WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear disarmament united

  1. Nuclear Disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher

    1982-01-01

    Material about nuclear disarmament and the arms race should be included in secondary school curricula. Teachers can present this technical, controversial, and frightening material in a balanced and comprehensible way. Resources for instructional materials are listed. (PP)

  2. Nuclear armament and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-05-01

    This document discusses the objectives and the specifications of the non-proliferation treaty, in the framework of the nuclear armament and disarmament. Three chapters are proposed: State of the art; the international agreements and treaties and the United Nation Organization part; debates and forecasts on the proliferation fight, the Pugwash movement and a chronology of the situation. (A.L.B.)

  3. The United Nations disarmament yearbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This book is organized under the following parts; Comprehensive approaches to disarmament; Nuclear disarmament; Prohibition or restriction of use of other weapons; Consideration of conventional weapons and other approaches; Information and studies

  4. Nuclear disarmament verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVolpi, A.

    1993-01-01

    Arms control treaties, unilateral actions, and cooperative activities -- reflecting the defusing of East-West tensions -- are causing nuclear weapons to be disarmed and dismantled worldwide. In order to provide for future reductions and to build confidence in the permanency of this disarmament, verification procedures and technologies would play an important role. This paper outlines arms-control objectives, treaty organization, and actions that could be undertaken. For the purposes of this Workshop on Verification, nuclear disarmament has been divided into five topical subareas: Converting nuclear-weapons production complexes, Eliminating and monitoring nuclear-weapons delivery systems, Disabling and destroying nuclear warheads, Demilitarizing or non-military utilization of special nuclear materials, and Inhibiting nuclear arms in non-nuclear-weapons states. This paper concludes with an overview of potential methods for verification

  5. Nuclear reactors and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagro, J.C.; Estrada Oyuela, M.E.; Garcia Moritan, R.

    1987-01-01

    From a brief analysis of the perspectives of nuclear weapons arsenals reduction, a rational use of the energetic potential of the ogives and the authentic destruction of its warlike power is proposed. The fissionable material conversion contained in the nuclear fuel ogives for peaceful uses should be part of the disarmament agreements. This paper pretends to give an approximate idea on the resources re assignation implicancies. (Author)

  6. Nuclear disarmament: the rebound?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, D.

    2010-01-01

    The elimination of nuclear weapons is often considered as a simple naive and unrealistic utopia, or as an ambition or an ethical requirement but utopian as well. In this book, the author reveals some concrete elements of the debate between international actors (governments, institutions, non-governmental organizations and opinion movements) which took place at the last non-proliferation treaty conference of New York (US) in May 2010. He stresses on the contradictions and blockages and on the elements showing that nuclear disarmament is probably at a turning point. Will we move from non-proliferation to weapons elimination? He analyses also the defensive diplomatic position of France before and during the conference but with a huge effort of communication. (J.S.)

  7. Australians' attitudes to nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, A.W.; Trahair, R.C.S.; Powell, R.J.; Walker, R.M.

    1985-08-01

    The results of a series of surveys of 2900 Australians show that some 80 per cent favour nuclear disarmament. The nuclear disarmament view is broad-based, for example it cuts across differences in age, sex and education. However the view is more common among people towards the left of the political spectrum who view the world as benign rather than hostile and who consider stockpiles can be reduced by small, reciprocated and supervised reductions. Between 2.5 per cent and 5.5 per cent of respondents act to bring about nuclear disarmament. The findings support and extend results from studies outside Australia showing that attitudes favouring nuclear disarmament are distributing themselves widely

  8. Nuclear non proliferation and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In the framework of the publication of a document on the ''weapons mastership, disarmament and non proliferation: the french action'', by the ministry of Foreign Affairs and the ministry of Defense, the French Documentation organization presents a whole document. This document describes and details the following topics: the conference on the treaty of non proliferation of nuclear weapons, the France, Usa and Non Governmental Organizations position, the threats of the proliferation, the french actions towards the disarmament, the disarmament in the world, a chronology and some bibliographic resources. (A.L.B.)

  9. Conference on disarmament: prevention of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, R.

    1985-01-01

    Australia's Ambassador for Disarmament urges the Conference to establish an appropriate means for ensuring that practical work under Item 3 - the prevention of nuclear war - is carried out. The text of the Australian reply to the Secretary-General of the United Nations on the prevention of nuclear war follows the Ambassador's speech

  10. The nuclear arsenals and nuclear disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaby, F

    1998-01-01

    Current world stockpiles of nuclear weapons and the status of treaties for nuclear disarmament and the ultimate elimination of nuclear weapons are summarised. The need for including stockpiles of civil plutonium in a programme for ending production and disposing of fissile materials is emphasized, and the ultimate difficulty of disposing of the last few nuclear weapons discussed.

  11. Demand: a total nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessel, Stephane; Jacquard, Albert

    2012-01-01

    This bibliographical note presents a book, in which the authors make a plea for a total nuclear disarmament. They think that humanity cannot be found in competition, but in emulation, and examine how we can get rid of the nuclear bomb. They discuss the background of nuclear energy, state that nuclear weapons have always been useless and extremely dangerous, consider arms race as crazy and as a crime against humanity, recall that nuclear weapons already made numerous victims (Hiroshima, Nagasaki, nuclear tests), that they are a sword of Damocles over 7 billions human beings, that nuclear winter would be an apocalypse, that the Non Proliferation Treaty is a decoy. They discuss the political role of nuclear weapons, and outline that the only solution is their abolition. They discuss what has already been done and what is still to be done, and formulate a strategy for the future

