WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear double resonance

  1. Study of γ-irradiated lithographic polymers by electron spin resonance and electron nuclear double resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlick, S.; Kevan, L.

    1982-01-01

    The room temperature gamma irradiation degradation of the lithographic polymers, poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), poly(methyl-α-chloroacrylate) (PMCA), poly(methyl-α-fluoroacrylate) (PMFA), and poly(methylacrylonitrile) (PMCN), have been studied by electron spin resonance and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) to assess their molecular degradation processes of relevance to electron beam lithography. Two classes of radicals are found, chain radicals and chain scission radicals. PMMA and PMCA mainly form chain scission radicals consistent with degradation while for PMCN the resolution is poorer, and this is only probable. PMFA forms mainly chain radicals consistent with predominant crosslinking. The total radical yield is greatest in PMCA and PMCN. ENDOR is used to assess the compactness of the radiation degradation region for PMMA and PMCA and hence the potential resolution of the resist; this appears to be about the same for these methacrylate polymers

  2. Resonant cell of a double nuclear electron resonance spectrometer for performance in a 120-350 Gs magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldin, V.I.; Stepanov, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    Spectrometer double-frequency resonance cell construction of a double nuclear electron resonance for operation in 120-350 Gs magnetic fields is described. The cell has been developed from a special decimeter resonator with a concentrated capacitance. The electric and magnetic components of a high frequency field are efficiently divided in the separator. Therefore, the insertion of a measuring coil and a sample in the maximum of the magnetic component of the field does not practically affect the distribution and parameters of the high-frequency field. The double-frequency resonance cell proposed provides for a higher accuracy of measuring amplifications of the nuclear magnetic resonance signals when there is the overhauzer effect for 120-350 Gs magnetic fields

  3. Electron spin resonance (ESR), electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and general triple resonance of irradiated biocarbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.U.; Rossi, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Several irradiated bicarbonates were studied by magnetic resonance techniques. Seven paramagnetic species, attributed to CO 2 - , SO 2 - and SO 3 - were identified. Comparison between radiation induced defects in bioaragonites and aragonite single-crystals show that isotropic and orthorhombic CO 2 - centers with broad line spectra are not produced in the latter samples. Vibrational and rotational properties of isotropic CO 2 - centers were studied from low temperature Q-band spectras. Vibrational frequency is determined from the 13 CO 2 - hyperfine spectrum and yielded ν 1.54 x 10 13 s -1 . The correlation time for isotropic CO 2 - , τc) = 1.2 x 10 -11 s (T = 300 K0, is typical of radicals rotating in liquids. ENDOR and General Triple spectroscopy show that orthorhombic CO 2 - centres are surrounded by water molecules located in the second nearest CO 2 2- sites at 5.14, 5.35 and 6.02 A. Water molecules replacing carbonates or as liquid inclusion of growth solution in local crystal imperfections may be responsible for the variety of orthorhombic and isotropic CO 2 - species, respectively. (author)

  4. Electromagnetic properties of inner double walled carbon nanotubes investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Bouhrara, M.; Abou-Hamad, E.; Alabedi, G.; Al-Taie, I.; Kim, Y.; Wagberg, T.; Goze-Bac, C.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analytical technique was used to investigate the double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) electromagnetic properties of inner walls. The local magnetic and electronic properties of inner nanotubes in DWNTs were analyzed using 25% 13C enriched C 60 by which the effect of dipolar coupling could be minimized. The diamagnetic shielding was determined due to the ring currents on outer nanotubes in DWNTs. The NMR chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) spectra and spin-lattice relaxation studies reveal the metallic properties of the inner nanotubes with a signature of the spin-gap opening below 70 K.

  5. Correlation between magnetic properties and nuclear magnetic resonance observations in Sr2FeMoO6 double perovskite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colis, S.; Pourroy, G.; Panissod, P.; Meny, C.; Dinia, A.

    2004-01-01

    We present the influence of the sintering temperature on the magnetic properties of Sr 2 FeMoO 6 double perovskite, on the basis of magnetization and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. Interestingly, the saturation magnetization originating mainly from the Fe moments is correlated with the amount of Mo magnetic moments observed by NMR measurements. We show that there is an optimum temperature of 1000 deg. C for which the reaction leading to the double perovskite becomes more advanced and/or the number of antisite defects is minimum

  6. Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation in Model Nuclear Waste Glasses: A Solid-State Double-Resonance NMR Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martineau, Ch.; Michaelis, V.K.; Kroeker, S. [Univ Manitoba, Dept Chem, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Schuller, S. [CEA Valrho Marcoule, LDMC, SECM, DTCD, DEN, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France)

    2010-07-01

    Double-resonance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are used in addition to single-resonance NMR experiments to probe the degree of mixing between network-forming cations Si and B, along with the modifier cations Cs{sup +} and Na{sup +} in two molybdenum-bearing model nuclear waste glasses. The double-resonance experiments involving {sup 29}Si in natural abundance are made possible by the implementation of a CPMG pulse-train during the acquisition period of the usual REDOR experiments. For the glass with lower Mo content, the NMR results show a high degree of Si-B mixing, as well as an homogeneous distribution of the cations within the borosilicate network, characteristic of a non-phase-separated glass. For the higher-Mo glass, a decrease of B-Si(Q{sup 4}) mixing is observed, indicating phase separation. {sup 23}Na and {sup 133}Cs NMR results show that although the Cs{sup +} cations, which do not seem to be influenced by the molybdenum content, are spread within the borate network, there is a clustering of the Na{sup +} cations, very likely around the molybdate units. The segregation of a Mo-rich region with Na{sup +} cations appears to shift the bulk borosilicate glass composition toward the metastable liquid liquid immiscibility region and induce additional phase separation. Although no crystallization is observed in the present case, this liquid liquid phase separation is likely to be the first stage of crystallization that can occur at higher Mo loadings or be driven by heat treatment. From this study emerges a consistent picture of the nature and extent of such phase separation phenomena in Mo-bearing glasses, and demonstrates the potential of double-resonance NMR methods for the investigation of phase separation in amorphous materials. (authors)

  7. Electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance study of the neutral copper acceptor in ZnGeP sub 2 crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Stevens, K T; Setzler, S D; Schünemann, P G; Pollak, T M

    2003-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance have been used to characterize the neutral copper acceptor in ZnGeP sub 2 crystals. The copper substitutes for zinc and behaves as a conventional acceptor (i.e. the 3d electrons do not play a dominant role). Because of a high degree of compensation from native donors, the copper acceptors in our samples were initially in the nonparamagnetic singly ionized state (Cu sub Z sub n sup -). The paramagnetic neutral state (Cu sub Z sub n sup 0) was observed when the crystals were exposed to 632.8 nm or 1064 nm laser light while being held at a temperature below 50 K. The g matrix of the neutral copper acceptor is axial g sub p sub a sub r = 2.049 and g sub p sub e sub r sub p = 2.030), with the unique principal direction parallel to the tetragonal c axis of the crystal. The hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole matrices also exhibit c-axis symmetry (A sub p sub a sub r = 87.6 MHz, A sub p sub e sub r sub p = 34.8 MHz and P = 0.87 MHz for sup 6 su...

  8. Electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double-resonance study of Ti sup 3 sup + centres in KTiOPO sub 4

    CERN Document Server

    Setzler, S D; Fernelius, N C; Scripsick, M P; Edwards, G J; Halliburton, L E

    2003-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance have been used to characterize four Ti sup 3 sup + centres in undoped crystals of potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO sub 4 or KTP). These 3d sup 1 defects (S = 1/2) are produced by ionizing radiation (either 60 kV x-rays or 355 nm photons from a tripled Nd:YAG laser), and form when the regular Ti sup 4 sup + ions in the crystal trap an electron. Two of these trapped-electron centres are only observed in hydrothermally grown KTP and the other two are dominant in flux-grown KTP. Both of the Ti sup 3 sup + centres in hydrothermally grown crystals have a neighbouring proton (i.e. an OH sup - molecule). In the flux-grown crystals, one of the Ti sup 3 sup + centres is adjacent to an oxygen vacancy and the other centre is tentatively attributed to a self-trapped electron (i.e. a Ti sup 3 sup + centre with no stabilizing entity nearby). The g matrix and phosphorus hyperfine matrices are determined for all four Ti sup 3 sup + centres, and the proto...

  9. Electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double-resonance study of Ti{sup 3+} centres in KTiOPO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setzler, S D [BAE Systems, Nashua, NH 03061 (United States); Stevens, K T [Northrop Grumman, Space Technology, Synoptics, Charlotte, NC 28273 (United States); Fernelius, N C [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, AFRL/MLPSO, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States); Scripsick, M P [Nova Phase, Newton, NJ 07860 (United States); Edwards, G J [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Halliburton, L E [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2003-06-18

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance have been used to characterize four Ti{sup 3+} centres in undoped crystals of potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO{sub 4} or KTP). These 3d{sup 1} defects (S = 1/2) are produced by ionizing radiation (either 60 kV x-rays or 355 nm photons from a tripled Nd:YAG laser), and form when the regular Ti{sup 4+} ions in the crystal trap an electron. Two of these trapped-electron centres are only observed in hydrothermally grown KTP and the other two are dominant in flux-grown KTP. Both of the Ti{sup 3+} centres in hydrothermally grown crystals have a neighbouring proton (i.e. an OH{sup -} molecule). In the flux-grown crystals, one of the Ti{sup 3+} centres is adjacent to an oxygen vacancy and the other centre is tentatively attributed to a self-trapped electron (i.e. a Ti{sup 3+} centre with no stabilizing entity nearby). The g matrix and phosphorus hyperfine matrices are determined for all four Ti{sup 3+} centres, and the proton hyperfine matrix is determined for the two centres associated with OH{sup -} ions. These Ti{sup 3+} centres contribute to the formation of the grey tracks often observed in KTP crystals used to generate the second harmonic of high-power, near-infrared lasers.

  10. Contribution to the study of molecular movements in cyclohexane by electron spin resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance using a radical probe; Contribution a l'etude des mouvements moleculaires dans le cyclohexane par resonance paramagnetique electronique et double resonance electronique-nucleaire a l'aide d'une sonde radicalaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volino, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    Solutions of stable free radicals of the nitroxide type have been studied as a function of temperature. In the plastic or globular state, the cyclohexane molecules have rapid rotational and diffusional movements. They transmit this movement to dissolved free radicals. Conversely, measurements by electron spin resonance of the absolute movement of the radicals, and by electron nuclear double resonance of their movement relative to the cyclohexane molecules give very precise methods for local analyses of the movement present in the cyclohexane matrix. The principle of these techniques makes up the 'radical probe method'. (author) [French] Des solutions de radicaux libres stables, du type nitroxyde dans le cyclohexane ont ete etudiees, en fonction de la temperature. Les molecules de cyclohexane, dans l'etat plastique ou globulaire, sont animees de mouvements rapides de rotation sur elles-memes et de diffusion. Elles transmettent leur mobilite aux radicaux libres dissous. Reciproquement, la mesure du mouvement absolu des radicaux, a l'aide de la resonance paramagnetique electronique, et celle du mouvement relatif des radicaux et des molecules de cyclohexane par double resonance electronique-nucleaire, constituent des methodes tres precises pour analyser localement les mouvements presents dans la matrice de cyclohexane. Ce principe et ces techniques constituent la 'methode de la sonde radicalaire'. (auteur)

  11. Contribution to the study of molecular movements in cyclohexane by electron spin resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance using a radical probe; Contribution a l'etude des mouvements moleculaires dans le cyclohexane par resonance paramagnetique electronique et double resonance electronique-nucleaire a l'aide d'une sonde radicalaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volino, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    Solutions of stable free radicals of the nitroxide type have been studied as a function of temperature. In the plastic or globular state, the cyclohexane molecules have rapid rotational and diffusional movements. They transmit this movement to dissolved free radicals. Conversely, measurements by electron spin resonance of the absolute movement of the radicals, and by electron nuclear double resonance of their movement relative to the cyclohexane molecules give very precise methods for local analyses of the movement present in the cyclohexane matrix. The principle of these techniques makes up the 'radical probe method'. (author) [French] Des solutions de radicaux libres stables, du type nitroxyde dans le cyclohexane ont ete etudiees, en fonction de la temperature. Les molecules de cyclohexane, dans l'etat plastique ou globulaire, sont animees de mouvements rapides de rotation sur elles-memes et de diffusion. Elles transmettent leur mobilite aux radicaux libres dissous. Reciproquement, la mesure du mouvement absolu des radicaux, a l'aide de la resonance paramagnetique electronique, et celle du mouvement relatif des radicaux et des molecules de cyclohexane par double resonance electronique-nucleaire, constituent des methodes tres precises pour analyser localement les mouvements presents dans la matrice de cyclohexane. Ce principe et ces techniques constituent la 'methode de la sonde radicalaire'. (auteur)

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D.; Peters, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    Ten years following computerized tomography, a new technique called nuclear magnetic resonance revolutionizes the field of diagnostic imaging. A major advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance is that the danger of radiation is non-existent as compared to computerized tomography. When parts of the human body are subject to radio-frequencies while in a fixed magnetic field, its most detailed structures are revealed. The quality of images, the applications, as well as the indications are forever increasing. Images obtained at the level of the brain and spinal cord through nuclear magnetic resonance supercede those obtained through computerized tomography. Hence, it is most likely that myelography, along with pneumoencephalography will be eliminated as a diagnostic means. It is without a doubt that nuclear magnetic resonance is tomorrow's computerized tomography [fr

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    In a method of imaging a body in which nuclear magnetic resonance is excited in a region including part of the body, and the free induction decay signal is measured, a known quantity of a material of known nuclear magnetic resonance properties, for example a bag of water, is included in the region so as to enhance the measured free induction decay signal. This then reduces the generation of noise during subsequent processing of the signal. (author)

  15. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  16. Observation of strongly forbidden solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions via electron-electron double resonance detected NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Albert A.; Corzilius, Björn; Haze, Olesya; Swager, Timothy M.; Griffin, Robert G., E-mail: rgg@mit.edu [Department of Chemistry and Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-12-07

    We present electron paramagnetic resonance experiments for which solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions were observed indirectly via polarization loss on the electron. This use of indirect observation allows characterization of the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process close to the electron. Frequency profiles of the electron-detected solid effect obtained using trityl radical showed intense saturation of the electron at the usual solid effect condition, which involves a single electron and nucleus. However, higher order solid effect transitions involving two, three, or four nuclei were also observed with surprising intensity, although these transitions did not lead to bulk nuclear polarization—suggesting that higher order transitions are important primarily in the transfer of polarization to nuclei nearby the electron. Similar results were obtained for the SA-BDPA radical where strong electron-nuclear couplings produced splittings in the spectrum of the indirectly observed solid effect conditions. Observation of high order solid effect transitions supports recent studies of the solid effect, and suggests that a multi-spin solid effect mechanism may play a major role in polarization transfer via DNP.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, R.

    1991-01-01

    In order to include the effect of a magnetic object in a subject under investigation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) apparatus is operable at more than one radio frequency (RF) frequency. The apparatus allows normal practice as far as obtaining an NMR response or image from a given nuclear species is concerned, but, in addition, interrogates the nuclear spin system at a frequency which is different from the resonance frequency normally used for the given nuclear species, as determined from the applied magnetic field. The magnetic field close to a magnetised or magnetisable object is modified and the given nuclear species gives a response at the different frequency. Thus detection of a signal at the frequency indicates the presence of the chosen nuclei close to the magnetised or magnetisable object. Applications include validation of an object detection or automatic shape inspection system in the presence of magnetic impurities, and the detection of magnetic particles which affect measurement of liquid flow in a pipe. (author)

  18. Double Fano resonances in plasmon coupling nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Fei; Jin, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Fano resonances are investigated in nanorods with symmetric lengths and side-by-side assembly. Single Fano resonance can be obtained by a nanorod dimer, and double Fano resonances are shown in nanorod trimers with side-by-side assembly. With transverse plasmon excitation, Fano resonances are caused by the destructive interference between a bright superradiant mode and dark subradiant modes. The bright mode originates from the electric plasmon resonance, and the dark modes originate from the magnetic resonances induced by near-field inter-rod coupling. Double Fano resonances result from double dark modes at different wavelengths, which are induced and tuned by the asymmetric gaps between the adjacent nanorods. Fano resonances show a high figure of merit and large light extinction in the periodic array of assembled nanorods, which can potentially be used in multiwavelength sensing in the visible and near-infrared regions. (paper)

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueterjans, H.

    1987-01-01

    Contributions by various authors who are working in the field of NMR imaging present the current status and the perspectives of in-vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, explaining not only the scientific and medical aspects, but also technical and physical principles as well as questions concerning practical organisation and training, and points of main interest for further research activities. (orig./TRV) [de

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarises the aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) considered by the National Health Technology Advisory Panel and makes recommendations on its introduction in Australia with particular regard to the need for thorough evaluation of its cost effectiveness. Topics covered are: principles of the technique, equipment required, installation, costs, reliability, performance parameters, clinical indications, training and staff requirements, and safety considerations

  1. Giant nuclear resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snover, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    Giant nuclear resonances are elementary mods of oscillation of the whole nucleus, closely related to the normal modes of oscillation of coupled mechanical systems. They occur systematically in most if not all nuclei, with oscillation energies typically in the range 10-30 MeV. One of the best - known examples is the giant electric dipole (El) resonance, in which all the protons and all the neutrons oscillate with opposite phase, producing a large time - varying electric dipole moment which acts as an effective antenna for radiating gamma ray. This paper discusses this mode as well as quadrupole and monopole modes

  2. Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Transparencias en inglés de la asignatura "Resonancia Magnética Nuclear Avanzada" (Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) (36643) que se imparte en el Máster de Química Médica como asignatura optativa de 3 créditos ECTS. En esta asignatura se completa el estudio iniciado en la asignatura de quinto curso de la licenciatura en Química "Determinación estructural" (7448) y en la del Grado de Química de tercer curso "Determinación estructural de los compuestos orgánicos" (26030) en lo referente a té...

  3. Resonance enhancement of neutrinoless double electron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivoruchenko, M.I.; Simkovic, Fedor; Frekers, Dieter; Faessler, Amand

    2011-01-01

    The process of neutrinoless double electron (0νECEC) capture is revisited for those cases where the two participating atoms are nearly degenerate in mass. The theoretical framework is the formalism of an oscillation of two atoms with different total lepton number (and parity), one of which can be in an excited state so that mass degeneracy is realized. In such a case and assuming light Majorana neutrinos, the two atoms will be in a mixed configuration with respect to the weak interaction. A resonant enhancement of transitions between such pairs of atoms will occur, which could be detected by the subsequent electromagnetic de-excitation of the excited state of the daughter atom and nucleus. Available data of atomic masses, as well as nuclear and atomic excitations are used to select the most likely candidates for the resonant transitions. Assuming an effective mass for the Majorana neutrino of 1 eV, some half-lives are predicted to be as low as 10 22 years in the unitary limit. It is argued that, in order to obtain more accurate predictions for the 0νECEC half-lives, precision mass measurements of the atoms involved are necessary, which can readily be accomplished by today's high precision Penning traps. Further advancements also require a better understanding of high-lying excited states of the final nuclei (i.e. excitation energy, angular momentum and parity) and the calculation of the nuclear matrix elements.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus is described including a magnet system which is capable of providing a steady magnetic field along an axis, and is constructed so as to define a plurality of regions along the axis in each of which the field is substantially homogeneous so that in each region an imaging operation may be separately carried out. Iron shields increase the field homogeneity. In use, each patient lies on a wheeled trolley which is provided with magnetic field gradient coils and an RF coil system, some of the coils being movable to facilitate positioning of the patient, and there are terminals for connection to a common computing and control facility. (author)

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremin, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic imaging, have been the medical application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's been used to study the structure of various compounds in chemistry and physics, and in the mid-1970 to produce images of rabbits and eventually of the human hand and head. The images are produced by making use of the nuclear magnetization of the hydrogen ion, or proton, that is present in biological material to record the density distribution of protons in cellular water and lipids. An exploration of the end-results of complicated free induction decay signals, that have been digitized and frequency-analysed by mathematical computerized techniques to produce an image of tissue density, is given. At present NMR produces images comparable to those of early computed tomography

  6. Radiofrequency/infrared double resonance spectroscopy of the HD+ ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrington, Alan; McNab, I.R.; Montgomerie, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    We describe a double resonance technique for obtaining radiofrequency spectra of the HD + ion in vibration-rotation levels close to the dissociation limit. Infrared transitions are driven by Doppler tuning an HD + ion beam into resonance with a carbon dioxide infrared laser, and are detected by measuring H + fragment ions produced by electric field dissociation of the upper vibration-rotation level. Radiofrequency transitions between nuclear hyperfine components of the lower vibration-rotation level are then detected through resonant increases in the H + fragment ion current. The high spectroscopic resolution obtained, and the ability to measure magnetic dipole hyperfine transitions, will enable the hyperfine constants to be determined accurately. (author)

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Guo, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most widely used instrumental methods, with applications ranging from the characterization of pure compounds by high-resolution NMR to the diagnosis of disease by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To give some idea of the wide-spread use of NMR, a computer search for the period 1985-1987 turned up over 500 books and review articles and over 7000 literature citations, not including papers in which NMR was used together with other spectroscopic methods for the routine identification of organic compounds. Consequently, they have by necessity been somewhat selective in the topics they have chosen to cover and in the articles they have cited. In this review, which covers the published literature for the approximate period Sept 1985-Aug 1987, they have focused on new developments and applications of interest to the chemist. First they review recent developments in instrumentation and techniques. Although there have not been any major break-throughs in NMR instrumentation during the past two years, significant refinements have been reported which optimize instrumentation for the demanding multiple pulse experiments in routine use today. Next they review new developments in methods for processing NMR data, followed by reviews of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments

  8. Pion double charge exchange in the Δ33 resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirzba, A.; Toki, H.; Siciliano, E.R.; Johnson, M.B.; Gilman, R.

    1989-01-01

    We examine the model dependence and nuclear-structure sensitivity of several Δ 33 -dominated processes contributing to pion double charge exchange on nuclei in the region of the Δ 33 resonance. These processes include the Δ 33 -nucleon interaction V NΔ and sequential scattering, in which the pion undergoes single charge exchange on two different nucleons. In all cases, the scattering takes place through the exchange of an intermediate π and ρ meson. Sequential-mediated double charge exchange is found to be only moderately sensitive to short-range correlations, meson-nucleon form factors, and the rho meson, whereas V NΔ -mediated double charge exchange is very sensitive to all these effects. Results are given for double charge exchange on 18 O (double isobaric analog transitions) and 16 O (nonanalog transitions). Sequential double charge exchange is shown to favor non-spin-flip matrix elements of the transition operator whereas V NΔ -mediated double charge exchange favors spin-flip matrix elements. The energy dependence of the zero-degree cross sections for V NΔ and sequential scattering are also different: Sequential tends to increase monotonically from 100 to 300 MeV, whereas V NΔ peaks at about 150 MeV. The delta-nucleon interaction is found likely to dominate over sequential scattering in nonanalog double charge exchange. The V NΔ is also large in analog double charge exchange, but it does not enable us to explain the anomalous behavior of the 18 O differential cross sections

  9. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyer, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The spectroscopy of nuclear magnetic resonance constitutes a major analytical technique in biological and organic analysis. This technique appears now in the programme of preparatory classes and its teaching is developed in the second year of DEUG. The following article reviews on the nuclear magnetic resonance and on the possibilities it offers to bring to the fore the physico-chemical properties of molecules. (N.C.)

  10. Resonant double loop antenna development at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Brown, R.A.; Bryan, W.E.; Fadnek, A.; Hoffman, D.J.; King, J.F.; Livesey, R.L.; McIlwain, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the development of ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) systems for fusion research, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has built resonant double loop (RDL) antennas for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, US) and Tore Supra (Centre d'Etudes Nucleaire, Cadarache, France). Each antenna has been designed to deliver 4 MW of power. The electrical circuit and the mechanical philosophy employed are the same for both antennas, but different operating environments lead to substantial differences in the designs of specific components. A description and a comparison of the technologies developed in the two designs are presented. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  11. Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geick, R.

    1981-01-01

    This review starts with the basic principles of resonance phenomena in physical systems. Especially, the connection is shown between the properties of these systems and Fourier transforms. Next, we discuss the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance. Starting from the general properties of physical systems showing resonance phenomena and from the special properties of nuclear spin systems, the main part of this paper reviews pulse and Fourier methods in nuclear magnetic resonance. Among pulse methods, an introduction will be given to spin echoes, and, apart from the principle of Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, an introduction to the technical problems of this method, e.g. resolution in the frequency domain, aliasing, phase and intensity errors, stationary state of the spin systems for repetitive measurements, proton decoupling, and application of Fourier methods to systems in a nonequilibrium state. The last section is devoted to special applications of Fourier methods and recent developments, e.g. measurement of relaxation times, solvent peak suppression, 'rapid scan'-method, methods for suppressing the effects of dipolar coupling in solids, two-dimensional Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, and spin mapping or zeugmatography. (author)

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus including a coil for generating a gradient field in a plane perpendicular to a static magnetic field, means for controlling the operation of the coil to rotationally shift in angular steps the gradient direction of the gradient field at an angle pitch of some multiple of the unit index angle through a plurality of rotations to assume all the shift positions of the gradient direction, a rough image reconstructor for reconstructing a rough tomographic image on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance signals acquired during a rotation of the second gradient magnetic field, a rough image display for depicting the rough tomographic image, a final image reconstructor for reconstructing a final tomographic image on the basis of all nuclear magnetic resonance signals corresponding to all of the expected rotation shift positions acquired during a plurality of rotations and a final image display for depicting the final tomographic image

  13. Understanding the Double Quantum Muonium RF Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitzman, S. R.; Cottrell, S. P.; Fleming, D. G.; Sun-Mack, S.

    A physically intuitive analytical solution to the Mu + RF Hamiltonian and lineshape is developed. The method is based on reformulating the problem in a basis set that explicitly accounts for the 1q RF transitions and identifying an isolated upper 1q quasi-eigenstate within that basis. Subsequently the double quantum resonance explicitly manifests itself via the non-zero interaction term between the pair of lower ortho-normalized 1q basis states, which in this field region are substantially the | \\uparrow \\uparrow > and | \\downarrow \\downarrow > Mu states.

  14. Transmission loss of double wall panels containing Helmholtz resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prydz, R. A.; Kuntz, H. L.; Morrow, D. L.; Wirt, L. S.

    Data and an analysis are presented on the use of Helholtz resonators in double wall panels (i.e., aircraft sidewalls). Several wall materials and resonator configurations were tested, and the resonators were found to substantially increase the transmission loss of the double wall system at the tuning frequency.

  15. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  16. Improvement in transmission loss of aircraft double wall with resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jincai; Shi, Liming; Ye, Xining

    1991-08-01

    A little volume low frequency resonator applicable to double-wall configuration of propeller-driven aircraft was designed on the basis of the principle of Helmholtz resonator. The normal incidence absorption coefficient of the various single resonator has been measured. The agreement between theoretical and experimental results is encouraging. An array of resonators whose resonant frequency at 85 Hz and 160 Hz, respectively, are installed between aircraft double-panel, and it has been shown that transmission loss of the double wall structure with resonators improve 4 dB and 6.5 dB in 1/3rd octave bandwidth at 80 Hz and 160 Hz center frequency, respectively, and 5 dB and 7 dB at resonant frequencies, compared with that of the double wall configuration without resonators.

  17. Nuclear quadrupole resonance of arsenolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madarazo, R.

    1988-01-01

    A pulsed Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) spectrometer was constructed using imported Matec units. Peripherical components were specially assembled and tested for the implantation of the spin-echo technique in the Laboratorio de Centros de Cor of IFUSP. The R.F. operation range is from 50 to 1 ) and spin-spin (T 2 ) relaxation times were carried out at room temperature in arsenolite. The 75 As NQR frequency measured at room temperature is 116.223 MHz. (author) [pt

  18. Aluminum and gallium nuclei as microscopic probes for pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance diagnostics of electric-field gradient and spin density in garnet ceramics doped with paramagnetic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskaya, Yu. A.; Mamin, G. V.; Babunts, R. A.; Badalyan, A. G.; Edinach, E. V.; Asatryan, H. R.; Romanov, N. G.; Orlinskii, S. B.; Khanin, V. M.; Wieczorek, H.; Ronda, C.; Baranov, P. G.

    2018-03-01

    The presence of aluminum and gallium isotopes with large nuclear magnetic and quadrupole moments in the nearest environment of impurity ions Mn2+ and Ce3+ in garnets made it possible to use hyperfine and quadrupole interactions with these ions to determine the spatial distribution of the unpaired electron and the gradient of the electric field at the sites of aluminum and gallium in the garnet lattice. High-frequency (94 GHz) electron spin echo detected electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance measurements have been performed. Large difference in the electric field gradient and quadrupole splitting at octahedral and tetrahedral sites allowed identifying the positions of aluminum and gallium ions in the garnet lattice and proving that gallium first fills tetrahedral positions in mixed aluminum-gallium garnets. This should be taken into account in the development of garnet-based scintillators and lasers. It is shown that the electric field gradient at aluminum nuclei near Mn2+ possessing an excess negative charge in the garnet lattice is ca. 2.5 times larger than on aluminum nuclei near Ce3+.

  19. Electron density distribution in BaPb1−xSbxO3 superconducting oxides studied by double nuclear magnetic resonance methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piskunov, Yu. V.; Ogloblichev, V. V.; Arapova, I. Yu.; Sadykov, A. V.; Gerashchenko, A. P.; Verkhovskii, S. V.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of charge disorder on the formation of an inhomogeneous state of the electron system in the conduction band in BaPb 1−x Sb x O 3 superconducting oxides is investigated experimentally by NMR methods. The NMR spectra of 17 O are measured systematically, and the contributions from 17 O atoms with different cation nearest surroundings are identified. It is found that microscopic regions with an elevated spin density of charge carriers are formed within two coordination spheres near antimony ions. Nuclei of the superconducting phase of the oxide (regions with an elevated antimony concentration) microscopically distributed over the sample are detected in compounds with x = 0.25 and 0.33. Experiments in which a double resonance signal of the spin echo of 17 O- 207 Pb and 17 O- 121 Sb are measured in the metal phase of BaPb 1−x Sb x O 3 oxides are carried out for the first time. The constants of indirect heteronuclear spin-spin 17 O- 207 Pb interaction are determined as functions of the local Knight shift 207 Ks. The estimates of the constants of the indirect interaction between the nuclei of the nearest neighbors (O-Pb and Pb-Pb atoms) and analysis of evolution of the NMR spectra of 17 O upon a change in the antimony concentration are convincing evidence in favor of the development of a microscopically inhomogeneous state of the electron system in the metal phase of BaPb 1−x Sb x O 3 oxides.

  20. Magnetophonon resonance in double quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploch, D.; Sheregii, E. M.; Marchewka, M.; Wozny, M.; Tomaka, G.

    2009-05-01

    The experimental results obtained for the magnetotransport in pulsed magnetic fields in the InGaAs/InAlAs double quantum well (DQW) structures of two different shapes of wells and different values of the electron density are reported. The magnetophonon resonance (MPR) was observed for both types of structures within the temperature range 77-125 K. Four kinds of LO phonons are taken into account to interpret the MPR oscillations in the DQW and a method of the Landau level calculation in the DQW is elaborated for this aim. The peculiarity of the MPR in the DQW is the large number of the Landau levels caused by SAS splitting of the electron states (splitting on the symmetric and anti-symmetric states) and the large number of the phonon assistance electron transitions between Landau levels. The significant role of the carrier statistics is shown too. The behavior of the electron states in the DQWs at comparably high temperatures has been studied using the MPR. It is shown that the Huang and Manasreh [Manasreh [Phys. Rev. B 54, 2044 (1996)] model involving screening of exchange interaction is confirmed.

  1. Pion double charge exchange and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginocchio, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    Pion double charge exchange to both the double-analog state and the ground state is studied for medium weight nuclei. The relative cross section of these two transitions and the importance of nuclear structure as a function of pion kinetic energy is examined. 16 figs., 5 tabs

  2. Topology of the interactions pattern in pharmaceutically relevant polymorphs of methylxanthines (caffeine, theobromine, and theophiline): combined experimental (¹H-¹⁴N nuclear quadrupole double resonance) and computational (DFT and Hirshfeld-based) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Olejniczak, Grzegorz A; Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko

    2014-09-22

    Three anhydrous methylxanthines: caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine; 1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-(3H,7H)-dione) and its two metabolites theophylline (1,3-dimethylxanthine; 1,3-dimethyl-7H-purine-2,6-dione) and theobromine (3,7-dimethyl-xanthine; 3,7-dimethyl-7H-purine-2,6-dione), which reveal multifaceted therapeutic potential, have been studied experimentally in solid state by (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR (nuclear magnetic resonance-nuclear quadrupole resonance) double resonance (NQDR). For each compound the complete NQR spectrum consisting of 12 lines was recorded. The multiplicity of NQR lines indicates the presence of a stable β form of anhydrous caffeine at 233 K and stable form II of anhydrous theobromine at 213 K. The assignment of signals detected in NQR experiment to particular nitrogen atoms was made on the basis of quantum chemistry calculations performed for monomer, cluster, and solid at the DFT/GGA/BLYP/DPD level. The shifts due to crystal packing interactions were evaluated, and the multiplets detected by NQR were assigned to N(9) in theobromine and N(1) and N(9) in caffeine. The ordering theobromine > theophylline > caffeine site and theophylline theobromine theobromine) to π···π stacking (caffeine). Substantial differences in the intermolecular interactions in stable forms of methylxanthines differing in methylation (site or number) were analyzed within the Hirshfeld surface-based approach. The analysis of local environment of the nitrogen nucleus permitted drawing some conclusions on the nature of the interactions required for effective processes of recognition and binding of a given methylxanthine to A1-A(2A) receptor (target for caffeine in the brain). Although the interactions responsible for linking neighboring methylxanthines molecules in crystals and methylxanthines with targets in the human organism can differ significantly, the knowledge of the topology of interactions provides reliable preliminary information about the nature of this binding.

  3. Detection of internal fields in double-metal terahertz resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitrofanov, Oleg; Han, Zhanghua; Ding, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) double-metal plasmonic resonators enable enhanced light-matter coupling by exploiting strong field confinement. The double-metal design however restricts access to the internal fields. We propose and demonstrate a method for spatial mapping and spectroscopic analysis of the internal...... electromagnetic fields in double-metal plasmonic resonators. We use the concept of image charges and aperture-type scanning near-field THz time-domain microscopy to probe the fields confined within the closed resonator. The experimental method opens doors to studies of light-matter coupling in deeply sub...

  4. Nature of isomerism of solid isothiourea salts, inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases, as studied by 1H-14N nuclear quadrupole double resonance, X-ray, and density functional theory/quantum theory of atoms in molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latosińska, J N; Latosińska, M; Seliger, J; Žagar, V; Maurin, J K; Kazimierczuk, Z

    2012-02-09

    Isothioureas, inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases, have been studied experimentally in solid state by nuclear quadrupole double resonance (NQDR) and X-ray methods and theoretically by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules/density functional theory. Resonance frequencies on (14)N have been detected and assigned to particular nitrogen sites in each molecule. The crystal packings of (S)-3,4-dichlorobenzyl-N-methylisothiouronium chloride with the disordered chlorine positions in benzene ring and (S)-butyloisothiouronium bromide have been resolved in X-ray diffraction studies. (14)N NQDR spectra have been found good indicators of isomer type and strength of intra- or intermolecular N-H···X (X = Cl, Br) interactions. From among all salts studied, only for (S)-2,3,4,5,6-pentabromobenzylisothiouronium chloride are both nitrogen sites equivalent, which has been explained by the slow exchange. This unique structural feature can be a key factor in the high biological activity of (S)-2,3,4,5,6-pentabromobenzylisothiouronium salts.

  5. Double-spin-flip resonance of rhodium nuclei at positive and negative spin temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuoriniemi, J.T.; Knuuttila, T.A.; Lefmann, K.

    2000-01-01

    Sensitive SQUID-NMR measurements were used to study the mutual interactions in the highly polarized nuclear-spin system of rhodium metal. The dipolar coupling gives rise to a weak double-spin-flip resonance. The observed frequency shifts allow deducing separately the dipolarlike contribution...

  6. Transition metal nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pregosin, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    Transition metal NMR spectroscopy has progressed enormously in recent years. New methods, and specifically solid-state methods and new pulse sequences, have allowed access to data from nuclei with relatively low receptivities with the result that chemists have begun to consider old and new problems, previously unapproachable. Moreover, theory, computational science in particular, now permits the calculation of not just 13 C, 15 N and other light nuclei chemical shifts, but heavy main-group element and transition metals as well. These two points, combined with increasing access to high field pulsed spectrometer has produced a wealth of new data on the NMR transition metals. A new series of articles concerned with measuring, understanding and using the nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the metals of Group 3-12 is presented. (author)

  7. The nuclear magnetic resonance well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yumin; Shen Huitang

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristic of the nuclear magnetic resonance logging is described at first. Then its development and its principle is presented. Compared with the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, the magnet techniques is the first question that we must solve in the manufacture of the NMR well logging

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.; MacDonald, J.; Hutchison, S.; Eastwood, L.M.; Redpath, T.W.T.; Mallard, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method of deriving three dimensional image information from an object using nuclear magnetic resonance signals comprises subjecting the object to a continuous, static magnetic field and carrying out the following set of sequential steps: 1) exciting nuclear spins in a selected volume (90deg pulse); 2) applying non-aligned first, second and third gradients of the magnetic field; 3) causing the spins to rephase periodically by reversal of the first gradient to produce spin echoes, and applying pulses of the second gradient prior to every read-out of an echo signal from the object, to differently encode the spin in the second gradient direction for each read-out signal. The above steps 1-3 are then successively repeated with different values of gradient of the third gradient, there being a recovery interval between the repetition of successive sets of steps. Alternate echoes only are read out, the other echoes being time-reversed and ignored for convenience. The resulting signals are appropriately sampled, set out in an array and subjected to three dimensional Fourier transformation. (author)

  9. Resonant double photoionisation spectroscopy of strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokell, E; Grimm, M; Sheridan, P, E-mail: emma.sokell@ucd.i, E-mail: paul.sheridan@ucd.i [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2009-11-01

    Resonant triple-differential cross-section (TDCS) measurements on atomic strontium on the 4p {yields} 4d resonance are presented. All of these TDCS measurements display unexpected lobes at a mutual emission angle for the two electrons of 180{sup o}. Possible explanations for these lobes are explored.

  10. Resonant microsphere gyroscope based on a double Faraday rotator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chengfeng; Tang, Jun; Cui, Danfeng; Wu, Dajin; Zhang, Chengfei; Li, Chunming; Zhen, Yongqiu; Xue, Chenyang; Liu, Jun

    2016-10-15

    The resonant microsphere gyroscope is proposed based on a double Faraday rotator system for the resonant microsphere gyroscope (RMSG) that is characterized by low insertion losses and does not destroy the reciprocity of the gyroscope system. Use of the echo suppression structure and the orthogonal polarization method can effectively inhibit both the backscattering noise and the polarization error, and reduce them below the system sensitivity limit. The resonance asymmetry rate dropped from 34.2% to 2.9% after optimization of the backscattering noise and the polarization noise, which greatly improved the bias stability and the scale factor linearity of the proposed system. Additionally, based on the optimum parameters for the double Faraday rotator system, a bias stability of 0.04°/s has been established for an integration time of 10 s in 1000 s in a resonator microsphere gyroscope using a microsphere resonator with a diameter of 1 mm and a Q of 7.2×106.

  11. Charge-exchange giant resonances as probes of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.

    2001-09-01

    Giant resonances populated in charge-exchange reactions can reveal detailed information about nuclear structure properties, in spite of their apparent featurelessness. The (p,n) and (n,p) reactions - as well as their analog reactions - proceed via the same nuclear matrix element as beta decay. Thereby, they are useful for probing electroweak properties in nuclei, especially for those not accessible to beta decay. The nuclear physics aspects of double beta decay might be investigated in double charge-exchange reactions. detailed nuclear structure information, such as the presence of ground-state correlations, can be revealed via identification of 'first-forbidden' transitions. In addition, astrophysics aspects and halo properties of nuclei have been investigated in charge exchange. Finally, these experiments have questioned our knowledge of the absolute strength of the strong interaction

  12. Nuclear structure and double beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, P.

    1988-01-01

    Double beta decay is a rare transition between two nuclei of the same mass number A involving a change of the nuclear charge Z by two units. It has long been recognized that the Oν mode of double beta decay, where two electrons and no neutrinos are emitted, is a powerful tool for the study of neutrino properties. Its observation would constitute a convincing proof that there exists a massive Majorana neutrino which couples to electrons. Double beta decay is a process involving an intricate mixture of particle physics and physics of the nucleus. The principal nuclear physics issues have to do with the evaluation of the nuclear matrix elements responsible for the decay. If the authors wish to arrive at quantitative answers for the neutrino properties the authors have no choice but to learn first how to understand the nuclear mechanisms. The authors describe first the calculation of the decay rate of the 2ν mode of double beta decay, in which two electrons and two antineutrinos are emitted

  13. High resolution spectroscopy in solids by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonagamba, T.J.

    1991-07-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for High Resolution Spectroscopy in Solids are described. Also the construction project of a partially home made spectrometer and its applications in the characterization of solid samples are shown in detail. The high resolution spectrometer used is implemented with the double resonance multiple pulses sequences and magic angle spinning (MAS) and can be used with solid and liquid samples. The maximum spinning frequency for the MAS experiment is in excess of 5 Khz, the double resonance sequences can be performed with any type of nucleus, in the variable temperature operating range with nitrogen gas: -120 0 C to +160 0 C, and is fully controlled by a Macintosh IIci microcomputer. (author)

  14. Fifty years of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Valderrama, Juan Crisostomo

    1997-01-01

    Short information about the main developments of nuclear magnetic resonance during their fifty existence years is presented. Beside two examples of application (HETCOR and INADEQUATE) to the structural determination of organic compounds are described

  15. Principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pykett, I.L.; Newhouse, J.H.; Buonanno, F.S.; Brady, T.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Kistler, J.P.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    The physical principles which underlie the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are presented in this primer. The major scanning methods are reviewed, and the principles of technique are discussed. A glossary of NMR terms is included

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Trackbed Moisture Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    In this initial phase, conducted from March 2015 through December 2016, Vista Clara and its subcontractor Zetica Rail successfully developed and tested a man-portable, non-invasive spot-check nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) moisture sensor that dire...

  17. Resonance double magnetic bremsstrahlung in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomin, P.I.; Kholodov, R.I.

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of resonance double magnetic bremsstrahlung in the approximation of weakly excited electron states in a strong external magnetic field is analyzed. The differential probability of this process in the Breit-Wigner form is obtained. The probability of double magnetic bremsstrahlung (second-order process of perturbation theory) is compared with the probability of magnetic bremsstrahlung (first-order process of perturbation theory)

  18. Resonant tunneling through double-barrier structures on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Wei-Yin; Zhu Rui; Deng Wen-Ji; Xiao Yun-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Quantum resonant tunneling behaviors of double-barrier structures on graphene are investigated under the tight-binding approximation. The Klein tunneling and resonant tunneling are demonstrated for the quasiparticles with energy close to the Dirac points. The Klein tunneling vanishes by increasing the height of the potential barriers to more than 300 meV. The Dirac transport properties continuously change to the Schrödinger ones. It is found that the peaks of resonant tunneling approximate to the eigen-levels of graphene nanoribbons under appropriate boundary conditions. A comparison between the zigzag- and armchair-edge barriers is given. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  19. Analytical Model of Planar Double Split Ring Resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Jensen, Thomas; Krozer, Viktor

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses on accurate modelling of microstrip double split ring resonators. The impedance matrix representation for coupled lines is applied for the first time to model the SRR, resulting in excellent model accuracy over a wide frequency range. Phase compensation is implemented to take i...

  20. Stimulated resonance Raman spectroscopy: An alternative to laser-rf double resonance for ion spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.; Dinneen, T.; Mansour, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    Stimulated resonance Raman spectroscopy is presented as an alternative to laser-rf double resonance for obtaining high-precision measurements in ion beams. By use of a single-phase modulated laser beam to derive the two required fields, the laser--ion-beam alignment is significantly simplified. In addition, this method is especially useful in the low-frequency regime where the laser-rf double-resonance method encounters difficulties due to modifications of the ion-beam velocity distribution. These modifications, which result from interaction with the traveling rf wave used to induce magnetic dipole transitions, are observed and quantitatively modeled

  1. Noble metal nanostructures for double plasmon resonance with tunable properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petr, M.; Kylián, O.; Kuzminova, A.; Kratochvíl, J.; Khalakhan, I.; Hanuš, J.; Biederman, H.

    2017-02-01

    We report and compare two vacuum-based strategies to produce Ag/Au materials characterized by double plasmon resonance peaks: magnetron sputtering and method based on the use of gas aggregation sources (GAS) of nanoparticles. It was observed that the double plasmon resonance peaks may be achieved by both of these methods and that the intensities of individual localized surface plasmon resonance peaks may be tuned by deposition conditions. However, in the case of sputter deposition it was necessary to introduce a separation dielectric interlayer in between individual Ag and Au nanoparticle films which was not the case of films prepared by GAS systems. The differences in the optical properties of sputter deposited bimetallic Ag/Au films and coatings consisted of individual Ag and Au nanoparticles produced by GAS is ascribed to the divers mechanisms of nanoparticles formation.

  2. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimatsu, Toru; Shirai, Shota; Hashimoto, Katsushi; Sato, Ken; Hirayama, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance) involving quantum Hall states (QHSs) was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs

  3. Nuclear level mixing resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coussement, R.; Put, P.; Scheveneels, G.; Hardeman, F.

    1985-01-01

    The existent methods for measuring quadrupole interactions are not suited to nuclei with lifetimes in the micro-seconds to minutes region. AD/NQR, a possible candidate in this lifetime gap, has not yet succeeded in overcoming its predicted difficulties. A new resonant method, recently developed and based on the principles of level mixing (cfr atomic spectroscopy) covers this less accessible lifetime range. Many other kinds of resonances can be described according to the level mixing formalism. The particular example of NMR as a level mixing resonance (LMR) is discussed. The underlying theory of LMR and its important consequences, leading to some interesting features of the method, is briefly formulated. Two successfully performed measurements demonstrate the feasibility and the predicted characteristics of this new promising method. (orig.)

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burl, M.; Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the rate of flow of a liquid in a selected region of a body by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are described. The method includes a sequence of applying a first magnetic pulse effective to excite nuclear magnetic resonance of a chosen nucleus within the liquid preferentially in a slice of the body which includes the selected region. A period of time (tsub(D)) is waited and then a second magnetic pulse is applied which is effective to excite nuclear magnetic resonance of the nuclei preferentially in the slice, and the free induction decay signal is measured. The whole sequence is repeated for different values of the period of time (tsub(D)). The variation in the value of the measured signal with tsub(D) is then related to the rate of flow of the liquid through the slice. (author)

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Weiping; Wang Qi; Zhou Xin

    2013-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the basic principle of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Protein's structures and functions and dynamics studied by liquid NMR are elaborated; methods for enhancing the resolution of solid state NMR and its applications are discussed; the principle of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is interpreted, and applications in different aspects are reviewed. Finally, the progress of NMR is commented. (authors)

  6. Force detection of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rugar, D.; Zueger, O.; Hoen, S.; Yannoni, C.S.; Vieth, H.M.; Kendrick, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    Micromechanical sensing of magnetic force was used to detect nuclear magnetic resonance with exceptional sensitivity and spatial resolution. With a 900 angstrom thick silicon nitride cantilever capable of detecting subfemtonewton forces, a single shot sensitivity of 1.6 x 10 13 protons was achieved for an ammonium nitrate sample mounted on the cantilever. A nearby millimeter-size iron particle produced a 600 tesla per meter magnetic field gradient, resulting in a spatial resolution of 2.6 micrometers in one dimension. These results suggest that magnetic force sensing is a viable approach for enhancing the sensitivity and spatial resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging

  7. On the role of resonances in double-mode pulsation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziembowski, W.; Kovacs, G.

    1984-01-01

    Simultaneous effects of resonant coupling and non-linear saturation of linear driving mechanism on the finite amplitude solution of multi-modal pulsation problem and on its stability are investigated. Both effects are calculated in the lowest order of approximation in terms of amplitudes. It is shown that the 2:1 resonance between one of the two linearly unstable modes and a higher frequency mode causes double-mode (fundamental and first overtone) pulsation. In a certain range of parameters, such as the frequency mismatch, the linear growth and damping rates, it is the only stable solution of the problem. (author)

  8. Basis of the nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahceli, S.

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this book which is translated from English language is to explain the physical and mathematical basis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). There are nine chapters covering different aspects of NMR. In the firs chapter fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics are given at a level suitable for readers to understand NMR fully. The remaining chapters discuss the magnetic properties of nucleus, the interactions between atoms and molecules, continuous wave NMR, pulsed NMR, nuclear magnetic relaxation and NMR of liquids

  9. Optically controlled resonant tunneling in a double-barrier diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, S. C.; Wu, S.; Sanders, S.; Griffel, G.; Yariv, A.

