WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear education network

  1. European nuclear education network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.; Moons, F.; Safieh, J.

    2005-01-01

    In most countries within the European Union that rely to a significant extent on nuclear power, neither undergraduate nor PhD education is producing a sufficient number of engineers and doctors to fill the needs of the industry. As a result of an EU-supported project, a new education organisation, European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN), has recently been established, with the aim to establish a European master's degree of nuclear engineering. Recently, a new EU project, Nuclear European Platform of Training and University Organisations (NEPTUNO), has been launched, aiming at the practical implementation of ENEN and harmonisation of training activities. (author)

  2. ENEN - European Nuclear Educational Network Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Regge, P.

    2006-01-01

    After the pioneering initiative of BNEN, the Belgian Nuclear higher Education Network, other countries, e.g. Italy, United Kingdom, Germany, Switzerland, etc., created their own pool of education. At the European level the ENEN Association (European Nuclear Education Network) is a sustainable product generated by an FP5 project. The main objective of the ENEN Association is the preservation and the further development of higher nuclear education and expertise. This objective is realized through the co-operation between European universities, involved in education and research in the nuclear engineering field, nuclear research centres and nuclear industry

  3. International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN): Promoting nuclear security education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamad Samudi Yasir

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: The need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underlined at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors Meetings. Successive IAEA Nuclear Security Plans, the most recent of which was agreed by the Board of Governors in September 2009, give high priority to assisting States in establishing educational programmes in nuclear security in order to ensure the sustainability of nuclear security improvements. The current Nuclear Security Plan 1 covering 2010-2013 emphasizes on the importance of considering existing capacities at international, regional and national levels while designing nuclear security academic programmes. In the course of implementing the Plan, the IAEA developed a guide entitled Educational Programme in Nuclear Security (IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12) that consists of a model of a MAster of Science (M.Sc.) and a Certificate Programme in Nuclear Security. This guide was aims at assisting universities or other educational institutes to developed academic programmes in nuclear security. Independently, some universities already offered academic programmes covering some areas of nuclear security, while other universities have asked the IAEA to support the implementation of these programmes. In order to better address current and future request for assistance in this area, the IAEA establish a collaboration network-International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN), among universities who are providing nuclear security education or who are interested in starting an academic programme/ course(s) in nuclear security. Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) is a first local university became a member of INSEN since the beginning of the establishment. (author)

  4. The role of networking for nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowin, P.; Yanev, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear knowledge is the basis for almost all nuclear activities, and education and training are the most fundamental means to transfer knowledge from one generation to the next. Understanding means and trends in knowledge transfer through education and training thus deserves a closer examination. In the past years, a number of trends and questions in nuclear knowledge, education and training have emerged. With declining student enrolment numbers and a general stagnation of the use of nuclear power in some of the IAEA's Member States, the issue of a slow erosion of the knowledge base and the possibility of loosing knowledge has become increasingly important, in particular if seen against the background of a possible renaissance of nuclear power in the future. In other Member States, an expansion of nuclear power is expected, with a corresponding need for human resources. As a result, in many Member States education and training of the next generation and succession planning have become key issues. Several actions are being taken in the nuclear education and training sector, ranging from governmental programs to industry recruitment efforts, but most importantly a trend to increased networking and sharing of resources and facilities has become apparent. This paper starts with a working definition of 'nuclear knowledge' and a review of the history of nuclear knowledge, its accumulation over past decades and trends in its dissemination - either favouring networking and sharing knowledge, e.g. for sustainable development, or restricting such sharing, e.g. in the case of commercially used knowledge. It then examines the present trend to and motivation for increased networking of nuclear education and training as a part of transfer of that knowledge from one generation to the next. After a brief overview about the theory of networking, it can be said that networking can contribute to efficiency, sharing of resources, the effectiveness of programs, the timeliness of

  5. The role of networking for nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowin, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear knowledge is the basis for almost all nuclear activities. Education and training are the most fundamental means to transfer knowledge from one generation to the next. The paper gives a working definition of 'nuclear knowledge' and reviews the history of nuclear knowledge, it's accumulation over past decades and trends in it's dissemination - either favouring networking and sharing knowledge, e.g. for sustainable development, or restricting such sharing, e.g. in the case of commercially used knowledge. In the past years, a number of trends and questions in nuclear knowledge, education and training have emerged. With declining student enrolment numbers and a general stagnation of the use of nuclear power in some of the IAEA's Member States, the issue of a slow erosion of the knowledge base and the possibility of loosing knowledge has become increasingly important, in particular if seen against the background of a possible renaissance of nuclear power in the future. In other Member States, an expansion of nuclear power is expected, with a corresponding need for human resources. As a result, in many Member States education and training of the next generation and succession planning have become key issues. Several actions are being taken in the nuclear education and training sector, ranging from governmental programs to industry recruitment efforts, but most importantly a trend to increased networking and sharing of resources and facilities has become apparent. After a brief overview about the theory of networking, network types and characteristics, the paper presents selected networks in nuclear education and training as examples, including the IAEA initiative Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT). Based on a review of the key factors leading to the success of those networks, it can be concluded that networking already is a key element in shaping the nuclear educational sector, and that networking nuclear education and training

  6. The European Nuclear Education Network Association - ENEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Regge, P.P.

    2005-01-01

    The temporary network, established through the European 5 th Framework Programme project ENEN, was given a more permanent character by the foundation of the European Nuclear Education Network Association, a non-profit-making association according to the French law of 1901, pursuing a pedagogic and scientific aim. Its main objective is the preservation and the further development of higher nuclear education and expertise. This objective is realized through the co-operation between the European universities, involved in education and research in the nuclear engineering field, the nuclear research centres and the nuclear industry. The membership of the ENEN Association now consists of 35 universities members and 6 research centres. The paper briefly describes the history and structure of the ENEN Association and elaborates on the objectives and activities of its five committees during its first two years of operation. Supported by the 5 th and 6 th Framework Programme of the European Community, the ENEN Association established the delivery of the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering certificate. In particular, education and training courses have been developed and offered to materialise the core curricula and optional fields of study in a European exchange structure. Pilot editions of those courses and try-outs of training programmes have been successfully organised with a satisfying interest, attendance and performance by the students and the support of nuclear industries and international organisations. The involvement of ENEN in the 6 th EC Framework project EUROTRANS will further enlarge its field of activities into a realm of nuclear disciplines. The ENEN Association further contributes to the management of nuclear knowledge within the European Union as well as on a world-wide level, through contacts with its sister Network ANENT in Asia, and by its participation to activities of the World Nuclear University. (author)

  7. The European Nuclear Education Network Association - ENEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, D.

    2006-01-01

    The temporary network, established through the European 5. Framework Programme project ENEN, was given a more permanent character by the foundation of the European Nuclear Education Network Association, a non-profit-making association according to the French law of 1901, pursuing a pedagogic and scientific aim. Its main objective is the preservation and the further development of higher nuclear education and expertise. This objective is realized through the co-operation between the European universities, involved in education and research in the nuclear engineering field, the nuclear research centres and the nuclear industry. The membership of the ENEN Association now consists of 35 universities members and 6 research centres. The paper briefly describes the history and structure of the ENEN Association and elaborates on the objectives and activities of its five committees during its first two years of operation. Supported by the 5. and 6. Framework Programme of the European Community, the ENEN Association established the delivery of the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering certificate. In particular, education and training courses have been developed and offered to materialize the core curricula and optional fields of study in a European exchange structure. Pilot editions of those courses and try-outs of training programmes have been successfully organised with a satisfying interest, attendance and performance by the students and the support of nuclear industries and international organisations. The involvement of ENEN in the 6. EC Framework project EUROTRANS will further enlarge its field of activities into a realm of nuclear disciplines. The ENEN Association further contributes to the management of nuclear knowledge within the European Union as well as on a world-wide level, through contacts with its sister Network ANENT in Asia, and by its participation to activities of the World Nuclear University. (author)

  8. The European Nuclear Education Network Association - ENEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, D. [Institut des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, CEA - Centre de Saclay, Bat. 395, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-07-01

    The temporary network, established through the European 5. Framework Programme project ENEN, was given a more permanent character by the foundation of the European Nuclear Education Network Association, a non-profit-making association according to the French law of 1901, pursuing a pedagogic and scientific aim. Its main objective is the preservation and the further development of higher nuclear education and expertise. This objective is realized through the co-operation between the European universities, involved in education and research in the nuclear engineering field, the nuclear research centres and the nuclear industry. The membership of the ENEN Association now consists of 35 universities members and 6 research centres. The paper briefly describes the history and structure of the ENEN Association and elaborates on the objectives and activities of its five committees during its first two years of operation. Supported by the 5. and 6. Framework Programme of the European Community, the ENEN Association established the delivery of the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering certificate. In particular, education and training courses have been developed and offered to materialize the core curricula and optional fields of study in a European exchange structure. Pilot editions of those courses and try-outs of training programmes have been successfully organised with a satisfying interest, attendance and performance by the students and the support of nuclear industries and international organisations. The involvement of ENEN in the 6. EC Framework project EUROTRANS will further enlarge its field of activities into a realm of nuclear disciplines. The ENEN Association further contributes to the management of nuclear knowledge within the European Union as well as on a world-wide level, through contacts with its sister Network ANENT in Asia, and by its participation to activities of the World Nuclear University. (author)

  9. Towards the European Nuclear Engineering Education Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavko, B.; Giot, M.; Sehgal, B.R.; Goethem, G. Van

    2003-01-01

    Current priorities of the scientific community regarding basic research lie elsewhere than in nuclear sciences. The situation today is significantly different than it was three to four decades ago when much of the present competence base in nuclear sciences was in fact generated. In addition, many of the highly competent engineers and scientists, who helped create the present nuclear industry, and its regulatory structure, are approaching retirement. To preserve nuclear knowledge and expertise through the higher nuclear engineering education in the 5 th framework program of the European Commission the project ENEN (European Nuclear Engineering Education Network) was launched, since the need to keep the university curricula in nuclear sciences and technology alive has been clearly recognized at European level. As the follow up of this project an international nuclear engineering education consortium of universities with partners from the nuclear sector is presently in process of being established This association called ENEN has as founding members: 14 universities and 8 research institutes from 17 European countries. (author)

  10. European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsa, Olivia; Meglea, Claudia; Banutoiu, Marina; Paraschiva, M. V.; Meglea, S.

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of the ENEN Association is the preservation and further development of a higher nuclear education and expertise. This objective should be achieved through the co-operation between European universities involved in education and research in the nuclear engineering field, research centers and the nuclear industry. To reach this objective, the ENEN Association has to: Promote and develop the collaboration in nuclear engineering education of engineers and researchers required by the nuclear industry and the regulatory bodies; Ensure the quality of nuclear academic engineering education and training; Increase the attractiveness for engagement in the nuclear field for students and young academics. The basic objectives of the ENEN Association shall be to: Deliver an European Master of Science Degree in Nuclear Engineering and promote PhD studies; Promote exchange of students and teachers participating in the frame of this network; Increase the number of students by providing incentives; Establish a framework for mutual recognition; Foster and strengthen the relationship with research laboratories and networks, industry and regulatory bodies, by involving them in (or association them with) nuclear academic education and by offering continuous training. The aims of the ENEN Association shall be achieved by: Discussion on educational objectives, methods and course contents among the members and with external partners, particularly national European industries; Organization of internal audits on the quality of nuclear engineering curricula; Awarding the label of 'European Master degree of Science in Nuclear Engineering' to the curricula satisfying the criteria set up by the ENEN Association; Cooperation between the members, and with the research centers and the nuclear industry for enhancement of mobility of teachers and students, organization of training and advanced courses, use of large research and teaching facilities or infrastructures; Cooperation

  11. Nuclear safety education and training network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, J.; Ulfkjaer, L.

    2004-01-01

    In March 2001, the Secretariat convened an Advisory Group on Education and Training in nuclear safety. The Advisory Group considered structure, scope and means related to the implementation of an IAEA Programme on Education and Training . A strategic plan was agreed and the following outputs were envisaged: 1. A Training Support Programme in nuclear safety, including a standardized and harmonized approach for training developed by the IAEA and in use by Member States. 2. National and regional training centres, established to support sustainable national nuclear safety infrastructures. 3. Training material for use by lecturers and students developed by the IAEA in English and translated to other languages. The implementation of the plan was initiated in 2002 emphasizing the preparation of training materials. In 2003 a pilot project for a network on Education and Training in Asia was initiated

  12. Romanian network of nuclear education RONEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghitescu, P.; Prisecaru, I.; Dupleac, D. [Bucharest Univ. Politehnica (Romania)

    2007-07-01

    RONEN (Romanian Network of Nuclear Education) aims at developing an efficient, flexible and modern training system in the nuclear education area, which answers the requirements of nuclear industry (NPP, regulatory bodies, subcontractors, dismantling, radioprotection, waste management). The first step was the investigation of the actual stage of the training in nuclear field in Romania. The second step was the investigation of the actual stage of training in the field of nuclear physics and engineering in other European countries. The third step was to create the infrastructure for the implementation and development of modern/learning programs and technologies. RONEN developed a data base on the project web-site, and proposed a global strategy in order to harmonize the curricula (by guidelines and self-evaluation reports), to implement pilot modern teaching programs (by handbooks for courses/modules), to introduce advanced learning technologies (like recommendations for Systematic Approach to Training, e-learning and distance-learning platforms), to strengthen and better use the existing research infrastructure for research and development among the network partners.

  13. Romanian network of nuclear education RONEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghitescu, P.; Prisecaru, I.; Dupleac, D.

    2007-01-01

    RONEN (Romanian Network of Nuclear Education) aims at developing an efficient, flexible and modern training system in the nuclear education area, which answers the requirements of nuclear industry (NPP, regulatory bodies, subcontractors, dismantling, radioprotection, waste management). The first step was the investigation of the actual stage of the training in nuclear field in Romania. The second step was the investigation of the actual stage of training in the field of nuclear physics and engineering in other European countries. The third step was to create the infrastructure for the implementation and development of modern/learning programs and technologies. RONEN developed a data base on the project web-site, and proposed a global strategy in order to harmonize the curricula (by guidelines and self-evaluation reports), to implement pilot modern teaching programs (by handbooks for courses/modules), to introduce advanced learning technologies (like recommendations for Systematic Approach to Training, e-learning and distance-learning platforms), to strengthen and better use the existing research infrastructure for research and development among the network partners

  14. The Belgian Nuclear Higher Education Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.; D'Haeseleer, W.; Giot, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: BNEN, the Belgian Nuclear Higher Education Network has been created in 2001 by five Belgian universities and the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN) as a joint effort to maintain and further develop a high quality programme in nuclear engineering in Belgium. In a country where a substantial part of electricity generation will remain of nuclear origin for a number of years, there is a need for well educated and well trained engineers in this area. Public authorities, regulators and industry brought their support to this initiative. In the framework of the new architecture of higher education in Europe, the English name for this 60 ECTS programme is 'Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering'. To be admitted to this programme, students must already hold a university degree in engineering or equivalent. Linked with university research, benefiting from the human resources and infrastructure of SCK-CEN, encouraged and supported by the partners of the nuclear sector, this programme should be offered not only to Belgian students, but also more widely throughout Europe and the world. The master programme is a demanding programme where students with different high level backgrounds in engineering have to go through highly theoretical subjects like neutron physics, fluid flow and heat transfer modelling, and apply them to reactor design, nuclear safety and plant operation and control. At a more interdisciplinary level, the programme includes some important chapters of material science, with a particular interest for the fuel cycle. Radiation protection belongs also to the backbone of the programme. All the subjects are taught by academics appointed by the partner universities, whereas the practical exercises and laboratory sessions are supervised by researchers of SCK-CEN. The final thesis offers an opportunity for internship in industry or in a research laboratory. More information: http://www.sckcen.be/BNEN. (author)

  15. International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN) and the Nuclear Security Training and Support Centre (NSSC) Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, Dmitriy

    2013-01-01

    International Nuclear Security Education Network established in 2010: A partnership between the IAEA and universities, research institutions and other stakeholders - •Promotion of nuclear security education; • Development of educational materials; • Professional development for faculty members; • Collaborative research and resource sharing. Currently over 90 members from 38 member states. Mission: to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. Nuclear Security Support Centre: Primary objectives are: • Develop human resources through the implementation of a tailored training programme; • Develop a network of experts; • Provide technical support for lifecycle equipment management and scientific support for the detection of and the response to nuclear security events

  16. AFRA Network for Education in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, N.; Wanjala, F.

    2017-01-01

    AFRA-NEST was Conceived at the AFRA Ministerial Conference held in Aswan in 2007. The main objective of AFRA-NEST is to facilitate operation and networking in higher education, training and related research in Nuclear Science (NS&T) in the African Region through: • Sharing of information and materials of nuclear education and training. The strategies for implementing the objectives are: the use ICT for web-based education and training,; recognition of Regional Designated Centres (RDCs) for professional nuclear education in nuclear science and technology, and organization of harmonized and accredited programs at tertiary levels for teaching and research in the various nuclear disciplines. The main function of the AFRA-NEST is to; foster sustainable human resource development and nuclear knowledge management; host the Cyber Learning Platform for Nuclear Education and Training for the AFRA region and to integrate all available higher education capabilities in Africa

  17. Romanian nuclear higher education towards a network of excellency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghitescu, Petre

    2006-01-01

    RONEN - Romanian Nuclear Education Network - aims at becoming the future network of excellency for nuclear higher education in Romania. University Politehnica of Bucharest participated in ENEN and NEPTUNO FP-5 and FP-6 programs, being a founding member of ENEN Association. The experience gained by ENEN as well as the present European trends show that realization of associations and networks endow with more power the educational national capacities and makes easier the European cooperation. The objective of this project is to develop an efficient, flexible and modern system in the nuclear education field, able to comply with the requirements of final users (NPP operators, regulations organisms, subcontractors, decommissioning operators, radiation protection, personnel, radioactive waste disposal managers), complying at the same time with the common European perspectives of education and research (FP-6, FP-7, EUROATOM). This system is the proposed network of excellency, gathering all the Romanian institutions (universities, research-development centers, training centers, etc) implied in the nuclear education field and using the existent experience of BNEN (Belgian Network of Nuclear Education) and ENEN. The participants in RONEN are the Universities of Bucharest, Pitesti, Babes-Bolyai in Cluj-Napoca, the Vocational Training Center of National Institute for R and D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering Bucharest, the Training Center of Cernavoda NPP, and the Institute for Nuclear Research in Pitesti

  18. AFRA Network for Education in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, O.N.; Wanjala, F.

    2017-01-01

    The Africa Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research Development and Training related to Science and Technology (AFRA) established the AFRA Network for Education in Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA-NEST) in order to implement AFRA strategy on Human Resource Development (HRD) and Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM). The strategies for implementing the objectives are: to use ICT for web-based education and training; recognition of Regional Designated Centres (RDCs) for professional nuclear education in nuclear science and technology, and organization of harmonized and accredited programs at tertiary levels and awarding of fellowships/scholarships to young and brilliant students for teaching and research in the various nuclear disciplines

  19. The Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, F.; Grover, R.B.; Han, K.W.

    2004-01-01

    The per capita electricity availability in the Asian region is below the world average. Nuclear energy is considered by several countries in the region as a potential source to meet their growing energy demand. Thus, there is likely to be an expansion of nuclear power programme in the Asian region. Additionally, as the economies in the region expand, there will be an increasing role for isotope and radiation technologies in the health care, agriculture, and industrial sectors. The growing demand for power and non-power applications of nuclear technologies would require a sustainable supply of well-qualified nuclear workforce. The Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology, ANENT in short, was established in February 2004 in response to this need. The state of nuclear education in the region is at different levels in different countries. This diversity provides an opportunity for sharing of knowledge and resources. ANENT will facilitate cooperation in education, related research and training through: (i) sharing of information and materials on nuclear education and training; (ii) exchange of students, teachers and researchers; (iii) establishment of reference curricula and facilitating mutual recognition of degrees; and (iv) facilitating communication between ANENT member institutions and other regional and global networks. By focusing on education, ANENT complements existing activities undertaken by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and supports IAEA activities for the preservation of nuclear knowledge. ANENT is a comprehensive initiative in education and training in that it will give equal importance to power and non-power technologies, thus meeting the diverse needs of the countries in the Asian region. (author)

  20. The Belgian Nuclear Higher Education Network: Your way to the European Master in Nuclear Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.; D'haeseleer, W.; Giot, M.

    2004-01-01

    BNEN, the Belgian Nuclear Higher Education Network has been created in 2001 by five Belgian universities and the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK CEN) as a joint effort to maintain and further develop a high quality programme in nuclear engineering in Belgium. More information: http://www.sckcen.be/BNEN. (author)

  1. European Nuclear Education Network Association - Support for nuclear education, training and knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghitescu, Petre

    2009-01-01

    Developed in 2002-2003 the FP5 EURATOM project 'European Nuclear Engineering Network - ENEN' aimed to establish the basis for conserving nuclear knowledge and expertise, to create an European Higher Education Area for nuclear disciplines and to facilitate the implementation of the Bologna declaration in the nuclear disciplines. In order to ensure the continuity of the achievements and results of the ENEN project, on 22 September 2003, the European Nuclear Higher Education Area was formalized by creating the European Nuclear Education Network Association. ENEN Association goals are oriented towards universities by developing a more harmonized approach for education in the nuclear sciences and engineering in Europe, integrating European education and training in nuclear safety and radiation protection and achieving a better cooperation and sharing of resources and capabilities at the national and international level. At the same time it is oriented towards the end-users (industries, regulatory bodies, research centers, universities) by creating a secure basis of knowledge and skills of value to the EU. It maintains an adequate supply of qualified human resources for design, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear infrastructures and plants. Also it maintains the necessary competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and applications of radiation in industry and medicine. In 2004-2005, 35 partners continued and expanded the started in FP 5 ENEN Association activities with the FP6 project 'NEPTUNO- Nuclear Education Platform for Training and Universities Organizations'. Thus ENEN established and implemented the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering, expanded its activities from education to training, organized and coordinated training sessions and pilot courses and included in its activities the Knowledge Management. At present, the ENEN Association gathers 45 universities, 7 research centers and one multinational company

  2. Open Access to the Belgian Nuclear higher Education Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, S.

    2005-01-01

    Under the name of the Belgian Nuclear higher Education Network, five Belgian universities, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Universiteit Gent, Universite de Liege, Vrije Universiteit Brussel have established in 2002, in collaboration with the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, a common Belgian Interuniversity Programme of the third cycle leading to the academic degree of Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering. Under the lead of the SCK-CEN a project to use and share the acquired experience of the Consortium BNEN - in order to support the realization of a common European Education Programme in Nuclear Engineering - has been accepted by the European Commission for funding under the EU's Sixth Research Framework Programme.The project wants to contribute actively to the development of a more harmonised approach for education in nuclear sciences and engineering in Europe. It brings the European higher Education Area closer to realization and helps to safeguard the necessary competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and other uses of radiation in industry and medicine in Europe. The project foresees input and participation from stakeholders from different countries of the enlarged European Union (EU-25) and will therefore contribute to the integration of the new member states into the European Research Area and thus to the enlargement of Europe. The set-up of the project foresees an active role for female experts with the intention to reinforce the place and role of women in science

  3. Korean efforts for education and training network in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Kyong-Won; Lee, Eui-Jin

    2007-01-01

    education programs along with a career in the nuclear fields at home and abroad should raise young generation's interests. Global network will serve as a vehicle that drives nuclear education and training forward. NTC of KAERI has developed the ANENT temporary web site (www.anent-temp.org) for the IAEA Consultancy Meting on Establishment of ANENT held in June 2003 at KAERI. According to the results from the discussion of the meeting, KAERI has requested to continue to work toward establishment of a web site for all activities related to ANENT. The followings are KAERI's efforts made for the ANENT: Installation of a portable cyber education system (Edu-V producer) and cyber studio for the effective production of VOD materials; Production of VOD type learning materials: 3 IAEA courses containing 52 lectures. For the progress of the establishment of ANENT, it is believed that exchange of informational and materials on education and training should be considered in advance among the member states. The followings are our suggestions for the exchange of information and materials to be discussed among member states: Formulation of a working group; Identification of the scope of activities; Establishment of cooperative mechanism; Design of ANENT web, and loading of existing information and materials on the web; Production and loading of new materials including cyber education and training materials; Sustainable operation of ANENT web site

  4. Asian network for education in nuclear technology: An initiative to promote education and training in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosilov, A.

    2006-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that there is a need to consolidate the efforts of academia and industry in education and training. Partnerships of operating organizations with educational institutions and universities that provide qualified professionals for the nuclear industry should be assessed based upon medium and long term needs and strengthened where needed. In this regard the IAEA is taking the necessary action to initiate this kind of partnership through continuous networking. The paper describes the IAEA approach to promoting education and training through the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT). (author)

  5. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    This CD-ROM is attached to the booklet 'Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)'. It contains the background material with regard to ANENT in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentation material made by Member States, and meeting summaries during the period 2002-2005. Further information on the current ANENT activities and related IAEA activities is available at 'http://anent-iaea.org' and 'http://iaea.org/inisnkm'

  6. Situation of the education in the nuclear field: networks of training and paper of the universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguez, E.

    2008-01-01

    In this work the education networks in nuclear engineering around Europe American and Asia are presented, focusing in the main role of universities in collaboration with the nuclear industry. (Author) 5 refs

  7. Interfacing Nuclear Security and Safeguards through Education and Support Centre Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the work of the International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN) and the International Nuclear Security Training and Support Centre Network (NSSC) as the means to achieve sustainable human resource development in member states. The paper also examines how both security and safeguards can benefit from collaborative and coordinated activities when such networks focus on practical achievements. (author)

  8. Managing Nuclear Knowledge: IAEA Activities and International Coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    The important role which the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) plays in assisting Member States in the preservation and enhancement of nuclear knowledge and in facilitating international collaboration in this area has been recognized by the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency in resolutions GC(46)/RES/11B, GC(47)/RES/10B, GC(48)/RES/13 and GC(50)/RES/13. The IAEA continues to support the enhancement and stabilization of nuclear education and training with the objective of securing the availability of qualified human resources for the nuclear sector. Its most important approaches are networking regional educational institutions and fostering cooperation to develop harmonized curricula, prepare and disseminate teaching materials. The Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT), established by the IAEA in 2004, became operational in 2005. An ANENT website has been set up and is being expanded, such as developing a long-distance learning platform. Also, a reference curriculum for nuclear engineering is being developed with the cooperation of external partners.This booklet summarizes the main activities being carried out by the IAEA with regard to the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) and other related activities including those completed during the period 2002–2005. It briefly describes the background information on the events leading to the formation of the ANENT; the terms of reference formulated at the second Coordination Committee meeting held in Vietnam, October 2005; and objectives, strategy and other institutional and managerial policies reaffirmed by the members. CD-ROM attached to the printed booklet containing nearly all of the background material in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentations made by Member States, and meeting summaries

  9. The European Nuclear Education Network: Towards Harmonisation of Education, Training, and Transfer of Knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuomisto, F.; Cizelj, L.; Dieguez Porras, P.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association strives to develop a more harmonized approach for education in the nuclear sciences and nuclear engineering in Europe and to integrate European education and training in nuclear safety and radiation protection. Improved co-operation and sharing of academic resources and capabilities at the national and international level is an important long-term objective. With respect to stakeholders, such as nuclear industries, research centers, regulatory bodies and other nuclear infrastructures, the primary objectives of ENEN are to create a secure basis of skills and knowledge of value to the EU, and to maintain a high-quality supply of qualified human resources for design, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear infrastructures, industries and power plants. ENEN supports activities aimed at maintaining the necessary competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and applications of radiation and nuclear techniques in agriculture, industry and medicine. In this technical brief we describe selected activities pursued to reach these goals. (author

  10. Development of an Educational Network to Strengthen Education, Training and Outreach in Latin America: LANENT-Latin American Network for Education in Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, A.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: In the current century, networks have played an important role in the dissemination of experiences, information exchange and training of human resources for different area of expertise. The IAEA has encouraged in regions, through its member states, the creation of educational networks to meet rapidly and efficiently the dissemination and exchange of knowledge between professionals and students in the nuclear area. With this vision, the Latin American Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (LANENT) was established to contribute to preserving, promoting and sharing nuclear knowledge as well as fostering nuclear knowledge transfer in the Latin American region. LANENT seeks to increase technical and scientific cooperation among its members in so far as to promote the benefits of nuclear technology and foster the progress and development of nuclear technology in areas such as education, health, the industry, the government, the environment, the mining industry, among others. By means of LANENT, the participating institutions of this network, devoted to education and training of professionals and technicians in the Latin American region, may have access to major information on nuclear technology so as to make their human resources broaden their nuclear knowledge. Moreover, this network seeks to communicate the benefits of nuclear technology to the public with the aim of arousing interest in nuclear technology of the younger generations. This paper will present and analyze results and initiatives developed by LANENT in Latin America. (author

  11. Nuclear networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Burke, Brian

    2017-07-04

    Nuclear lamins are intermediate filament proteins that represent important structural components of metazoan nuclear envelopes (NEs). By combining proteomics and superresolution microscopy, we recently reported that both A- and B-type nuclear lamins form spatially distinct filament networks at the nuclear periphery of mouse fibroblasts. In particular, A-type lamins exhibit differential association with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Our studies reveal that the nuclear lamina network in mammalian somatic cells is less ordered and more complex than that of amphibian oocytes, the only other system in which the lamina has been visualized at high resolution. In addition, the NPC component Tpr likely links NPCs to the A-type lamin network, an association that appears to be regulated by C-terminal modification of various A-type lamin isoforms. Many questions remain, however, concerning the structure and assembly of lamin filaments, as well as with their mode of association with other nuclear components such as peripheral chromatin.

  12. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    This booklet summarizes the main activities being carried out by the IAEA with regard to the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) and other related activities including those completed during the period 2002-2005. It briefly describes the background information on the events leading to the formation of the ANENT; the terms of reference formulated at the second Coordination Committee meeting held in Vietnam, October 2005; and objectives, strategy and other institutional and managerial policies reaffirmed by the members. The attached CD-ROM contains nearly all of the background material in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentations made by Member States, and meeting summaries

  13. Establishment of web-based Asian network for education in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K. W.; Lee, E. J.; Kim, Y. T.; Nam, Y. M.; Kim, H. K.

    2004-01-01

    The Korean nuclear community recognizes the importance of nuclear knowledge management and the essential role of nuclear manpower development. International cooperation in the field could be an important vehicle for the promotion of attracting the young generation, facilitating the accessibility of nuclear personnel to the international forum, developing the careers of nuclear personnel, upgrading education and training capabilities, and increasing the mutual benefits. The expected framework of future international cooperation for nuclear education and training may need to focus on the integration and sharing of available resources at national, regional and inter-regional levels. A good example of the IAEA activity set forth echoing the expectation is ANENT (Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology) using the web-based network

  14. Education and Training, and Knowledge Networks for Capacity-Building in Nuclear Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrabit, Khammar

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: • Capacity Building (CB) is critical for States to establish and maintain effective and sustainable nuclear security regime. • IAEA is a worldwide platform promoting international cooperation for CB in nuclear security involving more than 160 countries and over 20 Organizations and Initiatives. • IAEA Division of Nuclear Security is ready to continue supporting States in developing their CB through: – Comprehensive Training Programme: more than 80 training events annually – International Nuclear Security Training and Support Centre Network (NSSC) – Comprehensive Education Programme – International Nuclear Security Network (INSEN)

  15. The Belgian nuclear higher education network: the evolution of an academic programme in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkvens, T.; Coeck, M.

    2014-01-01

    The master-after-master in nuclear engineering provided by the Belgian Nuclear higher Education Network (BNEN) is a one-year, 60 ECTS programme which combines the expertise of six Belgian universities and SCK.CEN, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, which participates through its Academy for Nuclear Science and Technology. It was created in close collaboration with representatives of academia, research centres, industry and other nuclear stakeholders. The BNEN consortium Due to its modular programme, BNEN is accessible for both full-time students (mainly young engineering graduates) as well as young professionals already employed in the nuclear industry. The programme is offered in English to facilitate the participation of international students. One of the important aspects of the BNEN programme is the fact that exercises and hands-on sessions in the specialised laboratories of SCK.CEN complement the theoretical classes to bring the students into contact with all facets of nuclear energy. Several of SCK.CEN's researchers provide valuable contributions to the programme through seminars and practical exercises. From their daily practices and responsibilities they give an expert view on the subjects that are being taught. In 2012, in the framework of an official accreditation process all aspects of the BNEN programme were audited by an international visitation panel. The most important outcome of this process is the current reform of the academic programme, which will be implemented in the academic year 2014-2015, taking into account the recommendations by the visitation panel. In this paper, the history of the BNEN programme will be discussed, the new BNEN programme will be presented as well as the process that has led to its implementation. (authors)

  16. European Nuclear Education Network ENEN, Ten years of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, W.; Dies, J.; Dieguez, P.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Networking between European Universities based on mutual recognition (ECTS Bologna system) enabled: • Development of new academic programmes at a Master level; • Mobility of students to hosting universities, members of ENEN; • Mobility of Professors to teach in other Universities, when needed; • Maintain the quality of the educational programmes; • Joint and successful organisation of activities in the fields of: Education, Training and Knowledge Management; • The establishment of bridges between the Universities and the end-users (industries, regulatory bodies, research centres, etc.)

  17. Establishment of Oversea HRD Network and Operation of International Nuclear Education/Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. J.; Min, B. J.; Han, K. W.

    2008-02-01

    The project deals with establishment of international network for human resources and the development of international nuclear education and training programs. The primary result is the establishment of KAERI International Nuclear R and D Academy as a new activity on cooperation for human resource development and building network. For this purpose, KAERI concluded the MOU with Vietnamese Universities and selected 3 students to provide Master and Ph. D. Courses in 2008. KAERI also held the 3rd World Nuclear University Summer Institute, in which some 150 international nuclear professionals attended for 6 weeks. Also, as part of regional networking, the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) was promoted through development of a cyber platform and accomplishment the first IAEA e-training course. There were 3 kind of development activities for the international cooperation of human resources development. Firstly, the project provided training courses on nuclear energy development for the Egyptian Nuclear personnel under the bilateral cooperation. Secondly, the project published the English textbook and its lecture materials on introduction to nuclear engineering and fundamentals on OPR 1000 system technology. Lastly, the project developed a new KOICA training course on research reactor and radioisotope application technology to expand the KOICA sponsorship from 2008. The international nuclear education/training program had offered 15 courses to 314 people from 52 countries. In parallel, the project developed 11 kinds of lecturer materials and also developed 29 kinds of cyber lecturer materials. The operation of the International Nuclear Training and Education Center (INTEC) has contributed remarkably not only to the effective implementation of education/training activities of this project, but also to the promotion of other domestic and international activities of KAERI and other organizations

  18. Establishment of Oversea HRD Network and Operation of International Nuclear Education/Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. J.; Min, B. J.; Han, K. W. (and others)

    2008-02-15

    The project deals with establishment of international network for human resources and the development of international nuclear education and training programs. The primary result is the establishment of KAERI International Nuclear R and D Academy as a new activity on cooperation for human resource development and building network. For this purpose, KAERI concluded the MOU with Vietnamese Universities and selected 3 students to provide Master and Ph. D. Courses in 2008. KAERI also held the 3rd World Nuclear University Summer Institute, in which some 150 international nuclear professionals attended for 6 weeks. Also, as part of regional networking, the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) was promoted through development of a cyber platform and accomplishment the first IAEA e-training course. There were 3 kind of development activities for the international cooperation of human resources development. Firstly, the project provided training courses on nuclear energy development for the Egyptian Nuclear personnel under the bilateral cooperation. Secondly, the project published the English textbook and its lecture materials on introduction to nuclear engineering and fundamentals on OPR 1000 system technology. Lastly, the project developed a new KOICA training course on research reactor and radioisotope application technology to expand the KOICA sponsorship from 2008. The international nuclear education/training program had offered 15 courses to 314 people from 52 countries. In parallel, the project developed 11 kinds of lecturer materials and also developed 29 kinds of cyber lecturer materials. The operation of the International Nuclear Training and Education Center (INTEC) has contributed remarkably not only to the effective implementation of education/training activities of this project, but also to the promotion of other domestic and international activities of KAERI and other organizations.

  19. Asian Network for higher Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT). Report of the consultancy meeting on ANENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    ANENT is expected to help Member States to address the following issues: Promote, manage and preserve nuclear knowledge; Attract talented youth to pursue a career in nuclear science and technology in spite of several competing career options that are now available to them; Spread the benefit of atomic energy to the region by educating and training and information sharing. ANENT will serve as facilitator for communication with other regional and global networks

  20. Development of the South African Network for Nuclear Education, Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cilliers, A.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: South Africa has long been regarded as an active country in the nuclear industry with two operating power reactors and a research reactor. In recent years’ research and development projects, such as the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor, has established additional expertise in the country situated at various institutions. After the PBMR project was stopped, the expertise became fragmented throughout the country and some experts even left the country. A number of training and research facilities have also completed their research cycle and are in the process of being decommissioned. With the renewed interest in nuclear technology and the states position to complete the procurement of 9600 MW of nuclear power before the end of the year, nuclear knowledge gap has been identified and the need to capture all nuclear education and research in an educational network as well as to establish new nuclear training and research facilities such as small training reactors and research laboratories to support the national new build programme. This expertise and research facilities were combined into SAN-NEST (South African Network for Nuclear Education, Science and Technology) for South Africa and the African continent, with links to AFRA-NEST. The paper reports on the successes and challenges of the establishment and operation of SAN-NEST. (author

  1. A network to enhance cooperation for research and higher education on radiation protection and nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenas, J.; Gallardo, Sergio . E mail: sergalbe@iqn.upv.es

    2008-01-01

    The educational capacity of many Institutions of Higher Education in Nuclear Engineering decreased under the combined effect of a declining interest among students as well as from academic and political authorities. An increasing cooperation at the international level on educational efforts is necessary. The CHERNE network is an initiative mainly focussed on teaching and learning activities to develop a wide-scope open academic network to enhance cooperation, competence and equipment sharing between its partners. Typical activities organized within the network include workshops, intensive courses, seminars and conferences. The CHERNE network and its main objectives as well as the activities developed since its foundation are presented. Special attention is given to international intensive courses (SPERANSA, JUNCSS, ICARO, etc.) organized for students of the member institutions. The common feature of these courses is a strong practical part in specialized facilities, including in some cases access to large equipment like research reactors and accelerators. (author)

  2. Passing the torch: ANENT- The Asian network for education in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatimah Mohd Amin; Gowin, Peter; Han, K.W.

    2004-01-01

    Recent trends show that the nuclear industry is poised for expansion for the first time in decades. The greatest expansion is seen in Asia. Out of 15 new nuclear power plants connected to the grid during the period 2000-2002, 12 are in Asia. In 2002, all new nuclear plant construction was in Asia. Besides energy generation, nuclear technology has an important role in meeting basic human needs - clean water, modern health care and food security. The expansion in the nuclear industry requires a sustainable, qualified and experienced workforce to ensure a high level of safety and performance as well as the next generation of innovative technologies. Even where no expansion is foreseen, it is vital that steps are taken to prevent the loss of accumulated knowledge to ensure that the operation of existing nuclear facilities meets the highest safety requirements and to prepare for decommissioning activities. Ageing of the nuclear workforce in many countries has prompted the nuclear community to initiate various programmes to address the issue of the ageing workforce, which is worsened by the declining interest in the nuclear field among the young. In 2002, the IAEA General Conference adopted a resolution on 'Nuclear Knowledge' (GC(46)/RES/11B), which was reiterated in the 2003 General Conference (GC(47)/ RES/10B). These resolutions emphasized the importance of nuclear knowledge management and called on Member States to strengthen their efforts in this activity. In response to the resolutions, the Agency convened a consultancy meeting to prepare the groundwork for the establishment of the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT). ANENT was established in 2004 to promote, manage and preserve nuclear knowledge and to ensure the continued availability of talented and qualified human resources in the nuclear field in the Asian region. The First Coordinating Committee meeting in February 2004 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, marked the official formation of ANENT

  3. Study on the establishment of the IAEA Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. J.; Han, K. W.; Lee, H. Y. [and others

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this project is to establish a web-portal including a database for the exchange of information and materials for nuclear education and training among ANENT members, and eventually contribute to the sustainable development of nuclear technology for peaceful uses in the Asian IAEA member countries. The project has resulted in the development of a web-portal for ANENT (www.anent-iaea.org). The portal primarily includes a Database for Nuclear Education and Training (NET DB). and functions to deal with group activities which were identified in the first ANENT Coordination Committee meeting. NET DB contains information about relevant education and training institutions/universities in terms of their faculty members or researchers, curricula, education and training materials, etc. While, the group activities are exchange of information and materials for education and training, e-learning, establishment of a reference curricula and a system for a mutual recognition of credits, and cooperation with other networks. Finally, an IAEA regional workshop was held to review the developed web-portal and an agreement was reached on the use of the web-portal with some revisions. Furthermore, the IAEA has requested the NTC/KAERI to develop ANENT Cyber-Platform for the continued upgrading of ANENT Web-portal.

  4. Study on the establishment of the IAEA Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. J.; Han, K. W.; Lee, H. Y.

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this project is to establish a web-portal including a database for the exchange of information and materials for nuclear education and training among ANENT members, and eventually contribute to the sustainable development of nuclear technology for peaceful uses in the Asian IAEA member countries. The project has resulted in the development of a web-portal for ANENT (www.anent-iaea.org). The portal primarily includes a Database for Nuclear Education and Training (NET DB). and functions to deal with group activities which were identified in the first ANENT Coordination Committee meeting. NET DB contains information about relevant education and training institutions/universities in terms of their faculty members or researchers, curricula, education and training materials, etc. While, the group activities are exchange of information and materials for education and training, e-learning, establishment of a reference curricula and a system for a mutual recognition of credits, and cooperation with other networks. Finally, an IAEA regional workshop was held to review the developed web-portal and an agreement was reached on the use of the web-portal with some revisions. Furthermore, the IAEA has requested the NTC/KAERI to develop ANENT Cyber-Platform for the continued upgrading of ANENT Web-portal

  5. Development and Operation of International Nuclear Education/Training Program and HRD Cooperation Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. J.; Min, B. J.; Han, K. W.

    2006-12-01

    The primary result of the project is the establishment of a concept of International Nuclear R and D Academy that integrates the on-going long term activity for international nuclear education/training and a new activity to establish an international cooperation network for nuclear human resources development. For this, the 2007 WNU Summer Institute was hosted with the establishment of an MOU and subsequent preparations. Also, ANENT was promoted through development of a cyber platform for the ANENT web-portal, hosting the third ANENT Coordination Committee meeting, etc. Then a cooperation with universities in Vietnam was launched resulting in preparation of an MOU for the cooperation. Finally, a relevant system framework was established and required procedures were drafted especially for providing students from developing countries with long term education/training programs (e.g. MS and Ph D. courses). The international nuclear education/training programs have offered 13 courses to 182 people from 43 countries. The overall performance of the courses was evaluated to be outstanding. In parallel, the establishment of an MOU for the cooperation of KOICA-IAEA-KAERI courses to ensure their stable and systematic operation. Also, an effort was made to participate in FNCA. Atopia Hall of the International Nuclear Training and Education Center (INTEC) hosted 477 events (corresponding to 18,521 participants) and Nuri Hall (guesthouse) accommodated 4,616 people in 2006. This shows a steady increase of the use rate since the opening of the center, along with a continuous improvement of the equipment

  6. Development and Operation of International Nuclear Education/Training Program and HRD Cooperation Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E J; Min, B J; Han, K W [and others

    2006-12-15

    The primary result of the project is the establishment of a concept of International Nuclear R and D Academy that integrates the on-going long term activity for international nuclear education/training and a new activity to establish an international cooperation network for nuclear human resources development. For this, the 2007 WNU Summer Institute was hosted with the establishment of an MOU and subsequent preparations. Also, ANENT was promoted through development of a cyber platform for the ANENT web-portal, hosting the third ANENT Coordination Committee meeting, etc. Then a cooperation with universities in Vietnam was launched resulting in preparation of an MOU for the cooperation. Finally, a relevant system framework was established and required procedures were drafted especially for providing students from developing countries with long term education/training programs (e.g. MS and Ph D. courses). The international nuclear education/training programs have offered 13 courses to 182 people from 43 countries. The overall performance of the courses was evaluated to be outstanding. In parallel, the establishment of an MOU for the cooperation of KOICA-IAEA-KAERI courses to ensure their stable and systematic operation. Also, an effort was made to participate in FNCA. Atopia Hall of the International Nuclear Training and Education Center (INTEC) hosted 477 events (corresponding to 18,521 participants) and Nuri Hall (guesthouse) accommodated 4,616 people in 2006. This shows a steady increase of the use rate since the opening of the center, along with a continuous improvement of the equipment.

  7. Networking of institutions in India to promote research and education in nuclear science and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, R.R.

    2007-01-01

    broader areas of interest to it. The desire of DAE in strengthening university system is reflected in yet another of its visionary initiative which is the establishment of University Grants Commission (UGC)-DAE consortium for Scientific Research which is aimed at opening up DAE advanced research facilities to academic institutions. Providing post-doctoral fellowships for carrying research in its laboratories is another step that DAE has taken to strengthened research-technology linkage. Furthermore, the BARC Training School Programme has been keeping pace with emerging demands of the expanding Indian NEA Programme by educating and training manpower in diverse specializations at newer centres. Having established R and D centers and institutions for basic research, DAE has taken the next logical step of weaving them in to a network for advancing the pace of research in nuclear science on one hand and, on the other, for accelerating the process of transforming R and D into technology products and their applications. This end is sought to be achieved by bringing the academic programmes of the R and D centers and the grant-in-aid institutes of DAE under one umbrella institute named Homi Bhabha National Institute (HBNI) having the status of a Deemed to be University. The status of a Deemed to be University was conferred upon HBNI on June 3, 2005 by the Ministry of Human Resource Development, Government of India. Its academic programmes are scheduled to start from August-September 2006. The HBNI is a network of ten institutions in DAE. Called its constituent Institutions (CIs), four of them are the R and D centers and six are the grant-in-aid institutions. The HBNI would conduct academic programmes in Engineering, Physical, Chemical, Life and Mathematical Sciences and also in Strategic Studies for the award of Masters and Doctoral degrees and Post Graduate Diploma with its curricula and research oriented to the needs of the nuclear science and technology and related fields. HBNI

  8. Education and Training Networks as a Tool for Nuclear Security Human Resource Development and Capacity Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, D.

    2014-01-01

    Human Resource Development for Capacity Building for Nuclear Security: • Comprehensive Training Programme Objective: To raise awareness, to fill gaps between the actual performance of personnel and the required competencies and skills and, to build-up qualified instructors/trainers. • Promoting Nuclear Security Education Objective: To support the development of teaching material, faculty expertise and preparedness, and the promotion of nuclear security education in collaboration with the academic and scientific community. Ultimate Goal: To develop capabilities for supporting sustainable implementation of the international legal instruments and IAEA guidelines for nuclear security worldwide, and to foster nuclear security culture. Education priorities for the future: • Incorporate feedback from the first pilot program into future academic activities in nuclear security; • Based on feedback from pilot program: • Revise the NSS12 guidance document; • Update educational materials and textbooks. • Support INSEN members, which consider launching MSc programs at their institutions; • Continue promoting nuclear security education as part of existing degree programs (through certificate or concentration options); • Support the use of new forms of teaching and learning in nuclear security education: • Online e-learning degree programmes and modules; • Learning by experience; • Problem-oriented learning tailored to nuclear security functions

  9. Situation of the education in the nuclear field: networks of training and paper of the universities; Situacion de la educacion en el campo nuclear: redes de formacion y papel de las universidades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguez, E.

    2008-07-01

    In this work the education networks in nuclear engineering around Europe American and Asia are presented, focusing in the main role of universities in collaboration with the nuclear industry. (Author) 5 refs.

  10. Nuclear training and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandklef, S.

    2008-01-01

    There is a large need in this period of anticipated growth of the nuclear industry to keep and increase the level of competence beyond that provided by universities, technical institutes and on-the-job training. ANT International has developed several programs to assist the nuclear industry in meeting this need. The programs are based on utilizing the experience and skills of a network of experts who have a wide experience in the relevant technical areas of importance to nuclear power operations. Examples of these programs are given in this report together with an extensive list of ANT International reports in the field of nuclear fuel technology, water chemistry and reactor materials. These reports have been and are used for training and education in Europe, North America and Asia. (author)

  11. Nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    All scientists and technologists are agreed that the coal based fuel cycle is somewhere between 50 to 300 times more dangerous than the uranium fuel cycle. Under these circumstances it is not difficult to show that on a more quantitative basis, the nuclear industry, in all countries, has an unblemished safety record when compared with other energy sources. Various hazards and benefits of nuclear power are analyzed in this paper comparing with other energy sources. (Liu)

  12. European nuclear education initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glatz, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    Whatever option regarding their future nuclear energy development is chosen by European Union Member States, the availability of a sufficient number of well trained and experienced staff is key for the responsible use of nuclear energy. This is true in all areas including design, construction, operation, decommissioning, fuel cycle and waste management as well as radiation protection. Given the high average age of existing experts leading to a significant retirement induce a real risk of the loss of nuclear competencies in the coming years. Therefore the demand of hiring skilled employees is rising. The challenge of ensuring a sufficient number of qualified staff in the nuclear sector has been acknowledged widely among the different stakeholders, in particular the nuclear industry, national regulatory authorities and Technical Support Organisations (TSOs). Already the EURATOM Treaty refers explicitly to the obligation for the Commission to carry out training actions. Recently initiatives have been launched at EU level to facilitate and strengthen the efforts of national stakeholders. The European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association aims at preservation and further development of expertise in the nuclear field by higher education and training. The goal of the European Nuclear Energy Leadership Academy (ENELA) is to educate future leaders in the nuclear field to ensure the further development of sustainable European nuclear energy solutions The European Nuclear Energy Forum (ENEF) is a platform operated by the European Commission for a broad discussion on the opportunities and risks of nuclear energy. The nuclear programs under investigation in the Joint Research Center (JRC) are increasingly contributing to Education and Training (E and T) initiatives, promoting a better cooperation between key players and universities as well as operators and regulatory bodies in order to mutually optimise their training programmes. Another objective is to increase

  13. ENEN - European nuclear engineering network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsa, Olivia; Paraschiva, M.V.; Banutoiu, Maria

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents the main objectives and expected results of European Project FP5 - ENEN - 'European Nuclear Engineering Network'. The underlying objective of the work is safeguarding the nuclear knowledge and expertise through the preservation of higher nuclear engineering education. Co-operation between universities and universities and research centres, will entail a better use of dwindling teaching capacity, scientific equipment and research infrastructure. 'Today, the priorities of the scientific community regarding basic research lie elsewhere than in nuclear sciences. Taken together, these circumstances create a significantly different situation from three to four decades ago when much of the present competence base was in fact generated. In addition, many of the highly competent engineers and scientists, who helped create the present nuclear industry, and its regulatory structure, are approaching retirement age. These competence issues need to be addressed at Community level and a well designed Community research and training programme should play a role that is more important than ever before. This is an area where the concept of an European research area should be further explored'. The outcome from this project should be a clear road map for the way ahead in nuclear engineering education in Europe. The underlying objective of the concerted action is the preservation of nuclear knowledge and expertise through the preservation of higher nuclear engineering education. 'Many diverse technologies, currently serving nations world-wide, would be affected by an inadequate number of future nuclear scientists and engineers. Nuclear technology is widespread and multidisciplinary: nuclear and reactor physics, thermal hydraulics and mechanics, material science, chemistry, health science, information technology and a variety of other areas. Yet the advancement of this technology, with all its associated benefits, will be threatened if not curtailed unless the

  14. The nuclear data centres network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1997-03-01

    The activities of eleven nuclear data centers are summarized and their cooperation under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency is described. The Nuclear Data Centers Network has been established with the objective of providing nuclear physics databases that are required for nuclear technology, including energy and non-energy nuclear applications. (author)

  15. The Nuclear Data Centres Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1995-08-01

    The activities of eleven nuclear data centers are summarized and their cooperation under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency is described. The Nuclear Data Centers Network has been established with the objective of providing nuclear physics databases that are required for nuclear technology, including energy and non-energy nuclear applications. (author)

  16. The nuclear data centres network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.

    1999-03-01

    The activities of thirteen nuclear data centers are summarized and their cooperation under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency is described. The Nuclear Data Centers Network has been established with the objective of providing nuclear physics databases that are required for nuclear technology, including energy and non-energy nuclear applications. (author)

  17. The Nuclear Data Centres Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmel, H D [ed.

    1995-08-01

    The activities of eleven nuclear data centers are summarized and their cooperation under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency is described. The Nuclear Data Centers Network has been established with the objective of providing nuclear physics databases that are required for nuclear technology, including energy and non-energy nuclear applications. (author).

