuclear disaster prevention and cooperates with international organizations. Concerning about the assistance to the Accident of Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power Station caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake at 11 March, 2011, JAEA assisted activities including environmental radiation monitoring, environmental radioactivity analyses, resident public consulting etc., with its full scale effort. NEAT served as the center of these supporting activities of JAEA. This annual report summarized these activities of JAEA/NEAT in the fiscal year 2010. (author)

  7. Development of Secure and Sustainable Nuclear Infrastructure in Emerging Nuclear Nations Such as Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipwash, Jacqueline L; Kovacic, Donald N

    2008-01-01

    The global expansion of nuclear energy will require international cooperation to ensure that nuclear materials, facilities, and sensitive technologies are not diverted to non-peaceful uses. Developing countries will require assistance to ensure the effective regulation, management, and operation of their nuclear programs to achieve best practices in nuclear nonproliferation. A developing nation has many hurdles to pass before it can give assurances to the international community that it is capable of implementing a sustainable nuclear energy program. In August of this year, the U.S. Department of Energy and the Ministry of Science and Technology of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam signed an arrangement for Information Exchange and Cooperation on the Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy. This event signals an era of cooperation between the U.S. and Vietnam in the area of nuclear nonproliferation. This paper will address how DOE is supporting the development of secure and sustainable infrastructures in emerging nuclear nations such as Vietnam

  8. Nuclear physics principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lilley, J S

    2001-01-01

    This title provides the latest information on nuclear physics. Based on a course entitled Applications of Nuclear Physics. Written from an experimental point of view this text is broadly divided into two parts, firstly a general introduction to Nuclear Physics and secondly its applications.* Includes chapters on practical examples and problems* Contains hints to solving problems which are included in the appendix* Avoids complex and extensive mathematical treatments* A modern approach to nuclear physics, covering the basic theory, but emphasising the many and important applicat

  9. Information technology support for emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uuspaeae, P.

    1990-01-01

    Information systems for distributed decision support for emergency management are considered. Specific applications include nuclear power plant emergencies. Emergencies in other industries such as chemical industry may also be considered. Research in the ISEM project is briefly summarized

  10. Medical emergency planning in case of severe nuclear power plant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlenschlaeger, L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to discuss a three-step-plan on medical emergency planning in case of severe accidents at nuclear power plants on the basis of own experiences in the regional area as well as on the basis of recommendations of the Federal Minister of the Interior. The medical considerations take account of the severity and extension of an accident whereby the current definitions used in nuclear engineering for accident situations are taken as basis. A comparison between obligatory and actual state is made on the possibilities of medical emergency planning, taking all capacities of staff, facilities, and equipment available in the Federal Republic of Germany into account. To assure a useful and quick utilization of the existing infra-structure as well as nation-wide uniform training of physicians and medical assistants in the field of medical emergency in case of a nuclear catastrophe, a federal law for health protection is regarded urgently necessary. (orig.) [de

  11. Emergency medical assistance programs for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linnemann, R.E.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This paper deals with a simple but practical medical support of geographically distributed nuclear reactors in isolated areas. A staff of experts at a centre devote their full attention to accident prevention and preparedness at reactor sites. They establish and maintain emergency medical programs at reactor sites and nearby support hospitals. The emphasis is on first aid and emergency treatment by medical attendants who are not and cannot be experts in radiation but do know how to treat patients. (author)

  12. Proposal of new framework in nuclear emergency response based on problem in East Japan Great Earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    In the nuclear emergency response activity in a East Japan great earthquake, the weakness the frame and the activity procedure (scheme) of the emergency response activity of our country that had been constructed after the accident of JCO became clear. Especially, it is necessary to recognize the importance of the enhancement of a prior plan after not only provision to response but also the damage to the environment occurs in the emergency for measures for restoration. Moreover, it is necessary to examine a concrete strategy about the management system strengthening of the radiation exposure at the accident. In this study, the experience and the finding in a East Japan great earthquake are arranged. The accident scenario that should be targeted is rearranged, and it proposes a new frame in the nuclear emergency response field through the requirement examinations such as the points of procedure, equipment, and the capital machine parts that lie a regulations frame of the nuclear emergency response, the activity frame of the nuclear emergency response, and materialized of the nuclear emergency response activity. (author)

  13. Proposal of new framework in nuclear emergency response based on problem in East Japan Great Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In the nuclear emergency response activity in a East Japan great earthquake, the weakness the frame and the activity procedure (scheme) of the emergency response activity of our country that had been constructed after the accident of JCO became clear. Especially, it is necessary to recognize the importance of the enhancement of a prior plan after not only provision to response but also the damage to the environment occurs in the emergency for measures for restoration. Moreover, it is necessary to examine a concrete strategy about the management system strengthening of the radiation exposure at the accident. In this study, the experience and the finding in a East Japan great earthquake are arranged. The accident scenario that should be targeted is rearranged, and it proposes a new frame in the nuclear emergency response field through the requirement examinations such as the points of procedure, equipment, and the capital machine parts that lie a regulations frame of the nuclear emergency response, the activity frame of the nuclear emergency response, and materialized of the nuclear emergency response activity. (author)

  14. Proposal of new framework in nuclear emergency response based on problem in East Japan Great Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    In the nuclear emergency response activity in a East Japan great earthquake, the weakness the frame and the activity procedure (scheme) of the emergency response activity of our country that had been constructed after the accident of JCO became clear. Especially, it is necessary to recognize the importance of the enhancement of a prior plan after not only provision to response but also the damage to the environment occurs in the emergency for measures for restoration. Moreover, it is necessary to examine a concrete strategy about the management system strengthening of the radiation exposure at the accident. In this study, the experience and the finding in a East Japan great earthquake are arranged. The accident scenario that should be targeted is rearranged, and it proposes a new frame in the nuclear emergency response field through the requirement examinations such as the points of procedure, equipment, and the capital machine parts that lie a regulations frame of the nuclear emergency response, the activity frame of the nuclear emergency response, and materialized of the nuclear emergency response activity. (author)

  15. Report to Congress on status of emergency response planning for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    This report responds to a request (Public Law 96-295, Section 109) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to report to Congress on the status of emergency response planning in support of nuclear power reactors. The report includes information on the status of this planning as well as on the Commission actions relating to emergency preparedness. These actions include a summary of the new regulatory requirements and the preliminary results of two comprehensive Evacuation Time Estimate studies; one requested by the NRC including 50 nuclear power plant sites and one conducted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for 12 high population density sites. FEMA provided the information in this report on the status of State and local planning, including projected schedules for joint State/county/licensee emergency preparedness exercises. Included as Appendicies are the NRC Emergency Planning Final Regulations, 10 CFR Part 50 (45 FR 55402), the FEMA Proposed Rule, 'Review and Approval of State and Local Radiological Emergency Plans and Preparedness', 44 CFR Part 350 (45 FR 42341) and the NRC/FEMA Memorandums of Understanding

  16. Nuclear emergency preparedness in the Nordic and Baltic Sea countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaworska, A. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)

    2002-07-01

    Radiation emergency preparedness systems must be able to deal with the threats posed to each country and the region as a whole. The threats from nuclear accidents differ in the various countries of the region. The most serious nuclear threats are those with cross-border implications and are generally assumed to be due to the presence of nuclear reactors of various kinds. Some countries in the region, Finland, Germany, Lithuania, the Russian Federation and Sweden, have nuclear power plants, and several countries in the region possess smaller research reactors. Other nuclear threats arise from nuclear powered naval vessels or submarines, and from nuclear powered satellites. Production, transportation, use, and disposal of radioactive materials constitute potential local nuclear hazards. Finally, terrorist use of radioactive material poses a nuclear threat to all countries. (au)

  17. Nuclear emergency preparedness in the Nordic and Baltic Sea countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworska, A.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation emergency preparedness systems must be able to deal with the threats posed to each country and the region as a whole. The threats from nuclear accidents differ in the various countries of the region. The most serious nuclear threats are those with cross-border implications and are generally assumed to be due to the presence of nuclear reactors of various kinds. Some countries in the region, Finland, Germany, Lithuania, the Russian Federation and Sweden, have nuclear power plants, and several countries in the region possess smaller research reactors. Other nuclear threats arise from nuclear powered naval vessels or submarines, and from nuclear powered satellites. Production, transportation, use, and disposal of radioactive materials constitute potential local nuclear hazards. Finally, terrorist use of radioactive material poses a nuclear threat to all countries. (au)

  18. Managing a Nuclear Emergency Originating from Abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grlicarev, I.

    1998-01-01

    The basic aspects of managing a nuclear emergency, which occurred in a foreign country, are considered. The most important sources of information are defined by the bilateral or multilateral conventions. The decision aiding techniques and intervention levels can substantially improve the decision making. The experiences from the INEX-2 exercises are presented after the Swiss and Finnish exercise. (author)

  19. Nuclear astrophysics: An application of nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueloep, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics, a fruitful combination of nuclear physics and astrophysics can be viewed as a special application of nuclear physics where the study of nuclei and their reactions are motivated by astrophysical problems. Nuclear astrophysics is also a good example for the state of the art interdisciplinary research. The origin of elements studied by geologists is explored by astrophysicists using nuclear reaction rates provided by the nuclear physics community. Due to the high interest in the field two recent Nuclear Physics Divisional Conferences of the European Physical Society were devoted to nuclear astrophysics and a new conference series entitled 'Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics' has been established. Selected problems of nuclear astrophysics will be presented emphasizing the interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics. As an example the role of 14 N(p,r) 15 O reaction rate in the determination of the age of globular clusters will be discussed in details

  20. Study of developing nuclear fabrication facility's integrated emergency response manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taeh Yeong; Cho, Nam Chan; Han, Seung Hoon; Moon, Jong Han; Lee, Jin Hang [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Guem Young; Han, Ji Ah [Dongguk Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Public begin to pay attention to emergency management. Thus, public's consensus on having high level of emergency management system up to advanced country's is reached. In this social atmosphere, manual is considered as key factor to prevent accident or secure business continuity. Therefore, we first define possible crisis at KEPCO Nuclear Fuel (hereinafter KNF) and also make a 'Reaction List' for each crisis situation at the view of information-design. To achieve it, we analyze several country's crisis response manual and then derive component, indicate duties and roles at the information-design point of view. From this, we suggested guideline to make 'Integrated emergency response manual(IERM)'. The manual we used before have following few problems; difficult to applicate at the site, difficult to deliver information. To complement these problems, we searched manual elements from the view of information-design. As a result, we develop administrative manual. Although, this manual could be thought as fragmentary manual because it confined specific several agency/organization and disaster type.

  1. Analysis in nuclear power accident emergency based on random network and particle swarm optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Dichen; Fang Fang; Ding Weicheng; Chen Zhi

    2014-01-01

    The GERT random network model of nuclear power accident emergency was built in this paper, and the intelligent computation was combined with the random network based on the analysis of Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. The emergency process was divided into the series link and parallel link, and the parallel link was the part of series link. The overall allocation of resources was firstly optimized, and then the parallel link was analyzed. The effect of the resources for emergency used in different links was analyzed, and it was put forward that the corresponding particle velocity vector was limited under the condition of limited emergency resources. The resource-constrained particle swarm optimization was obtained by using velocity projection matrix to correct the motion of particles. The optimized allocation of resources in emergency process was obtained and the time consumption of nuclear power accident emergency was reduced. (authors)

  2. Network of siren, public address and display system to preparedness and response for nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, G.H.; Padmanabhan, N.; Raman, N.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.; Abani, M.C.

    2003-01-01

    For an effective emergency response and implementation of counter measures, communication during a nuclear emergency is a very important aspect. The declaration of a nuclear emergency must be immediately conveyed to all those working in the plant and around the nuclear site. Besides this, the nature of emergency also needs to be conveyed unambiguously along with corresponding counter measures, such as stay in, evacuation or all clear signal for the relevant plants. This requirement has necessitated the need for a networked signaling system. Based on this requirement, a microcontroller based signaling and a telephone/wireless based communication and display system has been designed at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. It is proposed to be used as a part of emergency preparedness and response programme at the nuclear facility sites. As per the design made for Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay site, each plant or area in the site is identified by a unique identification code. The main Site Emergency Control Centre/Emergency Response Centre at Mod. Labs. selectively calls the various plants and declares the nature of emergency to be followed In that plant/area through different siren signals along with display and announcement of instructions. This paper describes the details of the system that is designed for Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay site and proposed for other nuclear power plant sites. (author)

  3. Nordic nuclear emergency exercises. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennerstedt, T.; Stranden, E.; Salo, A.

    1995-01-01

    In all Nordic countries, nuclear emergency provisions have been revised following the Chernobyl accident. Local and national exercises are carried out regularly in each country. Several actions have been taken to harmonize the emergency approaches of the Nordic countries. In order to further promote consistent decisions in an emergency situation, two Nordic exercises were conducted in 1993. It was important to see if all five countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) responded in a similar way to a given situation, as far as risk assessment and protective measures were concerned. The exercises were mainly aimed at decision makers and advisers of the five national emergency organizations. Thus, the exercises did not include comparison of underlying calculations on, e.g., atmospheric trajectories or transfer of radioactive material from air to ground. Such functions were tested separately in drills that also formed part of the Nordic emergency preparedness program. The exercises included an acute-phase situation (NORA), and a late-phase situation (ODIN). The Nordic exercises aroused international interest, and hence observers from IAEA, OECD/NEA and the European Union were invited to the exercises. NORA was observed by representatives from IAEA (in Finland) and OECD/NEA (in Sweden). ODIN was attended by IAEA (in Sweden) and the European Union (in Norway). Generally speaking, regional exercises such as NORA and ODIN help improve national emergency preparedness planning, organization and operations as well as international coordination. (EG)

  4. Improvements around nuclear power plants for effective implementation of emergency countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivasista, K.; Ravi, K.; Gupta, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    The 5 km sterilized zone (SZ) and 16 km emergency planning zone (EPZ) were set up for Indian nuclear power plants in 1960s. There is also a requirement that the growth of population in SZ shall be controlled. In the current scenario where population growth in SZ at some of the sites is much above the natural growth, the distinction between the two zones may disappear. It is clear that emergency preparedness plans shall be in place for these zones. In today's context if these numbers have to be revised, there is a need to give a fresh look to the basis and growth of population in these zones. In view of this, the issue of size and requirement of SZ and EPZ in Indian context are revisited. Technological advances and emerging improvements in some of the elements of emergency response were reviewed to determine their potential effects on decisions of emergency protective actions. Some such elements which affect implementation of emergency countermeasures effectively in SZ and EPZ around Indian nuclear power plants are discussed in this paper. (author)

  5. Update of the Nuclear Criticality Slide Rule for the Emergency Response to a Nuclear Criticality Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duluc, Matthieu; Bardelay, Aurélie; Celik, Cihangir; Heinrichs, Dave; Hopper, Calvin; Jones, Richard; Kim, Soon; Miller, Thomas; Troisne, Marc; Wilson, Chris

    2017-09-01

    AWE (UK), IRSN (France), LLNL (USA) and ORNL (USA) began a long term collaboration effort in 2015 to update the nuclear criticality Slide Rule for the emergency response to a nuclear criticality accident. This document, published almost 20 years ago, gives order of magnitude estimates of key parameters, such as number of fissions and doses (neutron and gamma), useful for emergency response teams and public authorities. This paper will present, firstly the motivation and the long term objectives for this update, then the overview of the initial configurations for updated calculations and preliminary results obtained with modern 3D codes.

  6. Update of the Nuclear Criticality Slide Rule for the Emergency Response to a Nuclear Criticality Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duluc Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available AWE (UK, IRSN (France, LLNL (USA and ORNL (USA began a long term collaboration effort in 2015 to update the nuclear criticality Slide Rule for the emergency response to a nuclear criticality accident. This document, published almost 20 years ago, gives order of magnitude estimates of key parameters, such as number of fissions and doses (neutron and gamma, useful for emergency response teams and public authorities. This paper will present, firstly the motivation and the long term objectives for this update, then the overview of the initial configurations for updated calculations and preliminary results obtained with modern 3D codes.