    1991-03-01

    The resonant tunneling effect is optically enhanced in a GaAs/GaAlAs double-barrier structure that has partial lateral current confinement. The peak current increases and the valley current decreases simultaneously when the device surface is illuminated, due to the increased conductivity of the top layer of the structure. The effect of the lateral current confinement on the current-voltage characteristic of a double-barrier resonant tunneling structure was also studied. With increased lateral current confinement, the peak and valley current decrease at a different rate such that the current peak-to-valley ratio increases up to three times. The experimental results are explained by solving the electrostatic potential distribution in the structure using a simple three-layer model.

  10. Resonant Tunneling in Photonic Double Quantum Well Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Joel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Here, we study the resonant photonic states of photonic double quantum well (PDQW heterostructures composed of two different photonic crystals. The heterostructure is denoted as B/A/B/A/B, where photonic crystals A and B act as photonic wells and barriers, respectively. The resulting band structure causes photons to become confined within the wells, where they occupy discrete quantized states. We have obtained an expression for the transmission coefficient of the PDQW heterostructure using the transfer matrix method and have found that resonant states exist within the photonic wells. These resonant states occur in split pairs, due to a coupling between degenerate states shared by each of the photonic wells. It is observed that when the resonance energy lies at a bound photonic state and the two photonic quantum wells are far away from each other, resonant states appear in the transmission spectrum of the PDQW as single peaks. However, when the wells are brought closer together, coupling between bound photonic states causes an energy-splitting effect, and the transmitted states each have two peaks. Essentially, this means that the system can be switched between single and double transparent states. We have also observed that the total number of resonant states can be controlled by varying the width of the photonic wells, and the quality factor of transmitted peaks can be drastically improved by increasing the thickness of the outer photonic barriers. It is anticipated that the resonant states described here can be used to develop new types of photonic-switching devices, optical filters, and other optoelectronic devices.

  11. Nuclear disarmament verification via resonant phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecla, Jake J; Danagoulian, Areg

    2018-03-28

    Nuclear disarmament treaties are not sufficient in and of themselves to neutralize the existential threat of the nuclear weapons. Technologies are necessary for verifying the authenticity of the nuclear warheads undergoing dismantlement before counting them toward a treaty partner's obligation. Here we present a concept that leverages isotope-specific nuclear resonance phenomena to authenticate a warhead's fissile components by comparing them to a previously authenticated template. All information is encrypted in the physical domain in a manner that amounts to a physical zero-knowledge proof system. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the system is shown to reveal no isotopic or geometric information about the weapon, while readily detecting hoaxing attempts. This nuclear technique can dramatically increase the reach and trustworthiness of future nuclear disarmament treaties.

  12. Spectrometer for external detection of magnetic and related double resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagalyn, P.L.; Alexander, M.N.

    1977-01-01

    The patent relates to an improvement in nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer apparatus. It consists of a spectrometer which utilizes separate materials containing, respectively, sample and detector spin systems as opposed to one in which the sample and detector spins are contained in the same single material

  13. Why Nature Uses Radical SAM Enzymes so Widely: Electron Nuclear Double Resonance Studies of Lysine 2,3-Aminomutase Show the 5'-dAdo• "Free Radical" Is Never Free.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horitani, Masaki; Byer, Amanda S; Shisler, Krista A; Chandra, Tilak; Broderick, Joan B; Hoffman, Brian M

    2015-06-10

    Lysine 2,3-aminomutase (LAM) is a radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzyme and, like other members of this superfamily, LAM utilizes radical-generating machinery comprising SAM anchored to the unique Fe of a [4Fe-4S] cluster via a classical five-membered N,O chelate ring. Catalysis is initiated by reductive cleavage of the SAM S-C5' bond, which creates the highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical (5'-dAdo•), the same radical generated by homolytic Co-C bond cleavage in B12 radical enzymes. The SAM surrogate S-3',4'-anhydroadenosyl-L-methionine (anSAM) can replace SAM as a cofactor in the isomerization of L-α-lysine to L-β-lysine by LAM, via the stable allylic anhydroadenosyl radical (anAdo•). Here electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy of the anAdo• radical in the presence of (13)C, (2)H, and (15)N-labeled lysine completes the picture of how the active site of LAM from Clostridium subterminale SB4 "tames" the 5'-dAdo• radical, preventing it from carrying out harmful side reactions: this "free radical" in LAM is never free. The low steric demands of the radical-generating [4Fe-4S]/SAM construct allow the substrate target to bind adjacent to the S-C5' bond, thereby enabling the 5'-dAdo• radical created by cleavage of this bond to react with its partners by undergoing small motions, ∼0.6 Å toward the target and ∼1.5 Å overall, that are controlled by tight van der Waals contact with its partners. We suggest that the accessibility to substrate and ready control of the reactive C5' radical, with "van der Waals control" of small motions throughout the catalytic cycle, is common within the radical SAM enzyme superfamily and is a major reason why these enzymes are the preferred means of initiating radical reactions in nature.

  14. Why Nature Uses Radical SAM Enzymes so Widely: Electron Nuclear Double Resonance Studies of Lysine 2,3-Aminomutase Show the 5′-dAdo• “Free Radical” Is Never Free

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horitani, Masaki; Byer, Amanda S.; Shisler, Krista A.; Chandra, Tilak; Broderick, Joan B.; Hoffman, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Lysine 2,3-aminomutase (LAM) is a radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzyme and, like other members of this superfamily, LAM utilizes radical-generating machinery comprising SAM anchored to the unique Fe of a [4Fe-4S] cluster via a classical five-membered N,O chelate ring. Catalysis is initiated by reductive cleavage of the SAM S–C5′ bond, which creates the highly reactive 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical (5′-dAdo•), the same radical generated by homolytic Co–C bond cleavage in B12 radical enzymes. The SAM surrogate S-3′,4′-anhydroadenosyl-L-methionine (anSAM) can replace SAM as a cofactor in the isomerization of L-α-lysine to L-β-lysine by LAM, via the stable allylic anhydroadenosyl radical (anAdo•). Here electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy of the anAdo• radical in the presence of 13C, 2H, and 15N-labeled lysine completes the picture of how the active site of LAM from Clostridium subterminale SB4 “tames” the 5′-dAdo• radical, preventing it from carrying out harmful side reactions: this “free radical” in LAM is never free. The low steric demands of the radical-generating [4Fe-4S]/SAM construct allow the substrate target to bind adjacent to the S–C5′ bond, thereby enabling the 5′-dAdo• radical created by cleavage of this bond to react with its partners by undergoing small motions, ~0.6 Å toward the target and ~1.5 Å overall, that are controlled by tight van der Waals contact with its partners. We suggest that the accessibility to substrate and ready control of the reactive C5′ radical, with “van der Waals control” of small motions throughout the catalytic cycle, is common within the radical SAM enzyme superfamily and is a major reason why these enzymes are the preferred means of initiating radical reactions in nature. PMID:25923449

  15. Nuclear fuel, mass balances, conversion ratio, doubling time, and uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1976-11-01

    Information on the performance aspects of nuclear power plants is presented concerning conversion ratio, criticality, primitive economic analysis, stable breeder-converter industry, doubling time, breeder industry economic benefit, defining nuclear fuel, recommendations, and uncertainty

  16. Resonances: from nuclear physics to mesoscopic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Lidia S.; Maglione, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    Resonances are one of the most interesting phenomena in many fields of physics which lead to important findings. In the quantum world, systems with electrons, hadrons or atoms provide enormous amount of data on resonances, leading to the discovery of new states of matter. In nuclear physics, the recent findings on exotic nuclei, added to the list many new examples, which are important not only as direct data on resonances, but also for the production of new isotopes in regions of the nuclear chart which were 'terra incognita', until recently. With recent developments in microelectronics it is possible to create in the laboratory almost two dimensional wave guides where the motion of the electrons can exhibit typical quantum effects. The geometry of systems, such as bends, corners or crosses, has a strong influence on the conduction properties of the electrons, since it can create the appropriate conditions required for the formation of bound states or resonances in the conduction channels. Therefore it is quite important to have an accurate description of the relation between geometry and observables, which in a theoretical perspective emerges naturally from the solution of a multichannel eigenvalue problem. The study of resonances and their behaviour in these domains of physics, will be the purpose of the lecture. (Author)

  17. Microwave-optical double resonance spectroscopy. Final report, February 1, 1971-October 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Optical, zero-field and high-field optical detection of magnetic resonance, electron-nuclear double resonance, level anticrossing and cross relaxation, and electron paramagnetic resonance experiments have been performed on a variety of chemical systems in order to further basic knowledge of the structure, reactivity, and response to radiation of molecules in their ground and/or excited electronic states. Systems investigated include organic molecules oriented in low temperature crystals, simple free radicals, transition metal complexes, rare earth hydrides, and hemeproteins in biological enzymes. Many of these systems are of potential importance in a number of applied areas including hydrocarbon-based fuel systems, solar energy devices, laser-initiated photochemical reactions, and free radical mechanisms in chemical carcinogenesis

  18. Microwave-optical double resonance spectroscopy. Progress report, February 1, 1978--January 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, D.W.

    1978-11-01

    Optical, zero-field and high-field optical detection of magnetic resonance, electron-nuclear double resonance, level anticrossing and cross relaxation, and electron paramagnetic resonance experiments have been performed on a variety of chemical systems in order to further basic knowledge of the structure, reactivity, and response to radiation of molecules in their ground and/or excited electronic states. Systems investigated include organic molecules oriented in low temperature crystals, simple free radicals, transition metal complexes, rare earth hydrides, and hemeproteins in biological enzymes. Aside from their intrinsic interest, many of these systems are of potential importance in a number of applied areas including hydrocarbon-based fuel systems, solar energy devices, laser-initiated photochemical reactions, and free radical mechanisms in chemical carcinogenesis.

  19. Microwave-optical double resonance spectroscopy. Progress report, February 1, 1978--January 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, D.W.

    1978-01-01

    Optical, zero-field and high-field optical detection of magnetic resonance, electron-nuclear double resonance, level anticrossing and cross relaxation, and electron paramagnetic resonance experiments have been performed on a variety of chemical systems in order to further basic knowledge of the structure, reactivity, and response to radiation of molecules in their ground and/or excited electronic states. Systems investigated include organic molecules oriented in low temperature crystals, simple free radicals, transition metal complexes, rare earth hydrides, and hemeproteins in biological enzymes. Aside from their intrinsic interest, many of these systems are of potential importance in a number of applied areas including hydrocarbon-based fuel systems, solar energy devices, laser-initiated photochemical reactions, and free radical mechanisms in chemical carcinogenesis

  20. Double containment shell for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.

    1977-01-01

    A double containment shell is proposed for nuclear power plants, especially those equipped with pressurized water reactors. The shell offers increased environmental protection from primary circuit accidents. The inner shell is built of steel or concrete while the outer shell is always built of concrete. The space between the two shells is filled with water and is provided with several manholes and with stiffeners designed for compensation for load due to the water hydrostatic pressure. Water serves the airtight separation of the containment shell inside from the environment and the absorption of heat released in a primary circuit accident. In case the inner shell is made of concrete, it is provided with heat-removal tubes in-built in its walls ensuring rapid heat transfer from the inside of the containment to the water in the interwall space. (Z.M.)

  1. Two qubits in pure nuclear quadrupole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, G.B.; Goren, S.D.; Meerovich, V.M.; Sokolovsky, V.L.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown theoretically that by the use of two radio-frequency fields of the same resonance frequency but with the different phases and directions the degeneracy of the energy spectrum of a spin system with I=3/2 is removed. This leads to four non-degenerate spin states which can be used as a platform for quantum computing. The feasibility of quantum computing based on a pure (without DC magnetic fields) nuclear quadrupole resonance technique is investigated in detail. Various quantum logic gates can be constructed by using different excitation techniques allowing different manipulations with the spin system states. Three realizations of quantum logic gates are considered: the application of an additional magnetic field with the resonance frequency, the amplitude modulation of one of the applied RF fields by the resonance frequency field, and the level-crossing method. It is shown that the probabilities of the resonance transitions depend on the method of excitation and on the direction of the excitation field. Feasibility of quantum computing is demonstrated with the examples of constructing a controlled-NOT logic gate using the resonance excitation technique and SWAP and NOT2 logic gates using the level-crossing method. (author)

  2. Free radicals imaged in vivo in the rat by using proton-electron double-resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lurie, D.J.; Nicholson, Ian; Foster, M.A.; Mallard, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    A new technique called proton-electron double-resonance imaging is described for imaging free radicals in aqueous samples. The method is a combination of proton NMR imaging with nuclear electron double resonance. The results of using this technique to image free radicals in vivo in the rat are presented. Rats were injected intravenously with a nitroxide free radical solution and a series of images was obtained from which the clearance of the free radical through the liver and kidneys could be observed. (author)

  3. Nonlinear nuclear magnetic resonance in ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurgaliev, T.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of nonlinear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been studied theoretically by taking into account the interaction between NMR and FMR in the ferromagnets. The Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equations, describing the electron and nuclear magnetization behaviour in ferromagnets are presented in an integral form for a weakly excited electronic system. The stationary solution of these equations has been analysed in the case of equal NMR and FMR frequencies: the criteria for the appearance of two stable dynamic states is found and the high-frequency magnetic susceptibility for these systems is investigated. 2 figs., 8 refs

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance and medicine. Present applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    At the workshop on nuclear magnetic resonance and medicine held at Saclay, the following topics were presented: physical principles of NMR; NMR spectroscopy signal to noise ratio; principles of NMR imaging; methods of NMR imaging; image options in NMR; biological significance of contrast in proton NMR imaging; measurement and significance of relaxation times in cancers; NMR contrast agents; NMR for in-vivo biochemistry; potential effects and hazards of NMR applications in Medicine; difficulties of NMR implantation in Hospitals; NMR imaging of brain tumors and diseases of the spinal cord; NMR and Nuclear Medicine in brain diseases [fr

  5. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bax, A.; Lerner, L.

    1986-01-01

    Great spectral simplification can be obtained by spreading the conventional one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum in two independent frequency dimensions. This so-called two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy removes spectral overlap, facilitates spectral assignment, and provides a wealth of additional information. For example, conformational information related to interproton distances is available from resonance intensities in certain types of two-dimensional experiments. Another method generates 1 H NMR spectra of a preselected fragment of the molecule, suppressing resonances from other regions and greatly simplifying spectral appearance. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy can also be applied to the study of 13 C and 15 N, not only providing valuable connectivity information but also improving sensitivity of 13 C and 15 N detection by up to two orders of magnitude. 45 references, 10 figures

  6. Double resonance Raman effects in InN nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domenech-Amador, N.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L. [Institut Jaume Almera, Consell Superior d' Investigacions Cientifiques (CSIC), Lluis Sole i Sabaris s.n., Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Calarco, R. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems, Research Center Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Berlin (Germany); Yamaguchi, T.; Nanishi, Y. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, Noji-Higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

    2012-04-15

    We study the excitation wavelength dependence of the Raman spectra of InN nanowires. The E{sub 1}(LO) phonon mode, which is detected in backscattering configuration because of light entering through lateral faces, exhibits an upward frequency shift that can be explained by Martin's double resonance. The E{sub 1} (LO)/E{sub 2}{sup h} intensity ratio increases with the excitation wavelength more rapidly than the A{sub 1}(LO)/E{sub 2}{sup h} ratio measured in InN thin films. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance - from molecules to man

    OpenAIRE

    Wüthrich, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    Initial observations of the physical phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) date back to the late 1940s. In the following two decades high-resolution NMR in solution became an indispensible analytical tool in chemistry, and solid state NMR had an increasingly important role in physics. Some of the potentialities of the method for investigations of complex biological systems had also long been anticipated, and initial experiments with biological specimens were described already 30 year...

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR): principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quibilan, E.I.

    The basis for the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the ability of certain nuclei possessing both intrinsic angular momentum or ''spin'' I and magnetic moment to absorb electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency range. In principle, there are approximately 200 nuclei which may be investigated using the NMR technique. The NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum provides a variety of qualitative and quantitative analytical applications. The most obvious applications consist of the measurements of nuclear properties, such as spin number and nuclear magnetic moment. In liquids, the fine structure of resonance spectra provides a tool for chemical identification and molecular structure analysis. Other applications include the measurements of self-diffusion coefficients, magnetic fields and field homogeneity, inter-nuclear distances, and, in some cases, the water content of biological materials. (author)

  9. Double β-decay nuclear matrix elements and lepton conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergados, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    The nuclear matrix elements involved in the double β-decay of 48 Ca, 130 Te, and 128 Te were calculated using realistic nuclear interactions and shell model nuclear wave functions. The double doorway state is not appreciably mixed in the ground state of the final nuclei. So the ground state transitions contain a small fraction of the sum rule. A lepton nonconservation parameter eta -4 was deduced

  10. On the nuclear double beta decay: microscopic description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civitarese, Osvaldo

    1989-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the discussion of some problems related with microscopic descriptions of the nuclear double beta decay. It has been organized in the following order: 1) Review of the experimental situation; 2) Brief discussion of the theoretical aspects related to the current algebra, weak interaction, neutrino and majoron's status and 3) Elements of the standard nuclear theory involved in the calculation of transition densities for the nuclear double beta decay. (Author) [es

  11. Multinuclear solid-state high-resolution and C-13 -{Al-27} double-resonance magic-angle spinning NMR studies on aluminum alkoxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, A.; Prins, R.; Bokhoven, J.A. van; Eck, E.R.H. van; Kentgens, A.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    A combination of Al-27 magic-angle spinning (MAS)/multiple quantum (MQ)-MAS, C-13-H-1 CPMAS, and C-13-{Al-27} transfer of population in double-resonance (TRAPDOR) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used for the structural elucidation of the aluminum alkoxides aluminum ethoxide, aluminum

  12. Sealed magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe and process for spectroscopy of hazardous samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Herman M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Townsend, Mark R.; Ewing, James R.

    2016-06-14

    A magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is described that includes double containment enclosures configured to seal and contain hazardous samples for analysis. The probe is of a modular design that ensures containment of hazardous samples during sample analysis while preserving spin speeds for superior NMR performance and convenience of operation.

  13. Detection of single electron spin resonance in a double quantum dota)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppens, F. H. L.; Buizert, C.; Vink, I. T.; Nowack, K. C.; Meunier, T.; Kouwenhoven, L. P.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.

    2007-04-01

    Spin-dependent transport measurements through a double quantum dot are a valuable tool for detecting both the coherent evolution of the spin state of a single electron, as well as the hybridization of two-electron spin states. In this article, we discuss a model that describes the transport cycle in this regime, including the effects of an oscillating magnetic field (causing electron spin resonance) and the effective nuclear fields on the spin states in the two dots. We numerically calculate the current flow due to the induced spin flips via electron spin resonance, and we study the detector efficiency for a range of parameters. The experimental data are compared with the model and we find a reasonable agreement.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in pharmaceutical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has important applications in pharmaceutical research since it allows specific tissue and disease characterization in animal models noninvasively with excellent anatomical resolution and therefore provides improved ability to monitor the efficacy of novel drugs. The utility of NMR imaging in renal studies to monitor the mechanism of drug action and renal function in rats is described. The extension of the resolution of an NMR image to microscopic domain at higher magnetic field strengths and the utility of NMR microimaging in cerebrovascular and tumour metastasis studies in mice are discussed. (author). 40 refs., 14 figs

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory, quadrennial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This quadrennial report of the nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory gives an overview of the main activities. Among the different described activities, only one is interesting for the INIS database: it concerns the Solid NMR of cements used for radioactive wastes storage. In this case, the NMR is used to characterize the structure of the material and the composition, structure and kinetics of formation of the alteration layer which is formed at the surface of concrete during water leaching conditions. The NMR methodology is given. (O.M.)

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance applications in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Ling; Liu Maili

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a state-of-the-art technology which has been widely applied in biological systems over the past decades. It is a powerful tool for macromolecular structure determination in solution, and has the unique advantage of being capable of elucidating the structure and dynamic behavior of proteins during vital biomedical processes. In this review, we introduce the recent progress in NMR techniques for studying the structure, interaction and dynamics of proteins. The methods for NMR based drug discovery and metabonomics are also briefly introduced. (authors)

  17. Generation of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, N.X.

    1986-01-01

    Two generation techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance images, the retro-projection and the direct transformation method are studied these techniques are based on the acquisition of NMR signals which phases and frequency components are codified in space by application of magnetic field gradients. The construction of magnet coils is discussed, in particular a suitable magnet geometry with polar pieces and air gap. The obtention of image contrast by T1 and T2 relaxation times reconstructed from generated signals using sequences such as spin-echo, inversion-recovery and stimulated echo, is discussed. The mathematical formalism of matrix solution for Bloch equations is also presented. (M.C.K.)

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1983-01-01

    In a method of investigating the distribution of a quantity in a chosen region of a body (E) by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques movement of the body during the investigation is monitored by probes (A, B C) (C extends orthogonally to A and B) attached to the body and responsive to magnetic fields applied to the body during the investigation. An apparatus for carrying out the method is also described. If movement is detected, due compensation may be made during processing of the collected data, or the latter may be re-ascertained after appropriate adjustment e.g. a change in the RF excitation frequency. (author)

  19. Fast storage of nuclear quadrupole resonance signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anferov, V.P.; Molchanov, S.V.; Levchun, O.D.

    1988-01-01

    Fast multichannel storage of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signals is described. Analog-to-digital converter, arithmetic-logical unit, internal memory device (IMD) selection-storage unit and control unit are the storage main units. The storage is based on 43 microcircuits and provides for record and storage of NQR-signals at the contributed operation with Mera-60 microcomputer. Time of analog-to-digital conversion and signal recording into IMD is ∼ 1 mks. Capacity of analog-to-digital converter constitutes 8-10 bits. IMD capacity is 4 K bitsx16. Number of storage channels is 4

  20. Polarization Insensitivity in Double-Split Ring and Triple-Split Ring Terahertz Resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qian-Nan; Lan Feng; Tang Xiao-Pin; Yang Zi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    A modified double-split ring resonator and a modified triple-split ring resonator, which offer polarization-insensitive performance, are investigated, designed and fabricated. By displacing the two gaps of the conventional double-split ring resonator away from the center, the second resonant frequency for the 0° polarized wave and the resonant frequency for the 90° polarized wave become increasingly close to each other until they are finally identical. Theoretical and experimental results show that the modified double-split ring resonator and the modified triple-split ring resonator are insensitive to different polarized waves and show strong resonant frequency dips near 433 and 444 GHz, respectively. The results of this work suggest new opportunities for the investigation and design of polarization-dependent terahertz devices based on split ring resonators. (paper)

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance and earth magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance concerns nuclei whose spin is different from 0. These nuclei exposed to a magnetic field is comparable to a peg top spinning around its axis while being moved by a precession movement called Larmor precession. This article presents an experiment whose aim is to reveal nuclear magnetism of nuclei by observing Larmor precession phenomena due to the earth magnetic field. The earth magnetic field being too weak, it is necessary to increase the magnetization of the sample during a polarization phase. First the sample is submitted to a magnetic field B perpendicular to the earth magnetic field B 0 , then B is cut off and the nuclei move back to their equilibrium position by executing a precession movement due to B 0 field. (A.C.)

  2. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in a double magnetic tunnel junction

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2011-08-09

    We present quasi-classical approach to calculate a spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in double magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJ) FML/I/FMW/I/FMR, where the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer FMW can be aligned parallel or antiparallel with respect to the fixed magnetizations of the left FML and right FMR ferromagnetic electrodes. The transmission coefficients for components of the spin-dependent current, and TMR are calculated as a function of the applied voltage. As a result, we found a high resonant TMR. Thus, DMTJ can serve as highly effective magnetic nanosensor for biological applications, or as magnetic memory cells by switching the magnetization of the inner ferromagnetic layer FMW.© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance in ferromagnetic terbium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, C.L.T.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetic properties of terbium were studied by the method of zero field nuclear magnetic resonance at 1.5 to 4 and 85 to 160 0 K. Two unconventional experimental techniques have been employed: the swept frequency and the swept temperature technique. Near 4 0 K, triplet resonance line structures were found and interpreted in terms of the magnetic domain and wall structures of ferromagnetic terbium. In the higher temperature range, temperature dependence of the resonance frequency and the quadrupole splitting were measured. The former provides a measurement of the temperature dependence of the magnetization M, and it agrees with bulk M measurements as well as the latest spin wave theory of M(T) (Brooks 1968). The latter agrees well with a calculation using a very general single ion density matrix for collective excitations (Callen and Shtrikman 1965). In addition, the small temperature-independent contribution to the electric field gradient at the nucleus due to the lattice and conduction electrons was untangled from the P(T) data. Also an anomalous and unexplained relaxation phenomenon was also observed

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in organic chemistry. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zschunke, A.

    1977-01-01

    The fundamentals of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are discussed only briefly. The emphasis is laid on developing reader's ability to evaluate resonance spectra. The following topics are covered: principles of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; chemical shift and indirect nuclear spin coupling constants and their relation to the molecular structure; analysis of spectra; and uses for structural analysis and solution of kinetic problems, mainly with regard to organic compounds. Of interest to chemists and graduate students who want to make themselves acquainted with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

  5. Double resonant excitation of the second harmonic of terahertz raditation in dielectricgraphene layered metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapoport, Yu; Grimalsky, V.; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    to the interfaces, and generation of the p-type second harmonic wave occurs. The original concept is proposed to employ the double resonance arrangement for the effective generation of the second harmonic. The double resonant case can be realized when a high-permittivity dielectric is at the input of the structure...

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lens transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, C.F.

    1989-01-01

    Transparency of normal lens cytoplasm and loss of transparency in cataract were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. Phosphorus ( 31 P) NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the 31 P constituents and pH of calf lens cortical and nuclear homogenates and intact lenses as a function of time after lens enucleation and in opacification produced by calcium. Transparency was measured with laser spectroscopy. Despite complete loss of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) within 18 hrs of enucleation, the homogenates and lenses remained 100% transparent. Additions of calcium to ATP-depleted cortical homogenates produced opacification as well as concentration-dependent changes in inorganic phosphate, sugar phosphates, glycerol phosphorylcholine and pH. 1 H relaxation measurements of lens water at 200 MHz proton Larmor frequency studied temperature-dependent phase separation of lens nuclear homogenates. Preliminary measurements of T 1 and T 2 with non-equilibrium temperature changes showed a change in the slope of the temperature dependence of T 1 and T 2 at the phase separation temperature. Subsequent studies with equilibrium temperature changes showed no effect of phase separation on T 1 or T 2 , consistent with the phase separation being a low-energy process. 1 H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) studies (measurements of the magnetic field dependence of the water proton 1/T 1 relaxation rates) were performed on (1) calf lens nuclear and cortical homogenates (2) chicken lens homogenates, (3) native and heat-denatured egg white and (4) pure proteins including bovine γ-II crystallin bovine serum albumin (BSA) and myoglobin. The NMRD profiles of all samples exhibited decreases in 1/T 1 with increasing magnetic field

  7. Double gated-integrator for shaping nuclear radiation detector signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, J.

    2001-01-01

    A new shaper, the double gated-integrator, for shaping nuclear radiation detector signals is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The double gated-integrator consists of a pre-filter and two cascaded gated integrators. Two kinds of pre-filters were considered: a rectangular one and an exponential one. The results of the theoretical calculation show that the best figure of demerit for the double gated-integrator with exponential pre-filter is 1.016. This means that its noise to signal ratio is only 1.6% worse than that it is for infinite cusp shaping. The practical realization of the exponential pre-filter and that of the double gated integrator, both in analogue and in digital way, is very simple. Therefore, the double gated-integrator with exponential pre-filter could be a promising solution for shaping nuclear radiation detector signals

  8. Some double resonance and multiple quantum NMR studies in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemmer, D.E.

    1978-08-01

    The first section of this work presents the theory and experimental applications to analysis of molecular motion of chemical shielding lineshapes obtained with high resolution double resonance NMR techniques. Analysis of /sup 13/C powder lineshapes in hexamethylbenzene (HMB) and decamethylferrocene (DMFe) show that these molecules reorient in a jumping manner about the symmetry axis. Analysis of proton chemical shielding lineshapes of residual protons in heavy ice (D/sub 2/O) show that protons are exchanged among the tetrahedral positions of neighboring oxygen atoms, consistent with motion expected from defect migration. The second section describes the application of Fourier Transform Double Quantum NMR to measurement of chemical shielding of deuterium in powder samples. Studies of partially deuterated benzene and ferrocene give equal shielding anisotropies, ..delta..sigma = -6.5 ppM. Theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of dipolar couplings between deuterons using FTDQ NMR are presented. Crystals of BaClO/sub 3/.D/sub 2/O, ..cap alpha..,..beta.. d-2 HMB and ..cap alpha..,..beta..,..gamma.. d-3 HMB were studied, as were powders of d-2 HMB and anisic acid. The third section discusses general multiple quantum spectroscopy in dipolar coupled spin systems. Theoretical description is made for creation and detection of coherences between states without quantum number selection rules ..delta..m = +-1. Descriptions of techniques for partial selectivity of order in preparation and detection of multiple quantum coherences are made. The effects on selectivity and resolution of echo pulses during multiple quantum experiments are discussed. Experimental observation of coherences up to order 6 have been made in a sample of benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal. Experimental verifications of order selection and echo generation have been made.

  9. Some double resonance and multiple quantum NMR studies in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wemmer, D.E.

    1978-08-01

    The first section of this work presents the theory and experimental applications to analysis of molecular motion of chemical shielding lineshapes obtained with high resolution double resonance NMR techniques. Analysis of 13 C powder lineshapes in hexamethylbenzene (HMB) and decamethylferrocene (DMFe) show that these molecules reorient in a jumping manner about the symmetry axis. Analysis of proton chemical shielding lineshapes of residual protons in heavy ice (D 2 O) show that protons are exchanged among the tetrahedral positions of neighboring oxygen atoms, consistent with motion expected from defect migration. The second section describes the application of Fourier Transform Double Quantum NMR to measurement of chemical shielding of deuterium in powder samples. Studies of partially deuterated benzene and ferrocene give equal shielding anisotropies, Δsigma = -6.5 ppM. Theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of dipolar couplings between deuterons using FTDQ NMR are presented. Crystals of BaClO 3 .D 2 O, α,β d-2 HMB and α,β,γ d-3 HMB were studied, as were powders of d-2 HMB and anisic acid. The third section discusses general multiple quantum spectroscopy in dipolar coupled spin systems. Theoretical description is made for creation and detection of coherences between states without quantum number selection rules Δm = +-1. Descriptions of techniques for partial selectivity of order in preparation and detection of multiple quantum coherences are made. The effects on selectivity and resolution of echo pulses during multiple quantum experiments are discussed. Experimental observation of coherences up to order 6 have been made in a sample of benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal. Experimental verifications of order selection and echo generation have been made

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamsu, G.; Webb, W.R.; Sheldon, P.; Kaufman, L.; Crooks, L.E.; Birnberg, F.A.; Goodman, P.; Hinchcliffe, W.A.; Hedgecock, M.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images of the thorax were obtained in ten normal volunteers, nine patients with advanced bronchogenic carcinoma, and three patients with benign thoracic abnormalities. In normal volunteers, mediastinal and hilar structures were seen with equal frequency on NMR images and computed tomographic scans. The hila were especially well displayed on spin-echo images. Spin-echo images showed mediastinal invasion by tumor, vascular and bronchial compression and invasion, and hilar and mediastinal adenopathy. Tumor and benign abnormalities could be separated from mediastinal and hilar fat because of their longer T1 times. Lung masses and nodules as small as 1.5 cm could be seen on the spin-echo images. NMR imaging shows promise for assessment of benign and malignant mediastinal, hilar, and lung abnormalities

  11. Geochemical Controls on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Rosemary; Prasad, Manika; Keating, Kristina

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 Our research objectives are to determine, through an extensive set of laboratory experiments, the effect of the specific mineralogic form of iron and the effect of the distribution of iron on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation mechanisms. In the first nine months of this project, we have refined the experimental procedures to be used in the acquisition of the laboratory NMR data; have ordered, and conducted preliminary measurements on, the sand samples to be used in the experimental work; and have revised and completed the theoretical model to use in this project. Over the next year, our focus will be on completing the first phase of the experimental work where the form and distribution of the iron in the sands in varied

  12. Selectivity in multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, W.S.

    1980-11-01

    The observation of multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance transitions in isotropic or anisotropic liquids is shown to give readily interpretable information on molecular configurations, rates of motional processes, and intramolecular interactions. However, the observed intensity of high multiple-quantum transitions falls off dramatically as the number of coupled spins increases. The theory of multiple-quantum NMR is developed through the density matrix formalism, and exact intensities are derived for several cases (isotropic first-order systems and anisotropic systems with high symmetry) to shown that this intensity decrease is expected if standard multiple-quantum pulse sequences are used. New pulse sequences are developed which excite coherences and produce population inversions only between selected states, even though other transitions are simultaneously resonant. One type of selective excitation presented only allows molecules to absorb and emit photons in groups of n. Coherent averaging theory is extended to describe these selective sequences, and to design sequences which are selective to arbitrarily high order in the Magnus expansion. This theory and computer calculations both show that extremely good selectivity and large signal enhancements are possible

  13. Selectivity in multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Warren Sloan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division

    1980-11-01

    The observation of multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance transitions in isotropic or anisotropic liquids is shown to give readily interpretable information on molecular configurations, rates of motional processes, and intramolecular interactions. However, the observed intensity of high multiple-quantum transitions falls off dramatically as the number of coupled spins increases. The theory of multiple-quantum NMR is developed through the density matrix formalism, and exact intensities are derived for several cases (isotropic first-order systems and anisotropic systems with high symmetry) to shown that this intensity decrease is expected if standard multiple-quantum pulse sequences are used. New pulse sequences are developed which excite coherences and produce population inversions only between selected states, even though other transitions are simultaneously resonant. One type of selective excitation presented only allows molecules to absorb and emit photons in groups of n. Coherent averaging theory is extended to describe these selective sequences, and to design sequences which are selective to arbitrarily high order in the Magnus expansion. This theory and computer calculations both show that extremely good selectivity and large signal enhancements are possible.

  14. Evaluation and analysis of nuclear resonance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frohner, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    A probabilistic foundations of data evaluation are reviewed, with special emphasis on parameter estimation based on Bayes' theorem and a quadratic loss function, and on modern methods for the assignment of prior probabilities. The data reduction process leading from raw experimental data to evaluated computer files of nuclear reaction cross sections is outlined, with a discussion of systematic and statistical errors and their propagation and of the generalized least squares formalism including prior information and nonlinear theoretical models. It is explained how common errors induce correlations between data, what consequences they have for uncertainty propagation and sensitivity studies, and how evaluators can construct covariance matrices from the usual error information provided by experimentalists. New techniques for evaluation of inconsistent data are also presented. The general principles are then applied specifically to the analysis and evaluation of neutron resonance data in terms of theoretical models - R-matrix theory (and especially its practically used multi-level Breit-Wigner and Reich-Moore variants) in the resolved region, and resonance-averaged R-matrix theory (Hauser-Feshbach theory with width-fluctuation corrections) in the unresolved region. Complications arise because the measured transmission data, capture and fission yields, self-indication ratios and other observables are not yet the wanted cross sections. These are obtained only by means of parametrisation. The intervening effects - Doppler and resolution broadening, self-shielding, multiple scattering, backgrounds, sample impurities, energy-dependent detector efficiencies, inaccurate reference data etc - are therefore also discussed. (author)

  15. Diagnostic apparatus employing nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, K.; Yamada, N.; Yoshitome, E.; Matsuura, H.

    1987-01-01

    An NMR diagnostic apparatus is described comprising means for applying a primary magnetic field to a subject; means for applying RF pulses to the subject to give nuclear magnetic resonance to the nuclei of atoms in the subject; means for applying gradient magnetic fields to project an NMR signal of the nuclei at least in one direction; means for observing the NMR signal projected by the gradient magnetic fields applying means; and arithmetic means for constructing a distribution of information on resonance energy as an image from an output signal from the observing means; wherein the gradient magnetic fields applying means comprises means for applying the gradient magnetic fields at a predetermined time and for not applying the gradient magnetic fields at another predetermined time, during the time period of one view; and wherein the gradient magnetic fields applying means further comprises means for measuring the NMR signal during the predetermined time when the gradient magnetic fields are applied, and means for measuring the intensity of the primary magnetic field during the other predetermined time when no gradient magnetic fields are applied

  16. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Safeguards Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J; Ambers, Scott D

    2011-02-04

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of {gamma} rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. The promise of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique (NDA) in safeguards applications lies in its potential to directly quantify a specific isotope in an assay target without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as often required by other NDA methods. The use of NRF for detection of sensitive nuclear materials and other contraband has been researched in the past. In the safeguards applications considered here one has to go beyond mere detection and precisely quantify the isotopic content, a challenge that is discussed throughout this report. Basic NRF measurement methods, instrumentation, and the analytical calculation of NRF signal strengths are described in Section 2. Well understood modeling and simulation tools are needed for assessing the potential of NRF for safeguards and for designing measurement systems. All our simulations were performed with the radiation transport code MCNPX, a code that is widely used in the safeguards community. Our initial studies showed that MCNPX grossly underestimated the elastically scattered background at backwards angles due to an incorrect treatment of Rayleigh scattering. While new, corrected calculations based on ENDF form factors showed much better agreement with experimental data for the elastic scattering of photons on an uranium target, the elastic backscatter is still not rigorously treated. Photonuclear scattering processes (nuclear Thomson, Delbruck and Giant Dipole Resonance scattering), which are expected to play an important role at higher energies, are not yet included. These missing elastic scattering contributions were studied and their importance evaluated evaluated against data found in the literature as discussed in Section 3. A transmission experiment

  17. High resolution spectroscopy in solids by nuclear magnetic resonance; Espectroscopia de alta resolucao em solidos por ressonancia magnetica nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonagamba, T J

    1991-07-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for High Resolution Spectroscopy in Solids are described. Also the construction project of a partially home made spectrometer and its applications in the characterization of solid samples are shown in detail. The high resolution spectrometer used is implemented with the double resonance multiple pulses sequences and magic angle spinning (MAS) and can be used with solid and liquid samples. The maximum spinning frequency for the MAS experiment is in excess of 5 Khz, the double resonance sequences can be performed with any type of nucleus, in the variable temperature operating range with nitrogen gas: -120{sup 0} C to +160{sup 0} C, and is fully controlled by a Macintosh IIci microcomputer. (author).

  18. The double nuclear system is a new object of nuclear physics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V.V.

    1980-01-01

    Deep inelastic collisions of two complex nuclei result in formation of the specific nuclear complex - a double nuclear system which is a new unit of nuclear microworld. In this paper we consider the conditions under which the double nuclear system is formed, its properties, the statistical regularities of its disintegration, and the nuclear shell structure effect on its evolution. The possibility of using deep inelastic transfer reactions to produce nuclear far from the region of β-stability and nuclei with high angular momentum is discussed. (author)

  19. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in solid bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Limin.

    1990-01-01

    Phosphorus ( 31 P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) double-pulse transient experiments of solid bone have shown that the spins dephased by the dipolar spin-spin interactions can be refocused with a 90 degree-β pulse sequence so that an echo is observable at some time following the second pulse. The decay time constant of the maximum echo amplitude is larger than that of the free induction decay (FID) signal from a single 90 degree pulse. Depending on the nutation angle of the second pulse, the former decay time constant is about three-five times as long as the latter one. The dipolar-echo properties of the bone may be relevant with the interpair dipolar interactions. The experiments have also show that, in general, the time for the transient signal from the double pulses to reach the maximum amplitude is not equal to the pulse separation. This can be attributed to the effect of the heteronuclear dipolar interactions. In addition, it is found experimentally that refocused gradients applied only in a time interval of the formation of an echo have the capability of phase-encoding spatial information. Based on this, a new imaging method was proposed. With the method, several 31 P images of the solid bone samples have been obtained. The picture element size is 1-1.5 mm with very good signal-to-noise ratios. The imaging ability of the refocused gradients may be relevant with the inhomogeneous local field produced by the interpair dipolar interactions

  20. Nuclear aspects of double-beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoica, S.; Paun, V.

    2002-01-01

    Calculations of the neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ) matrix elements are performed with the second quasi random phase approximation (SQRPA) method for several nuclei. The results display a weak dependence on the single particle basis used and the Ikeda sum rule is fulfilled with good accuracy. Comparing our calculations with similar ones performed with other QRPA-based methods we estimate the accuracy of these methods in the prediction of the (0νββ) decay matrix elements and neutrino mass parameter, which is settled to about 50% from their calculated values. Taking the most recent experimental limits for the neutrinoless double beta decay half-lives, we also deduced new limits for the neutrino mass parameter. (authors)

  1. Nuclear elasticity applied to giant resonances of fast rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, S.; Bouyssy, A.

    1987-06-01

    Isoscalar giant resonances in fast rotating nuclei are investigated within the framework of nuclear elasticity by solving the equation of motion of elastic nuclear medium in a rotating frame of reference. Both Coriolis and centrifugal forces are taken into account. The nuclear rotation removes completely the azimuthal degeneracy of the giant resonance energies. Realistic large values of the angular velocity, which are still small as compared to the giant resonance frequencies, are briefly reviewed in relation to allowed high angular momenta. It is shown that for the A=150 region, the Coriolis force is dominating for small values (< ∼ 0.05) of the ratio of angular velocity to resonance frequency, whereas the centrifugal force plays a prominent part in the shift of the split resonance energies for larger values of the ratio. Typical examples of the resonance energies and their fragmentation due to both rotation and deformation are given

  2. Plasmon resonance in single- and double-layer CVD graphene nanoribbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Di; Emani, Naresh K.; Chung, Ting Fung

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic tunability of the plasmonic resonance in graphene nanoribbons is desirable in the near-infrared. We demonstrated a constant blue shift of plasmonic resonances in double-layer graphene nanoribbons with respect to single-layer graphene nanoribbons. © OSA 2015.......Dynamic tunability of the plasmonic resonance in graphene nanoribbons is desirable in the near-infrared. We demonstrated a constant blue shift of plasmonic resonances in double-layer graphene nanoribbons with respect to single-layer graphene nanoribbons. © OSA 2015....

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hricak, H.; Crooks, L.; Sheldon, P.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-01-01

    The role of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the kidney was analyzed in 18 persons (6 normal volunteers, 3 patients with pelvocaliectasis, 2 with peripelvic cysts, 1 with renal sinus lipomatosis, 3 with renal failure, 1 with glycogen storage disease, and 2 with polycystic kidney disease). Ultrasound and/or computed tomography (CT) studies were available for comparison in every case. In the normal kidney distinct anatomical structures were clearly differentiated by NMR. The best anatomical detail ws obtained with spin echo (SE) imaging, using a pulse sequence interval of 1,000 msec and an echo delay time of 28 msec. However, in the evaluation of normal and pathological conditions, all four intensity images (SE 500/28, SE 500/56, SE 1,000/28, and SE 1,000/56) have to be analyzed. No definite advantage was found in using SE imaging with a pulse sequence interval of 1,500 msec. Inversion recovery imaging enhanced the differences between the cortex and medulla, but it had a low signal-to-noise level and, therefore, a suboptimal overall resolution. The advantages of NMR compared with CT and ultrasound are discussed, and it is concluded that NMR imaging will prove to be a useful modality in the evaluation of renal disease

  4. Quantitative analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wainai, T; Mashimo, K [Nihon Univ., Tokyo. Coll. of Science and Engineering

    1976-04-01

    Recent papers on the practical quantitative analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) are reviewed. Specifically, the determination of moisture in liquid N/sub 2/O/sub 4/ as an oxidizing agent for rocket propulsion, the analysis of hydroperoxides, the quantitative analysis using a shift reagent, the analysis of aromatic sulfonates, and the determination of acids and bases are reviewed. Attention is paid to the accuracy. The sweeping velocity and RF level in addition to the other factors must be on the optimal condition to eliminate the errors, particularly when computation is made with a machine. Higher sweeping velocity is preferable in view of S/N ratio, but it may be limited to 30 Hz/s. The relative error in the measurement of area is generally 1%, but when those of dilute concentration and integrated, the error will become smaller by one digit. If impurities are treated carefully, the water content on N/sub 2/O/sub 4/ can be determined with accuracy of about 0.002%. The comparison method between peak heights is as accurate as that between areas, when the uniformity of magnetic field and T/sub 2/ are not questionable. In the case of chemical shift movable due to content, the substance can be determined by the position of the chemical shift. Oil and water contents in rape-seed, peanuts, and sunflower-seed are determined by measuring T/sub 1/ with 90 deg pulses.

  5. Nuclear resonant scattering beamline at SPring-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harami, Taikan [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kamigori, Hyogo (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1996-04-01

    Mainly by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research and Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, the construction of the Super Photon ring-8 GeV (SPring-8) which is the large scale synchrotron radiation facility for a high luminance light source placing emphasis on short wavelength region (shorter than about 1 nm) is in progress at the Harima Science Park City, Hyogo Prefecture. The features of the SPring-8 are the high luminance of light, the good parallelism and directionality of light, the quasi-monochromatic light with variable wavelength, and the possibility of design from straight polarization to circular polarization. The injection system that accelerates electrons up to 8 GeV and the storage ring storing the 8 GeV electrons for long hours, and 61 beamlines are explained. The manufacture of the nuclear resonant scattering beamline as the beamline for joint utilization was begun. Its transport channel and the experiment hutch are shown. By the features of undulator synchrotron radiation, the research on the matters with small recoilless fraction such as biological substances, liquid, gas and others and the research on time-dependent phenomena become feasible anew. The research on the dynamic structural analysis of heme protein is planned. (K.I.)

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of metabolic regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sillerud, L.O.; Han, C.H.; Whaley, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for the detection of the metabolic transformations of biological compounds labeled with stable isotopes, particularly carbon-13 have been explored. We have studied adipose tissue in the intact rat, the exteriorized epididymal fat pad, and the isolated adipocyte. Triacylglycerol metabolism in adipose tissue is regulated by lipogenic factors (insulin, corticosterone, thyroxine, and growth hormone) and lipolytic factors (glucagon and catecholamines). The synthesis of triglyceride from 5.5 mM glucose was stimulated by about 4-fold by 10 nM insulin. Triglyceride synthesis from glucose in the presence of insulin occurred at a rate of 330 nmol/hr/10 6 cells. Since the NMR signals from free and esterified fatty acids and glycerol are distinct, we could directly measure the rate of hormone-stimulated lipolysis. Epinephrine (10 μM) gave a lipolytic rate of 0.30 μmol/hr/10 6 cells as monitored by free-glycerol appearance in the medium. 13 C NMR provides a superior method for the measurement of triglyceride metabolism since it directly measures the changes in the substrates and products in situ

  7. Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keevil, Stephen F

    2006-01-01

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications. (topical review)

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lipoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, J.A.; Morrisett, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Several nuclei in lipoproteins are magnetically active and are thus potential NMR probes of lipoprotein structure. Table I lists the magnetic isotopes preset in the covalent structures of the molecular constituents of lipoproteins: lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates. Every type of nucleus that is part of the endogenous structure of these molecules has at least one magnetic isotope. Each magnetic nucleus represents an intrinsic and completely nonperturbing probe (when at the natural abundance level) of local molecular motion and magnetic environment. The NMR experiment itself is also nonperturbing and nondestructive. Table I also lists for each nucleus its nuclear spin, its natural isotopic abundance, its sensitivity, and its resonance frequency at two commonly employed magnetic in the low field range (21.14 kG or 2.11 Tesla) and the other in the high field range (47.0 kG or 4.70 Tesla). Of the nuclei listed in Table I, /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, and /sup 31/P have been the primary ones studied in lipoproteins. The general advantages and disadvantages afforded by these and other nuclei as probes of lipoprotein structure are discussed. /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy, the method which has had the most extensive application (and probably has the greatest future potential) to lipoproteins, is treated in greatest detail, but many of the principles described apply to other nuclei as well

  9. Quantum information processing and nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, H.K.

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computers are information processing devices which operate by and exploit the laws of quantum mechanics, potentially allowing them to solve problems which are intractable using classical computers. This dissertation considers the practical issues involved in one of the more successful implementations to date, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Techniques for dealing with systematic errors are presented, and a quantum protocol is implemented. Chapter 1 is a brief introduction to quantum computation. The physical basis of its efficiency and issues involved in its implementation are discussed. NMR quantum information processing is reviewed in more detail in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 considers some of the errors that may be introduced in the process of implementing an algorithm, and high-level ways of reducing the impact of these errors by using composite rotations. Novel general expressions for stabilising composite rotations are presented in Chapter 4 and a new class of composite rotations, tailored composite rotations, presented in Chapter 5. Chapter 6 describes some of the advantages and pitfalls of combining composite rotations. Experimental evaluations of the composite rotations are given in each case. An actual implementation of a quantum information protocol, approximate quantum cloning, is presented in Chapter 7. The dissertation ends with appendices which contain expansions of some equations and detailed calculations of certain composite rotation results, as well as spectrometer pulse sequence programs. (author)

  10. Comparative analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance well logging and nuclear magnetic resonance mud logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zugui

    2008-01-01

    The hydrogen atoms in oil and water are able to resonate and generate signals in the magnetic field, which is used by the NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) technology in petroleum engineering to research and evaluate rock characteristics. NMR well logging was used to measure the physical property parameters of the strata in well bore, whereas NMR mud logging was used to analyze (while drilling) the physical property parameters of cores, cuttings and sidewall coring samples on surface (drilling site). Based on the comparative analysis of the porosity and permeability parameters obtained by NMR well logging and those from analysis of the cores, cuttings and sidewall coring samples by NMR mud logging in the same depth of 13 wells, these two methods are of certain difference, but their integral tendency is relatively good. (authors)

  11. Sensing performance analysis on Fano resonance of metallic double-baffle contained MDM waveguide coupled ring resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Luo, Pei; Liu, Xiaofei; Di, Yuanjian; Han, Shuaitao; Cui, Xingning; He, Lei

    2018-05-01

    Based on the transmission property and the photon localization characteristic of the surface plasmonic sub-wavelength structure, a metallic double-baffle contained metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) waveguide coupled ring resonator is proposed. Like the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), the Fano resonance can be achieved by the interference between the metallic double-baffle resonator and the ring resonator. Based on the coupled mode theory, the transmission property is analyzed. Through the numerical simulation by the finite element method (FEM), the quantitative analysis on the influences of the radius R of the ring and the coupling distance g between the metallic double-baffle resonator and the ring resonator for the figure of merit (FOM) is performed. And after the structure parameter optimization, the sensing performance of the waveguide structure is discussed. The simulation results show that the FOM value of the optimized structure can attain to 5.74 ×104 and the sensitivity of resonance wavelength with refractive index drift is about 825 nm/RIU. The range of the detected refractive index is suitable for all gases. The waveguide structure can provide effective theoretical references for the design of integrated plasmonic devices.