  18. ANNETTE. Advanced networking for nuclear education and training and transfer of expertise; ANNETTE. Fortschrittliche Vernetzung von Aus- und Weiterbildungsinitiativen in Kerntechnik und Strahlenschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt-Hannig, A.; Bernhard-Stroel, C. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The present situation of nuclear energy in Europe asks for a continuing effort in the field of Education and Training aimed to assure a qualified workforce in the next decades. In this scenario, ANNETTE is aimed at enhancing and networking the Europe-wide efforts initiated in the past decades by different organisations belonging to academia, research centres and industry to maintain and develop Education and Training in the nuclear fields. This will allow consolidating, developing and better exploiting the achievements already reached in the past and to tackle the present challenges in preparing the European workforce in the nuclear fields.

  19. Nuclear education and international nuclear university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, C.S.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper author deals with the concept of establishing the International Nuclear University (INU) would be one of the most viable options. The INU would provide young professionals with not only university-level education but also high-skill training in the fields of nuclear technology. The program will emphasize on global and multi- disciplinary perspectives, which should offer our young generation broader opportunities of advanced education and motivate professional staffs in the enhancement of their knowledge and skills. The 'World Council of Nuclear Education' could be formed to steer the INU for close international cooperation under the auspices of the IAEA. The INU would organize a world network of existing nuclear- related educational organizations and training centers which already exist in Member States. Existing facilities and can be utilized at maximum. Use of cyber-lecturing through Internet, cross-approval of credits among educational organizations in degree work, certification of credits by the authorized body like IAEA, human resources placement services, etc. are some of the activities that the INU could provide in addition to its professional training and higher education. (authors)

  20. A Study on the Promotion of Networking for International Training and Education in Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. J.; Lee, E. J.; Han, K. W.

    2007-04-01

    For the diversification of Korea's participation in the ANENT, the country contributed to the establishment of a new project (2007-2009) for the promotion of ANENT activities. Along the same, KAERI contributed to the development of cyber platform. Also, available course contents from IAEA were surveyed. In particular an approval course entitled as 'Energy Planning' was planned to be implemented in 2007. Finally, the ANENT web-portal including the cyber platform was operated and improved by upgrading and adding information and data. In order to promote the domestic cultivation of young scientists, Korea hosted 2007 WNU SI for the first time in Asia. KAERI staff was attached to the head quarter office of WNU to develop the curricula of WNU SI jointly. Keeping the basic structure of the original curricula, the developed curricula included Korean experience of self reliance in nuclear power technology and development of advanced technology. Methodology for the cooperation between ANENT and WNU was studied resulting in 2 ways. Primarily, it was suggested and prepared to produce cyber contents from 2007 WNU SI so that they can be up-loaded both on WNU web site and ANENT cyber platform. Secondly, cooperation in education and training activities was suggested to conduct exchange of students, joint development of cyber contents, operation of ANENT-WNU joint courses, development of reference curricula, and mutual recognition of credits and degrees. The methodology for the cooperation between ANENT and WNU will be implemented as follows: cooperation in the use of cyber contents from 2007 WNU SI will be produced during the event and they will be up-loaded both on WNU web site and ANENT cyber platform for common use; cooperation in education and training activities will be implemented by way of exchanging students, jointly developing cyber contents, operating ANENT-WNU joint courses, developing reference curricula, and realizing mutual recognition of credits and degrees

  1. A Study on the Promotion of Networking for International Training and Education in Nuclear Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, B J; Lee, E J; Han, K W [and others

    2007-04-15

    For the diversification of Korea's participation in the ANENT, the country contributed to the establishment of a new project (2007-2009) for the promotion of ANENT activities. Along the same, KAERI contributed to the development of cyber platform. Also, available course contents from IAEA were surveyed. In particular an approval course entitled as 'Energy Planning' was planned to be implemented in 2007. Finally, the ANENT web-portal including the cyber platform was operated and improved by upgrading and adding information and data. In order to promote the domestic cultivation of young scientists, Korea hosted 2007 WNU SI for the first time in Asia. KAERI staff was attached to the head quarter office of WNU to develop the curricula of WNU SI jointly. Keeping the basic structure of the original curricula, the developed curricula included Korean experience of self reliance in nuclear power technology and development of advanced technology. Methodology for the cooperation between ANENT and WNU was studied resulting in 2 ways. Primarily, it was suggested and prepared to produce cyber contents from 2007 WNU SI so that they can be up-loaded both on WNU web site and ANENT cyber platform. Secondly, cooperation in education and training activities was suggested to conduct exchange of students, joint development of cyber contents, operation of ANENT-WNU joint courses, development of reference curricula, and mutual recognition of credits and degrees. The methodology for the cooperation between ANENT and WNU will be implemented as follows: cooperation in the use of cyber contents from 2007 WNU SI will be produced during the event and they will be up-loaded both on WNU web site and ANENT cyber platform for common use; cooperation in education and training activities will be implemented by way of exchanging students, jointly developing cyber contents, operating ANENT-WNU joint courses, developing reference curricula, and realizing mutual recognition of credits and degrees.

  2. A Study on the Promotion of Networking for International Training and Education in Nuclear Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, B. J.; Lee, E. J.; Han, K. W. (and others)

    2007-04-15

    For the diversification of Korea's participation in the ANENT, the country contributed to the establishment of a new project (2007-2009) for the promotion of ANENT activities. Along the same, KAERI contributed to the development of cyber platform. Also, available course contents from IAEA were surveyed. In particular an approval course entitled as 'Energy Planning' was planned to be implemented in 2007. Finally, the ANENT web-portal including the cyber platform was operated and improved by upgrading and adding information and data. In order to promote the domestic cultivation of young scientists, Korea hosted 2007 WNU SI for the first time in Asia. KAERI staff was attached to the head quarter office of WNU to develop the curricula of WNU SI jointly. Keeping the basic structure of the original curricula, the developed curricula included Korean experience of self reliance in nuclear power technology and development of advanced technology. Methodology for the cooperation between ANENT and WNU was studied resulting in 2 ways. Primarily, it was suggested and prepared to produce cyber contents from 2007 WNU SI so that they can be up-loaded both on WNU web site and ANENT cyber platform. Secondly, cooperation in education and training activities was suggested to conduct exchange of students, joint development of cyber contents, operation of ANENT-WNU joint courses, development of reference curricula, and mutual recognition of credits and degrees. The methodology for the cooperation between ANENT and WNU will be implemented as follows: cooperation in the use of cyber contents from 2007 WNU SI will be produced during the event and they will be up-loaded both on WNU web site and ANENT cyber platform for common use; cooperation in education and training activities will be implemented by way of exchanging students, jointly developing cyber contents, operating ANENT-WNU joint courses, developing reference curricula, and realizing mutual recognition of credits and

  3. Experience and advantages in implementation of educational program in network form at Department «Closed nuclear fuel cycle Technologies» of National Research Nuclear University «MEPhI»

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beygel‧, A. G.; Kutsenko, K. V.; Lavrukhin, A. A.; Magomedbekov, E. P.; Pershukov, V. A.; Sofronov, V. L.; Tyupina, E. A.; Zhiganov, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    The experience of implementation of the basic educational program of magistracy on direction «Nuclear Physics and Technologies» in a network form is presented. Examples of joint implementation of the educational process with employers organizations, other universities and intranet mobility of students are given.

  4. Experience and advantages in implementation of educational program in network form at Department «Closed nuclear fuel cycle Technologies» of National Research Nuclear University «MEPhI»

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beygel', A G; Kutsenko, K V; Lavrukhin, A A; Pershukov, V A; Sofronov, V L; Tyupina, E A; Zhiganov, A N; Magomedbekov, E P

    2017-01-01

    The experience of implementation of the basic educational program of magistracy on direction «Nuclear Physics and Technologies» in a network form is presented. Examples of joint implementation of the educational process with employers organizations, other universities and intranet mobility of students are given. (paper)

  5. Nuclear Security Education in Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakam, O.K.

    2015-01-01

    Morocco has made significant progress in the field of nuclear security by supporting the efforts and activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), promoting nuclear security under international initiatives and continues to undertake actions aiming at strengthening capacity building in nuclear security. As well, Morocco has developed a new law on radiological and nuclear safety and security which was promulgated in 2014. Some Moroccan universities in cooperation with the IAEA-International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN) and the US-DoS Partnership for Nuclear Security (PNS) are working to develop their nuclear security educational programmes. In this regard, faculties who have been involved in INSEN Professional Development Courses (PDCs) have acquired a high-quality of knowledge and teaching tools in nuclear security topics that led them to be able to develop and teach their nuclear security curriculum as is the case at the University of Ibn Tofail. Furthermore, University of Ibn Tofail has developed in 2014 with collaboration with CRDFGlobal the first Institute of Nuclear Material Management (INMM) Student Chapter in Africa. This Chapter has organized many events to promote best practices among the young generation. Moreover, University of Ibn Tofail and Brandenburg University in Germany are working to develop a PDC on Nuclear IT/Cyber Security to be held in Kenitra, Morocco. This PDC aims at building capacity among the academic communities from Africa and MENA Region in order to further raise awareness, develop and disseminate best practices, increase professional standards and therefore enhance nuclear security culture. So, this paper will present some nuclear security education activities in Morocco and more specifically at the University of Ibn Tofail. These activities involve women as leaders but also contribute in education and training of young generation of women in nuclear field. (author)

  6. The Enforcement Of The E-Learning Activities Under The Framework Of ANENT (Asian Network For Education In Nuclear Technology): Blended Leaning And E-Learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rho, Sipyo; Nam, Youngmi; Hwang, Hyeseon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) had declared the nuclear Knowledge should be managed and reserved to well to prevent cutting form old generation just retiring to young generation who had little interest about nuclear technology. In this background, ANENT (Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology)1), supported by the IAEA, had been organized as a partnership among Asian countries in 2004. Presently, including China, Japan, and Korea 19 Member states are joined and it does various activities to share the nuclear science and technology through the yearly coordination meeting, train the trainer workshop for to enforce e-Learning activities among member states. The IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) had declared the nuclear Knowledge should be managed and reserved to well to prevent cutting form old generation just retiring to young generation who had little interest about nuclear technology. In this background, ANENT (Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology)1), supported by the IAEA, had been organized as a partnership among Asian countries in 2004. Presently, including China, Japan, and Korea 19 Member states are joined and it does various activities to share the nuclear science and technology through the yearly coordination meeting, train the trainer workshop for to enforce e-Learning activities among member states.

  7. The Enforcement Of The E-Learning Activities Under The Framework Of ANENT (Asian Network For Education In Nuclear Technology): Blended Leaning And E-Learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Sipyo; Nam, Youngmi; Hwang, Hyeseon

    2016-01-01

    The IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) had declared the nuclear Knowledge should be managed and reserved to well to prevent cutting form old generation just retiring to young generation who had little interest about nuclear technology. In this background, ANENT (Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology)1), supported by the IAEA, had been organized as a partnership among Asian countries in 2004. Presently, including China, Japan, and Korea 19 Member states are joined and it does various activities to share the nuclear science and technology through the yearly coordination meeting, train the trainer workshop for to enforce e-Learning activities among member states. The IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) had declared the nuclear Knowledge should be managed and reserved to well to prevent cutting form old generation just retiring to young generation who had little interest about nuclear technology. In this background, ANENT (Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology)1), supported by the IAEA, had been organized as a partnership among Asian countries in 2004. Presently, including China, Japan, and Korea 19 Member states are joined and it does various activities to share the nuclear science and technology through the yearly coordination meeting, train the trainer workshop for to enforce e-Learning activities among member states

  8. Trends in nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartigue, J.; Martinez, T.

    2008-01-01

    Today's nuclear curricula have the purpose to fulfil labor requirements of the nuclear market, both power and applications, as well as keeping up the academic level required for research and development in nuclear sciences. This work analyses the power and applications markets and the situation of nuclear education in several countries, including Mexico, as well as collective efforts promoted by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and other organizations. Conclusions are obtained about the status and trends in nuclear education, emphasizing the role of the academic and users sectors to fit the future demand and the availability of skilled personnel. (author)

  9. Nuclear Education in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guet, C.

    2013-01-01

    This series of slides draws a picture of nuclear engineering training in France. The nuclear sector is very active and developed in France and covers all the aspects of the fuel cycle which implies a strong demand for highly skilled and trained staff. There are both an active involvement of industry in the education process through the design of adequate curricula and a strong support of the State. There are 5 masters dedicated to Science Nuclear Energy (Paris), Nuclear Waste Management (Nantes), Separation Chemistry (Montpellier), Materials for Nuclear Engineering (Grenoble), and 1 engineer degree in nuclear engineering (Saclay). In 2010-2011 there were about 1000 students completing a nuclear energy curriculum (nuclear engineering or specialized nuclear domains) at the master-engineer level throughout France. The detailed curriculum of the Master of Science Nuclear Energy is given. The National Institute of Nuclear Sciences and Techniques (INSTN) plays an important role, it has trained a large fraction of the French leading nuclear practitioners through its 50 years old 'Genie Atomique' curriculum. INSTN proposes also high level courses in nuclear disciplines including training of nuclear physicians, radio-pharmacists and medical physicists and is a major player for continuing education in nuclear sciences. (A.C.)

  10. Lymphatic Education & Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymphatic Education & Research Network Donate Now Become a Supporting Member X Living with LYMPHEDEMA AND Lymphatic Disease FAQs About ... December 8, 2017 11.08.2017 The Lymphatic Education & Research Network… Read More > ASRM LE&RN Combined ...

  11. The World Nuclear University: New partnership in nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    The important role which the IAEA plays in assisting Member States in the preservation and enhancement of nuclear knowledge and in facilitating international collaboration in this area has been recognized by the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency in resolutions GC(46)/RES/11B, GC(47)/RES/10B, GC(48)/RES/13 and GC(50)/RES/13. A continued focus of IAEA activities in managing nuclear knowledge is to support Member States to secure and sustain human resources for the nuclear sector, comprising both the replacement of retiring staff and building of new capacity. The IAEA assists Member States, particularly developing ones, in their efforts to sustain nuclear education and training in all areas of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, which is a necessary prerequisite for succession planning, in particular through the networking of nuclear education and training, including activities of the World Nuclear University (WNU) and the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT). The report on the attached CD-ROM, The World Nuclear University: New Partnership in Nuclear Education, gives an overview of the history of the development of the World Nuclear University and related IAEA activities and contains an analysis and recommendations from the first WNU Summer Institute, held in 2005 in the USA

  12. Nuclear Community in network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejedor, E.

    2014-01-01

    The internet has revolutionized the ways of communication and many companies/ organizations have adapted to the change but others have not, or have done it halfway. This presentation is a review of the main characteristics of virtual communities and their typology. The status of the Nuclear Online Community, both pro nuclear and antinuclear is analysed , and their main similarities and differences are discussed. The Pro nuclear Online Community is formed gradually. This presentation attempts to define some ways to increase the scope of the Community and encourage greater dissemination of the characteristics of nuclear energy. (Author)

  13. Nuclear Education Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbaffoni, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Common interests: Developing teachers and students; Outreach (material, activities, best practices); Material development and sharing, use of technology; Cooperation between academia, government and industry; Quality and accreditation; Sustainability; National/International collaboration, role of governments

  14. The US Nuclear Data Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: US Nuclear Data Network Meeting; TUNL A=3--20 Data Project Activity Report 1993; INEL Mass-chain Evaluation Project Activity Report for 1993; 1993 Isotopes; Nuclear Data Project Activity Report; The NNDC Activity Report Parts A and B; Minutes of the Formats and Procedures Subcommittee; Evaluation of High-spin Nuclear Data for ENSDF and Table of Superdeformed Nuclear Bands; Proposal for Support of a Experimental High-spin; Data File/Data-Network Coordinator; Radioactive Decay and Applications; A Plan for a Horizontal Evaluation of Decay Data; ENSDF On-line System; The MacNuclide Project Expanding the Scope of the Nuclear Structure Reference File; ENSDAT: Evaluated Nuclear Structure Drawings and Tables; Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) and CSEWG Strategy Session; A Draft Proposal for a USNDN Program Advisory Council; Recommendations of Focus Group 1; Recommendations of Focus Group 2; Recommendations of Focus Group 3; Recommendations of Focus Group 4; The Table of Isotopes; The Isotopes CD-ROM; Electronic Table of Isotopes (ETOI); and Electronic Access to Nuclear Data

  15. The US Nuclear Data Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-19

    This report discusses the following topics: US Nuclear Data Network Meeting; TUNL A=3--20 Data Project Activity Report 1993; INEL Mass-chain Evaluation Project Activity Report for 1993; 1993 Isotopes; Nuclear Data Project Activity Report; The NNDC Activity Report Parts A and B; Minutes of the Formats and Procedures Subcommittee; Evaluation of High-spin Nuclear Data for ENSDF and Table of Superdeformed Nuclear Bands; Proposal for Support of a Experimental High-spin; Data File/Data-Network Coordinator; Radioactive Decay and Applications; A Plan for a Horizontal Evaluation of Decay Data; ENSDF On-line System; The MacNuclide Project Expanding the Scope of the Nuclear Structure Reference File; ENSDAT: Evaluated Nuclear Structure Drawings and Tables; Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) and CSEWG Strategy Session; A Draft Proposal for a USNDN Program Advisory Council; Recommendations of Focus Group 1; Recommendations of Focus Group 2; Recommendations of Focus Group 3; Recommendations of Focus Group 4; The Table of Isotopes; The Isotopes CD-ROM; Electronic Table of Isotopes (ETOI); and Electronic Access to Nuclear Data.

  16. Nuclear Waste Education Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    In summary, both the Atlanta and Albuquerque pilot seminars achieved the Nuclear Waste Education Project's goal of informing citizens on both the substance and the process of nuclear waste policy so that they can better participate in future nuclear waste decisions. Nuclear waste issues are controversial, and the seminars exposed the nature of the controversy, and utilized the policy debates to create lively and provocative sessions. The format and content of any citizen education curriculum must be made to fit the particular goal that has been chosen. If the Department of Energy and the LWVEF decide to continue to foster an informed dialogue among presenters and participants, the principles of controversial issues education would serve this goal well. If, however, the Department of Energy and/or the LWVEF decide to go beyond imparting information and promoting a lively discussion of the issues, towards some kind of consensus-building process, it would be appropriate to integrate more interactive sessions into the format. As one evaluator wrote, ''In-depth participation in finding solutions or establishing policy -- small group discussion'' would have been preferable to the plenary sessions that mostly were in the form of lectures and expert panel discussion. The evaluator continued by saying, ''Since these [small group discussions] would require more time commitment, they might be part of follow-up workshops focused on particular topics.''

  17. Australia needs nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1999-01-01

    A matter of increasing concern in Australian society is the absence of a Commonwealth Government policy on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The lack of University level teaching facilities in nuclear energy engineering is also perceived to be an issue of national importance which must be addressed. More and more Australians deeply regret the lack of informed realism and scientific integrity which goes into endless debates on the technical, environmental and societal aspects of nuclear energy. Within the Australian community such important issues as uranium mining in Kakadu National Park, research reactor operation at Lucas Heights, the establishment of an international nuclear waste repository in Western Australia or the domestic use of nuclear electricity generation to minimise Australia's greenhouse emissions are still being debated at the intellectual level of radio talkback programs. Decision making in such areas deserves the disciplines of appropriate tertiary education. The Australian community has a right to know the relative risks and the environmental impacts of various fuel cycles as well as the technical limitations, true costs and energy audits of the 'alternative' energy technologies. Presently the Commonwealth of Australia is without a single School of Nuclear Engineering operating at a University level. Such a situation is believed to be unprecedented amongst the developed countries of the world. It is viewed with a measure of incredulity by the academic, diplomatic and political communities of the 'developing' countries of East Asia and the Pacific Basin. Many of these have a massive investment in the growth of peaceful nuclear energy and nuclear science and technology within their borders. Copyright (1999) Australian Institute of Energy News

  18. Social Networking Sites in Education

    OpenAIRE

    Suková, Lenka

    2010-01-01

    Diploma thesis deals with social networking sites and their use in education. Thesis is divided into two general parts. The first part deals with theory of learning; Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives and new educational theory based on learning in networks -- Connectivism. After that thesis focuses on the definition of social networking sites, introduction of some of the best known social networking sites and examples of their use in foreign and domestic educational practice. The sec...

  19. Nuclear Physics computer networking: Report of the Nuclear Physics Panel on Computer Networking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bemis, C.; Erskine, J.; Franey, M.; Greiner, D.; Hoehn, M.; Kaletka, M.; LeVine, M.; Roberson, R.; Welch, L.

    1990-05-01

    This paper discusses: the state of computer networking within nuclear physics program; network requirements for nuclear physics; management structure; and issues of special interest to the nuclear physics program office

  20. Nuclear education in Japanese universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamuro, Nobuhiro

    1981-01-01

    In 1957, the graduate courses for nuclear engineering were established in Kyoto University, Osaka University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology. Since then, the expansion of nuclear education has kept pace with the growth of the nuclear industry in Japan. The nuclear education in universities in more than 20 years can be roughly divided into three periods. In the first period from 1955 to 1965, nuclear education began at undergraduate level, and the facilities required for the research and education were set up. The imported reactor began the commercial operation in 1966 for the first time, and during the period of high economic growth, the request by the nuclear industry was met by providing special studies in addition to the regular curriculum studies. The research committee on nuclear engineering education was formed, and in 1973, Japan-U.S. cooperative seminar on education program for nuclear engineering was held. The first ''oil crisis'' occurred in 1973, and the significance of nuclear power as an alternative to oil increased. But as nuclear power plants became bigger and increased, the safety and the effect on environment have been discussed. Also the research and development of nuclear fusion have been promoted. All these factors were reflected to the nuclear education in universities. The carricula in universities and the tasks and prospects in nuclear engineering education are described. (Kako, I.)

  1. Nuclear education, training and support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vityazev, Vsevolod; Ushakov Artem

    2016-01-01

    The structure and key elements of the ROSATOM education and training system are presented. Educational and training services and technical support are provided during the NPP lifetime, including nuclear Infrastructure, nuclear power plant personnel training, equipment and post-warranty spare parts, nuclear power plant operation support, maintenance and repair, modernization and lifetime extension

  2. The German competence network on nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczera, B.; Fritz, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The present German energy policy is based on the phase-out of nuclear electricity generation, which means that the last of the currently operating eighteen German nuclear power plants will run until about 2022. While the plants will be shut down one after the other, decommissioning will start together with interim storage of the radioactive waste. The safe waste disposal in a final repository is planned to start around 2030 and may take another two decades, i.e., in Germany nuclear competence is further needed, at least until the mid of this century. Against this background, a high-ranking commission under the direction of the Federal Ministry of Economy and Technology evaluated the publicly funded nuclear safety related research and development (R and D) activities in Germany. One of the recommendations made by the commission was the foundation of a Competence Network on Nuclear Technology for an optimum coordination of the remaining nuclear activities including aspects of future human resources in this area. This Network was established in March 2000 with the following member institutions: Research Centre Juelich, Research Centre Karlsruhe, Research Centre Rossendorf and the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) in Munich and their neighbouring Technical Universities. The strategic objectives of the Competence Network include: Trend investigations on job development and on university education capacities in the nuclear technology sector; Enhanced cooperation of the Research Centres with universities in the nuclear field and support of international education initiatives (e.g. ENEN, WNU); Coordination and bundling of the activities in publicly funded reactor safety and waste management R and D programmes; Support of qualified young scientists and engineers (pre-doctoral students) - also by third-party funds; Participation in and collaboration with international projects and activities for advancements of international nuclear safety

  3. Nuclear technology databases and information network systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Shuichi; Kikuchi, Yasuyuki; Minakuchi, Satoshi

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the databases related to nuclear (science) technology, and information network. Following contents are collected in this paper: the database developed by JAERI, ENERGY NET, ATOM NET, NUCLEN nuclear information database, INIS, NUclear Code Information Service (NUCLIS), Social Application of Nuclear Technology Accumulation project (SANTA), Nuclear Information Database/Communication System (NICS), reactor materials database, radiation effects database, NucNet European nuclear information database, reactor dismantling database. (J.P.N.)

  4. Education of nuclear energy specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulikas, V.

    1999-01-01

    Preparation system of nuclear energy specialists in Lithuania is presented. Nuclear engineers are being prepared at Kaunas University of Technology. Post-graduates students usually continue studies at Obninsk Nuclear Energy Institute in Russia. Many western countries like Sweden, Finland and US is providing assistance in education of Lithuanian specialists. Many of them were trained in these countries

  5. Nuclear pharmacy education: international harmonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, S.M.; Cox, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    Education of nuclear pharmacists exists in many countries around the world. The approach and level of education varies between countries depending upon the expectations of the nuclear pharmacist, the work site and the economic environment. In Australia, training is provided through distance learning. In Europe and Canada, nuclear pharmacists and radiochemists receive postgraduate education in order to engage in the small-scale preparation and quality control of radiopharmaceuticals as well as research and development. In the U.S.A., nuclear pharmacy practitioners obtain basic knowledge primarily through undergraduate programs taken when pursuit the first professional degree in pharmacy. Licensed practitioners in pharmacy enter the practice of nuclear pharmacy through distance learning programs or short courses. While different approaches to education exist, there is a basic core of knowledge and a level of competence required of all nuclear pharmacists and radiochemists providing radiopharmaceutical products and services. It was with this realization that efforts were initiated to develop harmonization concepts and documents pertaining to education in nuclear pharmacy. The benefits of international harmonization in nuclear pharmacy education are numerous. Assurance of the availability of quality professionals to provide optimal products and care to the patient is a principle benefit. Spanning national barriers through the demonstration of self governance and unification in education will enhance the goal of increased freedom of employment between countries. Harmonization endeavors will improve existing education programs through sharing of innovative concepts and knowledge between educators. Documents generated will benefit new educational programs especially in developing nations. A committee on harmonization in nuclear pharmacy education was formed consisting of educators and practitioners from the international community. A working document on education was

  6. High education and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghitescu, Petre; Prisecaru, Ilie; Stefanescu, Petre

    1998-01-01

    The Faculty of Energy of the University 'Politecnica' in Bucharest is the only faculty in Romania in the field of nuclear energy education. With an experience of more than 29 years, the Faculty of Energy offers the major 'Nuclear Power Plants', which students graduate after a 5-year education as engineers in the Nuclear Power Plant major. Among the principal objectives of the development and reshape of the Romanian education system was mentioned the upgrading of organizational forms by introducing the transfer credit system, and starting in the fall '97 by accrediting Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety Master education. As a result of co-operation and assistance offered by TEMPUS-SENECA program, the new major is shaped and endowed with a modern curriculum harmonized with UE and IAEA requirements and a modern and performing laboratory. This way the Romanian higher education offers a fully correct and concordant structure with UE countries education. (authors)

  7. Negative Attitudes, Network and Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Patrick; la Cour, Lisbeth; Larsen, Birthe

    , the impact of negative attitudes and networking taking into account that these parameters may influence high and uneducated workers as well as immigrants and natives differently, creating different incentives to acquire education for the two ethnic groups. Using rich Danish administrative data, this paper......This paper explores potential explanations behind the educational gap between young natives and immigrants using two measures, negative attitudes towards immigrants and networking, which may influence natives and immigrants differently. The paper considers, both theoretically and empirically...... finds evidence that greater negative attitudes increase incentives for males to acquire education and that networking also increases immigrant education....

  8. Nuclear education, training and knowledge management in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeley, Phil; Slugen, Vladimir; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Rita [European Nuclear Society ENS, Brussels (Belgium). ENS High Scientific Council

    2010-04-15

    The situation in the nuclear education today is complex as it relates to nuclear technology for both peaceful and security applications. After more than 20 years period of depression in nuclear facility construction (significant mainly in Europe and USA), there is strong renewed interest in nuclear-generated electricity. Many factors have contributed to ''nuclear renaissance'' including concerns about possible climate changes due to carbon emissions. The Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) study in 2000, ''Nuclear Education and Training. Cause for Concern'', highlighted the necessity for a renaissance in nuclear education and training with some recommendations. The European Nuclear Energy Forum (ENEF) identified the nuclear education as one of highest risks in nuclear industry. The nuclear renaissance depends on the increased number of engineers properly educated in wide spectrum of nuclear disciplines. The world has responded. Networks have been established to respond to the necessity to maintain and perpetuate nuclear knowledge in order to provide a suitably qualified workforce for the future operation of nuclear power plants. The quality in Education, Training and Knowledge Management (ETKM) is strongly influenced and supported by development of nuclear research, exploitation of experimental and training facilities, existence of proper education and training networks, software tools, distance and e-learning and a variety of knowledge management activities. The projected global annual requirements for new nuclear engineers over the next 10 years will challenge existing academic and training institutions with respect to capacity and load factors on classrooms, laboratories and other facilities such as basic principles simulators. Additionally, the nuclear academic workforce may need to increase to meet the demand for educating/training the new industrial workforce and this will take time. Within the European context many of the

  9. Nuclear education, training and knowledge management in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeley, Phil; Slugen, Vladimir; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Rita

    2010-01-01

    The situation in the nuclear education today is complex as it relates to nuclear technology for both peaceful and security applications. After more than 20 years period of depression in nuclear facility construction (significant mainly in Europe and USA), there is strong renewed interest in nuclear-generated electricity. Many factors have contributed to ''nuclear renaissance'' including concerns about possible climate changes due to carbon emissions. The Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) study in 2000, ''Nuclear Education and Training. Cause for Concern'', highlighted the necessity for a renaissance in nuclear education and training with some recommendations. The European Nuclear Energy Forum (ENEF) identified the nuclear education as one of highest risks in nuclear industry. The nuclear renaissance depends on the increased number of engineers properly educated in wide spectrum of nuclear disciplines. The world has responded. Networks have been established to respond to the necessity to maintain and perpetuate nuclear knowledge in order to provide a suitably qualified workforce for the future operation of nuclear power plants. The quality in Education, Training and Knowledge Management (ETKM) is strongly influenced and supported by development of nuclear research, exploitation of experimental and training facilities, existence of proper education and training networks, software tools, distance and e-learning and a variety of knowledge management activities. The projected global annual requirements for new nuclear engineers over the next 10 years will challenge existing academic and training institutions with respect to capacity and load factors on classrooms, laboratories and other facilities such as basic principles simulators. Additionally, the nuclear academic workforce may need to increase to meet the demand for educating/training the new industrial workforce and this will take time. Within the European context many of the programmes will continue through

  10. Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.

    2001-02-01

    This report provides a brief description of the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Network in response to a request from the Advisory Group Meeting on ''Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators'' (IAEA, Vienna, 14-17 December 1998, report IAEA(NDS)-399 (1999)). This report supersedes the special issue of the Nuclear Data Newsletter No. 20 published in November 1994. (author)

  11. Investigation on Current Status of World Nuclear Education and Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, J. Y.; Min, M. J.; Noh, B. C.

    2010-04-01

    All over the world, the interest of nuclear energy is increasing and the expectations of it are getting more as one of the most practical alternative energy resources. However, since 1990s, as a lot of nuclear specialists are being retired, now the problem of manpower shortage is taken into consideration for all of us and will be continued until 2011. In this point of view, the good quality of the professional nuclear training and education systems and the nuclear education centers are requested in order to breed and supply the next generation nuclear scientists and engineers. Thus, the objective of this study is to explore the current status of world nuclear education for both of nuclear power countries and potential nuclear power utilization countries in the near future. This report introduces the importance of nuclear energy, the current status of world nuclear power plants operation and the contribution of nuclear energy. Besides, it also includes the nuclear energy development plan of potential nuclear developing countries in the near future. In addition, this study also explores the nuclear training and education systems of the nuclear development countries and the current status of nuclear education in various fields such as government, industries, nuclear power plants ect. Especially, as considering the status of nuclear education classified such as Asia, the Americas, East and West Europe, the Middle East and Africa, it shows the different characteristics of nuclear education systems in each regions aimed to identify the good practices on the nuclear education systems. Finally, through observation of international cooperation and networks of the various nuclear organizations, this will be contributed to the development of nuclear education for member states and be suggested the various of the direction of development for nuclear education in Korea. The report presents in the basis of the recent status data of the world nuclear education systems collected

  12. Local AREA networks in advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicknell, J.; Keats, A.B.

    1984-01-01

    The report assesses Local Area Network Communications with a view to their application in advanced nuclear reactor control and protection systems. Attention is focussed on commercially available techniques and systems for achieving the high reliability and availability required. A basis for evaluating network characteristics in terms of broadband or baseband type, medium, topology, node structure and access method is established. The reliability and availability of networks is then discussed. Several commercial networks are briefly assessed and a distinction made between general purpose networks and those suitable for process control. The communications requirements of nuclear reactor control and protection systems are compared with the facilities provided by current technology

  13. Negative Attitudes, Networks and Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Patrick; la Cour, Lisbeth; Larsen, Birthe

    This paper theoretically and empirically assesses the potential explanations behind the educational gap between young natives and immigrants using two measures, negative attitudes towards immigrants and networking. The paper considers that two these parameters may influence high and uneducated...... workers as well as immigrants and natives differently, creating different incentives to acquire education for the two groups. Using rich Danish administrative data, this paper finds suggestive evidence rejecting the theoretical case where negative attitudes decrease 1st generation immigrant education...... and indications that quality of networks seems to matter more for immigrants than the quantity of individuals in a potential network....

  14. International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Naohiko; Dunaeva, Svetlana

    2010-11-01

    The activities of fourteen nuclear data centres are summarized, and their cooperation under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency is described. Each of the centres provides coverage for different geographical zones and/or specific types of nuclear data, thus together providing a complete service for users worldwide. The International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC) was established with the objective of providing nuclear physics databases that are required for nuclear technology (encompassing energy and non-energy applications) by coordinating the collection, compilation and dissemination of nuclear data on an international scale. (author)

  15. Education and training in nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcon, S.; Marco, M.

    2014-01-01

    CIEMAT participates in the European project Matisse (Materials Innovations for a Safe and Sustainable nuclear in Europe) belonging to FP7, whose main objective is to promote the link between the respective national research programs through networking and integration of activities for innovation in materials for advanced nuclear systems, sharing among partners best practices and implementation of training tools and efficient communication. The draft four years, from 2013 to 2017, includes aspects such as the interaction between infrastructure, R and D programs and postgraduate education and training. (Author)

  16. A Social Networks in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova, Blanka; Poulova, Petra

    2015-01-01

    At present social networks are becoming important in all areas of human activities. They are simply part and parcel of everyday life. They are mostly used for advertising, but they have already found their way into education. The future potential of social networks is high as it can be seen from their statistics on a daily, monthly or yearly…

  17. Romanian network for structural integrity assessment of nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, Maria; Constantinescu, Dan Mihai; Brad, Sebastian; Ducu, Catalin

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Based of the Romanian option to develop and operate nuclear facilities, using as model the networks created at European level and taking into account the international importance of the structural integrity assessments for lifetime extension of the nuclear components, a national Project started since 2005 in the framework of the National Program 'Research of Excellence', Modulus I 2006-2008, managed by the Ministry of Education and Research. Entitled 'Integrated Network for Structural Integrity Monitoring of Critical Components in Nuclear Facilities', with the acronym RIMIS, the Project had two main objectives: - to elaborate a procedure applicable to the structural integrity assessment of the critical components used in Romanian nuclear facilities; - to integrate the national networking in a similar one, at European level, to enhance the scientific significance of Romanian R and D organizations as well as to increase the contribution to solving one of the major issue of the nuclear field. The paper aimed to present the activities performed in the Romanian institutes, involved in the Project, the final results obtained as part of the R and D activities, including experimental, theoretical and modeling ones regarding structural integrity assessment of nuclear components employed in CANDU type reactors. Also the activity carried out in the framework of the NULIFE network, created at European level of the FP6 Program and sustained by the RIMIS network will be described. (authors)

  18. Developing Strategies for Networked Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peregoy, Richard; Kroder, Stanley

    2000-01-01

    Assesses the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) of the distance learning approach to education, and discusses how one institution, the University of Dallas Graduate School of Management, has developed a progressively expanding networked distance education program. Includes quotes from three students that suggest the quality of…

  19. Sloan foundation nuclear education program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kursunoglu, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation realized the time had come for a real and significant contribution to the enlightenment of university students concerning nuclear matters. The Sloan Foundation chose to educate the youth of four-year colleges and universities with a curriculum established with the resource information sieved from three workshops for professors in these institutions. The three workshops were organized by groups at Harvard-MIT (two-week Summer Program on Nuclear Weapons and Arms Control), the University of California, San Diego (two-week Summer Seminar on Global Security and Arms Control), and the University of Miami (one-week Winter Workshop on Enlightenment: The Best Security in a Nuclear-Armed World). In this report the author focuses on a unified presentation of the basic facts, aims, and results of the Sloan Foundation Nuclear Education Program based on three workshops directed by Jack Ruina (MIT), Herbert York (USCD), and Behram Kursunoglu (UM) and offered from 1983-1990

  20. The role of nuclear education and training in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B.J.; Han, K.W.; Lee, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    utility training center (now Nuclear Power Education Institute) was established as an in-house training center for the training of operators and maintenance crews. For the sustainable development of nuclear science and technology, it calls for more qualified human resources. We ought to encourage our youth to become more interested in nuclear studies and careers. Korea is making strong efforts to support nuclear education and training for young generations. It is believed that internationally accepted advanced education and training programs along with a career in the nuclear fields at home and abroad would raise young generation's interests. Global network will serve as a vehicle that drives nuclear education and training forward. Accordingly, Korea is willing to contribute to the ANENT in a number of ways. RCA postdoctoral fellowship program, RCA/KAIST nuclear master's degree course, RCA/KOICA nuclear medicine internship program, and international education and training courses on nuclear power and nuclear non-power conducted by KAERI, KINS, KHNP will be useful to ANENT in exchange of students, teachers and researchers. Curricula and training materials on combined advanced technology fields which will be developed for the young generation will also be useful to ANENT in sharing information and materials of nuclear education and training. It is concluded that: Nuclear education and training in Korea has contributed importantly to the country's self reliance on nuclear energy technology for peaceful use; Nuclear education and training in Korea is expected to take a more innovative role to meet the need of attracting scientists to the nuclear field, preserving nuclear knowledge as well as advanced nuclear energy technology development; The community of nuclear education and training in Korea is making an extensive efforts to strengthen its capability at national level including networking, feels regional cooperation like ANENT is also important

  1. European TSO Network (ETSON) as Important Part of International Nuclear Safety Knowledge Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teske, Hartmuth; Dierschow, Frank; Eibl-Schwäger, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: • Nuclear networks, including ETSON, are fulfilling their respective and defined specific aims; • Common are such objectives like: – exchange of information; – transfer of knowledge; – support education and training; – collaborate effectively together; – promote coordination and – support harmonization. • Further endeavor are needed to: – Make more significant efforts in promoting the opportunities of collaborative actions; – Use more active the existing features of the modern network tools; – Combine regional or global networks with national web-based knowledge resources by developing and maintaining further the National Nuclear Regulatory Portals. • Nuclear safety and security networks are effectively contributing to build and sustain needed capacities and capabilities

  2. New Initiatives for International Cooperation for Nuclear Education in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strikhanov, M.

    2014-01-01

    Final remarks: Planned activities under the IAEA/MePhI cooperation - Assistance in implementing the IAEA initiative on Virtual Nuclear Management University; • Collecting and preserving information on peaceful use of nuclear science and technology through the Russian International Nuclear Information System (INIS) Center; • Assistance in implementing the educational laboratories of Virtual Nuclear laboratories for CLP4NET and T urbine-installation of NPP with VVER-1000 reactor“ simulator; • Develop and implement the selected courses using the CLP4NET or other suitable platform (3 Master’s degree programs on Nuclear Engineering, Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Nonproliferation); • Assistance in implementing the IAEA/ICTP School of NKM, August 2014 ; • A set of regional workshops on “The role of computer-based educational laboratories in Nuclear Engineering University Programmes”. New possible activities under the IAEA umbrella - • Cooperation with regional networks; • Establish a new network for Nuclear Education (CIS, EvrAzES, …) and develop together with other countries curricula, training programs and training materials on nuclear power and non-power applications; • Build public awareness of the benefits of nuclear technology and its applications; Support the IAEA in implementation of the selected courses in Member States. • Cooperation with foreign nuclear universities and training organizations for development of master and bachelor programs and postgraduate training

  3. Towards Building Cloud Education Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanka Hadzhikoleva

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the trends and prospects in higher education happening as a result of internationalization, as well as the possible risks and challenges. The training capabilities of cloud computing are examined. A review has been done of specific cloud services suitable for organizing and conducting educational and administrative activities. Some trends have been outlined, such as the probable consequences of building institutional education clouds and the opportunities for interoperability between them. The opportunities for building cloud education networks and their main characteristics are explored.

  4. Educating journalists about nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latek, Stanislaw

    2002-01-01

    Co-operating with the journalists for many years, I believe that I managed to win their trust and goodwill. This capital was not easy to acquire, but it is very easy to squander. Because one has to remember that the relations between the nuclear community and the media are very sensitive. Their fragile balance can be easily disturbed or even totally destroyed. Drawing on the last year experiences and lessons from my relations with the journalists in my role of a spokesman, I would like to present several messages, which I believe to be useful for the PIME audience. (author)

  5. Romanian knowledge transfer network in nuclear physics and engineering - REFIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghitescu, Petre; Prisecaru, Ilie

    2007-01-01

    According to the requirements of the Romanian Nuclear Programme regarding the education and training of the skilled personnel for the nuclear facilities, a knowledge transfer network named REFIN (in Romanian: Retea Educationala in Fizica si Ingineria Nucleara) was developed since 2005. The knowledge target field is nuclear physics and engineering. The main objective of this network is to develop an effective, flexible and modern educational system in the nuclear physics and engineering area which could meet the requirements of all known types of nuclear facilities and therewith be redundant with the perspectives of the European Research Area (FP7, EURATOM). A global strategy was proposed in order to harmonize the curricula between the network facilities to implement pilot modern teaching programs (courses/modules), to introduce advanced learning methods (as Systematic Approach to Training, e-learning and distance-learning), to strengthen and better use the existing research infrastructures of the research institutes in network. The education and training strategy is divided into several topics: university engineering , master, post-graduate, Ph.D. degree, post-doctoral activity, training for industry, improvement. For the first time in our country, a modular scheme is used allowing staff with different technical background to participate at different levels. In this respect, the European system with transferable credits (ECTS) is used. Based on this strategy, courses in 'Radioactive Waste Management' and 'Numerical and Experimental Methods in Reactor Physics' for both MS students and for industry. This way the training activity which a student attends will allow him or her to be involved, depending on specific professional needs, into a flexible educational scheme. This scheme will ensure competence and enhancement and also the possibility of qualification development and a better mobility on labour market. This kind of activity is already in progress in the

  6. The US Nuclear Data Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report contains: meeting of the Formats and Procedures Subcommittee of the USNDN; minutes of the Formats and Procedures Subcommittee meeting; University of Pennsylvania progress report since October 1989; TUNL A = 3 - 20 data project activity report 1990; Mass-chain evaluation and related activities at INEL; isotopes project report; nuclear data project activity report; the NNDC activity report; status of mass-chain evaluations; nuclear data sheets processing statistics for 1985--1990; nuclear data sheets update for A = 50; table of isotopes timetable; on-line access: status and service statistics; electronic nuclear data base environments; NNDC response on increase in productivity; a short ENSDF evaluation cycle; mass-chain evaluation and productivity; and response to panel report re: evaluation cycle time etc

  7. Pursuit of nuclear science and technology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangacharyulu, C.

    2009-01-01

    While it is quite encouraging to note that there is a nuclear renaissance underway around the world, there is a growing concern that the knowledge-base of nuclear technologies will be lost. Several international organizations are making concerted efforts to avert this situation by establishing collaborative workshops etc. In Western Canada, our challenges and opportunities are many-fold. As a uranium mining region, we can engage our economy in the full life-cycle of the nuclear energy industry. It is also important that we maintain and augment nuclear technologies. We need to develop the infrastructure to jump-start the education and training of the youth. We are taking a multi-prong approach to this end. We are initiating specializations in undergraduate programs which emphasize nuclear radiation physics and technology. We are collaborating with Canadian organizations such as University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE) and University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT). We are organizing collaborations with our colleagues at foreign institutions in Europe and Asia to provide an international component. We are also working with local industry and health organizations to provide a wide-range of learning opportunities to students by engaging them in research projects of immediate interest to professionals. My presentation will focus on these developments and we will also seek thoughts and suggestions for future collaborations.

  8. Negative Attitudes, Network and Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Patrick; la Cour, Lisbeth; Larsen, Birthe

    We consider the impact of negative attitudes against immigrants and immigration on educational choice in a search and wage bargaining model including networking. We consider two cases in terms of the importance of negative attitudes againts immigrants for high and low educated individuals and find...... that more negative attitudes against immigrants has a positive impact on education in one case and a negative impact in the other and has no impact on natives. Immigration improves employment perspectives for immigrants and thereby increases immigrant education whereas endogenous negative attitudes lead...... use Danish register data to find a signficant positive correlation between negative attitudes towards immigrants and high school attendance and find a positive impact of networking on high school attendance. In both the macro and the micro-econometric analysis we run the same regressions for natives...

  9. Global Nuclear Safety and Security Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Lingquan

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the Regulatory Network are: - to contribute to the effectiveness of nuclear regulatory systems; - to contribute to continuous enhancements, and - to achieve and promote radiation and nuclear safety and security by: • Enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of international cooperation in the regulation of nuclear and radiation safety of facilities and activities; • Enabling adequate access by regulators to relevant safety and security information; • Promoting dissemination of information on safety and security issues as well as information of good practices for addressing and resolving these issues; • Enabling synergies among different web based networks with a view to strengthening and enhancing the global nuclear safety framework and serving the specific needs of regulators and international organizations; • Providing additional information to the public on international regulatory cooperation in safety and security matters

  10. IAEA support for the establishment of nuclear security education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunegger-Guelich, Andrea; Rukhlo, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has not diminished. In response to the concerns of States, an international nuclear security framework has emerged through the establishment of a number of legally binding and non-binding international instruments which obligates or commits States to carry out a number of actions to protect against nuclear terrorism. In this context, the need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underscored at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors' Meetings. In the pursuit of this need, the IAEA has developed - together with academics and nuclear security experts from Member States - a technical guidance entitled IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 - Educational Programme in Nuclear Security that consists of a model Master of Science (M.Sc.) and a certificate programme in nuclear security. The paper sets out IAEA efforts to support the establishment of nuclear security at educational institutions, underlines particularly the objective and content of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 and discusses the efforts made by the IAEA to establish a network among educational and research institutions, and other stakeholders to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. (orig.)

  11. Theorizing Network-Centric Activity in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    HaLevi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Networks and network-centric activity are increasingly prevalent in schools and school districts. In addition to ubiquitous social network tools like Facebook and Twitter, educational leaders deal with a wide variety of network organizational forms that include professional development, advocacy, informational networks and network-centric reforms.…

  12. A.Q. Khan Nuclear Smuggling Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly MacCalman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdul Qadeer Khan, widely viewed as the father of Pakistan’s nuclear weapons program, was arrested on January 31, 2004 for his key role in the black market sale of nuclear technology and equipment to Iran, North Korea, Libya, and possibly others. A.Q. Khan’s nuclear smuggling network prospered throughout the 1980s and 1990s and was linked to middlemen and businesses in over 20 countries. The network offered buyers a menu of both technical expertise and materials with prices ranging from millions to hundreds of millions of dollars. The Khan network was ultimately exposed largely due to years of intelligence gathering by the United States and the United Kingdom. However, very few of the network’s members have been successfully prosecuted and the demand for nuclear material by both state and non-state actors continues. The exposure of Khan’s network confirmed that a non-state actor could procure and sell a turnkey nuclear weapons program to willing buyers.

  13. Nuclear data services of the Nuclear Data Centers Network available at the National Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Data Centers Network provides low and medium energy nuclear reaction data to users around the world. Online retrievals are available through the U.S. National Nuclear Data Center, the Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank, and the IAEA Nuclear Data Section from these extensive bibliographic, experimental data, and evaluated data files. In addition to nuclear reaction data, the various databases also provide nuclear structure and decay data, and other information of interest to users. The WorldWideWeb sites at the National Nuclear Data Center and the NEA Data Bank provide access to some of the Centers' files. (orig.)

  14. World's trends in nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartigue, J.; Martinez, T.

    2005-01-01

    determination and industrial quality control. As well, the use of tracers in Industry, Medicine, Biochemistry, etc., has long been established requiring, at its turn, an increasingly fine radiochemical preparation. Finally, the use of radiation sources in industrial and research activities calls too for highly qualified personnel. Even more, the growing regulations of nuclear energy demand a higher number of specialists in Health Physics. Unlike Basic Science, Applied Science must necessarily follow present and future market needs. This is of course valid for the applied branch of Nuclear Science, who has two components: the applications of radioisotopes and radiations and the power generation; the first one shows a very foreseeable development but the power one not yet. Therefore, educational systems need cover, in general, both aspects with an emphasis in that one considered the more relevant to every country. This work analyses the development and present situation of nuclear education in several countries (USA, Canada, Mexico, France, Spain, China, etc.) as well as the collective efforts promoted by the IAEA and other organisations such as the WNA. Statistical data of matriculation are presented. Some particular curricula are discussed and the main experimental facilities are mentioned. Conclusions are obtained regarding present lacks in training programs and some fore sights are made about probable trends derived from foreseeable scenarios.

  15. Multilayer Network Analysis of Nuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang; Ma, Yu-Gang; Chen, Qu; Han, Ding-Ding

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear reaction network is usually studied via precise calculation of differential equation sets, and much research interest has been focused on the characteristics of nuclides, such as half-life and size limit. In this paper, however, we adopt the methods from both multilayer and reaction networks, and obtain a distinctive view by mapping all the nuclear reactions in JINA REACLIB database into a directed network with 4 layers: neutron, proton, 4He and the remainder. The layer names correspond to reaction types decided by the currency particles consumed. This combined approach reveals that, in the remainder layer, the β-stability has high correlation with node degree difference and overlapping coefficient. Moreover, when reaction rates are considered as node strength, we find that, at lower temperatures, nuclide half-life scales reciprocally with its out-strength. The connection between physical properties and topological characteristics may help to explore the boundary of the nuclide chart.

  16. Status of nuclear technology education in Mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davaa, S.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.