  7. Survey on national practices and lessons learnt from off-site nuclear emergency exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktorsson, C.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear emergency exercises are considered to make an important contribution to the efficiency of emergency preparedness. Generally, the details of the emergency exercises are specified for each country and often for each site, reflecting the particular features that exist in relation to general emergency arrangements. The Chernobyl accident brought a new dimension into the arena of emergency arrangements - the international dimension. New conventions and revised international guidance have been issued and have been or are being included in national emergency plans. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency decided in 1990 to promote international co-operation in the field of emergency exercises and has adopted a programme of work in this field. One component of this programme, which concerns a survey on national practices and lessons learnt from the planning and conduct of emergency exercises, is dealt with in this paper

  8. Reflections on the emergency preparations and responses of China to Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoqiu; Li Bing; Yu Shaoqing

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviewed the emergency response of Japan in Fukushima nuclear accident, provided and discussed the issues should be of concern on emergency preparedness and response in future: (1) modifying the existing emergency preparedness and response system; (2) consolidating the concept of emergency preparedness as the ultimate level of defense-in-depth; (3) promoting the emergency response decision-making support capabilities; (4) valuing the information opening of involving nuclear news and radiation environmental information. (authors)

  9. Emergency planning and preparedness for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear installations are designed, constructed and operated in such a way that the probability for an incident or accident is very low and the probability for a severe accident with catastrophic consequences is extremely small. These accidents represent the residual risk of the nuclear installation, and this residual risk can be decreased on one hand by a better design, construction and operation and on the other hand by planning and taking emergency measures inside the facility and in the environment of the facility. By way of introduction and definition it may be indicated to define some terms pertaining to the subject in order to make for more uniform understanding. (orig./DG)

  10. Emergency Preparedness. Practical proposals for further harmonisation of the reactions in European countries to any distant nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, Hannele; Bijlholt, Jette; Calvaro, Jose-Manuel Martin; Degueldre, Didier; Vandecasteele, Christian; Willems, Petra; Djounova, Jana; Fueloep, Nandor; Haywood, Stephanie; Herzeele, Michel; Janssens, Augustin; ); Hofer, Peter; Holo, Eldri; Hubbard, Lynn; Lindh, Karin; Isnard, Olivier; Lieser, Joachim; Majerus, Patrick; McMahon, Ciara; Nizamska, Marina; Palsson, Sigurdur Emil; Perrin, Marie-Line; Xicluna, Delphine; Piller, Georges; Rusch, Ronald; Rauber, Dominique; Rother, Wolfram; Stephen, Patrick; Tkavc, Marjan; Van Gelder, Iris

    2013-06-01

    It was clear from the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi in Japan in March 2011 that national assessment and responses to nuclear emergencies even if at a great distance from Europe could be significantly improved by a more rapid exchange of information. Discussions on this point during the 7. HERCA Board of Heads meeting in June 2011 led to the 'Working Group Emergencies' (WGE) being tasked with reviewing the issues and proposing practical working solutions for a more harmonized approach in response to such distant nuclear and radiological emergency situations. The present report is the result of that work. The aim of the report is on the one hand to assist radiological safety authorities to improve their preparedness in some areas and, on the other hand, to provide an overview of the important radiological issues to be considered by radiation protection authorities in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency in a distant country

  11. The nuclear emergency information system based on GRRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bairong; Fu Li; Ma Jie; Zheng Qiyan

    2012-01-01

    By utilizing high operation characteristic of GPRS and advantage of transferring largely data packets, this paper set up a wireless communication network and nuclear emergency information system. This system studies useful data, short message, picture, storage and processing function for wireless control network platform. (authors)

  12. Emergency preparedness for nuclear electric generating facilities in foreign countries: A brief survey of practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuller, C R [Battelle Human Affairs Research Centers, Seattle, WA (United States); Marcus, A A; Hanhardt, Jr, A M; Selvin, M; Huelshoff, M [Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1980-12-01

    This report summarizes the emergency plans for accidents at nuclear power plants in Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Canada, and France. Soviet Union documents were examined, but no published information was found on the subject. The study of foreign plans was to determine what U.S. planners might learn that could be useful to them. Plans of the foreign countries were published before the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island and reflected a generally accepted premise that a serious nuclear emergency would never occur. Therefore, there are few ideas of immediate use to U.S. planners. Most countries have since begun to re-examine their emergency planning. The study also discusses the emergency action levels, warning systems, evacuation management and procedures, and public information and education for people living near nuclear power plants and defines roles of nuclear facility operators and roles of the government. (author)

  13. Meteorological considerations in emergency response capability at nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairobent, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Meteorological considerations in emergency response at nuclear power plants are discussed through examination of current regulations and guidance documents, including discussion of the rationale for current regulatory requirements related to meteorological information for emergency response. Areas discussed include: major meteorological features important to emergency response; onsite meteorological measurements programs, including redundant and backup measurements; access to offsite sources of meteorological information; consideration of real-time and forecast conditions and atmospheric dispersion modeling

  14. Evaluation of nuclear data for emergency preparedness system of nuclear power plants. Comparison of radioactivity inventories by newest nuclear data and rather older nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Kimura, Itsuro

    2004-01-01

    The radioactivity inventories for emergency preparedness systems of nuclear power plants calculated by the combination of the generally-used in Japan (general-version), the INSS used by the present authors (INSS-version) and the newest nuclear data library and codes (newest-version) were compared, and the maintaining of conservativeness of the general-version and the INSS-version against the newest-version was examined. And the influences of the radioactivity inventories by the difference between the nuclear cross section and fission yield data, decay data and calculation codes were investigated. As a result, (1) the radioactivity inventories calculated by general-version and INSS-version were not confirmed the conservativeness to the newest-version. But the difference was less than 10%, and it would not give large influence to the calculation of the emergency preparedness system of nuclear plants. (2) The influence of the radioactivity inventories such as 135 Xe build-up were observed by the difference of neutron flux level in an operation of reactors that occurred by the variety of nuclear cross section and fission yield data. (3) Little influence by the variety of decay data was confirmed. (4) The ORIGEN2.1 code underestimated the amount of fission products generated by fission of minor actinides. From these result, the radioactivity inventories for the emergency preparedness system of nuclear power plants are recommended to use the calculation results by the combination of the library for ORIGEN2 based on JENDL3.3 and the ORIGEN2.2 code. (author)

  15. Resilience and Brittleness in a Nuclear Emergency Response Simulation: Focusing on Team Coordination Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Wagner Schenkel; Buarque, Lia; Voshell, Martin; Branlat, Matthieu; Woods, David D.; Gomes, Jose Orlando

    2008-01-01

    The current work presents results from a cognitive task analysis (CTA) of a nuclear disaster simulation. Audio-visual records were collected from an emergency room team composed of individuals from 26 different agencies as they responded to multiple scenarios in a simulated nuclear disaster. This simulation was part of a national emergency response training activity for a nuclear power plant located in a developing country. The objectives of this paper are to describe sources of resilience and brittleness in these activities, identify cues of potential improvements for future emergency simulations, and leveraging the resilience of the emergency response System in case of a real disaster. Multiple CTA techniques were used to gain a better understanding of the cognitive dimensions of the activity and to identify team coordination and crisis management patterns that emerged from the simulation training. (authors)

  16. A decision support system for emergency response to major nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papazoglou, I.A.; Christou, M.D.

    1997-01-01

    A methodology for the optimization of the short-term emergency response in the event of a nuclear accident is presented. The method seeks an optimum combination of protective actions in the presence of a multitude of conflicting objectives and under uncertainty. Conflicting objectives arise in the attempt to minimize simultaneously the potential adverse effects of an accident and the associated socioeconomic impacts. Additional conflicting objectives arise whenever an emergency plan tends to decrease a particular health effect, such as acute deaths, while it increases another, such as latent deaths. The uncertainty is due to the multitude of possible accident scenarios and their respective probability of occurrence, the stochastic variability in the weather conditions, and the variability and/or lack of knowledge of the parameters of the risk assessment models. A multiobjective optimization approach is adopted. An emergency protection plan consists of defining a protective action at each spatial cell around the plant. Three criteria are used as the objective functions of the problem, namely, acute fatalities, latent effects, and socioeconomic cost. The optimization procedure defines the efficient frontier, i.e., all emergency plans that are not dominated by another in all three criteria. No value trade-offs are necessary up to this point. The most preferred emergency plan is then chosen among the set of efficient plans. Finally, the methodology is integrated into a computerized decision support system, and its use is demonstrated in a realistic application

  17. National emergency medical assistance program for commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linnemann, R.E.; Berger, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation Management Consultant's Emergency Medical Assistance Program (EMAP) for nuclear facilities provides a twenty-four hour emergency medical and health physics response capability, training of site and off-site personnel, and three levels of care for radiation accident victims: first air and rescue at an accident site, hospital emergency assessment and treatment, and definitive evaluation and treatment at a specialized medical center. These aspects of emergency preparedness and fifteen years of experience in dealing with medical personnel and patients with real or suspected radiation injury will be reviewed

  18. An expert system for improving nuclear emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salame-Alfie, A.; Goldbogen, G.C.; Ryan, R.M.; Wallace, W.A.; Yeater, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The accidents at TMI-2 and Chernobyl have produced initiatives aimed at improving nuclear plant emergency response capabilities. Among them are the development of emergency response facilities with capabilities for the acquisition, processing, and diagnosis of data which are needed to help coordinate plant operations, engineering support and management under emergency conditions. An effort in this direction prompted the development of an expert system. EP (EMERGENCY PLANNER) is a prototype expert system that is intended to help coordinate the overall management during emergency conditions. The EP system was built using the GEN-X expert system shell. GEN-X has a variety of knowledge representation mechanisms including AND/OR trees, Decision trees, and IF/THEN tables, and runs on an IBM PC-XT or AT computer or compatible. Among the main features, EP is portable, modular, user friendly, can interact with external programs and interrogate data bases. The knowledge base is made of New York State (NYS) Procedures for Emergency Classification, NYS Radiological Emergency Preparedness Plan (REPP) and knowledge from experts of the NYS Radiological Emergency Preparedness Group and the Office of Radiological Health and Chemistry of the New York Power Authority (NYPA)

  19. The international emergency management and engineering conference 1995: Proceedings. Globalization of emergency management and engineering: National and international issues concerning research and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, J.D. [ed.] [Optimal Systems, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States); Wybo, J.L. [ed.] [Ecole des Mines de Paris (France); Buisson, L. [ed.] [CEMAGREF, Saint-Martin d`Heres (France). Div. Nivologie

    1995-12-31

    This conference was held May 9--12, 1995 in Nice, France. The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information to cope more effectively with emergencies. Attention is focused on advance technology from both a managerial and a scientific viewpoint. Interests include computers and communication systems as well as the social science and management aspects involved in emergency management and engineering. The major sections are: Management and Social Sciences; Training; Natural Disasters; Nuclear Hazards; Chemical Hazards; Research; and Applications. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  20. Nuclear emergency plans in France. Strengths and weaknesses. Report 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boilley, David; Josset, Mylene

    2016-01-01

    This report first presents nuclear emergency plans in France (specific intervention plans, action at the municipal level, creation of a national plan, planning of the post-accidental phase, integration of the international and cross-border dimension. Then, it analyses strengths and weaknesses of these plans. It outlines the necessity to take the most severe accident scenarios into account (issue of selection of reference accidents, necessity of reviewing emergency planning areas, and assessment of the number of inhabitants about French nuclear installations). It proposes a review of measures of protection of populations (information, sheltering, iodine-based prophylaxis, evacuation, food control and restrictions, protection of human resources, cross-border problems). It discusses how to put an end to the emergency situation, and the assessment and collaboration on emergency plans. The next part proposes an analysis of noticed strengths and weaknesses in some PPIs (specific intervention plans) in terms of text accessibility, of description of the site and of its environment, of intervention area, of operational measures, and of preparation to the post-accidental phase

  1. Introducing PCTRAN as an evaluation tool for nuclear power plant emergency responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Yi-Hsiang; Shih, Chunkuan; Chiang, Show-Chyuan; Weng, Tung-Li

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► PCTRAN is integrated with an atmospheric dispersion algorithm. ► The improved PCTRAN acts as an accident/incident simulator and a data exchange system. ► The software helps the responsible organizations decide the rescue and protective actions. ► The evaluation results show the nuclear power plant accident and its off-site dose consequences. ► The software can be used for nuclear power plant emergency responses. - Abstract: Protecting the public from radiation exposure is important if a nuclear power plant (NPP) accident occurs. Deciding appropriate protective actions in a timely and effective manner can be fulfilled by using an effective accident evaluation tool. In our earlier work, we have integrated PCTRAN (Personal Computer Transient Analyzer) with the off-site dose calculation model. In this study, we introduce PCTRAN as an evaluation tool for nuclear power plant emergency responses. If abnormal conditions in the plant are monitored or observed, the plant staffs can distinguish accident/incident initiation events. Thus, the responsible personnel can immediately operate PCTRAN and set up those accident/incident initiation events to simulate the nuclear power plant transient or accident in conjunction with off-site dose distributions. The evaluation results consequently help the responsible organizations decide the rescue and protective actions. In this study, we explain and demonstrate the capabilities of PCTRAN for nuclear emergency responses, through applying it to simulate the postulated nuclear power plant accident scenarios.

  2. Annual report of Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center. April 1, 2011 - March 31, 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Hiromi; Okuno, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Akiko; Ikeda, Takeshi; Tamura, Kenichi; Nagakura, Tomohiro; Nakanishi, Chika; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Abe, Minako; Sato, Sohei; Kawakami, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Sumiya, Akihiro; Matsusaka, Masaru

    2012-08-01

    When a nuclear emergency occurs in Japan, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has the responsibility of providing technical support to the National government, local governments, police, fire stations and nuclear operators etc., because the JAEA has been designated as the Designated Public Institution under the Basic Act on Disaster Control Measures and the Act on Response to Armed Attack Situations, etc.. The Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) of JAEA provides a comprehensive range of technical support activities to an Off-Site Center in case of a nuclear emergency. Specifically, NEAT gives technical advice and information, dispatches specialists as required, and supplies the National Government and local governments with emergency equipments and materials. NEAT provides various exercise and training courses concerning nuclear disaster prevention to those personnel taking an active part in emergency response organizations at normal times. NEAT also researches on nuclear disaster prevention and cooperates with international organizations. Concerning the assistance to the Accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Station caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March, 2011, JAEA has assisted activities including environmental radiation monitoring, environmental radioactivity analyses, and response to telephone inquiries from residents etc., with utmost effort. NEAT has served as the center of these supporting activities of JAEA. This annual report summarized these activities of JAEA/NEAT in the fiscal year 2011. (author)

  3. Non-nuclear power application of nuclear technology in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funtua, I.I.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear Technology applications are found in Food and Agriculture, Human Health, Water Resources, Industry, Environment, Education and Research.There are more potentials for the deployment of nuclear technology in more aspects of our life with needed economic development in Nigeria.Nuclear Technology plays and would continue to play vital role in Agriculture, Human health, Water resources and industry in Nigeria.Nuclear technologies have been useful in developmental efforts worldwide and for these to take hold, capacity building programmes must be expanded and the general public must have informed opinions about the benefits and risk associated with the technologies.This presentation gives an overview of nuclear technology applications in Nigeria in the following areas: Food and Agriculture, Human Health, Water Resources, Industry, Education and Research

  4. Medical Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Training Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    In almost all nuclear and radiological emergencies, local emergency services (e.g. local medical, law enforcement, and fire brigades) will have the most important role in the early response. Within hours, hospitals may also have an important role to play in the response at the local level. Since nuclear and radiological emergencies are rare, medical responders often have little or no experience in dealing with this type of emergency and inexperience may lead to an inadequate response. For this reason, training in medical preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency is an important aspect of preparedness and response activities. These materials are designed for use at a training course on medical preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency. They contain a wide range of lectures and supporting materials, which cover the basic topics and more specific areas of medical preparedness and response. Therefore, in planning their specific courses, organizers are encouraged to choose those lectures and supportive materials from the CD-ROM that best match their training priorities. Materials on the CD-ROM address the following areas: • Terrorism in Perspective; • Malicious Act Scenarios; • Providing Information to the Medical Community and the Public; • Medical Response to a Radiation Mass Casualty Event; • Handling of Contaminated Persons in Malicious Events; • Planning and Preparedness for Medical Response to Malicious Events with Radioactive Material; • Handling the Bodies of Decedents Contaminated with Radioactive Material; • Radiation Emergencies: Scope of the Problem; • Common Sources of Radiation; • Basic Concepts of Ionizing Radiation; • Basic Concepts of Radiation Protection; • Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation – Basic Notions; • Basics of Radiopathology; • External Radioactive Contamination; • Internal Radioactive Contamination; • Acute Radiation Syndrome; • Cutaneous Radiation

  5. Development of national level preparedness for response to nuclear and radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2014-01-01

    In India, DAE being the nodal agency for technical support for response to any radiation emergency nuclear disaster and various nuclear and radiological emergency scenarios and their impacts are identified. To reduce their consequences development of methodologies for detection and quick impact assessment, trained First Responders and Quick Response Teams (QRTs), twenty two DAE Emergency Response Centers, mobile and aerial radiation monitoring systems, aerial and ground based validation trials etc. are carried out. Study related to radiological threats and simulated RDD experiments conducted using stable isotopes indicates that radiation levels for distances more than 50 m will not be very high as hotspots may be restricted to nearby area. The biggest challenge from an RDD explosion will be handling of the radioactive contamination and 'fear factor' compared to radiation exposure to public or First Responders. Level and pattern of radioactive contamination on ground following releases during nuclear accidents and minimum strength of orphan radioactive sources to be detected are taken into account for optimizing systems and monitoring methodology required for emergency preparedness

  6. Emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear activities are exercised so as to prevent the accidents. They are subjected to a rule whom application is controlled by the Asn. The risk of grave accident is so limited to a very low level of probability. He cannot be however completely pushed aside. The expression ' radiological emergency situation ' indicates a situation which ensues from an incident or of an accident risking to lead to an emission of radioactive materials or a level of radioactivity susceptible to strike a blow at the public health. The term ' nuclear crisis ' is used for the events which can lead to a radiological emergency situation on a nuclear basic installation or during a transport of radioactive materials. The preparation and the management of emergency situations, that they are of natural, accidental or terrorist origin, became a major concern of our society. We propose you of to know more about it in this file. (N.C.)

  7. Annual report of Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center. April 1, 2013 - March 31, 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takeshi; Muto, Shigeo; Akiyama, Kiyomitsu; Aoki, Kazufumi; Okamoto, Akiko; Kawakami, Takeshi; Kume, Nobuhide; Nakanishi, Chika; Koie, Masahiro; Kawamata, Hiroyuki; Nemotouchi, Toshimasa; Saito, Toru; Kato, Tadashi; Sumiya, Akio; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Sato, Sohei; Sumiya, Akihiro; Okuno, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Matsusaka, Masaru

    2015-02-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency, which will be abbreviated as JAEA hereafter, was assigned as a designated public institution under the Disaster Countermeasures Basic Act and under the Armed Attack Situations Response Act. Based on these Acts, the JAEA has the responsibility of providing technical support to the national government and/or local governments in case of disaster responses or response in the event of a military attack, etc. In order to fulfill the tasks, the JAEA has established the Emergency Action Plan and the Civil Protection Action Plan. In case of a nuclear emergency, the Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) dispatches specialists of JAEA, supplies the national government and local governments with emergency equipment and materials, and gives technical advice and information. In normal time, NEAT provides various exercises and training courses concerning nuclear disaster prevention to those personnel taking an active part in emergency response institutions of the national and local governments, police, fire fighters, self-defense forces, etc. in addition to the JAEA itself. The NEAT also researches nuclear disaster preparedness and response, and cooperates with international organizations. In the FY2013, the NEAT accomplished the following tasks: (1) Technical support activities as a designated public institution in cooperation with the national and local governments, etc. (2) Human resource development, exercise and training of nuclear emergency response personnel for the national and local governments, etc. (3) Researches on nuclear disaster preparedness and response, and sending useful information. (4) International contributions to Asian countries on nuclear disaster preparedness and response in collaboration with the international organizations. (author)

  8. Commercial grade item (CGI) dedication of MDR relays for nuclear safety related applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ranjit K.; Julka, Anil; Modi, Govind

    1994-08-01

    MDR relays manufactured by Potter & Brumfield (P&B) have been used in various safety related applications in commercial nuclear power plants. These include emergency safety features (ESF) actuation systems, emergency core cooling systems (ECCS) actuation, and reactor protection systems. The MDR relays manufactured prior to May 1990 showed signs of generic failure due to corrosion and outgassing of coil varnish. P&B has made design changes to correct these problems in relays manufactured after May 1990. However, P&B does not manufacture the relays under any 10CFR50 Appendix B quality assurance (QA) program. They manufacture the relays under their commercial QA program and supply these as commercial grade items. This necessitates CGI Dedication of these relays for use in nuclear-safety-related applications. This paper presents a CGI dedication program that has been used to dedicate the MDR relays manufactured after been used to dedicate the MDR relays manufactured after May 1990. The program is in compliance with current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) guidelines and applicable industry standards; it specifies the critical characteristics of the relays, provides the tests and analysis required to verify the critical characteristics, the acceptance criteria for the test results, performs source verification to quality P&B for its control of the critical characteristics, and provides documentation. The program provides reasonable assurance that the new MDR relays will perform their intended safety functions.