  12. Farewell to arms. What's blocking nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Harald

    2005-01-01

    In the 1960s, when the United States and Soviet Union submitted their draft non-proliferation treaty to the 18-member Disarmament Committee in Geneva, it was exactly that - a treaty to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons to more States. It prohibited non-nuclear weapon States from acquiring nuclear weapons and prohibited the five acknowledged nuclear-weapon States from supplying them. However, it was not possible to conclude a treaty on those terms alone. Consequently, Article IV (on peaceful nuclear cooperation) and VI (on disarmament) were added. Only on the basis of this 'bargain' could the global Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) come into existence. It is ironic that the nuclear-weapon States that care for their own sovereignty rights would overlook that sovereignty is also dear to other States.Today, in an era of stagnating nuclear disarmament, one hears voices from some nuclear-weapon States that the disarmament stipulation was without substance and unnecessary. They argue that non-nuclear weapon States care only about their security and nothing else. If the Treaty is perceived as losing its value, withdrawing from it might eventually be seen as a consideration. At this point, non-nuclear weapon States had believed that they shared with their nuclear-armed counterparts a solid outlook on how to proceed with the implementation of Article VI. No one had the illusion that all the steps would be strictly implemented. Most accepted that the failure to achieve an agreed amendment to the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty between Washington and Moscow led to the scrapping of that Treaty. But the pathetic under-achievement of the 'Thirteen Steps,' accompanied by statements of several nuclear-weapon States that they did not feel bound by these agreed measures came as a shock and led to great frustration among the majority of NPT members. If we start from the notion of the 'bargain' and accept that nuclear disarmament will not happen overnight, nuclear

  13. The United Nations disarmament yearbook. V. 25: 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The 2000 edition of The United Nations Disarmament Yearbook provides a descriptive narrative of events at the United Nations in the field of disarmament during the year of the historic Millennium Assembly. Though The Yearbook is now in its 25th edition, its more distant roots date back to the Armaments Year-Books issued by the League of Nations. Then, as now, nation-States and members of the concerned public have found it useful to have in one place a handy shelf reference documenting the triumphs and setbacks of the world community's efforts to reduce and eliminate the deadliest of weapons. The year 2000 marked a crucial juncture in the history of disarmament. During the Millennium Summit, 22 States responded to the Secretary-General's invitation to ratify six key legal instruments in the field of disarmament. Over the course of the year, 86 States chose to advance their security interests by ratifying or acceding to a wide range of disarmament treaties. The solemn 'ends' of disarmament also guided the deliberation of roughly 50 resolutions in the General Assembly as well as the work of many institutions throughout the United Nations disarmament machinery, including the Disarmament Commission, the Department for Disarmament Affairs and its three regional centres, the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research, and the Secretary-General's Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters. Even the Conference on Disarmament, which has been deadlocked for so many years, has persisted in its efforts to forge a new consensus on a multilateral agenda for this difficult field. The Security Council also devoted attention to aspects of disarmament pertaining to peace-keeping and peace-building.With respect to the 'means' of disarmament, the world community reaffirmed its determination to implement agreed disarmament commitments and to work out arrangements in new areas. The States parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) after four weeks of

  14. Nuclear disarmament: the rebound?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, D.

    2010-01-01

    The elimination of nuclear weapons is very often considered as a naive and unrealistic utopia, or as an ethical ambition or requirement but with no possible implementation. In this book, the author shades light on some concrete elements of the existing debate between international actors: governments, institutions, but also non-governmental organizations and opinion movements born during the last non-proliferation treaty conference. (J.S.)

  15. Remarks on nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear disarmament, United Nations Security Council, 24 September 2009, New York, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2009-01-01

    IAEA Director General Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei, Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) limited his speech to a few key issues. First he stated that the global nuclear non-proliferation regime is fragile and has many shortcomings because the IAEA's legal authority is severely limited in some countries and the IAEA verification mandate is centred on nuclear material and not on weaponization activities. Secondly there is a growing number of states that have mastered uranium enrichment or plutonium reprocessing. Any one of these states could develop nuclear weapons in a short span of time, if, for example, it decided to withdraw from the NPT. There is a need to move from national to multinational control of the nuclear fuel cycle. Thirdly the highest level of protection for nuclear and radioactive material has to be provided. A fourth issue is the need to strengthen the IAEA. A fifth issue is that the IAEA cannot do its work in isolation but depends on a supportive political process, with the Security Council at its core. A sixth issue is that the Security Council must put more emphasis on addressing the insecurities that lie behind many cases of proliferation, such as endemic conflicts, security imbalances and lack of trust. Finally, Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei is gratified to see nuclear disarmament back at the top of the international agenda, as well as recognition of the intrinsic link between nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation

  16. Nuclear energy, the climate and nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, V.

    1998-01-01

    The main concern of Pugwash, with very good reason, is nuclear disarmament, but a negative attitude towards nuclear energy is not only futile, but counterproductive as it misses opportunities to appropriately influence its development. Since nuclear energy cannot be abandoned for ecological (decrease in greenhouse gases emission) and economic reasons as a long term energy source, then efforts should be devoted to make it safe from proliferation, which is possible from scientific and technological point of view

  17. The Nuclear Disarmament Cases: Is Formalistic Rigour in Establishing Jurisdiction Impeding Access to Justice?

    OpenAIRE

    Ramkumar, Meenakshi; Singh, Aishwarya

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear disarmament falls within the purview of the purposes envisaged in Article 1 of the United Nations Charter. The International Court of Justice (ICJ) in 1996 delivered an advisory opinion on legality of use of nuclear weapons and has stated that the states in good faith must strive towards nuclear disarmament. In the 'Marshall Islands Cases', 20 years later the ICJ had the opportunity to address questions relating to cessation of the nuclear arms race and nuclear disarmament. However, t...

  18. Nuclear disarmament and peaceful nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, T.B.

    1989-01-01

    According to the author, it remains to be seen whether nuclear disarmament can reduce the risks of nuclear war sufficiently for the residual risks to be acceptable to a majority of the world's population, while at the same time vigorous growth in the world's dependence on nuclear energy for peaceful purposes continues. This paper discusses how use of nuclear materials from dismantled weapons as fuel for peaceful purposes may help progress to be made towards that goal, by stimulating considerable improvements in the effectiveness of arrangements for preventing diversion of the materials from peaceful to military purposes, while at the same time eliminating large numbers of nuclear weapons

  19. Nuclear issues on the agenda of the conference on disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernauer, T.