  12. Switchable coupling for superconducting qubits using double resonance in the presence of crosstalk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashhab, S.; Nori, Franco

    2007-01-01

    Several methods have been proposed recently to achieve switchable coupling between superconducting qubits. We discuss some of the main considerations regarding the feasibility of implementing one of those proposals: The double-resonance method. We analyze mainly issues related to the achievable effective coupling strength and the effects of crosstalk on this coupling mechanism. We also find a crosstalk-assisted coupling channel that can be an attractive alternative when implementing the double-resonance coupling proposal

  13. Single-level resonance parameters fit nuclear cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawbaugh, D. W.; Gibson, G.; Miller, M.; Page, S. L.

    1970-01-01

    Least squares analyses of experimental differential cross-section data for the U-235 nucleus have yielded single level Breit-Wigner resonance parameters that fit, simultaneously, three nuclear cross sections of capture, fission, and total.

  14. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and its utilization in image formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonagamba, T.J.; Tannus, A.; Panepucci, H.

    1987-01-01

    Some aspects about Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (as Larmor Theorem, radio frequency pulse, relaxation of spins system) and its utilization in two dimensional image processing with the necessity of a tomography plane are studied. (C.G.C.) [pt

  15. FY08 Annual Report for Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Glen A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.

    2009-01-06

    FY08 annual report for project the "Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging" project. Reviews accomplishments of last 3 years, including U-235 signature search, comparison of different photon sources, and examination of NRF measurements using monochromatic photon source.

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Oommen, Joanna Mary; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Agarwal, Praveen; Archer, Lynden A.

    2010-01-01

    using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NIMs are relatively stable over a temperature range from 300 to 383 K, rendering them usable in high temperature applications. We confirmed the presence of covalent bonds between the SiO2 core

  17. Proceedings of the nuclear magnetic resonance user meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Studies on utilization of nuclear magnetic resonance, such as: chemical analysis in complexes and organic compounds; structures and magnetic properties of solids; construction of images and; spectrometer designs, are presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  18. Monte Carlo-narrow resonance calculational techniques for treating double-heterogeneity effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelbard, E.M.; Chen, I.J.

    1986-01-01

    Reliable methods already exist for computing resonance integrals (RI's) in regular lattices. But lattice structures always contain irregularities. Such effects have been called ''double-heterogeneity'' effects. Two methods for computing double heterogeneity effects on RI's are reviewed and evaluated. 2 refs., 1 tab

  19. Panel Resonance Control and Cavity Control in Double-Panel Structures for Active Noise Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation of panel resonance control and cavity control in a double-panel structure is presented in this paper. The double-panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its low

  20. Magnetic resonance vs. computerized tomography, ultrasonic examinations and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruna, J.

    1985-01-01

    A symposium on magnetic resonance in nuclear medicine was held from 23rd to 27th January, 1985 in Munich and Garmisch-Partenkirchen. Discussed were suitable methods, the use of contrast media, the evaluation of results, the application of nuclear magnetic resonance in examining various body organs, and the latest apparatus. NMR achievements in medicine were compared to those by other diagnostic methods. (M.D.)

  1. On nuclear reaction duration at the range of overlapping resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear reaction duration above the threshold of overlapping resonances is investigated and its importance to obtain a new information on a collision mechanism is evidenced. It is shown also that the duration of resonant nuclear reactions is asymptotically decreasing according to the law[E 2 n(E)] -1 when the energy E and the number of open channels n(E) are increasing [ru

  2. GEOCHEMICAL CONTROLS ON NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used in the Earth Sciences as a means of obtaining information about the molecular-scale environment of fluids in porous geological materials. Laboratory experiments were conducted to advance our fundamental understanding of the link between the NMR response and the geochemical properties of geological materials. In the first part of this research project, we studied the impact of both the surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V) of the pore space and the surface relaxivity on the NMR response of fluids in sand-clay mixtures. This study highlighted the way in which these two parameters control our ability to use NMR measurements to detect and quantify fluid saturation in multiphase saturated systems. The second part of the project was designed to explore the way in which the mineralogic form of iron, as opposed to simply the concentration of iron, affects the surface relaxation rate and, more generally, the NMR response of porous materials. We found that the magnitude of the surface relaxation rate was different for the various iron-oxide minerals because of changes in both the surface-area-to-volume ratio of the pore space, and the surface relaxivity. Of particular significance from this study was the finding of an anomalously large surface relaxivity of magnetite compared to that of the other iron minerals. Differences in the NMR response of iron minerals were seen in column experiments during the reaction of ferrihydrite-coated quartz sand with aqueous Fe(II) solutions to form goethite, lepidocrocite and magnetite; indicating the potential use of NMR as a means of monitoring geochemical reactions. The final part of the research project investigated the impact of heterogeneity, at the pore-scale, on the NMR response. This work highlighted the way in which the geochemistry, by controlling the surface relaxivity, has a significant impact on the link between NMR data and the microgeometry of the pore space.

  3. Chiral discrimination in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeretti, Paolo

    2017-11-01

    Chirality is a fundamental property of molecules whose spatial symmetry is characterized by the absence of improper rotations, making them not superimposable to their mirror image. Chiral molecules constitute the elementary building blocks of living species and one enantiomer is favoured in general (e.g. L-aminoacids and D-sugars pervade terrestrial homochiral biochemistry) because most chemical reactions producing natural substances are enantioselective. Since the effect of chiral chemicals and drugs on living beings can be markedly different between enantiomers, the quest for practical spectroscopical methods to scrutinize chirality is an issue of great importance and interest. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a topmost analytical technique, but spectrometers currently used are ‘blind’ to chirality, i.e. unable to discriminate the two mirror-image forms of a chiral molecule, because, in the absence of a chiral solvent, the spectral parameters, chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants are identical for enantiomers. Therefore, the development of new procedures for routine chiral recognition would offer basic support to scientists. However, in the presence of magnetic fields, a distinction between true and false chirality is mandatory. The former epitomizes natural optical activity, which is rationalized by a time-even pseudoscalar, i.e. the trace of a second-rank tensor, the mixed electric dipole/magnetic dipole polarizability. The Faraday effect, magnetic circular dichroism and magnetic optical activity are instead related to a time-odd axial vector. The present review summarizes recent theoretical and experimental efforts to discriminate enantiomers via NMR spectroscopy, with the focus on the deep connection between chirality and symmetry properties under the combined set of fundamental discrete operations, namely charge conjugation, parity (space inversion) and time (motion) reversal.

  4. Analytical model for double split ring resonators with arbitrary ring width

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Jensen, Thomas; Krozer, Viktor

    2008-01-01

    For the first time, the analytical model for a double split ring resonator with unequal width rings is developed. The proposed models for the resonators with equal and unequal widths are based on an impedance matrix representation and provide the prediction of performance in a wide frequency range...

  5. Abnormal pulmonary vein drainage in upper right lobe associated with double aortic arch : magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busto, M.; Dolz, J.L.; Capdevilla, A.; Castanon, M.; Mulet, J.

    1997-01-01

    We present the magnetic resonance (MR) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) findings in a case of abnormal pulmonary vein drainage from upper right lobe to superior vena cava, associated with double aortic arch, in a six-month-old boy. (Author) 9 refs

  6. Isotopically selective RIMS of rare radionuclides by double-resonance excitation with cw lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushaw, B.A.; Munley, J.T.

    1990-09-01

    Double-resonance, Resonance Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (RIMS) using two single-frequency dye lasers and a CO 2 laser for photoionization has been shown to be both extremely sensitive and highly selective. Measurements on the radioisotope 210 Pb have demonstrated optical selectivity in excess of 10 9 and detection limits of less than 1 femtogram

  7. Charm and Hidden Charm Scalar Resonances in Nuclear Matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolos, Laura; Molina, Raquel; Gamermann, Daniel; Oset, Eulogio

    2009-01-01

    We study the properties of the scalar charm resonances D(s0)(2317) and D(0)(2400), and the theoretical hidden charm state X(3700) in nuclear matter. We find that for the D(s0)(2317) and X(3700) resonances, with negligible and small width at zero density, respectively, the width becomes about 100 MeV

  8. Development of a Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using a Double Saw Resonator System at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Yunusa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A double SAW resonator system was developed as a novel method for gas sensing applications. The proposed system was investigated for hydrogen sensing. Commercial Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW resonators with resonance frequencies of 433.92 MHz and 433.42 MHz were employed in the double SAW resonator system configuration. The advantages of using this configuration include its ability for remote measurements, and insensitivity to vibrations and other external disturbances. The sensitive layer is composed of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes and polyaniline nanofibers which were deposited on pre-patterned platinum metal electrodes fabricated on a piezoelectric substrate. This was mounted into the DSAWR circuit and connected in parallel. The sensor response was measured as the difference between the resonance frequencies of the SAW resonators, which is a measure of the gas concentration. The sensor showed good response towards hydrogen with a minimum detection limit of 1%.

  9. Atomic resonances in nuclear fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauser, C. F.; Barrachina, R. O.

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of zero energy resonances of photoionization and radiative recombination cross section for the different species in a fusion reactor. In this context, the interaction potential is screened and its typical length depends on the plasma density and temperature. Due to the nature of these resonances, we propose other atomic processes in which they can take place. Finally, we show the density and temperature conditions where these resonances occur and their probable consequence on the reactor performance. (author)

  10. Carbon-deuterium rotational-echo double-resonance NMR spectroscopy of lyophilized aspartame formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Suman A; Utz, Marcel; Gorman, Eric M; Pikal, Michael J; Munson, Eric J; Lubach, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    In this study, changes in the local conformation of aspartame were observed in annealed lyophilized glasses by monitoring changes in the distance between two labeled sites using C-(2)H rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Confirmation that the REDOR experiments were producing accurate distance measurement was ensured by measuring the (13)C-(15)N distance in glycine. The experiment was further verified by measuring the REDOR dephasing curve on (13)C-(2)H methionine. (13)C-(2)H REDOR dephasing curves were then measured on lyophilized aspartame-disaccharide formulations. In aspartame-sucrose formulation, the internuclear distances increased upon annealing, which correlated with decreased chemical reactivity. By contrast, annealing had only a minimal effect on the dephasing curve in aspartame-trehalose formulation. The results show that stability is a function of both mobility and local structure (conformation), even in a small molecule system such as lyophilized aspartame-sucrose. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Role of depth and location of minima of a double-well potential on vibrational resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasekar, S; Jeyakumari, S; Chinnathambi, V; Sanjuan, M A F

    2010-01-01

    We report our investigation into the role of depth and location of minima of a double-well potential on vibrational resonance in both underdamped and overdamped Duffing oscillators. The systems are driven by both low- and high-frequency periodic forces. We obtain theoretical expressions for the amplitude g of the high-frequency force at which resonances occur. The depth and location of the minima of the potential wells have a distinct effect on vibrational resonance in the underdamped and overdamped cases. In the underdamped system at least one resonance and at most two resonances occur and the number of resonances can be altered by varying the depth and location of the minima of the potential wells. We show that in the overdamped system there is always one and only one resonance, and the value of g at which resonance occurs is independent of the depth of the wells, but varies linearly with the locations of the minima of the wells.

  12. Systematic study on nuclear resonant scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, A.A.; Freitas, M.L.

    1974-01-01

    New resonant scattering effect of thermal neutron capture gamma rays from Ti and Fe on Sb, Cu, Se and Ce target were observed. These results together with those published by other authors are summarized and discussed in terms of a possible systematic search for new resonant scattering effects

  13. The design of virtual double-parameter nuclear spectrum acquisition system based on LabVIEW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Songqiu; Chen Chuan; Lei Wuhu

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces the design of virtual double-parameter nuclear spectrum acquisition system based on LabVIEW and NI multifunction DAQ board, and the use of it to measure the double-parameter nuclear spectrum

  14. Tunnel-induced Dipolar Resonances in a Double-well Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Bruno; Saenz, Alejandro

    2016-11-18

    A system of two dipolar particles that are confined in a double-well potential and interact via a realistic isotropic interaction potential is investigated as a protoype for ultracold atoms with a magnetic dipole moment or ultracold dipolar heteronuclear diatomic molecules in double-well traps or in optical lattices. The resulting energy spectrum is discussed as a function of the dipole-dipole interaction strength. The variation of the strength of the dipole-dipole interaction is found to lead to various resonance phenomena. Among those are the previously discussed inelastic confinement-induced resonances as well as the dipole-induced resonances. It is found that the double-well potential gives rise to a new type of resonances, tunnel-induced dipolar ones. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in a double magnetic tunnel junction

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Useinov, Niazbeck Kh H; Tagirov, Lenar R.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2011-01-01

    We present quasi-classical approach to calculate a spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in double magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJ) FML/I/FMW/I/FMR, where the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer FMW can

  16. Threedimensional imaging of organ structures by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, W.; Smolorz, J.; Wellner, U.

    1985-01-01

    A simple method for threedimensional imaging of organ structures is presented. The method is based on a special acquisition mode in a nuclear resonance tomograph, exciting layers of 20 cm thickness at different angulations. The display is done by cinematography (which is usually used in nuclear cardiology) projecting the structures in a rotating movement. (orig.) [de

  17. Contraband Detection with Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence: Feasibility and Impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruet, J; Lange, D

    2007-01-01

    In this report they show that cargo interrogation systems developed to thwart trafficking of illicit nuclear materials could also be powerful tools in the larger fight against contraband smuggling. In particular, in addition to detecting special nuclear materials, cargo scanning systems that exploit nuclear resonance fluorescence to detect specific isotopes can be used to help find: chemical weapons; some drugs as well as some chemicals regulated under the controlled substances act; precious metals; materials regulated under export control laws; and commonly trafficked fluorocarbons

  18. Double-digit growth characterizes 1981 nuclear programs abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    A 1980 international reactor survey shows a doubling of orders for nuclear power programs outside the US and a nearly 14% increase in nuclear capacity abroad. US manufacturers will not fill any of the 10 new foreign orders of 1980, and they received no new domestic orders. A statistical breakdown lists plants by country, type, net megawatts, year of reactor order, reactor manufacturer, location, date of commercial operation, and primary utility. The report also summarizes fuel-reprocessing and waste-management development in key countries. 1 figure, 1 table

  19. Pure Electric and Pure Magnetic Resonances in Near-Infrared Metal Double-Triangle Metamaterial Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Zhi-Shen; Pan Jian; Chen Zhuo; Zhan Peng; Min Nai-Ben; Wang Zhen-Lin

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally and numerically investigate the optical properties of metamaterial arrays composed of double partially-overlapped metallic nanotriangles fabricated by an angle-resolved nanosphere lithography. We demonstrate that each double-triangle can be viewed as an artificial magnetic element analogous to the conventional metal split-ring-resonator. It is shown that under normal-incidence conditions, individual double-triangle can exhibit a strong local magnetic resonance, but the collective response of the metamaterial arrays is purely electric because magnetic resonances of the two double-triangles in a unit cell having opposite openings are out of phase. For oblique incidences the metamaterial arrays are shown to support a pure magnetic response at the same frequency band. Therefore, switchable electric and magnetic resonances are achieved in double-triangle arrays. Moreover, both the electric and magnetic resonances are shown to allow for a tunability over a large spectral range down to near-infrared. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  20. Resonance internal conversion as a way of accelerating nuclear processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpeshin, F.F.

    2006-01-01

    Theory of resonance conversion is presented. Being a natural extension of the traditional internal conversion into the subthreshold area, resonance conversion in a number of cases strongly affects the nuclear processes. Moreover, concentrating the transition strength on the narrow bands corresponding to the spectral atomic lines, it offers a unique tool capable of accelerating nuclear decay rates. Furthermore, along with the conventional nonradiative process of nuclear excitation through NEET and its reverse, TEEN, resonance conversion offers an appropriate mathematics for consideration of a number of cross-invariant processes involving both nuclei and electrons: excitation and deexcitation of the nuclei by hyperfine magnetic field, nuclear spin mixing, hyperfine interaction and magnetic anomalies in the atomic spectra, collisional nuclear excitation via ionization of the shells in the muon decay in the orbit, etc. The mechanisms of the optical pumping of the isomers are also considered, as well as triggering their energy in the resonance field of a laser. The effect is especially high in the hydrogen-like heavy ions due to practical absence of any damping of the resonance. The theory is also generalized to the case of the discrete Auger transitions [ru

  1. Neutron resonance analysis for nuclear safeguards and security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradela, Carlos; Heyse, Jan; Kopecky, Stefan; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Harada, Hideo; Kitatani, Fumito; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Tsuchiya, Harufumi

    2017-09-01

    Neutron-induced reactions can be used to study the properties of nuclear materials of interest in the fields of nuclear safeguards and security. The elemental and isotopic composition of these materials can be determined by using the presence of resonance structures. This idea is the basis of two non-destructive analysis techniques which have been developed at the GELINA neutron time-of-flight facility at JRC-Geel: Neutron Resonance Capture Analysis (NRCA) and Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA). A combination of NRTA and NRCA has been proposed for the characterisation of particle-like debris of melted fuel formed in severe nuclear accidents. In this work, we present a quantitative validation of the NRTA technique which was used to determine the areal densities of Pu enriched reference samples used for safeguards applications. Less than 2% bias has been obtained for the fissile isotopes, with well-known total cross sections.

  2. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  3. Baryons and baryon resonances in nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenske, Horst; Dhar, Madhumita; Gaitanos, Theodoros; Cao, Xu

    2018-01-01

    Theoretical approaches to the production of hyperons and baryon resonances in elementary hadronic reactions and heavy ion collisions are reviewed. The focus is on the production and interactions of baryons in the lowest SU(3) flavor octet and states from the next higher SU(3) flavor decuplet. Approaches using the SU(3) formalism for interactions of mesons and baryons and effective field theory for hyperons are discussed. An overview of application to free space and in-medium baryon-baryon interactions is given and the relation to a density functional theory is indicated. The intimate connection between baryon resonances and strangeness production is shown first for reactions on the nucleon. Pion-induced hypernuclear reactions are shown to proceed essentially through the excitation of intermediate nucleon resonances. Transport theory in conjunction with a statistical fragmentation model is an appropriate description of hypernuclear production in antiproton and heavy ion induced fragmentation reactions. The excitation of subnuclear degrees of freedom in peripheral heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies is reviewed. The status of in-medium resonance physics is discussed.

  4. Quantitative dosing by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, I.

    1958-01-01

    The measurement of the absolute concentration of a heavy water reference containing approximately 99.8 per cent of D 2 O has been performed, by an original magnetic resonance method ('Adiabatic fast passage method') with a precision of 5.10 -5 on the D 2 O concentration. (author) [fr

  5. Parent di-nuclear quasimolecular states as exotic resonant states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, N.

    2002-01-01

    It in shown that the parent di-nuclear quasimolecular state is an exotic resonant state that corresponds to a S-matrix pole in the neighbourhood of an attractor in the k-plane. The properties of the parent quasimolecular states i.e. energy, widths, deviation from the linear dependence of the energy on l(l + 1) doorway character and criteria for observability, result naturally from the general properties of the exotic resonant states. (author)

  6. NMR magnetic field controller for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheler, G.; Anacker, M.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance controller for magnetic fields, which can also be used for pulsed NMR investigations, is described. A longtime stability of 10 -7 is achieved. The control signal is generated by a modified time sharing circuit with resonance at the first side band of the 2 H signal. An exact calibration of the magnetic field is achieved by the variation of the H 1 - or of the time-sharing frequency. (author)

  7. Apparatus and method for nuclear magnetic resonance scanning and mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damadian, R.V.

    1983-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method is disclosed for analyzing the chemical and structural composition of a specimen including whole-body specimens which may include, for example, living mammals, utilizing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. A magnetic field space necessary to obtain an NMR signal characteristic of the chemical structure of the specimen is focused to provide a resonance domain of selectable size, which may then be moved in a pattern with respect to the specimen to scan the specimen

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in food applications: a critical appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divakar, S.

    1998-01-01

    Usefulness of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in food applications is presented in this review. Some of the basic concepts of NMR pertaining to one-dimensional and two-dimensional techniques, solid-state NMR and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are discussed. Food applications dealt with encompass such diverse areas like nature and state of water in foods, detection and quantitation of important constituents of foods, intact food systems and NMR related to food biology. (author)

  9. Double-wall carbon nanotubes doped with different Br2 doping levels: a resonance Raman study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Gustavo M; Hou, Taige; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Endo, Morinobu; Akuzawa, Noboru; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2008-12-01

    This report focuses on the effects of different Br2 doping levels on the radial breathing modes of "double-wall carbon nanotube (DWNT) buckypaper". The resonance Raman profile of the Br2 bands are shown for different DWNT configurations with different Br2 doping levels. Near the maximum intensity of the resonance Raman profile, mainly the Br2 molecules adsorbed on the DWNT surface contribute strongly to the observed omega(Br-Br) Raman signal.

  10. Double giant resonances in time-dependent relativistic mean-field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, P.; Podobnik, B.

    1996-01-01

    Collective vibrations in spherical nuclei are described in the framework of time-dependent relativistic mean-field theory (RMFT). Isoscalar quadrupole and isovector dipole oscillations that correspond to giant resonances are studied, and possible excitations of higher modes are investigated. We find evidence for modes which can be interpreted as double resonances. In a quantized RMFT they correspond to two-phonon states. (orig.)

  11. High Quality Plasmonic Sensors Based on Fano Resonances Created through Cascading Double Asymmetric Cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiangao; Shao, Mingzhen; Zeng, Xiaoqi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a type of compact nanosensor based on a metal-insulator-metal structure is proposed and investigated through cascading double asymmetric cavities, in which their metal cores shift along different axis directions. The cascaded asymmetric structure exhibits high transmission and sharp Fano resonance peaks via strengthening the mutual coupling of the cavities. The research results show that with the increase of the symmetry breaking in the structure, the number of Fano resonances ...

  12. The use of acoustically tuned resonators to improve the sound transmission loss of double panel partitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, J. M.; Fahy, F. J.

    1986-10-01

    The effectiveness of tuned Helmholtz resonators connected to the partition cavity in double-leaf partitions utilized in situations requiring low weight structures with high transmission loss is investigated as a method of improving sound transmission loss. This is demonstrated by a simple theoretical model and then experimentally verified. Results show that substantial improvements may be obtained at and around the mass-air-mass frequency for a total resonator volume 15 percent of the cavity volume.

  13. Computer Assisted Instruction (Cain) For Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaturonrusmee, Wasna; Arthonvorakul, Areerat; Assateranuwat, Adisorn

    2005-10-01

    A computer assisted instruction program for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was developed by using Author ware 5.0, Adobe Image Styler 1.0, Adobe Photo shop 7.0 and Flash MX. The contents included the basic theory of 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the instrumentation of NMR spectroscopy, the two dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy and the interpretation of NMR spectra. The program was also provided examples, and exercises, with emphasis on NMR spectra interpretation to determine the structure of unknown compounds and solutions for self study. The questionnaire from students showed that they were very satisfied with the software

  14. Investigation based on nano-electromechanical system double Si3N4 resonant beam pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuan; Guo, Can; Yuan, Xiaowei

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a type of NEMS (Nano-Electromechanical System) double Si3N4 resonant beams pressure sensor. The mathematical models are established in allusion to the Si3N4 resonant beams and pressure sensitive diaphragm. The distribution state of stress has been analyzed theoretically based on the mathematical model of pressure sensitive diaphragm; from the analysis result, the position of the Si3N4 resonant beams above the pressure sensitive diaphragm was optimized and then the dominance observed after the double resonant beams are adopted is illustrated. From the analysis result, the position of the Si3N4 resonant beams above the pressure sensitive diaphragm is optimized, illustrating advantages in the adoption of double resonant beams. The capability of the optimized sensor was generally analyzed using the ANSYS software of finite element analysis. The range of measured pressure is 0-400 Kpa, the coefficient of linearity correlation is 0.99346, and the sensitivity of the sensor is 498.24 Hz/Kpa, higher than the traditional sensors. Finally the processing techniques of the sensor chip have been designed with sample being successfully processed.

  15. Basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valk, J.; MacLean, C.; Algra, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The intent of this book is to help clinicians understand the basic physical principles of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The book consists of the following: a discussion of elementary considerations; pulse sequencing; localization of MR signals in space; MR equipment; MR contrast agents; clinical applications; MR spectroscopy; and biological effects of MR imaging; a set of appendixes; and a bibliography. Illustrations and images are included

  16. Nuclear transparency and double beta decay of molybdenum 100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, H.W.

    1992-08-01

    Data taking is now complete on a double beta decay experiment which has been carried out with collaborators from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the University of New Mexico, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and work is continuing on a second collaborative experiment, AGS experiment 850 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory to study nuclear color transparency. In March, the experimental apparatus used to search for double beta decay in molybdenum 100 in the Consil silver mine in Osburn, Idaho was dismantled, and the data analysis is in its final stages. No evidence has been seen for the O + → O + mode of zero neutrino double beta decay collaborators with a 1σ lifetime limit of 3 x 10 22 years. This limit is 7.5 times greater than the limit we published previously in Physical Review Letters in 1989. Backgrounds have been simulated and fits are currently underway to a simulated O + → 2 + mode of zero neutrino double beta decay to improve on a very preliminary 1σ lifetime limit of 2.3 x 10 21 years presented at the April, 1992 meeting of the APS in Washington. A scintillating fiber detector with three Hamamatsu, H4140, 256 channel multianode phototubes has been built, instrumented, and tested in the May--July 1992 run in the EVA detector at Brookhaven Laboratory's AGS. Preliminary results from this detector have been disappointing. it is likely that the detector will have to be substantially redesigned before the 1993 AGS run

  17. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence and Isotopic Mapping of Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Micah S.; McNabb, Dennis P.

    2009-03-01

    National security programs have expressed interest in developing systems to isotopically map shipping containers, fuel assemblies, and waste barrels for various materials including special nuclear material (SNM). Current radiographic systems offer little more than an ambiguous density silhouette of a container's contents. In this paper we will present a system being developed at LLNL to isotopically map containers using the nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) method. Recent experimental measurements on NRF strengths in SNM are discussed.

  18. Bandgap properties in locally resonant phononic crystal double panel structures with periodically attached spring–mass resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Denghui, E-mail: qdhsd318@163.com; Shi, Zhiyu, E-mail: zyshi@nuaa.edu.cn

    2016-10-07

    Bandgap properties of the locally resonant phononic crystal double panel structure made of a two-dimensional periodic array of a spring–mass resonator surrounded by n springs (n equals to zero at the beginning of the study) connected between the upper and lower plates are investigated in this paper. The finite element method is applied to calculate the band structure, of which the accuracy is confirmed in comparison with the one calculated by the extended plane wave expansion (PWE) method and the transmission spectrum. Numerical results and further analysis demonstrate that two bands corresponding to the antisymmetric vibration mode open a wide band gap but is cut narrower by a band corresponding to the symmetric mode. One of the regulation rules shows that the lowest frequency on the symmetric mode band is proportional to the spring stiffness. Then, a new design idea of adding springs around the resonator in a unit cell (n is not equal to zero now) is proposed in the need of widening the bandwidth and lowering the starting frequency. Results show that the bandwidth of the band gap increases from 50 Hz to nearly 200 Hz. By introducing the quality factor, the regulation rules with the comprehensive consideration of the whole structure quality limitation, the wide band gap and the low starting frequency are also discussed. - Highlights: • The locally resonant double panel structure opens a band gap in the low frequency region. • The band gap is the coupling between the symmetric and antisymmetric vibration modes. • The band structure of the double panel is the evolution of that of the single plate. • By adding springs around the resonator in a unit cell, the bandwidth gets wider. • The band gap can be controlled by tuning the parameters.

  19. Ion cyclotron wave excitation by double resonance coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasoli, A.; Good, T.N.; Paris, P.J.; Skiff, F.; Tran, M.Q.

    1990-07-01

    A modulated high frequency wave is used to remotely excite low frequency oscillations in a linear, strongly magnetized plasma column. An electromagnetic wave is launched as an extraordinary mode across the plasma by an external waveguide in the Upper Hybrid frequency regime f=f UH =f ce =8 GHz, with P≤2 W. By frequency modulating (at f FM =1-60 kHz, with f ci ≅30 kHz) the pump wave, the resonant layer is swept radially across the profile and perpendicularly to the field lines at f=f FM . The resulting radial oscillation of the electron linear and non linear pressure can be considered to act as a source term for the ion wave. A localized virtual antenna is thereby created inside the plasma. Measurements of the ion dielectric response (interferograms and perturbed distribution functions) via laser induced fluorescence identify the two branches (forward, or ion-acoustic-like, and backward, or Bernstein, modes) of the electrostatic dispersion relation in the ion cyclotron frequency range. By changing the modulation bandwidth, and thus the spatial excursion of the oscillating resonant layer, a control on the perpendicular wavelength of the excited mode can be exerted. In particular, the possibility of selective excitation of the ion Bernstein wave is demonstrated experimentally. (author) 38 refs., 13 figs

  20. Carbon and deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shattuck, Thomas Wayne [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1976-07-01

    In Chapter I we present the results on a study of cross polarization dynamics, between protons and carbon-13 in adamantane, by the direct observation of the dilute, carbon-13, spins. These dynamics are an important consideration in the efficiency of proton enhancement double-resonance techniques and they also provide good experimental models for statistical theories of cross relaxation. In order to test these theories we present a comparison of the experimental and theoretical proton dipolar fluctuation correlation time τc, which is experimentally 110 ± 15 μsec and theoretically 122 μsec for adamantane. These double resonance considerations provide the background for extensions to deuterium and double quantum effects discussed in Chapter II. In Chapter II an approach to high resolution nmr of deuterium in solids is described. The m = 1 → -1 transition is excited by a double quantum process and the decay of coherence Q(τ) is monitored. Fourier transformation yields a deuterium spectrum devoid of quadrupole splittings and broadening. If the deuterium nuclei are dilute and the protons are spin decoupled, the double-quantum spectrum is a high resolution one and yields information on the deuterium chemical shifts Δω. The relationship Q(τ) ~ cos 2Δωτ is checked and the technique is applied to a single crystal of oxalic acid dihydrate enriched to ~ 10% in deuterium. The carboxyl and the water deuterium shifts are indeed resolved and the anisotropy of the carboxyl shielding tensor is estimated to be Δσ = 32 ± 3 ppm. A complete theoretical analysis is presented. The extension of cross relaxation techniques, both direct and indirect, to proton-deuterium double resonance is also described. The m = 1 → -1 double quantum transition and the m = ± 1 → 0 single quantum transitions may all be polarized and we present the derivation of the Hartmann-Hahn cross polarization conditions for each case. In addition the dynamics of the double quantum process

  1. Effect of resonance line shape on precision measurements of nuclear magnetic resonance shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachurin, A.M.; Smelyanskij, A.Ya.

    1986-01-01

    Effect of resonance line shape on the systematic error of precision measurements of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shifts of high resolution (on the center of NMR dispersion line) is analysed. Effect of the device resonance line form-function asymmetry is evaluated; the form-function is determined by configuration of the spectrometer magnetic field and enters the convolution, which describes the resonance line form. It is shown that with the increase of the relaxation line width the form-function effect on the measurement error yields to zero. The form-function effect on measurements and correction of a phase angle of NMR detection is evaluated. The method of semiquantitative evaluation of resonance line and NMR spectrometer parameters, guaranteeing the systematic error of the given infinitesimal, is presented

  2. Acoustic transmission resonance and suppression through double-layer subwavelength hole arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhifeng; Jin Guojun

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of acoustic waves passing through double-layer subwavelength hole arrays. The acoustic transmission resonance and suppression are observed. There are three mechanisms responsible for the transmission resonance: the excitation of geometrically induced acoustic surface waves, the Fabry-Perot resonance in a hole cavity (I-FP resonance) and the Fabry-Perot resonance between two plates (II-FP resonance). We can differentiate these mechanisms via the dispersion relation of acoustic modes supported by the double-layer structure. It is confirmed that the coupling between two single-layer perforated plates, associated with longitudinal interval and lateral displacement, plays a crucial role in modulating the transmission properties. The strong coupling between two plates can induce the splitting of the transmission peak, while the decoupling between plates leads to the appearance of transmission suppression. By analyzing the criterion derived for transmission suppression, we conclude that it is the destructive interference between the diffracted waves and the direct transmission waves assisted by the I-FP resonance of the first plate that leads to the decoupling between plates and then the transmission suppression.

  3. Susceptibility effects in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziener, Christian Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The properties of dephasing and the resulting relaxation of the magnetization are the basic principle on which all magnetic resonance imaging methods are based. The signal obtained from the gyrating spins is essentially determined by the properties of the considered tissue. Especially the susceptibility differences caused by magnetized materials (for example, deoxygenated blood, BOLD-effect) or magnetic nanoparticles are becoming more important for biomedical imaging. In the present work, the influence of such field inhomogeneities on the NMR-signal is analyzed. (orig.)

  4. Double Diffusive Natural Convection in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Hao; J. Nitao; T.A. Buscheck; Y. Sun

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we conduct a two-dimensional numerical analysis of double diffusive natural convection in an emplacement drift for a nuclear waste repository. In-drift heat and moisture transport is driven by combined thermal- and compositional-induced buoyancy forces. Numerical results demonstrate buoyancy-driven convective flow patterns and configurations during both repository heat-up and cool-down phases. It is also shown that boundary conditions, particularly on the drip-shield surface, have strong impacts on the in-drift convective flow and transport

  5. Spectral relationships between kicked Harper and on-resonance double kicked rotor operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawton, Wayne; Mouritzen, Anders Sørrig; Wang, Jiao

    2009-01-01

    Kicked Harper operators and on-resonance double kicked rotor operators model quantum systems whose semiclassical limits exhibit chaotic dynamics. Recent computational studies indicate a striking resemblance between the spectra of these operators. In this paper we apply C*-algebra methods to expla...

  6. Nuclear resonance apparatus including means for rotating a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus including magnet apparatus for generating a homogeneous static magnetic field between its magnetic poles, shims of a magnetic substance mounted on the magnetic poles to apply a first gradient magnetic field intensity distribution in a direction orthogonal as to the direction of line of magnetic force of the static magnetic field, gradient magnetic field generating electromagnetic apparatus for generating a second gradient magnetic field having a gradient magnetic field intensity distribution in superimposition with the static magnetic field and for changing the magnetic field gradient of the first gradient magnetic field, an oscillator for generating an oscillating output having a frequency corresponding to the nuclear magnetic resonance condition of an atomic nucleus to be measured, a coil wound around a body to be examined for applying the output of said oscillator as electromagnetic waves upon the body, a receiver for detecting the nuclear magnetic resonance signals received by the coil, a gradient magnetic field controller making a magnetic field line equivalent to the combined gradient magnetic fields and for rotating the line along the section of the body to be examined by controlling said gradient magnetic field generating electromagnetic apparatus and devices for recording the nuclear magnetic resonance signals, for reconstructing the concentration distribution of the specific atomic nuclei in the section of the body, and a display unit for depicting the result of reconstruction

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance of D(-)-α-amino-benzyl penicillin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Monica R.M.P.; Gemal, Andre L.; San Gil, Rosane A.S.; Menezes, Sonia M.C.

    1995-01-01

    The development of new drugs from penicillins has induced the study of this substances by nuclear magnetic resonance. Several samples of D(-)-α-amino-benzyl penicillin were analysed using 13 C NMR techniques in aqueous solution and solid state. Spectral data of this compounds were shown and the results were presented and analysed

  8. Selection of planes in nuclear magnetic resonance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonagamba, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    A prototype aiming to obtain images in nuclear magnetic resonance tomography was developed, by adjusting NMR spectrometer in the IFQSC Laboratory. The techniques for selecting planes were analysed by a set of computer codes, which were elaborated from Bloch equation solutions to simulate the spin system behaviour. Images were obtained using planes with thickness inferior to 1 cm. (M.C.K.)

  9. Communication patterns in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomov, D.; Filipov, F.; Kolev, N.

    1986-01-01

    A scientometric analysis of publications presented in four secondary information sources on the problem of nuclear magnetic resonance in physics, biomedicine and technology was carried out. A dynamic growth of the number of articles in biomedicine over 1982 to 1984 was established. Secondary publications play an important role in scientific communications as revealed by citation analysis. (author)

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance in cardiology: cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Claudio C.

    2003-01-01

    As a new gold standard for mass, volume and flow, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is probably the most rapidly evolving technique in the cardiovascular diagnosis. An integrated cardiac MRI examination allows the evaluation of morphology, global and regional function, coronary anatomy, perfusion, viability and myocardial metabolism, all of them in only one diagnostic test and in a totally noninvasive manner. The surgeons can obtain relevant information on all aspects of diseases of the heart and great vessels, which include anatomical details and relationships with the greatest field of view, and may help to reduce the number of invasive procedures required in pre and postoperative evaluation. However, despite these excellent advantages the present clinical utilization of MRI is still too often restricted to few pathologies or case studies in which other techniques fail to identify the cardiac or cardiovascular abnormalities. If magnetic resonance is an excellent method for diagnosing so many different cardiac conditions, why is so little it used in routine cardiac practice? Cardiologists are still not very familiar with the huge possibilities or cardiovascular MRI utilities. Our intention is to give a comprehensive survey of many of the clinical applications of this challenger technique in the study of the heart and great vessels. Those who continue to ignore this important and mature imaging technique will rightly fail to benefit. (author) [es

  11. Electron-nuclear magnetic resonance in the inverted state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatchenko, V.A.; Tsifrinovich, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    The paper considers the susceptibility of the electron-nucleus system of a ferromagnet when nuclear magnetization is inverted with respect to the hyperfine field direction. The inverted state is a situation in which nuclear magnetization is turned through π relative to its equilibrium orientation, whereas electron magnetization is in an equilibrium state with respect to an external magnetic field. The consideration is carried out for a thin plate magnetized in its plane. Amplification of a weak radiofrequency signal can be attained under the fulfilment of an additional inequality relating the interaction frequency with electron and nuclear relaxation parameters. The gain may exceed the gain for an inverted nuclear system in magnetically disordered substances. In the range of strong interaction between the frequencies of ferromagnetic (FMR) and nuclear magnetic (NMR) resonances the electron-nuclear magnetic resonance (ENMR) spectrum possesses a fine structure which is inverse to that obtained for the ENMR spectrum in a normal state. The inverted state ENMR line shape is analysed in detail for the case of so weak HF fields that the relaxation conditions may be regarded as stationary. The initial (linear) stages of a forced transient process arising in an electron-nuclear system under the effect of a strong HF field are briefly analysed

  12. Ultrasonic-resonator-combined apparatus for purifying nuclear aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Suxia; Zhang, Quanhu; Li, Sufen; Chen, Chen; Su, Xianghua [Xi' an Hi-Tech Institute, Xi' an (China)

    2017-12-15

    The radiation hazards of radionuclides in the air arising from the storage room of nuclear devices to the operators cannot be ignored. A new ultrasonic-resonator-combined method for purifying nuclear aerosol particles is introduced. To remove particles with diameters smaller than 0.3 μm, an ultrasonic chamber is induced to agglomerate these submicron particles. An apparatus which is used to purify the nuclear aerosol particles is described in the article. The apparatus consists of four main parts: two filtering systems, an ultrasonic chamber and a high-pressure electrostatic precipitator system. Finally, experimental results demonstrated the effectiveness of the implementation of the ultrasonic resonators. The feasibility of the method is proven by its application to the data analysis of the experiments.

  13. Analysis and characterization. Nuclear resonant scattering with the synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffer, R.; Teillet, J.

    2003-01-01

    The nuclear resonant scattering using the synchrotron radiation combines the uncommon properties of the Moessbauer spectroscopy and those of the synchrotron radiation. Since its first observation in 1984, this technique and its applications have been developed rapidly. The nuclear resonant scattering is now a standard technique for all the synchrotron radiation sources of the third generation. As the Moessbauer spectroscopy, it is a method of analysis at the atomic scale and a non destructive method. It presents the advantage not to require the use of radioactive sources of incident photons which can be difficult to make, of a lifetime which can be short and of an obviously limited intensity. The current applications are the hyperfine spectroscopy and the structural dynamics. In hyperfine spectroscopy, the nuclear resonant scattering can measure the same size than the Moessbauer spectroscopy. Nevertheless, it is superior in the ranges which exploit the specific properties of the synchrotron radiation, such as the very small samples, the monocrystals, the measures under high pressures, the geometry of small angle incidence for surfaces and multilayers. The structural dynamics, in a time scale of the nanosecond to the microsecond can be measured in the temporal scale. Moreover, the nuclear inelastic scattering gives for the first time a tool which allows to have directly the density of states of phonons and then allow to deduce the dynamical and thermodynamical properties of the lattice. The nuclear resonant scattering technique presented here, which corresponds to the Moessbauer spectroscopy technique (SM), is called 'nuclear forward scattering' (NFS). Current applications in physics and chemistry are develop. The NFS is compared to the usual SM technique in order to reveal its advantages and disadvantages. (O.M.)

  14. Resonant nuclear battery may aid in mitigating the greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    A new process for the direct conversion of radioactive decay energy directly into electricity of a usable form is currently being developed by Peripheral Systems, Inc. of Portland, Oregon. United States Patent 4,835,433 was issued May 30, 1989 to protect this Resonant Nuclear Power Supply. When developed, this system promises cheap, reliable power from a package small and light enough to be mobile and an energy density great enough for use as a space-based power supply. One of the potential domestic applications could be to power electric automobiles. Use in highly populated areas would have a tremendous beneficial effect on the ecology. The principle of operation for the resonant nuclear power supply is an LCR (inductance capacitance resistance) resonant tank circuit oscillating at its self-resonant frequency (at resonance, the inductive reactance and the capacitive reactance cancel to leave the ohmic resistance of the circuit as the only major loss of energy). A means for absorbing the natural radioactive decay energy emitted from an alpha or beta source is provided in the primary tank circuit and contributes an amount of energy, by means of the beta voltaic effect, in excess of the energy required to sustain the oscillation of the LCR primary tank. A transformer is impedance matched to this oscillating primary circuit for efficient energy transfer of the excess energy to a secondary output circuit, which yields net electrical power in a high-frequency usable form to drive a load

  15. Polarization of nuclear spins by a cold nanoscale resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Mark C.; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    A cold nanoscale resonator coupled to a system of nuclear spins can induce spin relaxation. In the low-temperature limit where spin-lattice interactions are ''frozen out,'' spontaneous emission by nuclear spins into a resonant mechanical mode can become the dominant mechanism for cooling the spins to thermal equilibrium with their environment. We provide a theoretical framework for the study of resonator-induced cooling of nuclear spins in this low-temperature regime. Relaxation equations are derived from first principles, in the limit where energy donated by the spins to the resonator is quickly dissipated into the cold bath that damps it. A physical interpretation of the processes contributing to spin polarization is given. For a system of spins that have identical couplings to the resonator, the interaction Hamiltonian conserves spin angular momentum, and the resonator cannot relax the spins to thermal equilibrium unless this symmetry is broken by the spin Hamiltonian. The mechanism by which such a spin system becomes ''trapped'' away from thermal equilibrium can be visualized using a semiclassical model, which shows how an indirect spin-spin interaction arises from the coupling of multiple spins to one resonator. The internal spin Hamiltonian can affect the polarization process in two ways: (1) By modifying the structure of the spin-spin correlations in the energy eigenstates, and (2) by splitting the degeneracy within a manifold of energy eigenstates, so that zero-frequency off-diagonal terms in the density matrix are converted to oscillating coherences. Shifting the frequencies of these coherences sufficiently far from zero suppresses the development of resonator-induced correlations within the manifold during polarization from a totally disordered state. Modification of the spin-spin correlations by means of either mechanism affects the strength of the fluctuating spin dipole that drives the resonator. In the case where product states can be chosen as energy

  16. Magnetic resonance of beta-active nuclei at double Larmor frequency in LiF polycrystals with dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulgakov, M.I.; Dzheparov, F.S.; Gul'ko, A.D.; Shestopal, V.E.; Stepanov, S.V.; Trostin, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    β-NMR-spectroscopy investigations of the resonance at double Larmor frequency of β-active nuclei 8 Li in LiF polycrystals are presented. The qualitative analysis of the dislocation influence on this resonance is developed. An important role of correlations in dislocation distributions as well as high responsivity of this resonance to quadrupole interactions are found. 13 refs.; 2 figs

  17. Missing and Spurious Level Corrections for Nuclear Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, G E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Pato, M P; Shriner, J F

    2005-01-01

    Neutron and proton resonances provide detailed level density information. However, due to experimental limitations, some levels are missed and some are assigned incorrect quantum numbers. The standard method to correct for missing levels uses the experimental widths and the Porter-Thomas distribution. Analysis of the spacing distribution provides an independent determination of the fraction of missing levels. We have derived a general expression for such an imperfect spacing distribution using the maximum entropy principle and applied it to a variety of nuclear resonance data. The problem of spurious levels has not been extensively addressed

  18. Hybrid model for the decay of nuclear giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.

    1986-12-01

    The decay properties of nuclear giant multipole resonances are discussed within a hybrid model that incorporates, in a unitary consistent way, both the coherent and statistical features. It is suggested that the 'direct' decay of the GR is described with continuum first RPA and the statistical decay calculated with a modified Hauser-Feshbach model. Application is made to the decay of the giant monopole resonance in 208 Pb. Suggestions are made concerning the calculation of the mixing parameter using the statistical properties of the shell model eigenstates at high excitation energies. (Author) [pt

  19. Real stabilization method for nuclear single-particle resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Zhou Shangui; Meng Jie; Zhao Enguang

    2008-01-01

    We develop the real stabilization method within the framework of the relativistic mean-field (RMF) model. With the self-consistent nuclear potentials from the RMF model, the real stabilization method is used to study single-particle resonant states in spherical nuclei. As examples, the energies, widths, and wave functions of low-lying neutron resonant states in 120 Sn are obtained. These results are compared with those from the scattering phase-shift method and the analytic continuation in the coupling constant approach and satisfactory agreements are found

  20. Frequency Characteristics of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotube Resonator with Different Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ha LEE

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have conducted classical molecular dynamics simulations for DWCNTs of various wall lengths to investigate their use as ultrahigh frequency nano-mechanical resonators. We sought to determine the variations in the frequency of these resonators according to changes in the DWCNT wall lengths. For a double-walled carbon nanotube resonator with a shorter inner nanotube, the shorter inner nanotube can be considered to be a flexible core, and thus, the length influences the fundamental frequency. In this paper, we analyze the variation in frequency of ultra-high frequency nano-mechnical resonators constructed from DWCNTs with different wall lengths.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.12951

  1. Modelling the nonlinear behaviour of double walled carbon nanotube based resonator with curvature factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ajay M.; Joshi, Anand Y.