    2007-01-01

    The National University of Mongolia (NUM) is the country's oldest, the only comprehensive university, and a leading center of science, education and culture. The NUM has twelve schools and faculties in the capital city Ulaanbaatar and three branches in provinces. The University offers the widest range of undergraduate and graduate programs in natural and social sciences and humanities. After sixty years of dynamic growth, the University has become a place of sustained innovation, a blend of scholarship and practical realism. The last ten years have been a period of reforms in the structure, financing and governance of Mongolian educational institutions. The NUM has been continuously adjusting its operations and curriculum to deal with new economic conditions, changing labour market demands and altered social aspirations. Committed to human peace, development and welfare in the increasingly globalized world, the NUM promotes equal and mutually beneficial international cooperation. It is a member of the International Association of Universities (IAU), University Mobility in Asia and the Pacific (UMAP), and Euro-Asian University Network (EAUN) and has direct co-operation agreements with more than sixty international academic and research centers in Europe, the USA and the Asia-Pacific Rim. On the threshold of the 21st century, the NUM remains a major center for fundamental and applied research as well as a university that is distinguished by the quality of its teaching. Following its values and traditions, the University strives to be an innovative and dynamic learning community. Requirements for Program Majored in Nuclear Technology: Profession major purpose: The objective is to provide knowledge and skills to use nuclear physics' methodology and nuclear radiation for education, science, health protection, agriculture, geology, mining, nature protection, energy and etc industries. The graduates of this major will become engineer technology staff and researchers in

  17. Harmonization of nuclear education and training in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglierin, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: At the Lisbon 2000 summit, a strategic goal was proposed for the European Union: to become the most competitive knowledge-based economy with more and better employment and social cohesion by 2010. In the particular case of nuclear fission technologies, this EC initiative was widely accepted by the stake holders concerned. In Europe, the main 'end users' of nuclear research or stake holders are actually: the research organisations (with mixed public / private funding), the manufacturing industry, the utilities and waste management organisations, the regulatory bodies (or technical safety organisations) and the academic (e.g. universities). With the aim to better integrate European education and training in nuclear engineering and safety in order to combat the decline in both student numbers and teaching establishments a FP6 EU project entitled NEPTUNO (Nuclear European Platform of Training and University Organizations) has started in 2004. In total 35 partner institutions from 17 countries have formed a network aimed in providing the necessary competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and other uses of radiation in industry and medicine. The project focuses on a harmonised approach for education and training in nuclear engineering in Europe and its implementation, including the better integration of national resources and capabilities. The expected result is an operational network for training and lifelong learning schemes as well as on academic education at the master, doctoral and post-doctoral level, underpinning: Substantiality of Europe's excellence in nuclear technology; Harmonised approaches to safety and best practices, both operational and regulatory, at European level in Member States and Accession Countries; Preservation of competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and other uses of radiation in industry and medicine; Harmonised approach for training and education in nuclear engineering

  18. Romanian Educational Seismic Network Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataru, Dragos; Ionescu, Constantin; Zaharia, Bogdan; Grecu, Bogdan; Tibu, Speranta; Popa, Mihaela; Borleanu, Felix; Toma, Dragos; Brisan, Nicoleta; Georgescu, Emil-Sever; Dobre, Daniela; Dragomir, Claudiu-Sorin

    2013-04-01

    Romania is one of the most active seismic countries in Europe, with more than 500 earthquakes occurring every year. The seismic hazard of Romania is relatively high and thus understanding the earthquake phenomena and their effects at the earth surface represents an important step toward the education of population in earthquake affected regions of the country and aims to raise the awareness about the earthquake risk and possible mitigation actions. In this direction, the first national educational project in the field of seismology has recently started in Romania: the ROmanian EDUcational SEISmic NETwork (ROEDUSEIS-NET) project. It involves four partners: the National Institute for Earth Physics as coordinator, the National Institute for Research and Development in Construction, Urban Planning and Sustainable Spatial Development " URBAN - INCERC" Bucharest, the Babeş-Bolyai University (Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Engineering) and the software firm "BETA Software". The project has many educational, scientific and social goals. The main educational objectives are: training students and teachers in the analysis and interpretation of seismological data, preparing of several comprehensive educational materials, designing and testing didactic activities using informatics and web-oriented tools. The scientific objective is to introduce into schools the use of advanced instruments and experimental methods that are usually restricted to research laboratories, with the main product being the creation of an earthquake waveform archive. Thus a large amount of such data will be used by students and teachers for educational purposes. For the social objectives, the project represents an effective instrument for informing and creating an awareness of the seismic risk, for experimentation into the efficacy of scientific communication, and for an increase in the direct involvement of schools and the general public. A network of nine seismic stations with SEP seismometers

  19. Nuclear Forensics and Radiochemistry: Reaction Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundberg, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-22

    In the intense neutron flux of a nuclear explosion the production of isotopes may occur through successive neutron induced reactions. The pathway to these isotopes illustrates both the complexity of the problem and the need for high quality nuclear data. The growth and decay of radioactive isotopes can follow a similarly complex network. The Bateman equation will be described and modified to apply to the transmutation of isotopes in a high flux reactor. A alternative model of growth and decay, the GD code, that can be applied to fission products will also be described.

  20. Supply and demand of nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    On June 6, 2011, the Atomexpo-2011 International Forum held a round-table discussion dedicated to Prospects of nuclear education in countries that plan to advance their nuclear power, and in countries that are about to launch their nuclear programmes. More than 80 participants representing many nations and international organizations discussed issues associated with the development of nuclear education and training infrastructure, as well as prospects for international cooperation in this sector [ru

  1. Nuclear waste disposal educational forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    In keeping with a mandate from the US Congress to provide opportunities for consumer education and information and to seek consumer input on national issues, the Department of Energy's Office of Consumer Affairs held a three-hour educational forum on the proposed nuclear waste disposal legislation. Nearly one hundred representatives of consumer, public interest, civic and environmental organizations were invited to attend. Consumer affairs professionals of utility companies across the country were also invited to attend the forum. The following six papers were presented: historical perspectives; status of legislation (Senate); status of legislation (House of Representatives); impact on the legislation on electric utilities; impact of the legislation on consumers; implementing the legislation. All six papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base

  2. Strategic Knowledge Networks for Global Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, J. Fiona

    2009-01-01

    The inherent opportunities for communication, collaboration and experiential learning in an online and global network create the impetus for the new network paradigm in higher education. A strategic knowledge network in education was designed and developed to build "Mode 2" knowledge capabilities; create new knowledge for innovative…

  3. A brief review of advances in complex networks of nuclear science and technology field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Jinqing

    2010-01-01

    A brief review of advances in complex networks of nuclear science and technology field at home and is given and summarized. These complex networks include: nuclear energy weapon network, network centric warfare, beam transport networks, continuum percolation evolving network associated with nuclear reactions, global nuclear power station network, (nuclear) chemistry reaction networks, radiological monitoring and anti-nuclear terror networks, and so on. Some challenge issues and development prospects of network science are pointed out finally. (authors)

  4. Management of nuclear knowledge and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murogov, V.M.; Kosilov, A.N.; )

    2010-01-01

    The authors believe that preservation of critical knowledge for transferring to the next generation and formation of competencies that would meet the demands of modern nuclear technology must be the basis of nuclear education and training of professional staff for full-scale development of the nuclear industry. It is also necessary to formulate requirements to new competencies, which will help people that possess them address tasks of innovative development of nuclear technologies, and ensure that managers and engineers of all levels possess them. Cooperation (including international) will be vital between state authorities, industrial companies, science and research institutions and higher education to create favourable conditions for nuclear education and professional training [ru

  5. Educating personnel for nuclear technology in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otcenasek, P.

    1980-01-01

    The basic preconditions are discussed of educating personnel for nuclear power and nuclear technology in Czechoslovakia. In educating specialists, the high societal significance of nuclear power and the need to obtain qualified personnel for safeguarding safety and reliability of nuclear facilities operation should primarily be borne in mind. The system of training applies not only to operating and maintenance personnel of nuclear power plants but also to fuel and power generation, transport, engineering, building industry, health care, education and other personnel. (J.B.)

  6. Reconstruction of nuclear engineering education in universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Masaharu; Tomota, Yo; Tanaka, Shunichi

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear engineering has become the area gradually loosing appeal to the young for these twenty years taking all the circumstances into consideration. However nuclear power is predicted to be primary energy of greatest importance even in the future and this needs highly motivated and excellent personnel in nuclear industry and society so as to develop and maintain nuclear power to a high degree. Under these circumstances discussions on how should be nuclear engineering research and education in the new era were presented from various viewpoints and they led to the direction of reconstruction of nuclear engineering education in universities and relevant organizations to train and ensure personnel. (T. Tanaka)

  7. Modeling management of research and education networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galagan, D.V.

    2004-01-01

    Computer networks and their services have become an essential part of research and education. Nowadays every modern R&E institution must have a computer network and provide network services to its students and staff. In addition to its internal computer network, every R&E institution must have a

  8. Engineering and science education for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Guidebook contains detailed information on curricula which would provide the professional technical education qualifications which have been established for nuclear power programme personnel. The core of the Guidebook consists of model curricula in engineering and science, including relevant practical work. Curricula are provided for specialization, undergraduate, and postgraduate programmes in nuclear-oriented mechanical, chemical, electrical, and electronics engineering, as well as nuclear engineering and radiation health physics. Basic nuclear science and engineering laboratory work is presented together with a list of basic experiments and the nuclear equipment needed to perform them. Useful measures for implementing and improving engineering and science education and training capabilities for nuclear power personnel are presented. Valuable information on the national experiences of IAEA Member States in engineering and science education for nuclear power, as well as examples of such education from various Member States, have been included

  9. VNML: Virtualized Network Management Laboratory for Educational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VNML: Virtualized Network Management Laboratory for Educational Purposes. ... Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences ... In this paper, we implement a Virtualized Network Management Laboratory named (VNML) linked to college ...

  10. Technological Developments in Networking, Education and Automation

    CERN Document Server

    Elleithy, Khaled; Iskander, Magued; Kapila, Vikram; Karim, Mohammad A; Mahmood, Ausif

    2010-01-01

    "Technological Developments in Networking, Education and Automation" includes a set of rigorously reviewed world-class manuscripts addressing and detailing state-of-the-art research projects in the following areas: Computer Networks: Access Technologies, Medium Access Control, Network architectures and Equipment, Optical Networks and Switching, Telecommunication Technology, and Ultra Wideband Communications. Engineering Education and Online Learning: including development of courses and systems for engineering, technical and liberal studies programs; online laboratories; intelligent

  11. National research and education network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasenor, Tony

    1991-01-01

    Some goals of this network are as follows: Extend U.S. technological leadership in high performance computing and computer communications; Provide wide dissemination and application of the technologies both to the speed and the pace of innovation and to serve the national economy, national security, education, and the global environment; and Spur gains in the U.S. productivity and industrial competitiveness by making high performance computing and networking technologies an integral part of the design and production process. Strategies for achieving these goals are as follows: Support solutions to important scientific and technical challenges through a vigorous R and D effort; Reduce the uncertainties to industry for R and D and use of this technology through increased cooperation between government, industry, and universities and by the continued use of government and government funded facilities as a prototype user for early commercial HPCC products; and Support underlying research, network, and computational infrastructures on which U.S. high performance computing technology is based.

  12. Effect of nuclear education on public attitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Teruaki

    1995-01-01

    A method is proposed to assess the effect of nuclear education. In this method, the nuclear education is treated as a part of the activities for public acceptance (PA), and a unit PA activity is assumed to give the same effect on the public, in essence, as a unit of nuclear information given by the newsmedia. Moreover, the change of attitude to nuclear energy is assumed to originate from enhanced understanding which, in turn, is brought by the stimulus given by the nuclear education. With the values of constants determined by using the data in Japan, example calculations were made for the educational time b 0 and the infiltration rate of education into minors B as parameters. It became clear from this calculation that the attitude to nuclear energy formed in the age of school children plays an essential role in shaping future public opinion since it is held in individuals without any notable modification for a long time after its formation, and that the effect of nuclear education to minors emerges depending on the variables b 0 and B in a highly non-linear manner. It was also found that there exists an optimum condition for nuclear education to attain the maximum amelioration of public opinion under a given condition of man-power for educational workers. (author)

  13. Nuclear Education, Training and Outreach in Latin America and the Caribbean Region - LANENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrachina, R.O.; François, J.L.; Sbaffoni, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Latin American Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (LANENT) was set up to contribute to preserving, promoting and sharing nuclear knowledge as well as fostering the transfer of nuclear knowledge in the Latin American region. LANENT has been actively pursuing joint activities for networking educational institutions at a regional level, the creation of distance learning initiatives and the use of shared facilities. Let us hope that these initial endeavors in nuclear education and training would ultimately contribute to the common and cooperative development of a technology so essential for the present and the future of our region

  14. Environmental pollutants monitoring network using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.D.

    1994-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) in collaboration with the NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA), Pacific Power and the Universities of NSW and Macquarie has established a large area fine aerosol sampling network covering nearly 60,000 square kilometres of NSW with 25 fine particle samplers. This network known as ASP commenced sampling on 1 July 1991. The cyclone sampler at each site has a 2.5 μm particle diameter cut off and samples for 24 hours using a stretched Teflon filter for each day. Accelerator-based Ion Beam Analysis(IBA) techniques are well suited to analyse the thousands of filter papers a year that originate from such a large scale aerosol sampling network. These techniques are fast multi-elemental and, for the most part, non-destructive so other analytical methods such as neutron activation and ion chromatography can be performed afterwards. Currently ANSTO receives 300 filters per month from this network for analysis using its accelerator based ion beam techniques on a 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. One week a month of accelerator time is dedicated to this analysis. This paper described the four simultaneous accelerator based IBA techniques used at ANSTO, to analyse for the following 24 elements H, C, N, O, F, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Ni, Co, Zn, Br and Pb. Each analysis requires only a few minutes of accelerator running time to complete. 15 refs., 9 figs

  15. Nuclear education in public health and nursing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winder, A.E.; Stanitis, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-three public health schools and 492 university schools of nursing were surveyed to gather specific information on educational programs related to nuclear war. Twenty public health schools and 240 nursing schools responded. Nuclear war-related content was most likely to appear in disaster nursing and in environmental health courses. Three schools of public health report that they currently offer elective courses on nuclear war. Innovative curricula included political action projects for nuclear war prevention

  16. Bayesian networks in educational assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Almond, Russell G; Steinberg, Linda S; Yan, Duanli; Williamson, David M

    2015-01-01

    Bayesian inference networks, a synthesis of statistics and expert systems, have advanced reasoning under uncertainty in medicine, business, and social sciences. This innovative volume is the first comprehensive treatment exploring how they can be applied to design and analyze innovative educational assessments. Part I develops Bayes nets’ foundations in assessment, statistics, and graph theory, and works through the real-time updating algorithm. Part II addresses parametric forms for use with assessment, model-checking techniques, and estimation with the EM algorithm and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). A unique feature is the volume’s grounding in Evidence-Centered Design (ECD) framework for assessment design. This “design forward” approach enables designers to take full advantage of Bayes nets’ modularity and ability to model complex evidentiary relationships that arise from performance in interactive, technology-rich assessments such as simulations. Part III describes ECD, situates Bayes nets as ...

  17. Dissemination of National Nuclear-HRD Network for Efficient and Effective N-HRD for NPP-Embarking Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, K.; Toba, A.; Hirose, H.; Ikuta, Y.; Sawai, T.; Takahashi, A.; Ueda, K.; Kita, T.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Close mutual cooperation among nuclear-related organizations, such as government, industry and academia is extremely useful to promote nuclear human resources development (HRD). National HRD network has already been established in Japan since Nov. 2010. The network has promoted the following five discussions: 1) elementary to high school education, 2) nuclear education at universities and colleges, 3) HRD for working engineers, 4) HRD to internationalize national human resources, and 5) supportive HRD activities to newly NPP introducing countries successfully. Through the establishment of the network, the communication has been strongly improved so that the Japan–IAEA joint Nuclear Energy Management School can be held successfully every year. Based on the good experience with the network, Japan would like to recommend the introduction of national nuclear HRD (N-HRD)-network to the NPP-embarking countries. We are interested in cooperation with IAEA for establishment of national N-HRD network for efficient and effective N-HRD. (author

  18. Networks and Collaboration in Spanish Education Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorín, Cecilia M.; Muijs, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Networks play an important role in today's societies. As a consequence, changes are apparent in the political, economic, cultural, educational and social agendas. Purpose: The main goal of this article is to map the situation of school networks in Spain. The research questions are focused on what forms collaboration and networking take…

  19. Reliability Analysis Techniques for Communication Networks in Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, T. J.; Jang, S. C.; Kang, H. G.; Kim, M. C.; Eom, H. S.; Lee, H. J.

    2006-09-01

    The objectives of this project is to investigate and study existing reliability analysis techniques for communication networks in order to develop reliability analysis models for nuclear power plant's safety-critical networks. It is necessary to make a comprehensive survey of current methodologies for communication network reliability. Major outputs of this study are design characteristics of safety-critical communication networks, efficient algorithms for quantifying reliability of communication networks, and preliminary models for assessing reliability of safety-critical communication networks

  20. Network for Astronomy School Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deustua, Susana E.; Ros, R. M.; Garcia, B.

    2014-01-01

    The Network for Astronomy School Education Project (NASE) was developed in response to the IAU's most recent 10 Years Strategic Plan to increase the efforts of the IAU in schools. NASE's mission is to stimulate teaching astronomy in schools, through professional development of primary and secondary school science teachers in developing and emerging countries. NASE's organizational principle is to build capacity by providing courses for three years in cooperation with a Local Organizing Committee (Local NASE Group). The Local NASE Group consists of 6-8 local university professors and education professional who will promote astronomy activities and organize future courses in subsequent years in their region of their country. NASE philosophy is to introduce low-tech astronomy, and has thus developed an a suite of activities that can be carried out with inexpensive, quotidian materials. Supporting these activities is a text for teachers, plus a complete set of instructional materials for each topic. These materials are available in English and Spanish, with future editions available in Chinese and Portuguese. We describe and discuss NASE activities in Central and South America from 2009 to the present.

  1. Overview of codes and tools for nuclear engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, D.; Pryakhin, A.; Medvedeva, L.

    2017-01-01

    The recent world trends in nuclear education have been developed in the direction of social education, networking, virtual tools and codes. MEPhI as a global leader on the world education market implements new advanced technologies for the distance and online learning and for student research work. MEPhI produced special codes, tools and web resources based on the internet platform to support education in the field of nuclear technology. At the same time, MEPhI actively uses codes and tools from the third parties. Several types of the tools are considered: calculation codes, nuclear data visualization tools, virtual labs, PC-based educational simulators for nuclear power plants (NPP), CLP4NET, education web-platforms, distance courses (MOOCs and controlled and managed content systems). The university pays special attention to integrated products such as CLP4NET, which is not a learning course, but serves to automate the process of learning through distance technologies. CLP4NET organizes all tools in the same information space. Up to now, MEPhI has achieved significant results in the field of distance education and online system implementation.

  2. Education and training in nuclear engineering and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.; Safieh, J.; Giot, M.; Mavko, B.; Sehgal, Raj B.; Schaefer, A.; Van Goethem, G.; D'haeseleer, W.

    2007-01-01

    The need to preserve, enhance or strengthen nuclear knowledge is worldwide recognized since a couple of years. Within the 5th framework program the European Commission supports the European nuclear higher education network. The ENEN contract started on Jan 1, 2002 and lasts for 24 months. The Commission support for this 'accompanying measure' amounts to EUR 197 716. Based upon a year-long extensive exchange of views between the partners of ENEN, consisting of a representative cross section of nuclear academic institutions and research laboratories of the EU-25, a coherent and practicable concept for a European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering has emerged. The concept is compatible with the Bologna philosophy of higher education for academic education in Europe. Pursuing the sustainability of the concept, the ENEN partners organized themselves in a non-profit-making association. Within the 6th framework program, the Commission services favourably evaluated the proposal: 'Nuclear European Platform of Training and University Organisations'. The objectives of the NEPTUNO co-ordination action are to establish a fair dialogue and a strong interaction between the academic and the industrial world and to bring all nuclear education and training activities under a common strategy of the ENEN type. The present proposal schedules for 18 months and the Commission earmarked a financial contribution of EUR 830 619. (author)

  3. On modern needs in nuclear physics and nuclear safety education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tom Loennroth

    2005-01-01

    The teaching of nuclear physics has a long history, particularly after the second world war, and the present author has 20 years of experience of teaching in that field. The research in nuclear physics has made major advances over the years, and the experiments become increasingly sophisticated. However, very often the university literature lags the development, as is, indeed, the case in all physics education. As a remedy of to-day, the didactic aspects are emphasized, especially at a basic level, while the curriculum content is. still left without upgrade. A standard textbook in basic nuclear physics is, while represent more modern theoretical treatises. The latter two, as their headings indicate, do not treat experimental methods, whereas has a presentation that illustrates methods and results with figures and references. However, they are from the 60 s and 70 s, they are old, and therefore cannot attract modern students of today. Consequently, one has the inevitable feeling that modern university teaching in nuclear physics, and the related area of nuclear safety, must be upgraded. A recent report in Finland, concluded that there is not sufficient nuclear safety education, but that on the other hand, it does not necessarily have to be connected with nuclear physics education, although this is recommendable. Further, the present Finnish university law states that 'The mission of the university shall be to promote free research and scientific and artistic education, to provide higher education based on research, and. to educate students to serve their country and humanity. In carrying out their mission, the universities shall interact with the surrounding society and promote the societal impact o research finding and artistic activities'. This mismatch between the curricula and the required 'societal impact' will be discussed, and examples of implications, usually not implemented, will be given. For nuclear physics specifically, the (lack of) connection between

  4. Current challenges for education of nuclear engineers. Beyond nuclear basics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenfelder, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In past decades, curricula for the education of nuclear engineers (either as a major or minor subject) have been well established all over the world. However, from the point of view of a nuclear supplier, recent experiences in large and complex new build as well as modernization projects have shown that important competences required in these projects were not addressed during the education of young graduates. Consequently, in the past nuclear industry has been obliged to either accept long periods for job familiarization, or to develop and implement various dedicated internal training measures. Although the topics normally addressed in nuclear engineering education (like neutron and reactor physics, nuclear materials or thermohydraulics and the associated calculation methods) build up important competences, this paper shows that the current status of nuclear applications requires adaptations of educational curricula. As a conclusion, when academic nuclear engineering curricula start taking into account current competence needs in nuclear industry, it will be for the benefit of the current and future generation of nuclear engineers. They will be better prepared for their future job positions and career perspectives, especially on an international level. The recommendations presented should not only be of importance for the nuclear fission field, but also for the fusion community. Here, the Horizon 2020 Roadmap to Fusion as published in 2012 now is focusing on ITER and on a longer-term development of fusion technology for a future demonstration reactor DEMO. The very challenging work program is leading to a strong need for exactly those skills that are described in this article.

  5. Current challenges for education of nuclear engineers. Beyond nuclear basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, Christian [AREVA GmbH, Offenbach (Germany). Training Center

    2014-07-15

    In past decades, curricula for the education of nuclear engineers (either as a major or minor subject) have been well established all over the world. However, from the point of view of a nuclear supplier, recent experiences in large and complex new build as well as modernization projects have shown that important competences required in these projects were not addressed during the education of young graduates. Consequently, in the past nuclear industry has been obliged to either accept long periods for job familiarization, or to develop and implement various dedicated internal training measures. Although the topics normally addressed in nuclear engineering education (like neutron and reactor physics, nuclear materials or thermohydraulics and the associated calculation methods) build up important competences, this paper shows that the current status of nuclear applications requires adaptations of educational curricula. As a conclusion, when academic nuclear engineering curricula start taking into account current competence needs in nuclear industry, it will be for the benefit of the current and future generation of nuclear engineers. They will be better prepared for their future job positions and career perspectives, especially on an international level. The recommendations presented should not only be of importance for the nuclear fission field, but also for the fusion community. Here, the Horizon 2020 Roadmap to Fusion as published in 2012 now is focusing on ITER and on a longer-term development of fusion technology for a future demonstration reactor DEMO. The very challenging work program is leading to a strong need for exactly those skills that are described in this article.

  6. ENEN's approaches and initiatives for nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safieh, Joseph; De Regge, Peter; Kusumi, Ryoko

    2011-01-01

    The European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN), established in 2003 through the EU Fifth Framework Programme (FP) project, was given a more permanent character by the foundation of the ENEN Association, a legal nonprofit-making body pursuing an instructive and scientific aim. Its main objective is the preservation and further development of expertise in the nuclear fields by higher education and training. This objective is realized through the cooperation between EU universities involved in education and research in nuclear disciplines, nuclear research centers and the nuclear industry. As of May 2009, the ENEN has 47 members in 17 EU countries. Since 2007 the ENEN Association has concluded a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with partners beyond Europe for further cooperation, such as South Africa, Russian Federation and Japan. The ENEN has good collaboration with national networks and international organizations, like Belgian Nuclear Education Network (BNEN) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The ENEN has provided support to its Members for the organization of and participation to selected E and T courses in nuclear fields. Based on the mutual recognition of those courses, the ENEN developed a reference curriculum in nuclear engineering, consisting of a core package of courses and optional substitute courses in nuclear disciplines, to be realized as the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE). From the experience gained through the EMSNE, a European Master of Science in Nuclear Disciplines will be delivered in the near future, extending ENEN's certification to other disciplines such as radiation protection and waste management and disposal. The ENEN-II Coordination Action consolidated and expanded the achievements of the ENEN and the NEPTUNO projects attained by the ENEN in respectively the 5th and 6th Framework Programmes. The objective of the ENEN-II project was to develop the ENEN Association in a sustainable way in the areas

  7. Educational systems - educational qualification of nuclear power plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeger, H.

    1986-01-01

    In this lecture the following common features of education and training systems are described: - description of general school education, vocational training and engineering study programs, - allocation of categories of activities to normal school training backgrounds, - recommendations for educational and training programs required for various positions in nuclear power plants (formal and on-the-job training), - examinations and licences for the personnel at nuclear power plants. (orig./GL)

  8. 11-th International conference Nuclear power safety and nuclear education - 2009. Abstracts. Part 1. Session: Safety of nuclear technology; Innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycle; Nuclear knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The book includes abstracts of the 11-th International conference Nuclear power safety and nuclear education - 2009 (29 Sep - 2 Oct, 2009, Obninsk). Problems of safety of nuclear technology are discussed, innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycles are treated. Abstracts on professional education for nuclear power and industry are presented. Nuclear knowledge management are discussed

  9. Current status nuclear training and education in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsono

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear technology was officially recognized through the setting up Panitia Negara untuk Penyelidikan Radioaktivitet in 1954, and the founding of Dewan Tenaga Atom Nasional and Lembaga Tenaga Atom (National Atomic Energy Board) in 1958 which then further reorganized and named BATAN (National Atomic Energy Agency) in 1964. Since the construction of the first research reactor in 1965, BATAN has been operating 3 research reactors. The application of nuclear technology in research, which was started in 1960's, was followed by application in non energy sectors such as agriculture and industries, and the utilization of radiation and radioisotopes in medical therapy and diagnostic. In 1997, in order to separate the control function and the promotion function of the application of nuclear energy in Indonesia, the Government set up two nuclear administrative agencies, i.e. the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) and the Nuclear Energy Control Board (BAPETEN). To provide well-educated and well-trained personnel in the fields of research, development, and application of nuclear technology, BATAN implementing its education and training program through the ETC (BATAN Education and Training Center) and STTN (Polytechnic Institute of Nuclear Technology), which were set up in 1981 and 1991, respectively. While STTN, formerly known as PATN, offers formal education at D3-level and D4-level in Technophysics and Techno-chemistry, the ETC is responsible for implementing education and training program, mainly in nuclear science and technology. In conducting education and training, ETC cooperates also with other education and training institutions, domestic as well as overseas institutions. ETC has set up a national network of nuclear education and training which involves some state universities and school, such as University of Indonesia, University of Gadjah Mada, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bogor Agriculture Institute, University of Pajajaran, and School of Medical

  10. US nuclear engineering education: Status and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This study, conducted under the auspices of the Energy Engineering Board of the National Research Council, examines the status of and outlook for nuclear engineering education in the United States. The study resulted from a widely felt concern about the downward trends in student enrollments in nuclear engineering, in both graduate and undergraduate programs. Concerns have also been expressed about the declining number of US university nuclear engineering departments and programs, the aging of their faculties, the appropriateness of their curricula and research funding for industry and government needs, the availability of scholarships and research funding, and the increasing ratio of foreign to US graduate students. A fundamental issue is whether the supply of nuclear engineering graduates will be adequate for the future. Although such issues are more general, pertaining to all areas of US science and engineering education, they are especially acute for nuclear engineering education. 30 refs., 12 figs., 20 tabs.

  11. US Nuclear Engineering Education: Status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This study, conducted under the auspices of the Energy Engineering Board of the National Research Council, examines the status of and outlook for nuclear engineering education in the United States. The study, as described in this report resulted from a widely felt concern about the downward trends in student enrollments in nuclear engineering, in both graduate and undergraduate programs. Concerns have also been expressed about the declining number of US university nuclear engineering departments and programs, the ageing of their faculties, the appropriateness of their curricula and research funding for industry and government needs, the availability of scholarships and research funding, and the increasing ratio of foreign to US graduate students. A fundamental issue is whether the supply of nuclear engineering graduates will be adequate for the future. Although such issues are more general, pertaining to all areas of US science and engineering education, they are especially acute for nuclear engineering education. 30 refs., 24 figs., 49 tabs

  12. Thermal hydraulics in undergraduate nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theofanous, T.G.

    1986-01-01

    The intense safety-related research efforts of the seventies in reactor thermal hydraulics have brought about the recognition of the subject as one of the cornerstones of nuclear engineering. Many nuclear engineering departments responded by building up research programs in this area, and mostly as a consequence, educational programs, too. Whether thermal hydraulics has fully permeated the conscience of nuclear engineering, however, remains yet to be seen. The lean years that lie immediately ahead will provide the test. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the author's own educational activity in undergraduate nuclear engineering education over the past 10 yr or so. All this activity took place at Purdue's School of Nuclear Engineering. He was well satisfied with the results and expects to implement something similar at the University of California in Santa Barbara in the near future

  13. Nursing education and the nuclear age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, S.

    1989-01-01

    As reflected in the nursing literature, nurses have only recently begun discussing professional responsibilities for avoidance of nuclear war. The literature of the 1950s and 1960s focused on issues of civil defense. The 1970s were mostly silent, but with the onset of the 1980s a few articles identified the need for the nursing profession to recognize the importance of nuclear war prevention. The responsibility of nursing education for including content about nuclear issues has not been discussed in the professional literature. The author surveyed baccalaureate programs of nursing education to determine whether this lack of discussion was reflected in nursing curricula. Responses indicated that the literature does not adequately reflect the level of activity and interest occurring within nursing education about nuclear issues. Nevertheless, because there is so little discussion in the professional literature, an implicit message is sent that nuclear issues are not of importance and that nurses should not openly address them.24 references

  14. SkyNet: Modular nuclear reaction network library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.

    2017-10-01

    The general-purpose nuclear reaction network SkyNet evolves the abundances of nuclear species under the influence of nuclear reactions. SkyNet can be used to compute the nucleosynthesis evolution in all astrophysical scenarios where nucleosynthesis occurs. Any list of isotopes can be evolved and SkyNet supports various different types of nuclear reactions. SkyNet is modular, permitting new or existing physics, such as nuclear reactions or equations of state, to be easily added or modified.

  15. Field test of wireless sensor network in the nuclear environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, L.; Wang, Q.; Bari, A.; Deng, C.; Chen, D.; Jiang, J.; Alexander, Q.; Sur, B.

    2014-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are appealing options for the health monitoring of nuclear power plants due to their low cost and flexibility. Before they can be used in highly regulated nuclear environments, their reliability in the nuclear environment and compatibility with existing devices have to be assessed. In situ electromagnetic interference tests, wireless signal propagation tests, and nuclear radiation hardness tests conducted on candidate WSN systems at AECL Chalk River Labs are presented. The results are favourable to WSN in nuclear applications. (author)

  16. Field test of wireless sensor network in the nuclear environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L., E-mail: lil@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Wang, Q.; Bari, A. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Deng, C.; Chen, D. [Univ. of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Jiang, J. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Alexander, Q.; Sur, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are appealing options for the health monitoring of nuclear power plants due to their low cost and flexibility. Before they can be used in highly regulated nuclear environments, their reliability in the nuclear environment and compatibility with existing devices have to be assessed. In situ electromagnetic interference tests, wireless signal propagation tests, and nuclear radiation hardness tests conducted on candidate WSN systems at AECL Chalk River Labs are presented. The results are favourable to WSN in nuclear applications. (author)

  17. Facebook, Social Networking, and Business Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Steven A.; Mulligan, Jamie R.; Ishida, Chiharu

    2012-01-01

    Brown (2012) asserts that faculty perceptions of Web 2.0 for teaching will influence its adoption. For example, social media's influence on educational delivery is growing (Hrastinski and Dennon 2012). Zulu et al. (2011) note that business educators are only beginning to understand social networking related to education. We report an exploratory…

  18. Educational Programme in Nuclear Security (Chinese Version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Higher education plays an essential role in nuclear security capacity building. It ensures the availability of experts able to provide the necessary competencies for the effective national nuclear security oversight of nuclear and other radioactive material and to establish and maintain an appropriate nuclear regime in a State. This guide provides both the theoretical knowledge and the practical skills necessary to meet the requirements described in the international framework for nuclear security. Emphasis is placed on the implementation of these requirements and recommendations in States. On the basis of this guide, each university should be able to develop its own academic programme tailored to suit the State's educational needs in the area of nuclear security and to meet national requirements.

  19. Education in nuclear engineering in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slugen, V.

    2005-01-01

    Slovak University of Technology is the largest and also the oldest university of technology in Slovakia. Surely more than 50% of high-educated technicians who work nowadays in nuclear industry have graduated from this university. The Department of Nuclear Physics and Technology of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology as a one of seven faculties of this University feels responsibility for proper engineering education and training for Slovak NPP operating staff. The education process is realised via undergraduate (Bc.), graduate (MSc.) and postgraduate (PhD..) study as well as via specialised training courses in a frame of continuous education system. (author)

  20. The view at nuclear renaissance via actual European and Slovak approach to nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slugen, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, preservation and optimal nuclear knowledge management are becoming a rising challenge worldwide. Many papers and experts talks at different conferences stressed attention on stagnating or decreasing expertise connecting to decreased numbers of graduates, professors or research workers. Several networks were created in the Europe in frame of the 5. and 6. EURATOM Framework Programme accented international collaboration in training and education physics (EUPEN, STEPS) or in nuclear power engineering (ENEN, NEPTUNO). In the Central-European region, there exists a very extensive and also effective international collaboration in nuclear industry and education. Similarly good situation is also among universities and technical high schools in this area. Actually, the Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava has established contacts with many universities abroad in the area of utilization of research and training reactors. One of good examples of international collaboration is ENEN - European Nuclear Education Network Association which resulted in a formation of 'Eugene Wigner Training Courses on Reactor Physics Experiments' running in the last 2 years as a mutual effort of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics (Budapest, Hungary), Czech Technical University (Prague, Czech Republic), University of Technology (Vienna, Austria), and Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (Bratislava, Slovakia). In total 69 participants from different European countries as Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Finland, Italy, Israel, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden and Switzerland took part at these international training courses so far. In the frame of these courses, students of nuclear engineering vivisited three different experimental facilities located at the course organisers' institutes and carried out experimental laboratory practices. The preservation of nuclear knowledge is possible only via effective use of all tools. The high

  1. The view at nuclear renaissance via actual European and Slovak approach to nuclear education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slugen, Vladimir [Slovak University of Technology, FEI STU, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2010-07-01

    In the last decade, preservation and optimal nuclear knowledge management are becoming a rising challenge worldwide. Many papers and experts talks at different conferences stressed attention on stagnating or decreasing expertise connecting to decreased numbers of graduates, professors or research workers. Several networks were created in the Europe in frame of the 5. and 6. EURATOM Framework Programme accented international collaboration in training and education physics (EUPEN, STEPS) or in nuclear power engineering (ENEN, NEPTUNO). In the Central-European region, there exists a very extensive and also effective international collaboration in nuclear industry and education. Similarly good situation is also among universities and technical high schools in this area. Actually, the Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava has established contacts with many universities abroad in the area of utilization of research and training reactors. One of good examples of international collaboration is ENEN - European Nuclear Education Network Association which resulted in a formation of 'Eugene Wigner Training Courses on Reactor Physics Experiments' running in the last 2 years as a mutual effort of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics (Budapest, Hungary), Czech Technical University (Prague, Czech Republic), University of Technology (Vienna, Austria), and Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (Bratislava, Slovakia). In total 69 participants from different European countries as Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Finland, Italy, Israel, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden and Switzerland took part at these international training courses so far. In the frame of these courses, students of nuclear engineering vivisited three different experimental facilities located at the course organisers' institutes and carried out experimental laboratory practices. The preservation of nuclear knowledge is possible only via effective use of all

  2. Wavelet network controller for nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habibiyan, H; Sayadian, A; Ghafoori-Fard, H

    2005-01-01

    Poor control of steam generator water level is the main cause of unexpected shutdowns in nuclear power plants. Particularly at low powers, it is a difficult task due to shrink and swell phenomena and flow measurement errors. In addition, the steam generator is a highly complex, nonlinear and time-varying system and its parameters vary with operating conditions. Therefore, it seems that design of a suitable controller is a necessary step to enhance plant availability factor. The purpose of this paper is to design, analyze and evaluate a water level controller for U-tube steam generators using wavelet neural networks. Computer simulations show that the proposed controller improves transient response of steam generator water level and demonstrate its superiority to existing controllers

  3. Application of artificial neural network to identify nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Peng; Wang Zhe; Li Tiantuo

    2005-01-01

    Applying the neutral network, the article studied the technology of identifying the gamma spectra of the nuclear material in the nuclear components. In the article, theory of the network identifying the spectra is described, and the results of identification of gamma spectra are given.(authors)

  4. Blended Learning in International Nuclear Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Z. [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The spread of nuclear power ambitions beyond the few early-adopter nations requires more globalized education. Two of the learning problems specific to international education are the need for a common instructional language and different cultural styles of learning. Blended learning, a mix of personal interaction between teacher and impersonal computer-based learning, can solve these problems. The new KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School outside Ulsan, Korea is investing heavily in blended learning.

  5. Blended Learning in International Nuclear Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Z.

    2012-01-01

    The spread of nuclear power ambitions beyond the few early-adopter nations requires more globalized education. Two of the learning problems specific to international education are the need for a common instructional language and different cultural styles of learning. Blended learning, a mix of personal interaction between teacher and impersonal computer-based learning, can solve these problems. The new KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School outside Ulsan, Korea is investing heavily in blended learning

  6. Future challenges in nuclear science education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, S.W.

    1993-01-01

    The role of Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society in nuclear science education is reviewed, and suggestions for enhanced involvement in additional areas are presented. Possible new areas of emphasis, such as educational programs for pre-college students and non-scientific public, are discussed. Suggestions for revitalizing the position of radiochemistry laboratories in academic institutions are offered. (author) 7 refs

  7. Education of nuclear engineering in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Yasutomo; Yamamuro, Nobuhiro

    1979-01-01

    The research Committee of Nuclear Engineering Education has two working groups. One group has carried out surveyes on the curriculums of nuclear engineering course of universities in Japan and the activities of graduates in the industrial worlds. The other group conducted an investigation on the present status of energy education in senior high schools. This is an interim report on the activity of the research committee. (author)

  8. Academic nuclear engineering education - the Dutch way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallerbos, E.J.M.; Geemert, R. van

    1997-01-01

    The academic nuclear engineering educational program in the Netherlands aims not only to give students a thorough knowledge of reactor physics but also to train them in practical skills and presentation techniques. These three aspects are important to become a successful nuclear engineer. (author)

  9. Coordinating Space Nuclear Research Advancement and Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Webb, Jonathon A.; Gross, Brian J.; Craft, Aaron E.

    2009-01-01

    The advancement of space exploration using nuclear science and technology has been a goal sought by many individuals over the years. The quest to enable space nuclear applications has experienced many challenges such as funding restrictions; lack of political, corporate, or public support; and limitations in educational opportunities. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) was established at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with the mission to address the numerous challenges and opportunities relevant to the promotion of space nuclear research and education.1 The CSNR is operated by the Universities Space Research Association and its activities are overseen by a Science Council comprised of various representatives from academic and professional entities with space nuclear experience. Program participants in the CSNR include academic researchers and students, government representatives, and representatives from industrial and corporate entities. Space nuclear educational opportunities have traditionally been limited to various sponsored research projects through government agencies or industrial partners, and dedicated research centers. Centralized research opportunities are vital to the growth and development of space nuclear advancement. Coordinated and focused research plays a key role in developing the future leaders in the space nuclear field. The CSNR strives to synchronize research efforts and provide means to train and educate students with skills to help them excel as leaders.

  10. Designing reliable wireless sensor network for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Takeshi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    This study proposes an innovative method for the monitoring the nuclear power plant. In this field, false detection of the trouble, both 'false negative' and 'false positive' will become a serious problem. In the other hand, since nuclear power plant is such a complicated system, wireless is required for implementing into real field. Considering these backgrounds, we propose a new reliable health monitoring system for nuclear power plant. This is based on an idea, 'a network on a network', such as 'wireless global network' on 'local network with self-maintenance function.' (author)

  11. Engineering and science education for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mautner-Markhof, F.

    1988-01-01

    Experience has shown that one of the critical conditions for the successful introduction of a nuclear power programme is the availability of sufficient numbers of personnel having the required education and experience qualifications. For this reason, the introduction of nuclear power should be preceded by a thorough assessment of the relevant capabilities of the industrial and education/training infrastructures of the country involved. The IAEA assists its Member States in a variety of ways in the development of infrastructures and capabilities for engineering and science education for nuclear power. Types of assistance provided by the IAEA to Member States include: Providing information in connection with the establishment or upgrading of academic and non-academic engineering and science education programmes for nuclear power (on the basis of curricula recommended in the Agency's Guidebook on engineering and science education for nuclear power); Expert assistance in setting up or upgrading laboratories and other teaching facilities; Assessing the capabilities and interest of Member States and their institutions/organizations for technical co-operation among countries, especially developing ones, in engineering and science education, as well as its feasibility and usefulness; Preparing and conducting nuclear specialization courses (e.g. on radiation protection) in various Member States

  12. Some thoughts about the relations between education, training and nuclear employment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turpin, L.

    2009-01-01

    This article tackles the question of education and training in nuclear industry. The different sectors of education are considered: I.F.P. school, universities. The question of students exchange as recommended by the European nuclear education network (E.N.E.N.) and as practised by the National Institute for nuclear science and technology (I.N.S.T.N., higher education institution under the joint supervision of the Ministries in charge of education and industry whom vocation is to disseminate the cea knowledge and know how). (N.C.)

  13. Networking for High Energy and Nuclear Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Harvey B.

    2007-07-01

    This report gives an overview of the status and outlook for the world's research networks and major international links used by the high energy physics and other scientific communities, network technology advances on which our community depends and in which we have an increasingly important role, and the problem of the Digital Divide, which is a primary focus of ICFA's Standing Committee on Inter-regional Connectivity (SCIC). Wide area networks of sufficient, and rapidly increasing end-to-end capability are vital for every phase of high energy physicists' work. Our bandwidth usage, and the typical capacity of the major national backbones and intercontinental links used by our field have progressed by a factor of more than 1000 over the past decade, and the outlook is for a similar increase over the next decade. This striking exponential growth trend, outstripping the growth rates in other areas of information technology, has continued in the past year, with many of the major national, continental and transoceanic networks supporting research and education progressing from a 10 Gigabits/sec (Gbps) backbone to multiple 10 Gbps links in their core. This is complemented by the use of point-to-point "light paths" to support the most demanding applications, including high energy physics, in a growing list of cases. As we approach the era of LHC physics, the growing need to access and transport Terabyte-scale and later 10 to 100 Terabyte datasets among more than 100 "Tier1" and "Tier2" centers at universities and laboratories spread throughout the world has brought the key role of networks, and the ongoing need for their development, sharply into focus. Bandwidth itself on an increasing scale is not enough. Realizing the scientific wealth of the LHC and our other major scientific programs depends crucially on our ability to use the bandwidth efficiently and reliably, with reliable high rates of data throughput, and effectively, where many parallel large-scale data

  14. NKM Perspectives of Nuclear Education in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, R.; Jaffar, G.; Haq, S. M. Z.; Khosa, S. U.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Karachi Institute of Power Engineering (KINPOE) and CHASNUPP Centre for Nuclear Training (CHASCENT) are the main institutes providing for the nuclear skilled man power demands of the country’s nuclear technology program. The PIEAS is a public sector university and offers M.Sc. and Ph.D. programmes in nuclear science and technology. The CHASCENT is the training institute which focuses on the training programmes for nuclear power, while the KINPOE offers Master programme in nuclear power engineering, post graduate training programme (PGTP) and Post Diploma Training Program (PDTP) related to nuclear power engineering and technology. The nuclear education programmes and other relevant NKM activities at PIEAS, KINPOE and CHASCENT play a key role in the information management, human resource and competence management. This paper presents the NKM perspective of nuclear education in Pakistan, its continuation and enhancement for the expanding nuclear power programme to meet the country’s energy demands. (author

  15. Nuclear education in Russia : Status, peculiarities, perspectives and international cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kryuchkov, Eduard F.

    2008-01-01

    The paper is devoted to analysis of Russian nuclear education system: its current status, specific features, difficulties and prospects. Russian higher education system in nuclear engineering has been created simultaneously with development of nuclear industry, and the system completely satisfied

  16. A working group for Japanese nuclear data measurement network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yukinobu

    2013-01-01

    A new working group in the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee has been established to make a cooperative network among researchers involved in nuclear data measurements and to discuss the strategy for nuclear data measurements. The working group activities are reported. (author)

  17. Neutral networks and their application in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Fuyu; Li Tiejun; Liao Zhongyue

    1994-01-01

    The neutral theory has been applied to various fields and many achievements have been obtained in many aspects, and the theory has also applied to nuclear engineering. In this paper, a few patterns of neutral networks and application in nuclear power plant is surveyed so as to bring the researching direction to nuclear work's attention at home

  18. Nuclear education and training: cause for concern?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Mankind now enjoys many benefits from nuclear-related technologies. There is, however, growing concern in many OECD countries that nuclear education and training is decreasing, perhaps to problematic levels. This booklet, a summary of the full report, conveys the results of a pioneering survey on nuclear education and training in almost 200 organisations in 16 countries. The current situation is presented and causes for concern are examined. Recommendations are made as to the actions governments, academia and industry must take in order to assure that crucial present requirements are met and future options are not precluded. (authors)

  19. The American nuclear Society's educational outreach programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacha, N.J.

    1994-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society has an extensive program of public educational outreach in the area of nuclear science and technology. A teacher workshop program provides up to five days of hands-on experiments, lectures, field trips, and lesson plan development for grades 6-12 educators. Curriculum materials have been developed for students in grades kindergarten through grade 12. A textbook review effort provides reviews of existing textbooks as well as draft manuscripts and textbook proposals, to ensure that the information covered on nuclear science and technology is accurate and scientifically sound

  20. Virtual nuclear reactor for education of nuclear reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Masashi; Narabayashi, Takashi; Shimazu, Youichiro

    2008-01-01

    As one of projects that were programmed in the cultivation program for human resources in nuclear engineering sponsored by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, the development of a virtual reactor for education of nuclear reactor physics started in 2007. The purpose of the virtual nuclear reactor is to make nuclear reactor physics easily understood with aid of visualization. In the first year of this project, the neutron slowing down process was visualized. The data needed for visualization are provided by Monte Carlo calculations; The flights of the respective neutrons generated by nuclear fissions are traced through a reactor core until they disappear by neutron absorption or slow down to a thermal energy. With this visualization and an attached supplement textbook, it is expected that the learners can learn more clearly the physical implication of neutron slowing process that is mathematically described by the Boltzmann neutron transport equation. (author)

  1. Nuclear energy education scenario around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabas, Roberta de Carvalho; Sabundjian, Gaiane

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear energy has been used as a source of clean energy with many benefits. Nevertheless, it is still addressed with prejudice. The atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II (1945), the Three Mile Island accident (1979), Chernobyl accident (1986), the crash of the cesium-137 in Goiana, Brazil (1987), and the recent accident in Fukushima (2011) may have been responsible for the negative image of nuclear energy. Researches on education have been conducted with students concerning the conceptual and practical issues of nuclear energy. This work aims to review the literature about nuclear energy education around the world in both, elementary school and high school. Since most educational researches on nuclear energy were published after 1980, this literature review covered the researches that have been published since 1980. The data were presented in chronological order. The results from the literature review provided a clear visualization of the global nuclear energy educational scenario, showing that the theme is still addressed with prejudice due to an incorrect view of nuclear energy and a limited view of its benefits. Concerning the science textbooks, the literature reports that the theme should be better addressed, encouraging students to research more about it. The data from this literature review will serve as a reference for a future proposal for a teaching training program for Brazilian science/physics high school teachers using a new teaching approach. (author)

  2. Nuclear energy education scenario around the world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barabas, Roberta de Carvalho; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: praroberta@uol.com.br, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear energy has been used as a source of clean energy with many benefits. Nevertheless, it is still addressed with prejudice. The atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II (1945), the Three Mile Island accident (1979), Chernobyl accident (1986), the crash of the cesium-137 in Goiana, Brazil (1987), and the recent accident in Fukushima (2011) may have been responsible for the negative image of nuclear energy. Researches on education have been conducted with students concerning the conceptual and practical issues of nuclear energy. This work aims to review the literature about nuclear energy education around the world in both, elementary school and high school. Since most educational researches on nuclear energy were published after 1980, this literature review covered the researches that have been published since 1980. The data were presented in chronological order. The results from the literature review provided a clear visualization of the global nuclear energy educational scenario, showing that the theme is still addressed with prejudice due to an incorrect view of nuclear energy and a limited view of its benefits. Concerning the science textbooks, the literature reports that the theme should be better addressed, encouraging students to research more about it. The data from this literature review will serve as a reference for a future proposal for a teaching training program for Brazilian science/physics high school teachers using a new teaching approach. (author)

  3. Educating nuclear engineers at German universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knorr, J.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear technology is a relatively young university discipline. Yet, as a consequence of the declining public acceptance of the peaceful use of nuclear power, its very existence is already being threatened at many universities. However, if Germany needs nuclear power, which undoubtedly is the case, highly qualified, committed experts are required above all. Nuclear technology develops internationally. Consequently, also university education must meet international standards. Generally, university education has been found to be the most effective way of increasing the number of scientific and engineering personnel. Nuclear techniques have meanwhile found acceptance in many other scientific disciplines, thus advancing those branches of science. Teaching needs research; like research in nucelar technology at the national research centers, also the universities are suffering massive financial disadvantages. Research is possible only if outside funds are solicited, which increase dependency and decreases basic research. (orig.) [de

  4. Nuclear engineering education in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    In discussing nuclear engineering education in the United States it is shown that the most critical issue facing the nuclear engineering education community today is enrolment in a time of increasing demand for graduate engineers. Related to the issue of enrolment is support for graduate students, whether it be fellowships, traineeships, or research assistantships. Other issues are those of maintaining a vital faculty in the face of a competitive job market, of maintaining research facilities and developing new ones, and of determining the directions of educational efforts in the future. (U.K.)

  5. NATO Education and Training Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Federated Battle Laboratories Network (CFBLNet) .............................................. 15  5.1  History ...CFBLNet countries, NATO nations and Partners perspective (January 2009) 5.1 History In April 1999, the US made a proposal to the NATO C3 Board to...permanent subscription provides standard access to the: • CFBLNet Blackbone ( IPv4 (IPv6) transport network) • CFBLNet CUE (Unclassified Enclave all

  6. Nuclear engineering education initiative at Ibaraki University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Kunihito; Kanto, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Nobuatsu; Saigusa, Mikio; Kurumada, Akira; Kikuchi, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    With the help of a grant from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Ibaraki University has been engaging for six years in the development and preparation of educational environment on nuclear engineering for each of graduate and undergraduate. Core faculty conducts general services including the design and implementation of curriculum, operational improvement, and implementation of lectures. 'Beginner-friendly introduction for nuclear power education' is provided at the Faculty of Engineering, and 'nuclear engineering education program' at the Graduate School of Science and Engineering. All the students who have interest or concern in the accidents at nuclear power plants or the future of nuclear power engineering have opportunities to learn actively. This university participates in the alliance or association with other universities, builds industry - government - academia cooperation with neighboring institutions such as the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, and makes efforts to promote the learning and development of applied skills related to nuclear engineering through training and study tours at each facility. For example, it established the Frontier Applied Atomic Science Center to analyze the structure and function of materials using the strong neutron source of J-PARC. As the efforts after the earthquake accident, it carried out a radiation survey work in Fukushima Prefecture. In addition, it proposed and practiced the projects such as 'development of methods for the evaluation of transfer/fixation properties and decontamination of radioactive substances,' and 'structure analysis of radioactive substances remaining in soil, litter, and polluted water and its application to the decontamination.' (A.O.)