  9. Improving the Reliability of Decision-Support Systems for Nuclear Emergency Management by Leveraging Software Design Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor B. Ionescu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel method of continuous verification of simulation software used in decision-support systems for nuclear emergency management (DSNE. The proposed approach builds on methods from the field of software reliability engineering, such as N-Version Programming, Recovery Blocks, and Consensus Recovery Blocks. We introduce a new acceptance test for dispersion simulation results and a new voting scheme based on taxonomies of simulation results rather than individual simulation results. The acceptance test and the voter are used in a new scheme, which extends the Consensus Recovery Block method by a database of result taxonomies to support machine-learning. This enables the system to learn how to distinguish correct from incorrect results, with respect to the implemented numerical schemes. Considering that decision-support systems for nuclear emergency management are used in a safety-critical application context, the methods introduced in this paper help improve the reliability of the system and the trustworthiness of the simulation results used by emergency managers in the decision making process. The effectiveness of the approach has been assessed using the atmospheric dispersion forecasts of two test versions of the widely used RODOS DSNE system.

  10. Emergency facility control device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehara, Morihiko.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the reliability of a nuclear reactor by allowing an emergency facility to be manually started and stopped to make its operation more convenient and eliminate the possibility of erroneous operation in an emergency. Constitution: There are provided a first water level detector for detecting a level lower than the first low water level in a reactor container and a second water level detector for detecting a level lower than the second low water level lower than the first low water level, and an emergency facility can be started and stopped manually only when the level is higher than the second low water level, but the facility will be started regardless of the state of the manual operation when the level is lower than the second low water level. Thus, the emergency facility can be started by manual operation, but will be automatically started so as to secure the necessary minimum operation if the level becomes lower than the second low water level and the stopping operation thereafter is forgotten. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Systematic preparation, execution and evaluation of emergency exercises at the Beznau nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenschert, J.

    2011-01-01

    Based on federal acts and a specific guideline of the nuclear authority ENSI, strict requirements are imposed on emergency exercises at Swiss NPPs. The Beznau NPP has conducted emergency exercises for more than 30 years. Systematic exercise planning assures that all emergency cases defined in the plant-specific emergency plan are considered in the exercise scenarios. Technically oriented scenarios cover all groups of initiating events and all safety levels of the defense in depth principle. The exercise results are an important input for optimization measures in the areas of emergency organization, documentation and infrastructure. Due to the goal-oriented enforcement of laws and guidelines by the nuclear authority ENSI, emergency exercises serve as a motor of further optimization of emergency preparedness. (orig.)

  12. Study of time-critical diagnostic method for emergency operation of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofuku, A.; Yoshikawa, H.; Itoh, K.; Wakabayashi, J.

    1986-01-01

    In order to support the emergency operation of nuclear power plant, the method of time-critical diagnostic plant analyzer has been investigated. The conception of the emergency operation support center is proposed and two types of plant analyzer may be installed in this center. One analyzer is a real-time tracking simulation code using the observed signals and another is a fast trend-prediction code. A real-time tracking code, TOKRAC, has been developed for analyzing the PWR primary loop thermo-hydraulics at SBLOCA, and the applicability of this code was examined by the numerical experiments for the initial phase transient of both TMI-2 accident and 6% coldleg SBLOCA of a Westinghouse-type PWR plant. The results showed that fairly good tracking was carried out by TOKRAC. The CPU time of TOKRAC was about 12-14 percent of real-time

  13. Community emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents: A selected and partially annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngen, G.

    1988-10-01

    The role of responding to emergencies at nuclear power plants is often considered the responsibility of the personnel onsite. This is true for most, if not all, of the incidents that may happen during the course of the plant's operating lifetime. There is however, the possibility of a major accident occurring at anytime. Major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island have taught their respective countries and communities a significant lesson in local emergency preparedness and response. Through these accidents, the rest of the world can also learn a great deal about planning, preparing and responding to the emergencies unique to nuclear power. This bibliography contains books, journal articles, conference papers and government reports on emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents. It does not contain citations for ''onsite'' response or planning, nor does it cover the areas of radiation releases from transportation accidents. The compiler has attempted to bring together a sampling of the world's collective written experience on dealing with nuclear reactor accidents on the sate, local and community levels. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, that written experience has grown enormously

  14. Community emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents: A selected and partially annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngen, G.

    1988-10-01

    The role of responding to emergencies at nuclear power plants is often considered the responsibility of the personnel onsite. This is true for most, if not all, of the incidents that may happen during the course of the plant`s operating lifetime. There is however, the possibility of a major accident occurring at anytime. Major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island have taught their respective countries and communities a significant lesson in local emergency preparedness and response. Through these accidents, the rest of the world can also learn a great deal about planning, preparing and responding to the emergencies unique to nuclear power. This bibliography contains books, journal articles, conference papers and government reports on emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents. It does not contain citations for ``onsite`` response or planning, nor does it cover the areas of radiation releases from transportation accidents. The compiler has attempted to bring together a sampling of the world`s collective written experience on dealing with nuclear reactor accidents on the sate, local and community levels. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, that written experience has grown enormously.

  15. Parametric study of emerging high power accelerator applications using Accelerator Systems Model (ASM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berwald, D.H.; Mendelsohn, S.S.; Myers, T.J.; Paulson, C.C.; Peacock, M.A.; Piaszczyk, CM.; Rathke, J.W.; Piechowiak, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    Emerging applications for high power rf linacs include fusion materials testing, generation of intense spallation neutrons for neutron physics and materials studies, production of nuclear materials and destruction of nuclear waste. Each requires the selection of an optimal configuration and operating parameters for its accelerator, rf power system and other supporting subsystems. Because of the high cost associated with these facilities, economic considerations become paramount, dictating a full evaluation of the electrical and rf performance, system reliability/availability, and capital, operating, and life cycle costs. The Accelerator Systems Model (ASM), expanded and modified by Northrop Grumman during 1993-96, provides a unique capability for detailed layout and evaluation of a wide variety of normal and superconducting accelerator and rf power configurations. This paper will discuss the current capabilities of ASM, including the available models and data base, and types of trade studies that can be performed for the above applications. (author)

  16. Nuclear data applications in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, M.K.; Schmidt, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology currently receive an increasing attention in many developing countries. More than 15 developing countries operate, construct or plan nuclear power reactors, 70 developing countries are using or planning to use nuclear techniques in medicine, agriculture, industry, and for other vital purposes. The generation, application and computer processing of nuclear data constitute important elements of the nuclear infrastructure needed for the successful implementation of nuclear science and technology. Developing countries become increasingly aware of this need, and, with the help and cooperation of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, are steadily gaining in experience in this field. The paper illustrates this development in typical examples. (orig.)

  17. Generic test procedure for the qualification of a nuclear emergency generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonis, J.C.; Bowman, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the proposed analytical and experimental procedures for the qualification of the standby generators and exciters used in the Emergency Diesel Generator Systems in a nuclear power plant. The components which require qualification are identified through a failure mode analysis of the systems conducted using engineering drawings updated to include all field changes. The qualification of each component includes the margins given in IEEE Std. 323-1974, ''Qualifying Class 1E Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations.'' These margins are combined with the plant specific data to define an enveloping set of environmental parameters. This set of enveloping parameters, plus margin, form the bases for the analysis or test qualification tasks. Proposed qualification of the composite electrical insulation systems used in the generator and exciter on the form or random wound coils is by traceable testing. However, before testing the thermal and radiation degradation data used in the design of the generator and exciter are evaluated to identify if these data are sufficiently traceable to eliminate the need for additional insulation tests. The required tests are guided by applicable standards

  18. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency's Use of Geographic Information Systems for Nuclear Emergency Response Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guber, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S, Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Agency's (NNSA) Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) provides Geographic Information System (GIS) support during nuclear emergency response activities. As directed by the NNSA, the RSL GIS staff maintains databases and equipment for rapid field deployment during an emergency response. When on location, GIS operators provide information products to on-site emergency managers as well as to emergency managers at the DOE Headquarters (HQ) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in Washington, D.C. Data products are derived from multiple information sources in the field including radiological prediction models, field measurements taken on the ground and from the air, and pertinent information researched on the Internet. The GIS functions as a central data hub where it supplies the information to response elements in the field, as well as to headquarters officials at HQ during emergency response activities

  19. Help Me Please!: Designing and Developing Application for Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ng Ken; Hafit, Hanayanti; Wahid, Norfaradilla; Kasim, Shahreen; Yusof, Munirah Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Help Me Please! Application is an android platform emergency button application that is designed to transmit emergency messages to target receivers with real time information. The purpose of developing this application is to help people to notify any emergency circumstances via Short Message Service (SMS) in android platform. The application will receive the current location from Global Positioning System (GPS), will obtain the current time from the mobile device and send this information to the receivers when user presses the emergency button. Simultaneously, the application will keep sending the emergency alerts to receivers and will update to database based on the time interval set by user until user stop the function. Object-oriented Software Development model is employed to guide the development of this application with the knowledge of Java language and Android Studio. In conclusion, this application plays an important role in rescuing process when emergency circumstances happen. The rescue process will become more effective by notifying the emergency circumstances and send the current location of user to others in the early hours.

  20. The problem of adequacy in skin dosimetry for the case of a nuclear reactor emergency and for occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osanov, D.

    1991-01-01

    The requirement for satisfactory skin dosimetry is, briefly, that the measured dosimetric values should be applicable for further unambiguous prediction of the radiation-induced effects. To fit these requirements the dose limits and actual dose burdens should be concerned with those target skin structures that are primarily responsible for biological effects. The problem of adequate skin dosimetry is here considered for the two most important situations: (1) for normal operation of nuclear power plants, and (2) for a nuclear reactor emergency. A method for determination of the absorbed dose of beta radiation in the surface tissues of the human body from a flat source produced by radionuclides accumulated on the ground surface is presented. Skin dose estimation techniques and actual values of personnel skin doses are also presented, as well as the application of such dose data in predicting the consequences of the irradiation. The principles of emergency and conventional skin dosemeter construction fulfilling the requirements for adequacy and for the measurement of the dose limits for occupational irradiation of the skin are discussed. (author)

  1. Nuclear emergencies and protective actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeblom, Klaus

    1995-01-01

    Although technical improvements have increased the safety of new and old nuclear power plants, many simultaneous component failures and/or human errors are improbable but possible. Both the plant (on-site) and the nearby area (off-site) have emergency plans. Rescue service authorities are responsible of the off-site. The main protective actions are sheltering, evacuation and iodine ingestion. The Loviisa off-site emergency plan assumes that a major part of this population takes care of their own protective actions; Rescue service authorities can then concentrate on the coordination activities and to those people who need help. To be able to carry out the protective actions timely and effectively the people should have information on radiation risk and emergency planning. In case of a potential accident the local population should follow the rescue service information and know how to shelter and how to evacuate themselves. Though there are many stockpiles of iodine pellets in the area the rescue service authorities recommend that each household should purchase iodine pellets for their own need. The utility and the rescue service authorities have distributed information brochures to all homes within 30 km from Loviisa NPP since 1990. This brochure gives information on radiation and protective actions in case of an accident. Because the brochures might not stay available and so also the local telephone book contains this information

  2. Study on the Enhancement of Nuclear Control and Emergency Preparedness Systems in KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Dong Sup; Lee, T. Y.; Lee, B. D.; Yoo, J. G.; Lee, G. Y.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. S.; Park, H. J

    2006-12-15

    The purposes of the study are: to implement obligations specified in treaties and domestic laws and to enhance the nuclear transparency suffered from a careless experiment, being issued in 2004, with nuclear material; and to prepare nuclear emergency and to settle down effectively the emergency situation. We established an infrastructure of the system of accounting for and control of nuclear material. and installed systematic measures to deal the cases of radiation accidents. In the first year (2006) the project is focused on the development of two systems: an information treatment system that controls and manages the nuclear material in facilities at KAERI; and a real-time surveillance system that integrates the safety system information of nuclear facilities in KAERI. The development of information treatment system for IAEA safeguards and facility-level accountancy has been initiated in October, 2006, and planned to complete by October 2007. Communication channels between the emergency control head-quarter and the briefing rooms of facilities and accident areas are established to implement an advanced supervision system for radiation accidents. Also, a surveillance system, that collects and supervises the facilities' safety system parameters in real time, is installed and confirmed that the display system of the safety parameters is stably operating.

  3. The application of XML in the effluents data modeling of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Feng; Lin Quanyi; Yue Huiguo; Zhang Yan; Zhang Peng; Cao Jun; Chen Bo

    2013-01-01

    The radioactive effluent data, which can provide information to distinguish whether facilities, waste disposal, and control system run normally, is an important basis of safety regulation and emergency management. It can also provide the information to start emergency alarm system as soon as possible. XML technology is an effective tool to realize the standard of effluent data exchange, in favor of data collection, statistics and analysis, strengthening the effectiveness of effluent regulation. This paper first introduces the concept of XML, the choices of effluent data modeling method, and then emphasizes the process of effluent model, finally the model and application are shown, While there is deficiency about the application of XML in the effluents data modeling of nuclear facilities, it is a beneficial attempt to the informatization management of effluents. (authors)

  4. Role definition among public officials and emergency workers in a nuclear evacuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    How public officials and emergency workers will resolve conflict between their official duties and assigned tasks and their family and conscience responsibilities is discussed in the context of the Indian Point nuclear station, and the Shoreham nuclear station

  5. Major alternatives for government policies, organizational structures, and actions in civilian nuclear reactor emergency management in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify and assess major alternatives for governmental policies, organizational structures, and actions in civilian nuclear reactor emergency management in the United States. The National Academy of Public Administration agreed to identify and evaluate alternatives for governmental policies, organizational structures, and actions in civilian nuclear reactor emergency management. It agreed to review present policies and practices in civilian nuclear reactor emergency management, to review selected experiences and practices of governmental agencies other than the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and industries other than the nuclear power industry, and to identify alternatives to the present nuclear emergency system

  6. Applications of nuclear energy in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitek, J.; Necas, V.

    2012-01-01

    Concepts and international frames of generation IV nuclear reactors. A review of use of nuclear energy for non electric applications especially in areas such as seawater desalination, hydrogen production, district heating and other industrial applications. (Author)

  7. QUEST: A model to quantify uncertain emergency search techniques, theory and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.M.; Goldsby, M.E.; Plantenga, T.D.; Wilcox, W.B.; Hensley, W.K.

    1996-01-01

    As recent world events show, criminal and terrorist access to nuclear materials is a growing national concern. The national laboratories are taking the lead in developing technologies to counter these potential threats to our national security. Sandia National Laboratories, with support from Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the Remote Sensing Laboratory, has developed QUEST (a model to Quantify Uncertain Emergency Search Techniques), to enhance the performance of organizations in the search for lost or stolen nuclear material. In addition, QUEST supports a wide range of other applications, such as environmental monitoring, nuclear facilities inspections, and searcher training. QUEST simulates the search for nuclear materials and calculates detector response fro various source types and locations. The probability of detecting a radioactive source during a search is a function of many different variables. Through calculation of dynamic detector response, QUEST makes possible quantitative comparisons of various sensor technologies and search patterns. The QUEST model can be used to examine the impact of new detector technologies, explore alternative search concepts, and provide interactive search/inspector training

  8. Emergency preparedness for nuclear power plants in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    In the case of an operating reactor, if it is determined that there are such deficiencies that a favourable NRC finding is not warranted and if the deficiencies are not corrected within four months of that determination, the Commission will determine whether the reactor should be shut down or whether some other enforcement action is appropriate. In any case, where the Commission believes that the public health, safety, or interest so requires, the plant will be required to shut down immediately. Emergency planning considerations must be extended to emergency planning zones, and these shall consist of an area of about 10 miles in radius for exposure to the radioactive plume that might result from an accident in a nuclear power reactor and an area of about 50 miles in radius for food that might become contaminated. To evaluate the effectiveness of the licensee programme to implement their emergency plan, a 'management oversight and risk tree' (MORT) approach was developed and used by NRC appraisal teams at all operating facilities and those close to licensing. Since April 1981, over 250 emergency preparedness exercises have been observed and annual inspections conducted at US commercial nuclear power generating facilities. As a result of this experience, licensees have generally progressed from a basic ability to implement their plan to a systematic demonstration of their emergency preparedness capabilities. Almost five years have elapsed since the inception of the upgraded emergency preparedness regulatory programme, and the NRC is evaluating the resources committed to the programme to determine if modifications are appropriate. Our goal is to ensure continued adequate readiness capability to protect the public health and safety in the event of an accident

  9. Necessity of long term nuclear data development for various applications needing nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukahori, Tokio

    2001-01-01

    Necessity of long term nuclear data development for accelerator-driven system target design, high-energy radiation shielding, medical application, space and astrophysical applications, etc. is described in this paper. For each application field needing nuclear data, considered were importance of nuclear data in determining the success or failure of the application, important gaps remaining in the nuclear data and feasibility of filling the gaps with a modest research effort. It can be concluded much more international discussions are required. (author)

  10. Emergency monitoring strategy and radiation measurements document of the NKS project emergency management and radiation monitoring in nuclear and radiological accidents (EMARAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahtinen, J. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) (Finland)

    2006-04-15

    This report is one of the deliverables of the NKS Project Emergency management and radiation monitoring in nuclear and radiological accidents (EMARAD) (20022005). The project and the overall results are briefly described in the NKS publication 'Emergency Management and Radiation Monitoring in Nuclear and Radiological Accidents. Summary Report on the NKS Project EMARAD' (NKS-137, April 2006). In a nuclear or radiological emergency, all radiation measurements must be performed efficiently and the results interpreted correctly in order to provide the decision-makers with adequate data needed in analysing the situation and carrying out countermeasures. Managing measurements in different situations in a proper way requires the existence of pre-prepared emergency monitoring strategies. Preparing a comprehensive yet versatile strategy is not an easy task to perform because there are lots of different factors that have to be taken into account. The primary objective of this study was to discuss the general problematics concerning emergency monitoring strategies and to describe a few important features of an efficient emergency monitoring system as well as factors affecting measurement activities in practise. Some information concerning the current situation in the Nordic countries has also been included. (au)