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the nonlinear vibration analysis of a double walled carbon nanotube based mass sensor with curvature factor or waviness, which is doubly clamped at a source and a drain. Nonlinear vibrational behaviour of a double-walled carbon nanotube excited harmonically near its primary resonance is considered. The double walled carbon nanotube is harmonically excited by the addition of an excitation force. The modelling involves stretching of the mid plane and damping as per phenomenon. The equation of motion involves four nonlinear terms for inner and outer tubes of DWCNT due to the curved geometry and the stretching of the central plane due to the boundary conditions. The vibrational behaviour of the double walled carbon nanotube with different surface deviations along its axis is analyzed in the context of the time response, Poincaré maps and Fast Fourier Transformation diagrams. The appearance of instability and chaos in the dynamic response is observed as the curvature factor on double walled carbon nanotube is changed. The phenomenon of Periodic doubling and intermittency are observed as the pathway to chaos. The regions of periodic, sub-harmonic and chaotic behaviour are clearly seen to be dependent on added mass and the curvature factors in the double walled carbon nanotube. Poincaré maps and frequency spectra are used to explicate and to demonstrate the miscellany of the system behaviour. With the increase in the curvature factor system excitations increases and results in an increase of the vibration amplitude with reduction in excitation frequency.

  2. Transmitted spectral modulation of double-ring resonator using liquid crystals in terahertz range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huijuan; Zhou, Qingli; Wang, Xiumin; Li, Chenyu; Wu, Ani; Zhang, Cunlin

    2013-12-01

    Metamaterials with subwavelength structural features show unique electromagnetic responses that are unattainable with natural materials. Recent research on these artificial materials has been pushed forward to the terahertz region because of potential applications in biological fingerprinting, security imaging, remote sensing, and high frequency magnetic and electric resonant devices. Active control of their properties could further facilitate and open up new applications in terms of modulation and switching. Liquid crystals, which have been the subject of research for more than a century, have the unique properties for the development of many other optical components such as light valves, tunable filters and tunable lenses. In this paper, we investigated the transmitted spectral modulation in terahertz range by using liquid crystals (5CB and TEB300) covering on the fabricated double-ring resonators to realize the shift of the resonance frequency. Our obtained results indicate the low frequency resonance shows the obvious blue-shift, while the location of high frequency resonance is nearly unchanged. We believe this phenomenon is related to not only the refractive index of the covering liquid crystals but also the resonant mechanism of both resonances.

  3. Fast response double series resonant high-voltage DC-DC converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S S; Iqbal, S; Kamarol, M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a novel double series resonant high-voltage dc-dc converter with dual-mode pulse frequency modulation (PFM) control scheme is proposed. The proposed topology consists of two series resonant tanks and hence two resonant currents flow in each switching period. Moreover, it consists of two high-voltage transformer with the leakage inductances are absorbed as resonant inductor in the series resonant tanks. The secondary output of both transformers are rectified and mixed before supplying to load. In the resonant mode operation, the series resonant tanks are energized alternately by controlling two Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switches with pulse frequency modulation (PFM). This topology operates in discontinuous conduction mode (DCM) with all IGBT switches operating in zero current switching (ZCS) condition and hence no switching loss occurs. To achieve fast rise in output voltage, a dual-mode PFM control during start-up of the converter is proposed. In this operation, the inverter is started at a high switching frequency and as the output voltage reaches 90% of the target value, the switching frequency is reduced to a value which corresponds to the target output voltage. This can effectively reduce the rise time of the output voltage and prevent overshoot. Experimental results collected from a 100-W laboratory prototype are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed system.

  4. 13. Nuclear magnetic resonance users meeting. Extended abstracts book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This annual meeting, held in Brazil from May 2 - 6, 2011 comprised seventeen lectures, given by invited speakers from Brazil and other countries, about the use of nuclear magnetic resonance for various analytical purposes; results from ninety five research works, most being carried out by scientific groups from various Brazilian R and D institutions, presented as congress panels/posters. A General Assembly meeting of AUREMN, the Brazilian Association of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Users, also took place during the event. Main topics of the research works presented at this meeting were thus distributed: 54% in analytical chemistry (mainly organic chemistry, both experimental and theoretical works), 18% in applied life sciences (agricultural and food sciences, biological sciences and medicine), 15% in materials science (including nanostructures, petroleum and alternative fuels), 10% in mathematical methods and computing for the interpretation of NMR data, and the remaining 3% in improvements in instrumentation interfaces or magnetic field configurations.

  5. The origins and future of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehrli, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    What began as a curiosity of physics has become the preeminent method of diagnostic medical imaging and may displace x-ray-based techniques in the 21st century. During the past two decades nuclear magnetic resonance has revolutionized chemistry, biochemistry, biology and, more recently, diagnostic medicine. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, (MRI) as it is commonly called, is fundamentally different from x-ray-based techniques in terms of the principles of spatial encoding and mechanisms of signal and contrast generation involved. MRI has a far richer ultimate potential than any other imaging technique known today, and its technology and applications are still far from maturation, which may not occur until early in the 21st century. 23 refs., 6 figs

  6. 13. Nuclear magnetic resonance users meeting. Extended abstracts book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This annual meeting, held in Brazil from May 2 - 6, 2011 comprised seventeen lectures, given by invited speakers from Brazil and other countries, about the use of nuclear magnetic resonance for various analytical purposes; results from ninety five research works, most being carried out by scientific groups from various Brazilian R and D institutions, presented as congress panels/posters. A General Assembly meeting of AUREMN, the Brazilian Association of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Users, also took place during the event. Main topics of the research works presented at this meeting were thus distributed: 54% in analytical chemistry (mainly organic chemistry, both experimental and theoretical works), 18% in applied life sciences (agricultural and food sciences, biological sciences and medicine), 15% in materials science (including nanostructures, petroleum and alternative fuels), 10% in mathematical methods and computing for the interpretation of NMR data, and the remaining 3% in improvements in instrumentation interfaces or magnetic field configurations.

  7. Resonating-group method for nuclear many-body problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.C.; LeMere, M.; Thompson, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    The resonating-group method is a microscopic method which uses fully antisymmetric wave functions, treats correctly the motion of the total center of mass, and takes cluster correlation into consideration. In this review, the formulation of this method is discussed for various nuclear many-body problems, and a complex-generator-coordinate technique which has been employed to evaluate matrix elements required in resonating-group calculations is described. Several illustrative examples of bound-state, scattering, and reaction calculations, which serve to demonstrate the usefulness of this method, are presented. Finally, by utilization of the results of these calculations, the role played by the Pauli principle in nuclear scattering and reaction processes is discussed. 21 figures, 2 tables, 185 references

  8. A deuterium and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic investigation of blood flow and carbohydrate metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosch, C.S.E.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the development and application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques for this study of whole tissue metabolism, tissue perfusion and blood flow. The feasibility of spin imaging deuterium-enriched tissue water is demonstrated in cat brain in vivo and in situ. The potential application of D 2 O administration to deuterium-flow-imaging is considered. NMR investigations of hepatic carbohydrate metabolism were performed in rat liver in vivo and in situ. A coaxial, double-surface-coil, double-resonance probe was developed for carbon detection while decoupling neighboring proton scalar interactions ( 13 C-[ 1 H]) in hepatic tissue within the living animal. Hormonal and substrate regulation of hepatic glucose and glycogen metabolism was investigated by monitoring the metabolic fate of an administered c-dose of [1- 13 C]glucose. Label flux was directed primarily into newly-synthesized 13 C-labeled glycogen. A multiple resonance ( 1 H, 13 C, 31 P) liver perfusion probe was designed for complimentary carbohydrate metabolic studies in rat liver in vitro. A description of the 13 C-[ 1 H]/ 31 P NMR perfusion probe is given. The surgical technique used for liver excision and peripheral life-support apparatus required to maintain hepatic function are also detailed

  9. E2 nuclear resonance effects in pionic and kaonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batty, C.J.; Biagi, S.F.; Blecher, M.

    1977-09-01

    The attenuation due to the E2 nuclear resonance effect has been measured in hadronic atoms using pions with 111 Cd and 112 Cd, and for kaons with 122 Sn. Energies of the relevant X-ray and γ-ray transitions and of the X-ray cascade intensities have also been measured so as to give a self-consistent set of information. The results are found to be in very good agreement with theoretical calculations. (author)

  10. Clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The advantages and present limitations of the clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are reviewed in outline, with passing references to skeletal muscular studies, in particular a group of children with advanced Duchenne dystrophy, and the applications to the study of cerebral metabolism of neonates, excised kidneys, biopsy studies of breast and axillary lymph node samples, and NMR spectroscopy performed during chemotherapy of a secondary rhabdomyosarcoma in the skin. (U.K.)

  11. Clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, R.J. (Glasgow Western Infirmary (UK))

    1984-09-01

    The advantages and present limitations of the clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are reviewed in outline, with passing references to skeletal muscular studies, in particular a group of children with advanced Duchenne dystrophy, and the applications to the study of cerebral metabolism of neonates, excised kidneys, biopsy studies of breast and axillary lymph node samples, and NMR spectroscopy performed during chemotherapy of a secondary rhabdomyosarcoma in the skin.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and brain functional exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bihan, D.; CEA, 91 - Orsay

    1997-01-01

    The utilization of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging for functional analysis of the brain is presented: the oxygenated and deoxygenated blood flowing in the brain do not have the same effect on NMR images; the oxygenated blood, related to brain activity, may be detected and the corresponding activity zone in the brain, identified; functional NMR imaging could be used to gain a better understanding of functional troubles linked to neurological or psychiatric diseases

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of epithelial metabolism and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaban, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a noninvasive technique for studying cellular metabolism and function. In this review the general applications and advantages of NMR will be discussed with specific reference to epithelial tissues. Phosphorus NMR investigations have been performed on epithelial tissues in vivo and in vitro; however, other detectable nuclei have not been utilized to date. Several new applications of phosphorus NMR to epithelial tissues are also discussed, including studies on isolated renal tubules and sheet epithelia

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, a Powerful Tool in Cultural Heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Noemi Proietti; Donatella Capitani; Valeria Di Tullio

    2018-01-01

    In this paper five case studies illustrating applications of NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) in the field of cultural heritage, are reported. Different issues were afforded, namely the investigation of advanced cleaning systems, the quantitative mapping of moisture in historic walls, the investigation and evaluation of restoration treatments on porous stones, the stratigraphy of wall paintings, and the detection of CO2 in lapis lazuli. Four of these case studies deal with the use of portable...

  15. Resonance and nuclear relaxation in GdCo2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barata, A.C.

    1988-04-01

    A study of the 59 Co nuclear magnetic resonance and relaxation was made on the intermetallic compound GdCo 2 from 4,2 k to 330 k using the spin echo technique. An oscillatory behaviour of the primary echo was observed in the whole range of temperatures studied. This is due to the electronic quadrupole interaction of the 59 Co nuclei. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  16. Display of cross sectional anatomy by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, W S; Andrew, E R; Bottomley, P A; Holland, G N; Moore, W S

    1978-04-01

    High definition cross-sectional images produced by a new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique are shown. The images are a series of thin section scans in the coronal plane of the head of a rabbit. The NMR images are derived from the distribution of the density of mobile hydrogen atoms. Various tissue types can be distinguished and a clear registration of gross anatomy is demonstrated. No known hazards are associated with the technique.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography in Hallervorden-Spatz's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.; Bauer, M.; Seiderer, M.; Rath, M.

    1984-01-01

    Two patients (mother and son) with Hallervorden-Spatz's syndrome were examined both via CT and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), using different measuring modes. In the patient with progressing disease pathological findings were seen in the right and left putamen with CT and NMR. All examinations in the mother with a less progressive syndrome were without any result. Information obtained via NMR did not yield significantly more relevant data than computed tomography. (orig.) [de

  18. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic studies of iron-containing biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Takehiro; Seto, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we report recent nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic (NRVS) studies of iron-containing biomolecules and their model complexes. The NRVS is synchrotron-based element-specific vibrational spectroscopic methods. Unlike Raman and infrared spectroscopy, the NRVS can investigate all iron motions without selection rules, which provide atomic level insights into the structure/reactivity correlation of biologically relevant iron complexes. (author)

  19. Low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonance with a dc SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.W.

    1991-07-01

    Conventional pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a technique well suited for the study of very large quadrupolar interactions. Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed for the study of smaller quadrupolar interactions. However, there are many nuclei which have quadrupolar interactions of intermediate strength. Quadrupolar interactions in this region have traditionally been difficult or unfeasible to detect. This work describes the development and application of a SQUID NQR technique which is capable of measuring intermediate strength quadrupolar interactions, in the range of a few hundred kilohertz to several megahertz. In this technique, a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) is used to monitor the longitudinal sample magnetization, as opposed to the transverse magnetization, as a rf field is swept in frequency. This allows the detection of low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonances over a very wide frequency range with high sensitivity. The theory of this NQR technique is discussed and a description of the dc SQUID system is given. In the following chapters, the spectrometer is discussed along with its application to the study of samples containing half-odd-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei, in particular boron-11 and aluminum-27. The feasibility of applying this NQR technique in the study of samples containing integer spin nuclei is discussed in the last chapter. 140 refs., 46 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Transmission line model for coupled rectangular double split‐ring resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Lei; Tang, Meng; Krozer, Viktor

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a model based on a coupled transmission line formulation is developed for microstrip rectangular double split‐ring resonators (DSRRs). This model allows using the physical dimensions of the DSRRs as an input avoiding commonly used extraction of equivalent parameters. The model inclu...... simulations of the DSRR structures. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microwave Opt Technol Lett 53:1311–1315, 2011; View this article online at wileyonlinelibrary.com. DOI 10.1002/mop.25988...

  1. A magnet without a magnetic circuit, of high homogeneity, specially for nuclear magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barjhoux, Yves.

    1981-01-01

    This invention concerns a high homogeneity, double access magnet without a magnetic circuit. It is specially adapted for nuclear magnetic resonance (N.M.R.) imagery. Another advantage worth stressing resides in the possibilities of NMR in biochemical analysis which will enable, for instance, cancerous tumours to be detected in vivo. In order to increase the NMR signal ratio over background noise, it is necessary to increase the homogeneity of the B 0 orientating magnetic field. This magnetic field must orientate the nuclear magnetic moments of the elementary particles which compose the body being examined and in particular the protons. It must therefore be relatively constant in intensity and direction in the entire domain of the examination [fr

  2. Efficient 525 nm laser generation in single or double resonant cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shilong; Han, Zhenhai; Liu, Shikai; Li, Yinhai; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Shi, Baosen

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports the results of a study into highly efficient sum frequency generation from 792 and 1556 nm wavelength light to 525 nm wavelength light using either a single or double resonant ring cavity based on a periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate crystal (PPKTP). By optimizing the cavity's parameters, the maximum power achieved for the resultant 525 nm laser was 263 and 373 mW for the single and double resonant cavity, respectively. The corresponding quantum conversion efficiencies were 8 and 77% for converting 1556 nm photons to 525 nm photons with the single and double resonant cavity, respectively. The measured intra-cavity single pass conversion efficiency for both configurations was about 5%. The performances of the sum frequency generation in these two configurations was studied and compared in detail. This work will provide guidelines for optimizing the generation of sum frequency generated laser light for a variety of configurations. The high conversion efficiency achieved in this work will help pave the way for frequency up-conversion of non-classical quantum states, such as the squeezed vacuum and single photon states. The proposed green laser source will be used in our future experiments, which includes a plan to generate two-color entangled photon pairs and achieve the frequency down-conversion of single photons carrying orbital angular momentum.

  3. 2H{ 19F} REDOR for distance measurements in biological solids using a double resonance spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grage, Stephan L.; Watts, Jude A.; Watts, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    A new approach for distance measurements in biological solids employing 2H{ 19F} rotational echo double resonance was developed and validated on 2H, 19F- D-alanine and an imidazopyridine based inhibitor of the gastric H +/K +-ATPase. The 2H- 19F double resonance experiments presented here were performed without 1H decoupling using a double resonance NMR spectrometer. In this way, it was possible to benefit from the relatively longer distance range of fluorine without the need of specialized fluorine equipment. A distance of 2.5 ± 0.3 Å was measured in the alanine derivative, indicating a gauche conformation of the two labels. In the case of the imidazopyridine compound a lower distance limit of 5.2 Å was determined and is in agreement with an extended conformation of the inhibitor. Several REDOR variants were compared, and their advantages and limitations discussed. Composite fluorine dephasing pulses were found to enhance the frequency bandwidth significantly, and to reduce the dependence of the performance of the experiment on the exact choice of the transmitter frequency.

  4. Effects of resonant magnetic perturbation on the triggering and the evolution of double-tearing mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Lin, W. B.; Wang, X. Q.

    2018-02-01

    The effects of resonant magnetic perturbation on the triggering and the evolution of the double-tearing mode are investigated by using nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics simulations in a slab geometry. It is found that the double-tearing mode can be destabilized by boundary magnetic perturbation. Moreover, the mode has three typical development stages before it reaches saturation: the linear stable stage, the linear-growth stage, and the exponential-growth stage. The onset and growth of the double-tearing mode significantly depend on the boundary magnetic perturbations, particularly in the early development stage of the mode. The influences of the magnetic perturbation amplitude on the mode for different separations of the two rational surfaces are also discussed.

  5. Vibrational Resonance in an Overdamped System with a Sextic Double-Well Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Can-Jun

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenon of vibrational resonance (VR) in an overdamped system with a sextic double-well potential under the excitation of two different periodic signals is investigated. The approximate analytical expression of the resonance amplitude Q at the low-frequency u is obtained. The VR is observed, and the values of B (the amplitude of the high-frequency signal) and Q (the frequency of the high-frequency signal) at which VR occurs are determined. Moreover, the relationship between B and Q is revealed. The theoretical predictions are found to be in good agreement with the numerical results.%@@ The phenomenon of vibrational resonance(VR)in an overdamped system with a sextic double-well potential under the excitation of two different periodic signals is investigated.The approximate analytical expression of the resonance amplitude Q at the low-frequency ω is obtained.The VR is observed,and the values of B(the amplitude of the high-frequency signal)and Ω(the frequency of the high-frequency signal)at which VR occurs are determined.Moreover,the relationship between B and Ω is revealed.The theoretical predictions are found to be in good agreement with the numerical results.

  6. High Quality Plasmonic Sensors Based on Fano Resonances Created through Cascading Double Asymmetric Cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangao; Shao, Mingzhen; Zeng, Xiaoqi

    2016-10-18

    In this paper, a type of compact nanosensor based on a metal-insulator-metal structure is proposed and investigated through cascading double asymmetric cavities, in which their metal cores shift along different axis directions. The cascaded asymmetric structure exhibits high transmission and sharp Fano resonance peaks via strengthening the mutual coupling of the cavities. The research results show that with the increase of the symmetry breaking in the structure, the number of Fano resonances increase accordingly. Furthermore, by modulating the geometrical parameters appropriately, Fano resonances with high sensitivities to the changes in refractive index can be realized. A maximum figure of merit (FoM) value of 74.3 is obtained. Considerable applications for this work can be found in bio/chemical sensors with excellent performance and other nanophotonic integrated circuit devices such as optical filters, switches and modulators.

  7. High Quality Plasmonic Sensors Based on Fano Resonances Created through Cascading Double Asymmetric Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangao Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a type of compact nanosensor based on a metal-insulator-metal structure is proposed and investigated through cascading double asymmetric cavities, in which their metal cores shift along different axis directions. The cascaded asymmetric structure exhibits high transmission and sharp Fano resonance peaks via strengthening the mutual coupling of the cavities. The research results show that with the increase of the symmetry breaking in the structure, the number of Fano resonances increase accordingly. Furthermore, by modulating the geometrical parameters appropriately, Fano resonances with high sensitivities to the changes in refractive index can be realized. A maximum figure of merit (FoM value of 74.3 is obtained. Considerable applications for this work can be found in bio/chemical sensors with excellent performance and other nanophotonic integrated circuit devices such as optical filters, switches and modulators.

  8. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Non Q.; Clarke, John

    1993-01-01

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  9. A theoretical study of resonant tunneling characteristics in triangular double-barrier diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongmei; Xu Huaizhe; Zhang Yafei

    2006-01-01

    Resonant tunneling characteristics of triangular double-barrier diodes have been investigated systematically in this Letter, using Airy function approach to solve time-independent Schroedinger function in triangular double-barrier structures. Originally, the exact analytic expressions of quasi-bound levels and quasi-level lifetime in symmetrical triangular double-barrier structures have been derived within the effective-mass approximation as a function of structure parameters including well width, slope width and barrier height. Based on our derived analytic expressions, numerical results show that quasi-bound levels and quasi-level lifetime vary nearly linearly with the structure parameters except that the second quasi-level lifetime changes parabolically with slope width. Furthermore, according to our improved transmission coefficient of triangular double-barrier structures under external electric field, the current densities of triangular double-barrier diodes with different slope width at 0 K have been calculated numerically. The results show that the N-shaped negative differential resistance behaviors have been observed in current-voltage characteristics and current-voltage characteristics depend on the slope width

  10. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance in isolated perfused rat pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takehisa; Kanno, Tomio; Seo, Yoshiteru; Murakami, Masataka; Watari, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was applied to measure phosphorus energy metabolites in isolated perfused rat pancreas. The gland was perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution at room temperature (25 degree C). 31 P resonances of creatine phosphate (PCr), ATP, ADP, inorganic phosphate (P i ) and phosphomonoesters (PMEs) were observed in all the preparations of pancreas. In different individual preparations, the resonance of PCr varied, but those of ATP were almost the same. The initial levels of PCr and ATP in individual preparations, however, remained almost unchanged during perfusion with the standard solution for 2 h. When the perfusion was stopped, the levels of ATP and PCr decreased, while the levels of PME and P i increased. At that time, the P i resonance shfted to a higher magnetic field, indicating that the tissue pH decreased. On reperfusion, the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds and the tissue pH were restored to their initial resting levels. Continuous infusion of 0.1 μM acetylcholine caused marked and sustained increases in the flow of pancreatic juice and protein output. During the stimulation the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds remained unchanged, while the tissue pH was decreased slightly

  11. Nuclear data adjustment methodology utilizing resonance parameter sensitivities and uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    This work presents the development and demonstration of a Nuclear Data Adjustment Method that allows inclusion of both energy and spatial self-shielding into the adjustment procedure. The resulting adjustments are for the basic parameters (i.e. resonance parameters) in the resonance regions and for the group cross sections elsewhere. The majority of this development effort concerns the production of resonance parameter sensitivity information which allows the linkage between the responses of interest and the basic parameters. The resonance parameter sensitivity methodology developed herein usually provides accurate results when compared to direct recalculations using existng and well-known cross section processing codes. However, it has been shown in several cases that self-shielded cross sections can be very non-linear functions of the basic parameters. For this reason caution must be used in any study which assumes that a linear relatonship exists between a given self-shielded group cross section and its corresponding basic data parameters. The study also has pointed out the need for more approximate techniques which will allow the required sensitivity information to be obtained in a more cost effective manner

  12. Induced Double-Beta Processes in Electron Fluxes as Resonance Reactions in Weak Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponov, Yu.V.

    2004-01-01

    A theory of induced double-beta processes in electron beams is developed. It is shown that a resonance mechanism of the excitation of the ground state of an intermediate nucleus is realized in them, this mechanism being described in the single-state-dominance approximation, where the process in question is broken down into two stages, the excitation of a dominant state and its decay. This approximation is valid irrespective of the features of this state, both for allowed (for a 1 + state of the intermediate nucleus) and for forbidden transitions. An analysis of the resonance mechanism reveals that its inclusion in double-beta-decay processes requires introducing additional diagrams that describe the gamma decay of virtual intermediate states. The inclusion of such corrections may lead to a decrease in the expected half-life and to a change in the beta spectrum. Effects associated with the interference between the two stages of a double-beta process are estimated, and it is shown that their influence can be significant if the time interval between these stages is less than or on the order of the lifetime of the dominant state

  13. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: investigating the spins of nuclear related materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpentier, Th.

    2007-10-01

    The author reviews his successive research works: his research thesis work on the Multiple Quantum Magic Angle Spinning (MQMAS) which is a quadric-polar nucleus multi-quanta correlation spectroscopy method, the modelling of NMR spectra of disordered materials, the application to materials of interest for the nuclear industry (notably the glasses used for nuclear waste containment). He presents the various research projects in which he is involved: storing glasses, nuclear magnetic resonance in paramagnetism, solid hydrogen storing matrices, methodological and instrument developments in high magnetic field and high resolution solid NMR, long range distance measurement by solid state Tritium NMR (observing the structure and dynamics of biological complex systems at work)

  14. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to certifiable food colors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmion, D.M.

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was found suitable for the identification of individual colours, for distinguishing individual colours from colour mixtures, for the identification and semi-quantitative determination of the individual colours in mixtures and for proofs of the adulteration of certified colours adding noncertified colours. The method is well suited for observing the purity of colours and may also be used as the control method in the manufacture of colours and in assessing their stability and their resistance to increased temperature and light. (M.K.)

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of apple juice containing enzyme preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prestes, Rosilene A.; Almeida, Denise Milleo; Barison, Andersson; Pinheiro, Luis Antonio; Wosiacki, Gilvan

    2012-01-01

    In this work, 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H NMR) was employed to evaluate changes in apple juice in response to the addition of Panzym Yieldmash and Ultrazym AFP-L enzymatic complexes and compare it with premium apple juice. The juice was processed at different temperatures and concentrations of enzymatic complexes. The differences in the results were attributed mainly to the enzyme concentrations, since temperature did not cause any variation. A quantitative analysis indicated that the concentration of fructose increased while the concentrations of sucrose and glucose decreased in response to increasing concentrations of the enzymatic complexes. (author)

  16. Implementation of Quantum Private Queries Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chuan; Hao Liang; Zhao Lian-Jie

    2011-01-01

    We present a modified protocol for the realization of a quantum private query process on a classical database. Using one-qubit query and CNOT operation, the query process can be realized in a two-mode database. In the query process, the data privacy is preserved as the sender would not reveal any information about the database besides her query information, and the database provider cannot retain any information about the query. We implement the quantum private query protocol in a nuclear magnetic resonance system. The density matrix of the memory registers are constructed. (general)

  17. Applications of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Sensors to Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi Proietti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR sensors have been increasingly applied to investigate, characterize and monitor objects of cultural heritage interest. NMR is not confined to a few specific applications, but rather its use can be successfully extended to a wide number of different cultural heritage issues. A breakthrough has surely been the recent development of portable NMR sensors which can be applied in situ for non-destructive and non-invasive investigations. In this paper three studies illustrating the potential of NMR sensors in this field of research are reported.

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, a Powerful Tool in Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi Proietti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper five case studies illustrating applications of NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in the field of cultural heritage, are reported. Different issues were afforded, namely the investigation of advanced cleaning systems, the quantitative mapping of moisture in historic walls, the investigation and evaluation of restoration treatments on porous stones, the stratigraphy of wall paintings, and the detection of CO2 in lapis lazuli. Four of these case studies deal with the use of portable NMR sensors which allow non-destructive and non-invasive investigation in situ. The diversity among cases reported demonstrates that NMR can be extensively applied in the field of cultural heritage.

  19. Transistor regenerative spectrometer for 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anferov, V.P.; Mikhal'kov, V.M.

    1981-01-01

    Improvement of the Robinson transducer for investigations of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) in 14 N is described. Amplifier of the suggested transducer is made using p-n field effect transistor and small-noise SHF bipolar transistor. Such a circuit permits to obtain optimal relation between input resistance, low-frequency noises and transconductance which provides uniform gain of the transducer in the frequency range of 0.6-12 MHz and permits to construct a transistor spectrometer of NQR not yielding to a lamp spectrometer in sensitivity [ru

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Applications to medicine and biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdugo, M.; Fauchet, M.; Menasche, P.; Grall, Y.; Piwnica, A.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a non-invasive exploratory technique based on a principle radically different from those of radiography, radionuclide exploration and ultrasonography. Signals coming from atomic nuclei and reflecting their density and chemical/biochemical environment are collected, thus providing information on the physiological and pathological state of tissues. The technique has multiple applications, either practical (tomographic imaging of the brain, thyroid gland and liver) or in the field of research, e.g. investigating ischaemic myocardial areas and pathological fluid composition, measuring intracellular pH, diagnosing the nature of a tumour and, broadly speaking, understanding the biochemical changes associated with malignant degeneration [fr

  1. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  2. Nuclear-magnetic-resonance quantum calculations of the Jones polynomial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, Raimund; Spoerl, Andreas; Pomplun, Nikolas; Schulte-Herbrueggen, Thomas; Glaser, Steffen J.; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Myers, John M.

    2010-01-01

    The repertoire of problems theoretically solvable by a quantum computer recently expanded to include the approximate evaluation of knot invariants, specifically the Jones polynomial. The experimental implementation of this evaluation, however, involves many known experimental challenges. Here we present experimental results for a small-scale approximate evaluation of the Jones polynomial by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR); in addition, we show how to escape from the limitations of NMR approaches that employ pseudopure states. Specifically, we use two spin-1/2 nuclei of natural abundance chloroform and apply a sequence of unitary transforms representing the trefoil knot, the figure-eight knot, and the Borromean rings. After measuring the nuclear spin state of the molecule in each case, we are able to estimate the value of the Jones polynomial for each of the knots.

  3. Parahydrogen-enhanced zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis, T.; Ganssle, P.; Kervern, G.; Knappe, S.; Kitching, J.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance, conventionally detected in magnetic fields of several tesla, is a powerful analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure and function. With the advent of prepolarization methods and detection schemes using atomic magnetometers or superconducting quantum interference devices, interest in NMR in fields comparable to the Earth's magnetic field and below (down to zero field) has been revived. Despite the use of superconducting quantum interference devices or atomic magnetometers, low-field NMR typically suffers from low sensitivity compared with conventional high-field NMR. Here we demonstrate direct detection of zero-field NMR signals generated through parahydrogen-induced polarization, enabling high-resolution NMR without the use of any magnets. The sensitivity is sufficient to observe spectra exhibiting 13C-1H scalar nuclear spin-spin couplings (known as J couplings) in compounds with 13C in natural abundance, without the need for signal averaging. The resulting spectra show distinct features that aid chemical fingerprinting.

  4. Application of nuclear resonance scattering for in vivo measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielopolski, L.; Vartsky, D.; Cohn, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear resonance scattering is applied in our laboratory to measure hepatic and cardiac iron overload. For iron analysis, a gaseous source of 4 mg MnCl 2 is introduced into an evacuated quartz vial. Following irradiation in a nuclear reactor, 56 Mn decays by beta emission to the 847-keV level of 56 Fe, which subsequently decays to the ground state of 56 Fe with a 7 ps half-life. The principal aim of this work is to evaluate the efficacy of the iron chelation therapy. Serial measurements over a time period of 6 to 12 months of a given patient will enable us to see how the iron is removed from the critical organs

  5. Capacitor-based detection of nuclear magnetization: nuclear quadrupole resonance of surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorovič, Alan; Apih, Tomaž; Kvasić, Ivan; Lužnik, Janko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko; Strle, Drago; Muševič, Igor

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate excitation and detection of nuclear magnetization in a nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) experiment with a parallel plate capacitor, where the sample is located between the two capacitor plates and not in a coil as usually. While the sensitivity of this capacitor-based detection is found lower compared to an optimal coil-based detection of the same amount of sample, it becomes comparable in the case of very thin samples and even advantageous in the proximity of conducting bodies. This capacitor-based setup may find its application in acquisition of NQR signals from the surface layers on conducting bodies or in a portable tightly integrated nuclear magnetic resonance sensor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Label-Free, Single Molecule Resonant Cavity Detection: A Double-Blind Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V. Chistiakova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical resonant cavity sensors are gaining increasing interest as a potential diagnostic method for a range of applications, including medical prognostics and environmental monitoring. However, the majority of detection demonstrations to date have involved identifying a “known” analyte, and the more rigorous double-blind experiment, in which the experimenter must identify unknown solutions, has yet to be performed. This scenario is more representative of a real-world situation. Therefore, before these devices can truly transition, it is necessary to demonstrate this level of robustness. By combining a recently developed surface chemistry with integrated silica optical sensors, we have performed a double-blind experiment to identify four unknown solutions. The four unknown solutions represented a subset or complete set of four known solutions; as such, there were 256 possible combinations. Based on the single molecule detection signal, we correctly identified all solutions. In addition, as part of this work, we developed noise reduction algorithms.

  7. Equal intensity double plasmon resonance of bimetallic quasi-nanocomposites based on sandwich geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravadhanula, V S K; Elbahri, M; Schuermann, U; Takele, H; Greve, H; Zaporojtchenko, V; Faupel, F [Chair for Multicomponent Materials, Technical Faculty of the CAU Kiel, Kaiserstrasse 2, D-24143 Kiel (Germany)], E-mail: ff@tf.uni-kiel.de

    2008-06-04

    We report a strategy to achieve a material showing equal intensity double plasmon resonance (EIDPR) based on sandwich geometry. We studied the interaction between localized plasmon resonances associated with different metal clusters (Au/Ag) on Teflon AF (TAF) in sandwich geometry. Engineering the EIDPR was done by tailoring the amount of Au/Ag and changing the TAF thickness. The samples were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy. Interestingly, and in agreement with the dipole-surface interaction, the critical barrier thickness for an optimum EIDPR was observed at 3.3 nm. The results clearly show a plasmon sequence effect and visualize the role of plasmon decay.

  8. Propagation of spiking regularity and double coherence resonance in feedforward networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Cong; Wang, Jiang; Qin, Ying-Mei; Deng, Bin; Tsang, Kai-Ming; Chan, Wai-Lok

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the propagation of spiking regularity in noisy feedforward networks (FFNs) based on FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model systematically. It is found that noise could modulate the transmission of firing rate and spiking regularity. Noise-induced synchronization and synfire-enhanced coherence resonance are also observed when signals propagate in noisy multilayer networks. It is interesting that double coherence resonance (DCR) with the combination of synaptic input correlation and noise intensity is finally attained after the processing layer by layer in FFNs. Furthermore, inhibitory connections also play essential roles in shaping DCR phenomena. Several properties of the neuronal network such as noise intensity, correlation of synaptic inputs, and inhibitory connections can serve as control parameters in modulating both rate coding and the order of temporal coding.

  9. Double threshold behavior in a resonance-controlled ZnO random laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Niyuki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We observed unusual lasing characteristics, such as double thresholds and blue-shift of lasing peak, in a resonance-controlled ZnO random laser. From the analysis of lasing threshold carrier density, we found that the lasing at 1st and 2nd thresholds possibly arises from different mechanisms; the lasing at 1st threshold involves exciton recombination, whereas the lasing at 2nd threshold is caused by electron-hole plasma recombination, which is the typical origin of conventional random lasers. These phenomena are very similar to the transition from polariton lasing to photon lasing observed in a well-defined cavity laser.

  10. Dissipative Double-Well Potential for Cold Atoms: Kramers Rate and Stochastic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroescu, Ion; Hume, David B; Oberthaler, Markus K

    2016-12-09

    We experimentally study particle exchange in a dissipative double-well potential using laser-cooled atoms in a hybrid trap. We measure the particle hopping rate as a function of barrier height, temperature, and atom number. Single-particle resolution allows us to measure rates over more than 4 orders of magnitude and distinguish the effects of loss and hopping. Deviations from the Arrhenius-law scaling at high barrier heights occur due to cold collisions between atoms within a well. By driving the system periodically, we characterize the phenomenon of stochastic resonance in the system response.

  11. Sidewall gated double well quasi-one-dimensional resonant tunneling transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolagunta, V. R.; Janes, D. B.; Melloch, M. R.; Youtsey, C.

    1997-12-01

    We present gating characteristics of submicron vertical resonant tunneling transistors in double quantum well heterostructures. Current-voltage characteristics at room temperature and 77 K for devices with minimum feature widths of 0.9 and 0.7 μm are presented and discussed. The evolution of the I-V characteristics with increasing negative gate biases is related to the change in the lateral confinement, with a transition from a large area 2D to a quasi-1D. Even gating of multiple wells and lateral confinement effects observable at 77 K make these devices ideally suited for applications in multi-valued logic systems and low-dimensional structures.

  12. Infinite dwell time and group delay in resonant electron tunneling through double complex potential barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opacak, Nikola; Milanović, Vitomir; Radovanović, Jelena

    2017-12-01

    Tunneling times in complex potentials are investigated. Analytical expressions for dwell time, self-interference time and group delay are obtained for the case of complex double delta potentials. It is shown that we can always find a set of parameters of the potential so that the tunneling times achieve very large values and even approach infinity for the case of resonance. The phenomenon of infinite tunneling times occurs for only one particular positive value of the imaginary part of the potential, if all other parameters are given.

  13. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  14. Modeling and characterization of double resonant tunneling diodes for application as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehl, Zacharie; Suchet, Daniel; Julian, Anatole; Bernard, Cyril; Miyashita, Naoya; Gibelli, Francois; Okada, Yoshitaka; Guillemolles, Jean-Francois

    2017-02-01

    Double resonant tunneling barriers are considered for an application as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells. Experimental symmetric and asymmetric double resonant tunneling barriers are realized by molecular beam epitaxy and characterized by temperature dependent current-voltage measurements. The negative differential resistance signal is enhanced for asymmetric heterostructures, and remains unchanged between low- and room-temperatures. Within Tsu-Esaki description of the tunnel current, this observation can be explained by the voltage dependence of the tunnel transmission amplitude, which presents a resonance under finite bias for asymmetric structures. This effect is notably discussed with respect to series resistance. Different parameters related to the electronic transmission of the structure and the influence of these parameters on the current voltage characteristic are investigated, bringing insights on critical processes to optimize in double resonant tunneling barriers applied to hot carrier solar cells.

  15. The isoscalar giant dipole resonance and nuclear incompressibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, U.

    2000-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The current status of the experimental work on the ISOSCALAR giant dipole resonance (ISGDR) will be reviewed. ISGDR is an exotic mode of collective nuclear vibration and can be described as a hydrodynamical density oscillation in which the volume of the nucleus remains constant and the state can be visualized in the form of a compression wave-analogous to a sound wave-oscillating back and forth through the nucleus. [1] Convincing evidence for the ISGDR has now been obtained in inelastic α-scattering measurements at 200 MeV (IUCF) [2], 240 MeV (Texas A and M) [3] and 400 MeV (RCNP, Osaka) [4]. In all nuclei studied so far, the ISGDR strength is observed to be spread over a rather wide excitation-energy range (up to ∼ 15 MeV). The excitation energy of the ISGDR is related to the nuclear incompressibility, K ∞ . The ISGDR results so far point to a value for K ∞ that is ∼ 30-40% lower than the obtained from the energies of the other compressional mode, the giant monopole resonance. Results from recent theoretical attempts to reconcile this difference will be presented. This work has been supported in part by the U.S. National Science Foundation. (author)

  16. Resonant Electromagnetic Interaction in Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Scott

    2008-03-01

    Basic ideas about how resonant electromagnetic interaction (EMI) can take place in finite solids are reviewed. These ideas not only provide a basis for conventional, electron energy band theory (which explains charge and heat transport in solids), but they also explain how through finite size effects, it is possible to create many of the kinds of effects envisioned by Giuliano Preparata. The underlying formalism predicts that the orientation of the external fields in the SPAWAR protocolootnotetextKrivit, Steven B., New Energy Times, 2007, issue 21, item 10. http://newenergytimes.com/news/2007/NET21.htm^,ootnotetextSzpak, S.; Mosier-Boss, P.A.; Gordon, F.E. Further evidence of nuclear reactions in the Pd lattice: emission of charged particles. Naturwissenschaften 94,511(2007)..has direct bearing on the emission of high-energy particles. Resonant EMI also implies that nano-scale solids, of a particular size, provide an optimal environment for initiating Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) in the PdD system.

  17. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of plasma lipoproteins in malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabholtz, J.M.; Rossignol, A.; Farnier, M.; Gambert, P.; Tremeaux, J.C.; Friedman, S.; Guerrin, J.

    1988-01-01

    A recent study described a method of detecting malignant tumors by water-supressed proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1 H NMR) study of plasma. We performed a similar study of the W 1/2, a mean of the full width at half height of the resonances of the methyl and methylene groups of the lipids of plasma lipoproteins which is inversely related to the spin-spin apparent relaxation time (T 2 * ). W 1/2 values were measured at a fixed baseline width of 310 Hz. The study was prospective and blinded and comprised 182 subjects consisting of 40 controls, 68 patients with untreated malignancies, 45 with malignant tumors undergoing therapy and 29 benign tumor patients. No differences were seen between any groups that could serve as a basis for a useful clinical test. The major difficulty in the determination of W 1/2 was due to interference of metabolite protons (particularly lactate) within the lipoprotein resonance signal. Triglyceride level was seen to correlate inversely with W 1/2 within malignant patient groups. These discrepant results may be related to differing triglyceride-rich very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) levels in the ;atient populations of each study. We conclude that the water-suppressed 1H NMR of plasma lipoproteins is not a valid measurement for assessing malignancy. (orig.)

  18. Investigating resonances above and below the threshold in nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Cognata, M., E-mail: lacognata@lns.infn.it [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Kiss, G. G. [ATOMKI, Debrecen (Hungary); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Spitaleri, C. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Trippella, O. [Sezione di Perugia - INFN, Perugia (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Resonances in nuclear cross sections dramatically change their trends. Therefore, the presence of unexpected resonances might lead to unpredicted consequences on astrophysics and nuclear physics. In nuclear physics, resonances allow one to study states in the intermediate compound systems, to evaluate their cluster structure, for instance, especially in the energy regions approaching particle decay thresholds. In astrophysics, resonances might lead to changes in the nucleosynthesis flow, determining different isotopic compositions of the nuclear burning ashes. For these reasons, the Trojan Horse method has been modified to investigate resonant reactions. Thanks to this novel approach, for the first time normalization to direct data might be avoided. Moreover, in the case of sub threshold resonances, the Trojan Horse method modified to investigate resonances allows one to deduce the asymptotic normalization coefficient, showing the close connection between the two indirect approaches.

  19. Hyperfine structure of the X 2Σ+ ground state of Ca 35Cl and Ca 37Cl by molecular-beam, laser-rf double resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, W.J.; Cok, D.R.; Goodman, L.S.

    1982-01-01

    The hyperfine structure of the X 2 Σ + state of Ca 35 Cl and Ca 37 Cl, unresolved in previous studies, has been investigated in detail by the molecular-beam, laser-rf, double-resonance technique. Results for the spin-rotation interaction and the dipole and quadrupole hfs constants are given in the form of Dunham coefficients so that the N'' and v'' dependence of each constant can be explicitly exhibited. The results, after dividing out the purely nuclear effects, fall between the corresponding values for CaF and CaBr, as expected

  20. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence off 54Cr: The Onset of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, P. C.; Beck, T.; Beller, J.; Krishichayan; Gayer, U.; Isaak, J.; Löher, B.; Mertes, L.; Pai, H.; Pietralla, N.; Romig, C.; Savran, D.; Schilling, M.; Tornow, W.; Werner, V.; Zweidinger, M.

    2016-06-01

    Low-lying electric and magnetic dipole excitations (E1 and M1) below the neutron separation threshold, particularly the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR), have drawn considerable attention in the last years. So far, mostly moderately heavy nuclei in the mass regions around A = 90 and A = 140 were examined with respect to the PDR. In the present work, the systematics of the PDR have been extended by measuring excitation strengths and parity quantum numbers of J = 1 states in lighter nuclei near A = 50 in order to gather information on the onset of the PDR. The nuclei 50,52,54Cr and 48,50Ti were examined via bremsstrahlung produced at the DArmstadt Superconducting electron Linear Accelerator (S-DALINAC) with photon energies up to 9.7 MeV with the method of nuclear resonance fluorescence. Numerous excited states were observed, many of which for the first time. The parity quantum numbers of these states have been determined at the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIγS) of the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory in Durham, NC, USA. Informations to the methods and the experimental setups will be provided and the results on 54Cr achieved will be discussed with respect to the onset of the PDR.

  1. CP violation induced by the double resonance for pure annihilation decay process in perturbative QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lue, Gang; Li, Sheng-Tao; Wang, Yu-Ting [Henan University of Technology, College of Science, Zhengzhou (China); Lu, Ye [Guangxi Normal University, Department of Physics, Guilin (China)

    2017-08-15

    In a perturbative QCD approach we study the direct CP violation in the pure annihilation decay process of anti B{sup 0}{sub s} → π{sup +}π{sup -}π{sup +}π{sup -} induced by the ρ and ω double resonance effect. Generally, the CP violation is small in the pure annihilation type decay process. However, we find that the CP violation can be enhanced by double ρ-ω interference when the invariant masses of the π{sup +}π{sup -} pairs are in the vicinity of the ω resonance. For the decay process of anti B{sup 0}{sub s} → π{sup +}π{sup -}π{sup +}π{sup -}, the CP violation can reach A{sub CP}(anti B{sup 0}{sub s} → π{sup +}π{sup -}π{sup +}π{sup -}) = 27.20{sup +0.05+0.28+7.13}{sub -0.15-0.31-6.11}%. (orig.)

  2. Tunable Resonant-Cavity-Enhanced Photodetector with Double High-Index-Contrast Grating Mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Yvind, Kresten; Chung, Il-Sug

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a broadband-tunable resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector (RCE-PD) structure with double high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirrors and numerically investigate its characteristics. The detector is designed to operate at 1550-nm wavelength. The detector structure consists....... Furthermore, the fact that it can be fabricated on a silicon platform offers us a possibility of integration with electronics.......In this paper, we propose a broadband-tunable resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector (RCE-PD) structure with double high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirrors and numerically investigate its characteristics. The detector is designed to operate at 1550-nm wavelength. The detector structure consists...... of a top InP HCG mirror, a p-i-n photodiode embedding multiple quantum wells, and a Si HCG mirror formed in the Si layer of a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The detection wavelength can be changed by moving the top InP HCG mirror suspended in the air. High reflectivity and small penetration length of HCGs...

  3. In Vivo Application of Proton-Electron Double-Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Shun; Krishna, Murali C.; Khramtsov, Valery V.; Utsumi, Hideo

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Proton-electron double-resonance imaging (PEDRI) employs electron paramagnetic resonance irradiation with low-field magnetic resonance imaging so that the electron spin polarization is transferred to nearby protons, resulting in higher signals. PEDRI provides information about free radical distribution and, indirectly, about the local microenvironment such as partial pressure of oxygen (pO2), tissue permeability, redox status, and acid-base balance. Recent Advances: Local acid-base balance can be imaged by exploiting the different resonance frequency of radical probes between R and RH+ forms. Redox status can also be imaged by using the loss of radical-related signal after reduction. These methods require optimized radical probes and pulse sequences. Critical Issues: High-power radio frequency irradiation is needed for optimum signal enhancement, which may be harmful to living tissue by unwanted heat deposition. Free radical probes differ depending on the purpose of PEDRI. Some probes are less effective for enhancing signal than others, which can reduce image quality. It is so far not possible to image endogenous radicals by PEDRI because low concentrations and broad line widths of the radicals lead to negligible signal enhancement. Future Directions: PEDRI has similarities with electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) because both techniques observe the EPR signal, directly in the case of EPRI and indirectly with PEDRI. PEDRI provides information that is vital to research on homeostasis, development of diseases, or treatment responses in vivo. It is expected that the development of new EPR techniques will give insights into novel PEDRI applications and vice versa. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 1345–1364. PMID:28990406

  4. Nuclear Fusion Rate Study of a Muonic Molecule via Nuclear Threshold Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, F.; Eskandari, M. R.