  7. Toward a Seamless Society: Networking in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambron, Sueann, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This collection of papers includes both presentations at a two-day conference of the Education Advisory Council at Apple Computer which considered information and insights on the use of telecommunications and networking in education, and papers describing other telecommunications projects that have been identified since the council's meeting.…

  8. Citation buidelines for nuclear data retrieved from databases resident at the Nuclear Data Centers Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    The Nuclear Data Centers Network is a world-wide cooperation of nuclear data centers under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Network organizes the task of collecting, compiling, standardizing, storing, assessing, and distributing the nuclear data on an international scale. Information available at the Centers includes bibliographic, experimental, and evaluated databases for nuclear reaction data and for nuclear structure and radioactive decay data. The objective of the Network is to provide the information to users in a convenient, readily-available form. To this end, online data services have been established at three of the centers: the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (NDS), and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank (NEADB). Some information is also available at the NNDC and NEADB World Wide Web sites

  9. The nuclear technology education consortium: an innovative approach to nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Dzh.; Klark, Eh.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report on the Nuclear Technology Education Consortium (NTEC) that includes 12 UK universities and Higher Education Institutes. It was established in 2005 to provide nuclear education and training at the Masters, Diploma, Certificate and Continuing Professional Development (CPD) levels. Module and providers of the NTEC are described (all modules are available in industry-friendly short formats). Students are allowed to select from 22 different modules, taught by experts, covering all aspects of nuclear education and training. It is the acknowledgement by each partner that they cannot deliver the range of modules individually but by cooperating. The NTEC program structure is given [ru

  10. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT). Report of the 1. Coordination Committee meeting including the ANENT Terms of Reference and the Action Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    It was noted that ANENT activities have started and ANENT is operational. The following conclusions are made: 1. Member States representatives are encouraged to contact IAEA TC through their respective official channels to request support for ANENT as a Regional TC Project; 2. Member States are invited to consider hosting one of the next Coordination Committee meetings; 3. The further ANENT activities should take into account the fact that nuclear energy and nuclear applications play equally important roles in Asia; 4. Nuclear safety plays a very important role and is being addressed through the ANSN. The meeting encouraged that ANSN and ANENT work together for synergistic effects. It was agreed that a representative from MINT would take the role of spokesperson of ANENT until the next Coordination Committee meeting

  11. Neural networks and their application to nuclear power plant diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reifman, J.

    1997-01-01

    The authors present a survey of artificial neural network-based computer systems that have been proposed over the last decade for the detection and identification of component faults in thermal-hydraulic systems of nuclear power plants. The capabilities and advantages of applying neural networks as decision support systems for nuclear power plant operators and their inherent characteristics are discussed along with their limitations and drawbacks. The types of neural network structures used and their applications are described and the issues of process diagnosis and neural network-based diagnostic systems are identified. A total of thirty-four publications are reviewed

  12. Learning to Embrace Nuclear Physics through Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avadanei, Camelia

    2010-01-01

    Due to its achievements, nuclear physics is more and more present in life of every member of the society. Its applications in the medical field and in nuclear energy, as well as the advanced research, always pushing the limits of science towards micro cosmos and macro cosmos, are subjects frequently presented in the media. In addition to their invaluable benefits, these achievements involve also particular rules to prevent potential risks. These risks are also underlined by the media, often being presented in an unfriendly manner. Specialists in nuclear physics are familiar with these problems complying with the specific rules in order to reduce risks at insignificant levels. The development of a specific field ('Radiation protection') defining norms and requirements for 'assuring the radiological safety of the workers, population and environment', and its dynamics represent a proof of a responsible attitude regarding nuclear safety. Dedicated international bodies and experts analyze and rigorously evaluate risks in order to draw the right ways of managing activity in the field. The improvement of the formal and informal education of public regarding the real risks of nuclear applications is very important in order to understand and better assimilate some general rules concerning the use of these techniques, as well as for their correct perception, leading to an increase of interest towards nuclear physics. This educational update can be started even from elementary school and continued in each stage of formal education in adapted forms. The task of informing general public is to be carried out mainly by specialists who, unlike 30-40 years ago, can rely on a much more efficient generation of communications' mean. Taking into account the lack of interest for nuclear, an attractive way of presenting the achievements and future possibilities of nuclear physics would contribute to youth orientation towards specific universities in order to become next generation of

  13. Learning to Embrace Nuclear Physics through Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avadanei, Camelia

    2010-01-01

    Due to its achievements, nuclear physics is more and more present in life of every member of the society. Its applications in the medical field and in nuclear energy, as well as the advanced research, always pushing the limits of science towards micro cosmos and macro cosmos, are subjects frequently presented in the media. In addition to their invaluable benefits, these achievements involve also particular rules to prevent potential risks. These risks are also underlined by the media, often being presented in an unfriendly manner. Specialists in nuclear physics are familiar with these problems complying with the specific rules in order to reduce risks at insignificant levels. The development of a specific field ("Radiation protection") defining norms and requirements for "assuring the radiological safety of the workers, population and environment," and its dynamics represent a proof of a responsible attitude regarding nuclear safety. Dedicated international bodies and experts analyze and rigorously evaluate risks in order to draw the right ways of managing activity in the field. The improvement of the formal and informal education of public regarding the real risks of nuclear applications is very important in order to understand and better assimilate some general rules concerning the use of these techniques, as well as for their correct perception, leading to an increase of interest towards nuclear physics. This educational update can be started even from elementary school and continued in each stage of formal education in adapted forms. The task of informing general public is to be carried out mainly by specialists who, unlike 30-40 years ago, can rely on a much more efficient generation of communications' mean. Taking into account the lack of interest for nuclear, an attractive way of presenting the achievements and future possibilities of nuclear physics would contribute to youth orientation towards specific universities in order to become next generation of

  14. Volunteerism: Social Network Dynamics and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajrouch, Kristine J.; Antonucci, Toni C.; Webster, Noah J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives . We examine how changes in social networks influence volunteerism through bridging (diversity) and bonding (spending time) mechanisms. We further investigate whether social network change substitutes or amplifies the effects of education on volunteerism. Methods . Data (n = 543) are drawn from a two-wave survey of Social Relations and Health over the Life Course (SRHLC). Zero-inflated negative binomial regressions were conducted to test competing hypotheses about how changes in social network characteristics alone and in conjunction with education level predict likelihood and frequency of volunteering. Results . Changes in social networks were associated with volunteerism: as the proportion of family members decreased and the average number of network members living within a one-hour drive increased over time, participants reported higher odds of volunteering. The substitution hypothesis was supported: social networks that exhibited more geographic proximity and greater contact frequency over-time compensated for lower levels of education to predict volunteering more hours. Discussion . The dynamic role of social networks and the ways in which they may work through bridging and bonding to influence both likelihood and frequency of volunteering are discussed. The potential benefits of volunteerism in light of longer life expectancies and smaller families are also considered. PMID:25512570

  15. Pickering education centre aids nuclear acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Activities at the new education centre at Pickering are described. The opening of the Nuclear Communications Centre, in 1978, resulting from a search for an effective means of maintaining public acceptance of Ontario Hydro's extensive nuclear power programme. Activities include participation in the interactive computer games, guided tours of educational exhibits including a model of Pickering A generating station, and displays depicting the Candu fuel cycle, outdoor exhibits of renewable energy sources, and tours of the plant. Outside activities include lectures to schools and citizen, business, or professional groups. (U.K.)

  16. Nuclear energy and education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soentono, S.

    1996-01-01

    In the modern society, education and training is a must since without it one is impossible to a part of the society. It is also indispensable since human resource is more important than natural resources to sustain the development. The modern society needs, and is also the product of a very long effort of human race, 'education and training'. Nuclear energy education and trainings, as one of the efforts to enhance the modern society, are currently demanded to assure the quality and reliability of personnel being involved in various kinds, levels, and stages of nuclear industries. These education and trainings are also required to suffice the demand for assurance of the quality and reliability of the products, e.g. nuclear components, systems, installations, other products, techniques, and services. Linking and matching of these education and trainings are also required. In the developing countries, it will be better to start with the non-energy application, e.g. application of isotopes and radiation in various fields. There must be cooperation giving rise to strong links between universities. The mechanism and cooperation should facilitate the character building of nuclear energy man power covering attitudes for pioneering, having scientific tradition and industrial orientated views, considering the safety first toward safety culture, and mastering communication. (J.P.N.)

  17. Nuclear education and information technology in the 21 st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Hristea, Viorel

    2008-01-01

    In the last two decades extensive changes in the information technology occurred. Nuclear education is characterized by a long time formation consisting of graduate background and a period of 4-6 years of direct and specialized formation by community of practice, or other knowledge transfer methods. The paper is intended to analyse the influence of the technology and globalization on the teaching techniques and pedagogy with a focus on Romanian aspects. Some aspects of teaching research connected with the actual changes will be discussed. Also, the networking methods and the sustainable partnership creation in the Romanian context taking into account the harmonization of the universities, research institutes, nuclear industry and other nuclear organizations will be analysed. (authors)

  18. Nuclear power plant fault-diagnosis using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keehoon; Aljundi, T.L.; Bartlett, E.B.

    1992-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been applied to various fields due to their fault and noise tolerance and generalization characteristics. As an application to nuclear engineering, we apply neural networks to the early recognition of nuclear power plant operational transients. If a transient or accident occurs, the network will advise the plant operators in a timely manner. More importantly, we investigate the ability of the network to provide a measure of the confidence level in its diagnosis. In this research an ANN is trained to diagnose the status of the San Onofre Nuclear Generation Station using data obtained from the plant's training simulator. Stacked generalization is then applied to predict the error in the ANN diagnosis. The data used consisted of 10 scenarios that include typical design basis accidents as well as less severe transients. The results show that the trained network is capable of diagnosing all 10 instabilities as well as providing a measure of the level of confidence in its diagnoses

  19. Fifty years experiences in nuclear engineering education at Tokyo Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Yasuhiko; Saito, Masaki; Aritomi, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear engineering education has been initiated in 1957 at the graduate school of Tokyo Institute of Technology. Educational activities have been conducted for fifty years under the support of the Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors. In the past fifty years, about 1000 Master students and 200 Doctoral students and 200 Doctoral students graduated from our Nuclear Engineering Department at Tokyo Institute of Technology. Many of them found their jobs in nuclear industries and institutes. International course of nuclear engineering was initiated in 1994, and so far about 90 students from 15 overseas countries have graduated from our Master and Doctoral Programs. In 2003, our proposal of 'Innovative Nuclear Energy System for the Sustainable World' was adopted as the Center of Excellent Program sponsored by Ministry of Education, Science and Technology. Recently a collaborative education network has been developed among Kanazawa University, Fukui University, Ibaraki University, Okayama University, Tokyo Institute of Technology and Japan Atomic Energy Agency. (author)

  20. Providing nuclear pharmacy education via the internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilliard, N.L.; Pickett, M.; Thaxton, P.; Norenberg, J.P.; Wittstrom, K.; Rhodes, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: (1) Increase the nuclear pharmacy education opportunities across the United States and the around the world. (2) Establish collaborative educational agreements between colleges of pharmacy and local nuclear pharmacy preceptors. (3) Decrease the shortage of radio pharmacists. 4) Provide nuclear education courses to supplement existing educational programs. Materials and Methods: Nuclear Education Online (www.nuclearonline.org) is an educational consortium between the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and the University of New Mexico. The faculty members from each institution have collaborated to design an online didactic curriculum and experiential training materials. The didactic portion is delivered via WebCT (www.webct.com) and involves interactive studies with faculty from UNM and UAMS. The student-centered curriculum is based on the APhA Syllabus for Nuclear Pharmacy Training and includes interactive web-based course materials, discussion groups, preceptor-led activities and problem-based learning (PBL) case studies based upon actual clinical studies and real-life pharmacy situations. Individual units of study include Nuclear Physics, Radiation Biology, Radiation Safety, Instrumentation, and Radiochemistry/Radiopharmacology. Students can begin the program at anytime. Once a cohort of students is established, the students proceed through the PBL cases, working interactively as a group. Results: Since June 2001, over 26 students have completed the 10-week certificate program. These students have been located across the U.S. and in Saudi Arabia. Fifteen students have completed individual courses in nuclear physics and instrumentation through colleges of pharmacy course offerings using the NEO faculty as instructors. Student evaluations revealed that 78% of the students thought that the NEO program was a 'great way to learn' (highest rating). When comparing PBL to a traditional classroom setting, two thirds of students preferred problem

  1. Nuclear education and training related issues: Needs and lessons learned in national and international context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubomir, Sklenka

    2010-01-01

    The paper is focused on nuclear education and training at research reactors and universities. Lack of experts and high educated and skilled professionals in nuclear engineering in the world caused by fast aging of the NPPs and research reactors staff and expected ''nuclear renaissance'' brings a new needs to the universities and research reactors. During the last few years some new trends in nuclear education became visible. Customers expect high quality nuclear education in wide range of knowledge and the complex services, which forces universities and research reactors to bring new challenges in the domain of education and training. State-of-the-art experimental equipment and methodologies specifically developed for the education, networking and dose cooperation between universities and research reactors at national and international levels, and sharing the experimental facilities are the trends which can be noticed today all over the world. Research reactors are suitable for education of students at all academic levels (BSc, MSc and PhD) not only in nuclear engineering, but also in various non-nuclear engineering studies (power engineering, electrical engineering, natural sciences, medical sciences, physical sciences, etc.). An effective way on how to provide the education and training at the research reactor should be started by evaluation of the initial students' background and then adaptation of the educational methodology to that level. Networking and closer co-operation between universities at national and international level in nuclear education started in late nineties in Europe and within a few years several networks were establish. The European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) as an European regional network with more than 40 European universities was inspiration for creating national networks in Europe (e.g. Belgium, UK, Czech Republic, etc.) and Non-European regional networks (Asia, North America, etc.). Research reactors play an important role in all

  2. Creation, organizing and development of the French nuclear documentation network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergnes, Gisele; Cheron, Christiane; Guilloux, Raymond

    1974-01-01

    This historical account covers the creation of the French nuclear documentation network, the preliminary research, aims, structures and first accomplishments of the Association Francaise de Documentation et d'Information Nucleaire (AFDIN) (French Association of Nuclear Documentation and Information) and its relations with the international system INIS [fr

  3. Nuclear education and training: cause for concern?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power plants have played an important role in electricity generation in the OECD member countries, contributing an average 24% over the past few years. One major criterion for the success of this technology has always been the education and training of competent personnel in all sectors of nuclear development and application. The high level of competence and know-how reached must be maintained in the future. Qualified personnel is required for running existing plants, building new nuclear power plants - at present especially in Japan and Korea - and for all activities associated with supply and waste management, decommissioning, and for all applications of nuclear technology above and beyond energy generation. The number of university graduates in the OECD countries is decreasing alarmingly, among other reasons because of the diminished attractiveness of these courses as a consequence of the reduced number of nuclear engineering courses offered in curricula. A broad-based program of disseminating basic information in nuclear technology in university curricula is urgently required. In industry, internal advanced and in-career training measures and programs are offered to ensure broad-based qualification as well as specialization in nuclear subjects of the staff, as demands are rising and flexibility is required of all staff members. This development implies that governments in particular are called upon to ensure, by long-term planning, that nuclear competence is preserved in science and research, in industry and applications, as part of their areas of responsibility and competence. Note: The full text of the study on which this contribution is based has been published under the title of 'Nuclear Education and Training: Cause for Concern?' by OECD-NEA, Paris, 2000, 124 pages. (orig.) [de

  4. Nuclear Community in network; La comunidad nuclear en la Red

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, E.

    2014-02-01

    The internet has revolutionized the ways of communication and many companies/ organizations have adapted to the change but others have not, or have done it halfway. This presentation is a review of the main characteristics of virtual communities and their typology. The status of the Nuclear Online Community, both pro nuclear and antinuclear is analysed , and their main similarities and differences are discussed. The Pro nuclear Online Community is formed gradually. This presentation attempts to define some ways to increase the scope of the Community and encourage greater dissemination of the characteristics of nuclear energy. (Author)

  5. Doctoral education in the nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguez, E.

    2013-01-01

    Doctoral education is a major priority for European universities. In the context of the Bologna Process the importance of doctoral education as the third cycle of higher education and the first stage of a young researchers career, and thus in linking the European Higher Education and Research Areas, was first highlighted in the 2003 Berlin Report. The core component of doctoral training is the advancement of knowledge through original research. considering the need for structured doctoral programs and the need for transparent supervision and assessment, we note that the normal workload of the third cycle in most countries would correspond 3-4 years full time. This is spirit of the new Spanish Doctoral Law. Then, universities should ensure that their doctoral programmes promote interdisciplinary training and the development of transferable skills, thus meeting the needs of the wider employment market. We need to achieve and overall increase in the numbers of doctoral candidates taking up research careers as early stage researchers and also increase the employability as a normal way as it is the case of other advance countries. In Spain, universities with doctoral nuclear programmes and the CIEMAT, with the sponsorship of the nuclear sector, a doctoral school in nuclear science and engineering should be created to enhance the research careers of Young students for the future of nuclear activities in Spain. (Author)

  6. The changing face of nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear engineering education in the US is in a near-crisis situation. Most academic programs are small with limited enrollments and faculty. Some of these programs are being absorbed into larger academic units, while others are being terminated. The number of identifiable academic programs has dropped dramatically over the last several years, and there is genuine concern that this downward trend will continue. The recent report by the National Academy of Sciences highlights the problems, needs, and prospects for nuclear engineering education in this country. At the same time, some programs appear to be relatively healthy and somewhat secure. A closer look at these programs indicates that there has been an evolution in the approach taken by these survivors toward both their academic and research programs. This paper discusses the approaches taken at Texas A and M University over the last 8 to 10 years to strengthen the Department of Nuclear Engineering

  7. Nuclear data newsletter. No. 20. Nuclear structure and decay data network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This special issue of the Nuclear Data Newsletter dated November 1994 gives information on the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Network established in 1974 under the auspices of the IAEA and comprising 17 laboratories and universities in 10 countries. The procedures for online access to US National Nuclear Data Center, NEA Data Bank in Paris and IAEA Nuclear Data Section in Vienna are presented

  8. Nuclear data newsletter. No. 20. Nuclear structure and decay data network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    This special issue of the Nuclear Data Newsletter dated November 1994 gives information on the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Network established in 1974 under the auspices of the IAEA and comprising 17 laboratories and universities in 10 countries. The procedures for online access to US National Nuclear Data Center, NEA Data Bank in Paris and IAEA Nuclear Data Section in Vienna are presented.

  9. Development of Broadband Nuclear Safety Data Network (B-NSDN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Gwang Seop; Kim, Dong Hoon; Park, Gi Yong

    2011-01-01

    Recently as introducing digital safety system in nuclear power plant, more data transmission capacity is required. Bandwidth of existing communication network is about a few Mbps. Thus data transmission quantity in recently digital safety system is beyond existing communication network's capacity. In this paper, new protocol that is suitable for safety system communication network is designed. FPGA based communication system is implemented. As result of test, effective bandwidth of B-NSDN is about 20Mbps

  10. The design of nuclear radiation measuring instrument of embedded network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huaiqiang; Ge Liangquan; Xiong Shengqing

    2009-01-01

    The design and realization of nuclear radiation measuring instrument is introduced. Due to the current nuclear instrument often used serial interface to communicate the PC, it is widely used for simple design and easy operation. However, as the demand of remote data acquisition and the call of sharing resources, the design of embedded the TCP/IP protocol stack into MCU, it may send the nuclear signal in Internet. Some devices that link each other with the network can be networked. The design is not only realizing remote data acquisition and sharing resources, but also reducing costs and improving the maintainability of the system. (authors)

  11. Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Bernard

    2010-12-13

    The decision to implement the Innovation in Nuclear Infrastructure and Engineering Program (INIE) was an important first step towards ensuring that the United States preserves its worldwide leadership role in the field of nuclear science and engineering. Prior to INIE, university nuclear science and engineering programs were waning, undergraduate student enrollment was down, university research reactors were being shut down, while others faced the real possibility of closure. For too long, cutting edge research in the areas of nuclear medicine, neutron scattering, radiochemistry, and advanced materials was undervalued and therefore underfunded. The INIE program corrected this lapse in focus and direction and started the process of drawing a new blueprint with positive goals and objectives that supports existing as well the next generation of educators, students and researchers.

  12. Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, John

    2010-01-01

    The decision to implement the Innovation in Nuclear Infrastructure and Engineering Program (INIE) was an important first step towards ensuring that the United States preserves its worldwide leadership role in the field of nuclear science and engineering. Prior to INIE, university nuclear science and engineering programs were waning, undergraduate student enrollment was down, university research reactors were being shut down, while others faced the real possibility of closure. For too long, cutting edge research in the areas of nuclear medicine, neutron scattering, radiochemistry, and advanced materials was undervalued and therefore underfunded. The INIE program corrected this lapse in focus and direction and started the process of drawing a new blueprint with positive goals and objectives that supports existing as well the next generation of educators, students and researchers.

  13. Nuclear education in Russia: Status, peculiarities, problems and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onykiy, B.N.; Kryuchkov, E.F.

    2005-01-01

    The paper is devoted to analysis of Russian nuclear education system: its current status, specific features, difficulties and prospects. Russian higher education system in nuclear engineering has been created simultaneously with the development of nuclear industry, and the system completely satisfied all industrial demands for the specialists of different qualification levels. For the past several decades, nuclear education has lost its attractiveness to young people. The paper discusses the actions to be undertaken for reversing the situation. The paper underlines particularly the special role of international collaboration and all-European integration of nuclear educational programmes for further development of nuclear education all over the world. (author)

  14. Network of educational investigation: Teaching innovatio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana de Pablo Redondo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The new educational reality, with the introduction of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA; and new requirements for education require a rethinking of the teaching process, which will use new technologies as key instruments. However, the concept of educational innovation goes beyond the widespread use of Information Technologies (IT. Structural changes are needed in educational institutions, which must be reorganized according to a new paradigm.This paper presents the strategic transformation developed by the National University of Distance Education (UNED; which involves the introduction of new instruments, new methodologies for current and prospective students and a new network organizational structure that facilitates global access to content and new methodologies. We emphasize Teaching Innovation Network, with special attention to the Educational Innovation in Finance. It shows a real example of combination of institutional change and educational initiatives. It combines efforts towards a better service and attention to students and the rest of the university community. And last, but not least, this new paradigm it is not only feasible but efficient because improvements outweigh organizational implications and economic costs

  15. Nuclear education in Russia. Status, peculiarities, perspectives and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryuchkov, Eduard F.

    2008-01-01

    The paper is devoted to analysis of Russian nuclear education system: its current status, specific features, difficulties and prospects. Russian higher education system in nuclear engineering has been created simultaneously with development of nuclear industry, and the system completely satisfied all industrial demands for the specialists of different qualification level. The specific features of PhD level (doctoral program) of education in Russia are discussed. The paper underlines particularly a special role of international collaboration in the field of nuclear education for further development of nuclear education all over the world. Some examples of international cooperation in the frames of new educational programs development are considered. (author)

  16. Qualitative exploration of centralities in municipal science education networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von der Fehr, Ane; Sølberg, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the social nature of educational change by conducting a social network analysis of social networks involving stakeholders of science education from teachers to political stakeholders. Social networks that comprise supportive structures for development of science education ar...... of science education, especially if they are aware of their own centrality and are able to use their position intentionally for the benefit of science education.......This article examines the social nature of educational change by conducting a social network analysis of social networks involving stakeholders of science education from teachers to political stakeholders. Social networks that comprise supportive structures for development of science education...... are diverse and in order to understand how municipal stakeholders may support such development, we explored four different municipal science education networks (MSE networks) using three different measures of centrality. The centrality measures differed in terms of what kind of stakeholder functions...

  17. Social networking policies in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Blake; Culley, Joan M; Hein, Laura C; Williams, Amber; Tavakoli, Abbas S

    2014-03-01

    Social networking use has increased exponentially in the past few years. A literature review related to social networking and nursing revealed a research gap between nursing practice and education. Although there was information available on the appropriate use of social networking sites, there was limited research on the use of social networking policies within nursing education. The purpose of this study was to identify current use of social media by faculty and students and a need for policies within nursing education at one institution. A survey was developed and administered to nursing students (n = 273) and nursing faculty (n = 33). Inferential statistics included χ², Fisher exact test, t test, and General Linear Model. Cronbach's α was used to assess internal consistency of social media scales. The χ² result indicates that there were associations with the group and several social media items. t Test results indicate significant differences between student and faculty for average of policies are good (P = .0127), policies and discipline (P = .0315), and policy at the study school (P = .0013). General Linear Model analyses revealed significant differences for "friend" a patient with a bond, unprofessional posts, policy, and nursing with class level. Results showed that students and faculty supported the development of a social networking policy.

  18. Consolidating African Research and Education Networking ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Consolidating African Research and Education Networking (CORENA) - Phase I. African universities and research institutions possess significant human capacity, but their contribution to national human development as well as their intellectual property output is still very limited. A major cause of this is lack of easy and ...

  19. Social Networking: A Collaborative Open Educational Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toetenel, Lisette

    2014-01-01

    Studies undertaken since the introduction of Web 2.0 have focussed mainly on open educational resources (OERs) such as email, blogging and virtual learning environments. No consistent efforts have been undertaken to study the use of social networking sites as a tool for learning in the second language classroom. This study examined the use of…

  20. Using Citation Network Analysis in Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yonjoo; Park, Sunyoung

    2012-01-01

    Previous reviews in the field of Educational Technology (ET) have revealed some publication patterns according to authors, institutions, and affiliations. However, those previous reviews focused only on the rankings of individual authors and institutions, and did not provide qualitative details on relations and networks of scholars and scholarly…

  1. Data bank for nuclear-physical studies in educational facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boboshin, I.N.; Varlamov, V.V.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Kapitonov, I.M.; Lenskaya, N.A.; Surgutanov, V.V.; Khoronenko, A.A.; Chernyaev, A.P.

    1986-01-01

    Purposes and tasks of nuclear data Centers of the USSR Ministry of Education are discussed in short. Files of both bibliographic and factographic nuclear-physical data widely used with the Centres to provide the state organizations and scientists, first of all educational facilities, with nuclear data to increase effectiveness of fundamental and applied investigations and educational process are described

  2. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT). Report of the IAEA regional workshop on the development of a web-portal for ANENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The report contains the status of the development of anent web-portal, the country evaluation of the web-portal, the summary evaluation and suggested preparation of an operation system for anent web-portal, suggestions on upgrading of anent web-portal (including the systematic connection to other web portals, the improvement on the content, E/Cyber learning, display of the periodic review, user groups and mailing list). The workshop participants have concluded that, in general, the ANENT web-portal developed by GA (Group Activity) 1 coordinator is considered as appropriate and user friendly as the infrastructure for promoting, managing and preserving nuclear knowledge and facilitating the ANENT Group Activities. ANENT is one of the mechanisms to enhance Technical Cooperation amongst Developing Countries and an initiative for Knowledge Management Practice in the region. The developed ANENT Web portal is an important platform to facilitate the fellowship-training placement of fellows not only under the IAEA Technical Cooperation Fellowship and Training Program but also for other regional and national programs in nuclear science and technology. For revising the web-portal in the short term, a number of comments were provided by the participants. Some of them were already implemented in the current version of web-portal during the workshop. The operation management system was prepared, which will be exercised until it is submitted to the 2nd Coordination Committee Meeting for approval and further possible changes. The prepared system covers mode of operation, operation management activities, responsibilities and operation management process: KAERI will designate a web-portal system administrator and each member country will nominate a data provider. For security, a back up system will be established. An alternative access control system was suggested for consideration in the 2nd Coordination Committee meeting in order to attract the general users providing them more

  3. Nuclear energy education and training in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In its continuing use of nuclear power, France faces numerous challenges, including the operation and maintenance of its existing array of reactors, waste management, the decommissioning of obsolete reactors, and research and development for future nuclear systems. All of these efforts must recognize and conform to international requirements. These activities mean that all participants in the French nuclear industry must continually update their approaches and skills, with respect to both domestic and worldwide nuclear power development. This requirement calls for the hiring and training of thousands of scientists and engineers each year in France and its partner or customer countries. Over the next ten years, domestic and international nuclear power activities in France will call for the recruitment of about 13,000 engineers with Master of Science or Ph.D. degrees, and 10,000 science technicians and operators with Bachelor of Science degrees. The chief employers will be EDF, AREVA, GDF-Suez, national agencies such as the Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs (ANDRA), sub-contractors, and R and D agencies such as the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), and the technical safety organization, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN). France has made a commitment to support countries that are ready to create the human, institutional, and technical conditions required to establish a civilian nuclear energy programme that meets all the requirements of safety, security, non-proliferation and environmental protection for present and future generations. These efforts are conducted through the France International Nuclear Agency (AFNI). In response to the need for competence-building in nuclear energy production, France now offers training opportunities in both French and English education programmes. Partnerships created by French nuclear energy participants and by AFNI can provide dedicated programmes

  4. Local-area networks in nuclear physics (survey)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foteev, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    The design fundamentals, comparative characteristics, and possibilities of local-area networks as applied to physics experiments are examined. The example of Ethernet is used to explain the operation of local networks, and the results of a study of their functional characteristics are presented. Examples of operational local networks in nuclear physics research and atomic engineering are given: the Japan Research Institute of Atomic Energy, the University of California, and Los Alamos National Laboratory; atomic power plant control in Japan; DECnet and Fastbus; network developments at the Siberian Branch of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR and at the Laboratory of Neutron Physics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research; and others. It is shown that local networks are important means that considerably increase productivity in data processing

  5. Understanding and education of nuclear power development issues in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jing

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the introduction of nuclear power to China; the understanding of nuclear power in China, education of nuclear power among chinese people. Through such efforts of The Chinese Nuclear Association the Chinese people already have the basic knowledge and support the nuclear power in general. But there are about fifty percent of people who do not know the nuclear power stations in China and thirty-six percent who do not know the benefit of nuclear power because of the vast and different education level in some undeveloped rural areas where the education can not reach

  6. Targeted initiatives. Support for nuclear engineering education in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutteridge, John

    2001-01-01

    Recruitment and education of a new generation of nuclear engineers stands to benefit in the USA from a range of programmes involving governmental bodies, universities, and industry groups. They are part of efforts to attract more students to consider and prepare for careers in the nuclear industry, and to provide financial support for nuclear research and education. Career prospects in the nuclear field are brightening. The demand for nuclear engineers and nuclear trained personnel is on the rise as the new century opens. During the past year several studies were completed in an attempt to ascertain the problems in nuclear engineering education and define initiatives to address these problems

  7. Asia nuclear-test-ban network for nuclear non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Nobuo; Kokaji, Lisa; Ichimasa, Sukeyuki

    2010-01-01

    In Global Center of Excellence Program of The University of Tokyo, Non- Proliferation Study Committee by the members of nuclear industries, electricity utilities, nuclear energy institutes and universities has initiated on October 2008 from the viewpoints of investigating a package of measures for nuclear non-proliferation and bringing up young people who will support the near-future nuclear energy system. One of the non-proliferation issues in the Committee is the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Objective of this treaty is to cease all nuclear weapon test explosions and all other nuclear explosion. This purpose should be contributed effectively to the political stability of the Asian region by continuous efforts to eliminate the nuclear weapons. In the Committee, by extracting several issues related to the CTBT, conception of 'Asia nuclear-test-ban network for nuclear non-proliferation' has been discussed with the aim of the nuclear-weapon security in Asian region, where environmental nuclear-test monitoring data is mainly treated and utilized. In this paper, the conception of the 'network' is presented in detail. (author)

  8. Research-based approaches to nuclear education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donev, J.M.K.C., E-mail: jason.donev@ucalgary.ca [Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Carpenter, Y., E-mail: ycarpenter@gmail.com [Univ.ty of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Teaching nuclear power requires an expert to communicate a significant number of abstract concepts from diverse disciplines, and assemble these into a larger intellectual framework for the students. Scholarly education research, particularly in individual science disciplines, has provided significant advances in teaching core subject material by breaking away from traditional lecturing. Thus far, however,little work has applied these results to introductory nuclear power classes. This paper explores a method of engaging introductory nuclear students deeply by using a combination of Socratic and mastery methods of teaching. Students develop conceptual understanding of the material through the group work and the use of diverse resources, including textbooks, online references, and computer models that encourage free exploration of these concepts. Marks have improved considerably, and students engage with the material at a significantly deeper level than in previous lecture-based iterations of this course. (author)

  9. Research-based approaches to nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donev, J.M.K.C.; Carpenter, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching nuclear power requires an expert to communicate a significant number of abstract concepts from diverse disciplines, and assemble these into a larger intellectual framework for the students. Scholarly education research, particularly in individual science disciplines, has provided significant advances in teaching core subject material by breaking away from traditional lecturing. Thus far, however,little work has applied these results to introductory nuclear power classes. This paper explores a method of engaging introductory nuclear students deeply by using a combination of Socratic and mastery methods of teaching. Students develop conceptual understanding of the material through the group work and the use of diverse resources, including textbooks, online references, and computer models that encourage free exploration of these concepts. Marks have improved considerably, and students engage with the material at a significantly deeper level than in previous lecture-based iterations of this course. (author)

  10. Nuclear I and C research and education under UNENE program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, J.

    2006-01-01

    Univ. Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE) is a not-for-profit organization. It is a unique industry - Univ. alliance in carrying out research to support Canadian nuclear industries. At this time, there are six major research areas in this network. One of them is Control, Instrumentation, and Electrical Systems for Nuclear Power plants. In this paper, a brief description of the structure and research activities of nuclear I and C at the Univ. of Western Ontario is provided. (authors)

  11. Nuclear engineering education in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    The critical issue facing the nuclear engineering education community today is first and foremost enrollment in a time of increasing demand for graduate engineers. Related to the issue of enrollment is support for graduate students, whether it be fellowships, traineeships, or research assistantships. Other issues are those of maintaining a vital faculty in the face of competitive job market, of maintaining research facilities and developing new ones, and last and certainly not least that of determining the directions of our educational efforts in the future. These issues are examined in the paper. (author)

  12. Scalable Video Streaming in Wireless Mesh Networks for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Wang, Xinheng; Zhao, Liqiang

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a video streaming system for education based on a wireless mesh network is proposed. A wireless mesh network is a self-organizing, self-managing and reliable intelligent network, which allows educators to deploy a network quickly. Video streaming plays an important role in this system for multimedia data transmission. This new…

  13. Network learning as an educational principle in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijf, de M.; Stobbelaar, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    The traditional way of educating nature management students, in which students are trained to solve relatively simple and technical problems, is no longer sufficient. Societies are changing towards a network society, which makes nature management more complex. This asks for new competences and new

  14. Nuclear engineering education in italian universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulla, S.; Panella, B.; Ravetto, P.

    2011-01-01

    The paper illustrates the evolution and the present situation of the university-level nuclear engineering education in Italy. The problems connected with the need of qualified faculty in view of a dramatic increase of students is pointed out. A short description of the programs at present available at Italian universities is also presented, together with some statistics referred to Politecnico di Torino. The mathematical and computation content of each programs is also analyzed. (author)

  15. A survey on the establishment of nuclear data network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J.; Chang, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    In Korea, there is a steady increase in the use of nuclear data due to diversification and activation of nuclear R and D activities, but effort toward construction of domestic Nuclear Data Network (NDN) is laid just in the beginning stage. A questionnaire survey of nuclear data users'opinion on a scheme of NDN establishment was, therefore, conducted for promoting the efficient production, evaluation and utilization of nuclear data. The survey was carried out through internet and mail, and 233 users of nuclear data responded the questionnaire. The survey results showed that most of nuclear data users (89% of respondents) perceived the necessity of NDN. The 50% of respondents preferred a nuclear data users' study-group for the establishment of NDN, while 42% preferred an operation of NDN as part of research and scientific activities. The 86% of respondents answered that KAERI could be a proper organization for the establishment and operation of NDN center. The respondents also answered that major considerations taken into account in the establisment of NDN should be as follows; construction of database system of nuclear data (38%), information share among nuclear data users (36%) and in-depth research on nuclear data production and evaluation (25%) and so on. Finally, the survey results showed that major functions of NDN center should be (1) share of nuclear data information among users (80% of respondents), (2) an intergrated management of imported or acquisited nuclear data abroad (78%), (3) production and evaluation of nuclear data (73%), and (4) support of nuclear data untilization (67%). (author)

  16. SkyNet: A Modular Nuclear Reaction Network Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.

    2017-12-01

    Almost all of the elements heavier than hydrogen that are present in our solar system were produced by nuclear burning processes either in the early universe or at some point in the life cycle of stars. In all of these environments, there are dozens to thousands of nuclear species that interact with each other to produce successively heavier elements. In this paper, we present SkyNet, a new general-purpose nuclear reaction network that evolves the abundances of nuclear species under the influence of nuclear reactions. SkyNet can be used to compute the nucleosynthesis evolution in all astrophysical scenarios where nucleosynthesis occurs. SkyNet is free and open source, and aims to be easy to use and flexible. Any list of isotopes can be evolved, and SkyNet supports different types of nuclear reactions. SkyNet is modular so that new or existing physics, like nuclear reactions or equations of state, can easily be added or modified. Here, we present in detail the physics implemented in SkyNet with a focus on a self-consistent transition to and from nuclear statistical equilibrium to non-equilibrium nuclear burning, our implementation of electron screening, and coupling of the network to an equation of state. We also present comprehensive code tests and comparisons with existing nuclear reaction networks. We find that SkyNet agrees with published results and other codes to an accuracy of a few percent. Discrepancies, where they exist, can be traced to differences in the physics implementations.

  17. Nuclear power plant monitoring method by neural network and its application to actual nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabeshima, Kunihiko; Suzuki, Katsuo; Shinohara, Yoshikuni; Tuerkcan, E.

    1995-11-01

    In this paper, the anomaly detection method for nuclear power plant monitoring and its program are described by using a neural network approach, which is based on the deviation between measured signals and output signals of neural network model. The neural network used in this study has three layered auto-associative network with 12 input/output, and backpropagation algorithm is adopted for learning. Furthermore, to obtain better dynamical model of the reactor plant, a new learning technique was developed in which the learning process of the present neural network is divided into initial and adaptive learning modes. The test results at the actual nuclear reactor shows that the neural network plant monitoring system is successfull in detecting in real-time the symptom of small anomaly over a wide power range including reactor start-up, shut-down and stationary operation. (author)

  18. Refinement of nuclear safety education reinforcing technical succession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokobori, Seiichi

    2008-01-01

    In April 2008, Musashi Institute of Technology established another faculty, the Faculty of Nuclear Safety Engineering, to educate students for nuclear engineering to meet the demands of personnel for nuclear business. At this new faculty, students mainly obtain professional knowledge and skills related to nuclear safety issues. This article described refinement of nuclear safety education by reinforcing technical succession topics, such as Rankine cycle, fission, two-phase flow, defense in depth in safety. LOCA/ECCS, seismic effects, reactor maintenance. (T. Tanaka)

  19. Potential applications of neural networks to nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Application of neural networks to the operation of nuclear power plants is being investigated under a US Department of Energy sponsored program at the University of Tennessee. Projects include the feasibility of using neural networks for the following tasks: diagnosing specific abnormal conditions, detection of the change of mode of operation, signal validation, monitoring of check valves, plant-wide monitoring using autoassociative neural networks, modeling of the plant thermodynamics, emulation of core reload calculations, monitoring of plant parameters, and analysis of plant vibrations. Each of these projects and its status are described briefly in this article. The objective of each of these projects is to enhance the safety and performance of nuclear plants through the use of neural networks

  20. Nuclear-fuel-cycle education: Module 1. Nuclear fuel cycle overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckhoff, N.D.

    1981-07-01

    This educational module is an overview of the nuclear-fule-cycle. The overview covers nuclear energy resources, the present and future US nuclear industry, the industry view of nuclear power, the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation program, the Union of Concerned Scientists view of the nuclear-fuel-cycle, an analysis of this viewpoint, resource requirements for a model light water reactor, and world nuclear power considerations

  1. Building a Global Ocean Science Education Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scowcroft, G. A.; Tuddenham, P. T.; Pizziconi, R.

    2016-02-01

    It is imperative for ocean science education to be closely linked to ocean science research. This is especially important for research that addresses global concerns that cross national boundaries, including climate related issues. The results of research on these critical topics must find its way to the public, educators, and students of all ages around the globe. To facilitate this, opportunities are needed for ocean scientists and educators to convene and identify priorities and strategies for ocean science education. On June 26 and 27, 2015 the first Global Ocean Science Education (GOSE) Workshop was convened in the United States at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. The workshop, sponsored by the Consortium for Ocean Science Exploration and Engagement (COSEE) and the College of Exploration, had over 75 participants representing 15 nations. The workshop addressed critical global ocean science topics, current ocean science research and education priorities, advanced communication technologies, and leveraging international ocean research technologies. In addition, panels discussed elementary, secondary, undergraduate, graduate, and public education across the ocean basins with emphasis on opportunities for international collaboration. Special presentation topics included advancements in tropical cyclone forecasting, collaborations among Pacific Islands, ocean science for coastal resiliency, and trans-Atlantic collaboration. This presentation will focus on workshop outcomes as well as activities for growing a global ocean science education network. A summary of the workshop report will also be provided. The dates and location for the 2016 GOES Workshop will be announced. See http://www.coexploration.net/gose/index.html

  2. EDUCATIONAL NETWORKING: HUMAN VIEW TO CYBER DEFENSE

    OpenAIRE

    Oleksandr Yu. Burov

    2016-01-01

    Networks play more and more important role for human life and activity, both in critical occupations (aviation, power industry, military missions etc.), and in everyday life (home computers, education, leisure). Interaction between human and other elements of human-machine system have changed, because they coincide in the information habitat. Human-system integration has reached new level of defense needs. The paper will introduce features of information society in respect of a human and corr...

  3. Manpower Requirements and Education in Nuclear Science: An International Perspective Nuclear Science Manpower and Education Panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeisler, R.; Clark, S.B.; Parry, S.J.; Choppin, G.R.; Danesi, P.R.; Rossbach, M.; Williamson, C.; and others

    2005-01-01

    The MARC-VI conference served as an excellent setting for a session organized to present and discuss the problems in nuclear science manpower and education. A panel discussion and contributed papers reflected the world-wide situation. Major points of the panel discussion are presented. As a result, a resolution on the current situation of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry was drafted and endorsed by the conference attendees. (author)

  4. Knowledge management and networking for enhancing nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, T.; Lederman, L.

    2004-01-01

    Striving for innovative solutions to enhance efficiency of programme delivery and a wider outreach of its nuclear safety activities, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has developed an Integrated Safety Approach as a platform for linking its safety related statutory functions and its many associated activities. The approach recognizes the vital importance of effective management of the knowledge base and builds on the integration between the IAEA's safety standards and all aspects of the provision for their application, including peer reviews and technical meetings to share lessons learned. The IAEA is using knowledge management techniques to develop process flows, map safety knowledge and to promote knowledge sharing. The first practical application was the establishment of a knowledge base related to safety aspects of ageing and long-term operation of nuclear power plants. The IAEA is also promoting and facilitating the establishment of regional nuclear and radiation safety networks to preserve existing knowledge and expertise as well as to strengthen sharing and creation of new knowledge in these fields. Prominent examples are the Asian Nuclear Safety Network established in the frame of the IAEA's Programme on the Safety of Nuclear Installations in South East Asia, Pacific and Far East Countries, and the Ibero-American Radiation Safety Network in the frame of the Ibero-American Forum of Nuclear Regulators. Results to date are most encouraging and suggest that this pioneer work should be extended to other regions and eventually to a global nuclear safety network. Responsive to the need of Member States, the IAEA Secretariat has prepared and made available a large number of up-to-date training packages in nuclear, radiation, transport and waste safety, using IAEA safety standards as a basis. It is also providing instruction to trainers in Member States on the use of these modules. This ensures that the material is properly used and that the IAEA

  5. Education for the nuclear power industry: Swedish perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.

    2005-01-01

    In the Swedish nuclear power industry staff, very few newly employed have a deep education in reactor technology. To remedy this, a joint education company, Nuclear Training and Safety Center (KSU), has been formed. To ensure that nuclear competence will be available also in a long-term perspective, the Swedish nuclear power industry and the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) have formed a joint center for support of universities, the Swedish Nuclear Technology Center (SKC). The activities of these organisations, their links to universities, and their impact on the competence development for the nuclear power industry will be outlined. (author)

  6. Systems Engineering Initiative: Undergraduate Education Enhancement in a Regional Education Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurwitz, R. C.; Peddicord, K.; Poston, J.; Yang, X.; Bostanci, H.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Systems Engineering Initiative (SEI) is an experience based education enhancement programme that forms teams of undergraduate students with faculty and industry mentors to solve problems of interest to industry. This model of innovation creates a new learning paradigm that is outside the traditional classroom based model and fits more of the Master-apprentice model as applied to engineering teams. The SEI programme is currently administered by the Nuclear Power Institute (NPI), a regional nuclear education network, and is being carried out at three partner universities. Previous nuclear related projects have benefited industry and are of high technical quality with publications in peer-reviewed journals and awards for presentations in various forums. Students within the programme have benefited through development of soft skills outside the traditional curriculum, understanding of how their knowledge fits into a nuclear organization, and exposure to career opportunities. Industry and other NPI stakeholders benefit from the development of capable engineers and technicians, positive outreach to the community, and most importantly, knowledge transfer to the next generation of nuclear professionals. (author

  7. Neural networks and their potential application in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    A neural network is a data processing system consisting of a number of simple, highly interconnected processing elements in an architecture inspired by the structure of the cerebral cortex portion of the brain. Hence, neural networks are often capable of doing things which humans or animals do well but which conventional computers often do poorly. Neural networks have emerged in the past few years as an area of unusual opportunity for research, development and application to a variety of real world problems. Indeed, neural networks exhibit characteristics and capabilities not provided by any other technology. Examples include reading Japanese Kanji characters and human handwriting, reading a typewritten manuscript aloud, compensating for alignment errors in robots, interpreting very noise signals (e.g., electroencephalograms), modeling complex systems that cannot be modeled mathematically, and predicting whether proposed loans will be good or fail. This paper presents a brief tutorial on neural networks and describes research on the potential applications to nuclear power plants

  8. Neural networks and their potential application to nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    A network of artificial neurons, usually called an artificial neural network is a data processing system consisting of a number of highly interconnected processing elements in an architecture inspired by the structure of the cerebral cortex portion of the brain. Hence, neural networks are often capable of doing things which humans or animals do well but which conventional computers often do poorly. Neural networks exhibit characteristics and capabilities not provided by any other technology. Neural networks may be designed so as to classify an input pattern as one of several predefined types or to create, as needed, categories or classes of system states which can be interpreted by a human operator. Neural networks have the ability to recognize patterns, even when the information comprising these patterns is noisy, sparse, or incomplete. Thus, systems of artificial neural networks show great promise for use in environments in which robust, fault-tolerant pattern recognition is necessary in a real-time mode, and in which the incoming data may be distorted or noisy. The application of neural networks, a rapidly evolving technology used extensively in defense applications, alone or in conjunction with other advanced technologies, to some of the problems of operating nuclear power plants has the potential to enhance the safety, reliability and operability of nuclear power plants. The potential applications of neural networking include, but are not limited to diagnosing specific abnormal conditions, identification of nonlinear dynamics and transients, detection of the change of mode of operation, control of temperature and pressure during start-up, signal validation, plant-wide monitoring using autoassociative neural networks, monitoring of check valves, modeling of the plant thermodynamics, emulation of core reload calculations, analysis of temporal sequences in NRC's ''licensee event reports,'' and monitoring of plant parameters

  9. Using neural networks for prediction of nuclear parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira Filho, Leonidas; Souto, Kelling Cabral, E-mail: leonidasmilenium@hotmail.com, E-mail: kcsouto@bol.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Rio de Janeiro (IFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Machado, Marcelo Dornellas, E-mail: dornemd@eletronuclear.gov.br [Eletrobras Termonuclear S.A. (GCN.T/ELETRONUCLEAR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Combustivel Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Dating from 1943, the earliest work on artificial neural networks (ANN), when Warren Mc Cullock and Walter Pitts developed a study on the behavior of the biological neuron, with the goal of creating a mathematical model. Some other work was done until after the 80 witnessed an explosion of interest in ANNs, mainly due to advances in technology, especially microelectronics. Because ANNs are able to solve many problems such as approximation, classification, categorization, prediction and others, they have numerous applications in various areas, including nuclear. Nodal method is adopted as a tool for analyzing core parameters such as boron concentration and pin power peaks for pressurized water reactors. However, this method is extremely slow when it is necessary to perform various core evaluations, for example core reloading optimization. To overcome this difficulty, in this paper a model of Multi-layer Perceptron (MLP) artificial neural network type backpropagation will be trained to predict these values. The main objective of this work is the development of Multi-layer Perceptron (MLP) artificial neural network capable to predict, in very short time, with good accuracy, two important parameters used in the core reloading problem - Boron Concentration and Power Peaking Factor. For the training of the neural networks are provided loading patterns and nuclear data used in cycle 19 of Angra 1 nuclear power plant. Three models of networks are constructed using the same input data and providing the following outputs: 1- Boron Concentration and Power Peaking Factor, 2 - Boron Concentration and 3 - Power Peaking Factor. (author)

  10. Using neural networks for prediction of nuclear parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira Filho, Leonidas; Souto, Kelling Cabral; Machado, Marcelo Dornellas

    2013-01-01

    Dating from 1943, the earliest work on artificial neural networks (ANN), when Warren Mc Cullock and Walter Pitts developed a study on the behavior of the biological neuron, with the goal of creating a mathematical model. Some other work was done until after the 80 witnessed an explosion of interest in ANNs, mainly due to advances in technology, especially microelectronics. Because ANNs are able to solve many problems such as approximation, classification, categorization, prediction and others, they have numerous applications in various areas, including nuclear. Nodal method is adopted as a tool for analyzing core parameters such as boron concentration and pin power peaks for pressurized water reactors. However, this method is extremely slow when it is necessary to perform various core evaluations, for example core reloading optimization. To overcome this difficulty, in this paper a model of Multi-layer Perceptron (MLP) artificial neural network type backpropagation will be trained to predict these values. The main objective of this work is the development of Multi-layer Perceptron (MLP) artificial neural network capable to predict, in very short time, with good accuracy, two important parameters used in the core reloading problem - Boron Concentration and Power Peaking Factor. For the training of the neural networks are provided loading patterns and nuclear data used in cycle 19 of Angra 1 nuclear power plant. Three models of networks are constructed using the same input data and providing the following outputs: 1- Boron Concentration and Power Peaking Factor, 2 - Boron Concentration and 3 - Power Peaking Factor. (author)

  11. Regional Educational Laboratory Electronic Network Phase 2 System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cradler, John

    1995-01-01

    The Far West Laboratory in collaboration with the other regional educational laboratories is establishing a regionally coordinated telecommunication network to electronically interconnect each of the ten regional laboratories with educators and education stakeholders from the school to the state level. For the national distributed information database, each lab is working with mid-level networks to establish a common interface for networking throughout the country and include topics of importance to education reform as assessment and technology planning.