    1991-01-01

    This research report examines three nuclear arms control and disarmament issues which figure on the agenda of the Conference on Disarmament - security assurance to non-nuclear-weapon States, the prevention of nuclear war, and the cessation of the nuclear arms race and nuclear disarmament

  20. Which logic for further nuclear disarmament?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautecouverture, B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the author is to draw a picture of the current situation of nuclear disarmament in the world. Budgetary necessities and deficit reduction could become an opportunity window for nuclear disarmament over the next years. The continued stalemate at the Conference of Disarmament (CD) illustrates that good will is not enough. Public awareness of nuclear issues in countries like India, Pakistan, Israel or China has always been very low. When it comes to States policies, if one considers that the nuclear world consists of 8/9 States (5 official Nuclear-weapon states (NWS) and 3/4 de facto NWS), 50% or more than 50% of them, depending on the place of North-Korea in the field, have been maintaining or increasing their arsenal and do not show any real sign to reverse the trend. As far as open literature is concerned, it can be argued that Iran is approaching the nuclear threshold. It appears that nuclear disarmament can only be the result of a peace process or at least of eased tensions, even if that condition is necessary but not sufficient. To go forward on the path of nuclear disarmament 3 conditions have to be fulfilled: progress in the process of democratization of states (for instance North-Korea), progress in the resolution of major regional conflicts (for instance India-Pakistan conflict), and never forget other weapons. (A.C.)

  1. The United Nations and disarmament since 1945

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Since the beginning of the United Nations, the combined efforts of Governments at global, regional and bilateral levels have led to a body of important agreements, treaties and conventions committing their parties to various arms limitation and disarmament measures. The multilateral instruments concluded so far are as follows: The Treaty Banning Nuclear Weapon Test in the Atmosphere, in Outer Space and under Water (partial test-ban Treaty); The Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies (outer space Treaty); The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (non-proliferation Treaty); The Treaty on the Prohibition of the Emplacement of Nuclear Weapons and Other Weapons of Mass Destruction on the Sea-Bed and the Ocean Floor and in the Subsoil Thereof (sea-bed Treaty); The Antarctic Treaty of 1959, for the demilitarization of Antarctica; The Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (Treaty of Tlatelolco); The South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty (Treaty of Rarotonga); The Vienna Document 1990 on confidence- and security-building measures, and a number of bilateral agreements, including: The Treaty on the Limitation of Underground Nuclear-Weapon Tests; The Treaty on Underground Nuclear Explosions for Peaceful Purposes; The Agreement on the Establishment of Nuclear Risk Reduction Centers and the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty

  2. Russia's Nuclear Forces: Between Disarmament and Modernization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podvig, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    that relies on strategic nuclear deterrent as a central element of security strategy, regardless of whether nuclear deterrence has any actual role in addressing those problems. The emphasis on strategic stability in the bilateral relationship with the United States was evident in the important role that Russia assigned to the U.S.-Russian arms control negotiations. Resumption of the legally binding arms control process was one of the key elements of the largely successful 'reset' policy pursued by the Obama Administration in its relationships with Russia. Also, during the negotiations Russia strongly emphasized its interest in those issues that it believed might directly affect its deterrent potential - missile defense and conventional strategic launchers. Russia's extremely cautious approach to the next round of nuclear disarmament talks suggests that these issues did not lose their importance after New START - looking at nuclear disarmament in the context of strategic stability, Russia expressed concerns that deep reductions could undermine its nuclear deterrent if, for example, the United States proceeds with deployment of its missile defense system. Whether or not these concerns are justified, they do play an important role in how Russia looks at the future of nuclear disarmament. However, the opposite is true as well - the nuclear disarmament process can change Russia's security policy in a variety of ways by addressing some of its concerns or failing to address others. After the successful conclusion of the New START negotiations, the direction of change in Russia's nuclear policy will depend on how the subsequent dialogue addresses a number of key issues. First, the arms control process will have to reconcile the U.S. and Russian strategic modernization programs with deeper nuclear reductions. In Russia's case this would critically depend on whether the two countries could resolve their differences on missile defense. They would also have to address the issue of

  3. Teaching about Nuclear Disarmament. Fastback 229.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, James, M.

    Background information to help educators teach about nuclear disarmament is presented. There are six sections. The first section, "Nuclear Arms Education: Avoiding the Final Catastrophe," discusses the national priority of preparing for war, militarism as a value, and the mushroom cloud and spaceship earth as symbols of a global age. The second…

  4. Nuclear armament and disarmament; Armement et desarmement nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    This document discusses the objectives and the specifications of the non-proliferation treaty, in the framework of the nuclear armament and disarmament. Three chapters are proposed: State of the art; the international agreements and treaties and the United Nation Organization part; debates and forecasts on the proliferation fight, the Pugwash movement and a chronology of the situation. (A.L.B.)

  5. Non-proliferation and nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shea, M.

    2000-01-01

    Fissionable materials are common to all nuclear weapons and controls on the production, storage, processing and use of fissionable materials provides one means to address non-proliferation and disarmament. In this article, the relevance of such controls is examined and the current situation and future prospects are assessed. (authors)

  6. Nuclear disarmament verification via resonant phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecla, Jake J; Danagoulian, Areg

    2018-03-28

    Nuclear disarmament treaties are not sufficient in and of themselves to neutralize the existential threat of the nuclear weapons. Technologies are necessary for verifying the authenticity of the nuclear warheads undergoing dismantlement before counting them toward a treaty partner's obligation. Here we present a concept that leverages isotope-specific nuclear resonance phenomena to authenticate a warhead's fissile components by comparing them to a previously authenticated template. All information is encrypted in the physical domain in a manner that amounts to a physical zero-knowledge proof system. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the system is shown to reveal no isotopic or geometric information about the weapon, while readily detecting hoaxing attempts. This nuclear technique can dramatically increase the reach and trustworthiness of future nuclear disarmament treaties.