    This work follows our previous calculations of the ground state binding energy, size, and the effective nuclear charge of the muonic T3 molecule, using the Born-Oppenheimer adiabatic approximation. In our past articles, we showed that the system possesses two minimum positions, the first one at the muonic distance and the second at the atomic distance. Also, the symmetric planner vibrational model assumed between the two minima and the approximated potential were calculated. Following from the previous studies, we now calculate the fusion rate of the T3 muonic molecule according to the overlap integral of the resonance nuclear compound nucleus and the molecular wave functions.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance in pulse radiolysis. Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.; Johnson, K.W.; Lowers, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance and chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP) were applied to the study of pulse radiolysis. Samples were irradiated with a 3-MeV electron beam from the Argonne Van de Graaff accelerator in an EPR magnet (approximately 4000 G) which had axial holes for beam access. A fast flow system transferred the irradiated solution to the rotating 5-mm NMR sample tube. The NMR spectra of mixtures of sodium acetate and methanol were presented to demonstrate the features of the CIDNP in pulse radiolysis

  6. Displacement and resonance behaviors of a piezoelectric diaphragm driven by a double-sided spiral electrode

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Zhiyuan

    2012-04-03

    This paper presents the design of a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) diaphragm actuated by double-sided patterned electrodes. Au/Cr electrodes were deposited on bulk PZT wafers by sputtering while patterned by a lift-off process. SU-8 thick film was used to form the structural layer. Double-spiral electrode induced in-plane poling and piezoelectric elongation are converted to an out-of-plane displacement due to the confined boundary condition. The influence of different drive configurations and electrode parameters on deflection has been calculated by finite element methods (FEM) using a uniform field model. Impedance and quasi-static displacement spectra of the diaphragm were measured after poling. Adouble-sided patterned electrode diaphragm can be actuated by more drive configurations than a single-sided one. Compared with a single-sided electrode drive, a double-sided out-of-phase drive configuration increases the coupling coefficient of the fundamental resonance from 7.6% to 11.8%. The displacement response of the diaphragm increases from 2.6 to 8.6nmV 1. Configurations including the electric field component perpendicular to the poling direction can stimulate shear modes of the diaphragm. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  7. An absolute nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer; Magnetometre absolu a resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvi, A [Commisariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-10-15

    After an introduction in which the various work undertaken since the discovery of nuclear magnetic resonance is rapidly reviewed, the author describes briefly In the first chapter three types of NMR magnetometers, giving the advantages and disadvantages of each of them and deducing from this the design of the apparatus having the greatest number of qualities Chapter II is devoted to the crossed coil nuclear oscillator which operates continuously over a wide range (800 gamma). To avoid an error due to a carrying over the frequency, the measurement is carried out using bands of 1000 {gamma}. Chapter III deals with frequency measurements. The author describes an original arrangement which makes possible the frequency-field conversion with an accuracy of {+-} 5 x 10{sup -6}, and the differential measurement between two nuclear oscillators. The report finishes with a conclusion and a few recordings. (author) [French] Apres une introduction rappelant les divers travaux effectues en resonance magnetique nucleaire depuis sa mise en evidence, l'auteur decrit sommairement dans le premier chapitre trois types de magnetometre a R.M.N. enumerant les avantages et les inconvenients de chacun a partir desquels il projet, l'appareillage reunissant le maximum de qualites. Le chapitre II est consacre a l'oscillateur nucleaire a bobines croisees permettant un fonctionnement continu dons une large plage (800 gamma). Pour eviter une erreur due a l'entrainement de frequence, la mesure s'effectue par bandes de 1000 {gamma} chacune. Le chapitre III traite la mesure de frequence. L'auteur expose un montage original permettant la traduction frequence-champ avec une precision egale a {+-} 5.10{sup -6}, et la mesure differentielle entre deux oscillateurs nucleaires. Une conclusion et quelques enregistrements terminent ce travail. (auteur)

  8. Control of the symmetry breaking in double-well potentials by the resonant nonlinearity management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistazakis, H. E.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Malomed, B. A.; Kevrekidis, P. G.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a one-dimensional model of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), combining the double-well potential, which is a usual setting for the onset of spontaneous-symmetry-breaking (SSB) effects, and time-periodic modulation of the nonlinearity, which may be implemented by means of the Feshbach-resonance-management (FRM) technique. Both cases of the nonlinearity that is repulsive or attractive on the average are considered. In the former case, the main effect produced by the application of the FRM is spontaneous self-trapping of the condensate in either of the two potential wells in parameter regimes where it would remain untrapped in the absence of the management. In the weakly nonlinear regime, the frequency of intrinsic oscillations in the FRM-induced trapped state is very close to half the FRM frequency, suggesting that the effect is accounted for by a parametric resonance. In the case of the attractive nonlinearity, the FRM-induced effect is the opposite, i.e., enforced detrapping of a state which is self-trapped in its unmanaged form. In the latter case, the frequency of oscillations of the untrapped mode is close to a quarter of the driving frequency, suggesting that a higher-order parametric resonance may account for this effect.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an encoding

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Jeffry Todd [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an

  11. Multinuclear solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance of inorganic materials

    CERN Document Server

    MacKenzie, Kenneth J D

    2002-01-01

    Techniques of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are constantly being extended to a more diverse range of materials, pressing into service an ever-expanding range of nuclides including some previously considered too intractable to provide usable results. At the same time, new developments in both hardware and software are being introduced and refined. This book covers the most important of these new developments. With sections addressed to non-specialist researchers (providing accessible answers to the most common questions about the theory and practice of NMR asked by novices) as well as a more specialised and up-to-date treatment of the most important areas of inorganic materials research to which NMR has application, this book should be useful to NMR users whatever their level of expertise and whatever inorganic materials they wish to study.

  12. Evaluation of human thyroid tumors by proton nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    deCertaines, J.; Herry, J.Y.; Lancien, G.; Benoist, L.; Bernard, A.M.; LeClech, G.

    1982-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used in a study of 40 patients with thyroid tumors following partial or total thyroidectomy. Three patient groups were considered: those with nodules showing increased uptake, those with solitary nodules with decreased uptake, and those with multinodular goiters. Spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times (T 1 and T 2 ) were measured on samples of nodular and extranodular tissue from each patient. Increased T 1 and T 2 were observed for benign cold nodules, an increase in T 1 alone for nodules with increased uptake, and a wide fluctuation in T 1 and T 2 for multinodular goiters. The four cancers in the series did not show a distinctive proton NMR pattern in comparison with the other nodular structures studied. The results point to the feasibility of applying NMR techniques to the detection of thyroid disease

  13. Programmable quantum-state discriminator by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinath, T.; Das, Ranabir; Kumar, Anil

    2005-01-01

    A programmable quantum-state discriminator is implemented by using nuclear magnetic resonance. We use a two-qubit spin-1/2 system, one for the data qubit and one for the ancilla (program) qubit. This device does the unambiguous (error-free) discrimination of a pair of states of the data qubit that are symmetrically located about a fixed state. The device is used to discriminate both linearly polarized states and elliptically polarized states. The maximum probability of successful discrimination is achieved by suitably preparing the ancilla qubit. It is also shown that the probability of discrimination depends on the angle of the unitary operator of the protocol and ellipticity of the data qubit state

  14. NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE THE GELLED PRODUCT OF CANNIZZARO REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Fernández-Sánchez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR of proton 1H, carbon 13C and two dimensional spectrums, product of a green organic synthesis of redox on the Cannizzaro reaction. The product was reported as a tribochemical gel (heterogeneous mixture and confirmed by Infrared Spectroscopy IR, X-ray and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The results in this paper confirm its structure through various techniques of NMR and evaluate the content of sodium benzoate and benzyl alcohol in the spectroscopy sample, examining the values of the integrals on 1H NMR signals. The result of analysis indicates that benzyl alcohol (dispersed phase is in 33.44% mol in comparison with sodium benzoate content (continuous phase. These results confirm that the gel structure over time loses the dispersed phase of the benzyl alcohol producing a xerogel.

  15. High field nuclear magnetic resonance application to polysaccharide chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincendon, Marc

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has been applied to polysaccharide chemistry using time averaging technique and high fields (100 and 250 MHz). The three methyl signals of methyl cellulose and cellulose triacetate are separated, and the C-6 substituent has been identified. Biosynthesis of bacterial cellulose has been performed using deuterium labelled D-glucose and Acetobacter xylinum. Per-acetylated derivative of bacterial cellulose has been studied by NMR; this study permitted us to determine the quantity of deuterium on each position of the anhydro-glucose unit in the polymer. NMR has also been used to see the anomeric end chain of cellulose and amylose derivatives and to show the fixation of bromine and t-butyl group on the free anomeric end chain of cellulose triacetate. (author) [fr

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of gallstones in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, K.L. Jr.; Hricak, H.; Margulis, A.R.; Bernhoft, R.; Way, L.W.; Filly, R.A.; Crooks, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging characteristics of gallstones of various composition from 36 patients were studied in vitro using a spin-echo imaging technique. The majority of gallstones (83%) produced no measurable NMR signal despite having a mean water content of 12% and a mean cholesterol content of 61%. Six (17%) of the stones had a weak but measurable signal in the center of the stone, which was thought to represent signal from water in clefts or pores within the stones. The mean water and cholesterol content of the stones with measurable signal did not differ significantly from that of stones with no signal. A possible explanation for these findings, based on the known NMR characteristics of solid materials, is offered

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terwey, B.; Koschorek, F.; Jensen, H.P.

    1985-12-01

    170 patients with suspected lesions of the cervical part of the medulla were examined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tomography. 27 cases revealed no pathological changes in the regions of the cervical medulla, the cervical canal and of the cervical spine. 143 cases produced pathological findings whose diagnoses determined therapeutical approach. Verified pathological changes comprised anomalies of the cranio-cervical junction like basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation, various types of cavity formation in the cervical medulla (syringomyelia, hydromyelia), demyelinization processes, intramedullary and extramedullary tumours, intervertebral disk degeneration processes, dislocation of intervertebral disks and spondylophytes with spinal stenoses. Sagittal sections in different functional positions allowed to demonstrate the biomechanical effects of extramedullary masses on the cervical medulla. However, proven tumours could not be differentiated successfully using histological methods. Nevertheless, NMR tomography will replace invasive methods like conventional cervical myelography and CT myelography in diagnostic clarification of diseases of the cervical medulla.

  18. Structural and conformational study of polysaccharides by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossennec, Veronique

    1989-01-01

    As some natural polysaccharides are involved in important biological processes, the use of nuclear magnetic resonance appears to be an adapted mean to determine their structure-activity relationship and is therefore the object of this research thesis. By using bi-dimensional proton-based NMR techniques, it is possible to identify minority saccharide units, to determine their conformation, and to identify units which they are bound to. The author reports the application of these methods to swine mucosa heparin, and to heparins displaying a high and low anticoagulant activity. The dermatan sulphate has also been studied, and the NMR analysis allowed some polymer structure irregularities to be identified. A molecular modelling of dermatan sulphate has been performed [fr

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terwey, B.; Koschorek, F.; Jensen, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    170 patients with suspected lesions of the cervical part of the medulla were examined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tomography. 27 cases revealed no pathological changes in the regions of the cervical medulla, the cervical canal and of the cervical spine. 143 cases produced pathological findings whose diagnoses determined therapeutical approach. Verified pathological changes comprised anomalies of the cranio-cervical junction like basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation, various types of cavity formation in the cervical medulla (syringomyelia, hydromyelia), demyelinization processes, intramedullary and extramedullary tumours, intervertebral disk degeneration processes, dislocation of intervertebral disks and spondylophytes with spinal stenoses. Sagittal sections in different functional positions allowed to demonstrate the biomechanical effects of extramedullary masses on the cervical medulla. However, proven tumours could not be differentiated successfully using histological methods. Nevertheless, NMR tomography will replace invasive methods like conventional cervical myelography and CT myelography in diagnostic clarification of diseases of the cervical medulla. (orig.) [de

  20. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance studies of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Jiri

    2002-03-25

    The combination of advanced high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques with high-pressure capability represents a powerful experimental tool in studies of protein folding. This review is organized as follows: after a general introduction of high-pressure, high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of proteins, the experimental part deals with instrumentation. The main section of the review is devoted to NMR studies of reversible pressure unfolding of proteins with special emphasis on pressure-assisted cold denaturation and the detection of folding intermediates. Recent studies investigating local perturbations in proteins and the experiments following the effects of point mutations on pressure stability of proteins are also discussed. Ribonuclease A, lysozyme, ubiquitin, apomyoglobin, alpha-lactalbumin and troponin C were the model proteins investigated.

  1. Study of biological fluids by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriat, M.; Vion-Dury, J.; Confort-Gouny, S.; Sciaky, M.; Cozzone, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the study of biofluids is rapidly developing and might soon constitute a new major medical application of this technique which benefits from technological and methodological progress such as higher magnetic fields, new probe design, solvent suppression sequences and advanced data processing routines. In this overview, the clinical and pharmacological impact of this new approach is examined, with emphasis on the NMR spectroscopy of plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and urine. Applications to pharmacokinetics and toxicology are illustrated. Interestingly, a number of biochemical components of fluids which are not usually assayed by conventional biochemical methods are readily detected by NMR spectroscopy which is clearly a new competitive entrant among the techniques used in clinical biology. Its ease-of-use, cost effectiveness and high informational content might turn it into a major diagnostic tool in the years to come [fr

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Oommen, Joanna Mary

    2010-08-13

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs) are a new class of nanomaterials that exhibit interesting properties including negligible vapor pressures and tunable physical states, among others. In this study, we analyzed the temperature-wise performance of NIMs using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NIMs are relatively stable over a temperature range from 300 to 383 K, rendering them usable in high temperature applications. We confirmed the presence of covalent bonds between the SiO2 core and the sulfonate group and determined relative concentrations of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings serve as first hand proof-of-concept for the usefulness of NMR analyses in further studies on the diffusive properties of NIMs. © 2010 The Electrochemical Society.

  3. Determining phenols in coal conversion products by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanitskaya, L.V.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Polonov, V.M.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1985-03-01

    Possibility of using nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the hydrogen 1 (/sup 1/H) isotope for a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the hydroxyl groups in the products of coal processing is investigated. The basis of the method is the fact that in NMR spectra of the /sup 1/H in organic compounds with acid protons, the latter are unprotected when strong bases are used as solvents because of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The resin from the medium-temperature semicoking of Cheremkhovskii coals, its hydrogenate, and phenol fraction of the hydrogenate were used for the investigation. The results were compared with the results of other NMR spectroscopy methods. The high solubility of hexamethanol and the fact that the products can be analyzed in the natural state, are some advantages of the method. 18 references.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaney, M.B.

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al 2 O 3 /Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 x 10 17 in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO 3 crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies

  5. Introductory remarks on double beta decay and nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, S.P.

    1986-01-01

    The particle physics aspects of double beta decay and the theory of the phenomenon are briefly reviewed. The distinction between Dirac and Majorana neutrinos is drawn by comparing the neutrino that accompanies a negatively charged lepton in some hadronic decay process with that which accompanies a positively charged lepton in some other decay process. Two modes of double beta decay are examined - one emitting two neutrinos and the other emitting no neutrinos. What can be learned from the existing data on double beta decay is considered, de-emphasizing the question of bounds on neutrino mass and concentrating on the properties of the phenomenon itself. Possible future experiments are anticipated. 16 refs

  6. Electron and nuclear magnetic resonances in compounds and metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasil Filho, N.

    1985-11-01

    Proton pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements were performed on the metallic hydrides ZrCr 2 H x (x = 2, 3, 4) and ZrV 2 H y (y = 2, 3, 4, 5) as a function of temperature between 180 and 400K. The ultimate aim was the investigation of the relaxation mechanisms in these systems by means of the measurement of both the proton ( 1 H) spin-lattice (T 1 ) and spin-spin (T 2 ) relaxation times and to use these data to obtain information about the diffusive motion of the hydrogen atoms. The diffusional activation energies, the jump frequencies and the Korringa constant, C k , related with the conduction electron contribution to the 1 H relaxation were determined for the above hydrides as a function of hydrogen concentration. Our results were analysed in terms of the relaxation models described by Bloembergen, Purcell and Pound (BPP model) and by Torrey. The Korringa type relaxation due to the conduction electrons in metallic systems was also used to interpret the experimental results. We also present the Electron Paramagnetic Ressonance (EPR) study of Gd 3+ , Nd 3+ and Er 3+ ions as impurities in several AB 3 intermetallic compounds where A = LA, Ce, Y, Sc, Th, Zr and B = Rh, Ir, Pt. The results were analysed in terms of the multiband model previously suggested to explain the behaviour of the resonance parameter in AB 2 Laves Phase compounds. (author) [pt

  7. A personal computer-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, Constantin; Pearson, Robert M.; Brown, Michael F.

    1994-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy using personal computer-based hardware has the potential of enabling the application of NMR methods to fields where conventional state of the art equipment is either impractical or too costly. With such a strategy for data acquisition and processing, disciplines including civil engineering, agriculture, geology, archaeology, and others have the possibility of utilizing magnetic resonance techniques within the laboratory or conducting applications directly in the field. Another aspect is the possibility of utilizing existing NMR magnets which may be in good condition but unused because of outdated or nonrepairable electronics. Moreover, NMR applications based on personal computer technology may open up teaching possibilities at the college or even secondary school level. The goal of developing such a personal computer (PC)-based NMR standard is facilitated by existing technologies including logic cell arrays, direct digital frequency synthesis, use of PC-based electrical engineering software tools to fabricate electronic circuits, and the use of permanent magnets based on neodymium-iron-boron alloy. Utilizing such an approach, we have been able to place essentially an entire NMR spectrometer console on two printed circuit boards, with the exception of the receiver and radio frequency power amplifier. Future upgrades to include the deuterium lock and the decoupler unit are readily envisioned. The continued development of such PC-based NMR spectrometers is expected to benefit from the fast growing, practical, and low cost personal computer market.

  8. Nuclear quadrupole resonance applied for arsenic oxide study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correia, J.A.S.

    1991-04-01

    The objectives of this study are mounting a pulsed Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) building a flow cryostat capable of varying the temperature continuously from 77 K to 340 K and using the spectrometer and the cryostat to study the polycrystalline arsenic oxide. The spin-lattice relaxation time (T 1 ), the spin-spin relaxation time (T 2 ) and the resonance frequency are obtained as a function of temperature. These data are obtained in 77 to 330 K interval. The relaxation times are obtained using the spin echo technique. The spin echo phenomenon is due to refocusing spins, when a 180 0 C pulse is applied after a 90 0 C pulse. The spin-lattice relaxation time is obtained using the plot of echo amplitude versus the repetition time. The spin-spin relaxation time is obtained using the plot of echo amplitude versus the separation between the 90 0 C - 180 0 C pulses. The theory developed by Bayer is used to explain the spin-lattice relaxation time and the frequency temperature dependence. The spin-spin relaxation time is discussed using the Bloch equations. (author)

  9. Narrow nuclear resonance profiling of Al with subnanometric depth resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, E.B.O. da; Krug, C.; Stedile, F.C.; Morais, J.; Baumvol, I.J.R.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the use of the narrow and isolated resonance at 404.9 keV in the cross-section curve of the 27 Al(p,γ) 28 Si nuclear reaction for profiling Al in ultrathin aluminum oxide films on Si. The samples were characterized as-deposited and after thermal annealing, so that Al transport could be studied. An estimated depth resolution of approximately 0.4 nm near the surface of the films could be obtained owing to: (i) the very small resonance width; (ii) the high stopping power of Al 2 O 3 for 404.9 keV protons; (iii) the high energy stability of the proton beam provided by the 500 kV HVEE ion implanter at Porto Alegre; and (iv) an apparent thickness magnification by a factor between 2.0 and 2.4 with the use of glancing incidence. This technique is compared to other methods for Al profiling like medium energy ion scattering and some sputtering-based techniques

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Present results and its application to renal pathology. Experimental study of hydronephrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, P.

    1987-01-01

    Results of proton nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and relaxation time measurement of experimental hydronephrosis in mice are presented. The study is preceded by a description of the physical principles underlying the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and of its biomedical applications and with a review of the clinical use of NMR imaging in renal pathology [fr

  11. Double beta decays and related subjects for particle and nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu

    1991-01-01

    Present status and some perspectives in 1990's are briefly given on double beta decays and related subjects. Subjects discussed are as follows I) Double beta decays without neutrinos, which require lepton number non-conservations and finite neutrino mass. II) Double beta decays followed by two neutrinos. III) Double weak processes with strangeness change ΔS = 2, leading to the H particle with 6 quarks of ss uu dd. IV) Charge non-conservation and electron decays. These are very rare nuclear processes studied by Ultra RAre-process NUclear Spectroscopy (URANUS). It is shown that URANUS is an important detector frontier of non-accelerator nuclear physics in 1990's. (orig.)

  12. Use of the image by nuclear magnetic resonance (nucleography) in obstetrical aspects. Part 1. Emprego da imagem por ressonancia magnetica nuclear (nucleografia) em obstetricia. Parte 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacreta, O [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    1987-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (nucleography) is a new method to study human body. In this paper the physical principles on nuclear magnetic resonance and its applications to the pregnant women are presented. (author).

  13. Pygmy quadrupole resonance as a manifestation of the nuclear skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoneva, Nadia [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Lenske, Horst [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Recently, a new mode of nuclear excitation called pygmy quadrupole resonance (PQR) was theoretically predicted in the framework of energy-density functional (EDF) theory plus three-phonon quasiparticle-phonon model (QPM) in Sn isotopic chain. It is closely connected with higher order multipole vibrations of nuclear skin induced by the action of the electromagnetic and hadronic external fields. The predictions initiated new experiments using ({sup 17}O,{sup 17}O{sup '}γ), (α,α{sup '}γ) and (γ,γ{sup '}) reactions which were carried out in {sup 124}Sn nucleus. The aim was to probe for the first time experimentally, the possibility of existence of PQR. The detailed analysis of the obtained experimental results in comparison with the EDF+QPM theory indicates clearly the presence of a multitude of discrete low-energy 2{sup +} excitations of neutron type which can be addressed to PQR mode. The independent measurements of B(E2) values with different probes and the theory allow to identify the dominant isoscalar character of these states. Furthermore, newly determined γ-decay branching ratios exclude a statistical origin of the PQR strength. The latter are important to discriminate between PQR and multiphonon excitations.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance method and apparatus for reducing motion artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailes, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus for imaging a region of a body in which part of the region is moving with a motion such that its displacement with respect to time is a nonmonotonic function during a time period over which a plurality of NMR data signals, which together define an image, are collected. The apparatus is described comprising: excitation means arranged to excite nuclear magnetic spins preferentially in the region; encoding means arranged to encode the magnetic spins; data collection means arranged to collect data signals representative of encoded magnetic spins; display means responsive to collected data signals to display an image of the region; measuring means arranged to produce an output indicative of the displacement of the moving part of the region; and control means for controlling the encoding means during the time period in dependence on the output of the measuring means so that data signals collected during the time period are collected in an order dependent on the motion such that motion artifacts are reduced

  15. Double plasma resonance instability as a source of solar zebra emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benáček, J.; Karlický, M.

    2018-03-01

    Context. The double plasma resonance (DPR) instability plays a basic role in the generation of solar radio zebras. In the plasma, consisting of the loss-cone type distribution of hot electrons and much denser and colder background plasma, this instability generates the upper-hybrid waves, which are then transformed into the electromagnetic waves and observed as radio zebras. Aims: In the present paper we numerically study the double plasma resonance instability from the point of view of the zebra interpretation. Methods: We use a 3-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell (3D PIC) relativistic model. We use this model in two versions: (a) a spatially extended "multi-mode" model and (b) a spatially limited "specific-mode" model. While the multi-mode model is used for detailed computations and verifications of the results obtained by the "specific-mode" model, the specific-mode model is used for computations in a broad range of model parameters, which considerably save computational time. For an analysis of the computational results, we developed software tools in Python. Results: First using the multi-mode model, we study details of the double plasma resonance instability. We show how the distribution function of hot electrons changes during this instability. Then we show that there is a very good agreement between results obtained by the multi-mode and specific-mode models, which is caused by a dominance of the wave with the maximal growth rate. Therefore, for computations in a broad range of model parameters, we use the specific-mode model. We compute the maximal growth rates of the double plasma resonance instability with a dependence on the ratio between the upper-hybrid ωUH and electron-cyclotron ωce frequency. We vary temperatures of both the hot and background plasma components and study their effects on the resulting growth rates. The results are compared with the analytical ones. We find a very good agreement between numerical and analytical growth

  16. Electron spin resonance and spin-valley physics in a silicon double quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiaojie; Ruskov, Rusko; Xiao, Ming; Tahan, Charles; Jiang, HongWen

    2014-05-14

    Silicon quantum dots are a leading approach for solid-state quantum bits. However, developing this technology is complicated by the multi-valley nature of silicon. Here we observe transport of individual electrons in a silicon CMOS-based double quantum dot under electron spin resonance. An anticrossing of the driven dot energy levels is observed when the Zeeman and valley splittings coincide. A detected anticrossing splitting of 60 MHz is interpreted as a direct measure of spin and valley mixing, facilitated by spin-orbit interaction in the presence of non-ideal interfaces. A lower bound of spin dephasing time of 63 ns is extracted. We also describe a possible experimental evidence of an unconventional spin-valley blockade, despite the assumption of non-ideal interfaces. This understanding of silicon spin-valley physics should enable better control and read-out techniques for the spin qubits in an all CMOS silicon approach.

  17. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in double-barrier planar magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, A. N.

    2011-08-24

    We present a theoretical approach to calculate the spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in a double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction (DMTJ), in which the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer can be aligned parallel or antiparallel in relation to the fixed magnetizations of the left and right ferromagnetic electrodes. The electron transport through the DMTJ is considered as a three-dimensional problem, taking into account all transmitting electron trajectories as well as the spin-dependent momentum conservation law. The dependence of the transmission coefficient and spin-polarized currents on the applied voltage is derived as an exact solution to the quantum-mechanical problem for the spin-polarized transport. In the range of the developed physical model, the resonant tunneling, nonresonant tunneling, and enhanced spin filtering can be explained; the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  18. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in double-barrier planar magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, A. N.; Kosel, Jü rgen; Useinov, N. Kh.; Tagirov, L. R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical approach to calculate the spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in a double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction (DMTJ), in which the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer can be aligned parallel or antiparallel in relation to the fixed magnetizations of the left and right ferromagnetic electrodes. The electron transport through the DMTJ is considered as a three-dimensional problem, taking into account all transmitting electron trajectories as well as the spin-dependent momentum conservation law. The dependence of the transmission coefficient and spin-polarized currents on the applied voltage is derived as an exact solution to the quantum-mechanical problem for the spin-polarized transport. In the range of the developed physical model, the resonant tunneling, nonresonant tunneling, and enhanced spin filtering can be explained; the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  19. THz/Infrared Double Resonance Two-Photon Spectroscopy of HD+ for Determination of Fundamental Constants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Lucian Constantin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A double resonance two-photon spectroscopy scheme is discussed to probe jointly rotational and rovibrational transitions of ensembles of trapped HD+ ions. The two-photon transition rates and lightshifts are calculated with the two-photon tensor operator formalism. The rotational lines may be observed with sub-Doppler linewidth at the hertz level and good signal-to-noise ratio, improving the resolution in HD+ spectroscopy beyond the 10−12 level. The experimental accuracy, estimated at the 10−12 level, is comparable with the accuracy of theoretical calculations of HD+ energy levels. An adjustment of selected rotational and rovibrational HD+ lines may add clues to the proton radius puzzle, may provide an independent determination of the Rydberg constant, and may improve the values of proton-to-electron and deuteron-to-proton mass ratios beyond the 10−11 level.

  20. Conformational Structure of Tyrosine, Tyrosyl-Glycine, and Tyrosyl-Glycyl-Glycine by Double Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Riziq, Ali; Grace, Louis; Crews, Bridgit; Callahan, Michael P,; van Mourik, Tanja; de Vries, Mattanjah S,

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the variation in conformation for the amino acid tyrosine (Y), alone and in the small peptides tyrosine-glycine (YC) and tyrosine-glycine-glycine (YGG), in the gas phase by using UV-UV and IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. For tyrosine we found seven different conformations, for YG we found four different conformations, and for YGG we found three different conformations. As the peptides get larger, we observe fewer stable conformers, despite the increasing complexity and number of degrees of freedom. We find structural trends similar to those in phenylalanine-glycine glycine (FGG) and tryptophan-glycine-glycine (WGG)j however) the effect of dispersive forces in FGG for stabilizing a folded structure is replaced by that of hydrogen bonding in YGG.

  1. A metamaterial terahertz modulator based on complementary planar double-split-ring resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chang-hui; Kuang, Deng-feng; Chang, Sheng-jiang; Lin, Lie

    2013-07-01

    A metamaterial based on complementary planar double-split-ring resonator (DSRR) structure is presented and demonstrated, which can optically tune the transmission of the terahertz (THz) wave. Unlike the traditional DSRR metamaterials, the DSRR discussed in this paper consists of two split rings connected by two bridges. Numerical simulations with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method reveal that the transmission spectra of the original and the complementary metamaterials are both in good agreement with Babinet's principle. Then by increasing the carrier density of the intrinsic GaAs substrate, the magnetic response of the complementary special DSRR metamaterial can be weakened or even turned off. This metamaterial structure is promised to be a narrow-band THz modulator with response time of several nanoseconds.

  2. Resonance spiking by periodic loss in the double-sided liquid cooling disk oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Rongzhi; She, Jiangbo; Li, Dongdong; Li, Fuli; Peng, Bo

    2017-03-01

    A double-sided liquid cooling Nd:YAG disk oscillator working at a pump repetition rate of 20 Hz is demonstrated. The output energy of 376 mJ is realized, corresponding to the optical-optical efficiency of 12.8% and the slope efficiency of 14%. The pump pulse width is 300 µs and the laser pulse width is 260 µs. Instead of being a damped signal, the output of laser comprises undamped spikes. A periodic intra-cavity loss was found by numerical analysis, which has a frequency component near the eigen frequency of the relaxation oscillation. Resonance effect will induce amplified spikes even though the loss fluctuates in a small range. The Shark-Hartmann sensor was used to investigate the wavefront aberration induced by turbulent flow and temperature gradient. According to the wavefront and fluid mechanics analysis, it is considered that the periodic intra-cavity loss can be attributed to turbulent flow and temperature gradient.

  3. Spin-orbit coupling and electric-dipole spin resonance in a nanowire double quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Hai; Li, Rui; Hu, Xuedong; You, J Q

    2018-02-02

    We study the electric-dipole transitions for a single electron in a double quantum dot located in a semiconductor nanowire. Enabled by spin-orbit coupling (SOC), electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR) for such an electron can be generated via two mechanisms: the SOC-induced intradot pseudospin states mixing and the interdot spin-flipped tunneling. The EDSR frequency and strength are determined by these mechanisms together. For both mechanisms the electric-dipole transition rates are strongly dependent on the external magnetic field. Their competition can be revealed by increasing the magnetic field and/or the interdot distance for the double dot. To clarify whether the strong SOC significantly impact the electron state coherence, we also calculate relaxations from excited levels via phonon emission. We show that spin-flip relaxations can be effectively suppressed by the phonon bottleneck effect even at relatively low magnetic fields because of the very large g-factor of strong SOC materials such as InSb.

  4. Probing nuclear correlations with pion-nucleus double charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginocchio, J.N.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper we have calculated the lowest order pion double charge reaction mechanism using shell model wavefunctions of medium weight nuclei. We have the sequential reaction mechanism in which the pion undergoes two single-charge exchange scatterings on the valence neutrons. The distortion of the incoming, intermediate, and outgoing pion are included. The closure approximation is made for the intermediate states with an average excitation energy used in the pion propagator. The double-charge exchange is assumed to take place on the valence nucleons which are assumed to be in one spherical shell model orbital. 34 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Proceedings of the nuclear magnetic resonance user meeting. Anais do Encontro de Usuarios de Ressonancia Magnetica Nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    Studies on utilization of nuclear magnetic resonance, such as: chemical analysis in complexes and organic compounds; structures and magnetic properties of solids; construction of images and; spectrometer designs, are presented. (M.C.K.).

  6. Pulse Double-Resonance EPR Techniques for the Study of Metallobiomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Nicholas; Nalepa, Anna; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Savitsky, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy exploits an intrinsic property of matter, namely the electron spin and its related magnetic moment. This can be oriented in a magnetic field and thus, in the classical limit, acts like a little bar magnet. Its moment will align either parallel or antiparallel to the field, giving rise to different energies (termed Zeeman splitting). Transitions between these two quantized states can be driven by incident microwave frequency radiation, analogous to NMR experiments, where radiofrequency radiation is used. However, the electron Zeeman interaction alone provides only limited information. Instead, much of the usefulness of EPR is derived from the fact that the electron spin also interacts with its local magnetic environment and thus can be used to probe structure via detection of nearby spins, e.g., NMR-active magnetic nuclei and/or other electron spin(s). The latter is exploited in spin labeling techniques, an exciting new area in the development of noncrystallographic protein structure determination. Although these interactions are often smaller than the linewidth of the EPR experiment, sophisticated pulse EPR methods allow their detection. A number of such techniques are well established today and can be broadly described as double-resonance methods, in which the electron spin is used as a reporter. Below we give a brief description of pulse EPR methods, particularly their implementation at higher magnetic fields, and how to best exploit them for studying metallobiomolecules. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Double-Slot Hybrid Plasmonic Ring Resonator Used for Optical Sensors and Modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Sun

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An ultra-high sensitivity double-slot hybrid plasmonic (DSHP ring resonator, used for optical sensors and modulators, is developed. Due to high index contrast, as well as plasmonic enhancement, a considerable part of the optical energy is concentrated in the narrow slots between Si and plasmonic materials (silver is used in this paper, which leads to high sensitivity to the infiltrating materials. By partial opening of the outer plasmonic circular sheet of the DSHP ring, a conventional side-coupled silicon on insulator (SOI bus waveguide can be used. Experimental results demonstrate ultra-high sensitivity (687.5 nm/RIU of the developed DSHP ring resonator, which is about five-times higher than for the conventional Si ring with the same geometry. Further discussions show that a very low detection limit (5.37 × 10−6 RIU can be achieved after loaded Q factor modifications. In addition, the plasmonic metal structures offer also the way to process optical and electronic signals along the same hybrid plasmonic circuits with small capacitance (~0.275 fF and large electric field, which leads to possible applications in compact high-efficiency electro-optic modulators, where no extra electrodes for electronic signals are required.

  8. New Approaches to Quantum Computing using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colvin, M; Krishnan, V V

    2003-01-01

    The power of a quantum computer (QC) relies on the fundamental concept of the superposition in quantum mechanics and thus allowing an inherent large-scale parallelization of computation. In a QC, binary information embodied in a quantum system, such as spin degrees of freedom of a spin-1/2 particle forms the qubits (quantum mechanical bits), over which appropriate logical gates perform the computation. In classical computers, the basic unit of information is the bit, which can take a value of either 0 or 1. Bits are connected together by logic gates to form logic circuits to implement complex logical operations. The expansion of modern computers has been driven by the developments of faster, smaller and cheaper logic gates. As the size of the logic gates become smaller toward the level of atomic dimensions, the performance of such a system is no longer considered classical but is rather governed by quantum mechanics. Quantum computers offer the potentially superior prospect of solving computational problems that are intractable to classical computers such as efficient database searches and cryptography. A variety of algorithms have been developed recently, most notably Shor's algorithm for factorizing long numbers into prime factors in polynomial time and Grover's quantum search algorithm. The algorithms that were of only theoretical interest as recently, until several methods were proposed to build an experimental QC. These methods include, trapped ions, cavity-QED, coupled quantum dots, Josephson junctions, spin resonance transistors, linear optics and nuclear magnetic resonance. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely capable of constructing small QCs and several algorithms have been implemented successfully. NMR-QC differs from other implementations in one important way that it is not a single QC, but a statistical ensemble of them. Thus, quantum computing based on NMR is considered as ensemble quantum computing. In NMR quantum computing, the spins with

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of macroscopic morphology and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrall, G.A.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1995-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are traditionally used to study molecular level structure and dynamics with a noted exception in medically applied NMR imaging (MRI). In this work, new experimental methods and theory are presented relevant to the study of macroscopic morphology and dynamics using NMR field gradient techniques and solid state two-dimensional exchange NMR. The goal in this work is not to take some particular system and study it in great detail, rather it is to show the utility of a number of new and novel techniques using ideal systems primarily as a proof of principle. By taking advantage of the analogy between NMR imaging and diffraction, one may simplify the experiments necessary for characterizing the statistical properties of the sample morphology. For a sample composed of many small features, e.g. a porous medium, the NMR diffraction techniques take advantage of both the narrow spatial range and spatial isotropy of the sample's density autocorrelation function to obtain high resolution structural information in considerably less time than that required by conventional NMR imaging approaches. The time savings of the technique indicates that NMR diffraction is capable of finer spatial resolution than conventional NMR imaging techniques. Radio frequency NMR imaging with a coaxial resonator represents the first use of cylindrically symmetric field gradients in imaging. The apparatus as built has achieved resolution at the micron level for water samples, and has the potential to be very useful in the imaging of circularly symmetric systems. The study of displacement probability densities in flow through a random porous medium has revealed the presence of features related to the interconnectedness of the void volumes. The pulsed gradient techniques used have proven successful at measuring flow properties for time and length scales considerably shorter than those studied by more conventional techniques

  10. Development of CdTe/Cd1-xMgxTe double barrier, single quantum well heterostructure for resonant tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuscher, G.; Keim, M.; Fischer, F.; Waag, A.; Landwehr, G.

    1995-01-01

    We report the first observation of resonant tunneling through a CdTe/Cd 1-x Mg x Te double barrier, single quantum well heterostructure. Negative differential resistance is observable at temperatures below 230 K, exhibiting a peak to valley ratio of 3:1 at 4.2 K. (author)

  11. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laws, David D.

    2000-01-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone (φ/ψ) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined 13 C a , chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of α-helical and β-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly β-sheet.

  12. Correlations, nuclear structure, and DCX [double charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, W.B.; Gibbs, W.R.; Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ

    1989-01-01

    To what extent can we understand current low-energy DCX cross sections to the DIAS in terms of the sequential mechanism? What do the results have to say about the nuclear wave functions? 20 refs., 20 figs

  13. Anatomy of double beta decay nuclear matrix elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Petr, E-mail: pxv@caltech.ed [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory 106-38 Caltech. Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2009-06-01

    The necessary ingredients for a realistic evaluation of the 0vbetabeta nuclear matrix elements are reviewed. It is argued that the short range nucleon correlations, nucleon finite size, and higher order nuclear currents need to be included in the calculation, even though a consensus on the best way to treat all of these effects has not been reached. Another positive development is the realization that the two alternative and complementary methods, the Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation and the Nuclear Shell Model, agree on many aspects of the calculation, in particular on the competition, or cancelation, between the contribution of nuclear pairing on one hand, and the other pieces of interaction that result in admixtures of broken pairs or higher seniority states on the other hand. The relatively short range (r <= 2-3 fm) of the effective 0vbetabeta operator found in both methods is a consequence of that competition.

  14. Low-energy nuclear reactions with double-solenoid- based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    solenoids to produce low-energy radioactive nuclear beams. In these systems the ... For many years, the disadvantage in these investigations ... fusion or breakup reaction, preferred with large forward-peaked cross-sections. To transfer the ...

  15. Bipolar programmable current supply for superconducting nuclear magnetic resonance magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivuniemi, Jaakko; Luusalo, Reeta; Hakonen, Pertti

    1998-09-01

    In high resolution continuous-wave nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) work well-reproducible, linear sweeps of current are needed. We have developed a microcontroller based programmable current supply, tested with superconducting magnets with inductance of 10 mH and 10 H. We achieved a resolution and noise of 4 ppm. The supply has an internal sweep with programmable ramping rate and a possibility for remote operation from a computer with either GPIB or RS232 interface. It is based on an 18-bit D/A converter. The maximum output current is ±10 A, the sweep rate can be set between 1 μA/s-140 mA/s, and the maximum output voltage is ±2.5 V. In work at ultralow temperatures, especially in superconducting quantum interference device NMR, all rf interference to the experiment should be avoided. One of the sources of this kind of unwanted input is the digital switching noise of fast logic devices. We discuss this problem in the context of our design.

  16. Discrete decoding based ultrafast multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Liangjie; Ye, Qimiao; Li, Jing; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy constitutes an important and powerful tool in analyzing chemical and biological systems. However, the abundant 3D information arrives at the expense of long acquisition times lasting hours or even days. Therefore, there has been a continuous interest in developing techniques to accelerate recordings of 3D NMR spectra, among which the ultrafast spatiotemporal encoding technique supplies impressive acquisition speed by compressing a multidimensional spectrum in a single scan. However, it tends to suffer from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions, which deteriorates in cases of NMR spectroscopy with more dimensions. In this study, the discrete decoding is proposed to liberate the ultrafast technique from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions by focusing decoding on signal-bearing sites. For verifying its feasibility and effectiveness, we utilized the method to generate two different types of 3D spectra. The proposed method is also applicable to cases with more than three dimensions, which, based on the experimental results, may widen applications of the ultrafast technique

  17. Discrete decoding based ultrafast multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Liangjie; Ye, Qimiao; Li, Jing; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy constitutes an important and powerful tool in analyzing chemical and biological systems. However, the abundant 3D information arrives at the expense of long acquisition times lasting hours or even days. Therefore, there has been a continuous interest in developing techniques to accelerate recordings of 3D NMR spectra, among which the ultrafast spatiotemporal encoding technique supplies impressive acquisition speed by compressing a multidimensional spectrum in a single scan. However, it tends to suffer from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions, which deteriorates in cases of NMR spectroscopy with more dimensions. In this study, the discrete decoding is proposed to liberate the ultrafast technique from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions by focusing decoding on signal-bearing sites. For verifying its feasibility and effectiveness, we utilized the method to generate two different types of 3D spectra. The proposed method is also applicable to cases with more than three dimensions, which, based on the experimental results, may widen applications of the ultrafast technique.

  18. Characterization of Canadian coals by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.; Ripmeester, J.

    1983-06-01

    Apparent aromaticities of a series of Canadian coals of different rank were estimated by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The aromaticities varied from 0.57 for a lignite up to 0.86 for a semi-anthracite coal. The aromaticities correlated well with fixed carbon and oxygen content of the coals as well as with the mean reflectance of the coals. Correlations were also established between aromaticities and the H/C and H/SUB/a/SUB/r/SUB/u/C/SUB/a/SUB/r ratios of the coals. Uncertainties in calculation of the hypothetical H/SUB/a/SUB/r/SUB/u/C/SUB/a/SUB/r ratios, from experimental data were pointed out. Structural parameters of the chars derived from the coals by pyrolysis at 535 C were, also, estimated. The H/C and H/SUB/a/SUB/r/SUB/u/C/SUB/a/SUB/r ratios of the chars were markedly lower than those of coals. This was complemented by higher apparent aromaticities of the chars compared with the coals. (21 refs.)

  19. Updated methodology for nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.

    2013-08-01

    Unconventional petroleum resources, particularly in shales, are expected to play an increasingly important role in the world's energy portfolio in the coming years. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), particularly at low-field, provides important information in the evaluation of shale resources. Most of the low-field NMR analyses performed on shale samples rely heavily on standard T1 and T2 measurements. We present a new approach using solid echoes in the measurement of T1 and T1-T2 correlations that addresses some of the challenges encountered when making NMR measurements on shale samples compared to conventional reservoir rocks. Combining these techniques with standard T1 and T2 measurements provides a more complete assessment of the hydrogen-bearing constituents (e.g., bitumen, kerogen, clay-bound water) in shale samples. These methods are applied to immature and pyrolyzed oil shale samples to examine the solid and highly viscous organic phases present during the petroleum generation process. The solid echo measurements produce additional signal in the oil shale samples compared to the standard methodologies, indicating the presence of components undergoing homonuclear dipolar coupling. The results presented here include the first low-field NMR measurements performed on kerogen as well as detailed NMR analysis of highly viscous thermally generated bitumen present in pyrolyzed oil shale.

  20. Visualization of cerebellopontine angle lesions by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Chikayuki; Takakura, Kintomo; Machida, Tohru; Araki, Tsutomu; Iio, Masahiro; Basugi, Norihiko.

    1983-01-01

    The preliminary results from the clinical use a prototype whole body nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) machine constructed by Toshiba Inc. are presented. Cranial NMR scans were performed on more than 30 cases with broad spectrum of neurologic diseases using saturation-recovery and inversion-recovery sequences with a field strength of 1500 Gauss. Selective excitation sequence was used for the slice selection and filtered backprojection was used to reconstruct the images. They were displayed on a 256 x 256 matrix as 12 mm thick sections. Data aquisition time varied between 3 and 12 minutes. Our initial experiences with six cases harboring cerebellopontine angle lesions discolsed advantages and disadvantages of NMR imaging in comparison with X-ray CT. The advantages were the absence of linear artifacts from the surrounding bone, the marked gray-white matter differentiation, and the variety of tomographic planes available. The disadvantages included the lack of bone detail, the lack of visualization of the major intracranial vessels, and the long time required for scanning (several minutes per slice). Although much continued evaluation is necessary, NMR seems to have vast potential as a diagnostic tool. (author)

  1. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on brain edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tanaka, C.; Hirakawa, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Yoshizaki, K.

    1982-01-01

    The water in normal and edematous brain tissues of rats was studied by the pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, measuring the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and the transverse relaxation time (T2). In the normal brain, T1 and T2 were single components, both shorter than in pure water. Prolongation and separation of T2 into two components, one fast and one slow, were the characteristic findings in brain edema induced by both cold injury and triethyl tin (TET), although some differences between the two types of edema existed in the content of the lesion and in the degree of changes in T1 and T2 values. Quantitative analysis of T1 and T2 values in their time course relating to water content demonstrated that prolongation of T1 referred to the volume of increased water in tissues examined, and that two phases of T2 reflected the distribution and the content of the edema fluid. From the analysis of the slow component of T2 versus water content during edema formation, it was demonstrated that the increase in edema fluid was steady, and its content was constant during formation of TET-induced edema. On the contrary, during the formation of cold-injury edema, water-rich edema fluid increased during the initial few hours, and protein-rich edema fluid increased thereafter. It was concluded that proton NMR relaxation time measurements may provide new understanding in the field of brain edema research

  2. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of quadrupolar systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuanhu [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-09-01

    This dissertation describes two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance theory and experiments which have been developed to study quadruples in the solid state. The technique of multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, MQMAS is first compared with another technique, dynamic-angle spinning (DAS). The similarity between the two techniques allows us to extend much of the DAS work to the MQMAS case. Application of MQMAS to a series of aluminum containing materials is then presented. The superior resolution enhancement through MQMAS is exploited to detect the five- and six-coordinated aluminum in many aluminosilicate glasses. Combining the MQMAS method with other experiments, such as HETCOR, greatly expands the possibility of the use of MQMAS to study a large range of problems and is demonstrated in Chapter 5. Finally, the technique switching-angle spinning (SAS) is applied to quadrupolar nuclei to fully characterize a quadrupolar spin system in which all of the 8 NMR parameters are accurately determined. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate that with the combination of two-dimensional NMR concepts and new advanced spinning technologies, a series of multiple-dimensional NMR techniques can be designed to allow a detailed study of quadrupolar nuclei in the solid state.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance of randomly diluted magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magon, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the nuclear relaxation rates and line shapes of the F O resonance in the diluted antiferromagnet Fe x Zn 1-x F 2 and Mn x Zn 1-x F 2 are studied over a large temperature range T N 1 ) of the F O nuclei, which are not transfer hyperfine coupled to the Fe (or Mn) spins, have been measured and calculated as a function of the concentration x. Good agreement with experiment is found for the theoretical results, which have been obtained in the range 0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.8. The temperature dependence of 1/T 1 for T N 1 data near T N was used to study Random Field Effects on the critical behavior of Mn .65 Zn . 3 5 F 2 , for fields applied parallel and perpendicular to the easy (C) axis. It was found that the transition temperature T N depressed substantially with field only for H o || C. The experimental results are in general accord with the theory for Random Field Effects in disordered, anisotropic antiferromagnets. The critical divergence of the inhomogeneously broadened F O NMR was studied in Fe .6 Zn .4 F 2 above T N . The experimental results agree with Heller's calculation of the NMR line broadening by Random Field Effects. With H o || C the line shape changes from Gaussian towards Lozentzian for t -2 and below T N its line width increase qualitatively following the increase in the sublattice magnetization. (author)

  4. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy-Based Identification of Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelreich, Uwe; Sorrell, Tania C; Daniel, Heide-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Rapid and robust high-throughput identification of environmental, industrial, or clinical yeast isolates is important whenever relatively large numbers of samples need to be processed in a cost-efficient way. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy generates complex data based on metabolite profiles, chemical composition and possibly on medium consumption, which can not only be used for the assessment of metabolic pathways but also for accurate identification of yeast down to the subspecies level. Initial results on NMR based yeast identification where comparable with conventional and DNA-based identification. Potential advantages of NMR spectroscopy in mycological laboratories include not only accurate identification but also the potential of automated sample delivery, automated analysis using computer-based methods, rapid turnaround time, high throughput, and low running costs.We describe here the sample preparation, data acquisition and analysis for NMR-based yeast identification. In addition, a roadmap for the development of classification strategies is given that will result in the acquisition of a database and analysis algorithms for yeast identification in different environments.