  11. Low-temperature nuclear heat applications: Nuclear power plants for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    The IAEA reflected the needs of its Member States for the exchange of information in the field of nuclear heat application already in the late 1970s. In the early 1980s, some Member States showed their interest in the use of heat from electricity producing nuclear power plants and in the development of nuclear heating plants. Accordingly, a technical committee meeting with a workshop was organized in 1983 to review the status of nuclear heat application which confirmed both the progress made in this field and the renewed interest of Member States in an active exchange of information about this subject. In 1985 an Advisory Group summarized the Potential of Low-Temperature Nuclear Heat Application; the relevant Technical Document reviewing the situation in the IAEA's Member States was issued in 1986 (IAEA-TECDOC-397). Programme plans were made for 1986-88 and the IAEA was asked to promote the exchange of information, with specific emphasis on the design criteria, operating experience, safety requirements and specifications for heat-only reactors, co-generation plants and power plants adapted for heat application. Because of a growing interest of the IAEA's Member States about nuclear heat employment in the district heating domaine, an Advisory Group meeting was organized by the IAEA on ''Low-Temperature Nuclear Heat Application: Nuclear Power Plants for District Heating'' in Prague, Czechoslovakia in June 1986. The information gained up to 1986 and discussed during this meeting is embodied in the present Technical Document. 22 figs, 11 tabs

  12. Generic procedures for monitoring in a nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    One of the most important aspects of managing a radiological emergency is the ability to promptly and adequately assess the need for protective actions. Protective action accident management must make use of the key relevant information available. Decision-making and accident assessment will be an iterative and dynamic process aimed at refining the initial evaluation as more detailed and complete information becomes available. Emergency monitoring is one of the main sources for obtaining needed information. This publication is in the scope of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Legal Series No. 14) under which the IAEA is authorized to assist a State Party or a Member State among other matters in developing appropriate radiation monitoring programmes, procedures and standards (Article 5). The scope of this manual is restricted to practical guidance for environmental and source monitoring during a nuclear or other radiological emergency. It does not address emergency response preparedness, nor does it cover the emergency management aspects of accident assessment. This manual is organised into sections relating to measurements in order of priority of a major reactor accident, namely: ambient gamma/beta dose rates from plume, ground deposition or source; radionuclide concentrations in air; deposition maps for 131 I and 137 Cs and other important radionuclides; radionuclide mix in deposition and radionuclide concentrations in food, drinking water and other samples. The introductory section provides an overview of the design of emergency monitoring and sampling programmes, monitoring teams and their qualifications and training, monitoring equipment and instrumentation, protective actions for emergency monitoring teams and quality assurance and quality control checks

  13. Experience from the third international nuclear emergency exercise (INEX 3) on consequence management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990's, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has offered its member countries a forum for improving efficiency and effectiveness in nuclear emergency management, focusing in particular on the international aspects of emergency preparedness and response. A central approach to this has been the preparation and conduct of the International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (INEX) series. The INEX 3 consequence management exercises were developed by the NEA Working Party on Nuclear Emergency Matters in response to its members desire to better prepare for the longer-term response following a nuclear or radiological emergency. The INEX 3 exercise series was developed in 2002-2004, and conducted throughout 2005 and early 2006 by 15 participating countries. The INEX 3 evaluation workshop held in Paris (France) in May 2006 was convened with the objective of allowing participants to share their national experiences with INEX 3, compare approaches, analyse the implications on decision making and identify key needs in longer-term consequence management. In addition to providing a valuable discussion forum for participants, the workshop concluded by establishing a set of identified needs in longer-term consequence management to which the participants felt that the NEA and international community could usefully contribute. These included the four main areas addressed by the exercise agriculture and food countermeasures, decisions on countermeasures such as travel, trade or tourism, recovery management and public information as well as stakeholder involvement and liability/compensation issues. This report summarises the development of the INEX 3 exercise, the major evaluation outcomes of the national exercises, and the key policy-level outcomes, recommendations and follow-up activities arising from the exercise and workshop. (authors)

  14. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme, Training Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of these training materials is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for a State embarking on a nuclear power programme, and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the Assistance Convention). Under Article 5.a(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. One of the concerns associated with nuclear power is the possibility that a State embarking on a nuclear power programme might not have sufficient capabilities and therefore would not be adequately prepared to respond to a radiation emergency caused by severe accident conditions. Protecting the public, the environment and property in the event of a failure of any level of defence in depth is the most important safety objective. A robust framework for emergency preparedness and response to a radiation emergency forms the last level of defence in depth and, as such, must be developed and implemented by any State embarking on a nuclear power programme, using best international practices. The establishment of capabilities and arrangements for emergency preparedness and response to severe accident conditions is one of the principal tasks in the development of a national infrastructure for nuclear power. State of the art emergency preparedness and response is a key element in achieving overall plant safety. This training course complements the IAEA publication 'Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme' (EPR-Embarking 2012). These materials are designed to help States apply the guidance in EPR-Embarking 2012, in order to develop the capability to adequately prepare for and respond to a radiation emergency after the commissioning and start of

  15. Practices and Experience in Stakeholder Involvement for Post-nuclear Emergency Management - Summary of the workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of post-accident consequence management is the involvement of stakeholders: in the planning, preparation and execution as well as in sustaining efforts over the long term. Having recognised the significance of stakeholder participation in several International Nuclear Emergency Exercises (INEX), the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) decided to organise the Practices and Experience in Stakeholder Involvement for Post-nuclear Emergency Management Workshop to explore these issues. This summary highlights the key issues discussed during the workshop, which brought together 75 emergency management and communication specialists from 16 countries. In light of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the experience shared during this workshop will be central to further improving national emergency management arrangements

  16. Application of probabilistic risk assessment in nuclear and environmental licensing processes of nuclear reactors in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata, Jonatas F.C. da; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Mesquita, Amir Z.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi, occurred in Japan in 2011, brought reflections, worldwide, on the management of nuclear and environmental licensing processes of existing nuclear reactors. One of the key lessons learned in this matter, is that the studies of Probabilistic Safety Assessment and Severe Accidents are becoming essential, even in the early stage of a nuclear development project. In Brazil, Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN, conducts the nuclear licensing. The organism responsible for the environmental licensing is Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources, IBAMA. In the scope of the licensing processes of these two institutions, the safety analysis is essentially deterministic, complemented by probabilistic studies. The Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is the study performed to evaluate the behavior of the nuclear reactor in a sequence of events that may lead to the melting of its core. It includes both probability and consequence estimation of these events, which are called Severe Accidents, allowing to obtain the risk assessment of the plant. Thus, the possible shortcomings in the design of systems are identified, providing basis for safety assessment and improving safety. During the environmental licensing, a Quantitative Risk Analysis (QRA), including probabilistic evaluations, is required in order to support the development of the Risk Analysis Study, the Risk Management Program and the Emergency Plan. This article aims to provide an overview of probabilistic risk assessment methodologies and their applications in nuclear and environmental licensing processes of nuclear reactors in Brazil. (author)

  17. Application of probabilistic risk assessment in nuclear and environmental licensing processes of nuclear reactors in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mata, Jonatas F.C. da; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: jonatasfmata@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: vasconv@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi, occurred in Japan in 2011, brought reflections, worldwide, on the management of nuclear and environmental licensing processes of existing nuclear reactors. One of the key lessons learned in this matter, is that the studies of Probabilistic Safety Assessment and Severe Accidents are becoming essential, even in the early stage of a nuclear development project. In Brazil, Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN, conducts the nuclear licensing. The organism responsible for the environmental licensing is Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources, IBAMA. In the scope of the licensing processes of these two institutions, the safety analysis is essentially deterministic, complemented by probabilistic studies. The Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is the study performed to evaluate the behavior of the nuclear reactor in a sequence of events that may lead to the melting of its core. It includes both probability and consequence estimation of these events, which are called Severe Accidents, allowing to obtain the risk assessment of the plant. Thus, the possible shortcomings in the design of systems are identified, providing basis for safety assessment and improving safety. During the environmental licensing, a Quantitative Risk Analysis (QRA), including probabilistic evaluations, is required in order to support the development of the Risk Analysis Study, the Risk Management Program and the Emergency Plan. This article aims to provide an overview of probabilistic risk assessment methodologies and their applications in nuclear and environmental licensing processes of nuclear reactors in Brazil. (author)

  18. Mass media communication of emergency issues and countermeasures in a nuclear accident: Fukushima reporting in European newspapers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallego, Eduardo; Cantone, Marie Claire; Oughton, Deborah H.; Tomkiv, Yevgeniya; Perko, Tanja; Prezelj, Iztok

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a large study of 1340 articles published by two major newspapers in six European countries (Belgium, Italy, Norway, Slovenia, Spain and Russia) in the first 2 months after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. The focus of the analysis is on the application and overall impact of protective actions, both during the emergency phase and later, how the newspapers describe those actions, which differences were apparent between countries and what recommendations can be extracted in order to improve general communication about these issues. A clear lesson is that, even under uncertainty and recognising limitations, responsible authorities need to provide transparent, clear and understandable information to the public and the mass media right from the beginning of the early phase of any nuclear emergency. Clear, concise messages should be given. Mass media could play a key role in reassuring the public if the countermeasures are clearly explained. (authors)

  19. Expecting the unexpected [The IAEA's Incident and Emergency Centre helps prepare States to face radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, W.; Buglova, E.

    2007-01-01

    The IAEA works with its partners worldwide to promote safe, secure and peaceful nuclear technologies. The IAEA's Statute assigns functions to the Secretariat in relation to radiation emergencies, including fostering international cooperation in the area of emergency preparedness and response. The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (often called the 'Emergency Conventions') place specific legal obligations on the IAEA with regard to emergency preparedness and response. In 2005, the IAEA established a fully integrated Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC) which acts as the global focal point for international preparedness, communication and response to nuclear and radiological incidents or emergencies irrespective of their cause. In this role, the IEC stands at the centre of coordinating effective and efficient activities worldwide. While emergency response capabilities have existed within the IAEA since concluding the Emergency Conventions in the 1980s, the decision to create an integrated Centre within the IAEA became more pressing with the growing use of nuclear applications worldwide as well as increasing concern over malicious use of nuclear or radioactive materials. Today, the IEC provides around-the-clock assistance to States dealing with nuclear and radiological events. Under the Emergency Conventions, the IEC coordinates actions of global experts and efforts within the IAEA. It also helps coordinate the responses of States as well as other international organizations, such as the WHO (World Health Organization), FAO (Food and Agricultural Organization) or WMO (World Meteorological Organization) in case of a nuclear or radiological emergency. Response to incidents and emergencies can involve exchange of information, provision of advice and/or coordination of field response. The IEC ensures that the IAEA's incident and emergency arrangements are fully

  20. The nuclear medicine department in the emergency management plan: a referent structure for the nuclear and radiological risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, J.L.; Ducassou, D.; Lesgourgues, P.; Zamaron, S.; Boulard, G.

    2006-01-01

    Each french public or private hospital has to establish guidelines for an immediate response to mass casualties (Emergency Management Plan or 'White' Plan). For a nuclear accident or terrorist attack, the staff of the Nuclear Medicine Department may be adequately prepared and equipped. This paper presents the nuclear and radiological risks section of the final draft of the White Plan developed at Bordeaux University Hospital. (author)

  1. Applications of computational intelligence in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayalal, M.L.; Jehadeesan, R.

    2016-01-01

    Computational intelligence techniques have been successfully employed in a wide range of applications which include the domains of medical, bioinformatics, electronics, communications and business. There has been progress in applying of computational intelligence in the nuclear reactor domain during the last two decades. The stringent nuclear safety regulations pertaining to reactor environment present challenges in the application of computational intelligence in various nuclear sub-systems. The applications of various methods of computational intelligence in the domain of nuclear reactors are discussed in this paper. (author)

  2. Operational intervention levels in a nuclear emergency, general concepts and a probabilistic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Baeverstam, U.; Naadland Holo, E.; Sinkko, K.

    1997-12-01

    This report deals with Operational Intervention Levels (OILs) in a nuclear or radiation emergency. OILs are defined as the values of environmental measurements, in particular dose rate measurements, above which specific protective actions should be carried out in emergency exposure situations. The derivation and the application of OILs are discussed, and an overview of the presently adopted values is provided, with emphasis on the situation in the Nordic countries. A new, probabilistic approach to derive OILs is presented and the method is illustrated by calculating dose rate OILs in a simplified setting. Contrary to the standard approach, the probabilistic approach allows for optimization of OILs. It is argued, that optimized OILs may be much larger than the presently adopted or suggested values. It is recommended, that the probabilistic approach is further developed and employed in determining site specific OILs and in optimizing environmental measuring strategies. (au)

  3. Fields of nuclear power application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper deals with nuclear power application in fields different from electricity generation, i.e. district heating, sea water desalination, coal gasification and nuclear splitting of water. (RW) [de

  4. Nuclear Data for Medical Applications – Recent Developments and Future Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.; Capote, R.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer treatment represents a major economic and medical issue because of the extensive incidence of the disease worldwide, with a particularly large rate of increase to be found in developing countries. Over the previous twenty years, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has dedicated a series of investigations towards identifying and quantifying the production routes and decay characteristics of radioisotopes judged to be of existing and emerging importance in nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. Both the recommendations formulated during the course of these technical debates and the results of recently completed and on-going IAEA coordinated research projects are focused towards the successful evolution of improvements in nuclear data for medical applications throughout the early 21 st century

  5. AGAPE-ET for human error analysis of emergency tasks and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. H.; Jeong, W. D.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a proceduralised human reliability analysis (HRA) methodology, AGAPE-ET (A Guidance And Procedure for Human Error Analysis for Emergency Tasks), covering both qualitative error analysis and quantification of human error probability (HEP) of emergency tasks in nuclear power plants. The AGAPE-ET method is based on the simplified cognitive model. By each cognitive function, error causes or error-likely situations have been identified considering the characteristics of the performance of each cognitive function and influencing mechanism of the performance influencing factors (PIFs) on the cognitive function. Then, error analysis items have been determined from the identified error causes or error-likely situations and a human error analysis procedure based on the error analysis items is organised to help the analysts cue or guide overall human error analysis. The basic scheme for the quantification of HEP consists in the multiplication of the BHEP assigned by the error analysis item and the weight from the influencing factors decision tree (IFDT) constituted by cognitive function. The method can be characterised by the structured identification of the weak points of the task required to perform and the efficient analysis process that the analysts have only to carry out with the necessary cognitive functions. The paper also presents the application of AGAPE-ET to 31 nuclear emergency tasks and its results

  6. ICENES '91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, μ-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session

  7. A Preliminary Assessment of Daily Weather Conditions in Nuclear Site for Development of Effective Emergency Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seok Jung; Ahn, Kwang Il

    2012-01-01

    A radiological emergency preparedness for nuclear sites is recognized as an important measure against anticipated severe accidents with environmental releases of radioactive materials. While there are many individual means in the emergency preparedness for nuclear accidents, one of most important means is to make a decision of evacuation or shelter of the public residents with the emergency plan zone (EPZ) of a nuclear site. In order to prepare an effective strategy for the evacuation as a basis of the emergency preparedness, it may need the understanding of atmospheric dispersion characteristics of radiation releases to the environment, mainly depending upon the weather conditions of a radiation releases location, i.e., a nuclear site. As a preliminary study for the development of an effective emergency plan, the basic features of the weather conditions of a specific site were investigated. A main interest of this study is to identify whether or not the site weather conditions have specific features helpful for a decision making of evacuation of the public residents

  8. Further development of nuclear emergency preparedness in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbitz, O.

    1995-06-01

    The threatpattern regarding nuclear accidents is summarized and the development of the Norwegian emergency preparedness through the last 10 years is examined. Relevant countermeasures during the acute phase of an accident is described and the sharing of responsibilities between central, regional and local level is presented. Suggestions on education and training are given. 9 refs., 2 figs

  9. Method for developing arrangements for response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. Updating IAEA-TECDOC-953. Emergency preparedness and response. Publication date: October 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    In 1997 the IAEA compiled, consolidated and organized existing information, and published the TECDOC-953 'Method for Development of Emergency Response Preparedness for Nuclear or Radiological Accidents'. Subsequently this publication was used extensively by the IAEA for training and for evaluation of emergency response programmes. In November 1999 a technical committee meeting (TCM) with representatives of over 20 States reviewed and provided feedback on IAEA-TECDOC-953. In March 2002, the IAEA's Board of Governors approved a Safety Requirements publication, 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency', jointly sponsored by seven international organizations, which establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State. The IAEA General Conference in resolution GC(46)/RES/9 encouraged Member States to implement, if necessary, instruments for improving their own preparedness and response capabilities for nuclear and radiological incidents and accidents, including their arrangements for responding to acts involving the malicious use of nuclear or radioactive material and to threats of such acts, and has further encouraged them to implement the Safety Requirements for Preparedness and Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. The obligations, responsibilities and requirements for preparedness and response for radiation emergencies are set out in the safety standards, in particular the 1996 'International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources'. Consensus information on relevant radiation protection criteria was established in 1994 and published in 'Intervention Criteria in a Nuclear or Radiation Emergency'. Several other guides and publications in the area of emergency preparedness and response had previously been issued. The present publication now being issued in the Emergency Preparedness and

  10. Development and study of airborne spectrometer system being compatible with nuclear emergency monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiangqi, Fang; Huaiwu, Wang; Mingkao, Hu; Renkang, Gu

    2002-01-01

    The exploitation and use of nuclear energy are of great importance to developing of national economy and maintaining state security. But it also has a possibility of serious accident. Based on the principles of airborne gamma ray spectrometry in the uranium exploration, nuclear emergency monitoring has been developed. This method has high sensitivity to the radioactive nuclides in the air and on the ground, and with the advantage of fast measuring in large area. Hence, in the middle of 1980s, some developed countries began to survey the scope and degree of nuclear accident contamination and environmental radiation level monitoring in the surrounding nuclear facilities, it can also be used to search for the lost radioactive sources. According to the actual situation and compatible guideline, National Nuclear Emergency Office consigned this project to our Center. After development and study on the Airborne gamma ray spectrometer system associated NaI(Tl) used for the uranium exploration, a compatible spectrometer system associated NaI(Tl) was established in a short period by us, which can fulfill airborne nuclear emergency survey basically. In normal situation, it was proved that the start-up time is less than two hours including transport to the airport. The system has high sensitivity to radioactive plume of 41 Ar and can respond rapidly to artificial sources, such as 192 Ir, 60 Co, 137 Cs and 131 I etc

  11. Emerging large-scale solar heating applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, W.P.; McClung, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    Currently the market for solar heating applications in Canada is dominated by outdoor swimming pool heating, make-up air pre-heating and domestic water heating in homes, commercial and institutional buildings. All of these involve relatively small systems, except for a few air pre-heating systems on very large buildings. Together these applications make up well over 90% of the solar thermal collectors installed in Canada during 2007. These three applications, along with the recent re-emergence of large-scale concentrated solar thermal for generating electricity, also dominate the world markets. This paper examines some emerging markets for large scale solar heating applications, with a focus on the Canadian climate and market. (author)

  12. Emerging large-scale solar heating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, W.P.; McClung, J.L. [Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC Canada), Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Currently the market for solar heating applications in Canada is dominated by outdoor swimming pool heating, make-up air pre-heating and domestic water heating in homes, commercial and institutional buildings. All of these involve relatively small systems, except for a few air pre-heating systems on very large buildings. Together these applications make up well over 90% of the solar thermal collectors installed in Canada during 2007. These three applications, along with the recent re-emergence of large-scale concentrated solar thermal for generating electricity, also dominate the world markets. This paper examines some emerging markets for large scale solar heating applications, with a focus on the Canadian climate and market. (author)

  13. Nuclear power plants in Germany. Recent developments in off-site nuclear emergency preparedness and response; Kernkraftwerke in Deutschland. Neue Entwicklungen im anlagenexternen Notfallschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gering, Florian [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim/Neuherberg (Germany). Abt. SW 2.2 Entscheidungshilfesysteme, Lageermittlung und Kommunikation

    2014-10-15

    The reactor accident in Fukushima, Japan, in 2011 triggered a thorough review of the off-site emergency preparedness and response for nuclear power plants in Germany. ''Off-site emergency preparedness and response'' includes all actions to protect the public outside the fence of a nuclear power plant. This review resulted in several changes in off-site emergency preparedness and response, which are briefly described in this article. Additionally, several recent activities are described which may influence emergency preparedness and response in the future.