  7. U.S.-Russian cooperation in nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podvig, Pavel

    2010-02-01

    The United States and Russia, the two largest nuclear powers, have a special obligation to provide leadership in nuclear disarmament and in strengthening the nuclear non-proliferation regime. In the past year the two countries made an effort to restart the arms control process by concluding a new treaty that would bring their legal disarmament obligations in line with the realities of their post-cold war relationships. The process of negotiating deeper nuclear reductions in the new environment turned out to be rather difficult, since the approaches that the countries used in the past are not well suited to dealing with issues like conversion of strategic nuclear delivery systems to conventional missions, tactical nuclear weapons, or dismantlement of nuclear warheads. This presentation considers the recent progress in U.S.-Russian arms control process and outlines the key issues at the negotiations. It also considers prospects for further progress in bilateral nuclear disarmament and issues that will be encountered at later stages of the process. The author argues that success of the arms reductions will depend on whether the United States and Russia will be able to build an institutional framework for cooperation on a range of issues - from traditional arms control to securing nuclear materials and from missile defense to strengthening the international nuclear safeguards. )

  8. The United Nations disarmament yearbook. V. 23: 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The United Nations Disarmament book is a designed to be a concise reference work. As background information is greatly condensed, reader may wish to consult the previous editions. Factual information in tabular form is provided in the appendices with the status of multilateral and regional disarmament agreements. The present volume, 23 years after the first one was published, represents some of the best times and some of the worst times for disarmament. Up to date information on disarmament is also available through the internet home page of the Department of Disarmament Affairs:www.un.org/depts/dda/DDAHome.htm

  9. A notable decade in nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starr, R.

    1998-01-01

    Timing and opportunity are critical factors in multilateral disarmament achievements. The grinding work of years can seem frustratingly open-ended until events and attitudes coalesce positively and enable that work to be utilized for results. One measure of the CTBTO's global value of the current work on preparing its implementation, is to envisage how we would be coping with recent nuclear test explosions without it. Right now its conclusion would be the overriding and much more difficult, objective of the multilateral scene

  10. The CTB Treaty and next steps towards nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, W.

    1998-01-01

    The achievement of a CTBT is of course the indispensable first step in any program of nuclear disarmament. It will not be easy for Conference on Disarmament to agree by consensus to establish the committee on nuclear disarmament and will be even more difficult for it to agree on its mandate or terms of reference. In the meantime the nuclear powers should seek to implement a number of steps towards nuclear disarmament which thy can argue and implement by their own accord. The next steps are described in this report

  11. The impact of nuclear and conventional disarmament on the African continent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azikiwe, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the Permanent Representative of Nigeria to the Office of the United nations at Geneva discusses the positive impact of nuclear and conventional disarmament for development in the African States

  12. The United Nations disarmament yearbook. V. 29: 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-09-01

    The United Nations Disarmament book is designed to be a concise reference work. As a good amount of background information is condensed, it may be helpful to consult previous editions. Factual information, presented where possible in tabular form, is provided in the appendices. Web sites of United Nations departments and specialized agencies, intergovernmental organizations, research institutes and non-governmental organizations appear as footnotes. The Department for Disarmament Affairs draws your attention to its web site at http://disarmament.un.org where up-to-date information on disarmament issues may be obtained throughout the year

  13. The dashed hope of nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brustlein, Corentin

    2013-01-01

    The author first recalls the objectives of a programme defined by President Obama during his speech in Prague in April 2009. It comprised a ratification of the CTBT, an elaboration of the FMCT, and the implementation of securing measures for nuclear materials. The author indicates that the last issue displayed some advances whereas the two others haven't displayed any. He notably comments the effects the New START treaty, the persistence of proliferation problems (Iran and North Korea) which are also a result of the preservation of their own nuclear arsenals by nuclear powers, and the limited success of the NPT 2010 conference. The author then outlines the importance of strategic unbalances related to the role assigned to nuclear weapons in terms of postures, doctrines and organisations, and evokes the first efforts for nuclear disarmament made by Washington and Moscow. In a last part, the author discusses the influence which a better control of the budget awarded to nuclear weapons by the USA could have on disarmament

  14. The United Nations General Assembly and Disarmament 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The report offers a summary of the proposals made and action taken on disarmament issues by the Assembly at its forty-second regular session. It is published in the framework of the World Disarmament Campaign, which was launched by a unanimous decision of the Assembly in 1982 to inform, to educate and to generate public understanding and support for the objectives of the United Nations in the field of disarmament

  15. Nuclear disarmament - A consultants observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, W.

    2003-01-01

    The changed situation in the conflict between the superpowers after the end of the Cold War requires a reduction in the excessive number of weapon systems, especially of nuclear weapons of mass destruction. While the U.S. approach is relatively transparent, Russia harbors a large number of administrative and technical reservations and uncertainties. This affects the nuclear fuel cycle in particular. The contribution analyzes the general boundary conditions, taking into account experience accumulated on the spot in a number of trips to Russia in the course of the past decade. A detailed account is given of the current situation in the civilian and military nuclear sectors in Russia. The state of development and the problems of the Russian nuclear fuel cycle are addressed. Other items discussed are aspects of the future nuclear fuel supply situation and other perspectives of the use of nuclear power in Russia associated with an establishment of closed nuclear fuel cycles in the interest of the long-term continuity of power supply. (orig.) [de

  16. Nuclear Security, Disarmament and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Abdus

    The world's stock of nuclear weapons, which was three in 1945, has been growing ever since and is 50,OOOa in 1985. Nearly two trillion dollars of the public funds have been spent over the years to improve their destructive power, and the means of delivering them. One indicator of the awful power of these weapons is that the explosive yield of the nuclear weapons stockpiled today by the US, USSR, UK, France, and China is equivalent to one million Hiroshima bombs. Less than 1,000 of these 50,000 weapons could destroy USA and USSR. A thousand more in an all-out nuclear exchange could destroy the world as a habitable planet, ending life for the living and the prospects of life for those not yet born, sparing no nation, no region of the world…

  17. Towards nuclear disarmament: State of affairs in the international legal framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanielle, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Since the dawn of the nuclear era, nuclear disarmament has been one of the highest priorities of the international community in ensuring global peace and security. Accordingly, numerous multilateral and bilateral political initiatives have been launched to fulfil this objective in a comprehensive manner. Many of these political efforts have resulted in the negotiation and adoption of legal instruments, which currently comprise the international legal framework on nuclear disarmament. Despite numerous achievements, this framework appears to be at a turning point. As a matter of fact, recent political and diplomatic tensions have reminded the international community that the far-reaching objective of global nuclear disarmament is under continuous pressure. In this context, is the international legal framework on nuclear disarmament effective? This article addresses both development and effectiveness of the international legal framework on nuclear disarmament. It first describes the position of nuclear disarmament within the United Nations (UN) machinery and the related political challenges. It then focuses on the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT),1 with a particular focus on the interpretation and legal requirements associated with Article VI. Finally, it provides an overview of the Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zones (NWFZs) and their role in the international denuclearization dynamics. (author)