  5. Work in progress: nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the gallbladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hricak, H.; Filly, R.A.; Margulis, A.R.; Moon, K.L.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-01-01

    A preliminary study of the relation between food intake and intensity of gallbladder bile on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images was made. Twelve subjects (seven volunteers, five patients) were imaged following a minimum of 14 hours of fasting. Six of seven volunteers were reimaged one hour after stimulation by either a fatty meal or an alcoholic beverage. An additional seven patients were imaged two hours after a hospital breakfast. It was found that concentrated bile emits a high-intensity spin echo signal (SE), while hepatic bile in the gallbladder produces a low-intensity SE signal. Following ingestion of cholecystogogue, dilute hepatic bile settles on top of the concentrated bile, each emitting SE signals of different intensity. The average T1 value of concentrated bile was 594 msec, while the T1 vaue of dilute hepatic bile was 2,646 msec. The average T2 values were 104 msec for concentrated bile and 126 msec for dilute bile. The most likely cause for the different SE intensities of bile is the higher water content, and therefore longer T1 or T2 relaxation times, of hepatic bile. It is suggested that NMR imaging has the ability to provide physiological information about the gallbladder and that it may prove to be a simple and safe clinical test of gallbladder function

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Li-ion Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ohno

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR imaging has high sensitivity to proton (1H and lithium (7Li. It is a useful measurement for electrolyte in Li-ion battery. 1H NMR images of lithium ion battery which is composed of LiMn2O4 / LiClO4 + propylene carbonate (PC / Li-metal have been studied. 1H NMR images of electrolyte near cathode material (LiMn2O4 showed anomalous intensity distribution, which was quite inhomogeneous. From NMR images as a function of repetition time (TR, it was concluded that the anomalous intensity distribution was not due to change of relaxation time but an indirect (spatial para-magnetization effect from cathode material. The paramagnetization induced by high magnetic field distorts linearity of magnetic gradient field, leading to apparent intensity variance. This functional image is an easy diagnostic measurement for magnetization of cathode material, which allows the possibility to check uniformity of cathode material and change of magnetization under electrochemical process.

  7. Multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of cartilage proteoglycans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerner, L.

    1985-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage is a composite material whose major function is to withstand compression while retaining flexibility. Its mechanical properties are affected by tissue hydration and ionic composition. Models of the mechanical behavior of cartilage have incorporated certain assumptions about the interactions of the major components of cartilage: collagen, proteoglycans, water, and cations. To determine the validity of these assumption, the authors have used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Two approaches have been used: (a) natural abundance carbon-13 NMR; and (b) NMR of sodium-23, potassium-39, magnesium-25, and calcium-43. Evidence from studies in intact tissues are reinforced by extensive measurements on solutions of proteoglycans and other relevant macromolecules. Based on the measurements of NMR relaxation rates and lineshapes reported here, it is concluded that neither sodium nor potassium interact strongly with bovine nasal proteoglycan aggregates or their substituent glycosaminoglycan chains in solution. Proteoglycans do bind magnesium and calcium. Therefore there is a qualitative difference between monovalent and divalent cations, which is not taken into account by polyelectrolyte models or models for the ionic dependence of mechanical properties. Cation binding to heparin, which has a higher charge density than cartilage proteoglycans, was also studied. The results presented here establish that heparin binds sodium, magnesium, and calcium.

  8. Nuclear resonance fluorescence of {sup 203,205}Tl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Fabian; Fritzsche, Matthias; Pietralla, Norbert; Savran, Deniz; Weller, Henry; Zweidinger, Markus [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet, Darmstadt (Germany); Rusev, Gencho; Tonchev, Anton P.; Tornow, Werner [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Duke University, Durham (United States); Zilges, Andreas [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Koeln (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    In order to investigate the dipole strength distribution in Thalium isotopes we have studied Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence of a sample composed of natural Thallium (consisting of 30% {sup 203}Tl and 70% {sup 205}Tl). Unpolarized bremsstrahlung with photo energies up to 7.5 MeV was used at the High Intensity Photon Setup (HIPS) at S-DALINAC at the IKP Darmstadt. 24 fluorescent {gamma}-ray transitions were observed, 19 of them for the first time. For the assignment of the polarity of two prominent {gamma}-ray transitions, one at 4.7 MeV and one at 4.9 MeV, the polarized photon beam of the High Intensity {gamma}-ray Source (HI{gamma}S) at Duke University was used. The experiment at HI{gamma}S revealed the existence of a photo-excited state of {sup 205}Tl at an excitation energy of 4.971 MeV that exhibits a transition to the first excited state at 203 keV.

  9. Gradient coil system for nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frese, G.; Siebold, H.

    1984-01-01

    A gradient coil system for an image-generating, nuclear magnetic resonance tomographic apparatus, particularly a zeugmatographic apparatus. The gradient coil system is arranged on a support body of rotational symmetry, illustratively a hollow cylindrical support body, having an axis which extends along the z-direction of an x, y, z coordinate system which has an origin in the center of imaging region. The gradient coil system contains two pairs of toroidal individual coils which are arranged symmetrically with respect to an x-y plane which extends through the center of the imaging region and which are arranged perpendicular to the z-axis. The direction of current flow in the individual coils of a coil pair is opposite to the direction of flow in the individual coils of the other coil pair. Moreover, further sets of coils are provided for generating field gradient Gx in the x-direction, and Gy in the y-direction. The hollow cylindrical shape of the support body on which the individual coils are arranged permit an imaging region having a substantially spherical volume with a substantially constant field gradient Gz to be achieved. Each of the coils has a predetermined linkage factor which corresponds to the product of the current flowing through the number of coil turns of the coil. Those coils which are arranged further from the plane of symmetry have a substantially larger linkage factor than the coils which are nearer to the plane of symmetry

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: new applications in the quantification and assessment of polysaccharide-based vaccine intermediates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido, Raine; Velez, Herman; Verez, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance has become the choice for structural studies, identity assays and simultaneous quantification of active pharmaceutical ingredient of different polysaccharide-based vaccine. In the last two decades, the application of quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance had an increasing impact to support several quantification necessities. The technique involves experiments with several modified parameters in order to obtain spectra with quantifiable signals. The present review is supported by some recent relevant reports and it discusses several applications of NMR in carbohydrate-based vaccines. Moreover, it emphasizes and describes several parameters and applications of quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of bentonite systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Furo, Istvan (Industrial NMR Centre and Div. of Physical Chemistry, Dept. of Chemistry, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-09-15

    This report summarizes results from a set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments performed on Ca and Na montmorillonite samples interacting with water. The primary goal with these studies was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during and after different physical processes such as swelling and sedimentation and on the time scale from minutes to years. Additionally, we also studied the distribution of foreign particles (such as native minerals as well as magnetic model particles) within bentonite systems and performed some diffusion NMR experiments with the aim of characterizing the state of colloids that form after clay dissolution. Both natural montmorillonites and purified and ion-exchanged montmorillonite clays were investigated. The primary variables were clay composition and water ionic strength. Bulk samples confined in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated. A critical issue for the stability of clay buffer layer in deep underground repository is to prevent or minimize the release of clay particles into the water phase. In our experiments, the most significant particle losses were found for Na-MX80 clay exposed to water with low ionic strength. With increasing the concentration of CaCl{sub 2} in the water phase both swelling and particle release are slowed down but not completely eliminated due probably to gradual change of water ion content via ion exchange with the clay itself. For natural MX80 samples, in spite of significant swelling expansion, no clay particle release above the sensitivity limit of 0.001 volume% was observed. Ca-MX80 exhibited the smallest expansion and no trace of clay particle released into the aqueous phase

  12. Methodology for nuclear magnetic resonance and ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, Akansha

    2014-01-01

    This thesis encompasses methodological developments in both nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The NMR section explores the effects of scalar relaxation on a coupled nucleus to measure fast exchange rates. In order to quantify these rates accurately, a precise knowledge of the chemical shifts of the labile protons and of the scalar couplings is normally required. We applied the method to histidine where no such information was available a priori, neither about the proton chemical shifts nor about the one-bond scalar coupling constants J( 1 H 15 N), since the protons were invisible due to fast exchange. We have measured the exchange rates of the protons of the imidazole ring and of amino protons in histidine by indirect detection via 15 N. Not only the exchange rate constants, but also the elusive chemical shifts of the protons and the coupling constants could be determined. For the mass spectrometry section, the ion isolation project was initiated to study the effect of phase change of radiofrequency pulses. Excitation of ions in the ICR cell is a linear process, so that the pulse voltage required for ejecting ions must be inversely proportional to the pulse duration. A continuous sweep pulse propels the ion to a higher radius, whereas a phase reversal causes the ion to come to the centre. This represents the principle of 'notch ejection', wherein the ion for which the phase is reversed is retained in the ICR cell, while the remaining ions are ejected. The manuscript also contains a theoretical chapter, wherein the ion trajectories are plotted by solving the Lorentzian equation for the three-pulse scheme used for two-dimensional ICR. Through our simulations we mapped the ion trajectories for different pulse durations and for different phase relations. (author)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of bentonite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Furo, Istvan

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes results from a set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments performed on Ca and Na montmorillonite samples interacting with water. The primary goal with these studies was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during and after different physical processes such as swelling and sedimentation and on the time scale from minutes to years. Additionally, we also studied the distribution of foreign particles (such as native minerals as well as magnetic model particles) within bentonite systems and performed some diffusion NMR experiments with the aim of characterizing the state of colloids that form after clay dissolution. Both natural montmorillonites and purified and ion-exchanged montmorillonite clays were investigated. The primary variables were clay composition and water ionic strength. Bulk samples confined in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated. A critical issue for the stability of clay buffer layer in deep underground repository is to prevent or minimize the release of clay particles into the water phase. In our experiments, the most significant particle losses were found for Na-MX80 clay exposed to water with low ionic strength. With increasing the concentration of CaCl 2 in the water phase both swelling and particle release are slowed down but not completely eliminated due probably to gradual change of water ion content via ion exchange with the clay itself. For natural MX80 samples, in spite of significant swelling expansion, no clay particle release above the sensitivity limit of 0.001 volume% was observed. Ca-MX80 exhibited the smallest expansion and no trace of clay particle released into the aqueous phase

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Advanced concepts and applications to quantum materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohlrautz, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, three separate topics were presented. These include the development of novel experimental NMR methods and data analysis, as well as their application to current topics of condensed matter research. The first part concerns NMR at the highest magnetic fields, i.e., in time-dependent pulsed high-field magnets. After a discussion of consequences for NMR, a method to acquire broad spectra was presented. Here, an intensity-correction for off-resonance effects was applied and the Fourier transform was modified to use time-dependent base functions. Subsequently, the method was tested with a Knight shift measurement of metallic aluminum using a second compound as a shift reference. It could be shown that signal averaging of a weak signal is possible, even across multiple field pulses. Thus, in principle, the signal-to-noise ratio can always be increased at the cost of measurement time, despite the inherently limited reproducibility of subsequent field high-field pulses. In another set of experiments, the feasibility of T 1 measurements was shown. Here, a weak radio frequency field was used to perform an adiabatic inversion of the spin system in the time-dependent field. Ensuing small-angle RF pulses monitored the relaxation process. Using a mathematical model, T 1 was then determined. Finally, this method was applied for the investigation of the spin-dimer antiferromagnet SrCu 2 (BO 3 ) 2 . Evidence for a field-induced change in the ground state of the material was found. This appears to be the first convincing observation of a field-induced phenomenon with pulsed field NMR. It proves that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at the highest fields is able to produce unique insights into quantum materials. The second part of the thesis concerns NMR investigations and analysis of cuprate high-temperature superconductors in conventional static field measurements. Results on HgBa 2 CuO 4+δ for underdoped, optimally doped, and overdoped materials revealed

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Advanced concepts and applications to quantum materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlrautz, Jonas

    2017-05-22

    In this thesis, three separate topics were presented. These include the development of novel experimental NMR methods and data analysis, as well as their application to current topics of condensed matter research. The first part concerns NMR at the highest magnetic fields, i.e., in time-dependent pulsed high-field magnets. After a discussion of consequences for NMR, a method to acquire broad spectra was presented. Here, an intensity-correction for off-resonance effects was applied and the Fourier transform was modified to use time-dependent base functions. Subsequently, the method was tested with a Knight shift measurement of metallic aluminum using a second compound as a shift reference. It could be shown that signal averaging of a weak signal is possible, even across multiple field pulses. Thus, in principle, the signal-to-noise ratio can always be increased at the cost of measurement time, despite the inherently limited reproducibility of subsequent field high-field pulses. In another set of experiments, the feasibility of T{sub 1} measurements was shown. Here, a weak radio frequency field was used to perform an adiabatic inversion of the spin system in the time-dependent field. Ensuing small-angle RF pulses monitored the relaxation process. Using a mathematical model, T{sub 1} was then determined. Finally, this method was applied for the investigation of the spin-dimer antiferromagnet SrCu{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}. Evidence for a field-induced change in the ground state of the material was found. This appears to be the first convincing observation of a field-induced phenomenon with pulsed field NMR. It proves that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at the highest fields is able to produce unique insights into quantum materials. The second part of the thesis concerns NMR investigations and analysis of cuprate high-temperature superconductors in conventional static field measurements. Results on HgBa{sub 2}CuO{sub 4+δ} for underdoped, optimally doped, and

  16. Double or quits?: The global future of civil nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, Peter; Grimston, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    Among the many disputes in the field of energy, in many countries none appear to be as acrimonious as those surrounding nuclear power. Its supporters are confident that nuclear power will have an important long-term future on the global energy scene, while its critics are equally confident that its days are numbered and that it was only developed to provide a political fig-leaf for a nuclear weapons programme. Both sides believe the other to be thoroughly biased or stupid and there is little constructive debate between them. As the disputes rage, especially over such issues as the management of nuclear waste, the economics and safety of nuclear power compared with other sources of electricity, the possible links with nuclear weapons and the attitude of the public towards the industry, decision-making is either paralysed or dominated by those who shout loudest. As a result, governments, industry and the financial sector have in recent years found it increasingly difficult to develop policy in this field. Deciding about future energy developments requires balanced and trustworthy information about issues such as the relative environmental effects of different options, the safety of installations, economics and the availability of resources. This is of particular importance now because world energy use is expected to continue to grow significantly during this century, particularly in less developed countries. In the same period, global emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide, will have to be severely curbed. To meet both these requirements may well involve a step change away from being able to meet growing energy needs by depending on an ever increasing supply of carboniferous fossil fuel. To address this situation, the Royal Institute of International Affairs undertook a two-year research project, aimed at providing information from the standpoint of an organization with no vested interest in either the pro or the anti camp, but close connections to

  17. Nuclear isovector giant resonances excited by pion single charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, B.H.

    1993-07-01

    This thesis is an experimental study of isovector giant resonances in light nuclei excited by pion single charge exchange reactions. Giant dipole resonances in light nuclei are known to be highly structured. For the mass 9 and 13 giant dipole resonances, isospin considerations were found to be very important to understanding this structure. by comparing the excitation functions from cross section measurements of the (π + , π 0 ) and (π, π 0 ) inclusive reactions, the authors determined the dominant isospin structure of the analog IVGR's. The comparison was made after decomposing the cross section into resonant and non-resonant components. This decomposition is made in the framework of strong absorption and quasi-free scattering. Measurements in the region of the isovector giant dipole resonances (IVGDR) were made to cover the inclusive angular distributions out to the second minimum. Study of the giant resonance decay process provides further understanding of the resonances. This study was carried out by observing the (π + , π 0 p) coincident reactions involving the resonances of 9 B and 13 N excited from 9 Be and 13 C nuclei. These measurements determined the spectra of the decay protons. This method also permitted a decomposition of the giant resonances into their isospin components. The multipolarities of the resonances were revealed by the decay proton angular correlations which, for dipoles, are of the form 1 + A 2 P 2 (cos θ)

  18. Significantly improving nuclear resonance fluorescence non-destructive assay by using the integral resonance transmission method and photofission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angell, Christopher T.; Hayakawa, Takehito; Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Hajima, Ryoichi

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive assay (NDA) of 239 Pu in spent nuclear fuel or melted fuel using a γ-ray beam is possible using self absorption and the integral resonance transmission method. The method uses nuclear resonance absorption where resonances in 239 Pu remove photons from the beam, and the selective absorption is detected by measuring the decrease in scattering in a witness target placed in the beam after the fuel, consisting of the isotope of interest, namely 239 Pu. The method is isotope specific, and can use photofission or scattered γ-rays to assay the 239 Pu. It overcomes several problems related to NDA of melted fuel, including the radioactivity of the fuel, and the unknown composition and geometry. This talk will explain the general method, and how photofission can be used to assay specific isotopes, and present example calculations. (author)

  19. Low-energy nuclear reactions with double-solenoid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The University of Notre Dame, USA (Becchetti et al, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Res. A505, 377 (2003)) and later the University of São Paulo, Brazil (Lichtenthaler et al, Eur. Phys. J. A25, S-01, 733 (2005)) adopted a system based on superconducting solenoids to produce low-energy radioactive nuclear beams. In these systems ...

  20. Contribution to the study of nuclear resonance in magnetic media (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann-Boutron, F.

    1963-06-01

    An attempt is made to interpret the results of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments made by various workers on ferro and ferrimagnetic compounds of the iron group. The problems encountered are the following: effects of the dipolar fields and the hyperfine structure anisotropy; signal intensity; frequency pulling due to the Suhl-Nakamura interaction between nuclear spins ; nuclear relaxation and ferrimagnetic resonance in single domain samples of impure YIG; nuclear relaxation in the Bloch walls of insulators. The results of our calculations are generally in good agreement with experiment. (author) [fr

  1. Double-Pionic Fusion of Nuclear Systems and the ''ABC'' Effect: Approaching a Puzzle by Exclusive and Kinematically Complete Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashkanov, M.; Clement, H.; Doroshkevich, E.; Khakimova, O.; Kren, F.; Meier, R.; Pricking, A.; Skorodko, T.; Wagner, G. J.; Bargholtz, C.; Geren, L.; Lindberg, K.; Tegner, P.-E.; Zartova, I.; Berlowski, M.; Stepaniak, J.; Bogoslawsky, D.; Ivanov, G.; Jiganov, E.; Morosov, B.

    2009-01-01

    The ABC effect--a puzzling low-mass enhancement in the ππ invariant mass spectrum, first observed by Abashian, Booth, and Crowe--is well known from inclusive measurements of two-pion production in nuclear fusion reactions. Here we report on the first exclusive and kinematically complete measurements of the most basic double-pionic fusion reaction pn→dπ 0 π 0 at beam energies of 1.03 and 1.35 GeV. The measurements, which have been carried out at CELSIUS-WASA, reveal the ABC effect to be a (ππ) I=L=0 channel phenomenon associated with both a resonancelike energy dependence in the integral cross section and the formation of a ΔΔ system in the intermediate state. A corresponding simple s-channel resonance ansatz provides a surprisingly good description of the data

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C36H30Br2OSb2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C36H30Cl2OSb2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  4. Statistical uncertainties of nondestructive assay for spent nuclear fuel by using nuclear resonance fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizuma, Toshiyuki, E-mail: shizuma.toshiyuki@jaea.go.jp [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hayakawa, Takehito; Angell, Christopher T.; Hajima, Ryoichi [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Minato, Futoshi; Suyama, Kenya [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Seya, Michio [Integrated Support Center for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Nuclear Security, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1198 (Japan); Johnson, Micah S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave. Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, One Washington Square, San Jose, CA 9519 (United States); McNabb, Dennis P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave. Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2014-02-11

    We estimated statistical uncertainties of a nondestructive assay system using nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) for spent nuclear fuel including low-concentrations of actinide nuclei with an intense, mono-energetic photon beam. Background counts from radioactive materials inside the spent fuel were calculated with the ORIGEN2.2-UPJ burn-up computer code. Coherent scattering contribution associated with Rayleigh, nuclear Thomson, and Delbrück scattering was also considered. The energy of the coherent scattering overlaps with that of NRF transitions to the ground state. Here, we propose to measure NRF transitions to the first excited state to avoid the coherent scattering contribution. Assuming that the total NRF cross-sections are in the range of 3–100 eV b at excitation energies of 2.25, 3.5, and 5 MeV, statistical uncertainties of the NRF measurement were estimated. We concluded that it is possible to assay 1% actinide content in the spent fuel with 2.2–3.2% statistical precision during 4000 s measurement time for the total integrated cross-section of 30 eV b at excitation energies of 3.5–5 MeV by using a photon beam with an intensity of 10{sup 6} photons/s/eV. We also examined both the experimental and theoretical NRF cross-sections for actinide nuclei. The calculation based on the quasi-particle random phase approximation suggests the existence of strong magnetic dipole resonances at excitation energies ranging from 2 to 6 MeV with the scattering cross-sections of tens eV b around 5 MeV in {sup 238}U.

  5. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laws, David Douglas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone (Φ/Ψ) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined 13Ca, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of α-helical and β-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly β-sheet.

  6. Science and history explored by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baias, Maria Antoaneta

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance was chosen as the main tool for investigating different biological and chemical systems, as it is unique in providing the information details about the morphology and molecular structures and conformations by which the fundamental properties of these biological and chemical systems can be understood. Proton spin-diffusion experiments combined with 13 C CPMAS spectroscopy were successfully applied to characterize the changes that occur during the thermal denaturation of keratin fibers from wool and hair. A model describing both the effect of thermal denaturation and the effect of different chemical treatments on keratin fibers is presented. Proton NMR spectroscopy was used for studying the proton exchange in Sulfonated Polyether Ether Ketone proton exchange membranes revealing that the water exchange processes in hydrated SPEEK-silica membranes are more efficient when low concentrations of polyethoxysiloxane (PEOS) are used for the membrane preparation. Proton 1D exchange spectroscopy combined with transverse relaxation measurements offered good insight in the state of water in hydrated SPEEK/SiO 2 membranes revealing that concentrations of 5%-10% wt. PEOS could enhance the electrical conductivity of PEM. Hyperpolarized 129 Xe NMR spectroscopy was successfully applied for monitoring the free radical polymerization reactions of methyl methacrylate, methyl acrylate and the copolymerization of methyl methacrylate and methyl acrylate. The observation of Xe chemical shift and linewidths during the reactions reveal information about the polymer chain growths during the polymerizations. The successful application of the NMR-MOUSE to visualise the different anatomical layers with varying proton densities opens the possibility of its use in clinical studies such as osteoporosis for bone density measurements. The NMR-MOUSE was also successfully applied for the analysis of violins and bows and a classification of the violins and bows as a function of

  7. Unconventional Tight Reservoirs Characterization with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, C. J. S.; Solatpour, R.; Kantzas, A.

    2017-12-01

    The increase in tight reservoir exploitation projects causes producing many papers each year on new, modern, and modified methods and techniques on estimating characteristics of these reservoirs. The most ambiguous of all basic reservoir property estimations deals with permeability. One of the logging methods that is advertised to predict permeability but is always met by skepticism is Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The ability of NMR to differentiate between bound and movable fluids and providing porosity increased the capability of NMR as a permeability prediction technique. This leads to a multitude of publications and the motivation of a review paper on this subject by Babadagli et al. (2002). The first part of this presentation is dedicated to an extensive review of the existing correlation models for NMR based estimates of tight reservoir permeability to update this topic. On the second part, the collected literature information is used to analyze new experimental data. The data are collected from tight reservoirs from Canada, the Middle East, and China. A case study is created to apply NMR measurement in the prediction of reservoir characterization parameters such as porosity, permeability, cut-offs, irreducible saturations etc. Moreover, permeability correlations are utilized to predict permeability. NMR experiments were conducted on water saturated cores. NMR T2 relaxation times were measured. NMR porosity, the geometric mean relaxation time (T2gm), Irreducible Bulk Volume (BVI), and Movable Bulk Volume (BVM) were calculated. The correlation coefficients were computed based on multiple regression analysis. Results are cross plots of NMR permeability versus the independently measured Klinkenberg corrected permeability. More complicated equations are discussed. Error analysis of models is presented and compared. This presentation is beneficial in understanding existing tight reservoir permeability models. The results can be used as a guide for choosing

  8. Resolution Improvement in Multidimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duma, L.

    2004-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is concerned with both liquid-state and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Most of this work is devoted to the investigation by solid-state NMR of C 13 -enriched compounds with the principal aim of presenting techniques devised for further improving the spectral resolution in multidimensional NMR of microcrystalline proteins. In fully C 13 -labelled compounds, the J-coupling induces a broadening of the carbon lineshapes. We show that spin-state-selective technique called IPAP can be successfully combined with standard polarisation transfer schemes in order to remove the J-broadening in multidimensional solid-state NMR correlation experiments of fully C 13 -enriched proteins. We present subsequently two techniques tailored for liquid-state NMR spectroscopy. The carbon directly detected techniques provide chemical shift information for all backbone hetero-nuclei. They are very attracting for the study of large bio-molecular systems or for the investigation of paramagnetic proteins. In the last part of this thesis, we study the spin-echo J-modulation for homonuclear two-spin 1/2 systems. Under magic-angle spinning, the theory of J-induced spin-echo modulation allows to derive a set of modulation regimes which give a spin-echo modulation exactly equal to the J-coupling. We show that the chemical-shift anisotropy and the dipolar interaction tend to stabilize the spin-echo J-modulation. The theoretical conclusions are supported by numerical simulations and experimental results obtained for three representative samples containing C 13 spin pairs. (author)

  9. Neutron Resonance Theory for Nuclear Reactor Applications: Modern Theory and Practices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Richard N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Blomquist, Roger N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Leal, Luiz C. [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Sûrete Nucleaire (ISRN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Yang, Won Sik [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2016-09-24

    The neutron resonance phenomena constitute one of the most fundamental subjects in nuclear physics as well as in reactor physics. It is the area where the concepts of nuclear interaction and the treatment of the neutronic balance in reactor fuel lattices become intertwined. The latter requires the detailed knowledge of resonance structures of many nuclides of practical interest to the development of nuclear energy. The most essential element in reactor physics is to provide an accurate account of the intricate balance between the neutrons produced by the fission process and neutrons lost due to the absorption process as well as those leaking out of the reactor system. The presence of resonance structures in many major nuclides obviously plays an important role in such processes. There has been a great deal of theoretical and practical interest in resonance reactions since Fermi’s discovery of resonance absorption of neutrons as they were slowed down in water. The resonance absorption became the center of attention when the question was raised as to the feasibility of the self-sustaining chain reaction in a natural uranium-fueled system. The threshold of the nuclear era was crossed almost eighty years ago when Fermi and Szilard observed that a substantial reduction in resonance absorption is possible if the uranium was made into the form of lumps instead of a homogeneous mixture with water. In the West, the first practical method for estimating the resonance escape probability in a reactor cell was pioneered by Wigner et al in early forties.

  10. Rotational-echo Double-resonance in Complex Biopolymers: a Study of Nephila Clavipes Dragline Silk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michal, Carl A.; Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1998-01-01

    Rotational-Echo Double-Resonance (REDOR) NMR on strategically 13C and 15N labeled samples is used to study the conformation of the LGXQ (X = S, G, or N) motif in the major ampullate gland dragline silk from the spider Nephila clavipes. A method is described for calculating REDOR dephasing curves suitable for background subtractions, using probability distributions of nitrogen atoms surrounding a given carbon site, which are developed from coordinates in the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank. The validity of the method is established by comparison to dephasings observed from natural abundance 13C peaks for G and A. Straightforward fitting of universal REDOR dephasing curves to the background corrected peaks of interest provide results which are not self-consistent, and a more sophisticated analysis is developed which better accounts for 15N labels which have scrambled from the intended positions. While there is likely some heterogeneity in the structures formed by the LGXQ sequences, the data indicate that they all form compact turn-like structures

  11. Spectral relationships between kicked Harper and on-resonance double kicked rotor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, Wayne; Mouritzen, Anders S.; Wang Jiao; Gong Jiangbin

    2009-01-01

    Kicked Harper operators and on-resonance double kicked rotor operators model quantum systems whose semiclassical limits exhibit chaotic dynamics. Recent computational studies indicate a striking resemblance between the spectra of these operators. In this paper we apply C*-algebra methods to explain this resemblance. We show that each pair of corresponding operators belongs to a common rotation C*-algebra B α , prove that their spectra are equal if α is irrational, and prove that the Hausdorff distance between their spectra converges to zero as q increases if α=p/q with p and q coprime integers. Moreover, we show that corresponding operators in B α are homomorphic images of mother operators in the universal rotation C*-algebra A α that are unitarily equivalent and hence have identical spectra. These results extend analogous results for almost Mathieu operators. We also utilize the C*-algebraic framework to develop efficient algorithms to compute the spectra of these mother operators for rational α and present preliminary numerical results that support the conjecture that their spectra are Cantor sets if α is irrational. This conjecture for almost Mathieu operators, called the ten Martini problem, was recently proven after intensive efforts over several decades. This proof for the almost Mathieu operators utilized transfer matrix methods, which do not exist for the kicked operators. We outline a strategy, based on a special property of loop groups of semisimple Lie groups, to prove this conjecture for the kicked operators

  12. Evaluation of colonic involvement in endometriosis: double-contrast barium enema vs. magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccioli, N; Foti, G; Manfredi, R; Mainardi, P; Spoto, E; Ruffo, G; Minelli, L; Mucelli, R Pozzi

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the accuracy of double-contrast barium enema (DCBE) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of intestinal endometriosis using the histological examination on resected specimen as comparative standard. Eighty-three consecutive patients with suspected intestinal endometriosis, resected between 2005 and 2007, were prospectively evaluated. All of the women underwent preoperative DCBE and MRI on the same day. We evaluated number, site (rectum, sigmoid, cecum), and size of the lesions. The imaging findings were correlated with those resulting at pathology. Among the 65 women who underwent surgery, 50/65 (76.9%) were found to have bowel endometriosis, with 9/50 (18%) patients presenting two lesions; DCBE allowed to detect 50/59 (84.7%) lesions. MRI allowed to detect 42/59 (71.1%) lesions. DCBE showed sensibility, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of respectively 84.7, 93.7, 98.0, 62.5, and 86.6%, MRI of 71.1, 83.3, 93.3, 46.8, and 74.6%. DCBE is more accurate than unenhanced MRI in the diagnosis of bowel endometriosis, and should be preferred in the preoperative management of this disease, since it usually enables a proper surgical planning.

  13. Modeling of Sulfate Double-Salt in Nuclear Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toghiani, B.; Lindner, J.S.; Weber, C.F.; Hunt, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    The Environmental Simulation Program (ESP) continues to adequately predict the solubility of most key chemical systems in the Hanford tank waste. For example, the ESP predictions were in fair agreement with the solubility experiments for the fluoride-phosphate system, although ESP probably underestimates the aqueous amounts. Due to the importance of this system in the formation of pipeline plugs, additional experiments have been made at elevated temperatures, and improvements to the ESP database will be made. ESP encountered problems with sulfate systems because the Public database for ESP does not include anhydrous sodium sulfate in mixed solutions below 32.4 C. This limitation leads to convergence problems and to spurious predictions of solubility near the transition point with sodium sulfate decahydrate when other salts such as sodium nitrate are present. However, ESP was able to make reasonable solubility predictions with a corrected database, demonstrating the need to validate and document the various databases that can be used by ESP. Even though ESP does not include the sulfate-nitrate double salt, this omission does not appear to be a major problem. The solubility predictions with and without the sulfate-nitrate double salt are comparable. In sharp contrast, the sulfate-fluoride double salt is included, but ESP still underestimates solubility in some cases. This problem can misrepresent the ionic strength of the solution, which is an important factor in the formation of pipeline plugs. Solubility tests on the sulfate-fluoride system are planned to provide additional data at higher temperatures and in caustic solutions. These results will be used to improve the range and accuracy of ESP predictions. ESP will continue to provide important predictions for waste processing operations while being evaluated and improved. For example, ESP will be used to determine the amount of water for the saltcake dissolution efforts at Hanford. When ESP underestimates the

  14. Pion-nucleus double charge exchange and the nuclear shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, N.; Gibbs, W.R.; Ginocchio, J.N.; Kaufmann, W.B.

    1988-01-01

    The pion-nucleus double charge exchange reaction is studied with special emphasis on nuclear structure. The reaction mechanism and nuclear structure aspects of the process are separated using both the plane-wave and distorted-wave impulse approximations. Predictions are made employing both the seniority model and a full shell model (with a single active orbit). Transitions to the double analog state and to the ground state of the residual nucleus are computed. The seniority model yields particularly simple relations among double charge exchange cross sections for nuclei within the same shell. Limitations of the seniority model and of the plane-wave impulse approximation are discussed as well as extensions to the generalized seniority scheme. Applications of the foregoing ideas to single charge exchange are also presented

  15. Characterization of urban aerosol using aerosol mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, M. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Lefer, B.; Rappenglück, B.

    2012-07-01

    Particulate matter was measured during August and September of 2006 in Houston as part of the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project. Aerosol size and composition were determined using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer. Aerosol was dominated by sulfate (4.1 ± 2.6 μg m-3) and organic material (5.5 ± 4.0 μg m-3), with contributions of organic material from both primary (˜32%) and secondary (˜68%) sources. Secondary organic aerosol appears to be formed locally. In addition, 29 aerosol filter samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy to determine relative concentrations of organic functional groups. Houston aerosols are less oxidized than those observed elsewhere, with smaller relative contributions of carbon-oxygen double bonds. These particles do not fit 1H NMR source apportionment fingerprints for identification of secondary, marine, and biomass burning organic aerosol, suggesting that a new fingerprint for highly urbanized and industrially influenced locations be established.

  16. Raman and 11B nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies of alkaline-earth lanthanoborate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brow, R.K.; Tallant, D.R.; Turner, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    Glasses from the RO·La 2 O 3 ·B 2 O 3 (R = Mg, Ca, and Ba) systems have been examined. Glass formation is centered along the metaborate tie line, from La(BO 2 ) 3 to R(BO 2 ) 2 . Glasses generally have transition temperatures >600 C and expansion coefficients between 60 x 10 -7 /C and 100 x 10 -7 /C. Raman and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies reveal changes in the metaborate network that depend on both the [R]:[La] ratio and the type of alkaline-earth ion. The fraction of tetrahedral sites is generally reduced in alkaline-earth-rich glasses, with magnesium glasses possessing the lowest concentration of B[4]. Raman spectra indicate that, with increasing [R]:[La] ratio, the preferred metaborate anion changes from a double-chain structure associated with crystalline La(BO 2 ) 3 to the single-chain and ring metaborate anions found in crystalline R(BO 2 ) 2 phases. In addition, disproportionation of the metaborate anions leads to the formation of a variety of other species, including pyroborates with terminal oxygens and more-polymerized species, such as diborates, with tetrahedral borons. Such structural changes are related to the ease of glass formation and some of the glass properties

  17. Water in Brain Edema : Observations by the Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GO, KG; Edzes, HT

    The state of water in three types of brain edema and in normal brain of the rat was studied by the pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. In cold-induced edema and in osmotic edema both in cortex and in white matter, the water protons have longer nuclear magnetic relaxation times than in

  18. Semiclassical shell structure and nuclear double-humped fission barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Magner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We derived the semiclassical trace formulas for the level density as sums over periodic-orbit families and isolated orbits within the improved stationary phase method. Averaged level-density shell corrections and shell-structure energies are continuous through all symmetry-breaking (bifurcation points with the correct asymptotics of the standard stationary phase approach accounting for continuous symmetries. We found enhancement of the nuclear shell structure near bifurcations in the superdeformed region. Our semiclassical results for the averaged level densities with the gross-shell and more thin-shell structures and the energy shell corrections for critical deformations are in good agreement with the quantum calculations for several single-particle Hamiltonians, in particular for the potentials with a sharp spheroidal shape. Enhancement of the shell structure owing to bifurcations of the shortest 3-dimensional orbits from equatorial orbits is responsible for the second well of fission barrier in a superdeformation region.

  19. Cyclotron resonance study of the two-dimensional electron layers and double layers in tilted magnetic fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goncharuk, Natalya; Smrčka, Ludvík; Kučera, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 22, - (2004), s. 590-593 ISSN 1386-9477. [International Conference on Electronic Properties of Two-Dimensional Systems /15./. Nara, 14.07.2003-18.07.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/01/0754 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : single layer * double layer * two-dimensional electron system * cyclotron resonance Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.898, year: 2004

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopic Characterization of Nanomaterials and Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chengchen

    Nanomaterials have attracted considerable attention in recent research due to their wide applications in various fields such as material science, physical science, electrical engineering, and biomedical engineering. Researchers have developed many methods for synthesizing different types of nanostructures and have further applied them in various applications. However, in many cases, a molecular level understanding of nanoparticles and their associated surface chemistry is lacking investigation. Understanding the surface chemistry of nanomaterials is of great significance for obtaining a better understanding of the properties and functions of the nanomaterials. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can provide a familiar means of looking at the molecular structure of molecules bound to surfaces of nanomaterials as well as a method to determine the size of nanoparticles in solution. Here, a combination of NMR spectroscopic techniques including one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopies was used to investigate the surface chemistry and physical properties of some common nanomaterials, including for example, thiol-protected gold nanostructures and biomolecule-capped silica nanoparticles. Silk is a natural protein fiber that features unique properties such as excellent mechanical properties, biocompatibility, and non-linear optical properties. These appealing physical properties originate from the silk structure, and therefore, the structural analysis of silk is of great importance for revealing the mystery of these impressive properties and developing novel silk-based biomaterials as well. Here, solid-state NMR spectroscopy was used to elucidate the secondary structure of silk proteins in N. clavipes spider dragline silk and B. mori silkworm silk. It is found that the Gly-Gly-X (X=Leu, Tyr, Gln) motif in spider dragline silk is not in a beta-sheet or alpha-helix structure and is very likely to be present in a disordered structure with evidence for 31-helix

  1. The influence of temperature in the characterization of nuclear resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, T.P.R. de; Martinez, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    A detailed analysis carried out to determine the temperature effects on the selection of different types of resonance for Resonance Integral calculations is presented. The type of approximation (WR, IR or NR) to be applied to the slowing down integral of the neutron balance equation depends on the relationship between the average energy lost by the neutron and the practical width. A method to include the temperature dependence in the ratio ΔE/GAMMA sub(p) is proposed. The results allowed us to show that this dependence negligence may lead to large errors in the Resonance Integral calculation. (Author) [pt

  2. Double parametric resonance for matter-wave solitons in a time-modulated trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baizakov, Bakhtiyor; Salerno, Mario; Filatrella, Giovanni; Malomed, Boris

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the motion of solitons in a self-attractive Bose-Einstein condensate, loaded into a quasi-one-dimensional parabolic potential trap, which is subjected to time-periodic modulation with an amplitude ε and frequency Ω. First, we apply the variational approximation, which gives rise to decoupled equations of motion for the center-of-mass coordinate of the soliton, ξ(t), and its width a(t). The equation for ξ(t) is the ordinary Mathieu equation (ME) (it is an exact equation that does not depend on the adopted ansatz), the equation for a(t) being a nonlinear generalization of the ME. Both equations give rise to the same map of instability zones in the (ε,Ω) plane, generated by the parametric resonances (PRs), if the instability is defined as the onset of growth of the amplitude of the parametrically driven oscillations. In this sense, the double PR is predicted. Direct simulations of the underlying Gross-Pitaevskii equation give rise to a qualitatively similar but quantitatively different stability map for oscillations of the soliton's width a(t). In the direct simulations, we identify the soliton dynamics as unstable if the instability (again, realized as indefinite growth of the amplitude of oscillations) can be detected during a time comparable with, or smaller than, the lifetime of the condensate (therefore accessible to experimental detection). Two-soliton configurations are also investigated. It is concluded that multiple collisions between solitons are elastic, and they do not affect the instability borders

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodson, Boyd M.

    1999-01-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodson, Boyd McLean [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

  5. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J.; Ambers, Scott D.

    2011-01-14

    The Next Generation Safeguard Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S Department of Energy is supporting a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. The following 14 NDA techniques are being studied: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer, Neutron Multiplicity, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Total Neutron (Gross Neutron), X-Ray Fluorescence, {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection, Delayed Gamma, Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, Passive Prompt Gamma, Self-integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry, and Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis. Understanding and maturity of the techniques vary greatly, ranging from decades old, well-understood methods to new approaches. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) is a technique that had not previously been studied for SNF assay or similar applications. Since NRF generates isotope-specific signals, the promise and appeal of the technique lies in its potential to directly measure the amount of a specific isotope in an SNF assay target. The objectives of this study were to design and model suitable NRF measurement methods, to quantify capabilities and corresponding instrumentation requirements, and to evaluate prospects and the potential of NRF for SNF assay. The main challenge of the technique is to achieve the sensitivity and precision, i.e., to accumulate sufficient counting statistics, required for quantifying the mass of Pu isotopes in SNF assemblies. Systematic errors, considered a lesser problem for a direct measurement and only briefly discussed in this report, need to be evaluated for specific instrument designs in the future. Also, since the technical capability of using NRF to measure Pu in SNF has not been established, this report does not directly address issues such as cost, size

  6. Direct vs statistical decay of nuclear giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Hussein, M.S.; Carlson, B.V.; Merchant, A.C.; Adhikari, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical framework for the description of the decay of giant multipole resonances id developed. Besides the direct decay, both the pre-equilibrium and statistical (compound) decays are taken into account in a consistent way. It is shown that the statistical decay of the giant resonance is not necessarily described by the Hauser-Feshbach theory owing to the presence of a mixing parameter, which measures the degree of fragmentation. Applications are made to several cases. (Author) [pt

  7. The role of reversed kinematics and double kinematic solutions in nuclear reactions studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, M.; Parker, W.E.; Moses, D.J.; Lacey, R.; Alexander, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The advantages of reversed kinematics in nuclear reactions studies are discussed, with particular emphasis on the origin of double solutions in the reaction kinematics. This possibility for double solutions does not exist in normal kinematics, and provides the basis for a new method of imposing important experimental constraints on the uniqueness of fitting complex observations. By gating on one or the other of the two solutions, light particle kinematics can be greatly influenced in coincidence measurements. The power of the method is illustrated with data for the reaction 1030 MeV 121 Sb+ 27 Al, where charged particle emissions arise from several different sources. (orig.)

  8. Double resonance modulation characteristics of optically injection-locked Fabry–Perot lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorogush, E S; Afonenko, A A

    2015-01-01

    The distributed resonator model is used to show the presence of several resonance responses on the modulation characteristic of optically injection-locked Fabry–Perot lasers. The positions of the resonance peaks on the modulation characteristic are determined by the resonator length and frequency detuning of optical injection. It is shown that an appropriate choice of the resonator length and injection locking conditions allows one to obtain efficient modulation in two ranges near 40 – 60 GHz or to increase the direct modulation bandwidth up to 50 GHz. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  9. Double resonance modulation characteristics of optically injection-locked Fabry–Perot lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorogush, E S; Afonenko, A A [Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus)

    2015-12-31

    The distributed resonator model is used to show the presence of several resonance responses on the modulation characteristic of optically injection-locked Fabry–Perot lasers. The positions of the resonance peaks on the modulation characteristic are determined by the resonator length and frequency detuning of optical injection. It is shown that an appropriate choice of the resonator length and injection locking conditions allows one to obtain efficient modulation in two ranges near 40 – 60 GHz or to increase the direct modulation bandwidth up to 50 GHz. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  10. Crossed-coil detection of two-photon excited nuclear quadrupole resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eles, Philip T.; Michal, Carl A.

    2005-08-01

    Applying a recently developed theoretical framework for determining two-photon excitation Hamiltonians using average Hamiltonian theory, we calculate the excitation produced by half-resonant irradiation of the pure quadrupole resonance of a spin-3/2 system. This formalism provides expressions for the single-quantum and double-quantum nutation frequencies as well as the Bloch-Siegert shift. The dependence of the excitation strength on RF field orientation and the appearance of the free-induction signal along an axis perpendicular to the excitation field provide an unmistakable signature of two-photon excitation. We demonstrate single- and double-quantum excitation in an axially symmetric system using 35Cl in a single crystal of potassium chlorate ( ωQ = 28 MHz) with crossed-coil detection. A rotation plot verifies the orientation dependence of the two-photon excitation, and double-quantum coherences are observed directly with the application of a static external magnetic field.

  11. A study of relaxation mechanisms in the A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} state of nitric oxide by time resolved double resonant polarization spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampanoni-Panariello, A; Bombach, R; Hemmerling, B; Hubschmid, W [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Double resonant polarization labeling spectroscopy is applied to detect nitric oxide in flames and to characterize rotational energy transfer and orientation changing collisions in its first excited electronic state. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  12. Radioimmunotherapy of human lymphoma in athymic, nude mice as monitored by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, D.A.; DeNardo, G.L.; DeNardo, S.J.; Matson, G.B.; Epstein, A.L.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    Human B cell lymphoma (Raji) growing in athymic, nude mice has been successfully treated with a single pulse dose of 131 I-labeled monoclonal antibody (Lym-1) specific for this tumor. Sequential in vivo measurements of phosphate metabolites in the tumors by 31 P surface coil nuclear magnetic resonance showed a significant initial decrease of phosphocreatine following radioimmunotherapy. Diminution of relative ATP to Pi peak area ratio suggesting tissue damage occurred within 3-4 days. The sequence of alterations of nuclear magnetic resonance spectra from tumors of treated mice were strikingly different from sequential nuclear magnetic resonance spectra obtained from tumors of control mice. These observations lead us to conclude that 31 P surface coil nuclear magnetic resonance is a promising non-invasive method for assessing and predicting the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy. Further spatial discrimination of the region of tissue observed by the surface coil nuclear magnetic resonance experiment is under exploration in an effort to increase the utility of these methods

  13. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of advanced energy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George D.

    In order to better understand the physical electrochemical changes that take place in lithium ion batteries and asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been useful to probe and identify changes on the atomic and molecular level. NMR is used to characterize the local environment and investigate the dynamical properties of materials used in electrochemical storage devices (ESD). NMR investigations was used to better understand the chemical composition of the solid electrolyte interphase which form on the negative and positive electrodes of lithium batteries as well as identify the breakdown products that occur in the operation of the asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors. The use of nano-structured particles in the development of new materials causes changes in the electrical, structural and other material properties. NMR was used to investigate the affects of fluorinated and non fluorinated single wall nanotubes (SWNT). In this thesis three experiments were performed using solid state NMR samples to better characterize them. The electrochemical reactions of a lithium ion battery determine its operational profile. Numerous means have been employed to enhance battery cycle life and operating temperature range. One primary means is the choice and makeup of the electrolyte. This study focuses on the characteristics of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that is formed on the electrodes surface during the charge discharge cycle. The electrolyte in this study was altered with several additives in order to determine the influence of the additives on SEI formation as well as the intercalation and de-intercalation of lithium ions in the electrodes. 7Li NMR studies where used to characterize the SEI and its composition. Solid state NMR studies of the carbon enriched acetonitrile electrolyte in a nonaqueous asymmetric hybrid supercapacitor were performed. Magic angle spinning (MAS) coupled with cross polarization NMR

  14. Nuclear effects in electron spin resonance of crystalline solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ursu, I.; Nistor, S.V.

    1976-01-01

    A survey on the theory of paramagnetic ions in crystals is given. Some recent applications in which nuclear properties are studied by means of the ESR method are presented against this background. Finer effects in the hyperfine structure of ESR spectra, temperature dependance of the hyperfine coupling of S-state ions, observation of nuclear isotopic shift in ESR represent the applications discussed

  15. Focus: Two-dimensional electron-electron double resonance and molecular motions: The challenge of higher frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franck, John M.; Chandrasekaran, Siddarth; Dzikovski, Boris; Dunnam, Curt R.; Freed, Jack H., E-mail: jhf3@cornell.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and National Biomedical Center for Advanced ESR Technology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    The development, applications, and current challenges of the pulsed ESR technique of two-dimensional Electron-Electron Double Resonance (2D ELDOR) are described. This is a three-pulse technique akin to 2D Exchange Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, but involving electron spins, usually in the form of spin-probes or spin-labels. As a result, it required the extension to much higher frequencies, i.e., microwaves, and much faster time scales, with π/2 pulses in the 2-3 ns range. It has proven very useful for studying molecular dynamics in complex fluids, and spectral results can be explained by fitting theoretical models (also described) that provide a detailed analysis of the molecular dynamics and structure. We discuss concepts that also appear in other forms of 2D spectroscopy but emphasize the unique advantages and difficulties that are intrinsic to ESR. Advantages include the ability to tune the resonance frequency, in order to probe different motional ranges, while challenges include the high ratio of the detection dead time vs. the relaxation times. We review several important 2D ELDOR studies of molecular dynamics. (1) The results from a spin probe dissolved in a liquid crystal are followed throughout the isotropic → nematic → liquid-like smectic → solid-like smectic → crystalline phases as the temperature is reduced and are interpreted in terms of the slowly relaxing local structure model. Here, the labeled molecule is undergoing overall motion in the macroscopically aligned sample, as well as responding to local site fluctuations. (2) Several examples involving model phospholipid membranes are provided, including the dynamic structural characterization of the boundary lipid that coats a transmembrane peptide dimer. Additionally, subtle differences can be elicited for the phospholipid membrane phases: liquid disordered, liquid ordered, and gel, and the subtle effects upon the membrane, of antigen cross-linking of receptors on the surface of plasma membrane

  16. Focus: Two-dimensional electron-electron double resonance and molecular motions: The challenge of higher frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franck, John M.; Chandrasekaran, Siddarth; Dzikovski, Boris; Dunnam, Curt R.; Freed, Jack H.