  14. Nuclear science in the 20th century. Nuclear technology applications in material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei Junchen; Xu Furong; Zheng Chunkai

    2003-01-01

    The application of nuclear technology to material science has led to a new cross subject, nuclear material science (also named nuclear solid physics) which covers material analysis, material modification and new material synthesis. This paper reviews the development of nuclear technical applications in material science and the basic physics involved

  15. Cytogenetic Dosimetry: Applications in Preparedness for and Response to Radiation Emergencies - Training Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    These materials are designed for use at a four day training course on the application of cytogenetic dosimetry in preparedness for and response to radiation emergencies. They contain information on: (1) Basics of biological effects of ionizing radiation: Parts 1+2; (2) Basics of dosimetry; (3) dicentric assay; (4) Retrospective dosimetry by translocation analysis; (5) Premature chromosome condensation analysis; (6) Cytokinesis block micronucleus assay; (7) Applied statistics for biodosimetry; (8) Automatic analysis of chromosomal assays; (9) Biodosimetry in mass casualty events; (10) Safety of laboratory staff and quality programmes; (11) Examples of accident investigations; (12) Cytogenetic dose estimation in the criticality accident in Tokaimura; (13) Radiological accidents in Latin America; (14) Radiological accidents in Georgia. Additionally, the CD contains two working sessions with the reference materials for use and a standard training programme. This training course consists of lectures and work sessions that can easily be utilized by a State to build a basic capability in biodosimetry application in a nuclear or radiological emergency

  16. Experience and Prospects of Nuclear Heat Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woite, G.; Konishi, T.; Kupitz, J.

    1998-01-01

    Relevant technical characteristics of nuclear reactors and heat application facilities for district heating, process heat and seawater desalination are presented and discussed. The necessity of matching the characteristics of reactors and heat applications has consequences for their technical and economic viability. The world-wide operating experience with nuclear district heating, process heating, process heat and seawater desalination is summarised and the prospects for these nuclear heat applications are discussed. (author)

  17. Application of RASCAL code for multiunit accident in domestic nuclear sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Hyun; Jeong, Seung Young [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    All of domestic nuclear power plant sites are multiunit site (at least 5 - 6 reactors are operating), so this capability has to be quickly secured for nuclear licensee and institutes responsible for nuclear emergency response. In this study, source term and offsite dose from multiunit event were assessed using a computer code, RASCAL. An emergency exercise scenario was chosen to verify applicability of the codes to domestic nuclear site accident. Employing tools and new features of the code, such as merging more than two individual source terms and source term estimate for long term progression accident, main parameters and information in the scenario, release estimates and dose projections were performed. Radiological releases and offsite doses from multiunit accident were calculated using RASCAL.. A scenario, in which three reactors were damaged coincidently by a great natural disaster, was considered. Surrogate plants were chosen for the code calculation. Source terms of each damaged unit were calculated individually first, and then total source term and integrated offsite dose assessment data was acquired using a source term merge function in the code. Also comparison between LTSBO and LOCA source term estimate options was performed. Differences in offsite doses were caused by release characteristics. From LTSBO option, iodines were released much higher than LOCA. Also LTSBO source term release was delayed and the duration was longer than LOCA. This option would be useful to accidents which progress with much longer time frame than LOCA. RASCAL can be useful tool for radiological consequence assessment in domestic nuclear site accidents.

  18. Emergency power systems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the Nuclear Safety Standards programme for establishing Codes and Safety Guides relating to nuclear power plants (NPPs). The first edition of the present Safety Guide was developed in the early 1980s. The text has now been brought up-to-date, refined in several details and amended to include non-electrical diverse and independent power sources. This Guide applies to NPP for which the total power supply comprises a normal power supply and an emergency power supply (EPS), which may be electrical or a combination of electrical and non-electrical. The Guide provides general guidance for all types of EPS and specific guidance on the design safety requirements and the features of the electrical and non-electrical portions of the EPS. 9 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Accident assessment under emergency situation in Daya Bay nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ling; Chen Degan; Lin Shumou; Fu Guohui

    2004-01-01

    The accident assessment under emergency situation includes the accident status evaluation and its consequence estimation. This paper introduces evaluation methods for accident status and its assistant computer system (SESAME-GNP) utilized during the emergency situation in Guangdong Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (GNPS) in detail. At the same time, an improved accident consequence estimation system in GNPS (RACAS-GNP) is briefly described. With the improvement of the accident assessment systems, the capability of emergency response in GNPS is strengthened

  20. On-site emergency intervention plan for nuclear accident situation at SCN-Pitesti TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margeanu, S.; Oprea, I.

    2008-01-01

    A 14 MW TRIGA research reactor is operated on the Institute for Nuclear Research site. In the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency that may affect the public the effectiveness of protective actions depends on the adequacy of intervention plans prepared in advance. Considerable planning is necessary to reduce to manageable levels the types of decisions leading to effective responses to protect the public in such an event. The essential structures of our on-site, off-site and county emergency intervention plan and the correlation between emergency intervention plans are presented. (authors)

  1. Retrospective and emergency dosimetry in response to radiological incidents and nuclear mass-casualty events: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailiff, I.K.; Sholom, S.; McKeever, S.W.S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews recent research on the application of the physical dosimetry techniques of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and luminescence (optically stimulated luminescence, OSL, and thermoluminescence, TL) to determine radiation dose following catastrophic, large-scale radiological events. Such data are used in dose reconstruction to obtain estimates of dose due to the exposure to external sources of radiation, primarily gamma radiation, by individual members of the public and by populations. The EPR and luminescence techniques have been applied to a wide range of radiological studies, including nuclear bomb detonation (e.g., Hiroshima and Nagasaki), nuclear power plant accidents (e.g., Chernobyl), radioactive pollution (e.g., Mayak plutonium facility), and in the future could include terrorist events involving the dispersal of radioactive materials. In this review we examine the application of these techniques in ‘emergency’ and ‘retrospective’ modes of operation that are conducted on two distinct timescales. For emergency dosimetry immediate action to evaluate dose to individuals following radiation exposure is required to assess deterministic biological effects and to enable rapid medical triage. Retrospective dosimetry, on the other hand, contributes to the reconstruction of doses to populations and individuals following external exposure, and contributes to the long-term study of stochastic processes and the consequential epidemiological effects. Although internal exposure, via ingestion of radionuclides for example, can be a potentially significant contributor to dose, this review is confined to those dose components arising from exposure to external radiation, which in most studies is gamma radiation. The nascent emergency dosimetry measurement techniques aim to perform direct dose evaluations for individuals who, as members of the public, are most unlikely to be carrying a dosimeter issued for radiation monitoring purposes in the event

  2. Neutron detector suitcase for the Nuclear Emergency Search Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdy, E.J.; Henry, C.N.; Hastings, R.D.; France, S.W.

    1978-02-01

    A portable high-efficiency neutron detection system has been constructed for the Nuclear Emergency Search Team. It includes an alarm system based on time interval measurements of the incoming neutron detection pulses. The system is designed for transportation by vehicle in searching for neutron-emitting radioactive materials

  3. Legislative framework on establishing emergency response plan in the case of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosel, N.; Valcic, I.; Biscan, R.

    2000-01-01

    To give an overview of the legislative framework, which defined emergency planning in Croatia in the case of a nuclear accident, it's necessary to look at all international recommendations and obligations and the national legislation, acts and regulations. It has to be emphasized that Croatia signed three international conventions in this field, and by that took over some responsibilities and obligations. Beside that, it is also in Croatian interest to follow the recommendations of international institutions such as International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA standards and technical documents). On the other hand, national legislation in this field consists of several laws, which cover nuclear safety measures, governmental organization, natural disasters and acts (decree, decisions) of responsible authority for emergency planning in the case of a nuclear accident (Ministry of Economy). This paper presents an overview of the international and Croatian legislation which influenced the emergency planning in the case of a nuclear accident. (author)

  4. Nuclear- and radiochemistry. Vol. 2. Modern applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesch, Frank

    2016-01-01

    This work is conceived to meet the demand of state-of-the-art literature to teach the fundamentals as well as the modern applications of nuclear chemistry. The work will consist of two volumes: the first one covering the basics of nuclear chemistry such as the relevant parameters of instable atomic nuclei, the various modi of radioactive transmutations, the corresponding types of radiation including their detection and dosimetry, and finally the mechanisms of nuclear reactions. The second volume addresses relevant fields of nuclear chemistry, such as the chemistry of radioactive elements, application of radioactive nuclei in life sciences, nuclear energy, waste managements and environmental aspects, radiochemical separations, radioanalytical and spectroscopic methods, etc. Here, leading experts will contribute up-to-date knowledge on the most important application of nuclear chemistry.

  5. Techniques and applications of the human reliability analysis in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Fausto C.

    1995-01-01

    The analysis and prediction of the man-machine interaction are the objectives of human reliability analysis. In this work is presented in a manner that could be used by experts in the field of Probabilistic Safety Assessment, considering primarily the aspects of human errors. The Technique of Human Error Rate Prediction (THERP) is used in large scale to obtain data on human error. Applications of this technique are presented, as well as aspects of the state-of-art and of research and development of this particular field of work, where the construction of a reliable data bank is considered essential. In this work is also developed an application of the THERP for the TRIGA Mark 1 IPR R-1 Reactor of the Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnologia Nuclear, Brazilian research institute of nuclear technology. The results indicate that some changes must be made in the emergency procedures of the reactor, in order to achieve a higher level of safety

  6. Radiological safety for the public during nuclear emergencies: application of intervention levels and derived intervention levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.; Kumar, K.S.

    2006-01-01

    Control of radiation exposures to the public following a major nuclear accident can be achieved through intervention by implementing countermeasures such as sheltering, iodine prophylaxis, evacuation, control of foodstuff, etc. Intervention levels (I.L.) are formulated such that exposure to individuals from all exposure pathways is well below the thresholds for deterministic effects, and risk of stochastic health effects to individuals and overall incidence of stochastic effects in the exposed population are minimized. It is also necessary to translate such I.L. into quantities, called derived intervention levels (D.I.L.) that can be measured. The I.L. followed in various countries for the recommended countermeasures cater to the exposure range of 1-50 mSv for sheltering, 10-500 mSv for evacuation, 30- 1000 mSv for iodine prophylaxis and 1-10 mSv for food control. The models used for these are based on conservative estimations assuming maximum dose delivered to the critical group for the pathway assumed. While the concept of upper dose level above which countermeasures is always justified to avoid deterministic effects, the lower range of dose levels have to be optimised based on various parameters as discussed in this paper. While arriving at the I.L., the question to be addressed is: How much (dose) risk should be averted by the intervention planned? Implementation of any countermeasure will result in some inconvenience/ limitation of resource/ disruption and consequently, a positive net benefit will justify the intervention. Sheltering may result in substantially less disruption than evacuation, but if the type of sheltering is not offering enough radiation shielding or ventilation protection, this may not result in significant reduction of exposure. It is to be ensured that deterministic effects are totally avoided and it is possible to define a safe threshold exposure and above which balancing risks and benefits is not applicable. While the dose limit for the

  7. Emergency monitoring strategy and radiation measurements. Working document of the NKS project emergency management and radiation monitoring in nuclear and radiological accidents (EMARAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahtinen, J.

    2006-04-01

    This report is one of the deliverables of the NKS Project Emergency management and radiation monitoring in nuclear and radiological accidents (EMARAD) (20022005). The project and the overall results are briefly described in the NKS publication 'Emergency Management and Radiation Monitoring in Nuclear and Radiological Accidents. Summary Report on the NKS Project EMARAD' (NKS-137, April 2006). In a nuclear or radiological emergency, all radiation measurements must be performed efficiently and the results interpreted correctly in order to provide the decision-makers with adequate data needed in analysing the situation and carrying out countermeasures. Managing measurements in different situations in a proper way requires the existence of pre-prepared emergency monitoring strategies. Preparing a comprehensive yet versatile strategy is not an easy task to perform because there are lots of different factors that have to be taken into account. The primary objective of this study was to discuss the general problematics concerning emergency monitoring strategies and to describe a few important features of an efficient emergency monitoring system as well as factors affecting measurement activities in practise. Some information concerning the current situation in the Nordic countries has also been included. (au)

  8. The Nuclear Emergency Assistance Team, a mobile intervention facility for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear emergency assistance team consisting of a vehicle pool and a stock of technical equipment was set up for operation in case of major reactor accidents. The equipment is kept in 6 containers which can be shipped on trucks, by rail or by helicopter or plane. Technical equipment and tasks of each container are briefly explained. Special transport vehicles for remote handling of contaminated material are described. (ORU) [de

  9. Industrial Applications of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This publication provides a detailed overview of the potential use of nuclear energy for industrial systems and/or processes which have a strong demand for process heat/steam and power, and on the mapping of nuclear power reactors proposed for various industrial applications. It describes the technical concepts for combined nuclear-industrial complexes that are being pursued in various Member States, and presents the concepts that were developed in the past to be applied in connection with some major industries. It also provides an analysis of the energy demand in various industries and outlines the potential that nuclear energy may have in major industrial applications such as process steam for oil recovery and refineries, hydrogen generation, and steel and aluminium production. The audience for this publication includes academia, industry, and government agencies.

  10. Amendment to the Decree of the Slovak Nuclear Regulatory Authority on details concerning emergency planning in case of nuclear incident or accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biharyová, Michaela

    2018-01-01

    Following up amendment to the Slovak Atomic Act, the Decree No. 55/2006 on details concerning emergency planning in case of nuclear incident or accident has also been amended now. Following a short introductory text by the author, the entire text of the ‘Decree of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic No 9/2018 Coll. of 2 January 2018 amending Decree of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic No 55/2006 Coll. on details in emergency planning in case of nuclear incident or accident as amended by Decree No. 35/2012 Coll.’ is reproduced. The Amendment entered into force 1 February 2018. (orig.)

  11. Nuclear energy an introduction to the concepts, systems, and applications of nuclear processes

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, Raymond L; Murphy, Arthur T; Rosenthal, Daniel I

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear Energy: An Introduction to the Concepts, Systems, and Applications of Nuclear Processes introduces the reader to the concepts, systems, and applications of nuclear processes. It provides a factual description of basic nuclear phenomena, as well as devices and processes that involve nuclear reactions. The problems and opportunities that are inherent in a nuclear age are also highlighted.Comprised of 27 chapters, this book begins with an overview of fundamental facts and principles, with emphasis on energy and states of matter, atoms and nuclei, and nuclear reactions. Radioactivi

  12. The Programmable Logic Controller and its application in nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomar, J.; Wyman, R.

    1993-09-01

    This document provides recommendations to guide reviewers in the application of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCS) to the control, monitoring and protection of nuclear reactors. The first topics addressed are system-level design issues, specifically including safety. The document then discusses concerns about the PLC manufacturing organization and the protection system engineering organization. Supplementing this document are two appendices. Appendix A summarizes PLC characteristics. Specifically addressed are those characteristics that make the PLC more suitable for emergency shutdown systems than other electrical/electronic-based systems, as well as characteristics that improve reliability of a system. Also covered are PLC characteristics that may create an unsafe operating environment. Appendix B provides an overview of the use of programmable logic controllers in emergency shutdown systems. The intent is to familiarize the reader with the design, development, test, and maintenance phases of applying a PLC to an ESD system. Each phase is described in detail and information pertinent to the application of a PLC is pointed out

  13. The Programmable Logic Controller and its application in nuclear reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomar, J.; Wyman, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This document provides recommendations to guide reviewers in the application of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCS) to the control, monitoring and protection of nuclear reactors. The first topics addressed are system-level design issues, specifically including safety. The document then discusses concerns about the PLC manufacturing organization and the protection system engineering organization. Supplementing this document are two appendices. Appendix A summarizes PLC characteristics. Specifically addressed are those characteristics that make the PLC more suitable for emergency shutdown systems than other electrical/electronic-based systems, as well as characteristics that improve reliability of a system. Also covered are PLC characteristics that may create an unsafe operating environment. Appendix B provides an overview of the use of programmable logic controllers in emergency shutdown systems. The intent is to familiarize the reader with the design, development, test, and maintenance phases of applying a PLC to an ESD system. Each phase is described in detail and information pertinent to the application of a PLC is pointed out.

  14. Convention on assistance in the case of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    The full text of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency adopted by the General Conference at its special session from 24-26 September 1986 is presented. It is stipulated that the States Parties shall cooperate between themselves and with the Agency to facilitate prompt assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency to minimize its consequences and to protect life, the property and the environment from the effects of radioactive releases

  15. Activities of the nuclear emergency assistance and training center. Strengthening co-operation with parties in normal circumstances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Fumitaka; Matsui, Tomoaki; Nomura, Tamotsu

    2005-01-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) established the Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) in March 2002. The center aims to provide various support nuclear safety regulatory bodies, local governments and nuclear facility licenses as specialists about nuclear and radiological issues according to the role shown in the Basic Disaster Management Plan. Upon a nuclear and/or radiological disaster occurring in Japan, NEAT will send specialists to the disaster scene, and offer the use of special equipments. NEAT maintains frequent contact with related organizations in normal circumstance. NEAT also participates in nuclear emergency exercises instructed by the parties concerned, which has contributed to the brewing of mutual trust with related organizations. In October 2005, JNC and JAERI merged into a new organization named the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). NEAT, as a section of the organization, continuously deals with nuclear emergencies. (author)

  16. Economical scale of nuclear energy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The nuclear energy industry is supported by two wheels of radiation and energy applications. When comparing both, they have some different sides, such as numbers of employees and researchers, numbers and scales of works, effect on society, affecting effects and regions of industrial actions, problems on safety, viewpoint on nuclear proliferation protection and safety guarantee, energy security, relationship to environmental problem, efforts on wastes disposal, and so on. Here described on economical scale of radiation application in fields of industry, agriculture, and medicine and medical treatment, and on economical scale of energy application in nuclear power generation and its instruments and apparatus. (G.K.)