  12. Nuclear education and training: from concern to capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) first published in 2000 Nuclear Education and Training: Cause for Concern?, which highlighted significant issues in the availability of human resources for the nuclear industry. Ten years on, Nuclear Education and Training: From Concern to Capability considers what has changed in that time and finds that, while some countries have taken positive actions, in a number of others human resources could soon be facing serious challenges in coping with existing and potential new nuclear facilities. This is exacerbated by the increasing rate of retirement as the workforce ages. This report provides a qualitative characterisation of human resource needs and appraises instruments and programmes in nuclear education and training initiated by various stakeholders in different countries. In this context, it also examines the current and future uses of nuclear research facilities for education and training purposes. Regarding the nuclear training component of workforce competence, it outlines a job taxonomy which could be a basis for addressing the needs of workers across this sector. It presents the taxonomy as a way of enhancing mutual recognition and increasing consistency of education and training for both developed and developing countries. Contents: 1 - A decade of change: Background; The evolving environment; A key resource - a competent workforce; 2 - Review of nuclear education and associated facilities: Introduction; Education and training - progress over the last decade; Present use of research infrastructure for education and training in NEA member countries; 3 - Towards a blueprint for workforce development: The benefits of a competent nuclear workforce; Classifying competence; Analysis ; 4 - Ensuring capability - the recommendations: Nuclear human resource features and requirements; Ten years on - the developments; Approach to developing a common job taxonomy; 5 - Appendices: Recommendations from Nuclear Education and Training

  13. Nuclear Regulatory Authority Personnel Educating and Training within the National Nuclear Program Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapov, V.; Goryaeva, T.; Moiseenko, A.; Kapralov, E.; Museridze, A.

    2014-01-01

    International Cooperation for Nuclear Education and Knowledge: Aims: •Creation of system of continuous personnel training for EvrAzES states in the field of nuclear power applications based on the international standards; •Development of educational service export as following of export of Russian nuclear technology; • Development of educational and scientific contacts to IAEA, WNU, ENEN, ANENT, biggest scientific centers and universities of USA, EU and Asia. Directions of activities: • Education. Transfer of knowledge to new generation, to new developing countries and cooperation with the nuclear education of leading powers; • Scientific enlightening activity – students, specialists, decision makers; • Informational and analytical work

  14. Nuclear power plant status diagnostics using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, E.B.; Uhrig, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    In this work, the nuclear power plant operating status recognition issue is investigated using artificial neural networks (ANNs). The objective is to train an ANN to classify nuclear power plant accident conditions and to assess the potential of future work in the area of plant diagnostics with ANNS. To this end, an ANN was trained to recognize normal operating conditions as well as potentially unsafe conditions based on nuclear power plant training simulator generated accident scenarios. These scenarios include; hot and cold leg loss of coolant, control rod ejection, loss of offsite power, main steam line break, main feedwater line break and steam generator tube leak accidents. Findings show that ANNs can be used to diagnose and classify nuclear power plant conditions with good results

  15. Development of nuclear power plant diagnosis technique using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiguchi, Masahiro; Fukawa, Naohiro; Nishimura, Kazuo

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear power plant diagnosis technique has been developed, called transient phenomena analysis, which employs neural network. The neural networks identify malfunctioning equipment by recognizing the pattern of main plant parameters, making it possible to locate the cause of an abnormality when a plant is in a transient state. In a case where some piece of equipment shows abnormal behavior, many plant parameters either directly or indirectly related to that equipment change simultaneously. When an abrupt change in a plant parameter is detected, changes in the 49 main plant parameters are classified into three types and a characteristic change pattern consisting of 49 data is defined. The neural networks then judge the cause of the abnormality from this pattern. This neural-network-based technique can recognize 100 patterns that are characterized by the causes of plant abnormality. (author)

  16. Global trends in nuclear education at the tertiary level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    2001-01-01

    The public perception of nuclear science and engineering and the nuclear industry is today, primarily shaped by radical greens, nuclear-opponents, the media and socio-political opportunists. Only countries with a well diversified tertiary education system embracing all aspects of nuclear science and engineering can counter efficiently the pseudo-science and socio-political manipulation which has severely restricted nuclear energy development over the past three decades. National laboratories alone find this task extremely difficult, if not impossible

  17. Virtual private networks application in Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glidewell, Donnie D.; Smartt, Heidi A.; Caskey, Susan A.; Bonino, Anibal D.; Perez, Adrian C.; Pardo, German R.; Vigile, Rodolfo S.; Krimer, Mario

    2004-01-01

    As the result of the existence of several regional delegations all over the country, a requirement was made to conform a secure data interchange structure. This would make possible the interconnection of these facilities and their communication with the Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN) headquarters. The records these parts exchange are often of classified nature, including sensitive data by the local safeguards inspectors. On the other hand, the establishment of this network should simplify the access of authorized nuclear and radioactive materials users to the ARN databases, from remote sites and with significant trust levels. These requirements called for a network that should be not only private but also secure, providing data centralization and integrity assurance with a strict user control. The first proposal was to implement a point to point link between the installations. This proposal was deemed as economically not viable, and it had the disadvantage of not being easily reconfigurable. The availability of new technologies, and the accomplishment of the Action Sheet 11 under an agreement between Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority and the United States Department of Energy (DOE), opened a new path towards the resolution of this problem. By application of updated tunneling security protocols it was possible to project a manageable and secure network through the use of Virtual Private Networking (VPN) hardware. A first trial installation of this technology was implemented between ARN headquarters at Buenos Aires and the Southern Region Office at Bariloche, Argentina. This private net is at the moment under test, and it is planned to expand to more sites in this country, reaching for example to nuclear power plants. The Bariloche installation had some interesting peculiarities. The solutions proposed to them revealed to be very useful during the development of the network expansion plans, as they showed how to adapt the VPN technical requisites to the

  18. Industry, university and government partnership to address research, education and human resource challenges for nuclear industry in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the outcome of an important recent initiative of the Canadian nuclear industry to reinvigorate interest in education and collaborative research in prominent Canadian universities. This initiative has led to the formation of the University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE), incorporated in 2002. (author)

  19. Experimental (Network) and Evaluated Nuclear Reaction Data at NDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, N.; Semkova, V.; Simakov, S.P.; Zerkin, V.

    2011-01-01

    Dr Simakov of Nuclear Data Services Unit in the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) gave a brief overview of the data compilation and evaluation activities in the nuclear data community: experimental nuclear reaction data (EXFOR, http://www-nds.iaea.org/exfor/) and evaluated nuclear reaction data (ENDF, http://www-nds.iaea.org/endf). The International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC) coordinated by NDS includes 14 Centres in 8 Countries (China, Hungary, India, Japan, Korea, Russian, Ukraine, USA) and 2 International Organizations (NEA, IAEA). It had the first meeting of four core centres (Brookhaven, Saclay, Obninsk, Vienna) in 1966 and the EXFOR was adopted as an official data exchange format. In 2000, IAEA implemented the EXFOR database as a relational multiform database and the EXFOR is a trusted, increasing and living database with 19100 experimental works (as of September 2011) and 141600 data tables. The EXFOR provides a compilation control system for selection of articles and compilation of data and the NRDC home page provides manuals, documents and codes. The nuclear data can be retrieved by the web-retrieval system or distributed on a DVD on request. The EXFOR data play a critical role in the development of evaluated nuclear reaction data. There are several major general purpose libraries: ENDF (US), CENDL (China), JEFF (EU), JENDL (Japan) and RUSFOND (Russia). In addition, there are special libraries for particular applications: EAF (European Activation File), FENDL (Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for ITER neutronics), IBANDL (Ion Beam Analysis Nuclear Data Library for surface analysis of solids), IRDF, DXS (Dosimetry, radiation damage and gas production data) and Medical portal. Dr V. Zerkin of NDS demonstrated the data retrieval from the EXFOR database and the ENDF library.

  20. Experimental (Network) and Evaluated Nuclear Reaction Data at NDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, N; Semkova, V; Simakov, S P; Zerkin, V [Nuclear Data Services Unit, Nuclear Data Section, IAEA, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-11-15

    Dr Simakov of Nuclear Data Services Unit in the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) gave a brief overview of the data compilation and evaluation activities in the nuclear data community: experimental nuclear reaction data (EXFOR, http://www-nds.iaea.org/exfor/) and evaluated nuclear reaction data (ENDF, http://www-nds.iaea.org/endf). The International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC) coordinated by NDS includes 14 Centres in 8 Countries (China, Hungary, India, Japan, Korea, Russian, Ukraine, USA) and 2 International Organizations (NEA, IAEA). It had the first meeting of four core centres (Brookhaven, Saclay, Obninsk, Vienna) in 1966 and the EXFOR was adopted as an official data exchange format. In 2000, IAEA implemented the EXFOR database as a relational multiform database and the EXFOR is a trusted, increasing and living database with 19100 experimental works (as of September 2011) and 141600 data tables. The EXFOR provides a compilation control system for selection of articles and compilation of data and the NRDC home page provides manuals, documents and codes. The nuclear data can be retrieved by the web-retrieval system or distributed on a DVD on request. The EXFOR data play a critical role in the development of evaluated nuclear reaction data. There are several major general purpose libraries: ENDF (US), CENDL (China), JEFF (EU), JENDL (Japan) and RUSFOND (Russia). In addition, there are special libraries for particular applications: EAF (European Activation File), FENDL (Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for ITER neutronics), IBANDL (Ion Beam Analysis Nuclear Data Library for surface analysis of solids), IRDF, DXS (Dosimetry, radiation damage and gas production data) and Medical portal. Dr V. Zerkin of NDS demonstrated the data retrieval from the EXFOR database and the ENDF library.

  1. Establishment of a Nuclear Cooperation Network between Korea and Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung Pyo; Sohn, Dong Seong; Song, Kee Chan (and others)

    2008-03-15

    The objective of this study is to establish a personnel network and to identify potential complementary areas for technical cooperation in the future to advance Korean-Brazilian nuclear cooperation activities. To this end, current status of the cooperation in the areas of economy, energy resources and S and T between the two countries was surveyed, and the history of the nuclear development program and the current nuclear R and D status in Brazil, as well as the bilateral nuclear cooperation activities of both countries were analyzed. In addition, areas of mutual interest were identified by both countries' focal points and a personnel network was established. Based on the aforementioned preliminary activities, bilateral joint seminars were held in Brazil. At the joint seminars, possible areas of cooperation were discussed and joint research collaboration areas were surveyed and identified while both sides made efforts to expand the information and experts exchanges in specific areas. Through this study, possible specific areas of cooperation in which both sides have a common interest were identified in such areas as radiation technology application, post irradiation examination, radioactive waste management, I and C, and advanced nuclear fuel, and also concrete implementation methods were proposed. These results will be effectively utilized in establishing a basic direction for expanding bilateral nuclear cooperation activities in the future. Consistent establishment of a foundation for promoting cooperation could be established and maintained through the operation of a focal point in charge of coordinating bilateral technical cooperation, and then a long-term and stable human network could be established.

  2. Establishment of a Nuclear Cooperation Network between Korea and Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung Pyo; Sohn, Dong Seong; Song, Kee Chan

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study is to establish a personnel network and to identify potential complementary areas for technical cooperation in the future to advance Korean-Brazilian nuclear cooperation activities. To this end, current status of the cooperation in the areas of economy, energy resources and S and T between the two countries was surveyed, and the history of the nuclear development program and the current nuclear R and D status in Brazil, as well as the bilateral nuclear cooperation activities of both countries were analyzed. In addition, areas of mutual interest were identified by both countries' focal points and a personnel network was established. Based on the aforementioned preliminary activities, bilateral joint seminars were held in Brazil. At the joint seminars, possible areas of cooperation were discussed and joint research collaboration areas were surveyed and identified while both sides made efforts to expand the information and experts exchanges in specific areas. Through this study, possible specific areas of cooperation in which both sides have a common interest were identified in such areas as radiation technology application, post irradiation examination, radioactive waste management, I and C, and advanced nuclear fuel, and also concrete implementation methods were proposed. These results will be effectively utilized in establishing a basic direction for expanding bilateral nuclear cooperation activities in the future. Consistent establishment of a foundation for promoting cooperation could be established and maintained through the operation of a focal point in charge of coordinating bilateral technical cooperation, and then a long-term and stable human network could be established

  3. Validating neural-network refinements of nuclear mass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utama, R.; Piekarewicz, J.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Nuclear astrophysics centers on the role of nuclear physics in the cosmos. In particular, nuclear masses at the limits of stability are critical in the development of stellar structure and the origin of the elements. Purpose: We aim to test and validate the predictions of recently refined nuclear mass models against the newly published AME2016 compilation. Methods: The basic paradigm underlining the recently refined nuclear mass models is based on existing state-of-the-art models that are subsequently refined through the training of an artificial neural network. Bayesian inference is used to determine the parameters of the neural network so that statistical uncertainties are provided for all model predictions. Results: We observe a significant improvement in the Bayesian neural network (BNN) predictions relative to the corresponding "bare" models when compared to the nearly 50 new masses reported in the AME2016 compilation. Further, AME2016 estimates for the handful of impactful isotopes in the determination of r -process abundances are found to be in fairly good agreement with our theoretical predictions. Indeed, the BNN-improved Duflo-Zuker model predicts a root-mean-square deviation relative to experiment of σrms≃400 keV. Conclusions: Given the excellent performance of the BNN refinement in confronting the recently published AME2016 compilation, we are confident of its critical role in our quest for mass models of the highest quality. Moreover, as uncertainty quantification is at the core of the BNN approach, the improved mass models are in a unique position to identify those nuclei that will have the strongest impact in resolving some of the outstanding questions in nuclear astrophysics.

  4. Nuclear power plant maintenance optimisation SENUF network activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrand, R.; Bieth, M.; Pla, P.; Rieg, C.; Trampus, P.

    2004-01-01

    During providing scientific and technical support to TACIS and PHARE nuclear safety programs a large amount of knowledge related to Russian design reactor systems has accumulated and led to creation of a new Network concerning Nuclear Safety in Central and Eastern Europe called ''Safety of Eastern European type Nuclear Facilities'' (SENUF). SENUF contributes to bring together all stakeholders of TACIS and PHARE: beneficiaries, end users, Eastern und Western nuclear industries, and thus, to favour fruitful technical exchanges and feedback of experience. At present the main focus of SENUF is the nuclear power plant maintenance as substantial element of plant operational safety as well as life management. A Working Group has been established on plant maintenance. One of its major tasks in 2004 is to prepare a status report on advanced strategies to optimise maintenance. Optimisation projects have an interface with the plant's overall life management program. Today, almost all plants involved in SENUF network have an explicit policy to extend their service life, thus, component ageing management, modernization and refurbishment actions became much more important. A database is also under development, which intends to help sharing the available knowledge and specific equipment and tools. (orig.)

  5. Nuclear power plant maintenance optimisation SENUF network activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstrand, R.; Bieth, M.; Pla, P.; Rieg, C.; Trampus, P. [Inst. for Energy, EC DG Joint Research Centre, Petten (Netherlands)

    2004-07-01

    During providing scientific and technical support to TACIS and PHARE nuclear safety programs a large amount of knowledge related to Russian design reactor systems has accumulated and led to creation of a new Network concerning Nuclear Safety in Central and Eastern Europe called ''Safety of Eastern European type Nuclear Facilities'' (SENUF). SENUF contributes to bring together all stakeholders of TACIS and PHARE: beneficiaries, end users, Eastern und Western nuclear industries, and thus, to favour fruitful technical exchanges and feedback of experience. At present the main focus of SENUF is the nuclear power plant maintenance as substantial element of plant operational safety as well as life management. A Working Group has been established on plant maintenance. One of its major tasks in 2004 is to prepare a status report on advanced strategies to optimise maintenance. Optimisation projects have an interface with the plant's overall life management program. Today, almost all plants involved in SENUF network have an explicit policy to extend their service life, thus, component ageing management, modernization and refurbishment actions became much more important. A database is also under development, which intends to help sharing the available knowledge and specific equipment and tools. (orig.)

  6. Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes - Romanian experience: Master - Nuclear Materials and Technologies Educational Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeca, S.; Valeca, M.

    2012-01-01

    The main objectives of the Master Nuclear Materials and Technologies Educational Plan are: 1. To deliver higher education and training in the following specific domains, such as: Powders Technology and Ceramic Materials, Techniques of Structural Analysis, Composite Materials, Semiconductor Materials and Components, Metals and Metallic Alloys, Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, Nuclear Materials, The Engineering of Special Nuclear Materials, 2. To train managers of the Nuclear Waste Products and Nuclear Safety, 3. To qualify in ICT Systems for Nuclear Process Guidance, 4. To qualify in Environmental Protection System at the Level of Nuclear Power Stations, 5. To train managers for Quality Assurance of Nuclear Energetic Processes, 6. To deliver higher education and training regarding the International Treatises, Conventions and Settlements in force in the field of nuclear related activities. (author)

  7. Annual report of Nuclear Technology and Education Center. April 1, 2007-March 31, 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-03-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year 2007. This is the third year since the inauguration of JAEA, and NuTEC now flexibly designs and carries out training courses upon request while carrying out the annually scheduled training programs. During this period, the number of trainees completing the domestic training courses was 466, and that for staff technical training was 694. Three prep-examination training courses for '1st class radiation protection supervisor', 'Nuclear fuel protection supervisor' and 'Professional engineer on nuclear and radiation' which were opened only for staff members were newly opened to the public. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities; cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, cooperative graduate school program with 14 graduate schools and 1 under-graduate school, and Nuclear HRD Program initiated by MEXT and METI implemented since 2007. Joint course has started networking 3 universities utilizing the Japan Nuclear Education Network, and trial experimental courses for students from newly participating universities were offered. International cooperation was also conducted as scheduled. Joint training course and Instructor training program were carried out bilaterally with Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam. Human Resources Development Workshop under the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia was arranged, and Asian Nuclear Training and Education Program to enhance the matching of the needs and available training program of the participating countries were discussed. (author)

  8. Program Spotlight: National Outreach Network's Community Health Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Outreach Network of Community Health Educators located at Community Network Program Centers, Partnerships to Advance Cancer Health Equity, and NCI-designated cancer centers help patients and their families receive survivorship support.

  9. UNENE: an update on nuclear education and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalaby, B.A.; Snell, V.G.; Rouben, B.

    2011-01-01

    University Network for Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (known as UNENE) was created in 2002 as a partnership between Industry and universities with the objectives of establishing a nuclear R and D program in universities to train and develop Highly Qualified Personnel (HQP) to address the demographic gap and to create a sustainable source of expertise for independent industry and public consultation. Seven years into its creation, UNENE is now a well established and fully functional framework with programs mainly focussing on education and research serving the industry at large. The educational component is in the form of an M. Eng program mainly catering for working profession's by being offered on weekends and using distance learning tools. It is intended to enhance competencies and build knowledge for students. The R and D programs are lead by Industrial Research chairs (IRCs) and other prominent researchers in areas of importance to the industry. This paper examines the above topics and its outcomes as of March 2010. (author)

  10. UNENE: an update on nuclear education and research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalaby, B.A.; Snell, V.G.; Rouben, B., E-mail: basma.shalaby@rogers.com, E-mail: vgsolutions@rogers.com, E-mail: rouben@alum.mit.edu [University Network for Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE), Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    University Network for Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (known as UNENE) was created in 2002 as a partnership between Industry and universities with the objectives of establishing a nuclear R and D program in universities to train and develop Highly Qualified Personnel (HQP) to address the demographic gap and to create a sustainable source of expertise for independent industry and public consultation. Seven years into its creation, UNENE is now a well established and fully functional framework with programs mainly focussing on education and research serving the industry at large. The educational component is in the form of an M. Eng program mainly catering for working profession's by being offered on weekends and using distance learning tools. It is intended to enhance competencies and build knowledge for students. The R and D programs are lead by Industrial Research chairs (IRCs) and other prominent researchers in areas of importance to the industry. This paper examines the above topics and its outcomes as of March 2010. (author)

  11. UNENE: an update on nuclear education and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalaby, B.A.; Snell, V.G.; Rouben, B.

    2010-01-01

    University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (known as UNENE) was created in 2002 as a partnership between Industry and universities with the objectives of establishing a nuclear R and D program in universities, train and develop Highly Qualified Personnel (HQP) to address the demographic gap, and to create a sustainable source of expertise for independent industry and public consultation. Seven years into its creation, UNENE is now a well established and fully functional framework with programs mainly focussing on education and research serving the industry at large. The educational component is in the form of an M. Eng. program mainly catering for working professionals by being offered on weekends and using distance-learning tools. It is intended to enhance competencies and build knowledge for students. The R and D programs are led by Industrial Research chairs (IRCs) and other prominent researchers in areas of importance to the industry. This paper examines the above topics and its outcomes as of March 2010. (author)

  12. BUILDING A NETWORK FOR NEUTRON SCATTERING EDUCATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pynn, Roger; Baker, Shenda Mary; Louca, Despo A.; McGreevy, Robert L.; Ekkebus, Allen E.; Kszos, Lynn A.; Anderson, Ian S.

    2008-01-01

    In a concerted effort supported by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Commerce, and the Department of Energy, the United States is rebuilding its leadership in neutron scattering capability through a significant investment in U.S. neutron scattering user facilities and related instrumentation. These unique facilities provide opportunities in neutron scattering to a broad community of researchers from academic institutions, federal laboratories, and industry. However, neutron scattering is often considered to be a tool for 'experts only' and in order for the U.S. research community to take full advantage of these new and powerful tools, a comprehensive education and outreach program must be developed. The workshop described below is the first step in developing a national program that takes full advantage of modern education methods and leverages the existing educational capacity at universities and national facilities. During March 27-28, 2008, a workshop entitled 'Building a Network for Neutron Scattering Education' was held in Washington, D.C. The goal of the workshop was to define and design a roadmap for a comprehensive neutron scattering education program in the United States. Successful implementation of the roadmap will maximize the national intellectual capital in neutron sciences and will increase the sophistication of research questions addressed by neutron scattering at the nation's forefront facilities. (See Appendix A for the list of attendees, Appendix B for the workshop agenda, Appendix C for a list of references. Appendix D contains the results of a survey given at the workshop; Appendix E contains summaries of the contributed talks.) The workshop brought together U.S. academicians, representatives from neutron sources, scientists who have developed nontraditional educational programs, educational specialists, and managers from government agencies to create a national structure for providing ongoing neutron scattering education. A

  13. BUILDING A NETWORK FOR NEUTRON SCATTERING EDUCATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pynn, Roger [ORNL; Baker, Shenda Mary [ORNL; Louca, Despo A [ORNL; McGreevy, Robert L [ORNL; Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL; Anderson, Ian S [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    In a concerted effort supported by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Commerce, and the Department of Energy, the United States is rebuilding its leadership in neutron scattering capability through a significant investment in U.S. neutron scattering user facilities and related instrumentation. These unique facilities provide opportunities in neutron scattering to a broad community of researchers from academic institutions, federal laboratories, and industry. However, neutron scattering is often considered to be a tool for 'experts only' and in order for the U.S. research community to take full advantage of these new and powerful tools, a comprehensive education and outreach program must be developed. The workshop described below is the first step in developing a national program that takes full advantage of modern education methods and leverages the existing educational capacity at universities and national facilities. During March 27-28, 2008, a workshop entitled 'Building a Network for Neutron Scattering Education' was held in Washington, D.C. The goal of the workshop was to define and design a roadmap for a comprehensive neutron scattering education program in the United States. Successful implementation of the roadmap will maximize the national intellectual capital in neutron sciences and will increase the sophistication of research questions addressed by neutron scattering at the nation's forefront facilities. (See Appendix A for the list of attendees, Appendix B for the workshop agenda, Appendix C for a list of references. Appendix D contains the results of a survey given at the workshop; Appendix E contains summaries of the contributed talks.) The workshop brought together U.S. academicians, representatives from neutron sources, scientists who have developed nontraditional educational programs, educational specialists, and managers from government agencies to create a national structure for providing ongoing neutron

  14. Nuclear science and technology education and training in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsono

    2007-01-01

    Deployment of nuclear technology requires adequate nuclear infrastructure which includes governmental infrastructure, science and technology infrastructure, education and training infrastructure, and industrial infrastructure. Governmental infrastructure in nuclear, i.e. BATAN (the National Nuclear Energy Agency) and BAPETEN (the Nuclear Energy Control Agency), need adequate number of qualified manpower with general and specific knowledge of nuclear. Science and technology infrastructure is mainly contained in the R and D institutes, education and training centers, scientific academies and professional associations, and national industry. The effectiveness of this infrastructure mainly depends on the quality of the manpower, in addition to the funding and available facilities. Development of human resource needed for research, development, and utilization of nuclear technology in the country needs special attention. Since the national industry is still in its infant stage, the strategy for HRD (human resource development) in the nuclear field addresses the needs of the following: BATAN for its research and development, promotion, and training; BAPETEN for its regulatory functions and training; users of nuclear technology in industry, medicine, agriculture, research, and other areas; radiation safety officers in organizations or institutions licensed to use radioactive materials; the education sector, especially lecturers and teachers, in tertiary and secondary education. Nuclear science and technology is a multidisciplinary and a highly specialized subject. It includes areas such as nuclear and reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, chemistry, material science, radiation protection, nuclear safety, health science, and radioactive waste management. Therefore, a broad nuclear education is absolutely essential to master the wide areas of science and technology used in the nuclear domain. The universities and other institutions of higher education are the only

  15. The International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Security Education Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRAUNEGGER-GUELICH, A.; RUKHLO, V.; GREGORIC, M.; COLGAN, P.

    2011-01-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has not diminished. In response to the concerns of States, an international nuclear security framework has emerged through the establishment of a number of legally binding and non-binding international instruments which obligates or commits States to carry out a number of actions to protect against nuclear terrorism. In this context, the need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underscored at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors' Meetings. In the pursuit of this need, the IAEA provides a comprehensive nuclear security training programme to States on a regular basis, and has developed a concept that seeks to effectively pass ownership of nuclear security knowledge and skills to States through the establishment of a Nuclear Security Support Centre. In addition, the IAEA has developed a technical guidance titled IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 - Educational Programme in Nuclear Security that consists of a model of a Master of Science (M.Sc.) and assists educational institutions to provide nuclear security education. The article sets out IAEA efforts in the area of nuclear security training and education, including the assistance to States for establishing a Nuclear Security Support Centre. It underlines the objective and content of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12, discusses different concepts on how to establish nuclear security at universities and, emphasizes on the IAEA efforts to assist educational and research institutions, and other stake holders to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. (author)

  16. Nuclear education and training: marriages that work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, H.D.

    1985-01-01

    Public Service Electric and Gas Company is meeting the education and training needs of its nuclear department operations, support, and services personnel through a variety of activities in association with institutions of higher education. Activities include credit or credit recommendation programs at the associates, undergraduate, and graduate degree level. The paper emphasizes the process of working with a local college in the development of a new degree program for submission through the State Board of Education. The development, review, evaluation, and approval process is detailed as well as lessons learned. Plans for further development of the program toward ABET accreditation are also described. Samples of the surveys conducted to determine employee interest in terms of academic area, academic level, offering strategies, etc. are presented. The process of soliciting program proposals from universities and colleges, the selection process, and implementation of the programs are also discussed. More briefly described is the preparation for credit recommendation process from regionally accredited groups. External degree programs, off-hours course presentations on-site for undergraduate and graduate credit, faculty extern, student intern, and co-op activities are also discussed

  17. SOCIAL NETWORKS AS THE ENVIRONMENT EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojsław Czupryński

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of the global Internet has changed the way the entire human population communicates. The internet has become a platform, where human societies build their lives, and traditional communication over the last few years has been replaced by social networks. Today, social networks are the subject of many debates concerning their advantages, disadvantages and the ideas of what they bring to the future. Portals are not only the way of communication, fun, an idea to spend free time, but also source of social and humanistic knowledge too. Against that, social media could be a huge risk for those who use them. The assigned job above discusses about the topic the detrimental effect what the social networks bring. A series of deviant behaviors caused by use of the portal is also presented in this report. Often they become a dysfunctional generator of actions that manifest themselves among the youth. Consequently, there was a need to take action to stop the growth of this phenomenon among young people. First of all the primary activities at this level are prevention and education in the family.

  18. EDUCATIONAL NETWORKING: HUMAN VIEW TO CYBER DEFENSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr Yu. Burov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Networks play more and more important role for human life and activity, both in critical occupations (aviation, power industry, military missions etc., and in everyday life (home computers, education, leisure. Interaction between human and other elements of human-machine system have changed, because they coincide in the information habitat. Human-system integration has reached new level of defense needs. The paper will introduce features of information society in respect of a human and corresponding changes in HF/E: (1 information becomes a tool, goal, mean and environment of a human activity, (2 it becomes a part of the human nature and this makes him/her unprotected, (3 human psycho-physiological status becomes not only a basis of effective performance, but an object of control and support, and means of a human security and safety should be a part of information habitat, (4 networking environment becomes an independent actor in a human activity. Accompanying cyber-security challenges and tasks are discussed, as well as types of networking threats and Human View regarding the cyber security challenges.

  19. Education and training of experts for the nuclear power sector at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technologies, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipka, J.; Slugen, V.; Miglierini, M.; Necas, V.; Hascik, J.; Pavlovic, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technologies, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava has been training experts for the nuclear sector for over 40 years now. Current status and trends in nuclear education within the faculty's educational system, encompassing BSc, MSc and PhD studies, are highlighted. Dedicated training courses in the safety aspects of operation of the nuclear power installations are also organized for NPP staff. Periodical training is also provided to supervising physicists at the Jaslovske Bohunice and Mochovce nuclear power plants. Major international projects aimed at nuclear knowledge management and preservation are highlighted and the ENEN - European Nuclear Education Network project is described. (P.A.)

  20. Russian center of nuclear science and education is the way of nuclear engineering skilled personnel training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murogov, V.M.; Sal'nikov, N.L.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear power engineering as the key of nuclear technologies is not only the element of the power market but also the basis of the country's social-economic progress. Obninsk as the first science town in Russia is the ideal place for the creation of integrated Science-Research Center of Nuclear Science and Technologies - The Russian Center of Nuclear Science and Education (Center for conservation and development of nuclear knowledge) [ru

  1. Nuclear Security Education Program at the Pennsylvania State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uenlue, Kenan [The Pennsylvania State University, Radiation Science and Engineering Center, University Park, PA 16802-2304 (United States); The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, University Park, PA 16802-2304 (United States); Jovanovic, Igor [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, University Park, PA 16802-2304 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The availability of trained and qualified nuclear and radiation security experts worldwide has decreased as those with hands-on experience have retired while the demand for these experts and skills have increased. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has responded to the continued loss of technical and policy expertise amongst personnel and students in the security field by initiating the establishment of a Nuclear Security Education Initiative, in partnership with Pennsylvania State University (PSU), Texas A and M (TAMU), and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). This collaborative, multi-year initiative forms the basis of specific education programs designed to educate the next generation of personnel who plan on careers in the nonproliferation and security fields with both domestic and international focus. The three universities worked collaboratively to develop five core courses consistent with the GTRI mission, policies, and practices. These courses are the following: Global Nuclear Security Policies, Detectors and Source Technologies, Applications of Detectors/Sensors/Sources for Radiation Detection and Measurements Nuclear Security Laboratory, Threat Analysis and Assessment, and Design and Analysis of Security Systems for Nuclear and Radiological Facilities. The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) Nuclear Engineering Program is a leader in undergraduate and graduate-level nuclear engineering education in the USA. The PSU offers undergraduate and graduate programs in nuclear engineering. The PSU undergraduate program in nuclear engineering is the largest nuclear engineering programs in the USA. The PSU Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) facilities are being used for most of the nuclear security education program activities. Laboratory space and equipment was made available for this purpose. The RSEC facilities include the Penn State Breazeale

  2. Nuclear Security Education Program at the Pennsylvania State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenlue, Kenan; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The availability of trained and qualified nuclear and radiation security experts worldwide has decreased as those with hands-on experience have retired while the demand for these experts and skills have increased. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has responded to the continued loss of technical and policy expertise amongst personnel and students in the security field by initiating the establishment of a Nuclear Security Education Initiative, in partnership with Pennsylvania State University (PSU), Texas A and M (TAMU), and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). This collaborative, multi-year initiative forms the basis of specific education programs designed to educate the next generation of personnel who plan on careers in the nonproliferation and security fields with both domestic and international focus. The three universities worked collaboratively to develop five core courses consistent with the GTRI mission, policies, and practices. These courses are the following: Global Nuclear Security Policies, Detectors and Source Technologies, Applications of Detectors/Sensors/Sources for Radiation Detection and Measurements Nuclear Security Laboratory, Threat Analysis and Assessment, and Design and Analysis of Security Systems for Nuclear and Radiological Facilities. The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) Nuclear Engineering Program is a leader in undergraduate and graduate-level nuclear engineering education in the USA. The PSU offers undergraduate and graduate programs in nuclear engineering. The PSU undergraduate program in nuclear engineering is the largest nuclear engineering programs in the USA. The PSU Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) facilities are being used for most of the nuclear security education program activities. Laboratory space and equipment was made available for this purpose. The RSEC facilities include the Penn State Breazeale

  3. Implementing Physical Protection Education for an Enhanced Nuclear Security Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Kim, Hyun Chul; Shin, Ick Hyun; Lee, Hyung Kyung; Choe, Kwan Kyoo [KINAC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, we are going to outline our efforts and experiences at implementing physical protection education. KINAC (as the only designated educational institute) places great effort in delivering an effective and a high-quality education program for physical protection. We have also provided a way for nuclear operators to share the lessons they have gained through their own experiences. We made physical protection education an important communication channel, not only among nuclear operators but also between operators and a regulatory body. There is growing attention given to education and training on the subject of physical protection in order to enhance the nuclear security culture. The IAEA recommends that all personnel in organizations directly involved with the nuclear industry receive regularly education in physical protection according to the recently revised INFCIRC/225/Rev.5. The Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC) and the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC), which are mainly responsible for the national nuclear security regime, have already recognized the importance of education and training in physical protection. The NSSC enacted its decree on physical protection education and training in 2010. KINAC was designated as the first educational institute in 2011 and implemented physical protection education as mandatory from 2012.

  4. Implementing Physical Protection Education for an Enhanced Nuclear Security Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Kim, Hyun Chul; Shin, Ick Hyun; Lee, Hyung Kyung; Choe, Kwan Kyoo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we are going to outline our efforts and experiences at implementing physical protection education. KINAC (as the only designated educational institute) places great effort in delivering an effective and a high-quality education program for physical protection. We have also provided a way for nuclear operators to share the lessons they have gained through their own experiences. We made physical protection education an important communication channel, not only among nuclear operators but also between operators and a regulatory body. There is growing attention given to education and training on the subject of physical protection in order to enhance the nuclear security culture. The IAEA recommends that all personnel in organizations directly involved with the nuclear industry receive regularly education in physical protection according to the recently revised INFCIRC/225/Rev.5. The Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC) and the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC), which are mainly responsible for the national nuclear security regime, have already recognized the importance of education and training in physical protection. The NSSC enacted its decree on physical protection education and training in 2010. KINAC was designated as the first educational institute in 2011 and implemented physical protection education as mandatory from 2012

  5. MSU SINP CDFE nuclear data activities in the nuclear reaction data centres network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boboshin, I.N.; Varlamov, V.V.; Komarov, S.Yu.; Peskov, N.N.; Semin, S.B.; Stepanov, M.E.; Chesnokov, V.V.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is the progress report of the Centre for Photonuclear Experiments Data, Moscow. It is a short review of the works carried out by the CDFE concerning the IAEA nuclear reaction data centers network activities from May 2001 until May 2002. and the description of the main results obtained. (a.n.)

  6. Ocean breeze monitoring network at the Oyster Creek Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, W.

    1987-01-01

    The Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station (OCNGS) is located in New Jersey 10 km west of the Atlantic Ocean. Routine meteorological monitoring at the station has consisted of a single meteorological tower 120 m high and instrumented at the 10-m, 46-m, and 116-m levels. An analysis of 5 yr of data from this tower showed the OCNGS is affected by an ocean breeze ∼ 1 day out of 4 during May through August. This suggested the need for meteorological monitoring in addition to the single met tower at OCNGS. As a result of the 1985 OCNGS meteorological monitoring study, GPU Nuclear established an ocean breeze monitoring network in the fall of 1986. It is a permanent part of OCNGS meteorological monitoring and consists of the same sites as used in the 1985 field study. Meteorological towers are located at the ocean site, the inland site, and at OCNGS. The ocean tower is 13 m (43 ft) high, the inland tower 10 m (33 ft), and the OCNGS tower 116 m (380 ft). Wind speed, wind direction, and temperature are measured on each tower; delta-temperature is also measured on the main tower. The instruments are calibrated in the spring, summer, and fall. The network is operated and maintained by GPU Nuclear Environmental Controls. The ocean breeze monitoring network and meteorological information system forms the basis for including the effects of the ocean breeze in OCNGS emergency off-site dose assessment

  7. Nuclear techniques and professional education at InSTEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz Rizo, Oscar; D’Alessandro Rodríguez, Katia; Gelen Rudnikas, Alina; López Pino, Neivy; Borroto Portela, Jorge; Domínguez Catasús, Judith; Abreu Díaz, Aida M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper includes the most relevant results obtained by InSTEC´s Group of Nuclear Applications in the last 25 years, in the development of nuclear techniques and its application in different social areas. The impact of applied research on graduated and post graduated education in nuclear careers as well as the social recognition of the university community are presented. (author)

  8. Nuclear science and engineering education at a university research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveland, W.

    1993-01-01

    The role of an on-site irradiation facility in nuclear science and engineering education is examined. Using the example of a university research reactor, the use of such devices in laboratory instruction, public outreach programs, special instructional programs, research, etc. is discussed. Examples from the Oregon State University curriculum in nuclear chemistry, nuclear engineering and radiation health are given. (author) 1 tab

  9. A European network for nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. EMIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jehenson, P.; Lartigau, E.; Guidez, J.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear medicine and radiotherapy make a vital contribution to the diagnosis and treatment of major disease. This role is likely to expand with new developments including availability of new medical isotopes. A European network (EMIR) was initiated in 2001 by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission, to identify and solve difficulties that constrain nuclear medicine and radiotherapy development in Europe and facilitate closer interdisciplinary collaboration. Participating organisations include the main European associations of medical radiation specialists, radiopharmaceutical/radioisotope producers, nuclear research reactor institutions, research organizations and the JRC. The steering committee established task groups focusing on eight key areas for development. Liaison with non-European organizations will be encouraged. (author)

  10. Utilization of social networks in education and their impact on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Utilization of social networks in education and their impact on knowledge acquisition ... Developed countries are known to be quick adopters of modern advanced ... in education changing traditional systems to more open and interactive ones.

  11. Nuclear information and education experience in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginniff, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    The presentation discusses the importance of public information and education in the field of energy and particularly in the field of nuclear energy development. The attempt is made to explain some issues connected with the nuclear fuel cycle. Appendix contains comments on the United Kingdom educational materials in this area

  12. Status of higher education in nuclear technology in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.

    2007-01-01

    To harness the benefits of nuclear energy and the applications of radiation and radionuclides in various disciplines, a broad and deeply rooted nuclear education is essential. To cater to its needs, the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has established training institutes/centres of higher education. This paper briefly describes the programmes offered by these institutes/centres. (author)

  13. Infiltration of quality concepts in nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodall, D.M.

    1993-01-01

    The principles of total quality management (TQM) have been applied increasingly in the nuclear power industry over the last decade. The involvement of industrial professionals on the advisory boards of engineering colleges and departments has increasingly led in recent years to the recommendation that TQM be applied as appropriate to engineering education. This paper describes the concepts of TQM in their application to engineering education, specifically in the nuclear engineering area. A summary of the concerns expressed by nuclear engineering academics, as well as the record of successful implementation of TQM in the nuclear engineering education environment is provided in this paper

  14. Neural network modeling of chaotic dynamics in nuclear reactor flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welstead, S.T.

    1992-01-01

    Neural networks have many scientific applications in areas such as pattern classification and time series prediction. The universal approximation property of these networks, however, can also be exploited to provide researchers with tool for modeling observed nonlinear phenomena. It has been shown that multilayer feed forward networks can capture important global nonlinear properties, such as chaotic dynamics, merely by training the network on a finite set of observed data. The network itself then provides a model of the process that generated the data. Characterizations such as the existence and general shape of a strange attractor and the sign of the largest Lyapunov exponent can then be extracted from the neural network model. In this paper, the author applies this idea to data generated from a nonlinear process that is representative of convective flows that can arise in nuclear reactor applications. Such flows play a role in forced convection heat removal from pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors, and decay heat removal from liquid-metal-cooled reactors, either by natural convection or by thermosyphons

  15. Empirical modeling of nuclear power plants using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parlos, A.G.; Atiya, A.; Chong, K.T.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of a procedure for nonlinear identification of process dynamics encountered in nuclear power plant components is presented in this paper using artificial neural systems. A hybrid feedforward/feedback neural network, namely, a recurrent multilayer perceptron, is used as the nonlinear structure for system identification. In the overall identification process, the feedforward portion of the network architecture provides its well-known interpolation property, while through recurrency and cross-talk, the local information feedback enables representation of time-dependent system nonlinearities. The standard backpropagation learning algorithm is modified and is used to train the proposed hybrid network in a supervised manner. The performance of recurrent multilayer perceptron networks in identifying process dynamics is investigated via the case study of a U-tube steam generator. The nonlinear response of a representative steam generator is predicted using a neural network and is compared to the response obtained from a sophisticated physical model during both high- and low-power operation. The transient responses compare well, though further research is warranted for training and testing of recurrent neural networks during more severe operational transients and accident scenarios

  16. Romanian regulatory requirements on nuclear field specific education needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, L.; Velicu, O.

    2004-01-01

    This work is intended as a general presentation of the educational system and research field, with reference to nuclear sciences, and the legal system, with reference to requirements established by the regulatory body for the professional qualification and periodic training of personnel involved in different activities in the nuclear field. Thus, part 2 and 3 of the work present only public information regarding the education in nuclear sciences and nuclear research in Romania; in part 4 the CNCAN requirements for the personnel training, specific to nuclear activities are slightly detailed; part 5 consists of few words about the public information activities in Romania; and part 6 tries to draw a conclusion. (authors)

  17. An efficient and cost effective nuclear medicine image network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampathkumaran, K.S.; Miller, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    An image network that is in use in a large nuclear medicine department is described. This network was designed to efficiently handle a large volume of clinical data at reasonable cost. Small, limited function computers are attached to each scintillation camera for data acquisition. The images are transferred by cable network or floppy disc to a large, powerful central computer for processing and display. Cost is minimized by use of small acquisition computers not equipped with expensive video display systems or elaborate analysis software. Thus, financial expenditure can be concentrated in a powerful central computer providing a centralized data base, rapid processing, and an efficient environment for program development. Clinical work is greatly facilitated because the physicians can process and display all studies without leaving the main reading area. (orig.)

  18. Vibration analysis in nuclear power plant using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loskiewicz-Buczak, A.; Alguindigue, I.E.

    1993-01-01

    Vibration monitoring of components in nuclear power plants has been used for a number of years. This technique involves the analysis of vibration data coming from vital components of the plant to detect features which reflect the operational state of machinery. The analysis leads to the identification of potential failures and their causes, and makes it possible to perform efficient preventive maintenance. This paper documents the authors' work on the design of a vibration monitoring methodology enhanced by neural network technology. This technology provides an attractive complement to traditional vibration analysis because of the potential of neural networks to handle data which may be distorted or noisy. This paper describes three neural networks-based methods for the automation of some of the activities related to motion and vibration monitoring in engineering systems

  19. Artificial neural networks in the nuclear engineering (Part 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista Filho, Benedito Dias

    2002-01-01

    The field of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), one of the branches of Artificial Intelligence has been waking up a lot of interest in the Nuclear Engineering (NE). ANN can be used to solve problems of difficult modeling, when the data are fail or incomplete and in high complexity problems of control. The first part of this work began a discussion with feed-forward neural networks in back-propagation. In this part of the work, the Multi-synaptic neural networks is applied to control problems. Also, the self-organized maps is presented in a typical pattern classification problem: transients classification. The main purpose of the work is to show that ANN can be successfully used in NE if a carefully choice of its type is done: the application sets this choice. (author)

  20. Nuclear engineering education in the United States: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Spinrad, B.I.

    1986-01-01

    The executive summary of the White Paper entitled The Revitalization of Nuclear Energy Education in the United States is the major component of this paper. The White Paper was completed under the auspices of the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO). The presentation highlights events and program changes that have occurred in 1985-1986 following publication of the NEDHO White Paper. Many of these events provide optimism for the revitalization of nuclear engineering education

  1. Education and training in nuclear sciences and technologies: a challenge for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giot, Michel

    2006-01-01

    The ENEN Association (European Nuclear Engineering Network) located at the premises of INSTN, a sustainable product generated by an FP5 project, promotes the clustering of educational activities at national level, and the international mobility of students and teachers as the means to fight against the loss of competencies in Europe. After the pioneering initiative of BNEN, the Belgian Nuclear higher Education Network, two other countries created their own pool of education: Italy with CIRTEN (Consorzio InterUniversitario per la Ricerca Tecnologica sull'Energia Nucleare), and the United Kingdom with NTEC (Nuclear Technology Education Consortium). Also in Germany, recently, ILK (Internationale Laenderkommission Kerntechnik) recommended building up regional and supra-regional competence centres under the auspices of the National Alliance for Competence. In Switzerland, increased cooperation is taking place between the two federal polytechnic universities and the Paul Scherrer Institute. In this paper we describe this clustering process and discuss its possible future development. The subject of the paper is confined to nuclear engineering. (authors)

  2. Nuclear education and training in OECD member countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    Mankind now enjoys many benefits from nuclear-related technologies. There is, however, growing concern in many OECD countries that nuclear education and training is decreasing, perhaps to problematic levels. This report conveys the results of a pioneering survey on nuclear education and training in almost 200 organizations in 16 countries. In most countries there are now fewer comprehensive, high-quality nuclear technology programs at universities than before. Facilities and faculties for nuclear education are aging, and the number of nuclear programs is declining. The principal reason for the deterioration of nuclear education is the downward spiral of budgetary cut and low enrolment of student whose perception is affected by the educational circumstances, negative public perception, the downsizing of the industry, and reductions in government-funded nuclear programmes, where little strategic planning is occurring. Unless something is done to arrest it, this downward spiral of declining student interest and academic opportunities will continue. Failure to take appropriate steps now will seriously jeopardize the provision of adequate expertise tomorrow. We must act now on the following recommendations: strategic role of governments; the challenges of revitalizing nuclear education by university; vigorous research and maintaining high-quality training; and benefits of collaboration and sharing best practices. (author)

  3. Development of an Integrated Education/Training based Nuclear Outreach Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Kyongwon; Nam, Youngmi; Hwang, Ina; Lee, Jisuk; Ko, Hansuk; Lee, Taejoon

    2013-01-01

    The Korean nuclear community also recognizes the importance of outreach from its experience with rad waste and nuclear power programs. Accordingly, nationwide programs dealing with public information, support for local community development, and HRD are implemented continuously involving a number of organizations concerned. The Nuclear Training and Education Center (NTC) of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), with its unique function and capability as a national research organization, has needs for the enhancement of public acceptance for KAERI programs, a better contribution to the national effort, and addressing the emerging needs for international education/training on nuclear outreach. This paper presents an integrated education/training based nuclear outreach model with a set of reference program, which is developed for NTC. An integrated education/training based nuclear outreach model for NTC is developed addressing the increasing needs for public acceptance on the peaceful use of nuclear energy, in terms of supporting KAERI activities, contributing to the national nuclear outreach efforts, and promoting international education and training on nuclear outreach. The model, harmonized with the national nuclear outreach system, consists of objectives, target audiences, a set of reference program supported by infrastructure and networking, and an evaluation system. The program is further specified into sub-programs with detailed design for the respective audiences. The developed model with a reference program is characterized by its integrity in terms of encompassing the whole outreach process cycle, and setting up of a target audience based total program structure with existing and new sub-programs. Also, it intends to be sustainable by addressing future generations' needs as well as innovative in the program delivery. The model will be continuously upgraded and applied addressing respective needs of the audiences

  4. Development of an Integrated Education/Training based Nuclear Outreach Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kyongwon; Nam, Youngmi; Hwang, Ina; Lee, Jisuk; Ko, Hansuk; Lee, Taejoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The Korean nuclear community also recognizes the importance of outreach from its experience with rad waste and nuclear power programs. Accordingly, nationwide programs dealing with public information, support for local community development, and HRD are implemented continuously involving a number of organizations concerned. The Nuclear Training and Education Center (NTC) of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), with its unique function and capability as a national research organization, has needs for the enhancement of public acceptance for KAERI programs, a better contribution to the national effort, and addressing the emerging needs for international education/training on nuclear outreach. This paper presents an integrated education/training based nuclear outreach model with a set of reference program, which is developed for NTC. An integrated education/training based nuclear outreach model for NTC is developed addressing the increasing needs for public acceptance on the peaceful use of nuclear energy, in terms of supporting KAERI activities, contributing to the national nuclear outreach efforts, and promoting international education and training on nuclear outreach. The model, harmonized with the national nuclear outreach system, consists of objectives, target audiences, a set of reference program supported by infrastructure and networking, and an evaluation system. The program is further specified into sub-programs with detailed design for the respective audiences. The developed model with a reference program is characterized by its integrity in terms of encompassing the whole outreach process cycle, and setting up of a target audience based total program structure with existing and new sub-programs. Also, it intends to be sustainable by addressing future generations' needs as well as innovative in the program delivery. The model will be continuously upgraded and applied addressing respective needs of the audiences.

  5. Education in the nuclear sciences at Japanese universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, Y.

    1990-01-01

    Though there are 430 government and private universities in Japan, only a limited number of them have the department associated with nuclear science education. And the education is one-sided to government universities because mainly of financial problem. Nuclear engineering departments are installed at only 7 big universities. In addition, there are 3 institutes associated with a nuclear reactor. In these facilities, education on reactor physics, radiation measurement, electromagnetics and material sciences are conducted. For education on safety handling of radioactive materials, 10 radioisotope centers and 7 radiochemistry laboratories attached to big government universities act an important role. Almost all of the financial support for the above nuclear education come from the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. However, some other funds are introduced by the private connection of professors

  6. A Network Primer: Full-Fledged Educational Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Ariella

    1988-01-01

    Discusses some of the factors included in choosing appropriate computer networks for the classroom. Describes such networks as those produced by Apple Computer, Corvus Systems, Velan, Berkeley Softworks, Tandy, LAN-TECH, Unisys, and International Business Machines (IBM). (TW)

  7. Model of influence of nuclear education on public relations to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elagin, Yu.P.

    1996-01-01

    Method for evaluating the effect of the pupils nuclear education, as part of activities for improving the attitude of the population to nuclear power engineering is proposed. Results of calculations, made with constants values, obtained from Japan, are discussed. It is shown that the attitude to nuclear energy, formed at school, plays an essential role in formation of the future public opinion

  8. Social Network Theory in Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Peter A.

    Collaborative groups are important both in the learning environment of engineering education and, in the real world, the business of engineering design. Selecting appropriate individuals to form an effective group and monitoring a group's progress are important aspects of successful task performance. This exploratory study looked at using the concepts of cognitive social structures, structural balance, and centrality from social network analysis as well as the measures of emotional intelligence. The concepts were used to analyze potential team members to examine if an individual's ability to perceive emotion in others and the self and to use, understand, and manage those emotions are a factor in a group's performance. The students from a capstone design course in computer engineering were used as volunteer subjects. They were formed into groups and assigned a design exercise to determine whether and which of the above-mentioned tools would be effective in both selecting teams and predicting the quality of the resultant design. The results were inconclusive with the exception of an individual's ability to accurately perceive emotions. The instruments that were successful were the Self-Monitoring scale and the accuracy scores derived from cognitive social structures and Level IV of network levels of analysis.

  9. Challenges and Opportunities in Nuclear Science and Radiochemistry Education at the University of Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J. David; Etter, Randy L.; Neumeyer, Gayla M.; Miller, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last thirty years, numerous reports and workshops have documented the decline in nuclear and radiochemistry education programs in the United States. Practitioners and stakeholders are keenly aware of the impact this decline will have on emerging technologies and critical research and are fully committed to rebuilding programs in nuclear and radiochemistry. The challenge is, however, to persuade our academic peers and administrations to invest in nuclear and radiochemistry education and training programs in view of multiple competing priorities. This paper provides an overview of the expansion of the radiochemistry program and the creation of the Nuclear Energy Technology Workforce (NETWork) Center at the University of Missouri, Columbia and the lessons learned along the way.