    2015-01-01

    The development, applications, and current challenges of the pulsed ESR technique of two-dimensional Electron-Electron Double Resonance (2D ELDOR) are described. This is a three-pulse technique akin to 2D Exchange Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, but involving electron spins, usually in the form of spin-probes or spin-labels. As a result, it required the extension to much higher frequencies, i.e., microwaves, and much faster time scales, with π/2 pulses in the 2-3 ns range. It has proven very useful for studying molecular dynamics in complex fluids, and spectral results can be explained by fitting theoretical models (also described) that provide a detailed analysis of the molecular dynamics and structure. We discuss concepts that also appear in other forms of 2D spectroscopy but emphasize the unique advantages and difficulties that are intrinsic to ESR. Advantages include the ability to tune the resonance frequency, in order to probe different motional ranges, while challenges include the high ratio of the detection dead time vs. the relaxation times. We review several important 2D ELDOR studies of molecular dynamics. (1) The results from a spin probe dissolved in a liquid crystal are followed throughout the isotropic → nematic → liquid-like smectic → solid-like smectic → crystalline phases as the temperature is reduced and are interpreted in terms of the slowly relaxing local structure model. Here, the labeled molecule is undergoing overall motion in the macroscopically aligned sample, as well as responding to local site fluctuations. (2) Several examples involving model phospholipid membranes are provided, including the dynamic structural characterization of the boundary lipid that coats a transmembrane peptide dimer. Additionally, subtle differences can be elicited for the phospholipid membrane phases: liquid disordered, liquid ordered, and gel, and the subtle effects upon the membrane, of antigen cross-linking of receptors on the surface of plasma membrane

  17. The concept of the double-purpose electro-nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergelson, B.P.; Balyuk, S.A. [Institute of theoretical and experimental physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-10-01

    The parameters have been determined on a conceptual level of the electro-nuclear facility intended for electric power generation and minor actinide transmutation. Electro-nuclear facilities (ENFs) have been developed without apparent success for many years. The main difficulties are associated with high accelerator cost and absence of their own clearly defined place for ENFs in the nuclear-power complex. In recent years, however, the situation has changed in many aspects in connection with the rise in safety requirements for nuclear power industry and because of the necessity to decrease the equilibrium level of the long-lived radiotoxicity in particular. In the authors opinion double-purpose ENFs designed for power generation and tansmutation of minor actinides are promising. The results of conceptual investigations for such a facility being operated on liquid fuel in the condition of a uranium-plutonium fuel cycle are given here.

  18. Coulomb and nuclear excitations of narrow resonances in 17Ne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marganiec

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available New experimental data for dissociation of relativistic 17Ne projectiles incident on targets of lead, carbon, and polyethylene targets at GSI are presented. Special attention is paid to the excitation and decay of narrow resonant states in 17Ne. Distributions of internal energy in the O15+p+p three-body system have been determined together with angular and partial-energy correlations between the decay products in different energy regions. The analysis was done using existing experimental data on 17Ne and its mirror nucleus 17N. The isobaric multiplet mass equation is used for assignment of observed resonances and their spins and parities. A combination of data from the heavy and light targets yielded cross sections and transition probabilities for the Coulomb excitations of the narrow resonant states. The resulting transition probabilities provide information relevant for a better understanding of the 17Ne structure.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance of D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzyl penicillin; Ressonancia magnetica nuclear da D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzil penicilina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Monica R.M.P.; Gemal, Andre L.; San Gil, Rosane A.S. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Menezes, Sonia M.C. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1995-12-31

    The development of new drugs from penicillins has induced the study of this substances by nuclear magnetic resonance. Several samples of D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzyl penicillin were analysed using {sup 13} C NMR techniques in aqueous solution and solid state. Spectral data of this compounds were shown and the results were presented and analysed 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. The function of single containment and double containment of PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Weijing.

    1985-01-01

    The function and structures of single containment and double containment of PWR nuclear power plant were described briefiy. The dissimilarites of diffent type of containments, which effects the impact of environment are discused. The impact of environment, effected by 'source term', containment gas leak rate and diffusion pattern of the released gas, under different operating condition is analysed. Especially, the impact of environment under LOCA accident is fully analysed

  1. Double Beta Decay and Neutrino Masses Accuracy of the Nuclear Matrix Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faessler, Amand

    2005-01-01

    The neutrinoless double beta decay is forbidden in the standard model of the electroweak and strong interaction but allowed in most Grand Unified Theories (GUT's). Only if the neutrino is a Majorana particle (identical with its antiparticle) and if it has a mass, the neutrinoless double beta decay is allowed. Apart of one claim that the neutrinoless double beta decay in 76 Ge is measured, one has only upper limits for this transition probability. But even the upper limits allow to give upper limits for the electron Majorana neutrino mass and upper limits for parameters of GUT's and the minimal R-parity violating supersymmetric model. One further can give lower limits for the vector boson mediating mainly the right-handed weak interaction and the heavy mainly right-handed Majorana neutrino in left-right symmetric GUT's. For that one has to assume that the specific mechanism is the leading one for the neutrinoless double beta decay and one has to be able to calculate reliably the corresponding nuclear matrix elements. In the present contribution, one discusses the accuracy of the present status of calculating the nuclear matrix elements and the corresponding limits of GUT's and supersymmetric parameters

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaap, M.S. van der; Valk, J.

    1989-01-01

    In this article a review is given of the use of magnetic resonance imaging for the central nervous system. An example of the screening of the population for multiple scelerosis is given. A good preliminary examination and the supply of relevant information to the person which performs the imaging is necessary. (R.B.). 9 figs.; 4 tabs

  3. 41 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications - Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    The Report consist of abstracts of 63 communications presented during the 41 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications, held on December 1-2, 2008 in Cracow. Presentations cover a variety of research fields, including magnetic resonance imaging in vivo, applications of NMR spectroscopy to medical diagnosis, studies on molecular properties of different materials as well as quantum chemical calculations of NMR parameters.

  4. Materials of the 39 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications - Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Report comprises abstracts of 78 communications presented during the 39 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications, held on November, 30 - December, 2006 in Cracow (PL). They cover a variety of research fields, including magnetic resonance imaging in vivo, applications of NMR spectroscopy to medical diagnosis, studies on molecular properties of different materials as well as quantum chemical calculations of NMR parameters

  5. 41 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications - Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Report consist of abstracts of 63 communications presented during the 41 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications, held on December 1-2, 2008 in Cracow. Presentations cover a variety of research fields, including magnetic resonance imaging in vivo, applications of NMR spectroscopy to medical diagnosis, studies on molecular properties of different materials as well as quantum chemical calculations of NMR parameters

  6. Control of slow-to-fast light and single-to-double optomechanically induced transparency in a compound resonator system: A theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziauddin; Rahman, Mujeeb ur; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Qamar, Sajid

    2017-10-01

    The transmission characteristics of probe light field is investigated theoretically in a compound system of two coupled resonators. The proposed system consisted of two high-Q Fabry-Perot resonators in which one of the resonators is optomechanical. Optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT), having relatively large window, is noticed via strong coupling between the two resonators. We investigate tunable switching from single to double OMIT by increasing amplitude of the pump field. We notice that, control of slow and fast light can be obtained via the coupling strength between the two resonators.

  7. Relativistic effects in the intermolecular interaction-induced nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of xenon dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Ilias, Miroslav; Jensen, Hans Jorgen Aagaard; Vaara, Juha

    2007-10-28

    Relativistic effects on the (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and (131)Xe nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) tensors are examined in the weakly bound Xe(2) system at different levels of theory including the relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) method. The intermolecular interaction-induced binary chemical shift delta, the anisotropy of the shielding tensor Deltasigma, and the NQC constant along the internuclear axis chi( parallel) are calculated as a function of the internuclear distance. DHF shielding calculations are carried out using gauge-including atomic orbitals. For comparison, the full leading-order one-electron Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) is applied using a common gauge origin. Electron correlation effects are studied at the nonrelativistic (NR) coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbational triples [CCSD(T)] level of theory. The fully relativistic second-order Moller-Plesset many-body perturbation (DMP2) theory is used to examine the cross coupling between correlation and relativity on NQC. The same is investigated for delta and Deltasigma by BPPT with a density functional theory model. A semiquantitative agreement between the BPPT and DHF binary property curves is obtained for delta and Deltasigma in Xe(2). For these properties, the currently most complete theoretical description is obtained by a piecewise approximation where the uncorrelated relativistic DHF results obtained close to the basis-set limit are corrected, on the one hand, for NR correlation effects and, on the other hand, for the BPPT-based cross coupling of relativity and correlation. For chi( parallel), the fully relativistic DMP2 results obtain a correction for NR correlation effects beyond MP2. The computed temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient of the (129)Xe nuclear shielding is compared to experiment in Xe gas. Our best results, obtained with the piecewise approximation for the binary chemical shift combined with the

  8. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Gulino, M.; Tumino, A. [Kore University, Enna, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, < 1 MeV or even < 10 keV, are requested for this is the window where these processes are more effective. Two effects have prevented to achieve a satisfactory knowledge of the relevant nuclear processes, namely, the Coulomb barrier exponentially suppressing the cross section and the presence of atomic electrons. These difficulties have triggered theoretical and experimental investigations to extend our knowledge down to astrophysical energies. For instance, indirect techniques such as the Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance.

  9. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S.; Gulino, M.; Tumino, A.; Lamia, L.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, < 1 MeV or even < 10 keV, are requested for this is the window where these processes are more effective. Two effects have prevented to achieve a satisfactory knowledge of the relevant nuclear processes, namely, the Coulomb barrier exponentially suppressing the cross section and the presence of atomic electrons. These difficulties have triggered theoretical and experimental investigations to extend our knowledge down to astrophysical energies. For instance, indirect techniques such as the Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance

  10. Proceedings of the 9. Meeting of the nuclear magnetic resonance users. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been one of the methods more powerful for characterizing and identifying substances, because it allows a detailed evaluation on internal molecular dynamics as well as clarifying its molecular and electronic structures. This meeting has presented a widespread variety of NMR techniques, as well as, advances in the use of this techniques in studies of the structure of liquids and solids. Theoretical and experimental papers are presented, covering the following subjects: nuclear magnetic resonance, structural chemical analysis, chemical shift and NMR spectrometers

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisvieux, A.

    1987-01-01

    Patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy and normal subjects were investigated with nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. To evaluate the NMR scanner possibilities, the results were compared with the echocardiographic investigation of the same patients. The capabilities of NMR imaging to provide information about intracardiac anatomy are emphasized. This study is preceded by a description of the physical principles underlying the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and of the techniques used to obtain NMR images and a review of the clinical use of NMR imaging for cardiac diagnosis [fr

  12. Nuclear-excited Feshbach resonances in the electron scattering from hydrogen halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoth, G.; Gote, M.; Radle, M.; Jung, K.; Ehrhardt, H.

    1989-01-01

    The energy dependences of the differential cross sections for the electron impact excitation of the higher vibrational levels (v=2 and v=3) of HF and HCl have been measured. Besides the threshold peak a resonance structure has been observed in the v=3 excitation functions of HF below the cusp structure at the opening of the v=4 channel. This resonance structure is the first experimental proof for the existence of the nuclear-excited Feshbach resonances which are interpreted to be the origin of the threshold peaks in the vibrational excitation channels

  13. Educational simulator app and web page for exploring Nuclear and Compass Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars G.

    experimentation that improves understanding of basic MR phenomena. The simulator is used to introduce and explore electromagnetism, magnetic dipoles, static and radiofrequency fields, Compass MR, the free induction decay (FID), relaxation, the Fourier transform (FFT), the resonance condition, spin, precession......, the Larmor equation, Nuclear MR, resonant excitation (linear and quadrature), and off-resonance effects. Methods and implementation: The simulator is a complete HTML5/JavaScript[1,2] rewrite of the JavaCompass[3] so it now executes in modern browsers with no additional software needed. Spin dynamics...

  14. Self consistent and covariant propagation of pions, nucleon and isobar resonances in cold nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korpa, C.L.; Lutz, M.F.M.; Technische Univ. Darmstadt

    2003-06-01

    We evaluate the in-medium spectral functions for pions, nucleon and isobar resonances in a self consistent and covariant manner. The calculations are based on a recently developed formulation which leads to predictions in terms of the pion-nucleon scattering phase shifts and a set of Migdal parameters describing important short range correlation effects. We do not observe any significant softening of pion modes if we insist on reasonable isobar resonance properties but predict a considerable broadening of the N(1440) and N(1520) resonances in nuclear matter. (orig.)

  15. Photon nuclear scattering on lead and bismuth in the region of the giant resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamas, Gabriel.

    1976-01-01

    The results of monochromatic photon nuclear scattering studies on natural lead and bismuth targets are presented. The cross sections for the inelastic scattering leading to the first excited levels of 204 Pb, 206 Pb and 207 Pb are important, in agreement with theoretical predictions. The elastic scattering amplitude is related to the total photon absorption by dispersion relations. It is then possible to determine the spin of resonances excited by the reaction studied. Precise measurements carried out between 14 and 20MeV revealed that the angular distribution cannot be explained by a single dipolar resonance. A quadrupolar resonance at E 2 =14MeV must be introduced [fr

  16. Chiral NNLOsat descriptions of nuclear multipole resonances within the random-phase approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q.; Hu, B. S.; Xu, F. R.; Ma, Y. Z.; Dai, S. J.; Sun, Z. H.; Jansen, G. R.

    2018-05-01

    We study nuclear multipole resonances in the framework of the random-phase approximation by using the chiral potential NNLOsat. This potential includes two- and three-body terms that have been simultaneously optimized to low-energy nucleon-nucleon scattering data and selected nuclear structure data. Our main focuses have been the isoscalar monopole, isovector dipole, and isoscalar quadrupole resonances of the closed-shell nuclei, 4He, O 16 ,22 ,24 , and Ca,4840. These resonance modes have been widely observed in experiment. In addition, we use a renormalized chiral potential Vlow-k, based on the N3LO two-body potential by Entem and Machleidt [Phys. Rev. C 68, 041001 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevC.68.041001]. This introduces a dependency on the cutoff parameter used in the normalization procedure as reported in previous works by other groups. While NNLOsat can reasonably reproduce observed multipole resonances, it is not possible to find a single cutoff parameter for the Vlow-k potential that simultaneously describes the different types of resonance modes. The sensitivity to the cutoff parameter can be explained by missing induced three-body forces in the calculations. Our results for neutron-rich O,2422 show a mixing nature of isoscalar and isovector resonances in the dipole channel at low energies. We predict that 22O and 24O have low-energy isoscalar quadrupole resonances at energies lower than 5 MeV.

  17. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy studies of proteins-glycoconjugates interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetti, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis work has been focused on the analysis of the structural requisites for recognition and binding between proteins and glycoconjugates, essential for the comprehension of mechanisms of paramount importance in chemistry, biology and biomedicine. A large variety of techniques, such as crystallographic analysis, titration microcalorimetry (ITC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and fluorescence spectroscopy, allows the elucidation of molecular recognition events. In the last years...

  18. Direct vs statistical decay of nuclear giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.

    1986-07-01

    A theoretical framework for the description of the decay of giant multipole resonances is developed. Besides the direct decay, both the pre-equilibrium and statistical (compound) decays are taken into account in a consistent way. It is shown that the statistical decay of the GR is not necessarily correctly described by the Hauser-Feshbach theory owing to the presence of a mixing parameter, which measures the degree of fragmentation. Applications are made to several cases. (Author) [pt

  19. Value of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabon-Martin, C.

    1987-01-01

    The present study summarizes an experience with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of twelve patients with a variety of cardiac abnormalities (myocardial infarction, mural thrombi, obstructive cardiomyopathy, pericarditis). The results are compared with clinical data, with measurements from other techniques such as two-dimensional echocardiography and with the images in normal subjects. An anticipated advantage of MRI is the ability to provide better tissue characterization, than has been attained with other imaging techniques, by relaxation time measurement [fr

  20. Measuring nuclear reaction cross sections to extract information on neutrinoless double beta decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Agodi, C.; Acosta, L.; Auerbach, N.; Bellone, J.; Bijker, R.; Bonanno, D.; Bongiovanni, D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Boztosun, I.; Branchina, V.; Bussa, M. P.; Calabrese, S.; Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Calvo, D.; Carbone, D.; Chávez Lomelí, E. R.; Coban, A.; Colonna, M.; D'Agostino, G.; De Geronimo, G.; Delaunay, F.; Deshmukh, N.; de Faria, P. N.; Ferraresi, C.; Ferreira, J. L.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fisichella, M.; Foti, A.; Gallo, G.; Garcia, U.; Giraudo, G.; Greco, V.; Hacisalihoglu, A.; Kotila, J.; Iazzi, F.; Introzzi, R.; Lanzalone, G.; Lavagno, A.; La Via, F.; Lay, J. A.; Lenske, H.; Linares, R.; Litrico, G.; Longhitano, F.; Lo Presti, D.; Lubian, J.; Medina, N.; Mendes, D. R.; Muoio, A.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Pakou, A.; Pandola, L.; Petrascu, H.; Pinna, F.; Reito, S.; Rifuggiato, D.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Russo, A. D.; Russo, G.; Santagati, G.; Santopinto, E.; Sgouros, O.; Solakci, S. O.; Souliotis, G.; Soukeras, V.; Spatafora, A.; Torresi, D.; Tudisco, S.; Vsevolodovna, R. I. M.; Wheadon, R. J.; Yildirin, A.; Zagatto, V. A. B.

    2018-02-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0vββ) is considered the best potential resource to access the absolute neutrino mass scale. Moreover, if observed, it will signal that neutrinos are their own anti-particles (Majorana particles). Presently, this physics case is one of the most important research “beyond Standard Model” and might guide the way towards a Grand Unified Theory of fundamental interactions. Since the 0vββ decay process involves nuclei, its analysis necessarily implies nuclear structure issues. In the NURE project, supported by a Starting Grant of the European Research Council (ERC), nuclear reactions of double charge-exchange (DCE) are used as a tool to extract information on the 0vββ Nuclear Matrix Elements. In DCE reactions and ββ decay indeed the initial and final nuclear states are the same and the transition operators have similar structure. Thus the measurement of the DCE absolute cross-sections can give crucial information on ββ matrix elements. In a wider view, the NUMEN international collaboration plans a major upgrade of the INFN-LNS facilities in the next years in order to increase the experimental production of nuclei of at least two orders of magnitude, thus making feasible a systematic study of all the cases of interest as candidates for 0vββ.

  1. Out-pile Test of Double Cladding Fuel Rod Mockups for a Nuclear Fuel Irradiation Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Jaemin; Park, Sungjae; Kang, Younghwan; Kim, Harkrho; Kim, Bonggoo; Kim, Youngki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    An instrumented capsule for a nuclear fuel irradiation test has been developed to measure fuel characteristics, such as a fuel temperature, internal pressure of a fuel rod, a fuel pellet elongation and a neutron flux during an irradiation test at HANARO. In the future, nuclear fuel irradiation tests under a high temperature condition are expected from users. To prepare for this request, we have continued developing the technology for a high temperature nuclear fuel irradiation test at HANARO. The purpose of this paper is to verify the possibility that the temperature of a nuclear fuel can be controlled at a high temperature during an irradiation test. Therefore we designed and fabricated double cladding fuel rod mockups. And we performed out-pile tests using these mockups. The purposes of a out-pile test is to analyze an effect of a gap size, which is between an outer cladding and an inner cladding, on the temperature and the effect of a mixture ratio of helium gas and neon gas on the temperature. This paper presents the design and fabrication of double cladding fuel rod mockups and the results of the out-pile test.

  2. Clinical application of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (resistive type) on cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Katsuya; Watanabe, Shigeru; Masuda, Yoshiaki; Inagaki, Yoshiaki; Ikehira, Hiroo; Fukuda, Nobuo; Tateno, Yukio.

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) imaging in diagnosing cardiovascular disease, 27 subjects were examined using a 0.1-Tesla resistive type (ASAHI MARK-J). In 10 normal subjects, four cardiac chambers, interventricular septum, aorta, pulmonary vessels and vena cava were clearly identified in NMR imaging. In two patients with old anteroseptal myocardial infarction, anteroseptal wall thinning and left ventricular aneurysm with mural thrombi were demonstrated. In two cases of antrolateral and posterolateral myocardial infarction, however, infarcted areas were not identified in NMR imaging. In one patient with congestive cardiomyopathy, enlarged left ventricle without hypertrophy was recognized. In two patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, NMR imaging disclosed thickened left ventricular wall associated with its narrowed cavity. A mural thrombus in the right ventricle was distinctly visualized in one patient with cardio-vascular Behcet's disease. In two patients with mitral valve stenosis, enlarged left atrium with a mural thrombus was clearly demonstrated in both cross and longitudinal sections. In three patients with thoratic aortic aneurysm, local dilatation of aorta and mural thrombi were recognized. In four patients with dissecting aortic aneurysm, double channels with an intimal flap in the aorta were visualized in NMR imaging. Mean T 1 values and standard deviations of left ventricle, left ventricular wall, and thrombi were 593+-89, 341+-20, 316+-84 msec, respectively. Mean T 1 values of thrombi were ordinally shorter than those of left ventricule. But some thrombi which might be expected fresh had longer T 1 values. (J.P.N.)

  3. The use of acoustically tuned resonators to improve the sound transmission loss of double-panel partitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, J. M.; Fahy, F. J.

    1988-07-01

    Double-leaf partitions are often utilized in situations requiring low weight structures with high transmission loss, an example of current interest being the fuselage walls of propeller-driven aircraft. In this case, acoustic excitation is periodic and, if one of the frequencies of excitation lies in the region of the fundamental mass-air-mass frequency of the partition, insulation performance is considerably less than desired. The potential effectiveness of tuned Helmholtz resonators connected to the partition cavity is investigated as a method of improving transmission loss. This is demonstrated by a simple theoretical model and then experimentally verified. Results show that substantial improvements may be obtained at and around the mass-air-mass frequency for a total resonator volume 15 percent of the cavity volume.

  4. Unraveling multi-spin effects in rotational resonance nuclear magnetic resonance using effective reduced density matrix theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SivaRanjan, Uppala; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical model integrating the concepts of reduced density matrix and effective Hamiltonians is proposed to explain the multi-spin effects observed in rotational resonance (R 2 ) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Employing this approach, the spin system of interest is described in a reduced subspace inclusive of its coupling to the surroundings. Through suitable model systems, the utility of our theory is demonstrated and verified with simulations emerging from both analytic and numerical methods. The analytic results presented in this article provide an accurate description/interpretation of R 2 experimental results and could serve as a test-bed for distinguishing coherent/incoherent effects in solid-state NMR

  5. Unraveling multi-spin effects in rotational resonance nuclear magnetic resonance using effective reduced density matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SivaRanjan, Uppala; Ramachandran, Ramesh, E-mail: rramesh@iisermohali.ac.in [Department of Chemical Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Mohali, Sector 81, Manauli, P.O. Box-140306, Mohali, Punjab (India)

    2014-02-07

    A quantum-mechanical model integrating the concepts of reduced density matrix and effective Hamiltonians is proposed to explain the multi-spin effects observed in rotational resonance (R{sup 2}) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Employing this approach, the spin system of interest is described in a reduced subspace inclusive of its coupling to the surroundings. Through suitable model systems, the utility of our theory is demonstrated and verified with simulations emerging from both analytic and numerical methods. The analytic results presented in this article provide an accurate description/interpretation of R{sup 2} experimental results and could serve as a test-bed for distinguishing coherent/incoherent effects in solid-state NMR.

  6. How nanoparticles encapsulating fluorophores allow a double detection of biomolecules by localized surface plasmon resonance and luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbillon, G; Faure, A C; Kork, N El; Moretti, P; Roux, S; Tillement, O; Ou, M G; Descamps, A; Perriat, P; Vial, A; Bijeon, J-L; Marquette, C A; Jacquier, B

    2008-01-01

    The paper shows how polysiloxane particles encapsulating fluorophores can be successfully used to detect biotin-streptavidin binding by two types of technique. After functionalization of the particles by streptavidin, the fixation of the biomolecule can indeed be detected by a shift of the localized surface plasmon resonance of the biotinylated gold dots used as substrate and by the luminescence of the fluorophores evidenced by scanning near-field optical microscopy. The development of particles allowing such a double detection opens a route for increasing the reliability of biological detection and for multi-labelling strategies crossing both detection principles

  7. How nanoparticles encapsulating fluorophores allow a double detection of biomolecules by localized surface plasmon resonance and luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbillon, G; Faure, A C; Kork, N El; Moretti, P [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS UMR 5620, Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents (LPCML), Domaine Scientifique de La Doua, Bat Kastler, 10 rue Andre Marie Ampere 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Roux, S; Tillement, O [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS UMR 5620, Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents (LPCML), Domaine Scientifique de La Doua, Bat Kastler, 10 rue Andre Marie Ampere 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ou, M G; Descamps, A; Perriat, P [Materiaux, Ingenierie et Sciences (MATEIS), CNRS UMR 5510, Universite de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, Domaine Scientifique de La Doua, 7 avenue Jean Capelle 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Vial, A; Bijeon, J-L [Institut Charles Delaunay, CNRS FRE 2848, Laboratoire de Nanotechnologie et d' Instrumentation Optique (LNIO), Universite de Technologie de Troyes, 12 rue Marie Curie BP 2060 10010 Troyes Cedex (France); Marquette, C A [Laboratoire de Genie Enzymatique et Biomoleculaire, UMR 5246 CNRS-ICBMS, Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Jacquier, B [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS UMR 5620, Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents (LPCML), Domaine Scientifique de La Doua, Bat Kastler, 10 rue Andre Marie Ampere 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2008-01-23

    The paper shows how polysiloxane particles encapsulating fluorophores can be successfully used to detect biotin-streptavidin binding by two types of technique. After functionalization of the particles by streptavidin, the fixation of the biomolecule can indeed be detected by a shift of the localized surface plasmon resonance of the biotinylated gold dots used as substrate and by the luminescence of the fluorophores evidenced by scanning near-field optical microscopy. The development of particles allowing such a double detection opens a route for increasing the reliability of biological detection and for multi-labelling strategies crossing both detection principles.

  8. High-precision hyperfine structure measurement in slow atomic ion beams by collinear laser-rf double resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarjit Sen; Childs, W.J.; Goodman, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    A new collinear laser-ion beam apparatus for slow ions (1 to 1.5 keV) has been built for measuring the hyperfine structure of metastable levels of ions with laser-rf double resonance technique. Narrow linewidths of ∼60 kHz (FWHM) have been observed for the first time in such systems. As a first application the hyperfine structure of the 4f 7 ( 8 S 0 )5d 9 D/sub J/ 0 metastable levels of /sup 151,153/Eu + has been measured with high precision. 10 refs., 8 figs

  9. Neutrino nuclear responses for double beta decays and astro neutrinos by charge exchange reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu

    2014-09-01

    Neutrino nuclear responses are crucial for neutrino studies in nuclei. Charge exchange reactions (CER) are shown to be used to study charged current neutrino nuclear responses associated with double beta decays(DBD)and astro neutrino interactions. CERs to be used are high energy-resolution (He3 ,t) reactions at RCNP, photonuclear reactions via IAR at NewSUBARU and muon capture reactions at MUSIC RCNP and MLF J-PARC. The Gamow Teller (GT) strengths studied by CERs reproduce the observed 2 neutrino DBD matrix elements. The GT and spin dipole (SD) matrix elements are found to be reduced much due to the nucleon spin isospin correlations and the non-nucleonic (delta isobar) nuclear medium effects. Impacts of the reductions on the DBD matrix elements and astro neutrino interactions are discussed.

  10. Electron-nuclear interaction in 13C nanotube double quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Churchill, H O H; Bestwick, A J; Harlow, J W

    2009-01-01

    For coherent electron spins, hyperfine coupling to nuclei in the host material can either be a dominant source of unwanted spin decoherence or, if controlled effectively, a resource enabling storage and retrieval of quantum information. To investigate the effect of a controllable nuclear...... environment on the evolution of confined electron spins, we have fabricated and measured gate-defined double quantum dots with integrated charge sensors made from single-walled carbon nanotubes with a variable concentration of 13C (nuclear spin I=1/2) among the majority zero-nuclear-spin 12C atoms. We observe...... strong isotope effects in spin-blockaded transport, and from the magnetic field dependence estimate the hyperfine coupling in 13C nanotubes to be of the order of 100 ¿µeV, two orders of magnitude larger than anticipated. 13C-enhanced nanotubes are an interesting system for spin-based quantum information...

  11. Strong Coupling Cavity QED with Gate-Defined Double Quantum Dots Enabled by a High Impedance Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stockklauser

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The strong coupling limit of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED implies the capability of a matterlike quantum system to coherently transform an individual excitation into a single photon within a resonant structure. This not only enables essential processes required for quantum information processing but also allows for fundamental studies of matter-light interaction. In this work, we demonstrate strong coupling between the charge degree of freedom in a gate-defined GaAs double quantum dot (DQD and a frequency-tunable high impedance resonator realized using an array of superconducting quantum interference devices. In the resonant regime, we resolve the vacuum Rabi mode splitting of size 2g/2π=238  MHz at a resonator linewidth κ/2π=12  MHz and a DQD charge qubit decoherence rate of γ_{2}/2π=40  MHz extracted independently from microwave spectroscopy in the dispersive regime. Our measurements indicate a viable path towards using circuit-based cavity QED for quantum information processing in semiconductor nanostructures.

  12. Time-dependent resonant tunnelling for parallel-coupled double quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Bing; Djuric, Ivana; Cui, H L; Lei, X L

    2004-01-01

    We derive the quantum rate equations for an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer with two vertically coupled quantum dots embedded in each of two arms by means of the nonequilibrium Green function in the sequential tunnelling regime. Based on these equations, we investigate time-dependent resonant tunnelling under a small amplitude irradiation and find that the resonant photon-assisted tunnelling peaks in photocurrent demonstrate a combination behaviour of Fano and Lorentzian resonances due to the interference effect between the two pathways in this parallel configuration, which is controllable by threading the magnetic flux inside this device

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance J coupling constant polarizabilities of hydrogen peroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Hanna; Nielsen, Monia R.; Pagola, Gabriel I.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the so far most extended investigation of the calculation of the coupling constant polarizability of a molecule. The components of the coupling constant polarizability are derivatives of the NMR indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constant with respect to an external elec...

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory, quadrennial report; Laboratoire commun de resonance magnetique nucleaire, rapport quadriennal 1994-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This quadrennial report of the nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory gives an overview of the main activities. Among the different described activities, only one is interesting for the INIS database: it concerns the Solid NMR of cements used for radioactive wastes storage. In this case, the NMR is used to characterize the structure of the material and the composition, structure and kinetics of formation of the alteration layer which is formed at the surface of concrete during water leaching conditions. The NMR methodology is given. (O.M.)

  15. Fission decay properties of nuclear giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Arruda Neto, J.D.T.; Hussein, M.S.; Carlson, B.V.

    1986-05-01

    The statistical fission decay properties of the giant dipole, quadrupole and monopole resonances in 236 U are investigated with the aid of the Hauser-Feshbach model. It is found, contrary to several recent claims, that the GQR fission decay probability is as large as that of the GDR, at energies higher than the fission barrier. At energies close to the f.b., the GQR fission probability is found to be appreciably larger than that of the GDR. The GMR fission probability follows closely that of the GQR. (Author) [pt

  16. Microcomputer simulation of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging contrasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bihan, D.

    1985-01-01

    The high information content of magnetic resonance images is due to the multiplicity of its parameters. However, this advantage introduces a difficulty in the interpretation of the contrast: an image is strongly modified according to the visualised parameters. The author proposes a micro-computer simulation program. After recalling the main intrinsic and extrinsic parameters, he shows how the program works and its interest as a pedagogic tool and as an aid for contrast optimisation of images as a function of the suspected pathology [fr

  17. Quantitative dosing by nuclear magnetic resonance; Dosages quantitatifs par resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, I [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The measurement of the absolute concentration of a heavy water reference containing approximately 99.8 per cent of D{sub 2}O has been performed, by an original magnetic resonance method ('Adiabatic fast passage method') with a precision of 5.10{sup -5} on the D{sub 2}O concentration. (author) [French] La determination du titre absolu d'une eau lourde etalon de teneur approximative de 99,8 pour cent de D{sub 2}O a pu etre effectuee par une methode originale de resonance magnetique ('Methode de passage rapide adiabatique') a une precision de 5.10{sup -5} sur le titre de D{sub 2}O. (auteur)

  18. Quantitative dosing by nuclear magnetic resonance; Dosages quantitatifs par resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, I. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The measurement of the absolute concentration of a heavy water reference containing approximately 99.8 per cent of D{sub 2}O has been performed, by an original magnetic resonance method ('Adiabatic fast passage method') with a precision of 5.10{sup -5} on the D{sub 2}O concentration. (author) [French] La determination du titre absolu d'une eau lourde etalon de teneur approximative de 99,8 pour cent de D{sub 2}O a pu etre effectuee par une methode originale de resonance magnetique ('Methode de passage rapide adiabatique') a une precision de 5.10{sup -5} sur le titre de D{sub 2}O. (auteur)

  19. Add-drop double bus microresonator array local oscillators for sharp multiple Fano resonance engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahua; Qu, Ye; Wu, Ying

    2018-03-01

    Asymmetric resonances are currently the subject of considerable research efforts in photonic nanostructures. Here we propose a feasible method to achieve multiple Fano resonances and their control in an optical compound system consisting of an array of on-chip microresonators without mutual coupling and two parallel fiber waveguides side-coupled to the microresonator array by means of a local oscillator. We derive analytical and transparent expressions for the power transmission function summing over the two light transporting paths within the framework of quantum optics. It is clearly shown that introducing the local oscillator as an additional light propagating path plays an important role in the formation of narrow and multiple Fano resonance lineshapes. The power transmission spectrum through the combination of both the microresonator array and the local oscillator is very sensitive to the system parameters, for example, the intrinsic decay rate of the resonator, the phase shift factor of the local oscillator, the transmission coefficient of the fiber beam splitter, and the total number of the microresonators. Through detailed analysis, we identify the optimums for generating Fano resonance lineshapes. Also, we assess the experimental feasibility of the scheme using currently available technology. The proposed method is relatively straightforward as it requires only one local oscillator as one interferometer arm and it is mostly fiber-based. We believe that our work will help to understand and improve multiple Fano resonance engineering.

  20. Principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) - current state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerski, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has progressed rapidly from laboratory curiosity to commercial exploitation and clinical application in the space of only three years. The physical principles underlying the technique are described and the equipment requirements outlined. The question of optimal magnetic field strength is discussed. (author)

  1. Time-domain, nuclear-resonant, forward scattering: the classical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoy, G.R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter assuming the matter to have nuclear transitions in resonance with incident electromagnetic radiation. The source of the radiation is taken to be of two types; natural radioactive gamma decay and synchrotron radiation. Numerical examples using 57 Fe are given for the two types of source radiation. Calculated results are contrasted for the two cases. Electromagnetic radiation produced by recoil-free gamma-ray emission has essentially the natural linewidth. Electromagnetic radiation from a synchrotron, even with the best monochromators available, has a relatively broad-band spectrum, essentially constant for these considerations. Polarization effects are considered. In general, the nuclear-resonant medium changes the polarization of the input radiation on traversing the medium. Calculations are presented to illustrate that synchrotron radiation studies using nuclear-resonant forward scattering have the potential for making high-precision measurements of hyperfine fields and recoilless fractions. An interesting aspect of nuclear-resonant forward scattering, relative to possible gamma-ray laser development, is the so-called 'speed-up' effect

  2. Phosphorus-doped thin silica films characterized by magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, H.J.; Skibsted, J.; Kristensen, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of 31P and 29Si have been achieved for a thin silica film doped with only 1.8% 31P and deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on a pure silicon wafer. The observation of a symmetric 31P chemical shift tensor is consistent...

  3. Ga nuclear magnetic resonance study of UTGa5(T = Ni,Pt)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Harukazu; Sakai, Hironori; Tokunaga, Yo; Tokiwa, Yoshihumi; Ikeda, Shugo; Onuki, Yoshichika; Kambe, Shinsaku; Walstedt, Russell E

    2003-01-01

    Ga nuclear magnetic resonance measurements have been carried out for the 5f antiferromagnets UNiGa 5 and UPtGa 5 . The transferred field at the Ga nuclei has been evaluated. The magnetic structure in the antiferromagnetic region has been confirmed from the microscopic point of view. The mechanism of the hyperfine interaction is discussed

  4. Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and Polychlorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in vito

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-06

    L. Narayanan. and B. M. Jamot. ’Effects of Peulluoro-n- octanoic Acid , Perfluoro-n-decanoic Acid , and Clofibrate on Hepatic Phosphorus Metabolism in...pathways and examined the impact of perfluorocarboxylic acid exposure. This investigative strategy will delineate the metabolic effices exerted by...Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and Polychlorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in Vivo Principal Investigator: Nicholas V. Reo

  5. Nuclear data project in Korea and resonance parameter evaluation of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jonghwa; Oh, Soo-Youl

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear data activities in the fields of evaluation, processing, measurement, and service in Korea are presented in this paper. As one of the current activities, the neutron resonance parameters for stable or long-lived nineteen fission products have been evaluated and the results are presented here. (author)

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance and the question of 5F electron localization in the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradin, F.Y.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance results are presented for a number of NaCl-type compounds and cubic Laves-phase type compounds of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium. Special emphasis is placed on the Knight shift and spin-lattice relaxation time measurements and their interpretation in terms of localized or itinerant pictures of the 5Line integral electrons

  7. Rheo-NMR: nuclear magnetic resonance and the rheology of complex fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callaghan, Paul T.

    1999-01-01

    The application of nuclear magnetic resonance methods to the study of complex fluids under shearing and extensional flows is reviewed. Both NMR velocimetry and spectroscopy approaches are discussed while specific systems studied include polymer melts, rigid rod and random coil polymers in solution, lyotropic and thermotropic liquid crystals and liquid crystalline polymers, and wormlike micelles. Reference is made to food systems. (author)

  8. The design of photoelectric signal processing system for a nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian; Zhou, Binquan; Li, Hong; Zhao, Xinghua; Mu, Weiwei; Wu, Wenfeng

    2017-10-01

    Navigation technology is crucial to the national defense and military, which can realize the measurement of orientation, positioning, attitude and speed for moving object. Inertial navigation is not only autonomous, real-time, continuous, hidden, undisturbed but also no time-limited and environment-limited. The gyroscope is the core component of the inertial navigation system, whose precision and size are the bottleneck of the performance. However, nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope is characteristic of the advantage of high precision and small size. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope can meet the urgent needs of high-tech weapons and equipment development of new generation. This paper mainly designs a set of photoelectric signal processing system for nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope based on FPGA, which process and control the information of detecting laser .The photoelectric signal with high frequency carrier is demodulated by in-phase and quadrature demodulation method. Finally, the processing system of photoelectric signal can compensate the residual magnetism of the shielding barrel and provide the information of nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope angular velocity.

  9. Aspects of the engineering design of whole-body nuclear magnetic resonance machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.; Collins, A.G.; Hall, A.S.; Harman, R.R.; Butson, P.C.; Gilderdale, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The paper on whole-body nuclear magnetic resonance machines reviews the basic physics very briefly, then examines the design requirements and engineering constraints for the major components of such a system. The paper concludes with a brief resume of the techniques used, and a short presentation of the type of results that are achieved. (author)

  10. In situ nuclear magnetic resonance study of defect dynamics during deformation of materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murty, K.L.; Detemple, K.; Kanert, O.; Peters, G; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques can be used to monitor in situ the dynamical behaviour of point and line defects in materials during deformation. These techniques are non-destructive and non-invasive. We report here the atomic transport, in particular the enhanced diffusion during deformation

  11. A Noninvasive Method to Study Regulation of Extracellular Fluid Volume in Rats Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR)-based measurement of body composition of rodents is an effective method to quickly and repeatedly measure proportions of fat, lean, and fluid without anesthesia. TD-NMR provides a measure of free water in a living animal, termed % f...

  12. Measurement of single electron and nuclear spin states based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Gennady P [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bishop, Alan R [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Chernobrod, Boris M [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hawley, Marilyn E [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Tsifrinovich, Vladimir I [Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    A novel approach for measurement of single electron and nuclear spin states is suggested. Our approach is based on optically detected magnetic resonance in a nano-probe located at the apex of an AFM tip. The method provides single electron spin sensitivity with nano-scale spatial resolution.

  13. Measurement of single electron and nuclear spin states based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Gennady P; Bishop, Alan R; Chernobrod, Boris M; Hawley, Marilyn E; Brown, Geoffrey W; Tsifrinovich, Vladimir I

    2006-01-01

    A novel approach for measurement of single electron and nuclear spin states is suggested. Our approach is based on optically detected magnetic resonance in a nano-probe located at the apex of an AFM tip. The method provides single electron spin sensitivity with nano-scale spatial resolution

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance analogs of the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, S.

    1998-01-01

    It has been recently shown that analogs of the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger experiment, which demonstrates the impossibility of certain types of local hidden variable theories in quantum mechanics, can be performed using nuclear magnetic resonance on spins in molecules at finite temperature. This paper examines the role of decoherence in the microscopic 'measurements' used to perform the NMR experiments. (author)

  15. Sc-45 nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of precipitation in dilute Al-Sc alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celotto, S; Bastow, TJ

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with Sc-45 is used to determine the solid solubility of scandium in aluminium and to follow the precipitation of Al3Sc during the ageing of an Al-0.06 at.% Sc alloy via the two fully resolved peaks, corresponding to Sc in the solid solution Al matrix and to Sc in the

  16. Principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging using an inhomogeneous polarizing field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briguet, A.; Chaillout, J.; Goldman, M.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, it is indicated how to reconstruct nuclear magnetic resonance images acquired in an inhomogeneous static magnetic field without the previous knowledge of its spatial distribution. The method provides also the map of the static magnetic field through the sample volume; furthermore it allows the use of non uniform but spatially controlled encoding gradients [fr

  17. Development of atomic-beam resonance method to measure the nuclear moments of unstable nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, T., E-mail: sugimoto@ribf.riken.jp [SPring-8 (Japan); Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Kawamura, H.; Murata, J. [Rikkyo University, Department of Physics (Japan); Nagae, D.; Shimada, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Ueno, H.; Yoshimi, A. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    We have been working on the development of a new technique of atomic-beam resonance method to measure the nuclear moments of unstable nuclei. In the present study, an ion-guiding system to be used as an atomic-beam source have been developed.

  18. Quantification of lipoprotein profiles by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aru, Violetta; Lam, Chloie; Khakimov, Bekzod

    2017-01-01

    Lipoproteins and their subfraction profiles have been associated to diverse diseases including Cardio Vascular Disease (CVD). There is thus a great demand for measuring and quantifying the lipoprotein profile in an efficient and accurate manner. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is un...

  19. Interaction between adrenaline and dibenzo-18-crown-6: Electrochemical, nuclear magnetic resonance, and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhang-Yu; Liu, Tao; Wang, Xue-Liang

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between adrenaline (Ad) and dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6) was studied by cyclic voltammetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the theoretical calculations, respectively. The results show that DB18C6 will affect the electron transfer properties of Ad. DB18C6 can form stable supramolecular complexes with Ad through ion-dipole and hydrogen bond interactions.

  20. Structure and dynamics of paramagnetic transients by pulsed EPR and NMR detection of nuclear resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of transient radicals in pulse radiolysis can be studied by time resolved EPR and NMR techniques. EPR study of kinetics and relaxation is illustrated. The NMR detection of nuclear resonance in transient radicals is a new method which allows the study of hyperfine coupling, population dynamics, radical kinetics, and reaction mechanism. 9 figures

  1. 19F-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a tool to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    19F-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a tool to investigate host-guest complexation of some antidepressant drugs with natural and modified cyclodextrins. Leila Shafiee Dastjerdi1* and Mojtaba Shamsipur2. 1Faculty of Science, Roudehen Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, 2Department of Chemistry, ...

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of living systems : Applications in comparative physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanDenThillart, G; VanWaarde, A

    The most attractive feature of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is the noninvasive and nondestructive measurement of chemical compounds in intact tissues. MRS already has many applications in comparative physiology, usually based on observation of P-31, since the levels of phosphorus

  3. Display of cross sectional anatomy by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinshaw, W.S.; Andrew, E.R.; Bottomley, P.A.; Holland, G.N.; Moore, W.S.; Worthington, B.S.

    1978-01-01

    High definition cross-sectional images produced by a new nuclear magnetic resonace (NMR) technique are shown. The images are a series of thin section scans in the coronal plane of the head of a rabbit. The NMR images are derived from the distribution of the density of mobile hydrogen atoms. Various tissue types can be distinguished and a clear registration of gross anatomy is demonstrated. No known hazards are associated with the technique. (author)

  4. Switching Device Dead Time Optimization of Resonant Double-Sided LCC Wireless Charging System for Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the reduction of the influence of the dead time setting on power level and efficiency of the inverter of double-sided LCC resonant wireless power transfer (WPT system, a dead time soft switching optimization method for metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET is proposed. At first, the mathematic description of double-sided LCC resonant wireless charging system is established, and the operating mode is analyzed as well, deducing the quantitative characteristic that the secondary side compensation capacitor C2 can be adjusted to ensure that the circuit is inductive. A dead time optimization design method is proposed, contributing to achieving zero-voltage switching (ZVS of the inverter, which is closely related to the performance of the WPT system. In the end, a prototype is built. The experimental results verify that dead time calculated by this optimized method can ensure the soft switching of the inverter MOSFET and promote the power and efficiency of the WPT.

  5. Mechanical design parameters for detection of nuclear signals by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.J.; Hanlon, J.A.; Lamartine, B.; Hawley, M.; Solem, J.C.; Signer, S.; Jarmer, J.J.; Penttila, S.; Sillerud, L.O.; Pryputniewicz, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Recent theoretical work has shown that mechanical detection of magnetic resonance from a single nuclear spin is in principle possible. This theory has recently been experimentally validated by the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance signals using microscale cantilevers. Currently we are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are three orders of magnitude lower in intensity than electron signals. In order to achieve the needed thousand-fold improvement in sensitivity we have undertaken the development of optimized mechanical cantilevers and highly polarized samples. Finite element modeling is used as a tool to simulate cantilever beam dynamics and to optimize the mechanical properties including Q, resonant frequency, amplitude of vibration and spring constant. Simulations are compared to experiments using heterodyne hologram interferometry. Nanofabrication of optimized cantilevers via ion milling will be directed by the outcome of these simulations and experiments. Highly polarized samples are developed using a three-fold approach: (1) high magnetic field strength (2.5T), (2) low temperature (1K), and (3) use of samples polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization. Our recent experiments have demonstrated nuclear polarizations in excess of 50% in molecules of toulene

  6. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of (TMTSF) 2PF 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBrierty, V. J.; Douglass, D. C.; Wudl, F.

    1982-09-01

    Inverse linewidths and spin-lattice relaxation times of fluorine and proton magnetic resonance spectra are used to examine molecular motion in the organic superconductor (TMTSF) 2PF 6. The results clearly show that rotation of the PF 6- anion is the principal agent for the observed relaxation of fluorine contrary to some suggestions in the current literature. This interpretation is based upon qualitative comparison with relaxation in plastic crystals, where molecular rotation is well characterized, and upon the quantitative agreement between the calculated and observed linewidth change near 90K and the maximum spin-lattice relaxation rate at 140K. There is also motional evidence, supported by X-ray structure measurements, that a phase transition occurs in the vicinity of 160K.

  7. Phase-space exploration in nuclear giant resonance decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdz, S.; Nishizaki, S.; Wambach, J.; Speth, J.

    1995-01-01

    The rate of phase-space exploration in the decay of isovector and isoscalar giant quadrupole resonances in 40 Ca is analyzed. The study is based on the time dependence of the survival probability and of the spectrum of generalized entropies evaluated in the space of one-particle--one-hole (1p-1h) and 2p-2h states. Three different cases for the level distribution of 2p-2h background states, corresponding to (a) high degeneracy, (b) classically regular motion, and (c) classically chaotic motion, are studied. In the latter case the isovector excitation evolves almost statistically while the isoscalar excitation remains largely localized, even though it penetrates the whole available phase space

  8. Development of nuclear magnetic resonance tomography technology - TORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannus, A.