  17. Radiation monitoring strategy in nuclear or radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahtinen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Radiation measurements provide indispensable data needed for the management of a nuclear or radiological emergency. There must exist pre-prepared emergency monitoring strategies, with accompanying procedures and methods, that help the authorities to perform measurements efficiently and, consequently, to evaluate the radiological situation correctly and to carry out proper countermeasures on time. However, defining a realistic yet comprehensive radiation monitoring strategy for emergencies is far from being an easy task. The very concept of 'emergency monitoring strategy' should be understood in a broad sense. In an ideal case, a strategy has interfaces with all related emergency and information exchange arrangements and agreements both at the national and international level. It covers all activities from the recognition of a potential hazard situation to environmental sampling performed during the late phases of an accident. It integrates routine-monitoring practices with the special requirements set by emergency monitoring and the use of fixed monitoring stations with that of mobile measurement teams. It includes elements for gathering, analyzing, transmitting and presenting data, as well as for combining them with different kinds of forecasts. It also takes into account the various intrinsic characteristics of possible threat scenarios and contains options for adapting measuring activities according to prevailing environmental conditions. Furthermore, a strategy must have relevant links to the social and economical realities and to the primary interests of different stakeholders. In order to assist individual countries in establishing national strategies, international organisations (IAEA, OECD/NEA, EU) have published basic guidelines for emergency response and radiation measurements. Nuclear accidents, especially the Chernobyl case with its large-scale environmental consequences, and other kinds of shocking events (like the one on September 11, 2001

  18. UME in the nuclear and radiological emergencies; UME ante las emergencias nucleares y radiológicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armada, C.J.; Martín, J.M.

    2015-07-01

    This article begins with a general overview of the Military Emergencies Unit (UME) which allows the reader to learn about their missions and capabilities as well as the historical background of its creation. Later we will focus on the composition, resources and capabilities of the Emergency Intervention Group and Environment al Technology (GIETMA), which is the specialized unit of the UME for Nuclear and Radiological Emergencies, focusing on its radiation detection and identification equipment. Next we will explain the importance of the collaboration agreement with the CSN, which has allowed the cession of materials to establish an Environmental Mobile Unit in the UME, the training of technical staff and the support in the selection of radiological equipment provided to the GIETMA. This collaboration will also seek to reach an agreement with UNESA that will allow the support of the UME in all of the Spanish NPP’s Emergency Plans. Finally, an assessment of the current state of the UME will be conducted to support interventions in nuclear and radiological emergencies. [Spanish] En este artículo se comenzará con una presentación general de la Unidad Militar de Emergencias (UME) que permita al lector conocer sus misiones y capacidades, así como los antecedentes históricos de su creación. Posteriormente nos centraremos en la composición, medios y capacidades del Grupo de Intervención en Emergencias Tecnológicas y Medioambientales (GIETMA), que es la Unidad especializada de la UME para intervención en emergencias nucleares y radiológicas, haciendo hincapié en los equipos de detección e identificación radiológica con los que está dotado. Se explicará la mportancia que ha tenido el convenio de colaboración con el CSN, con la cesión de los materiales necesarios para establecer una Unidad Móvil Ambiental en la UME, la formación técnica del personal y su apoyo en la elección de los equipos radiológicos con los que se ha dotado al GIETMA. También se

  19. Preparation, Conduct and Evaluation of Exercises to Test Preparedness for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to serve as a practical tool for the preparation, conduct and evaluation of exercises to test preparedness for response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. It fulfils in part the functions assigned to the IAEA under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), namely, to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning the methodologies, techniques and available results of research on such emergencies. To ensure effective response to radiation emergencies when needed, provisions should be made for regular training of emergency response personnel. As stated in Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (Safety Requirements, Safety Standard Series No. GS-R-2), 'The operator and the response organizations shall make arrangements for the selection of personnel and training to ensure that the personnel have the requisite knowledge, skills, abilities, equipment, procedures and other arrangements to perform their assigned response functions'. A further requirement is that 'Exercise programmes shall be conducted to ensure that all specified functions required to be performed for emergency response and all organizational interfaces for facilities in threat category I, II or III and the national level programmes for threat category IV or V are tested at suitable intervals'. In 2004 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(48)/RES/10 encouraged Member States to 'implement the Safety Requirements for Preparedness and Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency'. This document is published as part of the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series to assist in meeting these requirements and to fulfil Article 5 of the Assistance Convention. It was developed based on a number of assumptions about national and local capabilities. Therefore, the exercise structure, terms and scenarios must be

  20. Guidance for emergency planning in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, Tommy; Ekdahl, Maria

    2008-06-01

    Ringhals has been a model for this study, but the purpose has been to make the report applicable at all nuclear power plants in Sweden. The work has been done in close co-operation with the Swedish nuclear power plants and Rescue Services in the nuclear power municipalities Oesthammar, Oskarshamn, and Varberg. The internal fire brigade at the nuclear power plants has also been involved. A document will also be published as a further guidance at efforts of the type fires, which are mentioned in the enclosed document. After a fire in a switchgear room in 2005 the need of making the existing effort planning more effective at nuclear power plants was observed. The idea with the planning is to plan the effort in order to give the operational and emergency staff a good and actual support to come to a decision and to start the mission without delay. The risk information is showed by planning layouts, symbols and drawings as basis, give risk information and effort information. The effort information shows outer arrangements, manual action points, fire installations, passive fire safety etc. The risk information is shown by risk symbols. Their purpose is to give a fast overview of the existing risks. Reactor safety effects is the ruling influence if an effort has to be done in order to secure safety for a third person. In order to make an effort in an area personal risks for rescue staff, such as electricity risks, radiological risks, chemicals and gas bottles with compressed gases, has to be eliminated. For complicated missions detailed instructions are needed in order to handle specific risks. In a group discussion different people with pertinent knowledge has to value which problematic efforts need detailed instruction. Missions that have to be analyzed in a work group as above are: fire may affect the reactor safety, fire that may threaten the structural integrity, chemical discharge with big consequence on environment/third person and handling of gas system (compressed

  1. Exercises for radiological and nuclear emergency response. Planing - performance - evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, A.; Faleschini, J.; Goelling, K.; Stapel, R.; Strobl, C.

    2010-01-01

    The report of the study group emergency response seminar covers the following topics: (A) purpose of exercises and exercise culture: fundamentals and appliances for planning, performance and evaluation; (B) exercises in nuclear facilities; (C) exercises of national authorities and aid organizations on nuclear scenarios; exercises of national authorities and aid organizations on other radiological scenarios; (D) exercises in industrial plants, universities, medical facilities and medical services, and research institutes; (E) transnational exercises, international exercises; (F): exercises on public information.

  2. Emerging sensor and I and C technologies for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsah, K.; Wood, R. T.; Freer, E.; Antonescu, C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a survey of emerging technologies in the field of instrumentation and controls (I and C). The survey findings give an overview of the state-of-the-art in selected technology focus areas for industrial, research, or scientific applications that are relevant to nuclear power plant I and C systems, and discuss potential regulatory impact for safety-related applications. Four technology focus areas are selected for review: Sensors and Measurement Systems; Radiation Hardness of Microprocessors and other Integrated Circuits; Diagnostics and Prognostics Systems; and High-Integrity Software. It is concluded that, while there have been considerable advances in digital I and C hardware, advances in software engineering have not kept pace with hardware. The authors anticipate advances in hardware (e.g., more accurate sensors, sophisticated on-line diagnostics, advances in rad-hard electronics) to influence some regulatory revisions (e.g., surveillance requirements, margins, calibration intervals). However, the state-of-the-art in software engineering has not advanced enough to warrant significant changes in the current position in software review requirements. (authors)

  3. Importance of Promocat in nuclear emergency management in ANAV; Impacto del Promocat en la gestion de emergencias en ANAV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil Cortiella, R.; Torres Gurdel, C.

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear power plant emergency management tool PROMOCAT, has been developed for supporting and facilitating the nuclear emergency management in the Spanish NPPs of Asco and Vandellos II. PROMOCAT is a computerized tool that comprises all the activities made by the Technical Support Centre (TSC) and Offsite facilities. In order to ease the management and decision-making during a nuclear emergency. In addition, the drill mode helps to improve and strengthen emergency personnel training. (Author)

  4. Annual report of Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center. April 1, 2012 - March 31, 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takeshi; Muto, Shigeo; Okuno, Hiroshi; Katagiri, Hiromi; Akiyama, Kiyomitsu; Okamoto, Akiko; Koie, Masahiro; Ikeda, Takeshi; Nemotouchi, Toshimasa; Saito, Toru; Sumiya, Akio; Kawamata, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Chika; Hirayama, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Sato, Sohei; Sumiya, Akihiro; Kawakami, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Aoki, Kazufumi; Matsusaka, Masaru; Nagakura, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Koichi

    2014-02-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency, which will be abbreviated as JAEA hereafter, was assigned as a designated public institution under the Disaster Countermeasures Basic Act and under the Armed Attack Situations Response Act. Based on these Acts, the JAEA has the responsibility of providing technical support to the National government and/or local governments in case of disaster responses or response in the event of a military attack, etc. In order to fulfill the tasks, the JAEA has established the Emergency Action Plan and the Civil Protection Action Plan. In case of a nuclear emergency, the Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) of JAEA provides technical support activities to an Off-Site Center in any prefecture. Specifically, NEAT dispatches specialists, supplies the National Government and local governments with emergency equipment and materials, and gives technical advice and information. In normal time, NEAT provides various exercises and training courses concerning nuclear disaster prevention to those personnel taking an active part in emergency response institutions of the national and local governments, police, fire fighters, self-defense forces, etc. in addition to the JAEA itself. The NEAT also researches nuclear disaster preparedness and response, and cooperates with international organizations. In the FY2012, the NEAT accomplished the following tasks: (1) Technical support activities as a designated public institution in cooperation with the national and local governments, etc. (2) Human resource development, exercise and training of nuclear emergency response personnel for the national and local governments, etc. (3) Researches on nuclear disaster preparedness and response, and sending useful information. (4) International contributions to Asian countries on nuclear disaster preparedness and response in collaboration with the international organizations. The responses of the JAEA to the accident of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power

  5. Review of Virtual Reality Technology Application in Fire and Medical Exercise for Development of VR based Radiological Emergency Exercise System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sub Lee; Lee, Byung Il; Park, Seong Jun; Lee, Dewhey; Park, Younwon

    2016-01-01

    The article of Act on Physical Protection and Radiological Emergency (APPRE) was amended as a nuclear licensee shall formulate a radiological emergency exercise plan as prescribed by the Ordinance of the Prime minister and execute such plan with the approval of the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC). Current radiological emergency exercise is basically conducting in the field. The field exercise essentially requires participation of mass population. Due to lack of time, cost, communication and participation, the field exercise necessarily causes several limitations in an aspect of effectiveness. The public participants often misunderstood the situation as real though it is just an exercise so several conflicts are occurring. Furthermore, the exercise program is too ideal to reflect the real accident situation. In this point of view, application of virtual reality (VR) technology is highlighted with its many advantages. VR technology is expected to resolve those existing problems. Our research team is currently developing VR based radiological emergency exercise system. In this paper, the advantages and actual application of VR based training were introduced. With those advantages and improvement of existing disadvantages, our VR based radiological emergency exercise system will be developed. Not only physical interactive features, but also interactive fail-considered real-like scenarios will be adopted in the system. The ultimate goal of the system is safe and perfect evacuation of residents in case of radioactive accident

  6. Review of Virtual Reality Technology Application in Fire and Medical Exercise for Development of VR based Radiological Emergency Exercise System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Sub Lee; Lee, Byung Il; Park, Seong Jun; Lee, Dewhey; Park, Younwon [BEES Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The article of Act on Physical Protection and Radiological Emergency (APPRE) was amended as a nuclear licensee shall formulate a radiological emergency exercise plan as prescribed by the Ordinance of the Prime minister and execute such plan with the approval of the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC). Current radiological emergency exercise is basically conducting in the field. The field exercise essentially requires participation of mass population. Due to lack of time, cost, communication and participation, the field exercise necessarily causes several limitations in an aspect of effectiveness. The public participants often misunderstood the situation as real though it is just an exercise so several conflicts are occurring. Furthermore, the exercise program is too ideal to reflect the real accident situation. In this point of view, application of virtual reality (VR) technology is highlighted with its many advantages. VR technology is expected to resolve those existing problems. Our research team is currently developing VR based radiological emergency exercise system. In this paper, the advantages and actual application of VR based training were introduced. With those advantages and improvement of existing disadvantages, our VR based radiological emergency exercise system will be developed. Not only physical interactive features, but also interactive fail-considered real-like scenarios will be adopted in the system. The ultimate goal of the system is safe and perfect evacuation of residents in case of radioactive accident.

  7. Resources available for nuclear power plant emergencies under the Price-Anderson Act and the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Through a series of TABLETOP exercises and other events that involved participation by State and Federal organizations, the need was identified for further explanation of financial and other related resources available to individuals and State and local governments in a major emergency at a nuclear power plant. A group with representatives from the Nuclear Regulatory commission, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the American Nuclear Insurers/Mutual Atomic Energy Liability Underwriters was established to work toward this end. This report is the result of that effort. This document is not meant to modify, undermine, or replace any other planning document (e.g., the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan or the Federal Response Plan). Its purpose is to clarify issues that have surfaced regarding resources available under the Price-Anderson and Stafford Acts

  8. Nuclear energy I, Non-energetic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartigue G, J.; Navarrete T, M.; Cabrera M, L.; Arandia, P.A.; Arriola S, H.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear energy is defined as the energy produced or absorbed in the nuclear reactions, therefore, these are divided in endothermic and exothermic. The exothermic nuclear reactions present more interest from the point of view of its applications and they can show in four main forms: radioactivity (from 0 to 4 MeV/reaction; light nucleus fusion ( ∼ 20 MeV/reaction), heavy nucleus fusion (∼ 200 MeV/reaction) and nucleons annihilation ( ∼ 2000 MeV/reaction). Nowadays only the fission has reached the stage of profitable energetic application, finding the other three forms in research and development. The non-energetic applications of the nuclear energy are characterized by they do not require of prior conversion to another form of energy and they are made through the use of radioisotopes as well as through the use of endothermic reaction caused in particle accelerators. In this work are presented some of the non-energetic applications with its theoretical and experimental basis as well as its benefits of each one. (Author)

  9. Research on artificial neural network applications for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Soon-Heung; Cheon, Se-Woo

    1992-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are an emerging computational technology which can significantly enhance a number of applications. These consist of many interconnected processing elements that exhibit human-like performance, i.e., learning, pattern recognition and associative memory skills. Several application studies on ANNs devoted to nuclear power plants have been carried out at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology since 1989. These studies include the feasibility of using ANNs for the following tasks: (1) thermal power prediction, (2) transient identification, (3) multiple alarm processing and diagnosis, (4) core thermal margin prediction, and (5) prediction of core parameters for fuel reloading. This paper introduces the back-propagation network (BPN) model which is the most commonly used algorithm, and summarizes each of the studies briefly. (author)

  10. Safety of emerging nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, V.M.; Slesarev, I.S.

    1989-01-01

    The first stage of world nuclear power development based on light water fission reactors has demonstrated not only rather high rate but at the same time too optimistic attitude to safety problems. Large accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl essentially affects the concept of NP development. As a result the safety and social acceptance of NP became of absolute priority among other problems. That's why emerging nuclear power systems should be first of all estimated from this point of view. In the paper some quantitative criteria of safety derived from estimations of social risk and economic-ecological damage from hypothetical accidents are formulated. On the base of these criteria we define two stages of possible way to meet safety demands: first--development of high safety fission reactors and second--that of asymptotic high safety ENEs. The limits of tolorated expenses for safety are regarded. The basis physical factors determining hazards of NES accidents are considered. This permits to classify the ways of safety demands fulfillment due to physical principals used

  11. New aspects in the radiological emergency plan outside the Nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alva L, S.

    1991-01-01

    The Mexican government through the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards has imposed to the Federal Commission of Electricity to fulfill the requirement of having a functional Emergency Plan and under the limits that the regulator organisms in the world have proposed. The PERE (Plan of External Radiological Emergency) it has been created for the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde, Mexico

  12. Emerging Environmental Justice Issues in Nuclear Power and Radioactive Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Kyne

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear hazards, linked to both U.S. weapons programs and civilian nuclear power, pose substantial environment justice issues. Nuclear power plant (NPP reactors produce low-level ionizing radiation, high level nuclear waste, and are subject to catastrophic contamination events. Justice concerns include plant locations and the large potentially exposed populations, as well as issues in siting, nuclear safety, and barriers to public participation. Other justice issues relate to extensive contamination in the U.S. nuclear weapons complex, and the mining and processing industries that have supported it. To approach the topic, first we discuss distributional justice issues of NPP sites in the U.S. and related procedural injustices in siting, operation, and emergency preparedness. Then we discuss justice concerns involving the U.S. nuclear weapons complex and the ways that uranium mining, processing, and weapons development have affected those living downwind, including a substantial American Indian population. Next we examine the problem of high-level nuclear waste and the risk implications of the lack of secure long-term storage. The handling and deposition of toxic nuclear wastes pose new transgenerational justice issues of unprecedented duration, in comparison to any other industry. Finally, we discuss the persistent risks of nuclear technologies and renewable energy alternatives.

  13. Emerging Environmental Justice Issues in Nuclear Power and Radioactive Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyne, Dean; Bolin, Bob

    2016-07-12

    Nuclear hazards, linked to both U.S. weapons programs and civilian nuclear power, pose substantial environment justice issues. Nuclear power plant (NPP) reactors produce low-level ionizing radiation, high level nuclear waste, and are subject to catastrophic contamination events. Justice concerns include plant locations and the large potentially exposed populations, as well as issues in siting, nuclear safety, and barriers to public participation. Other justice issues relate to extensive contamination in the U.S. nuclear weapons complex, and the mining and processing industries that have supported it. To approach the topic, first we discuss distributional justice issues of NPP sites in the U.S. and related procedural injustices in siting, operation, and emergency preparedness. Then we discuss justice concerns involving the U.S. nuclear weapons complex and the ways that uranium mining, processing, and weapons development have affected those living downwind, including a substantial American Indian population. Next we examine the problem of high-level nuclear waste and the risk implications of the lack of secure long-term storage. The handling and deposition of toxic nuclear wastes pose new transgenerational justice issues of unprecedented duration, in comparison to any other industry. Finally, we discuss the persistent risks of nuclear technologies and renewable energy alternatives.