  10. Potential of Social Networking Sites for Distance Education Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Jaime; Perini, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This chapter explores the potential of social networking sites for increasing student engagement for distance education learners. The authors present a modified student engagement model with a focus on the integration of technology, specifically social networking sites for community college distance education learners. The chapter concludes with…

  11. Computer Networking Strategies for Building Collaboration among Science Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aust, Ronald

    The development and dissemination of science materials can be associated with technical delivery systems such as the Unified Network for Informatics in Teacher Education (UNITE). The UNITE project was designed to investigate ways for using computer networking to improve communications and collaboration among university schools of education and…

  12. Exploring Educational and Cultural Adaptation through Social Networking Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Sherry D.; Magro, Michael J.; Sharp, Jason H.

    2011-01-01

    Social networking sites have seen tremendous growth and are widely used around the world. Nevertheless, the use of social networking sites in educational contexts is an under explored area. This paper uses a qualitative methodology, autoethnography, to investigate how social networking sites, specifically Facebook[TM], can help first semester…

  13. Social Network Methods for the Educational and Psychological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Tracy M.

    2016-01-01

    Social networks are especially applicable in educational and psychological studies involving social interactions. A social network is defined as a specific relationship among a group of individuals. Social networks arise in a variety of situations such as friendships among children, collaboration and advice seeking among teachers, and coauthorship…

  14. Modeling operational risks of the nuclear industry with Bayesian networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, Patricia; Lustosa, Leonardo J.

    2009-01-01

    Basically, planning a new industrial plant requires information on the industrial management, regulations, site selection, definition of initial and planned capacity, and on the estimation of the potential demand. However, this is far from enough to assure the success of an industrial enterprise. Unexpected and extremely damaging events may occur that deviates from the original plan. The so-called operational risks are not only in the system, equipment, process or human (technical or managerial) failures. They are also in intentional events such as frauds and sabotage, or extreme events like terrorist attacks or radiological accidents and even on public reaction to perceived environmental or future generation impacts. For the nuclear industry, it is a challenge to identify and to assess the operational risks and their various sources. Early identification of operational risks can help in preparing contingency plans, to delay the decision to invest or to approve a project that can, at an extreme, affect the public perception of the nuclear energy. A major problem in modeling operational risk losses is the lack of internal data that are essential, for example, to apply the loss distribution approach. As an alternative, methods that consider qualitative and subjective information can be applied, for example, fuzzy logic, neural networks, system dynamic or Bayesian networks. An advantage of applying Bayesian networks to model operational risk is the possibility to include expert opinions and variables of interest, to structure the model via causal dependencies among these variables, and to specify subjective prior and conditional probabilities distributions at each step or network node. This paper suggests a classification of operational risks in industry and discusses the benefits and obstacles of the Bayesian networks approach to model those risks. (author)

  15. Modeling operational risks of the nuclear industry with Bayesian networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieland, Patricia [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Industrial; Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: pwieland@cnen.gov.br; Lustosa, Leonardo J. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Industrial], e-mail: ljl@puc-rio.br

    2009-07-01

    Basically, planning a new industrial plant requires information on the industrial management, regulations, site selection, definition of initial and planned capacity, and on the estimation of the potential demand. However, this is far from enough to assure the success of an industrial enterprise. Unexpected and extremely damaging events may occur that deviates from the original plan. The so-called operational risks are not only in the system, equipment, process or human (technical or managerial) failures. They are also in intentional events such as frauds and sabotage, or extreme events like terrorist attacks or radiological accidents and even on public reaction to perceived environmental or future generation impacts. For the nuclear industry, it is a challenge to identify and to assess the operational risks and their various sources. Early identification of operational risks can help in preparing contingency plans, to delay the decision to invest or to approve a project that can, at an extreme, affect the public perception of the nuclear energy. A major problem in modeling operational risk losses is the lack of internal data that are essential, for example, to apply the loss distribution approach. As an alternative, methods that consider qualitative and subjective information can be applied, for example, fuzzy logic, neural networks, system dynamic or Bayesian networks. An advantage of applying Bayesian networks to model operational risk is the possibility to include expert opinions and variables of interest, to structure the model via causal dependencies among these variables, and to specify subjective prior and conditional probabilities distributions at each step or network node. This paper suggests a classification of operational risks in industry and discusses the benefits and obstacles of the Bayesian networks approach to model those risks. (author)

  16. EXPERIENCE NETWORKING UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION TRAINING MASTERS SAFETY OF LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Mikhailovna Rebko

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article discloses experience networking of universities (Herzen State Pedagogical University and Sakhalin State University in the development and implementation of joint training programs for master’s education in the field of life safety «Social security in the urban environment». The novelty of the work is to create a schematic design of basic educational training program for master’s education in the mode of networking, and to identify effective instructional techniques and conditions of networking.Purpose – present the results of the joint development of a network of the basic educational program (BEP, to identify the stages of networking, to design a generalized scheme of development and implementation of a network of educational training program for master’s education in the field of life safety.Results generalized model of networking partner institutions to develop and implement the basic educational program master.Practical implications: the education process for Master of Education in the field of health and safety in Herzen State Pedagogical University and Sakhalin State University.

  17. Elastic Network Model of a Nuclear Transport Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Patrick; Liu, Wing K.; Lee, Dockjin; Seo, Sangjae; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Moon K.

    2010-05-01

    The structure of Kap95p was obtained from the Protein Data Bank (www.pdb.org) and analyzed RanGTP plays an important role in both nuclear protein import and export cycles. In the nucleus, RanGTP releases macromolecular cargoes from importins and conversely facilitates cargo binding to exportins. Although the crystal structure of the nuclear import complex formed by importin Kap95p and RanGTP was recently identified, its molecular mechanism still remains unclear. To understand the relationship between structure and function of a nuclear transport complex, a structure-based mechanical model of Kap95p:RanGTP complex is introduced. In this model, a protein structure is simply modeled as an elastic network in which a set of coarse-grained point masses are connected by linear springs representing biochemical interactions at atomic level. Harmonic normal mode analysis (NMA) and anharmonic elastic network interpolation (ENI) are performed to predict the modes of vibrations and a feasible pathway between locked and unlocked conformations of Kap95p, respectively. Simulation results imply that the binding of RanGTP to Kap95p induces the release of the cargo in the nucleus as well as prevents any new cargo from attaching to the Kap95p:RanGTP complex.

  18. Nuclear science education in Taiwan, 1956-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung Chien

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear science education has been established in Taiwan at the College of Nuclear Science, National Tsing Hua University since 1956, the only one among 123 universities and colleges in Taiwan where nuclear-related education is offered. The Nuclear/Radiochemistry program, with nine faculty members, offers bachelor's, master's, and doctorate degrees in Nuclear Science. Lectures and lab classes of nuclear chemistry, radiochemistry, and allied branches in health physics, nuclear instruments, nuclear engineering, nuclear medicine, radiation biology, and environmental monitoring are given to the 17 undergraduate students and 33 postgraduate students currently registered. Support from the well-developed local nuclear power industry and government agencies is converged with rapid growth rate toward the Nuclear/Radiochemistry program; the 1992 annual research contracts for the program amounted over one million US dollars. Careerplacement program for graduates is developed to orientate them into the local nuclear power utilities as well as agricultural, medical, industrial, academic, and governmental sects where nuclear chemists and radiochemists at all levels are desperately needed. (author) 8 refs.; 3 figs.; 4 tabs

  19. Education - path towards solution regarding disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    Education, not emotional reaction, is the path to take in the safe disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Education is needed at all levels: Elementary schools, secondary schools, two-year colleges, four-year colleges, graduate schools, and adult education. The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) should not be expected to tackle this problem alone. Assistance is needed from local communities, schools, and state and federal governments. However, OCRWM can lay the foundation for a comprehensive educational plan directed specifically at educating the public on the spent nuclear fuel issue and OCRWM can begin the implementation of this plan

  20. Nuclear engineering education: A competence based approach to curricula development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining nuclear competencies in the nuclear industry is a one of the most critical challenges in the near future. With the development of a number of nuclear engineering educational programmes in several States, this publication provides guidance to decision makers in Member States on a competence based approach to curricula development, presenting the established practices and associated requirements for educational programmes in this field. It is a consolidation of best practices that will ensure sustainable, effective nuclear engineering programmes, contributing to the safe, efficient and economic operation of nuclear power plants. The information presented is drawn from a variety of recognized nuclear engineering programmes around the world and contributes to the main areas that are needed to ensure a viable and robust nuclear industry

  1. Expanding Usability of Virtual Network Laboratory in IT Engineering Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalibor M Dobrilovic

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with importance of virtual network laboratories usage in IT engineering education. It presents the particular virtual network laboratory model developed for usage in Computer Networks course as well. This virtual network laboratory, called VNLab, is based on virtualization technology. It has been successfully tested in educational process of Computer Network course for IT undergraduate students. Its usability for network related courses is analyzed by comparison of recommended curricula’s of world organizations such as IEEE, ACM and AIS. This paper is focused on expanding the usability of this virtual network laboratory to other non-network related courses. The primary expansion field is in domain of IT System Administration, IT Systems and Data Security and Operating Systems as well. The possible learning scenarios, learning tools and concepts for making this system applicable in these three additional fields are presented by the analyses of compatibility with recommended learning topics and outcomes by IEEE, ACM and AIS.

  2. Community-centred Networks and Networking among Companies, Educational and Cultural Institutions and Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konnerup, Ulla; Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone

    2010-01-01

    This article presents visions for community-centred networks and networking among companies, educational and cultural institutions and research based on blended on- and off-line collaboration and communication. Our point of departure is the general vision of networking between government, industry...... and research as formulated in the Triple Helix Model (Etzkowitz 2008). The article draws on a case study of NoEL, a network on e-learning among business, educational and cultural institutions and research, all in all 21 partners from all around Denmark. Focus is how networks and networking change character......’ in Networked Learning, Wenger et al. 2009; The analysis concerns the participation structure and how the network activities connect local work practices and research, and how technology and online communication contribute to a change from participation in offline and physical network activities into online...

  3. Ensuring the expert resources and education in nuclear energy field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirilae, P.

    1987-01-01

    The Finnish Atomic Energy Commission has published a report ''The Situation and the Needs for Development of Education in the Nuclear Energy Field''. According to it, the needs concerning the volume of education are small and no problem for Finland. But, the problem is how to maintain the present high level of training and education within this small volume

  4. EXPERIENCE NETWORKING UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION TRAINING MASTERS SAFETY OF LIFE

    OpenAIRE

    Elvira Mikhailovna Rebko

    2016-01-01

    The article discloses experience networking of universities (Herzen State Pedagogical University and Sakhalin State University) in the development and implementation of joint training programs for master’s education in the field of life safety «Social security in the urban environment». The novelty of the work is to create a schematic design of basic educational training program for master’s education in the mode of networking, and to identify effective instructional techniques and conditions...

  5. Educational experiments of radiochemistry in the nuclear engineering school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akatsu, Eiko

    1995-06-01

    Educational experiments of radiochemistry are described. They were an improvement of educational experiment of burn-up measurement as well as experiments on a solvent extraction, a cation exchange behavior of 60 Co, liquid scintillation spectrometry and half-life determination of 87 Rb, and determination of 137 Cs in sea water. Two or one of the experiments were ordinarily studied, depending the occasional situations, by the students of the general course or of the nuclear engineering course in the Nuclear Engineering School, Nuclear Education Center, JAERI from 1976 to 1994. (author)

  6. Nuclear Security Education in “non-Nuclear” Countries – Inseparable Component of Global Nuclear Security Scheme. Example of Montenegro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, S.

    2014-01-01

    • Global regime of nuclear security cannot be complete and functional if all countries are not involved; • Apart from the fact that developed nuclear countries are crucial in this sense (and determining the system), due attention should be paid to small, developing, “nonnuclear” ones; • Small problems in big countries are often big problems in small countries – so it is with HRD in nuclear related fields; • Everything is based on competence, with education being fundamental for building it up; • To that aim, the role of universities is of utmost importance, while networking is another corner stone; • Experience of Montenegro, perhaps exemplary in the above context, is discussed. (author)

  7. Research on artificial neural network applications for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Soon-Heung; Cheon, Se-Woo

    1992-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are an emerging computational technology which can significantly enhance a number of applications. These consist of many interconnected processing elements that exhibit human-like performance, i.e., learning, pattern recognition and associative memory skills. Several application studies on ANNs devoted to nuclear power plants have been carried out at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology since 1989. These studies include the feasibility of using ANNs for the following tasks: (1) thermal power prediction, (2) transient identification, (3) multiple alarm processing and diagnosis, (4) core thermal margin prediction, and (5) prediction of core parameters for fuel reloading. This paper introduces the back-propagation network (BPN) model which is the most commonly used algorithm, and summarizes each of the studies briefly. (author)

  8. A Comprehensive Nuclear Receptor Network for Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Kittler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In breast cancer, nuclear receptors (NRs play a prominent role in governing gene expression, have prognostic utility, and are therapeutic targets. We built a regulatory map for 24 NRs, six chromatin state markers, and 14 breast-cancer-associated transcription factors (TFs that are expressed in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. The resulting network reveals a highly interconnected regulatory matrix where extensive crosstalk occurs among NRs and other breast -cancer-associated TFs. We show that large numbers of factors are coordinately bound to highly occupied target regions throughout the genome, and these regions are associated with active chromatin state and hormone-responsive gene expression. This network also provides a framework for stratifying and predicting patient outcomes, and we use it to show that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta binds to a set of genes also regulated by the retinoic acid receptors and whose expression is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer.

  9. Contributions of the SCK.CEN Academy to education and training in nuclear science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coeck, Michele [SCK.CEN Academy, Boeretang 200, BE-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2015-07-01

    Thanks to its thorough experience in the field of nuclear science and technology, its innovative research and the availability of large and unique nuclear installations, SCK.CEN is not only a renowned nuclear research institution, but also an important partner for nuclear education and training in Belgium as well as at international level. Within the SCK.CEN Academy, more than 60 years of nuclear expertise and experience gained from our different research projects is collected and transferred. In the interest of maintaining a competent workforce in industry, Healthcare, research, and policy, and of transferring nuclear knowledge and skills to the next generations, the SCK.CEN Academy takes it as its mission to: - provide guidance for students and early-stage researchers; - organize academic courses and customized training for professionals; - offer policy support with regard to education and training matters; - care for critical-intellectual capacities for society. Specifically in the domain of nuclear instrumentation the SCK.CEN Academy provides an opportunity to students at Bachelor, Master and PhD level to make use of the SCK.CEN infrastructure to support their thesis research or to perform an internship with the aim to improve and extend their knowledge and skills in a specific research or technical domain. Further, they can contribute to new findings in the field of nuclear instrumentation. The students are guided by our scientists, engineers and technicians who have years of experience in the relevant field. In addition, the SCK.CEN Academy contributes to traditional university education programs and delivers courses in several nuclear topics such as dosimetry. We also coordinate the Belgian Nuclear higher Engineering Network (BNEN), a one year (60 ECTS) master-after-master specialization in nuclear engineering in which 6 Belgian universities and SCK.CEN are involved. Beyond the contributions to academic education, we also provide several customized training

  10. Contributions of the SCK.CEN Academy to education and training in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coeck, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to its thorough experience in the field of nuclear science and technology, its innovative research and the availability of large and unique nuclear installations, SCK.CEN is not only a renowned nuclear research institution, but also an important partner for nuclear education and training in Belgium as well as at international level. Within the SCK.CEN Academy, more than 60 years of nuclear expertise and experience gained from our different research projects is collected and transferred. In the interest of maintaining a competent workforce in industry, Healthcare, research, and policy, and of transferring nuclear knowledge and skills to the next generations, the SCK.CEN Academy takes it as its mission to: - provide guidance for students and early-stage researchers; - organize academic courses and customized training for professionals; - offer policy support with regard to education and training matters; - care for critical-intellectual capacities for society. Specifically in the domain of nuclear instrumentation the SCK.CEN Academy provides an opportunity to students at Bachelor, Master and PhD level to make use of the SCK.CEN infrastructure to support their thesis research or to perform an internship with the aim to improve and extend their knowledge and skills in a specific research or technical domain. Further, they can contribute to new findings in the field of nuclear instrumentation. The students are guided by our scientists, engineers and technicians who have years of experience in the relevant field. In addition, the SCK.CEN Academy contributes to traditional university education programs and delivers courses in several nuclear topics such as dosimetry. We also coordinate the Belgian Nuclear higher Engineering Network (BNEN), a one year (60 ECTS) master-after-master specialization in nuclear engineering in which 6 Belgian universities and SCK.CEN are involved. Beyond the contributions to academic education, we also provide several customized training

  11. Nuclear Engineering Education in Support of Thailand’s Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanyotha, S.; Pengvanich, P.; Nilsuwankosit, S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to introduce the nuclear engineering education at the Department of Nuclear Engineering, Chulalongkon University, Bangkok Thailand. The department has been offering curriculum in nuclear engineering to support the national nuclear power programme since 1970s. It is the oldest established nuclear engineering educational programme in the South East Asia region. Nevertheless, since the nuclear power programme has been postponed several times due to various reasons, the educational programme at the department has been continuously adapted to meet the nation’s needs. Several areas of study have been introduced, including nuclear power engineering, industrial applications of radioisotope, nuclear instrumentation, radioisotope production, radiation processing, environment and safety, nuclear materials, as well as the newly created nuclear security and non-proliferation. With the renewed interest in using nuclear power in Thailand in 2007, the department has been actively assisting both the government and the electric utility in preparing human resources to support the nuclear power programme through various educational and training modules. Realizing the importance of establishing and balancing all 3 aspects of the nuclear 3S (safety, security and safeguard) in Thailand and in the Southeast Asian region. The new curriculum of nuclear security and safeguard programme has been offered since 2013. Since the establishment, the department has produced hundreds of graduates (Diploma, Master’s, and Ph.D. levels) to feed the continuously expanding Thai nuclear industry. The full paper will provide detailed information of the curriculum, the challenges and obstacles that the department has encountered, as well as the national and international linkages which have been established over the years. (author)

  12. Nuclear science and society: social inclusion through scientific education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Denise S.

    2017-11-01

    This article presents a web-based educational project focused on the potential value of Information and Communication Technology to enhance communication and education on nuclear science throughout Brazil. The project is designed to provide trustworthy information about the beneficial uses of nuclear technology, educating children and teenagers, as well as their parents and teachers, demystifying paradigms and combating misinformation. Making use of a range of interactive activities, the website presents short courses and curiosities, with different themes that comprise the several aspects of the beneficial applications of nuclear science. The intention of the many interactive activities is to encourage research and to enhance learning opportunities through a self-learning universe where the target public is introduced to the basic concepts of nuclear physics, such as nuclides and isotopes, atomic interactions, radioactive decay, biological effects of radiation, nuclear fusion, nuclear fission, nuclear reactors, nuclear medicine, radioactive dating methods and natural occurring radiation, among other ideas and concepts in nuclear physics. Democratization of scientific education can inspire new thoughts, stimulate development and encourage scientific and technological researches.

  13. A comprehensive program of nuclear engineering and science education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereznai, G.; Lewis, B.

    2014-01-01

    The University of Ontario Institute of Technology offers undergraduate degrees in nuclear engineering, nuclear power, health physics and radiation science, graduate degrees (masters as well as doctorate) in nuclear engineering, and graduate diplomas that encompass a wide range of nuclear engineering and technology topics. Professional development programs tailored to specific utility needs are also offered, and the sharing of course material between the professional development and university education courses has strengthened both approaches to ensuring the high qualification levels required of professionals in the nuclear industry. (author)

  14. Nuclear science and technology in higher education in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernido, C.C.

    2007-01-01

    Education and training in nuclear science and technology in the Philippines are obtained from higher education institutions, and from courses offered by the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute. The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI), an institute under the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), is the sole government agency in charge of matters pertaining to nuclear science and technology, and the regulation of nuclear energy. The PNRI was tasked with fast-tracking nuclear education and information, together with the Department of Education, Culture and Sports (DECS), the Commission on Higher Education (CHED), and some other government agencies which constituted the Subcommittee on Nuclear Power Public Education and Information, by virtue of Executive Order 243 enacted by then President Ramos on May 12, 1995. This Executive Order created the Nuclear Power Steering Committee; the Subcommittee on Nuclear Power Public Education and Information was one of the subcommittees under it. The Nuclear Power Steering Committee was created when the government was again considering the feasibility of the nuclear power option; this Committee had since become inactive because the government has not re-embarked on a nuclear power program. The Philippines had a nuclear power program in the 1970's. The first nuclear power plant was nearing completion when Chernobyl and Three Mile Island happened. Due to the change in political climate and strong anti-nuclear sentiment, the first nuclear power plant had been mothballed. However, there is a possibility for the introduction of nuclear power in the country's projected energy sources by the year 2025. The country has one research reactor, a 3 MW Triga reactor, but at the present time it is not operational and is under extended shutdown. In the event that the Philippines will again implement a nuclear power program, there will be a great need for M.S. and Ph.D. holders in nuclear engineering. There are less than five

  15. Software network analyzer for computer network performance measurement planning over heterogeneous services in higher educational institutes

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, Mohd Nazri

    2009-01-01

    In 21st century, convergences of technologies and services in heterogeneous environment have contributed multi-traffic. This scenario will affect computer network on learning system in higher educational Institutes. Implementation of various services can produce different types of content and quality. Higher educational institutes should have a good computer network infrastructure to support usage of various services. The ability of computer network should consist of i) higher bandwidth; ii) ...

  16. Education in radiation, radioactivity, and nuclear science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faubert, I.; Wohrizek, J.; Donev, J., E-mail: Isaac.faubert@gmail.com [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear science and nuclear energy are not widely understood topics. A lack of understanding for a potentially dangerous technology can be the cause for avoidance and even fear. In order to break down the barriers of a misunderstood industry, high energy learning is an initiative to change the perspective of nuclear science and technology. Through explanation of the fundamental concepts surrounding nuclear science, we reconstruct a trust within the communities and cultures across the nation. Being able to change the perspective of uninformed and misinformed people may not only benefit the nuclear industry, but the state of our global environment. (author)

  17. Education in radiation, radioactivity, and nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faubert, I.; Wohrizek, J.; Donev, J.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear science and nuclear energy are not widely understood topics. A lack of understanding for a potentially dangerous technology can be the cause for avoidance and even fear. In order to break down the barriers of a misunderstood industry, high energy learning is an initiative to change the perspective of nuclear science and technology. Through explanation of the fundamental concepts surrounding nuclear science, we reconstruct a trust within the communities and cultures across the nation. Being able to change the perspective of uninformed and misinformed people may not only benefit the nuclear industry, but the state of our global environment. (author)

  18. Strategy for Nuclear Technology Education at Uppsala University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterlund, M.; Hakansson, A.; Tengborn, E.

    2010-01-01

    After the TMI accident 1979, and later the Tjernobyl accident, the future of nuclear power was vividly debated in Sweden. The negative public opinion governed a number of political decisions that marked an ambition to out-phase nuclear power prior to 2010. Due to this, the student's interest in nuclear technology ceased and together with the fact that public funding to nuclear technology was withdrawn, academic research and education within the field were effectively dismounted. In the beginning of 1990 it became clear to the society that nuclear power could not easily be closed down and the issue of the future competence supply to the nuclear industry was initiated. In the mid-nineties the situation became acute due to the fact that personnel in the nuclear industry started to retire in an increasing pace necessitating measures to be taken in order to secure the future operation of the nuclear power plants. In the year 2000, the Swedish nuclear power plants, Westinghouse Electric Sweden and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority embarked a project together with the three major universities in the field, Uppsala University, The Royal Institute of Technology and Chalmers University of Technology. The aim of this project was to define a financial platform for reconstructing the Swedish research and education in nuclear technology. The project, named the Swedish Centre for Nuclear Technology (SKC), has during a decade been the major financier to nuclear technology research and education. Using funding from SKC, Uppsala University formulated a strategy along two tracks: 1) Instead of creating ambitious master programs in nuclear technology, the already existing engineering programs in a wide range of fields were utilized to expose as many students as possible to nuclear technology. 2) A program was initiated together with the nuclear industry aiming at educating newly employed personnel. The result is encouraging; starting from essentially zero, typically 100

  19. Graduate nuclear engineering programmes motivate educational and research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavko, B.

    2000-01-01

    Some fifteen years ago the University of Ljubljana, Faculty for Mathematics and Physics together with the national research organisation the J. Stefan jointly established a Graduate programme of Nuclear Engineering. From the onset, the programme focused on nuclear technology, nuclear safety, and reactor physics and environment protection. Over the years this graduate programme has became the focal point of nuclear related, research and educational activities in Slovenia. It has grown into a meeting ground for recognised national and distinguished foreign educators and experienced professionals from the industry. In conjunction with an important national project, supported by the Slovenian government, entitled 'Jung Researcher' it also enhances the knowledge transfer to the next generation. Since the programme was introduced, the interest for this programme has been steadily growing. Accordingly, a number of PhD and MS degrees in NE have been awarded. The graduates of this programme have encountered very good job opportunities in nuclear as well as in non-nuclear sector. (author)

  20. Education and training in nuclear science/engineering in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, C.

    1994-01-01

    The present status of nuclear education and training in Taiwan is reviewed. The nuclear science/engineering program has been established in Taiwan under the College of Nuclear Science at the National Tsing Hua University since 1956; it remains the only program among 123 universities and colleges in Taiwan where education and training in nuclear fields are offered. The program, with 52 faculty members, offers advanced studies leading to BSc, MSc, and PhD degrees. Lectures and lab classes are given to 600 students currently registered in the program. Career placement program geared for the 200 graduate and 400 undergraduate students is to orientate them into the local nuclear power utilities as well as agricultural, medical, industrial, academic and governmental sectors where nuclear scientists and engineers at all levels are needed. 8 refs., 1 fig

  1. The European Nuclear Society Young Generation Network: Five years of networking experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meskens, Gaston

    2000-01-01

    In 1995, Mr Jan Runermark (Sweden), aware of a need for an exchange of knowledge from the older to the younger generation, came up with the idea of starting a European Nuclear Society Young Generation Network. A first network was formed with Sweden, the Netherlands, Spain, Finland, Germany and Belgium. The ENSYGN is now affiliated to the European Nuclear Society and brings together young students and professionals from 21 member countries Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, and United Kingdom, The ENSYGN Core group meets (at least) twice a year and elects its own chair and co chair for a term of two years. The ENSYGN chair has a seat in the ENS Steering Committee and in the ENS Board. The ENSYGN works closely together with other young generation networks from the US, Australia, Japan and South America. ENSYGN organises workshops and courses on European level, takes part in international meetings (fl. UNFCCC, OECD) and stimulates networking on national level

  2. Nuclear Physics Science Network Requirements Workshop, May 2008 - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tierney, Ed., Brian L; Dart, Ed., Eli; Carlson, Rich; Dattoria, Vince; Ernest, Michael; Hitchcock, Daniel; Johnston, William; Kowalski, Andy; Lauret, Jerome; Maguire, Charles; Olson, Douglas; Purschke, Martin; Rai, Gulshan; Watson, Chip; Vale, Carla

    2008-11-10

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States of America. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In May 2008, ESnet and the Nuclear Physics (NP) Program Office of the DOE Office of Science organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by the NP Program Office. Most of the key DOE sites for NP related work will require significant increases in network bandwidth in the 5 year time frame. This includes roughly 40 Gbps for BNL, and 20 Gbps for NERSC. Total transatlantic requirements are on the order of 40 Gbps, and transpacific requirements are on the order of 30 Gbps. Other key sites are Vanderbilt University and MIT, which will need on the order of 20 Gbps bandwidth to support data transfers for the CMS Heavy Ion program. In addition to bandwidth requirements, the workshop emphasized several points in regard to science process and collaboration. One key point is the heavy reliance on Grid tools and infrastructure (both PKI and tools such as GridFTP) by the NP community. The reliance on Grid software is expected to increase in the future. Therefore, continued development and support of Grid software is very important to the NP science community. Another key finding is that scientific productivity is greatly enhanced by easy researcher-local access to instrument data. This is driving the creation of distributed repositories for instrument data at collaborating institutions, along with a corresponding increase in demand for network-based data transfers and the tools

  3. Nuclear energy education: the role of the UKAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, J.

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes the educational work on nuclear energy, provided by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. The Authority provides a wide range of educational materials and services, including: a speaker service, organisation of educational seminars and symposia, and visits to establishments by teachers and students. The teaching aids produced as part of the Authority's education programme includes: teaching packs, computer software, videos, films, slide tapes, booklets and posters. (U.K.)

  4. Some aspects of the nuclear education of Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebellato, Ana; Hermida Lamanna, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the status and trend of university education in Uruguay doing special emphasis on the nuclear area. Furthermore, the regulatory framework, current education law, main principles which govern, objectives, brief description of the Ceibal plan and social inclusion for children and adolescents are listed. They are presented the main indicators at different levels of education. A special section presents bodies historical background which they have developed nuclear activities. They are described lines of work in the development and use of nuclear techniques in the most recent country and statement of projects Cyclotron (CUDIM) and gamma irradiation (LATU).Current status and trends in nuclear power generation energy policy its regulatory framework .Main offer in university careers in the subject, new courses creating and educational resources available: e learning environment program - PROEVA and free institutional knowledge repositories of the University -COLIBRI ROU

  5. Misinformation, nuclear energy and national education in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karatchentzeff, M.

    2005-01-01

    Some people think that nuclear energy will develop again in France. They are mistaken: they will face rising generations that are educated to be antinuclear. This paper analyses one of the ways by which this could be achieved. (author)

  6. A study on methodologies for assessing safety critical network's risk impact on Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, T. J.; Lee, H. J.; Park, S. K.; Seo, S. J.

    2006-08-01

    The objectives of this project is to investigate and study existing reliability analysis techniques for communication networks in order to develop reliability analysis models for Nuclear Power Plant's safety-critical networks. It is necessary to make a comprehensive survey of current methodologies for communication network reliability. Major outputs of the first year study are design characteristics of safety-critical communication networks, efficient algorithms for quantifying reliability of communication networks, and preliminary models for assessing reliability of safety-critical communication networks

  7. Advancing Health Professions Education Research by Creating a Network of Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Patricia A; Brandt, Barbara; Dekhtyar, Michael; Holmboe, Eric S

    2018-02-27

    Producing the best evidence to show educational outcomes, such as competency achievement and credentialing effectiveness, across the health professions education continuum will require large multisite research projects and longitudinal studies. Current limitations that must be overcome to reach this goal include the prevalence of single-institution study designs, assessments of a single curricular component, and cross-sectional study designs that provide only a snapshot in time of a program or initiative rather than a longitudinal perspective.One solution to overcoming these limitations is to develop a network of networks that collaborates, using longitudinal approaches, across health professions and regions of the United States. Currently, individual networks are advancing educational innovation toward understanding the effectiveness of educational and credentialing programs. Examples of such networks include: (1) the American Medical Association's Accelerating Change in Medical Education initiative, (2) the National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education, and (3) the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Accreditation System. In this Invited Commentary, the authors briefly profile these existing networks, identify their progress and the challenges they have encountered, and propose a vigorous way forward toward creating a national network of networks designed to determine the effectiveness of health professions education and credentialing.

  8. Neural networks. A new analytical tool, applicable also in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stritar, A.

    1992-01-01

    The basic concept of neural networks and back propagation learning algorithm are described. The behaviour of typical neural network is demonstrated on a simple graphical case. A short literature survey about the application of neural networks in nuclear science and engineering is made. The application of the neural network to the probability density calculation is shown. (author) [sl

  9. Technical Meeting on Establishing Networks for Countries Introducing Nuclear Power. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the meeting were to: • Learn about existing networking opportunities that may be of interest for embarking countries; • Discuss common challenges among Member States that could be addressed through better networking opportunities; • Determine appropriate sub-networks, such as future owner/operator organizations, heads of nuclear energy programme implementing organizations (NEPIOs), embarking countries and countries with current civil nuclear programmes; and • Discuss effective strategies for creating networks using existing social media platforms

  10. Attracting students to nuclear careers: INPO educational assistance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkle, M.

    1981-01-01

    The utility industry is responding to a manpower shortage of 2000 at nuclear plants with a concerted analysis of regional training centers and educational assistance programs through the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). University support and cooperation are generally strong. The INPO program includes undergraduate- and graduate-level scholarships and fellowships

  11. Nuclear-fuel-cycle education: Module 10. Environmental consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wethington, J.A.; Razvi, J.; Grier, C.; Myrick, T.

    1981-12-01

    This educational module is devoted to the environmental considerations of the nuclear fuel cycle. Eight chapters cover: National Environmental Policy Act; environmental impact statements; environmental survey of the uranium fuel cycle; the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant; transport mechanisms; radiological hazards in uranium mining and milling operations; radiological hazards of uranium mill tailings; and the use of recycle plutonium in mixed oxide fuel

  12. Nuclear War Education: Teaching the Most Important Academic Subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringler, Dick

    1983-01-01

    The state of nuclear war education in the college curriculum is briefly discussed, and a successful interdisciplinary course is described. Readings are listed for each course emphasis: nuclear science and weapons; consequences of their use; visions and nightmares; paths toward war: language, psychology, and politics; and paths toward peace. (MSE)

  13. Cyber Learning Platform for Nuclear Education and Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojtela, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Cyber Learning Platform for Nuclear Education and Training: … support capacity building and knowledge transfer in the nuclear sector by empowering web-based development and dissemination of high-quality learning resources in a way that is cost-effective, scalable and easy to use …

  14. SAYNPS Participation in Nuclear Public Education in South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thugwane, S.J. [South African Young Nuclear Professionals Society, P.O. Box 582 Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Khathi, N.F.; Rasweswe, M.A. [South African Young Nuclear Professionals Society, P.O. Box 582 Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); South African Nuclear Energy Corporation, P.O. Box 582 Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2008-07-01

    The South African Young Nuclear Professionals Society (SAYNPS) has an objective to help inform and educate the public about the importance and benefits of nuclear science and technology. In South Africa, the government hosts annual national science campaigns to promote science and technology. These include the National Science Week, Science Olympiads and Energy week. SAYNPS encourages its members to participate in these campaigns through exhibitions and schools outreach programmes. Through these campaigns, schoolteachers and learners are educated about the benefits of safe usage of nuclear technology and about different careers in the nuclear industry. Through participation in the different campaigns it was acknowledged that participation of young professionals in public education will help preserve nuclear knowledge in the country. It was concluded that public education is still a task that needs to be intensified in order for the public to know the benefits of safe usage of nuclear technology. Scope: This paper presents the role that SAYNPS has played in nuclear public education in South Africa in 2006 and 2007. (authors)

  15. SAYNPS Participation in Nuclear Public Education in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thugwane, S.J.; Khathi, N.F.; Rasweswe, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The South African Young Nuclear Professionals Society (SAYNPS) has an objective to help inform and educate the public about the importance and benefits of nuclear science and technology. In South Africa, the government hosts annual national science campaigns to promote science and technology. These include the National Science Week, Science Olympiads and Energy week. SAYNPS encourages its members to participate in these campaigns through exhibitions and schools outreach programmes. Through these campaigns, schoolteachers and learners are educated about the benefits of safe usage of nuclear technology and about different careers in the nuclear industry. Through participation in the different campaigns it was acknowledged that participation of young professionals in public education will help preserve nuclear knowledge in the country. It was concluded that public education is still a task that needs to be intensified in order for the public to know the benefits of safe usage of nuclear technology. Scope: This paper presents the role that SAYNPS has played in nuclear public education in South Africa in 2006 and 2007. (authors)

  16. Establishment of the International Nuclear Education/Training and its Cooperation Framework for Nuclear Transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. J.; Han, K. W.; Lee, E. J.

    2009-02-01

    This project covered development and implementation of international nuclear education/training programs, cooperation for nuclear human resource development and education/training. provision of MS and PhD courses for qualified students from developing countries, and strengthening of infrastructure for the nuclear education/training. The WNU one week summer course was held for domestic future generation in nuclear field. NTC operated the ANENT web portal and cyber platform, supported training on their use, and prepared a KAERI-IAEA Practical Arrangement for the promotion of web-base nuclear education/training. For FNCA, an analysis was conducted on the need of nuclear education/training in South East Asian countries. The bilateral cooperation included cooperation with Vietnam. provision of Korean experience for nuclear power personnel from Egypt, and commencing of cooperation with South Africa. Also, NTC participated in GENEP for sharing Korean experience in the nuclear human resource development project. KAERI-UST MA and PhD courses with 3 foreign students started in spring 2008 and implemented. The courses were advance nuclear reactor system engineering, accelerator and nano-beam engineering, and radiation measurement science. 13 international nuclear education/training courses (IAEA, KOICA, RCARO and bilateral) were implemented for 226 foreign trainees. A reference education/training program was developed, which consisted of 15 courses that can be customized to learner levels and project stages of countries in question (e.g. Middle East. Africa). A textbook entitled 'Research Reactor Design, Management and Utilization' was developed presenting Korean experience with research reactors

  17. High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dart, Eli; Bauerdick, Lothar; Bell, Greg; Ciuffo, Leandro; Dasu, Sridhara; Dattoria, Vince; De, Kaushik; Ernst, Michael; Finkelson, Dale; Gottleib, Steven; Gutsche, Oliver; Habib, Salman; Hoeche, Stefan; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Ibarra, Julio; Johnston, William; Kisner, Theodore; Kowalski, Andy; Lauret, Jerome; Luitz, Steffen; Mackenzie, Paul; Maguire, Chales; Metzger, Joe; Monga, Inder; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Nielsen, Jason; Price, Larry; Porter, Jeff; Purschke, Martin; Rai, Gulshan; Roser, Rob; Schram, Malachi; Tull, Craig; Watson, Chip; Zurawski, Jason

    2014-03-02

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements needed by instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In August 2013, ESnet and the DOE SC Offices of High Energy Physics (HEP) and Nuclear Physics (NP) organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the HEP and NP program offices. Several key findings resulted from the review. Among them: 1. The Large Hadron Collider?s ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus) and CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiments are adopting remote input/output (I/O) as a core component of their data analysis infrastructure. This will significantly increase their demands on the network from both a reliability perspective and a performance perspective. 2. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments (particularly ATLAS and CMS) are working to integrate network awareness into the workflow systems that manage the large number of daily analysis jobs (1 million analysis jobs per day for ATLAS), which are an integral part of the experiments. Collaboration with networking organizations such as ESnet, and the consumption of performance data (e.g., from perfSONAR [PERformance Service Oriented Network monitoring Architecture]) are critical to the success of these efforts. 3. The international aspects of HEP and NP collaborations continue to expand. This includes the LHC experiments, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) experiments, the Belle II Collaboration, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and others. The international nature of these collaborations makes them heavily

  18. Establishing Requirements for Nuclear Engineering Educational Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraskin, N.I.; Kosilov, A.N.; Sbaffoni, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: » There is no single approach in curricula development. » New programmes must fit into national requirements. » Because of the strong international interdependency of all nations using nuclear energy, it is critically important that a competent staff is engaged at all nuclear power plants in every country. » International approach for benchmarking university programs is to be in place with a direct benefit to the countries with new nuclear power projects

  19. Neural network analysis of nuclear waste glass composition vs durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibel, C.K.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between the chemical composition of oxide glasses and their physical properties is poorly understood, but it is becoming more important as vitrification (transformation into glass) of high-level nuclear waste becomes the favored method for long-term storage. The vitrified waste will be stored deep in geologic repositories where it must remain intact for at least 10,000 years. A strong resistance to groundwater exposure; i.c. a slow rate of glass dissolution, is of great importance. This project deals specifically with glass samples developed and tested for the nuclear fuel reprocessing facility near West Valley, New York. This facility needs to dispose of approximately 2.2 million liters of high-level radioactive liquid waste currently stored in stainless steel tanks. A self-organizing, artificial neural network was used to analyze the trends in the glass dissolution data for the effects of composition and the resulting durability of borosilicate glasses in an aqueous environment. This durability data can be used to systematically optimize the properties of the complex nuclear glasses and slow the dissolution rate of radionuclides into the environment

  20. Approaches to Education and Training for Kenya's Nuclear Power Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalambuka, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    1. Review of status and development of E and T for the nuclear power program in Kenya; 2. Review of challenges in nuclear E and T, and the initiatives being undertaken to mitigate them: • Recommendations for strategic action; 3. State of nuclear skills in the context of key drivers of the global revival in nuclear energy; 4. Point of view: Education in Applied Nuclear and Radiation physics at Nairobi: • Its growth has helped identify the gaps, and relevant practical approaches for realizing the broad spectrum of technical capacity to conduct a national NPP; 5. Proposed approach to support the E and T infrastructure necessary to allow the country to plan, construct, operate, regulate, and safely and securely handle nuclear facilities sustainably; 6. Specified E and T initiatives in the context of the national industrial development strategy and nuclear energy policy and funding for the complete life cycle and technology localization. (author)

  1. Accelerator physics and nuclear energy education in INRNE-BAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonev, D.; Goutev, N.; Georgiev, L. S.

    2015-01-01

    Presently Bulgaria has no research nuclear facility, neither a research reactor, nor an accelerator. With the new cyclotron laboratory in Sofia the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences will restart the experimental research program not only in the fi eld of nuclear physics, but also in many interdisciplinary fields related to nuclear physics. The cornerstone of the cyclotron laboratory is a cyclotron TR24, which provides a proton beam with a variable energy between 15 and 24 MeV and current of up to 0.4 mA. The TR24 accelerator allows for the production of a large variety of radioisotopes for medical applications and development of radiopharmaceuticals. The new cyclotron facility will be used for research in radiopharmacy, radiochemistry, radiobiology, nuclear physics, solid state physics, applied research, new materials and for education in all these fields including especially nuclear energy. Keywords: Cyclotron, PET/CT, radiopharmacy

  2. Do nuclear engineering educators have a special responsibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    Each 1000 MW(e) reactor in equilibrium contains 15 x 10 9 Ci of radioactivity. To handle this material safety requires an extremely high level of expertise and commitment - in many respects, an expertise that goes beyond what is demanded of any other technology. If one grants that nuclear engineering is more demanding than other engineering because the price of failure is greater, one must ask how can we inculcate into the coming generations of nuclear engineers a full sense of the responsibility they bear in practising their profession. Clearly a first requirement is that all elements of the nuclear community -utility executives, equipment engineers, operating engineers, nuclear engineers, administrators - must recognize and accept the idea that nuclear energy is something special, and that therefore its practitioners must be special. This sense must be instilled into young nuclear engineers during their education. A special responsibility therefore devolves upon nuclear engineering educators: first, to recognize the special character of their profession, and second, to convey this sense to their students. The possibility of institutionalizing this sense of responsibility by establishing a nuclear Hippocratic Oath or special canon of ethics for nuclear engineers ought to be discussed within the nuclear community. (author)

  3. Understanding Classrooms through Social Network Analysis: A Primer for Social Network Analysis in Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunspan, Daniel Z.; Wiggins, Benjamin L.; Goodreau, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Social interactions between students are a major and underexplored part of undergraduate education. Understanding how learning relationships form in undergraduate classrooms, as well as the impacts these relationships have on learning outcomes, can inform educators in unique ways and improve educational reform. Social network analysis (SNA)…

  4. Educational activity on nuclear energy in Aomori region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Katsunori

    2008-01-01

    There are many nuclear industries and research facilities in Aomori Prefecture, Japan. Fuel cycle facilities and a LWR power station are now in operation. Another fuel cycle facilities and power stations will soon be under construction. Fusion research activity, ITER-BA, has started last year. We have launched nuclear-related education and research programs to teach nuclear engineering knowledge and skills to the local students. Hachinohe Institute of Technology is located on Pacific ocean side of Aomori Prefecture close to Rokkasho area, and has six undergraduate departments and three graduate courses. Hitherto, many alumni have engaged in nuclear-related companies in the area. In addition to previous subject on nuclear engineering, a new activity 'Challenge Nuclear-site Experience Program' started in 2007, as one of nuclear educational promotion programs in Japan. The students from various engineering departments learned the status and role of nuclear industries and researches. A curriculum course for nuclear engineering will be ready in 2009 for undergraduate students through various departments. In the summer of 2007, the introductory lesson on nuclear power generation and the technical tour to the power station were carried out for two days. In the autumn, the introductory lesson on nuclear fuel cycle and the tour to fuel cycle facilities were performed for three days, including one day tour to research facilities in the area. Its aim was to let the students recognize the role of regional nuclear activities and the attractiveness of nuclear-related industries. The program was supported by Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry and was performed in cooperation with Tohoku Electric Power Company, Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited and Japan Atomic Energy Agency. (author)

  5. Nuclear education in Russia: Status, peculiarities, problems and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onykii, B.N.; Kryuchkov, E.F.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: For longer than 50-year period of nuclear industry development in the USSR, the specialists training system has been created to meet completely the industrial branch's demands for the specialists of all possible qualifications for research, engineering and production activities. This educational system does exist in Russia till now. In the presentation the following items will be addressed: Nuclear Engineering education in Russia: status and peculiarities; Demands of nuclear enterprises for the alumni. Role of the Universities in these problems solution; Nuclear engineering education problems in Russia; Master of science education in nuclear aria; Perspectives of nuclear education in Russia; Integration of nuclear education in Europe: perspectives and problems. The educational system in nuclear engineering, like an educational system in any other knowledge area in Russia, includes the training activities limited by Russian legislation only: academic training of the specialists with award of the State certificates (higher education, re-training, qualification upgrade); qualification upgrade of the specialists without award of the State certificates. The system of education represents a multi-level structure oriented at any possible needs of industrial branches. At present, more than 20 Russian higher education institutions train the specialists in nuclear engineering. The specialists training in nuclear engineering is being conducted in all these universities in full accordance with common educational curricula and standards which define some peculiarities of the specialists training in this area: 1) Combination of fundamental knowledge in physics and mathematics with profound engineering skills; 2) Large share of laboratory works; 3) Participation at the research work starting from the 4th year student; 4) Long education time (5-6 years) and period for thesis preparation (1/2 year - pre-diploma internship and 1/2 year of thesis preparation); 5) High

  6. Proceedings of NUCLEAR 2008 annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Turcu, Ilie

    2008-01-01

    The proceedings of the NUCLEAR 2008 annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education held at INR-Pitesti on May, 28 - 30 2008 contain 88 communications presented in 3 sections addressing the themes of Nuclear energy, Environmental protection, and Sustainable development. In turn these sections are addressing the following items: Section 1.1 - Nuclear safety and severe accidents (12 papers); Section 1.2 - Nuclear reactors (11 papers); Section 1.3 - Nuclear technologies and materials (20 papers); Section 2.1 - Radioprotection (5 papers); Section 2.2 - Radioactive waste management (20 papers); Section 2.3 - air, water and soil protection (5 papers); Section 3.1 - Strategies in energy (3 papers); Section 3.2 - Education, continuous formation and knowledge transfer (8 papers); Section 3.3 - International partnership for a sustainable development (4 papers). The conference proceedings where divided into two parts. This item refers particularly to the second part

  7. Proceedings of NUCLEAR 2008 annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Turcu, Ilie

    2008-01-01

    The proceedings of the NUCLEAR 2008 annual international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education held at INR-Pitesti on May, 28 - 30 2008 contain 88 communications presented in 3 sections addressing the themes of Nuclear energy, Environmental protection, and Sustainable development. In turn these sections are addressing the following items: Section 1.1 - Nuclear safety and severe accidents (12 papers); Section 1.2 - Nuclear reactors (11 papers); Section 1.3 - Nuclear technologies and materials (20 papers); Section 2.1 - Radioprotection (5 papers); Section 2.2 - Radioactive waste management (20 papers); Section 2.3 - air, water and soil protection (5 papers); Section 3.1 - Strategies in energy (3 papers); Section 3.2 - Education, continuous formation and knowledge transfer (8 papers); Section 3.3 - International partnership for a sustainable development (4 papers)

  8. Networked Learning and Network Science: Potential Applications to Health Professionals' Continuing Education and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Alvaro; Parboosingh, John

    2015-01-01

    Prior interpersonal relationships and interactivity among members of professional associations may impact the learning process in continuing medical education (CME). On the other hand, CME programs that encourage interactivity between participants may impact structures and behaviors in these professional associations. With the advent of information and communication technologies, new communication spaces have emerged that have the potential to enhance networked learning in national and international professional associations and increase the effectiveness of CME for health professionals. In this article, network science, based on the application of network theory and other theories, is proposed as an approach to better understand the contribution networking and interactivity between health professionals in professional communities make to their learning and adoption of new practices over time. © 2015 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  9. Education in the nuclear sciences in Japanese universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Although there are 430 governmental and private universities in Japan, only a limited number of them have departments associated with nuclear science education. Moreover, mainly because of financial pressures, this association is often limited to government universities. Nuclear engineering departments are incorporated with only seven of larger universities, and there are three institutes with nuclear reactors. In these facilities, education in reactor physics, radiation measurements, electromagnetic and material sciences, are conducted. In terms of radiation safety and radiological health physics, ten radioisotope centers and seven radiochemistry laboratories in universities play an important role. (author) 8 figs.; 5 tabs

  10. Current status of nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palladino, N.J.

    1975-01-01

    The 65 colleges and universities offering undergraduate degrees in nuclear engineering and the 15 schools offering strong nuclear engineering options are, in general, doing a good job to meet the current spectrum of job opportunities. But, nuclear engineering programs are not producing enough graduates to meet growing demands. They currently receive little aid and support from their customers --industry and government--in the form of scholarships, grants, faculty research support, student thesis and project support, or student summer jobs. There is not enough interaction between industry and universities. Most nuclear engineering programs are geared too closely to the technology of the present family of reactors and too little to the future breeder reactors and controlled thermonuclear reactors. In addition, nuclear engineering programs attract too few women and members of minority ethnic groups. Further study of the reasons for this fact is needed so that effective corrective action can be taken. Faculty in nuclear engineering programs should assume greater initiative to provide attractive and objective nuclear energy electives for technical and nontechnical students in other disciplines to improve their technical understanding of the safety and environmental issues involved. More aggressive and persistent efforts must be made by nuclear engineering schools to obtain industry support and involvement in their programs

  11. Status of nuclear engineering education in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear engineering education in the United States is reflective of the perceived health of the nuclear electric power industry within the country. Just as new commercial reactor orders have vanished and some power plants have shut down, so too have university enrollments shrunk and research reactors closed. This decline in nuclear trained specialists and the disappearance of the nuclear infrastructure is a trend that must be arrested and reversed if the United States is to have a workforce capable of caring for a nuclear power industry to not only meet future electric demand but to ensure that the over 100 existing plants, their supporting facilities and their legacy in the form of high level waste and facility clean-up are addressed. Additionally, the United States has an obligation to support and maintain its nuclear navy and other defence needs. And, lastly, if the United States is to have a meaningful role in the international use of nuclear power with regard to safety, non-proliferation and the environment, then it is imperative that the country continues to produce world-class nuclear engineers and scientists by supporting nuclear engineering education at its universities. The continued support of the federal government. and industry for university nuclear engineering and nuclear energy research and development is essential to sustain the nuclear infrastructure in the United States. Even with this support, and the continued excellent operation of the existing fleet of nuclear electric power plants, it is conceivable that nuclear engineering as an academic discipline may fall victim to poor communications and a tarnished public image. What is needed is a combination of federal and industrial support along with the creativity of the universities to expand their offerings to include more than power production. The objective is a positive message on careers in nuclear related fields, and recognition of the important role of nuclear energy in meeting the country

  12. Establishing Sustainable Nuclear Education: Education Capability Assessment and Planning (ECAP) Assist Mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugbor, U.; Peddicord, K.; Dies, J.; Philip, B.; Artisyuk, V.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The development of nuclear education, science and technology programmes is affected by the national context including national needs and capacities. The role and expectations for nuclear education and training might be different in technically matured countries, from countries where the technology is emerging. In this regard, particularly in developing countries, there is a need to balance nuclear education and training between immediate critical issues of radiation safety or human health and longer-term priorities in agriculture or industry. These priorities may or may not include the nuclear energy option. This paper shows how the Education Capability Assessment and Planning (ECAP) Assist Mission can contribute towards establishing sustainable nuclear education, including highlighting the various activities of each phase of the ECAP Process. (author

  13. Tackling the nuclear manpower shortage: industry, educators must work together

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witzig, W.