  18. The Nuclear Disarmament Movement: Politics, Potential, and Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear disarmament is a global ambition and requires collaboration, but who is collaborating, and what are their roles? This paper discusses the role of the American people in the path towards zero. Scholars have discussed at length the historical lessons of the global disarmament movement, and activists have worked to rekindle the movement after…

  19. Non proliferation and disarmament: nuclear disarmament and security policies in Sweden (1946-1975) - Historical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautecouverture, Benjamin

    2007-06-01

    The author first outlines that Sweden appeared during the Cold War as committed against nuclear weapons, but in fact concentrated this commitment on the objective of nuclear disarmament of nuclear countries without having a very clear position on the objective of non proliferation as it was defined at the end of the 1950's, and also maintained a (secret for while) military nuclear programme which has been progressively given up from the middle of the 1960's. Then, the author discusses why Sweden adopted this double posture, its effects on the international scene, and achievements and setbacks of the Swedish diplomacy with respect to disarmament until the first NPT review conference of 1975

  20. The United Nations disarmament yearbook. V. 19: 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The United Nations Disarmament Yearbook contains a review of the main developments and negotiations in the field of disarmament taking place each year, together with a brief history of the major issues. The series began with the 1976 edition. The Yearbook makes no claim to present fully the views of Member States of the Organization. For further information on the official positions of States, readers should consult the Official Records of the General Assembly and other sources. General Assembly resolutions and decisions are quoted in The Yearbook in the form in which they were adopted by the General Assembly. For the edited texts of these documents for 1994, readers should consult the Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-ninth Session, Supplement No. 49 (A/49/49). For an overview of the work of the United Nations in the field of disarmament, one should consult The United Nations and Disarmament: A short History (UN, 1988). A more detailed account is included in The United Nations and Disarmament: 1945-1970; United Nations and Disarmament: 1970-1975, and previous volumes of The United Nations Disarmament Yearbook

  1. The United Nations disarmament yearbook. V. 22: 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The United Nations Disarmament Yearbook contains a review of the main developments and negotiations in the field of disarmament and arms regulation each year. The Centre for Disarmament Affairs has endeavoured to make the publication as concise as possible without diminishing its usefulness as a reference work. Background information is greatly condensed; thus readers may wish to consult previous editions of The Yearbook. Factual information in tabular form is provided in the appendices. The status of multilateral and regional disarmament agreements is presented in appendix 1. With regard to resolutions on disarmament adopted by the General Assembly, texts are consolidated in appendix IV, information on sponsorship and voting is presented in appendix V and voting patterns are reproduced in appendix VI. Appendices II and Ill contain the texts of the Ottawa Convention on anti-personnel mines and the Inter-American Convention on trafficking in firearms, respectively

  2. A new approach to linking the NPT to nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinguelli Rosa, L.

    1997-01-01

    After about 25 years of the Non-Proliferation Treaty, in the post-Cold War era, the situation was: five declared nuclear-weapon states and more than 170 non-nuclear-weapon states signatories. The asymmetry in global conflicts changed from the East-West conflict due to ideological and military reasons, to the South-North conflict caused by economic reasons. Towards the reduction of nuclear arsenals different tools were used: Northern initiatives, Non-proliferation Treaty (worldwide), CTBT (all nuclear weapon states), START (USA and Russia); Southern initiatives, Tlatelolco treaty (Latin America), Bilateral agreement (Brazil and Argentina), Nuclear-Free Zones (proposed for Africa and New Zealand, Pelindaba Treaty. It is suggested that Pugwash movement should propose implementation of an additional resolution to the Non-proliferation Treaty in such a way as to advance concrete and practical actions towards nuclear disarmament. The instruments for that could be: a convention to be added to the Non-proliferation Treaty; a task for the Conference on Disarmament; a new commission within the United Nations

  3. Nuclear disarmament and the elimination of nuclear dangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daerr, Hans-Joachim

    2002-01-01

    ... today's threats to security and stability have become less predictable and require at the same time a joint response. They illustrate the need for a new international order organized around shared values, common norms of behaviour and the rule of law. Disarmament, arms control, and non-proliferation are indispensable elements of this cooperative international order... We have to make sure that the functions that are today attributed to nuclear weapons become dispensable ... Nuclear disarmament is the counterpart of the renunciation of nuclear weapons by non-nuclear-weapons states. This bargain must not be undermined ... The NPT is no licence to perpetuate the status of the nuclear 'haves' versus the nuclear 'have nots.' (author)

  4. Nuclear deterrence and disarmament: France in a corner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, L.

    2010-01-01

    The author comments the implications and consequences of the recent Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference which drew a line between emerging actors and non-aligned countries on one side, and nuclear states on the other. As the United States got some benefits from this review conference, France, because of its involvement on the Iranian issue and of its clumsy reaction to the Brazil's and Turkey's initiative, found itself in an uncomfortable position. The author stresses that nuclear weapon proliferation is presently the biggest threat against peace, and that negotiations on nuclear disarmament must be resumed. He describes France's position and orientations on this issue: to restore the NPT authority, to ratify the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), to implement the Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty (FMCT). He also discusses the importance of talks about nuclear deterrence in Europe, and more particularly about the role and the future of US tactical nuclear weapons and missiles present on the European soil