  14. Development of computerized supporting system for emergency response in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Il

    1992-02-01

    In emergency situation of nuclear power plants, effective use of emergency operating procedures (EOPs) is a crucial part of the emergency response process. However, there are several problems in the emergency operating procedures because of the form of the written procedures. They are voluminous and complicate for effective references under high stress situation. Inevitably, it takes time that could be better spent employing measures to control and stabilize to select the correct procedures and apply the decision logic. In this study, a computerized supporting system has been developed to reduce the operator error possibility under emergency situations of nuclear power plant. Using on-line input parameters, the system can determine the status of the critical safety functions and can find appropriate procedures and necessary operator actions automatically. Moreover, the system can help the operator decision making in the core melt accident situation. By tracking the EOP in an on-line mode, most steps concerning checking or verifying plant state are processed automatically without operator participations. Therefore, the interactions between the system and the operator are simplified significantly and the possibility of human error is reduced

  15. MASS MEDIA COMMUNICATION OF EMERGENCY ISSUES AND COUNTERMEASURES IN A NUCLEAR ACCIDENT: FUKUSHIMA REPORTING IN EUROPEAN NEWSPAPERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Eduardo; Cantone, Marie Claire; Oughton, Deborah H; Perko, Tanja; Prezelj, Iztok; Tomkiv, Yevgeniya

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents the results of a large study of 1340 articles published by two major newspapers in six European countries (Belgium, Italy, Norway, Slovenia, Spain and Russia) in the first 2 months after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. The focus of the analysis is on the application and overall impact of protective actions, both during the emergency phase and later, how the newspapers describe those actions, which differences were apparent between countries and what recommendations can be extracted in order to improve general communication about these issues. A clear lesson is that, even under uncertainty and recognising limitations, responsible authorities need to provide transparent, clear and understandable information to the public and the mass media right from the beginning of the early phase of any nuclear emergency. Clear, concise messages should be given. Mass media could play a key role in reassuring the public if the countermeasures are clearly explained. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Recent advances in modeling and validation of nuclear thermal-hydraulics applications with NEPTUNE CFD - 15471

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guingo, M.; Baudry, C.; Hassanaly, M.; Lavieville, J.; Mechitouna, N.; Merigoux, N.; Mimouni, S.; Bestion, D.; Coste, P.; Morel, C.

    2015-01-01

    NEPTUNE CFD is a Computational Multi-(Fluid) Dynamics code dedicated to the simulation of multiphase flows, primarily targeting nuclear thermo-hydraulics applications, such as the departure from nuclear boiling (DNB) or the two-phase Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS). It is co-developed within the joint research/development project NEPTUNE (AREVA, CEA, EDF, IRSN) since 2001. Over the years, to address the aforementioned applications, dedicated physical models and numerical methods have been developed and implemented in the code, including specific sets of models for turbulent boiling flows and two-phase non-adiabatic stratified flows. This paper aims at summarizing the current main modeling capabilities of the code, and gives an overview of the associated validation database. A brief summary of emerging applications of the code, such as containment simulation during a potential severe accident or in-vessel retention, is also provided. (authors)

  17. Organisation of the INEX2-HUN nuclear emergency exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lux, I.; Borsi, L.; Feher, I.; Ronaky, J.

    2000-01-01

    The third exercise in the INEX2 series organised under the auspices of OECD NEA was held in November 1998 in Hungary, with the participation of 4000 members of the Hungarian Emergency Response Organisation (HERO), 32 countries and 4 international organisations. The main goal of the INEX2 series was to exercise emergency preparedness activity with limited knowledge on the accident situation, to test the international notification schemes and to gain experience in informing the media and the population. The INEX2-HUN exercise assumed a medium severe accident in the Hungarian nuclear power plant with relatively high release of radioactive material that could reach also the territory of the neighbouring countries. The scenario of the accident has been elaborated by power plant experts and was played by the full scope simulator of the plant during the exercise. The nuclear emergency organisations were alerted and set up, and a full range exercise was held. The Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (HAEA) Centre of Emergency Response Training and Analysis (CERTA) obtained on-line data from the power plant, performed source term calculations, prepared progression forecast and even analysis. The radiological monitoring network of the Emergency Information Centre (EIC) of the Secretariat to the Governmental Commission for Nuclear Emergency Preparedness (GCNEP) collected and analysed (simulated) radiological data. EIC received also the meteorological data and - making use of the source term estimates obtained from CERTA - run the specific program that gave detailed description of the radiological situation over the affected area and generated proposals to the decision-makers on the interventions to be performed. The results of the analysis and simulation were used to compile the information to be communicated to the leading organs of HERO, to the neighbouring countries and to the international community by the International Contact Point situated in the HAEA. Technical questions

  18. Nuclear Medicine and Application of Nuclear Techniques in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiharto, Kunto

    1996-01-01

    The use of nuclear techniques medicine covers not only nuclear medicine and radiology in strict sense but also determination of body mineral content by neutron activation analysis and x-ray fluorescence technique either in vitro or in vivo, application of radioisotopes as tracers in pharmacology and biochemistry, etc. This paper describes the ideal tracer in nuclear medicine, functional and morphological imaging, clinical aspect and radiation protection in nuclear medicine. Nuclear technique offers facilities and chances related to research activities and services in medicine. The development of diagnostic as well as therapeutic methods using monoclonal antibodies labeled with radioisotope will undoubtedly play an important role in the disease control

  19. Mobile robotics application in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.L.; White, J.R. [REMOTEC, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Mobile robots have been developed to perform hazardous operations in place of human workers. Applications include nuclear plant inspection/maintenance, decontamination and decommissioning police/military explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), hostage/terrorist negotiations and fire fighting. Nuclear facilities have proven that robotic applications can be cost-effective solutions to reducing personnel exposure and plant downtime. The first applications of mobile robots in the nuclear industry began in the early 1980`s, with the first vehicles being one of a kind machines or adaptations of commercial EOD robots. These activities included efforts by numerous commercial companies, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, EPRI, and several national laboratories. Some of these efforts were driven by the recovery and cleanup activities at TMI which demonstrated the potential and need for a remote means of performing surveillance and maintenance tasks in nuclear plants. The use of these machines is now becoming commonplace in nuclear facilities throughout the world. The hardware maturity and the confidence of the users has progressed to the point where the applications of mobile robots is not longer considered a novelty. These machines are being used in applications where the result is to help achieve more aggressive goals for personnel radiation exposure and plant availability, perform tasks more efficiently, and allow plant operators to retrieve information from areas previously considered inaccessible. Typical examples include surveillance in high radiation areas (during operation and outage activities), radiation surveys, waste handling, and decontamination evolutions. This paper will discuss this evolution including specific applications experiences, examples of currently available technology, and the benefits derived from the use of mobile robotic vehicles in commercial nuclear power facilities.

  20. Mobile robotics application in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.L.; White, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Mobile robots have been developed to perform hazardous operations in place of human workers. Applications include nuclear plant inspection/maintenance, decontamination and decommissioning police/military explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), hostage/terrorist negotiations and fire fighting. Nuclear facilities have proven that robotic applications can be cost-effective solutions to reducing personnel exposure and plant downtime. The first applications of mobile robots in the nuclear industry began in the early 1980's, with the first vehicles being one of a kind machines or adaptations of commercial EOD robots. These activities included efforts by numerous commercial companies, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, EPRI, and several national laboratories. Some of these efforts were driven by the recovery and cleanup activities at TMI which demonstrated the potential and need for a remote means of performing surveillance and maintenance tasks in nuclear plants. The use of these machines is now becoming commonplace in nuclear facilities throughout the world. The hardware maturity and the confidence of the users has progressed to the point where the applications of mobile robots is not longer considered a novelty. These machines are being used in applications where the result is to help achieve more aggressive goals for personnel radiation exposure and plant availability, perform tasks more efficiently, and allow plant operators to retrieve information from areas previously considered inaccessible. Typical examples include surveillance in high radiation areas (during operation and outage activities), radiation surveys, waste handling, and decontamination evolutions. This paper will discuss this evolution including specific applications experiences, examples of currently available technology, and the benefits derived from the use of mobile robotic vehicles in commercial nuclear power facilities

  1. On-site emergency intervention plan for nuclear accident situation at INR-Pitesti TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oprea, I.; Margenu, S.; Preda, M.

    2001-01-01

    A nuclear incident is defined as a series of events leading to release of radioactive materials into the environment of sufficient concentration to make necessary protective actions. The decision to initiate a protective action is a complex process. The benefits of taking the action is weighed against the involved risk and constraints. In addition the decision will be made under difficult emergency conditions, probably with little detailed information available. Therefore, considerable planing is necessary to reduce to manageable levels the types of decisions leading to effective responses to protect the public in the event of a nuclear incident. The sequence of events for developing emergency plans and responding to nuclear incidents will vary according to individual circumstances, because the international recommendations and site-specific emergency plans cannot provide detailed guidance for all accident scenarios and variations in local conditions. Flexibility must be maintained in emergency response to reflect the actual circumstances encountered (e.g. source term characteristics, the large number of possible weather conditions and environmental situation such as time of the day, season of the year, land use and soil types, population distribution and economic structures, uncertainties in the availability of technical and administrative support and the behaviour of the population). This further complicates the decision-making process, especially under accident conditions where there are time pressures and psychological stress. Therefore one the most important problems in the case of a nuclear emergency is quantifying all these very different types of off-site consequences. Last years, and in particular since the Chernobyl accident, there has been a considerable increase in the resources allocated to development of computerised systems which allow for predicting the radiological impact of accidents and to provide information in a manageable and effective form to

  2. Mapping air pollution. Application of nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parr, R.M.; Stone, S.F.; Zeisler, R.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear techniques have important applications in the study of air pollution and many of its components. However, it is in the study of airborne particulate matter (APM) that nuclear analytical techniques find many of their most important applications. This article focuses on those applications, and on the work of the IAEA in this important field of study. 2 figs

  3. Radiological and nuclear emergency preparedness and response. How well are we prepared?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geick, Gunther H.G.; Herrmann, Andre R.; Koch, Doris; Meisenberg, Oliver; Rauber, Dominique; Stuerm, Rolf P.; Weiss, Wolfgang; Miska, Horst; Schoenhacker, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The contributions to this topic are dealing, in a broad overview, with important aspects of Nuclear Emergency Preparedness and Response, like the influence of the new ICRP recommendations number 103 and number 109 on emergency preparedness and on planning for response, possible problems in installing and operating emergency care centres, experience from exercises as well as the training of response personnel in Austria and Germany. Finally, measures in emergency preparedness with regard to a dirty bomb attack are reported by means of an INEX-4-exercise in Switzerland. (orig.)

  4. The management of post nuclear or radiological emergency situations in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godet, Jean-Luc; Mehl-Auget, Isabelle; Johanna Fite

    2008-01-01

    For several years, public authorities have defined an organisation for the management of emergency situations arising from an accident occurring at a nuclear installation. So far, the management of the risk arising from the post accident step was, in itself, not explored with the same care. Whatsoever, no formal policy on which the action of public authority could be based is today available. The French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN), in relation with the other concerned departments, is now in charge to prepare and implement the necessary provisions to respond to a post accident situation. In June 2005, ASN established the steering committee for the management of post nuclear or radiological emergency situations (CODIRPA). The definition of a national policy related to the management of the radiological risk during a post event situation has to integrate various organisation aspects such as: lifting of protection emergency provisions and rehabilitation of buildings, life in contaminated rural territories, agriculture and water, dose and radiological consequences, sanitary surveillance of victims and populations, indemnification, waste management of contaminated crops and soils, organisation of public Authorities. During the 2nd step of CODIRPA work (2008-2009), the first elements of policy will be consolidated and new scenarios will be studied (one worsened scenario and one scenario with alpha emitting radionuclide). In parallel, a procedure for local actor's consultation has just been launched. (author)

  5. Nuclear emergency exercises in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, F.B.

    1993-01-01

    The practice followed in planning, preparing and conducting offsite nuclear emergency exercises in the Province of Ontario, Canada, is described. In addition, some of the main issues that arise during this process are discussed, as well as Canadian experience in dealing with them. The planning process starts with basic decisions on the aim, scope and duration of the exercise. It proceeds through selection of the exercise objectives and participants, the development of scenarios and incident lists culminating in a master scenario and a master incident list, and finally, the production of control inputs. Preparations include the setting up of a planning organization, making arrangements for exercise control and evaluation, and the required logistics. Some aspects of international exercises are also covered, based upon experience with joint exercises with the U.S.A

  6. Recovery operations in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Much progress has been made over the last decade in the field of emergency planning and preparedness, including the development of guidance, criteria, training programmes, regulations and comprehensive plans in the support of nuclear facilities. To provide a forum for international review and discussion of actual experiences gained and lessons learned from the different aspects of recovery techniques and operations in response to serious accidents at nuclear facilities and accidents associated with radioactive materials, the IAEA organized the International Symposium on Recovery Operations in the Event of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. The symposium was held from 6 to 10 November 1989 in Vienna, Austria, and was attended by over 250 experts from 35 Member State and 7 international organizations. Although the prime focus was on on-site and off-site recovery from nuclear reactor accidents and on recovery from radiological accidents unrelated to nuclear power plants, development of emergency planning and preparedness resources was covered as well. From the experiences reported, lessons learned were identified. While further work remains to be done to improve concepts, plans, materials, communications and mechanisms to assemble quickly all the special resources needed in the event of an accident, there was general agreement that worldwide preparations to handle any possible future radiological emergencies had vastly improved. A special feature of the symposium programme was the inclusion of a full session on an accident involving a chemical explosion in a high level waste tank a a plutonium extraction plant in the Southern Urals in the USSR in 1957. Information was presented on the radioactive release, its dissemination and deposition, the resultant radiation situation, dose estimates, health effects follow-up, and the rehabilitation of contaminated land. This volume contains the full text of the 49 papers presented at the symposium together with a

  7. Emergency preparedness exercise ''Posavje 82'' in support of the Krsko Nuclear Power Plant, Krsko, Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, H.E.; Emmerson, B.W.

    1983-06-01

    In October 1982, the Yugoslavian Government requested the Agency's assistance in observing and evaluating an emergency preparedness exercise (code named ''POSAVJE 82'') on 5 and 6 November 1982, to test emergency plans and arrangements supportive of the KRSKO Nuclear Power Plant. The Krsko Nuclear Power Plant is a single unit pressurized water reactor of United States (Westinghouse) design rated at 664 MWe (Gross) and is located at Krsko, Socialist Republic of Slovenia, Yugoslavia. This assistance was provided by sending a Special Assistance Mission team of experts under the general provisions of the Agency's circular letter SC/651-3 of 7 April 1981 to Member States which offered such assistance upon request. This mission was a follow-up to a previous mission requested by the Yugoslavian Government which was conducted 24 June - 1 July 1981. At that time, the mission consisted of examining the then existing arrangements for emergency planning in support of the KRSKO Nuclear Power Plant at the National, Republic, local and nuclear power plant levels and discussing with Yugoslavian authorities criteria for emergency plan development and improvement. As a result of this 1981 mission, a ''Report to the Goverment of Yugoslavia'' (IAEA TA Report 1827 of 17 September 1981) was transmitted to the Yugoslavian Government. This report set forth a number of recommendations for improving and further developing the various emergency plans and arrangements for the KRSKO Nuclear Power Plant. A summary of the major recommendations contained in the report is given in Section 2.2. The entire report is listed as Reference 1 of Annex A

  8. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry in nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaobo; Hu Jinjun; Wang Huijuan; Guan Yongjing; Wang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a promising method to provide extreme sensitivity measurements of the production yields of long-lived radioisotopes, which cannot be detected by other methods. AMS technique plays an important role in the research of nuclear physics, as well as the application field of AMS covered nuclear science and technology, life science, earth science, environmental science, archaeology etc. The newest AMS field is that of actinide, particularly U and Pu, isotopic assay with expanding applications in nuclear safeguards and monitoring, and as a modern bomb-fallout tracer for atmospheric transport and surface sediment movement. This paper reviews the applications of AMS in the research of nuclear energy and nuclear security including the research of half life of radionuclides, cross section of nuclear reaction. (authors)

  9. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 4. Radiological emergency response planning for nuclear power plants in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, W.W.S.

    1977-01-01

    This report reviews the state of emergency response planning for nuclear power plants in California. Attention is given to the role of Federal agencies, particularly the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, in planning for both on and off site emergency measures and to the role of State and local agencies for off site planning. The relationship between these various authorities is considered. Existing emergency plans for nuclear power plants operating or being constructed in California are summarized. The developing role of the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission is examined

  10. NKS - The Nordic region's cooperative network for addressing challenges in nuclear safety and emergency preparedness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, K.G. [NKS/Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Andgren, K. [NKS/Vattenfall R and D (Sweden); Leino, K. [NKS/Fortum Power and Heat Oy (Finland); Magnusson, S. [NKS/Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority (Iceland); Physant, F. [NKS/FRIT, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2014-07-01

    Based on the foundation of a common cultural and historical heritage and a long tradition of collaboration, NKS aims to facilitate a common Nordic view on nuclear and radiation safety. A common understanding of rules, practice and measures, and national differences in this context, is here an essential requirement. Problems can generally be tackled quicker, more efficiently, more consistently and at a lower cost through collaboration, bearing in mind that key competencies are not equally distributed in the different Nordic countries. For instance common Nordic challenges emerge in relation to nuclear installations, where nuclear power plants are in operation in Finland and Sweden, and research reactors have been operated in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. There is an obvious benefit in exchanging ideas and technologies in relation to plant operation, and since a number of reactors in different Nordic countries are under decommissioning, a collaborative benefit can also be realised in that context. Sweden also has a nuclear fuel production plant, and its collaboration with other Nordic nuclear installations can also be beneficial. Further, a number of large radiological installations are projected in Nordic areas (e.g., the MAX-LAB/MAX IV synchrotron radiation source and the European spallation source ESS), where Nordic organisations are collaborating in addressing, e.g., potential environmental implications. On the emergency preparedness side, the Fukushima accident in March 2011 was a reminder that large accidents at nuclear installations can lead to widespread radioactive contamination in the environment. In order to respond to nuclear or radiological emergencies, should they affect Nordic populations, it is necessary to maintain an operational emergency preparedness. By continuously improving detection, response and decision aiding tools while maintaining an informal collaborative network between relevant stakeholders in the Nordic countries (including

  11. Development of the re-engineered European decision support system for off-site nuclear and radiological emergencies - JRODOS. Application to air pollution transport modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ievdin, I.; Treebushny, D.; Raskob, W.; Zheleznyak, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The European decision support system for nuclear and radiological emergencies RODOS includes a set of numerical models simulating the transport of radionuclides in the environment, estimating potential doses to the public and simulating and evaluating the efficiency of countermeasures. The re-engineering of the RODOS system using the Java technology has started recently which will allow to apply the new system called JRODOS on nearly any computational platform running Java virtual machine. Modern software development approaches were used for the JRODOS system architecture and implementation: distributed system design (client, management server, computational server), geo-database utilization, plug-in model structure and OpenMI-like compatibility to support seamless model inter-connection. Stable open source components such as an ORM solution (Hibernate), an OpenGIS component (Geotools) and a charting/reporting component (JFree, Pentaho) were utilized to optimize the development effort and allow a fast completion of the project. The architecture of the system is presented and illustrated for the atmospheric dispersion module ALSMC (Atmospheric Local Scale Model Chain) performing calculations of atmospheric pollution transport and the corresponding acute doses and dose rates. The example application is based on a synthetic scenario of a release from a nuclear power plant located in Europe. (author)

  12. Modifications of Probabilistic Safety Assessment-1 Nuclear Power Plant Dukovany based upon new version of Emergency Operating Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldorf, R.