    1981-01-01

    A 50% decline in graduate enrollment and an increase to 50% of foreign nationals among the nuclear engineering students since 1973 at Pennsylvania State University is typical of national trends, which have led to the closing of 13 undergraduate programs across the country. Penn State's proximity to Three Mile Island had less effect than its interactions with high schools and utilities in keeping the nuclear program as strong as it is. Penn State operates three separate career programs to interest high school students in a nuclear career. Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) educational assistance reflects industry interest, but more scholarships are needed to broaden student awareness

  14. Nuclear utility education and training becoming too plant specific?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, F.

    1986-01-01

    As the Supervisor of a university nuclear reactor and operations curriculum, the author has also been offering education and training programs for nuclear utility technical support and operations personnel. Similar results have been reported by other universities offering similar programs. These programs also provide very important benefits to university nuclear engineering departments in terms of much needed revenues during this time of declining student enrollment and also by the information flow from the nuclear utility participants to the university personnel, which can yield both improved courses and identify research opportunities. University programs serve an important complementary function to plant-specific programs and should be continued and supported

  15. Collaborative Network Management for Enhancing Quality Education of Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikoed, Wisithsak; Sirisuthi, Chaiyuth; Numnaphol, Kochaporn

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to study the network and collaborative factors that enhance quality education of primary schools. Different methods were used in this research work: (1) Related approaches, theories, and research literatures and (2) Scholars were interviewed on 871 issues in the form of questionnaire, and the collaborative network factors were…

  16. Remote but Not Removed: Professional Networks That Support Rural Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsley, Danette

    2018-01-01

    The Northwest Rural Innovation and Student Engagement (NW RISE) Network connects rural educators in the Pacific Northwest to help them succeed in the profession and overcome the challenges caused by teacher isolation. In this article, the author takes stock of what was learned in the four years since the network was established. She also shares…

  17. Integrating Social Networks in Teaching in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abousoliman, Onsy

    2017-01-01

    In response to the emerging and swiftly developing digital tools, this dissertation investigated integrating a specific category of these tools, social networks, in teaching in higher education. The study focused on exploring how social networks integration might impact the teaching/learning process and on investigating the challenges that could…

  18. Bluetooth-Assisted Context-Awareness in Educational Data Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Castano, F. J.; Garcia-Reinoso, J.; Gil-Castineira, F.; Costa-Montenegro, E.; Pousada-Carballo, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an auxiliary "location network", to support user-independent context-awareness in educational data networks; for example, to help visitors in a museum. We assume that, in such scenarios, there exist "service servers" that need to be aware of user location in real-time. Specifically, we propose the implementation of a…

  19. Going Social: The Impact of Social Networking in Promoting Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Neelesh Kumar; Verma, Ashish; Verma, Rama Shankar; Tiwari, Prashant

    2012-01-01

    The growth and the popularity of the Social networks has a high impact on the development of the students in the field of Personality, Attitudes, Knowledge and on its whole academic performance in classroom and society. This paper envisage on the impact of Social Network on Education and Training of the students.

  20. Educational Research Network for West and Central Africa ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant will assist the Educational Research Network for West and Central Africa (ERNWACA) by providing funding for succession planning, recruiting a regional coordinator (to be based in Mali) and strengthening the Network's capacity to mobilize resources with a view to long-term sustainability.

  1. Social networking in nursing education: integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakushi, Luciana Emi; Évora, Yolanda Dora Martinez

    2016-01-01

    to identify the use of social networking in nursing education. integrative literature review in the databases: LILACS, IBECS, Cochrane, BDENF, SciELO, CINAHL, Scopus, PubMed, CAPES Periodicals Portal and Web of Science, using the descriptors: social networking and nursing education and the keywords: social networking sites and nursing education, carried out in April 2015. of the 489 articles found, only 14 met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Most studies were published after 2013 (57%), originating from the United States and United Kingdom (77.8%). It was observed the use of social networking among nursing students, postgraduate students, mentors and nurses, in undergraduate programmes, hybrid education (blended-learning) and in interprofessional education. The social networking sites used in the teaching and learning process were Facebook (42.8%), Ning (28.5%), Twitter (21.4%) and MySpace (7.1%), by means of audios, videos, quizzes, animations, forums, guidance, support, discussions and research group. few experiences of the use of social networking in nursing education were found and their contributions show the numerous benefits and difficulties faced, providing resourses for the improvement and revaluation of their use in the teaching and learning process.

  2. Social networking in nursing education: integrative literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Emi Kakushi

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: to identify the use of social networking in nursing education. Method: integrative literature review in the databases: LILACS, IBECS, Cochrane, BDENF, SciELO, CINAHL, Scopus, PubMed, CAPES Periodicals Portal and Web of Science, using the descriptors: social networking and nursing education and the keywords: social networking sites and nursing education, carried out in April 2015. Results: of the 489 articles found, only 14 met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Most studies were published after 2013 (57%, originating from the United States and United Kingdom (77.8%. It was observed the use of social networking among nursing students, postgraduate students, mentors and nurses, in undergraduate programmes, hybrid education (blended-learning and in interprofessional education. The social networking sites used in the teaching and learning process were Facebook (42.8%, Ning (28.5%, Twitter (21.4% and MySpace (7.1%, by means of audios, videos, quizzes, animations, forums, guidance, support, discussions and research group. Conclusion: few experiences of the use of social networking in nursing education were found and their contributions show the numerous benefits and difficulties faced, providing resourses for the improvement and revaluation of their use in the teaching and learning process.

  3. STS: History and nuclear energy education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akin, J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses ways in which historical and current events can be used to teach about nuclear energy in both high school chemistry and physics classes. Starting with the discovery of the electron and going through to present day uses and controversies, students learn about nuclear energy and its continuing impact on society. Using texts which contain biographical sketches of the scientists involved with the early beginnings of nuclear physics, students also develop a greater respect and empathy for scientists and the moral dilemmas faced by them

  4. Annual report of Nuclear Technology and Education Center. April 1, 2008 - March 31, 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year 2008. This year is the 50th anniversary of NuTEC since the starting of the first training course in January, 1958 at the Radioisotope-School in Tokyo. On this occasion, a commemorative symposium was held and attended by around 150 participants. NuTEC flexibly designed and conducted out new training courses upon requests while conducting the annually scheduled training programs. In spite of some cancellations in an economic downturn, the number of trainees who completed the domestic training courses was 404, and that of those who completed the staff technical training courses was 862. As a result, the total number of trainees during this period grew over the previous fiscal year. 'Nuclear Training for METI Inspectors' was newly offered and also 'Qualification Course for the 3rd class radiation protection supervisor' was held at Tsuruga Technical High School. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities; cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, cooperative graduate school program with 14 graduate schools and one under-graduate school, and newly began to cooperate with Tsuyama National College of Technology. JAEA also continued cooperative activities with Nuclear HRD Program initiated by MEXT and METI implemented in 2007. The joint course has continued networking with five universities including newly two universities utilizing the Japan Nuclear Education Network (JNEN). International cooperation was also conducted as scheduled. The joint training course and the instructor training program were conducted bilaterally with Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam. JAEA exchanged a memorandum with CEA/INSTN and initiated preparatory work for on internship student from INSTN. Moreover, JAEA newly joined European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) and began to prepare for new international training

  5. Nuclear traffic and peloton formation in fungal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Marcus; Hickey, Patrick; Lewkiewicz, Stephanie; Dressaire, Emilie; Read, Nick

    2013-11-01

    Hyphae, the network of microfluidic pipes that make up a growing fungal cell, must balance their function as conduits for the transport of nuclei with other cellular functions including secretion and growth. Constant flow of nuclei may interfere with the protein traffic that enables other functions to be performed. Live-cell imaging reveals that nuclear flows are anti-congestive; that groups of nuclei flow faster than single nuclei, and that nuclei sweep through the colony in dense clumps. We call these clumps pelotons, after the term used to describe groups of cycle racers slip-streaming off each other. Because of the pelotons, individual hyphae transport nuclei only intermittently, producing long intervals in which hyphae can perform their other functions. Modeling reveals how pelotons are created by interactions between nuclei and the hyphal cytoskeleton, and reveal the control that the fungus enjoys over peloton assembly and timing.

  6. Coordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1984-09-01

    This meeting of the International NSDD (Nuclear Structure and Decay Data) Network dealt with problems related to both the coordination of the NSDD network of centres and groups and to physics questions related to the evaluation of NSDD. The status of the mass-chain and nuclear structure data is reviewed and the planned activities are presented

  7. Nuclear education and training: cause for concern?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, H.

    2000-01-01

    Many diverse technologies, currently serving nations worldwide, would be adversely affected if there was an inadequate number of nuclear scientists and engineers in the future with appropriate scientific and technical backgrounds and university curricula. (author)

  8. Undergraduate education in nuclear engineering in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.R.

    1993-01-01

    The discipline of nuclear engineering is described, giving some historical background to explain the structure of the curricula commonly found in nuclear engineering programs in the U.S. Typical curricula are described, along with a specific example given by the University of Michigan undergraduate program in nuclear engineering. The National Academy of Sciences report on U.S. nuclear engineering education is summarized, and the major findings are presented, including data on the number of programs, number of degrees, and enrollment trends. Some discussion is made of manpower trends and the degree to which nuclear programs can supply nuclear engineers to meet the anticipated demands of the current decade and into the next century. (author) 12 refs.; 2 figs.; 4 tabs

  9. Monitoring nuclear reactor systems using neural networks and fuzzy logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikonomopoulos, A.; Tsoukalas, L.H.; Uhrig, R.E.; Mullens, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach is presented that demonstrates the potential of trained artificial neural networks (ANNs) as generators of membership functions for the purpose of monitoring nuclear reactor systems. ANN's provide a complex-to-simple mapping of reactor parameters in a process analogous to that of measurement. Through such ''virtual measurements'' the value of parameters with operational significance, e.g., control-valve-disk-position, valve-line-up or performance can be determined. In the methodology presented the output of a virtual measuring device is a set of membership functions which independently represent different states of the system. Utilizing a fuzzy logic representation offers the advantage of describing the state of the system in a condensed form, developed through linguistic descriptions and convenient for application in monitoring, diagnostics and generally control algorithms. The developed methodology is applied to the problem of measuring the disk position of the secondary flow control valve of an experimental reactor using data obtained during a start-up. The enhanced noise tolerance of the methodology is clearly demonstrated as well as a method for selecting the actual output. The results suggest that it is possible to construct virtual measuring devices through artificial neural networks mapping dynamic time series to a set of membership functions and thus enhance the capability of monitoring systems. 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  10. Monitoring nuclear reactor systems using neural networks and fuzzy logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikonomopoulos, A.; Tsoukalas, L.H.; Uhrig, R.E.; Mullens, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach is presented that demonstrates the potential of trained artificial neural networks (ANNs) as generators of membership functions for the purpose of monitoring nuclear reactor systems. ANN's provide a complex-to-simple mapping of reactor parameters in a process analogous to that of measurement. Through such virtual measurements the value of parameters with operational significance, e.g., control-valve-disk-position, valve-line-up-or performance can be determined. In the methodology presented the output of virtual measuring device is a set of membership functions which independently represent different states of the system. Utilizing a fuzzy logic representation offers the advantage of describing the state of the system in a condensed form, developed through linguistic descriptions and convenient for application in monitoring, diagnostics and generally control algorithms. The developed methodology is applied to the problem of measuring the disk position of the secondary flow control is clearly demonstrated as well as a method for selecting the actual output. The results suggest that it is possible to construct virtual measuring devices through artificial neural networks mapping dynamic time series to a set of membership functions and thus enhance the capability of monitoring systems

  11. Cloud-Based Virtual Laboratory for Network Security Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Le; Huang, Dijiang; Tsai, Wei-Tek

    2014-01-01

    Hands-on experiments are essential for computer network security education. Existing laboratory solutions usually require significant effort to build, configure, and maintain and often do not support reconfigurability, flexibility, and scalability. This paper presents a cloud-based virtual laboratory education platform called V-Lab that provides a…

  12. Higher Education Change and Social Networks: A Review of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezar, Adrianna

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews literature on the potential for understanding higher education change processes through social network analysis (SNA). In this article, the main tenets of SNA are reviewed and, in conjunction with organizational theory, are applied to higher education change to develop a set of hypotheses that can be tested in future research.

  13. The Network Form of Implementing Educational Programs: Differences and Typology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Alexandr Borisovich

    2016-01-01

    The article describes peculiarities of implementation and major differences in network educational programs, currently introduced in Russia. It presents a general typology of models and forms for implementing interaction between educational institutions of Russia, including teacher institutes and federal universities, as well as a typology of…

  14. Education, training and work experience among nuclear power plant workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, L.M.; Doggette, J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper uses a unique data set to examine the prior work experience, training, and education of skilled and technical workers in United States nuclear power plants. The data were collected in the latter half of 1977 by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) in a survey of union locals in nuclear power plants. The survey results provided substantial evidence that workers in United States nuclear power plants have a relatively high level of education, training, and skill development. Analysis of average education by age did not reveal any significant differences in years of schooling between younger and older workers. Very high rates of participation in formal training programmes were reported by all types of workers. The most common type of training programme was held on-site at the power plant and was provided by utility personnel. The majority of workers reported previous work experience related to nuclear power plant activities. Almost one-third of the workers had been directly involved in nuclear energy in a previous job, the majority of these through the United States Navy nuclear programme. However, the newer plants are hiring relatively fewer persons with previous nuclear experience. (author)

  15. Online social networking issues within academia and pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff

    2008-02-15

    Online social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace are extremely popular as indicated by the numbers of members and visits to the sites. They allow students to connect with users with similar interests, build and maintain relationships with friends, and feel more connected with their campus. The foremost criticisms of online social networking are that students may open themselves to public scrutiny of their online personas and risk physical safety by revealing excessive personal information. This review outlines issues of online social networking in higher education by drawing upon articles in both the lay press and academic publications. New points for pharmacy educators to consider include the possible emergence of an "e-professionalism" concept; legal and ethical implications of using online postings in admission, discipline, and student safety decisions; how online personas may blend into professional life; and the responsibility for educating students about the risks of online social networking.

  16. Analysing the Correlation between Social Network Analysis Measures and Performance of Students in Social Network-Based Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnik, Goran; Costa, Eric; Alves, Cátia; Castro, Hélio; Varela, Leonilde; Shah, Vaibhav

    2016-01-01

    Social network-based engineering education (SNEE) is designed and implemented as a model of Education 3.0 paradigm. SNEE represents a new learning methodology, which is based on the concept of social networks and represents an extended model of project-led education. The concept of social networks was applied in the real-life experiment,…

  17. Cooperative Learning within Educational Networks: Perspectives for Good Educational Governance in Modern Reading Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Marci-Boehncke

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available German schools, universities, and libraries haven’t established a teaching and cooperation practice that uses the potential of a convergent and participatory culture (Jenkins 2006, 2009. Schools and libraries have to collaborate more closely using the digital networks and language of the students of today. Although official references, such as the report of the EU High-Level Group of Experts on Literacy (2012, postulate joint efforts with the objective of promoting reading and media education by different educational and non-educational institutions, at least in Germany this is currently still not a collaborative educational practice. One reason for this might be a missing link in local educational governance. Furthermore, the professional self-image of teachers and librarians, as well as the image of the cooperation partner, may limit effective public cooperation. This contribution starts (1 with an outline of the demands in the field of digital literacy and participatory culture, followed by (2 a discussion about the chances and potentials of partnerships between schools and public libraries, their specific interests, and potential. Finally, (3 problems and principles of good educational governance within those networks are identified and developed to excavate the potential, especially for academic teaching and students’ practice. The article is based on empirical data as well as participatory observation of the three-years teacher training and the seven years of on-the-job-training of librarians of public libraries (“Experten für das Lesen”.

  18. Nuclear Education and training: addressing a global need

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn Lee, Janice

    2008-01-01

    There is growing concern about the difficulties nuclear institutions in many OECD/NEA member countries are experiencing in recruiting qualified specialists. Recent studies have also shown that nuclear education and training have been suffering declines of various degrees. If no action is taken on this issue, the nuclear sector risks facing a shortage of qualified human resources to ensure the appropriate regulation and operation of existing nuclear facilities as well as the construction of new ones in those countries wishing to do so. The NEA Steering Committee for Nuclear Energy issued a statement on this subject in October 2007, the complete text of which is available at: www.nea.fr/html/general/press/2007/2007-05.html. The NEA has for many years been involved in efforts to define and address the need for qualified human resources. In this regard, the Agency: 1- carries out assessments of requirements and availability of qualified human resources in the nuclear field, 2- enhances nuclear education programmes, such as the International School of Nuclear Law, and 3- encourages large, high-profile international research and development programmes. These areas are addressed in the NEA Strategic Plan as well as in the specific NEA programmes discussed below. The presentation will focus on ways to address the issue of qualified human resources, share information about what others are doing, and discuss what we might do collectively. (author)

  19. The US nuclear reaction data network. Summary of the first meeting, March 13 ampersand 14 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The first meeting of the US Nuclear Reaction Data Network (USNRDN) was held at the Colorado School of Mines, March 13-14, 1996 chaired by F. Edward Cecil. The Agenda of the meeting is attached. The Network, its mission, products and services; related nuclear data and data networks, members, and organization are described in Attachment 1. The following progress reports from the members of the USNRDN were distributed prior to the meeting and are given as Attachment 2. (1) Measurements and Development of Analytic Techniques for Basic Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Applications; (2) Nuclear Reaction Data Activities at the National Nuclear Data Center; (3) Studies of nuclear reactions at very low energies; (4) Nuclear Reaction Data Activities, Nuclear Data Group; (5) Progress in Neutron Physics at Los Alamos - Experiments; (6) Nuclear Reaction Data Activities in Group T2; (7) Progress Report for the US Nuclear Reaction Data Network Meeting; (8) Nuclear Astrophysics Research Group (ORNL); (9) Progress Report from Ohio University; (10) Exciton Model Phenomenology; and (11) Progress Report for Coordination Meeting USNRDN

  20. Co-ordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1986-10-01

    The seventh meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluators concentrated on the organizational aspects of the coordination of the NSDD network and on the presentation and discussion of papers related to the physics of evaluation of NSDD. The report contains short status reports from NSDD Network members, the status of the mass-chain and nuclear structure data, a discussion of evaluation rules and procedures and a short presentation of the next activities

  1. The Nuclear Department, Royal Naval School of Marine Engineering - Provision of nuclear education and training to the naval nuclear propulsion programme and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trethewey, K.R.; Beeley, P.A.; Lockwood, R.S.; Harrop, I.

    2004-01-01

    The Nuclear Department at HMS SULTAN provides education, training and research support to the Royal Navy Nuclear Propulsion Programme, as well as a growing number of civilian programmes within the wider British nuclear industry. As an aspiring centre of excellence in nuclear engineering, the Department will play an important role as a repository of nuclear knowledge for the foreseeable future. (author)

  2. Nuclear Physics (Education) on the Web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Noy, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Web has long became an important source of information for researchers and educators. In the present paper we will shed some light on its main resources: Newsgroups, Mailing lists, Catalogs, Research- and Education-oriented Web-sites, and (Java) simulations

  3. Social networking-based simulations for nuclear security: Strategy assessment following nuclear cyber terror on South Korean nuclear power plants (NPPs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Tae Ho; Kwak, Sang Man

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The cyber terror modeling is made by the social networking algorithm. • This is applicable by the social networking service (SNS). • Security of nuclear industry could be controlled by the network theory. • Newly developed complex algorithm can be introduced. • Simplified graphics show the operator easily. - Abstract: Nuclear energy has been studied for the secure power productions, which is based on the simulation study following the incident of nuclear cyber terror attack on South Korean nuclear power plants (NPPs). The social networking is used for the terror incident modeling and its prevention strategies. The nuclear industry could be investigated in the aspect of minimizing the dangerous situations caused by possible terror attacks which are considered by the society oriented connectivity among the related people or groups. The social networking circle by system dynamics diagram (SNCSD) is constructed, where the configuration of a model social networking example by system dynamics (SD) is applied. From A to H regions, the values are obtained by the random numbers incorporated with the designed algorithms. The results show the comparative values of terror possibilities which are based on the proposed social networking algorithm. It is possible to prepare for potential terrorism in the nuclear industry

  4. Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development Program: Korean Education Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Yeol; Hwang, Il Soon; Kim, Si Hwan

    2009-01-01

    Many countries have decided nuclear power for next energy resources as one of the long-term energy supply options. IAEA projected nuclear power expansion up to 2030 reaching between 447 GWe and 691 GWe compared to 370 GWe and 2660 TWh at the end of 2006. Both low and high projection is accompanied with new nuclear power plant constructions respectively 178 and 357, about 11 units per year, and most new construction is in North America, the Far East, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia. During the last forty years, thirty three countries have established commercial nuclear power programs but only some of them have developed comprehensive and large scale peaceful nuclear power infrastructure. Although various cooperation and guidance program of nuclear power infrastructure, developing appropriate environment and infrastructure of nuclear power plant is still challenging problems for developing countries launching nuclear power program. With increasing the demand of safety and safeguard from international society, creating appropriate infrastructure becomes essential requirements in national nuclear power program. In the viewpoint of developing countries, without sufficient explanation and proper guidance, infrastructure could be seen only as another barrier in its nuclear power program. The importance of infrastructure development would be obscured by ostensible business and infrastructure program can result in increasing entering barriers to peaceful nuclear power application field without benefits to developing countries and international community. To avoid this situation by providing enough explanation and realistic case example and cooperate with the countries wanting to establish comprehensive nuclear power infrastructure in the peaceful applications, we are creating the education program of infrastructure development with basic guidelines of the IAEA infrastructure series and Korean experiences from least developed country to advanced country

  5. Thermal-hydraulics associated with nuclear education and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokobori, Seiichi

    2011-01-01

    This article was the rerecording of the author's lecture at the fourth 'Future Energy Forum' (aiming at improving nuclear safety and economics) held in December 2010. The lecture focused on (1) importance of thermal hydraulics associated with nuclear education and research (critical heat flux, two-phase flow and multiphase flow), (2) emerging trend of maintenance engineering (fluid induced vibration, flow accelerated corrosion and stress corrosion cracks), (3) fostering sensible nuclear engineer with common engineering sense, (4) balanced curriculum of basics and advanced research, (5) computerized simulation and fluid mechanics, (6) crucial point of thermo hydraulics education (viscosity, flux, steam and power generation), (7) safety education and human resources development (indispensable technologies such as defence in depth) and (8) topics of thermo hydraulics research (vortices of curbed pipes and visualization of two-phase flow). (T. Tanaka)

  6. Education and training for workers of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Motoyuki

    1985-01-01

    On the education concerning radiation control for the workers of nuclear power plants, the notice of the Ministry of Labor is to be observed in nuclear power stations from April-June, 1985, and to make the standard for executing it in unified state, the working group was organized in the Federation of Electric Power Companies. It drew up the ''Standard for education on radiation control''. First, the notice from the director of the Labor Standards Bureau, the Ministry of Labor, issued on June 26, 1984, is explained. The objective is to reduce the radiation exposure of workers by giving them the necessary knowledge and skill regarding the works involving radiation. The kinds of the education is divided into that given at the time of beginning the works involving radiation and that given after having taken up the job. Both studies and practical techniques are given. The ''Standard for education on radiation control'' stipulates its objective, the contents of the education, the object persons of education, the requirement for lecturers, the education curriculum, and records. In this standard, the details of education contents are determined. The time limit of the effectiveness of education is determined, and after it has expired, re-education is carried out. (Kako, I.)

  7. Current situation of nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queral, C.; Minguez, E.

    2001-01-01

    The last few years have seen a growing concern with the decreasing number of suitably qualified engineers and university graduates in the field of Nuclear Technology. The gap between supply and demand is now a fact in several countries, and for the reason the international community has prepared several reports on the issue that are summarized here. (Author) 4 refs

  8. Educational commitment and social networking: The power of informal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolak, Justyna P.; Zwolak, Michael; Brewe, Eric

    2018-06-01

    The lack of an engaging pedagogy and the highly competitive atmosphere in introductory science courses tend to discourage students from pursuing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors. Once in a STEM field, academic and social integration has been long thought to be important for students' persistence. Yet, it is rarely investigated. In particular, the relative impact of in-class and out-of-class interactions remains an open issue. Here, we demonstrate that, surprisingly, for students whose grades fall in the "middle of the pack," the out-of-class network is the most significant predictor of persistence. To do so, we use logistic regression combined with Akaike's information criterion to assess in- and out-of-class networks, grades, and other factors. For students with grades at the very top (and bottom), final grade, unsurprisingly, is the best predictor of persistence—these students are likely already committed (or simply restricted from continuing) so they persist (or drop out). For intermediate grades, though, only out-of-class closeness—a measure of one's immersion in the network—helps predict persistence. This does not negate the need for in-class ties. However, it suggests that, in this cohort, only students that get past the convenient in-class interactions and start forming strong bonds outside of class are or become committed to their studies. Since many students are lost through attrition, our results suggest practical routes for increasing students' persistence in STEM majors.

  9. Status of higher education in nuclear technology in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, A.

    2007-01-01

    Pakistan's nuclear power program was formally launched in 1959 with the establishment of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC). The first research reactor, the Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR1), went critical in 1965, while the first nuclear power plant, the Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP), was connected to the grid in 1972. PARR1, a 5 MW highly enriched uranium swimming pool reactor, has been upgraded to 10 MW low enriched reactor and KANUPP is a 137 MWe CANDU reactor. Later during the mid eighties PAEC added another small research reactor, PARR2, a miniature neutron source, and in 2000 a 325 MW PWR at Chashma, the Chashma Nuclear Power Plant (CHASHNUPP). Thus PAEC currently owns and operates two nuclear power plants and two research reactors. KANUPP has completed its design life of 30 years and is now undergoing the re-licensing process. CHASNUPP has just completed its first refuelling outage. Negotiations for the third nuclear power plant, also a 300 MW PWR from China, are continuing. The training and education programs in nuclear technology were initiated in the early 1960's soon after the establishment of PAEC. Initially the cream of fresh graduates in engineering, medicine and natural sciences, who were inducted in PAEC were given short training before they were sent for higher studies abroad. The availability of a nucleus of highly qualified professionals in nuclear power and allied disciplines, the lack of adequate facilities in the local educational institutions in these fields and the realization that many more professionals will be needed than could be trained abroad led to the establishment of coherent indigenous training and education program in the late sixties. Given below is a brief description of the centers set up by the PAEC for providing manpower for its nuclear power program

  10. Topics on Education Activities in Japanese Nuclear Industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroiwa, Haruko

    2008-01-01

    The progression of an aging society with fewer children or a foreseeable decrease in population has caused the nuclear power plants under planning canceled or delayed. As a result, the number of students graduating with a nuclear degree began to decrease, while the development of the next generation light water reactor or of the practical use of the fast breeder reactor requires many skilled engineers. Atomic Energy Commission of Japan realized this potential impact of human resources. The Commission submitted the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy including this issue to the government. The report says that without future talent development, Japan will lose its competitiveness against other industrialized countries, and that without replenishment after a large number of baby boomers retire, the shortage of specialists in the radiation field will occur. In conjunction with the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry carried out the Nuclear Power Human Resources Development Program in 2007 fiscal year. The program focused on i) Support of educational activities, such as basic nuclear education and research, internship, and preparation of core curriculums and texts for nuclear power, ii) Implementation of research in the basic and infrastructure technology fields supporting the nuclear power (ex. structural strength, material strength, welding, erosion/corrosion, heat transfer, radiation safety). This program will continue till the end of 2009 fiscal year. Besides in order to promote nuclear power acceptance and to secure diversity, effective measures should be taken to support young, women, and foreign researchers and to promote their utilization. Mitsubishi accepts overseas students and researchers as an internship every year, and accelerates the safety architecture in the world. (author)

  11. Topics on Education Activities in Japanese Nuclear Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroiwa, Haruko [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, LTD - MHI, 2-16-5 Kona Minato-K 108-8215 Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    The progression of an aging society with fewer children or a foreseeable decrease in population has caused the nuclear power plants under planning canceled or delayed. As a result, the number of students graduating with a nuclear degree began to decrease, while the development of the next generation light water reactor or of the practical use of the fast breeder reactor requires many skilled engineers. Atomic Energy Commission of Japan realized this potential impact of human resources. The Commission submitted the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy including this issue to the government. The report says that without future talent development, Japan will lose its competitiveness against other industrialized countries, and that without replenishment after a large number of baby boomers retire, the shortage of specialists in the radiation field will occur. In conjunction with the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry carried out the Nuclear Power Human Resources Development Program in 2007 fiscal year. The program focused on i) Support of educational activities, such as basic nuclear education and research, internship, and preparation of core curriculums and texts for nuclear power, ii) Implementation of research in the basic and infrastructure technology fields supporting the nuclear power (ex. structural strength, material strength, welding, erosion/corrosion, heat transfer, radiation safety). This program will continue till the end of 2009 fiscal year. Besides in order to promote nuclear power acceptance and to secure diversity, effective measures should be taken to support young, women, and foreign researchers and to promote their utilization. Mitsubishi accepts overseas students and researchers as an internship every year, and accelerates the safety architecture in the world. (author)

  12. Annual report of Nuclear Technology and Education Center. April 1, 2009 - March 31, 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year 2009. In this fiscal year, NuTEC flexibly designed and conducted new training courses upon requests while conducting the annually scheduled training programs, and actively enhanced the collaboration with academia and cooperation with international organizations. Probably due to the economic depression, the number of trainees who completed the national training courses in 2009 was 322, which is 20 percent less than the previous year. The number of those who completed the staff technical training courses was slightly increased to 787 in 2009. As a result, the total number of trainees during this period is about 6 percent less than the previous year. In order to correspond with the needs from outside of JAEA, five temporary courses were held upon the request from Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. 'Risk communication course' was newly offered upon the request from Nuclear Safety Commission. Furthermore, we addressed the longstanding issue to take countermeasure against the aging accommodation facility. The web site was also improved so that users can directly send the application for enrollment in the training courses through internet. These new services actually started in fiscal year 2010. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities; cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, and the cooperative graduate school program was enlarged to cooperate with totally 17 graduate schools (18 universities), one faculty of undergraduate school, and one technical college, including the newly joined 3 graduate schools (4 universities) in 2009. JAEA also continued cooperative activities with Nuclear HRD Program initiated by MEXT and METI in 2007. The joint course has continued networking with six universities including newly joined Osaka University through

  13. Nuclear Safeguards and Security Education at Russian Universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killinger, Mark H.; Goodey, Kent O.; Butler, Gilbert W.; Duncan, Cristen L.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is assisting key Russian universities in developing safeguards and security degree programs to prepare the next generation of specialists who will be responsible for protecting nuclear material from illicit use. These programs include course and laboratory work in nuclear material measurements, vulnerability analysis, exterior and interior sensors, and legal aspects of nuclear nonproliferation. Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI) has graduated nine classes of masters students, most of who are working in government agencies, research organizations, or pursuing their PhD. With DOE support, MEPhI has also established a 5 1/2-year engineering degree program in safeguards and security. This is a hands-on degree that more closely meets the needs of nuclear facilities. The first class graduated in February 2007, marking a major milestone in Russian nonproliferation education. A second engineering degree program has been established at Tomsk Polytechnic University and is designed to reach those students east of the Ural Mountains, where many nuclear facilities are located. The first class will graduate in February 2009. This paper describes current development of these education programs, new initiatives, and sustainability efforts to ensure their continued viability after DOE support ends. The paper also describes general nonproliferation education activities supported by DOE that complement the more technical safeguards and security education programs.

  14. The use of social-networking sites in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartledge, Peter; Miller, Michael; Phillips, Bob

    2013-10-01

    A social-network site is a dedicated website or application which enables users to communicate with each other and share information, comments, messages, videos and images. This review aimed to ascertain if "social-networking sites have been used successfully in medical education to deliver educational material", and whether "healthcare professionals, and students, are engaging with social-networking sites for educational purposes". A systematic-review was undertaken using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Eight databases were searched with pre-defined search terms, limits and inclusion criteria. Data was extracted into a piloted data-table prior to the narrative-synthesis of the Quality, Utility, Extent, Strength, Target and Setting of the evidence. 1047 articles were identified. Nine articles were reviewed with the majority assessing learner satisfaction. Higher outcome measures were rarely investigated. Educators used Facebook, Twitter, and a custom-made website, MedicineAfrica to achieve their objectives. Social-networking sites have been employed without problems of professionalism, and received positive feedback from learners. However, there is no solid evidence base within the literature that social-networking is equally or more effective than other media available for educational purposes.

  15. Matching grant program for university nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajorek, Stephen M.

    2002-01-01

    The grant augmented funds from Westinghouse Electric Co. to enhance the Nuclear Engineering program at KSU. The program was designed to provide educational opportunities and to train engineers for careers in the nuclear industry. It provided funding and access to Westinghouse proprietary design codes for graduate and undergraduate studies on topics of current industrial importance. Students had the opportunity to use some of the most advanced nuclear design tools in the industry and to work on actual design problems. The WCOBRA/TRAC code was used to simulate loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs)

  16. Russian University Education in Nuclear Safeguards and Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, Cristen L.; Kryuchkov, Eduard F.; Geraskin, Nikolay I.; Boiko, Vladimir I.; Silaev, Maxim E.; Demyanyuk, Dmitry G.; Killinger, Mark H.; Heinberg, Cynthia L.

    2009-01-01

    As safeguards and security (S and S) systems are installed and upgraded in nuclear facilities throughout Russia, it becomes increasingly important to develop mechanisms for educating future Russian nuclear scientists and engineers in the technologies and methodologies of physical protection (PP) and nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A). As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) program to secure nuclear materials in Russia, the Education Project supports technical S and S degree programs at key Russian universities and nonproliferation education initiatives throughout the Russian Federation that are necessary to achieve the overall objective of fostering qualified and vigilant Russian S and S personnel. The Education Project supports major educational degree programs at the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI) and Tomsk Polytechnic University (TPU). The S and S Graduate Program is available only at MEPhI and is the world's first S and S degree program. Ten classes of students have graduated with a total of 79 Masters Degrees as of early 2009. At least 84% of the graduates over the ten years are still working in the S and S field. Most work at government agencies or research organizations, and some are pursuing their PhD. A 5 and 1/2 year Engineering Degree Program (EDP) in S and S is currently under development at MEPhI and TPU. The EDP is more tailored to the needs of nuclear facilities. The program's first students (14) graduated from MEPhI in February 2007. Similar-sized classes are graduating from MEPhI each February. All of the EDP graduates are working in the S and S field, many at nuclear facilities. TPU also established an EDP and graduated its first class of approximately 18 students in February 2009. For each of these degree programs, the American project team works with MEPhI and TPU to develop appropriate curriculum, identify and acquire various training aids, develop and publish textbooks, and strengthen instructor skills

  17. Integration of Education: Using Social Media Networks to Engage Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Blair

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Any educator today will tell you that the strategies used in the classroom have evolved and changed with the access everyone has to technology. In a world with constant changes and shifts because of immediate access to information, the way course content is delivered must evolve and adjust to the new ways students learn. Engagement of students in course content and reaching learning objectives are the key elements educators strive for in every course. Enter social media networks and the ability to leverage the user activity with these applications in education. Now, educators can provide content which engages students and meets learning objectives the way students want to learn. By reviewing social media networks: Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, Blogs, Twitter, and Evernote, educators can position themselves to be as technology-savvy as today's students.

  18. The PEC Network 1993. Directory of the Peace Education Commission. Peace Education Miniprints, No. 47.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerstedt, Ake, Ed.

    This extensive list of the council members of the Peace Education Commission (PEC) from 1992-1994 gives mailing addresses and some telephone and fax numbers to enable direct contact with network members. The Peace Education Commission (PEC) facilitates international cooperation among individuals interested in peace education and research related…

  19. Introducing the PEC Network: Mailing Addresses of the Peace Education Commission. Peace Education Miniprints No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerstedt, Ake, Ed.

    The Peace Education Commission (PEC) was established to facilitate international cooperation among individuals interested in peace education and research related to the field. The major ambition of PEC is to serve as a useful network for transnational information and support in the peace education area. This document gives current mailing…

  20. The beneficial applications of nuclear technology: an educational project to disseminate knowledge and encourage research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Denise S., E-mail: denise@radioatividades.com.br [Omiccron Programacao Grafica Ltda (Omiccron P.G.), Atibaia, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear technology is part of our everyday life and helps to improve the quality of our lifestyle in more ways than people realize. Nevertheless, the issue divides public opinion in Brazil and worldwide. There is still great misinformation about nuclear technology and peaceful uses of radiation. Most often, the media and social networks associate radiation to nuclear weapons or major accidents. Parents and teachers are often unaware of the matter. Any construction depends on a solid foundation and education is the foundation of every society. This project aims the dissemination of nuclear technology contents for teachers and students of Elementary and Secondary Education throughout Brazil. Whereas Internet access has increased strongly in Brazilian schools, this project provides various web-based short courses about nuclear technology and its beneficial applications in several areas, such as medicine, agriculture, industry and energy. The design, created according to modern concepts, presents different thematic roles which please children and youth. Since this project aims the dissemination of information, all courses are offered to the public at absolutely no cost. Still, the Project will provide a restricted area for teachers, with related material to develop in class. This educational project uses the combination of multiple technologies and last generation internet resources. All content can be accessed from any traditional internet connection, either for computers or mobile technologies. Our goal is to promote the benefits of nuclear technology for new generations, combating misinformation, omission of the media and knowledge fragmentation. Education transforms old prejudices and inspires new thoughts, stimulating development and encouraging scientific and technological research. (author)

  1. The beneficial applications of nuclear technology: an educational project to disseminate knowledge and encourage research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, Denise S.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear technology is part of our everyday life and helps to improve the quality of our lifestyle in more ways than people realize. Nevertheless, the issue divides public opinion in Brazil and worldwide. There is still great misinformation about nuclear technology and peaceful uses of radiation. Most often, the media and social networks associate radiation to nuclear weapons or major accidents. Parents and teachers are often unaware of the matter. Any construction depends on a solid foundation and education is the foundation of every society. This project aims the dissemination of nuclear technology contents for teachers and students of Elementary and Secondary Education throughout Brazil. Whereas Internet access has increased strongly in Brazilian schools, this project provides various web-based short courses about nuclear technology and its beneficial applications in several areas, such as medicine, agriculture, industry and energy. The design, created according to modern concepts, presents different thematic roles which please children and youth. Since this project aims the dissemination of information, all courses are offered to the public at absolutely no cost. Still, the Project will provide a restricted area for teachers, with related material to develop in class. This educational project uses the combination of multiple technologies and last generation internet resources. All content can be accessed from any traditional internet connection, either for computers or mobile technologies. Our goal is to promote the benefits of nuclear technology for new generations, combating misinformation, omission of the media and knowledge fragmentation. Education transforms old prejudices and inspires new thoughts, stimulating development and encouraging scientific and technological research. (author)

  2. Application of local computer networks in nuclear-physical experiments and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foteev, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    The bases of construction, comparative performance and potentialities of local computer networks with respect to their application in physical experiments are considered. The principle of operation of local networks is shown on the basis of the Ethernet network and the results of analysis of their operating performance are given. The examples of operating local networks in the area of nuclear-physics research and nuclear technology are presented as follows: networks of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, California University and Los Alamos National Laboratory, network realization according to the DECnet and Fast-bus programs, home network configurations of the USSR Academy of Sciences and JINR Neutron Physical Laboratory etc. It is shown that local networks allows significantly raise productivity in the sphere of data processing

  3. Effects of Social Networking on Adolescent Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Muhammed; Omar, Adnan; Allison-Golding, Monique

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of social networking sites has grown tremendously especially among the teens and high school students. However, very little is known about the scale of use, the purpose, how students use these sites and, more specifically, whether these sites help or hurt their academic progress. This study investigates how high school…

  4. Project Work in Networked Distance Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten; Helbo, Jan; Jensen, Lars Peter

    2000-01-01

    devoted to courses and the other half to project work. A computer conference system, LuvitÒ provides facilities for the courses, as well as structured synchronous and asynchronous communication. Eight times per year two-day seminars are held at the university for intensive lectures, project work......Problem oriented project work has been the foundation for the educational system at Aalborg University since its start 25 years ago. The duration of each student project is one semester, and the students spend half of their time working on the project in groups of typically 5-6 persons....... As the experience since then has proven this to be a very successful innovation in higher education [1], it seems to be an obvious idea also to base our new distance educations on the project study form. Traditionally, however, distance education has been characterized by one-way communication and self...

  5. Bayes Academy - An Educational Game for Learning Bayesian Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Sotala, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of 'Bayes Academy', an educational game which aims to teach an understanding of Bayesian networks. A Bayesian network is a directed acyclic graph describing a joint probability distribution function over n random variables, where each node in the graph represents a random variable. To find a way to turn this subject into an interesting game, this work draws on the theoretical background of meaningful play. Among other requirements, actions in the game...

  6. The coming crisis in nuclear skills and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magwood, William D. IV; )

    2017-01-01

    In the early 1990's, nuclear engineering programs in universities across the United States began to collapse. Whereas at the beginning of the decade, there were nearly 2000 nuclear engineering students studying in US colleges and universities, the perception that there was no future career in nuclear technology led to a drop in enrolments to less than 800 by 1998. At the same time, entire programs were closing and university research reactors were being shut down at a rate of almost one each year. A governmental decision was made to reverse this trend. Impactful investments in university research, scholarships and fellowships, and infrastructure - along with vocal support for this field of study from senior government officials and members of Congress - had an immediate impact. Enrolments grew quickly and later accelerated as industry began hiring aggressively. Today, there are around 5000 nuclear engineering students in US schools, many focused on medical applications, non-proliferation, fusion and other areas - including, of course, advanced nuclear energy technologies. The nuclear specialists emerging from these education programs arrived at just the right time, as governmental agencies, industry and scientific organisations rushed to prepare for retirements in the ranks of experienced nuclear engineers. The foresight to support nuclear education in the late 1990's averted what might have been a crisis in human resources by 2010. However today, as we review the situation globally, the potential for a crisis over the next decade in the availability of trained nuclear specialists seems extraordinarily high. In many NEA countries, training of nuclear engineers and scientists is on a steadily declining path. Once highly lauded programs have been significantly diminished or already eliminated. In some fields, such as nuclear chemistry - which is essential in the application of radioactive materials to support advanced medical applications and explore advanced

  7. The NEA Nuclear Education, Skills and Technology (NEST) Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, Liudmila; Gulliford, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Since the use of nuclear technology for a wide range of purposes is increasing, with many NEA member countries constructing or planning to construct new generation nuclear power plants, the NEA is developing the NEA Nuclear Education, Skills and Technology (NEST) Framework in partnership with its member countries. This initiative will help address important gaps in nuclear skills capacity building, knowledge transfer and technical innovation in an international context. It will also assist countries examining long-term options to manage high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, as well as better ways to decommission old facilities. The majority of these countries are likewise facing challenging issues in other fields related to nuclear energy, ranging from medicine to the environment. The need to develop and apply innovative technologies in order to meet these challenges is apparent in all these areas. At the same time, advances in fields such as materials science and instrumentation, linked with the availability of high-performance computing, have opened up new avenues ripe for exploitation, which makes for a combination of exciting new areas of innovation alongside longstanding challenges in the nuclear field. The goal of NEST is to energise advanced students, post-doctoral appointees and young professionals to pursue careers in the nuclear field

  8. Postgraduate education in nuclear engineering: towards an european degree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giot, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the postgraduate degree in nuclear engineering jointly organised by four universities of the French Community of Belgium, and its possible evolution towards an European degree. The project includes the location of the programme outside the partner universities at the premises of the SCK.CEN, a modular structure of the curriculum, and an increased co-operation of the teaching staff within small groups of experts including academics, researchers and practitioners from the nuclear industry. This programme would favour the exchange of students and professors through a network of top quality European institutions pursuing the same teaching objectives. (author)

  9. Neural network recognition of nuclear power plant transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, E.B.; Danofsky, R.; Adams, J.; AlJundi, T.; Basu, A.; Dhanwada, C.; Kerr, J.; Kim, K.; Lanc, T.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this report is to describe results obtained during the first year of funding that will lead to the development of an artificial neural network (ANN) fault - diagnostic system for the real - time classification of operational transients at nuclear power plants. The ultimate goal of this three-year project is to design, build, and test a prototype diagnostic adviser for use in the control room or technical support center at Duane Arnold Energy Center (DAEC); such a prototype could be integrated into the plant process computer or safety - parameter display system. The adviser could then warn and inform plant operators and engineers of plant component failures in a timely manner. This report describes the work accomplished in the first of three scheduled years for the project. Included herein is a summary of the first year's results as, well as individual descriptions of each of the major topics undertaken by the researchers. Also included are reprints of the articles written under this funding as well as those that were published during the funded period

  10. Creating symbiosis in research and education. Preserve nuclear competencies for Germany and provide highest safety standards to international markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niessen, Stefan [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany). Research and Development, Innovations and Patent Management

    2015-06-15

    AREVA participates actively in networks of industry and science via university cooperation and gives new ideas born from practical experience for the academic training of future nuclear engineers. Thus, the company ensures both the availability of new talents for its export strategy and relevant expertise for nuclear safety in Germany. When it comes to education and science after the German nuclear phase-out decision, the efforts must focus on internationalization. Greater integration in international networks can contribute to keeping the nuclear know-how in Germany alive. This concerns both industry and science. By having foreign experts use German training facilities, participate in research projects and gather professional practice, they contribute to the safe operation here and experience first-hand our safety culture grown over decades. In this context, AREVA outlines its university cooperation in Germany and abroad.

  11. Creating symbiosis in research and education. Preserve nuclear competencies for Germany and provide highest safety standards to international markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niessen, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    AREVA participates actively in networks of industry and science via university cooperation and gives new ideas born from practical experience for the academic training of future nuclear engineers. Thus, the company ensures both the availability of new talents for its export strategy and relevant expertise for nuclear safety in Germany. When it comes to education and science after the German nuclear phase-out decision, the efforts must focus on internationalization. Greater integration in international networks can contribute to keeping the nuclear know-how in Germany alive. This concerns both industry and science. By having foreign experts use German training facilities, participate in research projects and gather professional practice, they contribute to the safe operation here and experience first-hand our safety culture grown over decades. In this context, AREVA outlines its university cooperation in Germany and abroad.

  12. Proceedings of NUCLEAR 2009 international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Turcu, Ilie

    2009-01-01

    The proceedings of the NUCLEAR 2009 international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education held at INR-Pitesti on May, 27 - 29 2009 contain 92 communications presented in two plenary sessions (6 and 4 talks, respectively) and three sections addressing the themes of Nuclear energy, Environmental protection, and Sustainable development. In turn these sections are addressing the following items: Section 1.1 - Nuclear safety and severe accidents (8 papers); Section 1.2 - Nuclear reactors (15 papers); Section 1.3 - Nuclear technologies and materials (32 papers); Section 2.1 - Radioactive waste management (18 papers; Section 2.2 and Section 2.3 - Radioprotection and air, water and soil protection (12 papers); Section 3.1 - Education, continuous formation and knowledge transfer (9 papers); Section 3.2 -Strategies in energy (Round table) (5 papers). A number of 17 papers although programmed have not actually been presented within these proceedings. These papers are presented as abstracts in 'Nuclear 2009 - BOOK of ABSTRACTS', separately processed

  13. The Nuclear and Radiochemistry in Chemistry Education Curriculum Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.D.; Missouri University, Columbia, MO; Kleppinger, E.W.

    2005-01-01

    Given the mismatch between supply of and demand for nuclear scientists, education in nuclear and radiochemistry has become a serious concern. The Nuclear and Radiochemistry in Chemistry Education (NRIChEd) Curriculum Project was undertaken to reintroduce the topics normally covered in a one-semester radiochemistry course into the traditional courses of a four-year chemistry major: general chemistry, organic chemistry, quantitative and instrumental analysis, and physical chemistry. NRIChEd uses a three-pronged approach that incorporates radiochemistry topics when related topics in the basic courses are covered, presents special topics of general interest as a vehicle for teaching nuclear and radiochemistry alongside traditional chemistry, and incorporates the use of non-licensed amounts of radioactive substances in demonstrations and student laboratory experiments. This approach seeks not only to reestablish nuclear science in the chemistry curriculum, but to use it as a tool for elucidating fundamental and applied aspects of chemistry as well. Moreover, because of its relevance in many academic areas, nuclear science enriches the chemistry curriculum by encouraging interdisciplinary thinking and problem solving. (author)

  14. Nuclear Policy in a Democracy: Do Educators Have a Choice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Alex

    1983-01-01

    Despite differing opinions on discussing nuclear policy in the curriculum and how students are best prepared for citizenship, educators can work together to assert the right of United States citizens to have access to information necessary to participate in the policymaking process. (MLF)

  15. IAEA education and training programme in nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, J.L.F.; Lederman, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the IAEA education and training (E and T) programme in nuclear safety. A strategic planning for the programme implementation is described in terms of objectives, outputs and activities. A framework based on areas of competency and the level of depth of the training is presented as well as the main achievements to date. (author)

  16. SOCIAL NETWORKING IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION: Undergraduate Students’ Views on Ning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülfem SEZEN BALCIKANLI

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available It was the aim of this study to investigate physical education undergraduate students’ views on the use of social networking, one of the most typical representations of Web 2.0 technologies. In order to do so, the researcher, who was the instructor of the class, entitled “Fair Play Education in Sport”, introduced Ning and its educational aspects to her students with a 50-minute presentation prior to the study. Following this, the students were encouraged to use this networking for 15 weeks in parallel with their class. During this application, the researcher helped the students to make the best use of Ning in educational settings. Upon the implementation, the researcher interviewed the students (n=19 in five groups on the basis of the questions prepared and piloted earlier. The interviews demonstrated that the students enjoyed using social networking in educational settings. The findings of the study were the following: Increasing student-student and teacher-student interaction, enhancing student motivation and classroom climate, sharing materials with the instructor and students, making use of students’ interests and needs, and making learning process more interesting and permanent. The research concluded that social networking could be used in PE classes effectively.