  5. Disarmament through regional dialogue: United States arms control and disarmament policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holum, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Less than fifty years ago, Japan and the United States faced one another in history's deadliest conflict. Since that world war, the competition has been limited to a mature-if spirited-contest for customers. The two countries have become firm friends for peace-and leaders in the international community's campaign against weapons of mass destruction. This friendship is too important to be shaken by momentary upsets. The countries that learned the most from the last great war are today among the most resolutely peaceful in the world. To my mind, it is no coincidence that Japan and Germany, two nations which transformed defeat in that war into remarkable economic success following it-which have sought prosperity and harmony with their neighbours instead of dominion over them-are the two nations the United States would like to see added as permanent members to the United Nations Security Council. There is hope that, some day, countries may be judged not by the arms but the commitments they keep-and the values they uphold. All responsible nations must affirm that nuclear non-proliferation is an enduring value, not a passing policy. United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency underlines that its highest priority in the coming year is indefinite and unconditional extension of the Non-proliferation Treaty

  6. Nuclear disarmament and the verification role of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, Carlos S.

    2008-01-01

    At the height of the cold war, nuclear arsenals reached a peak of some 70000 weapons. Although these numbers have since come down significantly, some 27000 weapons remain. The fact that decades go by and nuclear disarmament is not realised contributes to a deep sense of concern and disappointment. So do other factors, such as the persistence of nuclear doctrines that admit first use; the lack of binding negative assurances; the ongoing research on nuclear explosives including subcritical tests, and the maintaining readiness to resume full-scale testing. The sense of insufficient or outright lack of progress in nuclear disarmament is even more disturbing if measured against existing legal obligations. First and foremost among those is of course Article VI of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). According to the ICJ's Advisory Opinion, the obligation contained in Article VI is an obligation to achieve results in nuclear disarmament. Bringing the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) into force is still missing, as well as negotiating a Fissile Materials Cut-Off Treaty (FMCT). Despite significant unilateral reductions in nuclear arsenals, these have not been done within an international process that includes the commitment to total elimination. The notion that it is morally reprehensible for some countries to pursue weapons of mass destruction yet morally acceptable for others to rely on them for their security is simply unworkable. For achieving nuclear disarmament verification objectives, the IAEA clearly would have a major role to play. Under Article III.A.5 of its Statute, the Agency is allowed to apply, at the request of a State, safeguards to any of that State's nuclear activities. The Agency's capabilities and experience make it the international institution best suited to eventually perform nuclear disarmament verification tasks. In order to perform nuclear disarmament verification activities, the Agency would of course need to

  7. The Nuclear Disarmament Cases: Is Formalistic Rigour in Establishing Jurisdiction Impeding Access to Justice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Ramkumar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear disarmament falls within the purview of the purposes envisaged in Article 1 of the United Nations Charter. The International Court of Justice (ICJ in 1996 delivered an advisory opinion on legality of use of nuclear weapons and has stated that the states in good faith must strive towards nuclear disarmament. In the 'Marshall Islands Cases', 20 years later the ICJ had the opportunity to address questions relating to cessation of the nuclear arms race and nuclear disarmament. However, the ICJ has failed to foster nuclear disarmament within the international community. The ICJ dismissed Marshall Islands’ application on jurisdictional grounds because there was no legal dispute between the parties. The ICJ in determining the existence of a dispute introduced a subjective 'awareness' test. In this case note, we aim to examine the awareness test and its politico-legal effects in the development of international law. While doing so, we also argue that the test has further rendered the enforcement of nuclear disarmament obligations arduous.

  8. Russia's Nuclear Forces: Between Disarmament and Modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podvig, Pavel

    2011-04-01

    to the traditional view that relies on strategic nuclear deterrent as a central element of security strategy, regardless of whether nuclear deterrence has any actual role in addressing those problems. The emphasis on strategic stability in the bilateral relationship with the United States was evident in the important role that Russia assigned to the U.S.-Russian arms control negotiations. Resumption of the legally binding arms control process was one of the key elements of the largely successful 'reset' policy pursued by the Obama Administration in its relationships with Russia. Also, during the negotiations Russia strongly emphasized its interest in those issues that it believed might directly affect its deterrent potential - missile defense and conventional strategic launchers. Russia's extremely cautious approach to the next round of nuclear disarmament talks suggests that these issues did not lose their importance after New START - looking at nuclear disarmament in the context of strategic stability, Russia expressed concerns that deep reductions could undermine its nuclear deterrent if, for example, the United States proceeds with deployment of its missile defense system. Whether or not these concerns are justified, they do play an important role in how Russia looks at the future of nuclear disarmament. However, the opposite is true as well - the nuclear disarmament process can change Russia's security policy in a variety of ways by addressing some of its concerns or failing to address others. After the successful conclusion of the New START negotiations, the direction of change in Russia's nuclear policy will depend on how the subsequent dialogue addresses a number of key issues. First, the arms control process will have to reconcile the U.S. and Russian strategic modernization programs with deeper nuclear reductions. In Russia's case this would critically depend on whether the two countries could resolve their differences on

  9. Nuclear disarmament or survival of nuclear arms?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroot, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    START II has not yet been ratified by the US or Russian parliaments. Doubts may be raised over whether it will ever be. In the best case there will be more than 20,000 nuclear warheads in the arsenals of these two countries by the year 2003. All five nuclear states consider that nuclear weapons are an essential component of their national defense. It might sound childish but, the whole story is is so often childish: the five powers refuse to break their nuclear toys. They take even all possible measures to maintain and improve them and to ensure the survivability of their arsenals. To prepare for the next arms race..

  10. Report of the disarmament commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    At its forty-fifth session, the General Assembly adopted resolution 45/62 B of 4 December 1990, entitled ''Report of the Disarmament Commission'', by which the Assembly, inter alia: notes that no consensus could be reached on specific recommendations for the item regarding various aspects of the arms race, particularly the nuclear-arms race and nuclear disarmament, as well as a general approach to negotiations on nuclear and conventional disarmament; Working Group II on agenda item 5 of the United Nations Disarmament Commission, entitled ''Process of nuclear disarmament in the framework of international peace and security, with the objective of the elimination of nuclear weapons'', held 11 meetings during the 1991 substantive session of the Disarmament Commission which were preceded by a number of rounds of informal consultations conducted by the Chairman. A structure of work which would serve as a guideline for the work of the Group, while at the same time maintaining the general nature of the desired approach was agreed to by the Group; it included the following four items: 1. The relationship between the process of nuclear disarmament and international peace and security; 2. Review of the steps taken in the process of nuclear disarmament; 3. Strengthening the process of nuclear disarmament, necessary conditions, and mechanisms required for it; 4. The role of the United Nations system in the process of nuclear disarmament with the objective of the elimination of nuclear weapons