    1997-01-01

    In the frame of 'living Probabilistic Safety Assessment-1 Nuclear Power Plant Dukovany Project' being performed by Nuclear Research Institute Rez during 1997 is planned to reflect on Probabilistic Safety Assessment-1 basis on impact of Emergency Response Guidelines (as one particular event from the list of other modifications) on Plant Safety. Following highlights help to orient the reader in main general aspects, findings and issues of the work that currently continues on. Older results of Probabilistic Safety Assessment-1 Nuclear Power Plant Dukovany have revealed that human behaviour during accident progression scenarios represent one of the most important aspects in plant safety. Current effort of Nuclear Power Plants Dukovany (Czech Republic) and Bohunice (Slovak Republic) is focussed on development of qualitatively new symptom-based Emergency Operating Procedures called Emergency Response Guidelines Supplier - Westinghouse Energy Systems Europe, Brussels works in cooperation with teams of specialist from both Nuclear Power Plants. In the frame of 'living Probabilistic Safety Assessment-1 Nuclear Power Plant Dukovany Project' being performed by Nuclear Research Institute Rez during 1997 is planned to prove on Probabilistic Safety Assessment -1 basis an expected - positive impact of Emergency Response Guidelines on Plant Safety, Since this contract is currently still in progress, it is possible to release only preliminary conclusions and observations. Emergency Response Guidelines compare to original Emergency Operating Procedures substantially reduce uncertainty of general human behaviour during plant response to an accident process. It is possible to conclude that from the current scope Probabilistic Safety Assessment Dukovany point of view (until core damage), Emergency Response Guidelines represent adequately wide basis for mitigating any initiating event

  13. Method for Developing Arrangements for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (Updating IAEA-TECDOC-953) (Spanish Ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This publication provides a practical resource for emergency planning and fulfils, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. If used effectively, it will help users to develop a capability to adequately respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency

  14. Method for Developing Arrangements for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (Updating IAEA-TECDOC-953) (French Ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This publication provides a practical resource for emergency planning and fulfils, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. If used effectively, it will help users to develop a capability to adequately respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency

  15. Method for Developing Arrangements for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (Updating IAEA-TECDOC-953) (Russian Ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This publication provides a practical resource for emergency planning and fulfils, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. If used effectively, it will help users to develop a capability to adequately respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency

  16. Revision of criteria for foodstuffs control following a nuclear or radiological emergency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Hyun; Lee, Young Min; Jeong, Seung Young [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    GAL(generic action level)s were derived using cost-benefit methods. But the factors used to derive GALs, such as Gross National Product (GNP) and cost of foodstuff, have been changed for last 10 years. Moreover the standards did not consider exposure situation change from emergency exposure to existing exposure situation. In this study, two ways to revise existing standards for foodstuff control were considered; 1st, revision of GAL, 2nd, newly derived reference level. In this study, two methods to revise food control criteria following nuclear emergency were suggested. GAL based on recent GNI and cost of foodstuff would be revised and decreased up to 30 % than existing criteria. DRLs reflecting exposure situation and consumption pattern were smaller than existing criteria for group 1 nuclides. The approach considered in the study would be applied to set up domestic criteria for food control during and following nuclear or radiological emergency.

  17. Revision of criteria for foodstuffs control following a nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Hyun; Lee, Young Min; Jeong, Seung Young

    2015-01-01

    GAL(generic action level)s were derived using cost-benefit methods. But the factors used to derive GALs, such as Gross National Product (GNP) and cost of foodstuff, have been changed for last 10 years. Moreover the standards did not consider exposure situation change from emergency exposure to existing exposure situation. In this study, two ways to revise existing standards for foodstuff control were considered; 1st, revision of GAL, 2nd, newly derived reference level. In this study, two methods to revise food control criteria following nuclear emergency were suggested. GAL based on recent GNI and cost of foodstuff would be revised and decreased up to 30 % than existing criteria. DRLs reflecting exposure situation and consumption pattern were smaller than existing criteria for group 1 nuclides. The approach considered in the study would be applied to set up domestic criteria for food control during and following nuclear or radiological emergency

  18. Review of off-site emergency preparedness and response plan of Indian NPPs based on experience of Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Hukum; Dash, M.; Shukla, Vikas; Vijayan, P.; Krishnamurthy, P.R.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power plants in India are designed, constructed and operated based on the principle of the highest priority to nuclear safety. To deal with any unlikely situation of radiological emergency, the emergency preparedness and response plans are ensured to be in place at all NPPs prior to their commissioning. These plans are periodically reviewed and tested by conducting emergency exercise with the participation of various agencies such as Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, NDMA, district authorities, regulatory body and general public. On March 11, 2011 an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 hit the Fukushima Dai-ichi and Dai-ni followed by tsunami waves of height 15 meters above reference sea level. This resulted in large scale release of radioactive material from Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS. This led to the evacuation of a large number of people from the areas surrounding the affected nuclear power plants. The event was rated as level 7 event in International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). The event also revealed the challenges in handling radiological emergency situation in adverse environmental conditions, The experience of managing radiological emergency situation during Fukushima nuclear accident provides opportunities to review and improve emergency preparedness and response programme. The present paper presents the chronology of the emergency situation, challenges faced and handled in Fukushima. Even though the possibility of a Fukushima type nuclear accident in India is very remote due to the low probability of a high intensity earthquake followed by tsunami at NPP sites, the efforts needs to be initiated from the regulatory point of view for an effective Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans. The Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans of NPP sites were reviewed in the light of unique challenges of accident at Fukushima. It is realized that multi unit events are the realities that must be addressed as part of Emergency

  19. Review of off-site emergency preparedness and response plan of Indian NPPs based on experience of Fukushima nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Hukum; Dash, M.; Shukla, Vikas; Vijayan, P.; Krishnamurthy, P.R., E-mail: vshukla@aerb.gov.in [Operating Plants Safety Division, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai (India)

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear power plants in India are designed, constructed and operated based on the principle of the highest priority to nuclear safety. To deal with any unlikely situation of radiological emergency, the emergency preparedness and response plans are ensured to be in place at all NPPs prior to their commissioning. These plans are periodically reviewed and tested by conducting emergency exercise with the participation of various agencies such as Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, NDMA, district authorities, regulatory body and general public. On March 11, 2011 an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 hit the Fukushima Dai-ichi and Dai-ni followed by tsunami waves of height 15 meters above reference sea level. This resulted in large scale release of radioactive material from Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS. This led to the evacuation of a large number of people from the areas surrounding the affected nuclear power plants. The event was rated as level 7 event in International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). The event also revealed the challenges in handling radiological emergency situation in adverse environmental conditions, The experience of managing radiological emergency situation during Fukushima nuclear accident provides opportunities to review and improve emergency preparedness and response programme. The present paper presents the chronology of the emergency situation, challenges faced and handled in Fukushima. Even though the possibility of a Fukushima type nuclear accident in India is very remote due to the low probability of a high intensity earthquake followed by tsunami at NPP sites, the efforts needs to be initiated from the regulatory point of view for an effective Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans. The Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans of NPP sites were reviewed in the light of unique challenges of accident at Fukushima. It is realized that multi unit events are the realities that must be addressed as part of Emergency

  20. Catastrophe theory with application in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeca, Serban Constantin

    2002-01-01

    The monograph is structured on the following seven chapters: 1. Correlation of risk, catastrophe and chaos at the level of polyfunctional systems with nuclear injection; 1.1 Approaching the risk at the level of power systems; 1.2 Modelling the chaos-catastrophe-risk correlation in the structure of integrated classical and nuclear processes; 2. Catastrophe theory applied in ecosystems models and applications; 2.1 Posing the problems in catastrophe theory; 2.2 Application of catastrophe theory in the engineering of the power ecosystems with nuclear injection; 4.. Decision of abatement of the catastrophic risk based on minimal costs; 4.1 The nuclear power systems sensitive to risk-catastrophe-chaos in the structure of minimal costs; 4.2 Evaluating the market structure on the basis of power minimal costs; 4.3 Decisions in power systems built on minimal costs; 5. Models of computing the minimal costs in classical and nuclear power systems; 5.1 Calculation methodologies of power minimal cost; 5.2 Calculation methods of minimal costs in nuclear power sector; 6. Expert and neuro expert systems for supervising the risk-catastrophe-chaos correlation; 6.1 The structure of expert systems; 6.2 Application of the neuro expert program; 7. Conclusions and operational proposals; 7.1 A synthesis of the problems presented in this work; 7.2 Highlighting the novel aspects applicable in the power systems with nuclear injection

  1. Applications of artificial intelligence and expert systems in ANGRA-I emergency preparedness - The Brazilian case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarenga, M.A.B.; Guimaraes, A.C.F.

    1991-01-01

    This study describes a system to follow a nuclear accident and points the areas where the presence of artificial intelligence could be necessary: diagnostics systems, emergency classification, accident management strategies and protective actions. Logical rules could be combined with deterministic equations to provide an expert system prototype to manage a nuclear emergency preparedness for nuclear reactors (fast or thermal) in the Brazilian Nuclear Energy National Commission. (CNEN). (author)

  2. A knowledge based operator support system for emergency conditions in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh Babu, C.; Subramanium, K.

    1992-01-01

    The control centres of the operating Indian nuclear power plants contain a large number of indicators and controls spread over many panels. In the event of onset of an emergency condition, there results a profusion of information, both numeric and symbolic. The operator may succumb to an information and cognitive overload that may be compounded by a lack of knowledge. The failure to apply knowledge and reasoning to solve an operational problem can lead to human error, which has been a major contributing factor in nuclear accidents. From the viewpoint of Artificial Intelligence, human error occurs if the operational problem requires computing resources that exceed human capabilities. The application of Artificial Intelligence, particularly expert systems, to nuclear power plant control room activities has considerable potential to reduce operator error and improve safety and reliability. The purpose of this paper is to discuss an investigative study of the feasibility of developing an operator support system incorporating Artificial Intelligence techniques. An information processing model of such a system, herein designated as Knowledge Based Operator Support System - KBOSS, employing expert systems technology, has been developed. The features of this system are described, and issues involved in its development are discussed. (author). 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  3. Nuclear emergency preparedness and response in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miska, H.

    2009-01-01

    Off-site nuclear emergency response in Germany is divided into disaster response under the responsibility of the Laender and measures for precautionary radiation protection pursuant to the Precautionary Radiation Protection Act under the lead of federal authorities. Early countermeasures at the regional level require a different management than long-term and comprehensive actions of precautionary radiation protection. As situations may arise in which measures of both approaches overlap with regard to place and time, it is essential to make thorough preparations in order to avoid problems with implementation. (orig.)

  4. Knowledge databases as instrument for a fast assessment in nuclear emergency management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raskob, Wolfgang; Moehrle, Stella [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von- Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The European project PREPARE (Innovative integrated tools and platforms for radiological emergency preparedness and post-accident response in Europe) aims to close gaps that have been identified in nuclear and radiological preparedness following the first evaluation of the Fukushima disaster. Among others, a work package was established to develop a so called Analytical Platform exploring the scientific and operational means to improve information collection, information exchange and the evaluation of such types of disasters. As methodological approach knowledge databases and case-based reasoning (CBR) will be used. The application of knowledge gained from previous events or the establishment of scenarios in advance to anticipate possible event developments are used in many areas, but so far not in nuclear and radiological emergency management and preparedness. However in PREPARE, knowledge databases and CBR should be combined by establishing a database, which contains historic events and scenarios, their propagation with time, and applied emergency measures and using the CBR methodology to find solutions for events that are not part of the database. The objectives are to provide information about consequences and future developments after a nuclear or radiological event and emergency measures, which include early, intermediate and late phase actions. CBR is a methodology to solve new problems by utilizing knowledge of previously experienced problem situations. In order to solve a current problem, similar problems from a case base are retrieved. Their solutions are taken and, if necessary, adapted to the current situation. The suggested solution is revised and if it is confirmed, it is stored in the case base. Hence, a CBR system learns with time by storing new cases with its solutions. CBR has many advantages, such as solutions can be proposed quickly and do not have to be made from scratch, solutions can be proposed in domains that are not understood completely

  5. Applications of nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medveczky, L.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a scientific research-work are summarized. Nuclear track detectors were used for new applications or in unusual ways. Photographic films, nuclear emulsions and dielectric track detectors were investigated. The tracks were detected by optical microscopy. Empirical formulation has been derived for the neutron sensitivity of certain dielectric materials. Methods were developed for leak testing of closed alpha emitting sources. New procedures were found for the application and evaluation of track detector materials. The results were applied in the education, personnel dosimetry, radon dosimetry etc. (R.J.)

  6. Determination of action zone in the nuclear / radiology handling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ade Awalludin

    2013-01-01

    Assessment has been conducted on determination of action zone in nuclear or radiological emergency. The assessment is taken into account radiological risk level in nuclear or radiological emergency management process outside nuclear installation. Managing of nuclear emergency is same as that one of other emergency by adding the principles of radiation protection. This study aims to provide guidance in making of safety and security perimeter outside the nuclear installation for first responders during nuclear/radiological emergency based on dose rate, contamination level or distance from the scene. Separation of working zone is important for first responder safety that works in radiological environment in the event of nuclear or radiation emergency without violating their standard operating procedure. Value limit of safety and security perimeter has been made according to the conditions in Indonesia and considering the applicability in practical. (author)

  7. Advanced simulation and management software for nuclear emergency training and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, K.W.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of training of safety personnel to deal with real world scenarios is prevalent amongst nuclear emergency preparedness and response organizations. For the development of training tools we have committed to ensure that field procedures, data collection software and decision making tools be identical during training sessions as they would be during a real emergency. By identifying the importance of a fully integrated tool, we have developed a safety support system capable of both functioning in training mode and real mode, enabling emergency response organizations to train more efficiently and effectively. This new fully integrated emergency management tool is called S3-FAST also known as Safety Support Systems - Field Assessment Survey Tool. (orig.)

  8. Strainer device for an emergency cooling system in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trybom, J.

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates to a strainer device for separating contaminants from water in an emergency cooling system for a nuclear power plant. The nuclear power plant has a wet-well for water in the emergency cooling system and the strainer device comprises at least one strainer device, which is arranged in the wet-well. According to the invention the strainer is suspended in a desired position in the wet-well by means of at least a group of at least three tie rods arranged at angles to each other, each tie rod being fixed at one end to the strainer and its other end to the container or an anchor ring joined thereto. (author) figs

  9. Strategic Aspects of Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Management. Planning for Effective Decision Making; Consequence Management and Transition to Recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The collective experience of the NEA Working Party on Nuclear Emergency Matters (WPNEM), and in particular, the experience from the International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (INEX) series, has shown that it is important to plan and to implement emergency response actions based on a guiding strategic vision. Within this context, Strategic Aspects of Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Management presents a framework of strategic planning elements to be considered by national emergency management authorities when establishing or enhancing processes for decision making, and when developing or implementing protection strategies. The focus is on nuclear or radiological emergency situations leading to complex preparedness and response conditions, involving multiple jurisdictions and significant international interfaces. The report is aimed at national emergency management authorities, international organisations and those who are seeking to improve the effectiveness of emergency management. Its goal is to provide insights into decision-making processes within existing emergency planning arrangements. It also highlights common areas of good practice in decision making. Specific areas for improvement, identified during the INEX-3 consequence management exercise, are included, particularly in support of decision making for countermeasures for consequence management and the transition to recovery. (authors)

  10. The Application of Nuclear Technology for a Better World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ita, E.B.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear Technology is widely used in different areas and sector of our economy to better man kind and his environment. Peaceful applications of nuclear technology have several benefits to the world today. It is widely believed that nuclear technology is mainly used mainly for the production of electricity (Nuclear Power Plants – NPPs). Many are not aware of the other numerous benefits of nuclear technology. Nuclear technology can be applied in different fields for numerous benefits. Different sectors Nuclear Technology application can improve the living standard of man and his environment: – Food and Agriculture; – Medicine; – Industrial; – Energy; – Education; — Research and Development; – Environment. The benefits of the application of nuclear technology cannot be over emphasised. These benefits range from the improved quality of purified water we drink, the textiles we wear, improved quality of stored grains for preservation of foods, water analyses, improved transportation system work, drugs production, medical tests and analysis, clean environment through radioisotope techniques etc. The application of nuclear technology also gives a safer, greener, healthier and pollution free environment and atmosphere for human habitation. In my poster, the numerous benefits of the various applications of Nuclear Technology will be clearly enumerated and heighted. (author)

  11. Nuclear data, cross section libraries and their application in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings contain the articles presented at the named seminar. The articles deal with evaluated nuclear data libraries, computer codes for neutron transport and reactor calculations using nuclear data libraries, and the application of nuclear data libraries for the calculation of the interaction of neutron beams with materials. (HSI)

  12. Learning, innovation and communication: evolving dynamics of a nuclear emergency plan; Aprendizagem, inovacao e comunicacao: a dinamica evolutica de um plano de emergencia nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quadros, Andre Luiz Lopes

    2014-07-01

    The technological development inherent to modern societies has placed human beings in situations of choice from a wide variety of possible risks. As a way to protect people and the environment, actions need to be developed in order to reduce possible consequences of the materialisation of these risks. The thermonuclear power generation demand planning in order to prepare answers to possible emergency situations, as even being considered of low probability of occurrence, when they happen have a significant impact on populations and regions of its surroundings. Considering the relevance of this issue, this thesis aimed to identify and analyze the dynamics of preparedness and response to emergency situations in a Nuclear Power Plant, trying to understand its evolution over the time and systematizing it, considering the actors involved, processes of organizational learning, innovation and risk communication, considered as crucial for the development and improvement of emergency plans. Concerning preparedness and response to possible emergency situations in this nuclear plant, it was possible not only to confirm the importance of the three processes studied, bu