  17. Extensive utilisation of VR-1 reactor for nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rataj, J.

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents utilisation of the VR-1 reactor for nuclear education and training at national and international level. VR-1 reactor has been operating by the Czech Technical University since December 1990. The reactor is a pool-type light water reactor based on enriched uranium (19.7% 235 U) with maximum thermal power 1kW and for short time period up to 5kW. The moderator of neutrons is light water, which is also used as a reflector, a biological shielding and a coolant. Heat is removed from the core by natural convection. The pool disposition of the reactor facilitates access to the core, setting and removing of various experimental samples and detectors, easy and safe handling of fuel assemblies. The reactor core can contain from 17 to 21 fuel assemblies IRT-4M, depending on the geometric arrangement and kind of experiments to be performed in the reactor. The reactor is equipped with several experimental devices; e.g. horizontal, radial and tangential channels used to take out a neutron beam, reactivity oscillator for dynamics study and bubble boiling simulator. The reactor has been used very efficiently especially for education and training of university students and NPP's specialists for more than 18 years. The VR-1 reactor is utilised within various national and international activities such as Czech Nuclear Education Network (CENEN), European Nuclear Education Network and also Eastern European Research Reactor Initiative (EERRI). The reactor is well equipped for education and training not only by the experimental facility itself but also by incessant development of training methods and improvement of education experiments. The education experiments can be combined into training courses attended by students according to their study specialization and knowledge level. The training programme is aimed to the reactor and neutron physics, dosimetry, nuclear safety, and control of nuclear installations. Every year, approximately 250 university students undergo

  18. Nuclear skills and education training in the UK through the Dalton nuclear institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard Clegg

    2006-01-01

    The UK demand for nuclear skills and research requirements is showing signs of a significant upturn. More capacity is being needed to support the UK's national programmes on clean-up and decommissioning, keeping the nuclear option open, and longer term advanced reactors technology. In response to this, The University of Manchester has launched the Dalton Nuclear Institute. The Institute is working with government and industry to strengthen and develop the UK's strategic nuclear skills base in the university sector. The Institute's scope covers the broad entirety of the UK's nuclear requirements spanning reactors, fuel cycles, decommissioning, disposal, social policy and regulation, and with connections into nuclear medicine and fusion. The rational behind the setting up of the Dalton Nuclear Institute including its research and education strategies are explained below, together with a description of the areas of current strength and the areas where major university investment is being targeted to uplift UK capacity and infrastructure. A big driver is also to forge links with other world leading centres internationally that will complement Manchester's in house capability. In the UK, the Dalton Nuclear Institute is working in partnership with Nexia Solutions and the NDA (Nuclear Decommissioning Authority) to match the Institute's plans with end-user industry and sector requirements. A key driver is to maximize the utilisation of the UK's specialist research facilities, notably the new Sellafield Technology Centre in West Cumbria. Discussions are underway with Nexia Solutions and the NDA to grant academic access for the Dalton Nuclear Institute and its collaborators to the Sellafield Technology Centre, to utilize it along the lines akin to a 'teaching hospital' model. The paper also explains the steps Dalton has taken by setting up and leading a consortium with ten other higher education providers in the UK, to launch a national programme for postgraduate

  19. Nuclear and radiological terrorism: continuing education article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter D; Bokor, Gyula

    2013-06-01

    Terrorism involving radioactive materials includes improvised nuclear devices, radiation exposure devices, contamination of food sources, radiation dispersal devices, or an attack on a nuclear power plant or a facility/vehicle that houses radioactive materials. Ionizing radiation removes electrons from atoms and changes the valence of the electrons enabling chemical reactions with elements that normally do not occur. Ionizing radiation includes alpha rays, beta rays, gamma rays, and neutron radiation. The effects of radiation consist of stochastic and deterministic effects. Cancer is the typical example of a stochastic effect of radiation. Deterministic effects include acute radiation syndrome (ARS). The hallmarks of ARS are damage to the skin, gastrointestinal tract, hematopoietic tissue, and in severe cases the neurovascular structures. Radiation produces psychological effects in addition to physiological effects. Radioisotopes relevant to terrorism include titrium, americium 241, cesium 137, cobalt 60, iodine 131, plutonium 238, califormium 252, iridium 192, uranium 235, and strontium 90. Medications used for treating a radiation exposure include antiemetics, colony-stimulating factors, antibiotics, electrolytes, potassium iodine, and chelating agents.

  20. Nuclear education and training: assuring a competent workforce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urso, M.E.; Murphy, B.P.; Giot, M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the years the NEA has been instrumental in raising awareness on issues related to education and training (E and T) in nuclear science and technology. Ten years ago the OECD/NEA report 'Nuclear Education and Training: Cause for Concern?' [Ref. 1] highlighted that core competencies in nuclear technology were suffering a significant decline, becoming increasingly difficult to sustain. The study acted as a wake-up call, urging prompt and decisive actions by governments and other stakeholders to avert the risk of irreversible consequences. Combined with more recent studies and activities subsequently undertaken by OECD/NEA [Ref. 2 and 3] and following a policy debate on 'Nuclear Research' [Ref. 4], a statement on the need for qualified human resources in the nuclear field was unanimously adopted by the NEA Steering Committee [Ref. 5], underlying the prime responsibilities of governments. After 10 years, awareness has generally grown on the gravity and urgency of the issue, triggering, in some cases, significant initiatives. However, in a much altered context of growing nuclear reactor fleets, concerns still prevail regarding the availability of sufficient, skilled manpower and the adequacy of infrastructures. Strains in the human resources capacity still remain high and any potential increase in use of nuclear power might be hampered by a dearth of qualified personnel. The current NEA project has thus been undertaken to revise and update the 2000 OECD/NEA publication [Ref. 1]. The study provides a qualitative characterisation of human resource needs, distinguishing among nuclear professionals, technical staff and crafts: categories which require different types and degrees of E and T. Instruments to address such needs, already available, underway or planned are appraised. An assessment on the current and future uses of nuclear research facilities for E and T purposes was also undertaken, based on the factual foundation of data gathered through quantitative surveys

  1. Nuclear energy and education in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginniff, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The thesis of this paper is that sources of energy for a country must be dependable and their use from the production of the basic fuel to the disposal of the wastes should be up to standards which people can understand and accept. In the United Kingdom, the educational system is the source of basic information on sources of energy that are available and which sources are currently being developed to supply present and future energy needs. THe author provides a synopsis of educational techniques and materials which are used to educate the public about nuclear energy production

  2. KOREAN STUDENTS' BEHAVIORAL CHANGE TOWARD NUCLEAR POWER GENERATION THROUGH EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EUN OK HAN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As a result of conducting a 45 minute-long seminar on the principles, state of use, advantages, and disadvantages of nuclear power generation for Korean elementary, middle, and high school students, the levels of perception including the necessity (p<0.017, safety (p<0.000, information acquisition (p<0.000, and subjective knowledge (p<0.000, objective knowledge (p<0.000, attitude (p<0.000, and behavior (p<0.000 were all significantly higher. This indicates that education can be effective in promoting widespread social acceptance of nuclear power and its continued use. In order to induce behavior change toward positive judgments on nuclear power generation, it is necessary to focus on attitude improvement while providing the information in all areas related to the perception, knowledge, attitude, and behavior. Here, the positive message on the convenience and the safety of nuclear power generation should be highlighted.

  3. Current status and issues of nuclear human resource development/General activities of Japan nuclear human resource development network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Hiroyuki; Hino, Sadami; Tsuru, Hisanori

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Nuclear Human Resource Development Network (JN-HRD Net) was established in November 2010 with the aim of developing a framework for mutual cooperation and information sharing among nuclear-related organizations. Although the tasks and goals of developing human resources in the nuclear field have been shifted since the accident at the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, the necessity of fostering capable personnel in this field stays unchanged and the importance of our network activities has further emphasized. The meeting of JN-HRD Net was held on the 5th of February 2013, where its activities by each field were reported and views and opinions were actively exchanged between more than 90 participants. This paper briefly describes current status and issues of JN-HRD Net and its general activities conducted by the JN-HRD Net secretariat. (J.P.N.)

  4. On the network protocol performance evaluation for large scale communication system of nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, K. S.; Lee, T. H.; Kim, H. R.; Kim, D. H.; Ku, I. S.

    1998-01-01

    Computer technology has been dramatically advanced and it is now natural to apply digital network technology into nuclear plants. Communication architecture for nuclear plant defines the coordination of safety reactor control, balance of plant, subsystem utilities, and plant monitoring functions, and how they are connected and their user interface to guarantee plant performance and guarantee safety requirements. Therefore, to implement a digital network for control and monitoring systems of advanced nuclear plant needs systematic design and evaluation procedures because of responsive and hard real-time process characteristics of nuclear plant. In this paper, we evaluate several digital network protocols in terms of network delay, link failure effects to hard real-time requirements with full scale traffic

  5. Educating nuclear engineers by nuclear science and technology master at UPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahnert, C.; Minguez, E.; Perlado, M. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Nuclear; and others

    2014-05-15

    One of the main objectives of the Master on Nuclear Science and Technology implemented in the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, is the training for the development of methodologies of simulation and advanced analysis necessary in research and in professional work in the nuclear field, for Fission Reactors and Nuclear Fusion, including fuel cycle and safety aspects. The students are able to use the current computational methodologies/codes for nuclear engineering that covers a difficult gap between nuclear reactor theory and simulations. Also they are able to use some facilities, as the Interactive Graphical Simulator of PWR power plant that is an optimal tool to transfer the knowledge of the physical phenomena that are involved in the nuclear power plants, from the nuclear reactor to the whole set of systems and equipment on a nuclear power plant. The new Internet reactor laboratory to be implemented will help to understand the Reactor Physics concepts. The experimental set-ups for neutron research and for coating fabrication offer new opportunities for training and research activities. All of them are relevant tools for motivation of the students, and to complete the theoretical lessons. They also follow the tendency recommended for the European Space for higher Education (Bologna) adapted studies. (orig.)

  6. Educating nuclear engineers by nuclear science and technology master at UPM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnert, C.; Minguez, E.; Perlado, M.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main objectives of the Master on Nuclear Science and Technology implemented in the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, is the training for the development of methodologies of simulation and advanced analysis necessary in research and in professional work in the nuclear field, for Fission Reactors and Nuclear Fusion, including fuel cycle and safety aspects. The students are able to use the current computational methodologies/codes for nuclear engineering that covers a difficult gap between nuclear reactor theory and simulations. Also they are able to use some facilities, as the Interactive Graphical Simulator of PWR power plant that is an optimal tool to transfer the knowledge of the physical phenomena that are involved in the nuclear power plants, from the nuclear reactor to the whole set of systems and equipment on a nuclear power plant. The new Internet reactor laboratory to be implemented will help to understand the Reactor Physics concepts. The experimental set-ups for neutron research and for coating fabrication offer new opportunities for training and research activities. All of them are relevant tools for motivation of the students, and to complete the theoretical lessons. They also follow the tendency recommended for the European Space for higher Education (Bologna) adapted studies. (orig.)

  7. Public perception process of nuclear power risk and some enlightenment to public education for nuclear power acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Bo

    2013-01-01

    This paper, based on the international research literatures on perception of risks, designs a conceptual model of public perception of nuclear power risk. In this model, it is considered that the public perception of nuclear power risk is a dynamic, complicate and closed system and is a process from subjective perception to objective risk. Based on the features of the public perception of nuclear power risk and multi-faceted dimension influences as discussed, suggestions for the public education for nuclear power acceptance are given in five aspects with indication that the public education for nuclear power acceptance plays an important role in maintaining the public perception of nuclear power risk system. (author)

  8. A Program for Cultivating Nuclear Talent at Engineering Educational Institute in a Remote Area from Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsuyoshi

    Recently, in Japan, the number of students who hope for finding employment at the nuclear power company has decreased as students‧ concern for the nuclear power industry decreases. To improve the situation, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology launched the program of cultivating talent for nuclear power which supports research and education of nuclear power in the academic year of 2007. Supported by the program, Kushiro College of Technology conducted several activities concerning nuclear power for about a year. The students came to be interested in nuclear engineering through these activities and its results.

  9. Educating Next Generation Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineers at the Idaho National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, J.D.; Briggs, J.B.; Garcia, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    One of the challenges in educating our next generation of nuclear safety engineers is the limitation of opportunities to receive significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Such training is generally restricted to on-the-job-training before this new engineering workforce can adequately provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) can provide students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills. The ICSBEP and IRPhEP publish annual handbooks that contain evaluations of experiments along with summarized experimental data and peer-reviewed benchmark specifications to support the validation of neutronics codes, nuclear cross-section data, and the validation of reactor designs. Participation in the benchmark process not only benefits those who use these Handbooks within the international community, but provides the individual with opportunities for professional development, networking with an international community of experts, and valuable experience to be used in future employment. Traditionally students have participated in benchmarking activities via internships at national laboratories, universities, or companies involved with the ICSBEP and IRPhEP programs. Additional programs have been developed to facilitate the nuclear education of students while participating in the benchmark projects. These programs include coordination with the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) Next Degree Program, the Collaboration with the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office to train nuclear and criticality safety engineers, and student evaluations as the basis for their Master's thesis in nuclear engineering.

  10. Educating Next Generation Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineers at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Bess; J. B. Briggs; A. S. Garcia

    2011-09-01

    One of the challenges in educating our next generation of nuclear safety engineers is the limitation of opportunities to receive significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Such training is generally restricted to on-the-job-training before this new engineering workforce can adequately provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) can provide students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills. The ICSBEP and IRPhEP publish annual handbooks that contain evaluations of experiments along with summarized experimental data and peer-reviewed benchmark specifications to support the validation of neutronics codes, nuclear cross-section data, and the validation of reactor designs. Participation in the benchmark process not only benefits those who use these Handbooks within the international community, but provides the individual with opportunities for professional development, networking with an international community of experts, and valuable experience to be used in future employment. Traditionally students have participated in benchmarking activities via internships at national laboratories, universities, or companies involved with the ICSBEP and IRPhEP programs. Additional programs have been developed to facilitate the nuclear education of students while participating in the benchmark projects. These programs include coordination with the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) Next Degree Program, the Collaboration with the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office to train nuclear and criticality safety engineers, and student evaluations as the basis for their Master's thesis in nuclear engineering.

  11. Intrusion detection techniques for plant-wide network in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasekhar, P.; Shrikhande, S.V.; Biswas, B.B.; Patil, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power plants have a lot of critical data to be sent to the operator workstations. A plant wide integrated communication network, with high throughput, determinism and redundancy, is required between the workstations and the field. Switched Ethernet network is a promising prospect for such an integrated communication network. But for such an integrated system, intrusion is a major issue. Hence the network should have an intrusion detection system to make the network data secure and enhance the network availability. Intrusion detection is the process of monitoring the events occurring in a network and analyzing them for signs of possible incidents, which are violations or imminent threats of violation of network security policies, acceptable user policies, or standard security practices. This paper states the various intrusion detection techniques and approaches which are applicable for analysis of a plant wide network. (author)

  12. Using modular neural networks to monitor accident conditions in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear power plants are very complex systems. The diagnoses of transients or accident conditions is very difficult because a large amount of information, which is often noisy, or intermittent, or even incomplete, need to be processed in real time. To demonstrate their potential application to nuclear power plants, neural networks axe used to monitor the accident scenarios simulated by the training simulator of TVA's Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant. A self-organization network is used to compress original data to reduce the total number of training patterns. Different accident scenarios are closely related to different key parameters which distinguish one accident scenario from another. Therefore, the accident scenarios can be monitored by a set of small size neural networks, called modular networks, each one of which monitors only one assigned accident scenario, to obtain fast training and recall. Sensitivity analysis is applied to select proper input variables for modular networks

  13. Building an educational seismic network in Romanian schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharia, Bogdan; Tataru, Dragos; Grecu, Bogdan; Ionescu, Constantin; Bican-Brisan, Nicoleta; Neagoe, Cristian

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the earthquake phenomena and their effects is an important step toward the education of population and aims to raise the awareness about the earthquake risk and possible mitigation actions. In this sense, The Romanian Educational Seismic Network project represents an efficient communication tool, allowing teaching and learning about the earthquakes and seismic wave impact through experimental practices and educational activities. The seismic network consist of nine SEP seismometers installed in high-schools from the most important seismic areas (Vrancea, Banat, Făgăraş, Dobrogea), vulnerable cities (Bucharest, Iasi) or high populated places (Cluj, Sibiu, Timisoara, Zalău) and is coordinated by the National Institute of Earth Physics from Bucharest. Once installed, the seismic network is the starting point of activities for students through an e-learning platform. Some objectives are aimed: - To train students and teachers how to make analysis and interpretation of seismological data; - To make science more interesting for students; - To improve the participation rates in physical sciences for students; - To raise awareness of geoscience as a scientific discipline for pre-university students; - To promote the installation and effective use of educational seismographs and seismic data; - To reinforce and develop relationships between participating schools and research institutes; - To create an earthquake database this will be used by students and teachers for educational purposes. Different types of practical activities using educational seismometer, designed by researchers for students, are described in educational materials and in the web platform project. Also we encourage the teachers from the participating schools to share their experiences and produce new didactic tools for the classroom. This collaborative work could illustrate the conjugated efforts of researchers and teachers for a better education and awareness of the risk culture

  14. Understanding Groups in Outdoor Adventure Education through Social Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jostad, Jeremy; Sibthorp, Jim; Paisley, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Relationships are a critical component to the experience of an outdoor adventure education (OAE) program, therefore, more fruitful ways of investigating groups is needed. Social network analysis (SNA) is an effective tool to study the relationship structure of small groups. This paper provides an explanation of SNA and shows how it was used by the…

  15. Networking in Education. The Need for Managerial and Political Innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschke, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper provides commentary on some of the issues and projects considered in other papers presented at the conference, focusing in particular on some of the nontechnological issues associated with the design, development, and implementation of telecomputing and networking in education. Four types of telecomputing projects are considered:…

  16. Teacher Agency in Educational Reform: Lessons from Social Networks Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datnow, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a context for understanding how social networks among teachers support or constrain school improvement in terms of instructional practice, professional development, and educational reform. It comments on the articles in this special issue, summarizing their contributions to the field. This analysis reveals several important…

  17. Rwanda Health and Education Information Network (OASIS-RHEIN ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Rwanda Health and Education Information Network (OASIS-RHEIN). Partners in Health (PIH), an international nongovernmental organization, has demonstrated the effectiveness of its open source electronic medical record system (OpenMRS) in eight clinics in Rwanda. As a result, the Ministry of Health has decided to roll ...

  18. Networks of Practice in Science Education Research: A Global Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sonya N.; Siry, Christina

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we employ cultural sociology and Braj Kachru's model of World Englishes as theoretical and analytical tools for considering English as a form of capital necessary for widely disseminating research findings from local networks of practice to the greater science education research community. We present a brief analysis of recent…

  19. Project Work in Networked Distance Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten; Helbo, Jan; Jensen, Lars Peter

    2000-01-01

    -study, whereas the project study form is based on collaboration and dialogue. Consequently, successful implementation of project work in distance education requires extensive utilisation of new information and communication technology. In this paper the experiences of project work in a new Master of Industrial...... devoted to courses and the other half to project work. A computer conference system, LuvitÒ provides facilities for the courses, as well as structured synchronous and asynchronous communication. Eight times per year two-day seminars are held at the university for intensive lectures, project work......Problem oriented project work has been the foundation for the educational system at Aalborg University since its start 25 years ago. The duration of each student project is one semester, and the students spend half of their time working on the project in groups of typically 5-6 persons...

  20. NUCLEAR 2009 international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Turcu, Ilie

    2009-01-01

    The Book of abstracts of the papers submitted to 'NUCLEAR 2009 international conference on sustainable development through nuclear research and education' held at INR-Pitesti on May, 27 - 29 2009 contain 109 abstracts of the communications submitted for two plenary sessions (6 and 4 talks, respectively) and three sections addressing the themes of Nuclear energy, Environmental protection, and Sustainable development. In turn these sections are addressing the following items: Section 1.1 - Nuclear safety and severe accidents (8 papers); Section 1.2 - Nuclear reactors (15 papers); Section 1.3 - Nuclear technologies and materials (32 papers); Section 2.1 - Radioactive waste management (18 papers; Section 2.2 and Section 2.3 - Radioprotection and air, water and soil protection (12 papers); Section 3.1 - Education, continuous formation and knowledge transfer (9 papers); Section 3.2 -Strategies in energy (Round table) (5 papers). A number of 17 papers are presented only as abstracts in this book, the rest were presented fully during the conference. The proceedings of the conference are separately processed and introduced as such in the INIS database

  1. Networking of theories as a research practice in mathematics education

    CERN Document Server

    Bikner-Ahsbahs, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    How can we deal with the diversity of theories in mathematics education This was the main question that led the authors of this book to found the Networking Theories Group. Starting from the shared assumption that the existence of different theories is a resource for mathematics education research, the authors have explored the possibilities of interactions between theories, such as contrasting, coordinating, and locally integrating them. The book explains and illustrates what it means to network theories; it presents networking as a challenging but fruitful research practice and shows how the Group dealt with this challenge considering five theoretical approaches, namely the approach of Action, Production, and Communication (APC), the Theory of Didactical Situations (TDS), the Anthropological Theory of the Didactic (ATD), the approach of Abstraction in Context (AiC), and the Theory of Interest-Dense Situations (IDS). A synthetic presentation of each theory and their connections shows how the activity of netw...

  2. Public education programme for nuclear contingency planning in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, M. C.; Li, S. W.

    2002-01-01

    Two nuclear power stations on the coast of southern China are situated some 50 kilometers to the northeast of Hong Kong. Although the stations are far away from Hong Kong, the construction and operation of the nuclear power stations have generated public anxiety locally, in particular, after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. A comprehensive contingency plan which takes into account such concerns of the public has been implemented in Hong Kong. Cooperation by the public is vital to the effective implementation of any contingency plan. Understanding of the basics of radiation protection as well as the contingency plan will help the public to appreciate the situation and react in a rational manner. A public education program to promote awareness of the contingency plan has been implemented in Hong Kong. In particular, a Virtual Exhibition Hall on radiation has been developed and launched in February 2002 for access by the public via Internet. A video and a set of web pages will be launched in the later part of 2002 to inform and educate the public on matters related to nuclear accident response in Hong Kong. This paper describes the public education programme in Hong Kong to promote public awareness and understanding of the nuclear contingency plan

  3. Management of the nuclear knowledge and educational strategies in universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin del Campo M, C.

    2012-10-01

    An introduction is made to the topic of management of the nuclear knowledge and recommendations are presented for its implementation as a curricular subject in the universities and institutions that have post-graduate programs in the engineering and/or nuclear sciences area. The necessity of incorporating a wide variety of tools and innovative techniques of teaching (for example, simulators, didactic games in computer, e-learning) that assure that the learning will be given in an efficient and lasting way is projected. Some strategies are listed to attract the best students toward the academic programs in nuclear engineering or related. Given the great multidisciplinary of the personnel of a nuclear power station, and the other facilities of the fuel cycle, the importance is pointed out of providing the nuclear foundations to all the workers and directive with different formation to the nuclear area, in an attractive way so that they obtain and assimilate the nuclear foundations that will allow him to work efficiently and with all security. Finally, also an analysis is presented about the advantages that represent the education nets that integrate people or institutions in the national, regional or international ambit, which have been created to initiative of the IAEA, having as objective to share ideas, information, study programs, courses, software and resources in general that support the formation of human resources of very high quality, required by the nuclear facilities and the research centers on advanced technologies, as well as to implement programs of nuclear development to short, medium and long period in our country. (Author)

  4. The European Nuclear Science network touches base at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    ENSAR (European Nuclear Science and Applications Research) is an EU-supported project, which aims at fostering cooperation within the European low-energy nuclear physics community through the active sharing of expertise and best practices. The project also includes a transnational access programme to allow a large community of users to access the participating facilities, which include CERN’s ISOLDE. In the last week of April, CERN hosted the General Assembly and Programme Coordination Committee meetings, about 18 months after the project’s kick-off.   Participants in the ENSAR project. ENSAR involves 30 partner institutes, which include the seven large nuclear physics facilities in Europe. A large part of the European nuclear physics community is represented in ENSAR, in particular scientists who are performing research related to nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics and applications of nuclear science. In 2010, the project was awarded 8 million euros from the Europe...

  5. The Crisis in Radiochemistry and Nuclear Chemistry Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D C

    2005-01-01

    A brief summary of the current status of radiochemistry and nuclear chemistry in the U. S. and abroad will be given. Current and future needs for scientists in these fields, especially in the U. S., will be discussed. Challenges that must be met in order to reverse the ''catastrophic'' downward trend in the numbers of students, faculty, and university programs in radiochemistry and nuclear chemistry will be considered, and some potential ways to reinvigorate and expand relevant university research and educational programs will be suggested

  6. Nuclear education and training in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-03-01

    The purpose of this summary is to give a survey of the facilities for further education and training in the field of nuclear science and nuclear technology within the FRG. The classification of the different facilities presently existing, such as universities, technical colleges, engineering schools, and special institutes, seemed the most appropriate way of making the survey as straight forward as possible. The survey is mainly based on information received from the institutes concerned in reply to questionnaires distributed at the end of 1976. Further references are available in the Personal- und Vorlesungsverzeichnisse of the universities as well as in the Deutscher Fachhochschulfuehrer. (orig./HP) [de

  7. University-level education in nuclear and radiochemistry in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smodis, B.

    2006-01-01

    The status of education in nuclear and radiochemistry in Slovenia is reviewed and elucidated at both undergraduate and graduate levels. It is observed that both the quantity and the quality of studies have deteriorated during recent years/decades, thus following similar trends in the developed countries. Presently, no dedicated study of radioactivity is offered within the country. The main reason for this deterioration is a general decline of interest for studying nuclear sciences and the limited need for such specialization in a small country such as Slovenia. (author)

  8. Present status of nuclear education and training in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyose, R.; Sumita, K.; Moriya, F.

    1994-01-01

    In Japan, where about 30% of electricity is supplied by nuclear actives require a good number of able and ambitious young scientists and engineers especially in the future. On the other hand, almost all Japanese electric power companies, which operate nuclear power plants, are striving to keep expertise of reactor operators as high as possible. Present status in Japan of education at universities, research and training reactors, training courses at governmental institutions and nonprofit organizations, and operator training centers of electric power companies, are reviewed. 3 tabs

  9. Social networking for nurse education: Possibilities, perils and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Janet; Wyllie, Aileen; Jackson, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, we consider the potential and implications of using social networking sites such as Facebook® in nurse education. The concept of social networking and the use of Facebook will be explored, as will the theoretical constructs specific to the use of online technology and Web 2.0 tools. Theories around Communities of Inquiry (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000), Communities of Practice (Wenger, 1998), Activity Theory (Daniels, Cole, & Wertsch, 2007) and Actor-Network theory (Latour, 1997) will be briefly explored, as will the work of Vygotsky (1978), as applies to the social aspects of learning. Boundary issues, such as if and how faculty and students should or could be connected via social networking sites will also be explored.

  10. Discussion on the nuclear information resources co-constructing and sharing under network information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yang

    2010-01-01

    During the tenth five-year plan, along with the digitization of information, and the development of information transmission network, the co-construction and sharing of China's nuclear industry information is facing a new development opportunities and challenges. This paper is based on the analysis of the nuclear library status and characteristics, combined of the development process of nuclear information resources over the past 20 years. For the characteristic of information sharing and services in the net environment, the problem in the current co-construction and sharing of nuclear information, and the needs of the future nuclear research and development of nuclear production, this paper forecast the work trends of nuclear information, and gives some countermeasure to strength the development of the co-construction and sharing of nuclear information. (author)

  11. Assessment of specialized educational programs for licensed nuclear reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, B.D.; Saari, L.M.; White, A.S.; Geisendorfer, C.L.; Huenefeld, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    This report assesses the job-relatedness of specialized educational programs for licensed nuclear reactor operators. The approach used involved systematically comparing the curriculum of specialized educational programs for college credit, to academic knowledge identified as necessary for carrying out the jobs of licenses reactor operators. A sample of eight programs, including A.S. degree, B.S. degree, and coursework programs were studied. Subject matter experts in the field of nuclear operations curriculum and training determined the extent to which individual program curricula covered the identified job-related academic knowledge. The major conclusions of the report are: There is a great deal of variation among individual programs, ranging from coverage of 15% to 65% of the job-related academic knowledge. Four schools cover at least half, and four schools cover less than one-third of this knowledge content; There is no systematic difference in the job-relatedness of the different types of specialized educational programs, A.S. degree, B.S. degree, and coursework; and Traditional B.S. degree programs in nuclear engineering cover as much job-related knowledge (about one-half of this knowledge content) as most of the specialized educational programs

  12. Promoting nuclear education and technology in Thai high schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyes, W.

    1998-01-01

    The public acceptance project which Thailand is undertaking through the Chulalongkorn University project is based on the awareness that increased public support of nuclear power is an essential precondition to the consideration of a nuclear power program for the country. By approaching public education on this matter via an independent and recognized authority such as Chulalongkorn University, the issue has remained as an education and information process rather than becoming a political issue and falling victim to all of the pitfalls of that process. The model of selecting independent partners and organizations to conduct public education and public acceptance activities appears to be more effective than for the utility itself to more directly address such issues. It is of course recognized that at some time there will be a public discussion and debate of the issue of nuclear power in Thailand. However the work done by such public education projects in advance of any public announcements on any project plans should help to ensure that the ensuing public discussion will take place amongst a better informed public

  13. Improving evaluation criteria for monitoring networks of weak radioactive plumes after nuclear emergencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urso, L.; Astrup, Poul; Helle, K.B.

    2012-01-01

    Networks of monitoring stations have been set up in many European countries to detect the passage of a radioactive cloud in the event of a large-scale nuclear emergency. The layout and spatial density of these networks differs according to the needs and criteria defined by national authorities...

  14. Implementation of a communication and control network for the instruments of a nuclear analytical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunya, Eduardo; Baltuano, Oscar; Bedregal, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a communication network and control for a conventional laboratory instruments and nuclear analytical processes based on CAN open field bus to control devices and machines. Hardware components and software developed as well as installation and configuration tools for incorporating new instruments to the network re presented. (authors).

  15. The importance of environmental education in the process of nuclear and environmental licensing of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Jefferson Borges; Ribeiro, Katia Maria Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Today, there is a thread with regard to the global environment. To reduce the environmental impact due to spending supplies to meet the basic needs of the global population. Can be considered as the power of these needs and in this context, the environmental impact occurs by the use of fossil fuels and loss of land for use of water resources. To minimize these impacts, governments are establishing appropriate laws towards the use of renewable energy. However it appears that there is still a great distance between the established law and implementation in practice. In this context nuclear energy is an attractive option, both economic and environmental. The facilities that are somehow associated with nuclear power plants are classified as radioactive or nuclear. These facilities are subject to two licensing procedures: Environmental (by IBAMA) and Nuclear (by CNEN). Nuclear installations such as nuclear power plants Angra 1 and 2, deposits and tailings facilities of the nuclear fuel cycle in Rezende that are more the attention of the population. As part of these processes are reports of analysis of safety and environmental impacts and socio-economic (EIA/RIMA RFAS), which are available to the public and then discussed at public hearings, where there is the opportunity for questions on these reports. These questions are mainly related with the social-environmental and economic due to construction and operation of these facilities. This work is a research, discussing the law, identifying the difficulties in the licensing process and presents a discussion on the importance of environmental education at all school levels, for adult audiences and is a connection between the environmental education and process of environmental licensing and nuclear, showing how the popular consciousness more informed can better discuss issues associated with these licenses, understand the advantages and disadvantages and obtain benefits. (author)

  16. Technical Survey on Applications of Wireless Sensor Networks in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Jin; Bari, Ataul; Chen, Dongyi; Hashemian, Hash M.

    2014-01-01

    Even though there is no general consensus on using wireless technologies in nuclear power plants, potential applications of wireless sensor networks within nuclear power plants (NPPs) has been investigated. The topics of interests include potential interaction of wireless sensor networks with the sensitive protection equipment, radiation damage of the electronics on board sensor nodes, optimal placement of relay nodes that collect and forward data in the network, and possible applications, such as radiation dose and level monitoring, and equipment condition monitoring. Several wireless sensor networks have been deployed on site of NPPs on a trial basis to perform these tasks. Different aspects of deployment of such wireless sensor networks in NPPs have also been examined. Industrial standards or guidelines for deployment of WSNs in NPPs are also been considered. This paper examines the state of the art of wireless sensor networks in NPPs

  17. Technical Survey on Applications of Wireless Sensor Networks in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jin; Bari, Ataul [University of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada); Chen, Dongyi [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu (China); Hashemian, Hash M. [AMS Technology Center, Knoxville (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Even though there is no general consensus on using wireless technologies in nuclear power plants, potential applications of wireless sensor networks within nuclear power plants (NPPs) has been investigated. The topics of interests include potential interaction of wireless sensor networks with the sensitive protection equipment, radiation damage of the electronics on board sensor nodes, optimal placement of relay nodes that collect and forward data in the network, and possible applications, such as radiation dose and level monitoring, and equipment condition monitoring. Several wireless sensor networks have been deployed on site of NPPs on a trial basis to perform these tasks. Different aspects of deployment of such wireless sensor networks in NPPs have also been examined. Industrial standards or guidelines for deployment of WSNs in NPPs are also been considered. This paper examines the state of the art of wireless sensor networks in NPPs.

  18. Status of Nuclear Science Education and the Needs for Competency Based Education at the Beginning of Nuclear Power Programme in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yücel, H.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: In Turkey, in recent years, public opinion is mostly positive towards the establishment of NPPs because electricity demand is ever-increasing with a growing population and developing economy. For peaceful nuclear energy use, Turkey ratified the NPT in 1979 and has had a safeguards agreement, and its Additional Protocol since 2001. However, Turkey has not accumulated the essential nuclear knowledge and experience until now. The present nuclear education and training programmes are not focused on nuclear safety and power technology. There is lack of competencies concerned with measuring and monitoring, instrumentation and control for a safe operation of a reactor, and other specific nuclear equipment and facilities on site. The urgent needs should be determined to commence a competency based education in which the younger generations will instill confidence to nuclear technology. In nuclear training and education programs, it should be given a priority to nuclear safety and security culture. This should be a key requirement for newcomers to nuclear technology. In this presentation, the present status of nuclear science education in Turkey is discussed briefly and the fundamental arguments are dealt to focus on competency based nuclear education. Within international community, Turkey can seek collaborations and can consider the new challenges to tackle with the present difficulties in nuclear education programmes as a newcomer country. (author

  19. A belief network approach for development of a nuclear power plant diagnosis system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, I K; Kim, J T; Lee, D Y; Jung, C H; Kim, J Y; Lee, J S; Ham, C S [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    Belief network (or Bayesian network) based on Bayes` rule in probabilistic theory can be applied to the reasoning of diagnostic system. This paper describes the basic theory of concept and feasibility of using the network for diagnosis of nuclear power plants. An example shows that the probabilities of root causes of a failure are calculated from the measured or believed evidences. 6 refs., 3 figs. (Author)

  20. A belief network approach for development of a nuclear power plant diagnosis system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, I. K.; Kim, J. T.; Lee, D. Y.; Jung, C. H.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. S.; Ham, C. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    Belief network (or Bayesian network) based on Bayes` rule in probabilistic theory can be applied to the reasoning of diagnostic system. This paper describes the basic theory of concept and feasibility of using the network for diagnosis of nuclear power plants. An example shows that the probabilities of root causes of a failure are calculated from the measured or believed evidences. 6 refs., 3 figs. (Author)

  1. Relational nuclear databases upon the MSU INP CDFE Web-site and Nuclear Data Centres Network CDFE activities. P7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boboshin, I.N.; Varlamov, V.V.; Ivanov, E.M.; Ivanov, S.V.; Peskov, N.N.; Stepanov, M.E.; Chesnokov, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    This report contains only the short review of the work carried out by the CDFE concerning the IAEA Nuclear Reaction Data Centres Network activities for the period of time from the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting (15-19 May 2000, Obninsk, Russia) till May 2001 and the description of the main results obtained

  2. WORKING TOGETHER: EDUCATION, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FOR 5G NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Ivanova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the new world of globalization of ideas and mobility difficulties in knowledge diffusion still remains. The effectiveexchange of experiences and skills in new generation networks is not guaranteed by the enormous potentialsofinternetworking systems and devices. Conceptual model for performance modeling and evaluation of multiservicenetworks has been major interest for mobile networks providers. It is essential to assess the performance ofmobile system architectures in order to identify where potential bottlenecks and data packet blocking probabilityare possible to occur. Educational platforms, new simulations opportunities represent a good opportunity to reducethe digital divide and to ensure faster and higher communication trends. Several universities and companies arecurrently involved in using educational platforms to provide better results. Conceptual model for teletrafficengineering in educational platform and applications focuses on some important aspects: tutorials, exercise,simulations, and expectation values of parameters, testing and estimation of students work. In the same time thesame model is very appropriate for simulation of network management for the new generation networks. Thiseducational platform for academics, students and researchers, puts together some of the critical aspects ofdistributed systems and their characteristics, parameters and probability of blocking.

  3. Application of wireless sensor networks in personnel dosage monitoring system of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yonghong; Zhang Dafa; Jiang Wei; Chen Dengke

    2007-01-01

    Aim to meet the need of personnel dosage monitoring of nuclear power plant, a monitoring system was designed which based on wireless sensor network. First, the basic concept was described; the characteristics of the wireless sensor network applied in the monitoring system of nuclear power plant were also been analyzed; the structure of the system was built too. Finally, the special technologies like the choice of communication mode, the security of communication network and orientation that used in the monitoring system were discussed. (authors)

  4. Networking for Education for Sustainable Development in Austria: The Austrian ECOLOG-Schools Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Franz

    2016-01-01

    This case describes networking for education for sustainable development within the Austrian ECOLOG-schools network. The article presents theoretical concepts of networks in education in general, and the organization of the ECOLOG-network in particular. Based upon these foundations, the concept and results of a participatory evaluation study are…

  5. Doctoral education in the nuclear sector; La formacion de doctores en el sector nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguez, E.

    2013-03-01

    Doctoral aducation is a major priority for European universities. In the context of the Bologna Process the importance of doctoral education as the third cycle of higher education and the first stage of a young researchers career, and thus in linking the European Higher Education and Research Areas, was first highlighted in the 2003 Berlin Report. The core component of doctoral training is the advancement of knowledge through original research. considering the need for structured doctoral programs and the need for transparent supervision and assessment, we note that the normal workload of the third cycle in most countries would correspond 3-4 years full time. This is spirit of the new Spanish Doctoral Law. Then, universities should ensure that their doctoral programmes promote interdisciplinary training and the development of transferable skills, thus meeting the needs of the wider employment market. We need to achieve and overall increase in the numbers of doctoral candidates taking up research careers as early stage researchers and also increase the employability as a normal way as it is the case of other advance countries. In Spain, universities with doctoral nuclear programmes and the CIEMAT, with the sponsorship of the nuclear sector, a doctoral school in nuclear science and engineering should be created to enhance the research careers of Young students for the future of nuclear activities in Spain. (Author)

  6. Education and training on nuclear security in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pafilis, C. N.; Kamenopoulou, V.; Maltezos, A.; Seferlis, S.; Dimitriou, P.; Matikas, T. E.

    2009-01-01

    The Greek Atomic Energy Commission is the competent authority responsible for designing, implementing and supervising the radiation protection programme in Greece. According to its statutory law one of its main responsibilities is the provision of education and training to people involved in the national emergency response plan against nuclear and radiological threats. Due to the high requirements demanded for the safe conduct of the Athens 2004 Olympic Games, a nuclear security programme was established and the nuclear security infrastructure of the country was upgraded. Under this framework, GAEC provided training on radiation protection, prevention, detection, emergency preparedness and response to the personnel involved in the emergency plan. Since that time, the GAEC continues to organize seminars frequently addressed to the organizations involved in the emergency plan, in order to establish the sustainability of national operational capability on preparedness and response. (authors)

  7. Verification of failover effects from distributed control system communication networks in digitalized nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Moon Gi; Lee, Jae Ki; Lee, Kwang Hyun; Lee, Dong Il; Lim, Hee Taek [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Distributed Control System (DCS) communication networks, which use Fast Ethernet with redundant networks for the transmission of information, have been installed in digitalized nuclear power plants. Normally, failover tests are performed to verify the reliability of redundant networks during design and manufacturing phases; however, systematic integrity tests of DCS networks cannot be fully performed during these phases because all relevant equipment is not installed completely during these two phases. In additions, practical verification tests are insufficient, and there is a need to test the actual failover function of DCS redundant networks in the target environment. The purpose of this study is to verify that the failover functions works correctly in certain abnormal conditions during installation and commissioning phase and identify the influence of network failover on the entire DCS. To quantify the effects of network failover in the DCS, the packets (Protocol Data Units) must be collected and resource usage of the system has to be monitored and analyzed. This study introduces the use of a new methodology for verification of DCS network failover during the installation and commissioning phases. This study is expected to provide insight into verification methodology and the failover effects from DCS redundant networks. It also provides test results of network performance from DCS network failover in digitalized domestic nuclear power plants (NPPs)

  8. Applications of neural networks to monitoring and decision making in the operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Application of neural networks to monitoring and decision making in the operation of nuclear power plants is being investigated under a US Department of Energy sponsored program at the University of Tennessee. Projects include the feasibility of using neural networks for the following tasks: (1) diagnosing specific abnormal conditions or problems in nuclear power plants, (2) detection of the change of mode of operation of the plant, (3) validating signals coming from detectors, (4) review of ''noise'' data from TVA's Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant, and (5) examination of the NRC's database of ''Letter Event Reports'' for correlation of sequences of events in the reported incidents. Each of these projects and its status are described briefly in this paper. This broad based program has as its objective the definition of the state-of-the-art in using neural networks to enhance the performance of commercial nuclear power plants

  9. The wireless sensor network monitoring system for regional environmental nuclear radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chong; Liu Dao; Wang Yaojun; Xie Yuxi; Song Lingling

    2012-01-01

    The wireless sensor network (WSN) technology has been utilized to design a new regional environmental radiation monitoring system based on the wireless sensor networks to meet the special requirements of monitoring the nuclear radiation in certain regions, and realize the wireless transmission of measurement data, information processing and integrated measurement of the nuclear radiation and the corresponding environmental parameters in real time. The system can be applied to the wireless monitoring of nuclear radiation dose in the nuclear radiation environment. The measured data and the distribution of radiation dose can be vividly displayed on the graphical interface in the host computer. The system has functioned with the wireless transmission and control, the data storage, the historical data inquiry, the node remote control. The experimental results show that the system has the advantages of low power consumption, stable performance, network flexibility, range of measurement and so on. (authors)

  10. Measurement of anthropogenic radionuclides in the atmosphere with a radionuclide monitoring network for nuclear tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Chushiro; Yamamoto, Yoichi

    2011-01-01

    A worldwide radionuclide monitoring network for nuclear tests has detected the anthropogenic radioactive materials released in the atmosphere due to the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant impacted by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011. After four months have passed since the accident occurred, most overseas stations do not detect the radionuclides of Fukushima origin any more. The Takasaki station in Japan, however, is still detecting them every day. This paper describes radionuclide monitoring stations and the network of them as part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) in the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), as well as the measurement results of radionuclide particulates and radioactive isotopes of xenon released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant with the monitoring network. (J.P.N.)

  11. Social Networking Tools and Teacher Education Learning Communities: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Social networking tools have become an integral part of a pre-service teacher's educational experience. As a result, the educational value of social networking tools in teacher preparation programs must be examined. The specific problem addressed in this study is that the role of social networking tools in teacher education learning communities…

  12. Proceedings of the workshop cum symposium on applications of neural networks in nuclear science and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Workshop cum Symposium on Application of Neural Networks in Nuclear Science and Industry was held at Bombay during November 24-26. 1993. The past decade has seen many important advances in the design and technology of artificial neural networks in research and industry. Neural networks is an interdisciplinary field covering a broad spectrum of applications in surveillance, diagnosis of nuclear power plants, nuclear spectroscopy, speech and written text recognition, robotic control, signal processing etc. The objective of the symposium was to promote awareness of advances in neural network research and applications. It was also aimed at conducting the review of the present status and giving direction for future technological developments. Contributed papers have been organized into the following groups: a) neural network architectures, learning algorithms and modelling, b) computer vision and image processing, c) signal processing, d) neural networks and fuzzy systems, e) nuclear applications and f) neural networks and allied applications. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately. (M.K.V.)

  13. Nuclear Power Engineering Education Program, University of Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    The DOE/CECo Nuclear Power Engineering Education Program at the University of Illinois in its first year has significantly impacted the quality of the power education which our students receive. It has contributed to: the recently completed upgrade of the console of our Advanced TRIGA reactor which increases the reactor's utility for training, the procurement of new equipment to upgrade and refurbish several of the undergraduate laboratory set-ups, and the procurement of computational workstations in support of the instructional computing laboratory. In addition, smaller amounts of funds were used for the recruitment and retention of top quality graduate students, the support of faculty to visit other institutions to attract top students into the discipline, and to provide funds for faculty to participate in short courses to improve their skills and background in the power area. These items and activities have helped elevate in the student's perspective the role of nuclear power in the discipline. We feel this is having a favorable impact on student career selection and on ensuring the continued supply of well educated nuclear engineering graduates

  14. Digital game for education and dissemination of nuclear energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legey, Ana Paula; Silva, Marcio H.; Machado, Daniel M.; Santo, Andre Cotelli E.; Lapa, Celso M.F.; Mol, Antonio C.A., E-mail: analegey@hotmail.com, E-mail: machado.mol@gmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Realidade Virtual; Lima, Tiago Rocha; Paula, Vanessa M.; Junior, Israel L.; Augusto, Haline F., E-mail: tlrtiago@gmail.com, E-mail: vnspaula@hotmail.com, E-mail: halineffa@hotmail.com, E-mail: israel_plj@hotmail.com [Centro Universitario Carioca (UniCarioca), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Students are immersed in a society with many possibilities of interaction, either computer or smart phones. In addition, students demand more innovation, dynamism and interactivity in classrooms. The form of education that can motivate students to engage in the learning process can get them to be interested in the lessons and not prematurely abandon schools. On the other hand, educational materials based on Virtual Reality (VR), as computer games, have been considered an important educational tool for making dynamic, motivating, innovative, in addition to achieving those areas where traditional methods are not reaching its goal. Motivated by the above, and given the competence developed by the Virtual Reality Laboratory of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear / CNEN and the collaboration of the University Center UniCarioca, was developed a digital game based on virtual reality tools for the teaching of a subject of area of science that needs to be addressed to society more contextualized way: the different applications of nuclear energy. It is expected that this digital game is an important tool for the dissemination, teaching and learning the benefits of nuclear energy. (author)

  15. Digital game for education and dissemination of nuclear energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legey, Ana Paula; Silva, Marcio H.; Machado, Daniel M.; Santo, Andre Cotelli E.; Lapa, Celso M.F.; Mol, Antonio C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Students are immersed in a society with many possibilities of interaction, either computer or smart phones. In addition, students demand more innovation, dynamism and interactivity in classrooms. The form of education that can motivate students to engage in the learning process can get them to be interested in the lessons and not prematurely abandon schools. On the other hand, educational materials based on Virtual Reality (VR), as computer games, have been considered an important educational tool for making dynamic, motivating, innovative, in addition to achieving those areas where traditional methods are not reaching its goal. Motivated by the above, and given the competence developed by the Virtual Reality Laboratory of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear / CNEN and the collaboration of the University Center UniCarioca, was developed a digital game based on virtual reality tools for the teaching of a subject of area of science that needs to be addressed to society more contextualized way: the different applications of nuclear energy. It is expected that this digital game is an important tool for the dissemination, teaching and learning the benefits of nuclear energy. (author)

  16. Establishment of nuclear knowledge-information base; development of courseware on introductory nuclear engineering and establishment of digital education platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jong Soon; Na, Mang Yun; Lee, Goung Jin; Yang, Won Sik [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea)

    2002-01-01

    In this research, there are two major tasks. The first one is a development of digital course-ware program for introductory nuclear engineering. For this task, a development of lecture note is followed by lecture Slide files in html file format, which is based on web. For this purpose, following activities were performed; collection of related materials. planning of overall courseware, writing of lecture note and exercise plan, and securing the computer programs and codes needed. The second task of this research is to plan and install several hardwares in a multimedia class room as a digital education platform. The platform includes smart board with touch screen functionality, network server and personal computers. The digital education platform was established as a multimedia class room in the 2nd College of Engineering building, room 16210 by using the Server-Client environment and smart board, personal computer, and internet was connected by a TCP/IP way. For the courseware, hypertext was supported to be web-based, and photo, picture, data and related web links including text were developed in a close relation, it is possible for students to study big amounts of information in a systemized way and to maximize the learning efficiency. The whole range of introductory nuclear engineering course was divided into nuclear fuel cycle, reactor theory, heat transport, and reactor control, and digital contents were developed by each experts, but the final format of the courseware was maintained consistently for easy understanding . Also, the reactor experiment courseware developed by Kyunghee University can be utilized on this platform. 5 refs., 36 figs., 4 tabs. (Author)

  17. Impact of Nuclear Laboratory Personnel Credentials & Continuing Education on Nuclear Cardiology Laboratory Quality Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Saurabh; Sobieraj, Diana M; Mann, April; Parker, Matthew W

    2017-12-22

    Background/Objectives: The specific credentials and continuing education (CME/CE) of nuclear cardiology laboratory medical and technical staff are important factors in the delivery of quality imaging services that have not been systematically evaluated. Methods: Nuclear cardiology accreditation application data from the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) was used to characterize facilities performing myocardial perfusion imaging by setting, size, previous accreditation and credentials of the medical and technical staff. Credentials and CME/CE were compared against initial accreditation decisions (grant or delay) using multivariable logistic regression. Results: Complete data were available for 1913 nuclear cardiology laboratories from 2011-2014. Laboratories with initial positive accreditation decisions had a greater prevalence of Certification Board in Nuclear Cardiology (CBNC) certified medical directors and specialty credentialed technical directors. Certification and credentials of the medical and technical directors, respectively, staff CME/CE compliance, and assistance of a consultant with the application were positively associated with accreditation decisions. Conclusion: Nuclear cardiology laboratories directed by CBNC-certified physicians and NCT- or PET-credentialed technologists were less likely to receive delay decisions for MPI. CME/CE compliance of both the medical and technical directors was associated with accreditation decision. Medical and technical directors' years of experience were not associated with accreditation decision. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  18. Developing A Large-Scale, Collaborative, Productive Geoscience Education Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.; Bralower, T. J.; Egger, A. E.; Fox, S.; Ledley, T. S.; Macdonald, H.; Mcconnell, D. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Tewksbury, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past 15 years, the geoscience education community has grown substantially and developed broad and deep capacity for collaboration and dissemination of ideas. While this community is best viewed as emergent from complex interactions among changing educational needs and opportunities, we highlight the role of several large projects in the development of a network within this community. In the 1990s, three NSF projects came together to build a robust web infrastructure to support the production and dissemination of on-line resources: On The Cutting Edge (OTCE), Earth Exploration Toolbook, and Starting Point: Teaching Introductory Geoscience. Along with the contemporaneous Digital Library for Earth System Education, these projects engaged geoscience educators nationwide in exploring professional development experiences that produced lasting on-line resources, collaborative authoring of resources, and models for web-based support for geoscience teaching. As a result, a culture developed in the 2000s in which geoscience educators anticipated that resources for geoscience teaching would be shared broadly and that collaborative authoring would be productive and engaging. By this time, a diverse set of examples demonstrated the power of the web infrastructure in supporting collaboration, dissemination and professional development . Building on this foundation, more recent work has expanded both the size of the network and the scope of its work. Many large research projects initiated collaborations to disseminate resources supporting educational use of their data. Research results from the rapidly expanding geoscience education research community were integrated into the Pedagogies in Action website and OTCE. Projects engaged faculty across the nation in large-scale data collection and educational research. The Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network and OTCE engaged community members in reviewing the expanding body of on-line resources. Building Strong

  19. Analysis of several digital network technologies for hard real-time communications in nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ki Sang; No, Hee Chun

    1999-01-01

    Applying digital network technology for advanced nuclear plant requires deterministic communication for tight safety requirements, timely and reliable data delivery for operation critical and mission-critical characteristics of nuclear plant. Communication protocols, such as IEEE 802/4 Tiken Bus, IEEE 802/5 Token Ring, FDDI, and ARCnet, which have deterministic communication capability are partially applied to several nuclear power plants. Although digital communication technologies have many advantages, it is necessary to consider the noise immunity form electromagnetic interference (EMI), electrical interference, impulse noise, and heat noise before selecting specific digital network technology for nuclear plant. In this paper, we consider the token frame loss and data frame loss rate due to the link error event, frame size, and link data rate in different protocols, and evaluate the possibility of failure to meet the hard real-time requirement in nuclear plant. (author). 11 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  20. The role of NAA in nuclear chemistry education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, G.; Vivier, A.

    2007-01-01

    One of the missions of our Institute is the promotion of basic nuclear teaching for students as well as professional teaching for workers in nuclear industry and research. For nuclear chemistry education, we present here a one day teaching course on radioactive decay and nuclear reactions, and a two or three days course based on reactor irradiation of uranium oxide, instrumental and radiochemical analysis of fission products. In the first experiment, the neutron capture is presented as an example of nuclear reaction; the neutron activation of a silver coin with a Am-Be neutron source, followed by γ-ray spectrometry, is used to identify three radionuclides of silver and to calculate their half-lives. In the second experiment, our teaching reactor is used as a neutron source with a flux about 10 10 n x cm -2 x s -1 at a low thermal power (10 kW). This low flux allows us to irradiate a small uranium sample which is usable for spectrometry after a short cooling time of about two hours. The first day is reserved for instrumental analysis of the fission products and a second day for the radiochemical separation of a fission radionuclides. With these experimental results, the students have to calculate the number of fissions in the irradiated sample. On optional third day for postgraduate students is devoted to the presentation of NAA and some applications as uranium determination by the fission product spectrometry. (author)