  11. The United Nations disarmament yearbook. V. 26: 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The United Nations Disarmament Yearbook is designed to be a concise reference work. As a good amount of background information is condensed, it may be helpful to consult previous editions. Factual information, presented where possible in tabular form, is provided in the appendices, and website addresses of other UN departments and services, intergovernmental organizations, research institutes and non-governmental organizations appear as footnotes. The Department for Disarmament Affairs takes this opportunity to remind you that you can access current information on disarmament issues throughout the year by clicking onto the Department's home page on the Internet: www.un.org/Depts/dda. Among the many electronic resources, you will find updated on a daily basis, the status of multilateral treaties, containing the full texts of the treaties covered in appendix I of The Yearbook

  12. The American and Russian plans of nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallois, P.

    2010-01-01

    This text was published in 1991, at the end of the Cold War. The author comments the intentions of the US and Russia leaders, Bush and Gorbachev, on nuclear disarmament and more specifically on limitations and reductions concerning the different nuclear weapons types and vectors (ballistic missiles, submarine launched missiles, Europe-based missiles, nuclear strategic warheads, nuclear weapon movements, short range missiles, cruise missiles). He also evokes the consequences for France of the American propositions

  13. Arms control and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acton, P.

    1992-01-01

    Article VI of the Non-Proliferation Treaty commits each party to work towards nuclear disarmament and to negotiations to stop the nuclear arms race. All parties to the Treaty are included and a wide range of arms control and disarmament issues are covered. However the main focus at Treaty review conferences has been on nuclear disarmament by the nuclear weapon states which are party to the Treaty. This has led to bilateral United States - Soviet Union negotiations resulting in the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty in December 1987 and the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) in July followed by unilateral arms control measures in September and October 1991. (UK)

  14. United Nations study on disarmament and non-proliferation education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Science and technology transformed the world in the twentieth century. Living standards improved but warfare was rendered more deadly. Weapons of mass destruction - biological, chemical and nuclear - and their means of delivery were developed, as ever more sophisticated conventional armaments were produced and disseminated. The horrors and destruction of armed conflict persist. The need for disarmament and non-proliferation education and training has never been greater. Indeed, changing concepts and perceptions of security and threat magnify the urgency for new thinking to pursue disarmament and non-proliferation goals. More than a decade after the end of the cold war and at the start of the twenty- first century, there is a pressing need to combat ignorance, complacency and a culture of violence. These can be countered through long-term programmes of education and training, especially those related to disarmament and non- proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery, with a view to their reduction and complete elimination. At the same time, concern has heightened over the global threat of the excessive and destabilizing proliferation of conventional weapons, especially small arms and light weapons, rendering more acute the need to combat such proliferation in a sustained way through disarmament and non-proliferation education and training. Additionally there is a need to raise awareness of new challenges to international security and the process of disarmament. Among them, terrorism, with the possibility of the use of weapons of mass destruction, is a source of particular concern. Other challenges, such as organized crime, poverty, human rights abuses and environmental concerns must also be taken into account. Education and training remain important but under utilized tools for promoting peace, disarmament and non-proliferation. The present report addresses that issue and proposes ideas for action

  15. The Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament in the Eighties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, Paul.

    1988-01-01

    The Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament has been studied during the period 1979 to 1987. The study focuses specifically upon national CND, and seeks to fulfill three objectives: to provide an analysis of the internal workings of the Campaign, a discussion of its impact upon the British political system, and to relate these to recent and contemporary theories about social movements. (author)

  16. Deterrence and disarmament

    OpenAIRE

    Gärtner, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    In his April 2009 speech in Prague US President Barack Obama spoke of a world free of nuclear weapons. Obama stated that the United States would maintain nuclear deterrence during the disarmament process. This paper discusses the limitations and deficiencies of the traditional mutual nuclear deterrence and assesses why progress in nuclear disarmament since the end of the Cold War has fallen short of expectations.

  17. Ending reliance on nuclear and conventional arms. Edited transcripts of the disarmament week symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This publication contains the edited transcripts of the two meetings held at the United Nations in 1994: the Disarmament Week Symposium, sponsored by the United Nations Centre for Disarmament Affairs and Department of Public Information and the NGO Committee on Disarmament, from 25 to 27 October, and a panel discussion on the land mines crisis, sponsored by the NGO Committee on Disarmament, on 16 November. Only the material concerning the first Symposium was indexed for INIS database

  18. Arms limitation and disarmament in the United Nations: Perspectives and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Yasushi.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the Under-Secretary-General for Disarmament Affairs of the United Nations presented the main activities and achievements of the UN in the field of multilateral disarmament as well as the next steps to be undertaken by UN and Member States for disarmament and arms limitation

  19. Reviving nuclear disarmament, 26 February 2008, Oslo, Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2008-01-01

    In 1987, Reagan and Gorbachev did agree to abolish an entire class of nuclear weapons - shorter- and intermediate-range missiles - in the INF Treaty. They also created a legacy of dialogue, trust and verification. Significant cuts were subsequently agreed by the two opposing power blocs in everything from military manpower, tanks and warplanes to attack helicopters. There were also verified reductions in strategic nuclear weapons in the START process. Unfortunately, the momentum got lost. In recent years, nuclear threats have become more dangerous and more complex. The number of states known to have nuclear weapons has expanded to nine. Virtually all are extending or modernizing their nuclear weapon arsenals. Others have tried to develop clandestine nuclear programmes. Extremist groups have shown keen interest in acquiring nuclear weapons. Nuclear materials have become more difficult to control. Roughly 27 000 nuclear warheads still remain in the arsenals of these nine countries, 95 percent of which are in the hands of the United States and the Russian Federation. Strategic reliance on these weapons by these countries and their allies undoubtedly motivates others to do the same. And naturally, plans to replenish and modernize these weapons create a pervasive feeling of cynicism among many states - which sense a 'do as I say, not as I do' posture. The rest of the world should actually concentrate on is reaching out to the Middle East by helping to address the dire conditions in the region - chronic and festering conflicts, poverty and social injustice, repression and inept governance. These very conditions are at the root of the pervasive sense of injustice and humiliation that translates into extremism and violence, the drivers for most of the world's major non-proliferation and security concerns. Control of the nuclear fuel cycle is key to curbing proliferation risks. But it must be unambiguously under multinational control, not just managed by the leading nuclear