    1987-01-01

    The development of hardware and software necessary to implement the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques is described. The major subjects were the construction of an aquisition and control system which allowed the operation of a pulsed Fourier NMR spectrometer as a NMR Tomograph; further it was oriented the developing of a NMR spectrometer whose parameters could be easily reconfigured by the controlling system. As a result a sofisticated equipment which allows, more than the proposed, working with high resolution spectroscopic techniques and spectroscopy in solids, was obtained. Since the basic techniques employed in NMR and CT Tomographs are well known, a great emphasis was also given on the understanding of the image reconstruction techniques that constitutes today the frontier of research in this area. The results obtained with the system described here are considered good, comparable to the results from commercial units developed in cooperation with imaging groups located in universities abroad. (author) [pt

  9. Measurement of Charged Pions from Neutrino-produced Nuclear Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Clifford N. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A method for identifying stopped pions in a high-resolution scintillator bar detector is presented. I apply my technique to measure the axial mass MΔAfor production of the Δ(1232) resonance by neutrino, with the result MΔA = 1.16±0.20 GeV (68% CL) (limited by statistics). The result is produced from the measured spectrum of reconstructed momentum-transfer Q2. I proceed by varying the value of MΔA in a Rein-Sehgal-based Monte Carlo to produce the best agreement, using shape only (not normalization). The consistency of this result with recent reanalyses of previous bubble-chamber experiments is discussed.

  10. Observation of double resonant laser induced transitions in the $v = n - l - 1 = 2$ metastable cascade of antiprotonic helium-4 atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S; Tamura, H; Torii, H A; Hori, Masaki; Maas, F E; Morita, N; Kumakura, M; Sugai, I; Hartmann, F J; Daniel, H; Von Egidy, T; Ketzer, B; Pohl, R; Horváth, D; Eades, John; Widmann, E; Yamazaki, T

    1997-01-01

    A new laser-induced resonant transition in the $v=n-l-1=2$ metastable cascade of antiprotonic $^4$He atoms has been found by using a double resonance technique. This was done by setting the first laser to the already known 470.724 nm resonance ($(n,l)=(37,34)\\rightarrow (36,33)$), while the $(38,35)\\rightarrow (37,34)$ transition was searched for with the second laser. The resonant transition was found at wavelength of 529.622$\\pm$0.003 nm, showing excellent agreement with a recent prediction of Korobov.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of single proteins using quantum logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovchinsky, I; Sushkov, A O; Urbach, E; de Leon, N P; Choi, S; De Greve, K; Evans, R; Gertner, R; Bersin, E; Müller, C; McGuinness, L; Jelezko, F; Walsworth, R L; Park, H; Lukin, M D

    2016-02-19

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the structural analysis of organic compounds and biomolecules but typically requires macroscopic sample quantities. We use a sensor, which consists of two quantum bits corresponding to an electronic spin and an ancillary nuclear spin, to demonstrate room temperature magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of multiple nuclear species within individual ubiquitin proteins attached to the diamond surface. Using quantum logic to improve readout fidelity and a surface-treatment technique to extend the spin coherence time of shallow nitrogen-vacancy centers, we demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity sufficient to detect individual proton spins within 1 second of integration. This gain in sensitivity enables high-confidence detection of individual proteins and allows us to observe spectral features that reveal information about their chemical composition. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Development of nuclear fuel rod inspection technique using ultrasonic resonance phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Myung Sun; Lee, Jong Po; Ju, Young Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-11-01

    Acoustic resonance scattering from a nuclear fuel rod in water is analyzed. A new model for the background which is attributed to the interference of reflected wave and diffracted wave is found and here named {sup t}he inherent background{sup .} The resonance spectrum of a fuel rod is obtained by subtracting the inherent background from the scattered pressure. And also analyzed are the effect of material damping of cladding tube and pellet on the resonance spectrum of a fuel rod. The propagation characteristics of circumferential waves which cause the resonances of cladding tube is produced and the appropriate resonance modes for the application to the inspection of assembled fuel rods are selected. The resonance modes are experimentally measured for pre- and post-irradiated fuel rods and the validation of the fuel rod inspection using ultrasonic resonance phenomenon is examined. And thin ultrasonic sensors accessible into the narrow interval (about 2-3mm) between assembled fuel rods are designed and manufactured. 14 refs. (Author).

  13. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on bulge-containing DNA oligonucleotides from a mutational hot-spot sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodson, S.A.; Crothers, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    A series of bulge-containing and normal double-helical synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides, of sequence corresponding to a frame-shift mutational hot spot in the λ C/sub I/ gene, are compared by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 500 MHz. The imino proton resonances are assigned by one-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy. Nonselective T 1 inversion-recovery experiments are used to determine exchangeable proton lifetimes and to compare helix stability and dynamics of the three duplexes. An extra adenosine flanking the internal G-C base pairs has a strongly localized effect on helix stability, but the destabilizing effect of an extra cytidine in a C tract is delocalized over the entire G-C run. These data lead to the conclusion that the position of the bulge migrates along the run in the fast-exchange limit on the NMR time scale. Rapid migration of the bulge defect in homopolymeric sequences may help rationalize both frame-shift mutagenesis and translational frame shifting. The authors estimate that the unfavorable free energy of a localized bulge defect is 2.9-3.2 kcal/mol, in good agreement with earlier estimates for RNA helices

  14. The Transformations of French Nuclear Export Policy (1974-1976): A Triple Double Game

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouponneau, Florent

    2013-01-01

    A number of problems present themselves for any scholar seeking to take into account all determinants relating to 'national' and 'international' action in the analysis of foreign policy. In the domain of the French diplomatic practices of the mid-1970's-structured around the apparent issue of nuclear exports-archival consultation and interviews reveal that the various actors involved in this policy were not necessarily playing the same national and international 'double game.' While relations between states shape what they are and do, the various effects of refraction at work at the internal level prevents one from speaking of a state taken uniformly across a space of competition

  15. Double-arm time-of-flight mass-spectrometer of nuclear fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajvazian, G.M.; Astabatyan, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    A double-arm time-of-flight spectrometer of nuclear fragments for the investigation of heavy nuclei photofission in the intermediate energy range is described. The calibration results and working characteristics of the spectrometer, obtained using 252 Cf as a source of spontaneous fission, are presented. A mass resolution of σ m ∼2-3 a.m.u. was obtained within the registered fragments mass range of 80-160 a.m.u. The spectrometer was tested in the experiment on the investigation of 238 U nuclei fission by Bremsstahlung photons with Eγ max=1.75 GeV

  16. Double-Lambda hypernuclei and the nuclear medium effective Lambda Lambda interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Caro, José; García Recio, Carmen; Nieves Pamplona, Juan Miguel

    1999-01-01

    We fit the $^1 S_0 \\Lambda\\Lambda$ interaction in the nuclear medium to the masses of the experimentally known double-$\\Lambda$ hypernuclei: $^{\\phantom{6}6}_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}$He, $^{10}_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}$Be and $^{13}_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}$B. We derive this effective interaction from OBE J\\"ulich $\\Lambda\\Lambda$-type potentials and using both Hartree-Fock and variational approaches. We find that the inclusion of $\\Lambda\\Lambda$ correlations in the variational scheme leads to significant differenc...

  17. Nonlinear properties of double and triple barrier resonant tunneling structures in the sub-THz range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karuzskij, A.L.; Perestoronin, A.V.; Volchkov, N.A.

    2012-01-01

    The high-frequency nonlinear properties of GaAs/AlAs resonant tunneling diode (RTD) nanostructures and perspectives of implementation of the quantum regime of amplification in such structures, which is especially efficient in the range of sub-THz and THz ranges, are investigated. It is shown that in a triple barrier RTD the symmetry between the processes of amplification and dissipation can be avoided because of the interaction of an electromagnetic wave with both of resonant states in two quantum wells, that results in the significant growth of an RTD efficiency [ru

  18. Nonmonotonous electron mobility due to structurally induced resonant coupling of subband states in an asymmetric double quantum well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Nayak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We show that sharp nonmonotic variation of low temperature electron mobility μ can be achieved in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs barrier delta-doped double quantum well structure due to quantum mechanical transfer of subband electron wave functions within the wells. We vary the potential profile of the coupled structure as a function of the doping concentration in order to bring the subbands into resonance such that the subband energy levels anticross and the eigen states of the coupled structure equally share both the wells thereby giving rise to a dip in mobility. When the wells are of equal widths, the dip in mobility occurs under symmetric doping of the side barriers. In case of unequal well widths, the resonance can be obtained by suitable asymmetric variation of the doping concentrations. The dip in mobility becomes sharp and also the wavy nature of mobility takes a rectangular shape by increasing the barrier width. We show that the dip in mobility at resonance is governed by the interface roughness scattering through step like changes in the subband mobilities. It is also gratifying to show that the drop in mobility at the onset of occupation of second subband is substantially supressed through the quantum mechanical transfer of subband wave functions between the wells. Our results can be utilized for performance enhancement of coupled quantum well devices.

  19. Rapid vibrational and rotational energy-transfer rates in heated carbon dioxide collisions by double-resonance laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomason, M.D.

    1982-07-01

    Rates for resonant vibrational and rotational energy transfer from the 001 state by CO 2 + CO 2 collisions have been measured. All data were obtained by double resonance spectroscopy with CO 2 lasers in a 2.5 meter absorption cell at 700 0 K. Results for rotation transfer include pumped-level relaxation and the response of other 001 levels with ΔJ up to 18. These data are compared to four relevant collision models via a 35-level rate equation analysis. Sequence-band (002 → 101) and hot-band (011 → 110) lasting have been used to observe resonant nu 3 -transfer relaxation involving 001 + 001 reversible 002 + 000, 001 + 100 reversible 101 + 000, and 001 + 010 reversible 011 + 000. A multilevel rate analysis has been utilized to determine the rate coefficients for 001 going to the 002, the 101, and the 011 levels. Part of the hot-band data has been interpreted as due to 110 + 000 reversible 100 + 010, and the associated rate constant has been estimated. The results of the study are compared to the theory and to other experiments

  20. Sub-natural linewidth resonances in coherently-driven double Λ ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using the master equation approach, analytical results are obtained for the absorption spectrum of a weak probe in the presence of a strong pump. The model is applied to the double system 52 1/2 = 1, 2 → 523/2 ' = 1, 2 of 87Rb atom. It is shown that the absorption spectrum consists of a triplet, of which one ...

  1. Displacement and resonance behaviors of a piezoelectric diaphragm driven by a double-sided spiral electrode

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Zhiyuan; Olfatnia, Mohammad; Miao, Jianmin; Wang, Zhihong

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) diaphragm actuated by double-sided patterned electrodes. Au/Cr electrodes were deposited on bulk PZT wafers by sputtering while patterned by a lift-off process. SU-8 thick film

  2. Hadronic atoms and ticklish nuclei: the E2 nuclear resonance effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, M.

    1975-06-01

    The E2 nuclear resonance effect in hadronic atoms offers a way to increase the hadronic information that can be obtained from hadronic x-ray experiments. The effect occurs when an atomic deexcitation energy closely matches a nuclear excitation energy, so that some configuration mixing occurs. It shows up as an attenuation of some of the hadronic x-ray lines from a resonant versus a normal isotope target. The effect was observed very clearly in pionic cadmium in a recent LAMPF experiment. A planned LAMPF experiment will use the nuclear resonance effect to determine whether the p-wave π-nucleus interaction does indeed become repulsive for Z greater than or equal to 35 as predicted. The effect also appears in the kaonic molybdenum data taken at LBL because several of the stable molybdenum isotopes are resonant. A number of promising cases for π - , K - , anti p, and Σ - atoms are discussed and a spectacular and potentially very informative experiment on anti p- 100 Mo is proposed. (9 figures, 9 tables) (U.S.)

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance of randomly diluted magnetic materials; Ressonancia nuclear magnetica em materiais magneticos diluidos aleatoriamente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magon, C J

    1986-12-31

    The temperature dependence of the nuclear relaxation rates and line shapes of the F{sub O} resonance in the diluted antiferromagnet Fe{sub x} Zn{sub 1-x} F{sub 2} and Mn{sub x} Zn{sub 1-x} F{sub 2} are studied over a large temperature range T{sub N} < {approx} T {<=} 300 K. The high (room) temperature spin-lattice relaxation rates (1/T{sub 1}) of the F{sub O} nuclei, which are not transfer hyperfine coupled to the Fe (or Mn) spins, have been measured and calculated as a function of the concentration x. Good agreement with experiment is found for the theoretical results, which have been obtained in the range 0.1 {<=} x {<=} 0.8. The temperature dependence of 1/T{sub 1} for T{sub N}

  4. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Endodontics: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nardo, Dario; Gambarini, Gianluca; Capuani, Silvia; Testarelli, Luca

    2018-04-01

    This review analyzes the increasing role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in dentistry and its relevance in endodontics. Limits and new strategies to develop MRI protocols for endodontic purposes are reported and discussed. Eligible studies were identified by searching the PubMed databases. Only original articles on dental structures, anatomy, and endodontics investigated by in vitro and in vivo MRI were included in this review. Original articles on MRI in dentistry not concerning anatomy and endodontics were excluded. All the consulted studies showed well-defined images of pathological conditions such as caries and microcracks. The enhanced contrast of pulp provided a high-quality reproduction of the tooth shape and root canal in vitro and in vivo. Assessment of periapical lesions is possible even without the use of contrast medium. MRI is a nonionizing technique characterized by high tissue contrast and high image resolution of soft tissues; it could be considered a valid and safe diagnostic investigation in endodontics because of its potential to identify pulp tissues, define root canal shape, and locate periapical lesions. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Flow imaging by means of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedeen, V.J.; Rosen, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    To form an image (velocity profile) of fluid flowing in a vessel, the fluid is stimulated to produce a time-dependent magnetic resonance signal which is subjected to Fourier-transform. The stimulating is done so as to introduce spatially-dependent phase information indicative of the velocity profile of the fluid. Thus, for measuring velocity in the x-direction within a z-slice, after selective oxidation of the slice, a long gradient bsub(x), is applied, followed by a π pulse. A second frequency dispersing bsub(x) gradient bsub(x) is present in a period embracing the echo signal, following a phase encoding gradient bsub(y). Slice section may be omitted for projection imaging, and an image of fluid flow can be obtained by generating two data sets encoded with phase information indicative of two different velocity profiles of the fluid (taken at different times), combining the data sets, and displaying the resulting data set as an image. By analysing the signal over a period not centred at the middle of the echo signal, a frequency offset is introduced giving the image a striped appearance, the strips being curved in the presence of fluid flow. (author)

  6. Method of using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Leonard D.; Bennett, Dennis W.; Davis, Jon F.

    1985-01-01

    (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO is produced by the reaction of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH with SO.sub.2. Also produced in the reaction are ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 O and a new solid compound [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ]. Both (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO and [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] have fluorescent properties. The reaction of the subject invention is used in a method of measuring the concentration of SO.sub.2 pollutants in gases. By the method, a sample of gas is bubbled through a solution of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH, whereby any SO.sub.2 present in the gas will react to produce the two fluorescent products. The measured fluorescence of these products can then be used to calculate the concentration of SO.sub.2 in the original gas sample. The solid product [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] may be used as a standard in solid state NMR spectroscopy, wherein the resonance peaks of either .sup.1 H, .sup.13 C, .sup.15 N, or .sup.29 Si may be used as a reference.

  7. Noise reduction in double-panel structures by cavity and panel resonance control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.-H.; Berkhoff, A.P

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the cavity and the panel resonance control in a double‐panel structure. The double‐panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its light weight and effective

  8. The 132Sn giant dipole resonance as a constraint on nuclear matter properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Brandon; Bonasera, Giacomo; Shlomo, Shalom

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear giant resonances provide a sensitive method for constraining the properties of nuclear matter (NM) - many of which have large uncertainties - and thereby improve the nuclear energy-density functional. In this work, self-consistent Hartree-Fock random-phase approximation (HF-RPA) theory was employed to calculate the strength function and energy of the isovector giant dipole resonance (IVGDR) in the doubly-magic 132Sn nucleus. Several (17) commonly-used Skyrme-type interactions were employed. The correlations between the IVGDR centroid energy and each nuclear matter property were explored, as were correlations between the nuclear matter properties and the 132Sn neutron skin thickness rn -rp . Experimental data for the IVGDR centroid energy was used to constrain the symmetry energy density, the symmetry energy, and its first and second derivatives, respectively, of NM. Further investigation, particularly of nuclides far from stability, will be needed to extend the nuclear energy-density functional to the extremes of density and neutron abundance found in neutron stars and astrophysical nucleosynthesis environments.

  9. On the Fer expansion: Applications in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance and physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane, E-mail: esm041@mail.harvard.edu

    2016-01-18

    Theoretical approaches are useful and powerful tools for more accurate and efficient spin dynamics simulation to understand experiments and devising new RF pulse sequence in nuclear magnetic resonance. Solid-state NMR is definitely a timely topic or area of research, and not many papers on the respective theories are available in the literature of nuclear magnetic resonance or physics reports. This report presents the power and the salient features of the promising theoretical approach called Fer expansion that is helpful to describe the evolution of the spin system in nuclear magnetic resonance. The report presents a broad view of algorithms of spin dynamics based on the Fer expansion which provides procedures to control and describe the spin dynamics in solid-state NMR. Significant applications of the Fer expansion are illustrated in NMR and in physics such as classical physics, nonlinear dynamics systems, celestial mechanics and dynamical astronomy, hydrodynamics, nuclear, atomic, molecular physics, and quantum mechanics, quantum field theory, high energy physics, electromagnetism. The aim of this report is to bring to the attention of the spin dynamics community, the bridge that exists between solid-state NMR and other related fields of physics and applied mathematics.

  10. On the Floquet–Magnus expansion: Applications in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance and physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane, E-mail: emananga@gradcenter.cuny.edu [Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Charpentier, Thibault, E-mail: thibault.charpentier@cea.fr [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique, IRAMIS, Service interdisciplinaire sur les systèmes moléculaires et matériaux, CEA/CNRS UMR 3299, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-01-22

    Theoretical approaches are useful and powerful tools for more accurate and efficient spin dynamics simulation to understand experiments and devising new RF pulse sequence in nuclear magnetic resonance. Solid-state NMR is definitely a timely topic or area of research, and not many papers on the respective theories are available in the literature of nuclear magnetic resonance or physics reports. This report presents the power and the salient features of the promising theoretical approach called Floquet–Magnus expansion that is helpful to describe the time evolution of the spin system at all times in nuclear magnetic resonance. The report presents a broad view of algorithms of spin dynamics, based on promising and useful theory of Floquet–Magnus expansion. This theory provides procedures to control and describe the spin dynamics in solid-state NMR. Major applications of the Floquet–Magnus expansion are illustrated by simple solid-state NMR and physical applications such as in nuclear, atomic, molecular physics, and quantum mechanics, NMR, quantum field theory and high energy physics, electromagnetism, optics, general relativity, search of periodic orbits, and geometric control of mechanical systems. The aim of this report is to bring to the attention of the spin dynamics community, the bridge that exists between solid-state NMR and other related fields of physics and applied mathematics. This review article also discusses future potential theoretical directions in solid-state NMR.

  11. Force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance: recent advances and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, M; Degen, C L

    2010-08-27

    We review recent efforts to detect small numbers of nuclear spins using magnetic resonance force microscopy. Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a scanning probe technique that relies on the mechanical measurement of the weak magnetic force between a microscopic magnet and the magnetic moments in a sample. Spurred by the recent progress in fabricating ultrasensitive force detectors, MRFM has rapidly improved its capability over the last decade. Today it boasts a spin sensitivity that surpasses conventional, inductive nuclear magnetic resonance detectors by about eight orders of magnitude. In this review we touch on the origins of this technique and focus on its recent application to nanoscale nuclear spin ensembles, in particular on the imaging of nanoscale objects with a three-dimensional (3D) spatial resolution better than 10 nm. We consider the experimental advances driving this work and highlight the underlying physical principles and limitations of the method. Finally, we discuss the challenges that must be met in order to advance the technique towards single nuclear spin sensitivity-and perhaps-to 3D microscopy of molecules with atomic resolution.

  12. On the Fer expansion: Applications in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance and physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical approaches are useful and powerful tools for more accurate and efficient spin dynamics simulation to understand experiments and devising new RF pulse sequence in nuclear magnetic resonance. Solid-state NMR is definitely a timely topic or area of research, and not many papers on the respective theories are available in the literature of nuclear magnetic resonance or physics reports. This report presents the power and the salient features of the promising theoretical approach called Fer expansion that is helpful to describe the evolution of the spin system in nuclear magnetic resonance. The report presents a broad view of algorithms of spin dynamics based on the Fer expansion which provides procedures to control and describe the spin dynamics in solid-state NMR. Significant applications of the Fer expansion are illustrated in NMR and in physics such as classical physics, nonlinear dynamics systems, celestial mechanics and dynamical astronomy, hydrodynamics, nuclear, atomic, molecular physics, and quantum mechanics, quantum field theory, high energy physics, electromagnetism. The aim of this report is to bring to the attention of the spin dynamics community, the bridge that exists between solid-state NMR and other related fields of physics and applied mathematics.

  13. 43. Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and its Applications. Cracow. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-12-01

    42 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and its Applications, held on 1-2 December 2010 in Cracow (Poland), was devoted to the development of different magnetic resonance techniques and application of such techniques as crucial part of the studies. The Report contains 58 short descriptions of the contributions submitted by the participants of the Seminar. They cover all areas of the NMR application in major branches of basic chemistry, structural biology, medicine and materials science. Also recent results of the quantum chemical calculations of the NMR parameters are presented.

  14. Giant dipole resonances in hot nuclear matter in the model of self-relaxing mean field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okolowicz, J.; Ploszajczak, M.; Drozdz, S.; Caurier, E.

    1989-01-01

    The extended time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach is applied for the description of the isovector giant dipole resonance in 40 Ca at finite temperatures. The thermalization process is described using the relaxation-time ansatz for the collision integral. Strong inhibition of the giant-dipole-resonance γ-decay is found due to the fast vaporization of the nuclear surface for thermal excitation energies above E * /A ≅ 4.5 MeV. This pre-equilibrium emission of particles in the vapor phase is associated with the radial expansion of nucleus and with the vanishing particle binding energies mainly for protons. (orig.)

  15. Mirror and Bragg reflections of neutrons at a nuclear resonance: [Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batigun, C.M.; Brugger, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    These experiments have observed the mirror reflection and Bragg diffraction of neutrons at the energy of a low lying nuclear resonance of 115 In. The reflector was a mirror of In metal with the resonance at 1.457 eV. The mirror reflection for different angles of incidence has been measured and sets of data showing the relative reflectivities have been obtained. For the Bragg diffraction, the crystal was a wafer of InP and several examples of Bragg reflections near 1.455 eV were measured. 4 refs., 12 figs

  16. Sum rule approach to the study of statistical decay properties of nuclear giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.K.; Hussein, M.S.

    1987-03-01

    Corrections to the well-known statistical sum rule that relates the summed transmission coefficients on the one hand and 2πΓ C.N. .ρ C.N. On the other, in the context of the statistical decay properties of nuclear giant resonances, are discussed. These corrections arise both from pre-equilibrium processes as well as from the giant resonance itself. It is shown that the compound nucleus average width is reduced as a result of these corrections. (Author) [pt

  17. The Co59 nuclear magnetic resonances in (Ysub(1-x)Gdsub(x))2Co17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Hiroyuki; Yoshie, Hiroshi; Unate, Takao; Tsujimura, Akira; Deportes, J.

    1976-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonances of Co 59 in (Ysub(1-x)Gdsub(x)) 2 Co 17 have been observed at 77 K as a function of x (0 2 Co 17 and Gd 2 Co 17 is at most 7 kOe in magnitude, which is comparable to that obtained in GdCo 5 . The sign of the obtained difference depends on the Co sites. The difference is qualitatively explained as the contribution of 4f electrons of Gd atoms to the hyperfine field. The temperature dependence of the resonance frequencies in Gd 2 Co 17 has also been measured. (auth.)

  18. Effect of nonlinearity of spin interaction with electromagnetic resonance field on characteristics of polarized nuclear target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertij, A.A.; Gavrilov, S.P.; Shestopalov, V.P.

    1990-01-01

    Interaction of incident nuclear particle beam with J = 1/2 (neutrons) spin and (J = 1/2) protons with the target substance is considered. It is shown that neutron polarization at the target exit and neutron transparency (G) of the target depend significantly on incident wave amplitude level and physical parameter values which characterize the target, such as target temperature, resonator mirror reflection factor, number of spins interacting with the field, etc. Under interaction of neutrons with a target resonator which features a high mirror reflection factor and low losses for absorption which is not related to magnetic dipole absorption, a bistable response of neutron polarization and G manifests itself. 1 ref

  19. Dynamical nuclear spin polarization induced by electronic current through double quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Monis, Carlos; Platero, Gloria; Inarrea, Jesus

    2011-01-01

    We analyse electron-spin relaxation in electronic transport through coherently coupled double quantum dots (DQDs) in the spin blockade regime. In particular, we focus on hyperfine (HF) interaction as the spin-relaxation mechanism. We pay special attention to the effect of the dynamical nuclear spin polarization induced by the electronic current on the nuclear environment. We discuss the behaviour of the electronic current and the induced nuclear spin polarization versus an external magnetic field for different HF coupling intensities and interdot tunnelling strengths. We take into account, for each magnetic field, all HF-mediated spin-relaxation processes coming from different opposite spin level approaches. We find that the current as a function of the external magnetic field shows a peak or a dip and that the transition from a current dip to a current peak behaviour is obtained by decreasing the HF coupling or by increasing the interdot tunnelling strength. We give a physical picture in terms of the interplay between the electrons tunnelling out of the DQD and the spin-flip processes due to the nuclear environment.

  20. Development of Selective Excitation Methods in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Investigation of Hemoglobin Oxygenation in Erythrocytes Using Proton and Phosphorus -31 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetler, Bayard Keith

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) offers a potential method for making measurements of the percent oxygenation of hemoglobin (Hb) in living tissue non-invasively. As a demonstration of the feasibility of such measurements, we measured the percent oxygenation of Hb in red blood cells (erythrocytes) using resonances in the proton-NMR (^1H-NMR) spectrum which are characteristic of oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) and deoxyhemoglobin (deoxy-Hb), and are due to the unique magnetic properties of these molecules. To perform these measurements, we developed a new NMR method of selectively exciting signals in a region of interest with uniform phase and amplitude, while suppressing the signal of the water resonance. With this method, we are able to make exact calculations distinguishing between uniform phase excitation produced at large flip-angles using the non-linear properties of the Bloch equations, and uniform phase excitation produced at small flip-angles using asymmetric pulse excitation functions. We measured the percent oxygenation of three characteristic ^1H-NMR resonances of Hb: two from deoxy-Hb, originating from the N_delta H protons of histidine residue F8, which occur at different frequencies for the alpha and beta chains of Hb; and one from oxy-Hb, originating from the gamma_2 -CH_3 protons of valine residue E11. We performed experiments both on fresh erythrocytes and on erythrocytes depleted of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), and found that oxygen is more tightly bound to Hb in the former case. In both fresh and 2,3-DPG-depleted samples, we found that: (i) from the deoxy-Hb marker resonances, there is a small but significant difference in the oxygen saturation between the alpha and beta chains; (ii) the decrease in the areas of the deoxy-Hb marker resonances correlates well with the increase in the percent oxygenation of Hb as measured optically; (iii) the area of the oxy-Hb marker resonance may be up to ~15% less than the optically measured Hb saturation. We are

  1. Nuclear Structure Calculations for Two-Neutrino Double-β Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sarriguren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the two-neutrino double-β decay in 76Ge, 116Cd, 128Te, 130Te, and 150Nd, as well as the two Gamow-Teller branches that connect the double-β decay partners with the states in the intermediate nuclei. We use a theoretical microscopic approach based on a deformed self-consistent mean field with Skyrme interactions including pairing and spin-isospin residual forces, which are treated in a proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We compare our results for Gamow-Teller strength distributions with experimental information obtained from charge-exchange reactions. We also compare our results for the two-neutrino double-β decay nuclear matrix elements with those extracted from the measured half-lives. Both single-state and low-lying-state dominance hypotheses are analyzed theoretically and experimentally making use of recent data from charge-exchange reactions and β decay of the intermediate nuclei.

  2. Effect of nuclear radiation on the electrical properties of chemical double layer capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laghari, J.R.; Hammoud, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation on the electrical properties of chemical double layer capacitors are determined. The capacitors were irradiated in a 2-MW nuclear reactor to different fluence levels. The exposure rate was 2.2 x 10 10 n/cm 2 · s of thermal neutrons, 9.52 x 10 8 n/cm 2 · s of fast neutrons (> 2 MeV), and 1.47 x 10 6 rad/h of gamma radiation. The properties measured during and after irradiation included the capacitance, equivalent series resistance, and open-circuit voltage. The post-irradiation effect on the leakage current was also determined. It was found that while the capacitance increased during irradiation, the equivalent series resistance and the open-circuit voltage decreased slightly during irradiation. Changes in these properties were not permanent s was evident from post-irradiation measurements. The leakage current did not show any significant change with radiation. The results indicate that chemical double layer capacitors can be suitably used as backup power source in electronic equipment operating in a radiation environment with total fluences up to 4.05 x 10 14 n/cm 2

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance in low-symmetry superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, D. C.; Powell, B. J.

    2018-01-01

    We consider the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 in superconductors with accidental nodes, i.e., zeros of the order parameter that are not enforced by its symmetries. Such nodes in the superconducting gap are not constrained by symmetry to a particular position on the Fermi surface. We show, analytically and numerically, that a Hebel-Slichter-like peak occurs even in the absence of an isotropic component of the superconducting gap. For a gap with symmetry-required nodes the Fermi velocity at the node must point along the node. For accidental nodes this is not, in general, the case. This leads to additional terms in spectral function and hence the density of states. These terms lead to a logarithmic divergence in 1 /T1T at T →Tc- in models neglecting disorder and interactions [except for those leading to superconductivity; here T is temperature, Tc-=limδ→0(Tc-δ ) , and Tc is the critical temperature]. This contrasts with the usual Hebel-Slichter peak which arises from the coherence factors due to the isotropic component of the gap and leads to a divergence in 1 /T1T somewhat below Tc. The divergence in superconductors with accidental nodes is controlled by either disorder or additional electron-electron interactions. However, for reasonable parameters, neither of these effects removes the peak altogether. This provides a simple experimental method to distinguish between symmetry-required and accidental nodes.

  4. Recent research directions in Fribourg: nuclear dynamics in resonances revealed by 2-dimensional EEL spectra, electron collisions with ionic liquids and electronic excitation of pyrimidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, M.; Regeta, K.; Gorfinkiel, J.D.; Masin, Z.; Grimme, S.; Bannwarth, C.

    2016-01-01

    The article briefly reviews three subjects recently investigated in Fribourg: 1) electron collisions with surfaces of ionic liquids, 2) two-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra and 3) resonances in absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of unsaturated compounds. Electron energy loss spectra of four ionic liquids revealed a number of excited states, including triplet states. A solution of a dye in an ionic liquid showed an energy-loss band of the solute, but not in all ionic liquids. 2D spectra reveal state-to-state information (given resonance to given final state) and are shown to be an interesting means to gain insight into dynamics of nuclear motion in resonances. Absolute cross sections for pyrimidine are reported as a function of scattering angle and as a function of electron energy. They reveal resonant structure which was reproduced very nicely by R-matrix calculations. The calculation provided an assignment of the resonances which reveals common patterns in compounds containing double bonds. (authors)

  5. Interleaved localized 1H/31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerspeer, M.

    2005-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used as a spectroscopic method in physics and chemistry before it was developed to become a diagnostic imaging tool in medicine. When NMR spectroscopy is applied to human tissue, metabolism can be studied in normal physiological and pathological states in vivo. Metabolite concentrations and rates can be monitored dynamically and with localization of a defined region of interest. The 'window' which is opened for observation, i.e. which quantities are measured, depends on the nucleus used for RF excitation. Mechanisms of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) resynthesis, as a direct source of energy for muscle contraction, are phosphocreatine (PCr) splitting, glycolysis, beta-oxidation and, finally, oxidative phosphorylation. Whilst the dependency of these processes' fractional contribution to muscular energy supply on exercise type and duration is well known, quantitative models of the regulating mechanisms involved are still subject of current research. A large fraction of the established knowledge about metabolism is based on biochemical analysis of tissue acquired invasively (e.g. microdialysis and open-flow microperfusion) or representing averaged metabolic concentrations for the whole body (via serum metabolites or gas exchange analysis). Localized NMR spectroscopy, however, is capable of non-invasively acquiring time-resolved data from a defined volume of interest, in vivo. In contrast to the vast majority of MRS studies investigating metabolism, where spectra of a single nucleus (commonly 1 H, 31 P or 13 C) were acquired or several MR spectra with different nuclei were measured in separate experiments, this work opens an additional 'window' on muscle metabolism by interleaved localized acquisition of 1 H and 31 P NMR spectra from human calf muscle in vivo, during rest, exercise and recovery, in a single experiment. Using this technique, the time courses of the concentrations of phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate (Pi), ATP

  6. Ferromagnetic resonance in coupled permalloy double films separated by a Cu interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymowicz, A. Z.; Whiting, J. S. S.; Watson, M. L.; Chambers, A.

    1991-03-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) at 16 GHz was used to study the magnetic coupling between two-layers of permalloy separated by a nonmagnetic Cu layer. Samples with the same thickness (600 Å) of both permalloy layers were deposited from e-gun sources onto glass substrates in UHV. The thickness d of the Cu interlayer was varied from 5 to 37 Å. The exchange coupling energy ( E = - KM1· M2) model was used to describe the interaction between the two magnetic layers. It was found from the ferromagnetic resonance data in the perpendicular configuration that K( d) follows an exponential law, K = K0e - d/ q, where q = 9.3 Å.

  7. Microwave-optical double resonance spectroscopy. Progress report, February 1, 1975--January 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, D.W.

    1975-01-01

    Zero-field and high-field optical detection of magnetic resonance (ODMR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and optical spectroscopy experiments were performed on several systems in order to further basic knowledge of the structure, reactions, and response to radiation of atoms, molecules, and ions. Results on the following studies are reported: the direct observation of level anticrossing and mixing effects in excited molecular triplet states; anomalous zero-field splittings in the lowest triplet state of 1-iodonaphthalene; evidence for second-order spin-orbit coupling and spin delocalization effects in the lowest triplet state of benzophenone; direct observation of the optical absorption spectra of reactive free radicals at room temperature; measurements of the activation and thermodynamic parameters of several cyclohexenyl and cyclohexanonyl radicals; complete analyses of the level anticrossing and cross relaxation spectra of oriented molecular triplet states; solutions to the spin Hamiltonian for S = 1, I = 5/2 systems in both zero-field and high-field, an improvement by a factor of ten in the resolution of ODMR experiments in high field; and measurements of the optical and magnetic resonance properties of a series of halogenated naphthalenes in their lowest triplet states

  8. Scientific opportunities in nuclear resonance spectroscopy from source-driven revolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenoy, G. K., E-mail: gks@aps.anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Roehlsberger, R. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron, DESY (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    From the beginning of its discovery the Moessbauer effect has continued to be one of the most powerful tools with broad applications in diverse areas of science and technology. With the advent of synchrotron radiation sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the Super Photon Ring-8 (SPring-8), the tool has enlarged its scope and delivered new capabilities. The popular techniques most generally used in the field of materials physics, chemical physics, geoscience, and biology are hyperfine spectroscopy via elastic nuclear forward scattering (NFS), vibrational spectroscopy via nuclear inelastic scattering (NRIXS), and, to a lesser extent, diffusional dynamics from quasielastic nuclear forward scattering (QNFS). As we look ahead, new storage rings with enhanced brilliance such as PETRA-III under construction at DESY, Hamburg, and PEP-III in its early design stage at SLAC, Stanford, will provide new and unique science opportunities. In the next two decades, x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE-XFELs) and a seed (SXFELs), with unique time structure, coherence and a five to six orders higher average brilliance will truly revolutionize nuclear resonance applications in a major way. This overview is intended to briefly address the unique radiation characteristics of new sources on the horizon and to provide a glimpse of scientific prospects and dreams in the nuclear resonance field from the new radiation sources. We anticipate an expanded nuclear resonance research activity with applications such as spin and phonon mapping of a single nanostructure and their assemblies, interfaces, and surfaces; spin dynamics; nonequilibrium dynamics; photochemical reactions; excited-state spectroscopy; and nonlinear phenomena.

  9. Modeling and optimization of a double-well double-barrier GaN/AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN resonant tunneling diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Gao, Bo; Gong, Min; Shi, Ruiying

    2017-06-01

    The influence of a GaN layer as a sub-quantum well for an AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) on device performance has been investigated by means of numerical simulation. The introduction of the GaN layer as the sub-quantum well turns the dominant transport mechanism of RTD from the 3D-2D model to the 2D-2D model and increases the energy difference between tunneling energy levels. It can also lower the effective height of the emitter barrier. Consequently, the peak current and peak-to-valley current difference of RTD have been increased. The optimal GaN sub-quantum well parameters are found through analyzing the electrical performance, energy band, and transmission coefficient of RTD with different widths and depths of the GaN sub-quantum well. The most pronounced electrical parameters, a peak current density of 5800 KA/cm2, a peak-to-valley current difference of 1.466 A, and a peak-to-valley current ratio of 6.35, could be achieved by designing RTD with the active region structure of GaN/Al0.2Ga0.8 N/GaN/Al0.2Ga0.8 N (3 nm/1.5 nm/1.5 nm/1.5 nm).

  10. Investigation of the negative differential resistance reproducibility in AlN/GaN double-barrier resonant tunnelling diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucherit, M.; Soltani, A.; Rousseau, M.; Deresmes, D.; Berthe, M.; Durand, C.; De Jaeger, J.-C. [IEMN/UMR-CNRS 8520, Universite Lille1, PRES Universite Lille Nord de France (France); Monroy, E. [Equipe mixte CEA-CNRS-UJF Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs, DRFMC/SP2M/PSC, CEA-Grenoble (France)

    2011-10-31

    AlN/GaN double-barrier resonant tunnelling diodes were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaN/sapphire template and processed into mesa diameters from 2 {mu}m to 4 {mu}m. The current-voltage characteristics were carried out in direct current operation and under-high vacuum. A sharp negative differential resistance (NDR) was detected in the forward bias at 120 K. The NDR was observed for the mesa size of 2 {mu}m at 4 V with a peak-to-valley current ratio of 3.5. The measurement conditions were chosen to make NDR reproducible more than 50 times and apparent in both scan voltage directions after electrical treatment.

  11. /sup 31/P nuclear-magnetic-resonance studies an the developing embryos of Xenopus laevis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadian, D G [Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Biochemistry; Colman, A [Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Zoology

    1976-01-01

    The concentrations of nucleoside triphosphate, inorganic phosphate and yolk proteins, phosvitin and lipovitellin, have been monitored in living embryos of Xenopus laevis by /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The nucleoside triphosphate levels remain relatively constant at about 3.5 - 4.5 nmol/embryo at least until the 'spontaneous movement' stage of development. By the swimming tadpole stage an inorganic phosphate resonance representing about 30 nmol/embryo becomes evident in the NMR spectrum. Computer manipulation also shows such a resonance, although smaller, to be present at a somewhat earlier developmental stage; these findings are confirmed biochemically. The major contribution to the NMR spectrum of oocytes, unfertilized eggs and early embryos is the yolk phosphoprotein resonance. On isolation of the yolk from the embryos it is possible to quantify the contribution to the NMR spectrum from the lipid-phosphate and protein-phosphate moieties of the yolk proteins. During development, as the yolk is used up, it is found that the protein-phosphate resonance disappears at a greater rate than the lipid-phosphate peak. The total phosphorus content of the embryo (ca. 200 nmol/embryo) is shown biochemically to remain constant during development; however, the total amount of phosphorus observed by NMR decreases by about 40% during development. From the resonance positions of their ..cap alpha.., ..beta.. and ..gamma.. phosphate groups is is deduced that the nucleoside triphosphate molecules are liganded in vivo to a divalent cation which is not manganese, but could be either magnesium or calcium. From the position of the inorganic phosphate resonance it is deduced that the internal pH of embryos where this resonance is evident is 6.8 +- 0.2.

  12. Measurement of changes in nuclear charge radii of 2r by laser-induced resonance fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangrskij, Yu.P.; Zemlyanoj, S.G.; Marinova, K.P.; Markov, B.N.; Khoang Tkhi Kim Khueh; Chan Kong Tam; Kul'dzhanov, B.K.

    1987-01-01

    The optical isotopic shifts of Zr stable isotopes have been measured in three atomic transitions of type 4d 2 5s 2 → 4d 2 5s5p using the technique of laser-induced resonance fluorescence. The changes of nuclear mean-square charge radius Δ 2 > have been determined. The extracted values of Δ 2 > are compared to predictions of the droplet model. It is shown that the droplet model calculations can be made to agree with the experimental results, if changes of nuclear dynamical octupole deformation and of surface diffuseness parameter are taken into account

  13. Investigation of Condensed Media in Weak Fields by the Method of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, V. V.; Myazin, N. S.; Dudkin, V. I.; Velichko, E. N.

    2018-05-01

    A compact design of a rapid-response nuclear magnetic spectrometer for investigation of condensed media in weak fields is reported. As a result of investigation of different condensed media, special features of recording a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal in a weak magnetic field from a small volume of the medium under study are established. For the first time the NMR absorption spectra of condensed media in a weak field are collected. Based on the results of experimental studies, the potential of using a compact NMR-spectrometer for condensed media monitoring in a rapid response mode is determined.

  14. Billion-Fold Enhancement in Sensitivity of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Magnesium Ions in Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Gottberg, Alexander; Kowalska, Magdalena; Bissell, Mark L; Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Blaum, Klaus; Helmke, Alexander; Johnston, Karl; Kreim, Kim; Larsen, Flemming H; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Garcia Ruiz, Ronald F; Szunyogh, Daniel; Thulstrup, Peter W; Yordanov, Deyan T; Hemmingsen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    β-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is highly sensitive compared to conventional NMR spectroscopy, and may be applied for several elements across the periodic table. β-NMR has previously been successfully applied in the fields of nuclear and solid-state physics. In this work, β-NMR is applied, for the first time, to record an NMR spectrum for a species in solution. 31Mg β-NMR spectra are measured for as few as 107 magnesium ions in ionic liquid (EMIM-Ac) within minutes, as a prototypical test case. Resonances are observed at 3882.9 and 3887.2 kHz in an external field of 0.3 T. The key achievement of the current work is to demonstrate that β-NMR is applicable for the analysis of species in solution, and thus represents a novel spectroscopic technique for use in general chemistry and potentially in biochemistry.

  15. Methylmalonic aciduria and propionic acidaemia studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iles, R A; Hind, A J; Chalmers, R A

    1986-12-15

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to monitor changes in urinary metabolites in a patient with propionic acidaemia over a period of 10 months and in a patient with methylmalonic aciduria over a period of 11 days. Results could be obtained within 5-10 min of sample receipt. In the spectra on the patient with propionic acidaemia not only could fluctuations in 3-hydroxypropionate and propionylglycine excretion be followed, but also variations in creatine, glycine and betaine, which were often present at millimolar concentrations. The patient with methylmalonic aciduria had an acute episode of severe ketoacidosis during which the glycine excretion fell but creatine excretion rose and then fell on recovery from the episode. The changes in the creatine excretion may reflect disorders in intracellular energy supply. Nuclear magnetic resonance is a powerful technique for monitoring metabolic perturbations in the organic acidurias in 'real-time', allowing the planning and evaluation of therapy. (Auth.). 18 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs.

  16. Evaluation of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and collagen by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Paula de M.; Tavares, Maria I.B.

    2005-01-01

    Blends of natural and synthetic polymers represent a new class of materials with better mechanical properties and biocompatibility than those of the single components. Collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) are well known for their important biological properties. The blending of collagen with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) makes it possible to obtain new materials in which strong interactions between the synthetic and biological components occur. Do to the excellent biocompatibility of these polymers, this blend has been much studied intending biomedical applications. And a one technique that can provide important information on molecular mobility, compatibility and even evaluate the interactions that can occur with these polymers is the Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Thus, the purpose of this work is to evaluate collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. From the values of relaxation times obtained, we can conclude that these materials have different interactions, and different mobility domains, confirming the heterogeneity and complexity of these materials. (author)

  17. Methylmalonic aciduria and propionic acidaemia studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iles, R.A.; Hind, A.J.; Chalmers, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to monitor changes in urinary metabolites in a patient with propionic acidaemia over a period of 10 months and in a patient with methylmalonic aciduria over a period of 11 days. Results could be obtained within 5-10 min of sample receipt. In the spectra on the patient with propionic acidaemia not only could fluctuations in 3-hydroxypropionate and propionylglycine excretion be followed, but also variations in creatine, glycine and betaine, which were often present at millimolar concentrations. The patient with methylmalonic aciduria had an acute episode of severe ketoacidosis during which the glycine excretion fell but creatine excretion rose and then fell on recovery from the episode. The changes in the creatine excretion may reflect disorders in intracellular energy supply. Nuclear magnetic resonance is a powerful technique for monitoring metabolic perturbations in the organic acidurias in 'real-time', allowing the planning and evaluation of therapy. (Auth.)

  18. Dephasing due to Nuclear Spins in Large-Amplitude Electric Dipole Spin Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesi, Stefano; Yang, Li-Ping; Loss, Daniel

    2016-02-12

    We analyze effects of the hyperfine interaction on electric dipole spin resonance when the amplitude of the quantum-dot motion becomes comparable or larger than the quantum dot's size. Away from the well-known small-drive regime, the important role played by transverse nuclear fluctuations leads to a Gaussian decay with characteristic dependence on drive strength and detuning. A characterization of spin-flip gate fidelity, in the presence of such additional drive-dependent dephasing, shows that vanishingly small errors can still be achieved at sufficiently large amplitudes. Based on our theory, we analyze recent electric dipole spin resonance experiments relying on spin-orbit interactions or the slanting field of a micromagnet. We find that such experiments are already in a regime with significant effects of transverse nuclear fluctuations and the form of decay of the Rabi oscillations can be reproduced well by our theory.

  19. Study of nuclear energy systems and double strata scenarios for minor actinides transmutation in ADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavel, J.B.

    2012-01-01

    The French law of 28 June 2006 regarding advanced nuclear waste management requires a scientific assessment to define future industrial strategies. The present PhD thesis was carried in this framework and concerns specifically the research axis of minor actinides transmutation. A high power Accelerator Driven System (ADS) concept is developed at SUBATECH for this purpose. A 1 GeV proton beam feeds three liquid lead-bismuth spallation targets. The Multiple Spallation Target (MUST) ADS reaches the thermal powers up to 1 GW with a high specific power. A nuclear reactor dimensioning method has been developed and applied to different double strata scenarios. In these scenarios, SFR (Sodium Fast Reactors) or PWR (Pressurized Water Reactors) power reactors produce minor actinides that will be transmuted into ADS. In each core (SFR and ADS), the plutonium multi-reprocessing strategy is performed while ADS subcritical core also multi-reprocesses minor actinides. To limit the core reactivity and improve the fuel thermal conductivity, the minor actinides fuel is mixed with MgO inert matrix. Nuclear branches with lead and sodium coolants for the ADS, have been studied for different irradiation times and two transmutation strategies have been assessed: whether whole minor actinides, whether americium only is transmuted. The thesis presents precisely the MUST ADS design methodology and the calculations to get a fuel composition at equilibrium. Then a one cycle evolution is performed and analysed for the fuel and the multiplication factor. Radiotoxicity and thermal power of the waste produced are then compared. Finally, the study of double strata scenarios is performed to analyse the plutonium and minor actinides inventories in cycle and also the waste produced according to the transmutation strategies applied and the first stratum evolution. (author)

  20. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance in paramagnetic CoCl2.6H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oravcova, J.; Murin, J.; Rakos, M.; Olcak, D.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is studied of protons of the crystal water of paramagnetic CoCl 2 .6H 2 O. The measurements were carried out on powdered samples at room temperature, for values of the external magnetic field ranging from 0.3 to 1.0 T. The NMR signals of protons of the crystal water exhibit asymmetric shape which changes with the applied external magnetic field. We found that the second moment of the resonance line shows a linear dependence on the square of the induction of the externally applied magnetic field. The cause of the asymmetry of the NMR line of protons of the crystal water and the dependence of the second moment of the resonance line on the induction of external magnetic field are interpreted. (author)