  20. From nuclear non-proliferation to nuclear disarmament: a need to refocus NPT priorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, Manpreet

    1998-01-01

    This paper seeks to suggest that attempts at general and complete nuclear disarmament have largely failed because of an over emphasis on nuclear non-proliferation, particularly horizontal, while disarmament has attracted only lip service from the perpetrators of nuclear weapons. In this regard, the treaty of the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) that is deemed to be the core of the global non-proliferation regime is no less to blame for having indulged in a skewed pursuit of its twin objectives - nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear disarmament. The paper argues that nuclear non-proliferation can be sustainable only if complemented by nuclear disarmament. In the absence of the latter, proliferation of nuclear weapons, irrespective of the NPT and its safeguards regime, would always pose a potential risk

  1. The United Nations Disarmament Yearbook. V. 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Throughout 1991 the end of the cold war continued to have a positive impact on international relations. In the Minsk Declaration, proclaiming the establishment of the CIS, the Republic of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine undertook to discharge the international obligations incumbent on them under treaties and agreements entered into by the USSR and in the Alma Ata Declaration, this undertaking was accepted by all the eleven republics constituting the Commonwealth. In the course of 1991 several steps were taken which helped enhance the status of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. France and China had decided to accede. On 10 July, South Africa signed a safeguards agreement with IAEA. By the end of 1991, almost all the front-line States in southern Africa had also acceded to the Treaty. Argentina and Brazil concluded a joint safeguards agreement with IAEA and stated that they were taking measures to permit the full entry into force for them of the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (treaty of Tlatelolco). The European Council adopted a Declaration on non-proliferation and arms exports with a view to strengthening the regime of nuclear non-proliferation and, in the light of the Persian Gulf War, further enhancing the effectiveness of ''regimes of non-proliferation''. The heads of State and Government of the seven major industrialized countries reaffirmed their readiness to work in favour of an equitable and stable non-proliferation regime based on balance between nuclear non-proliferation and the development of peaceful uses of nuclear energy, and to achieve a strengthened and improved IAEA safeguards system. The work carried out in Iraq by the Special Commission, established by the Security Council broke new ground for the United Nations in several respects, in particular, those of intrusive on-site inspection and destruction of weapons and mass destruction and associated facilities under

  2. Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament: Where Next?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, G.

    2013-01-01

    Let me come straight to the point: We are still at a real watershed with respect to the whole nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament project, about which hopes have been so high for most of the last two years, especially following the political breakthrough of the election of a US president totally committed to the ultimate achievement of a nuclear weapon-free world. Unless the key players in the international community, and there are many that matter in this context, not just the United States of America and the Russian Federation, get really serious about moving forward on the multiple critical agenda issues that face us - not just safeguards, the subject of this symposium, but right across the whole spectrum of non-proliferation, disarmament and peaceful-uses challenges - there is a very real danger that such remaining momentum for change as there is will stall, that the whole project will fall apart, and that we will be condemned to live for the indefinitely foreseeable future in a nuclear world that is very dangerous indeed. The prevailing sentiment after the May Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference was one of relief - that the conference had not broken down as it did in 2005 and that catastrophe had been avoided; in effect, that this particular watershed point had been passed. But the positive gains from that conference, when objectively assessed, were negligible on crucial NPT regime strengthening issues, and, with the possible exception of the agreement to hold a Middle East conference in 2012, very slight indeed elsewhere. And, weighing in the negative balance, there have been some serious disappointments on other key benchmark issues spelled out in US President Obama's April 2009 Prague Speech and on which real movement had been hoped for this year. Nothing has moved on Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) ratification by the USA or any other major nuclear power; negotiations on a fissile material cut-off treaty (FMCT) remain

  3. From START to NEW START. The dilemma and future of nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plettenberg, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The report describes the existing four agreements on nuclear disarmament: START I (1991). START II (1993), SORT (2002) and NEW START (2010). The chapter on the dependence between nuclear disarmament and strategic stability covers the issues mutual assured destruction (MAD), credibility, overkill capacity; the role of nuclear weapons in the national strategies of the USA and NATO, Russia, Great Britain, France, China and the other nuclear states. Ways out of MAD include disarmament, de-alerting and mutual assured protection (MAP).

  4. Chinese perceptions of the utility of nuclear weapons. Prospects and potential problems in disarmament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing-dong, Yuan

    2010-07-01

    deployment of the long-anticipated DF- 31 and DF-31A long-range ballistic missiles and the Jin-class ballistic missile submarines. In addition, China is also developing anti-space weapons and missile defense, as well as cruise missile capabilities. The qualitative as well as quantitative improvements of the Chinese nuclear arsenal raise important questions for the global nuclear balance in 2025 as the United States and Russia implement their nuclear disarmament commitments, further cutting down their nuclear arsenals. But the more critical question to ask is how Beijing views the utility of nuclear weapons and how and to what extent such perspectives influence China's attitudes toward and participation in multilateral nuclear disarmament. This paper begins with a detailed analysis of Chinese positions on the role of nuclear weapons and of its arms control and disarmament policies. This is followed by a preliminary discussion of Chinese responses to the nuclear-free world initiative. Finally, the paper concludes by offering some recommendations on what needs to take place to remove the obstacles and concerns that may prohibit Beijing from endorsing and participating in efforts toward eliminating nuclear weapons. (author)

  5. Chinese perceptions of the utility of nuclear weapons. Prospects and potential problems in disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing-dong, Yuan

    2010-01-01

    -anticipated DF- 31 and DF-31A long-range ballistic missiles and the Jin-class ballistic missile submarines. In addition, China is also developing anti-space weapons and missile defense, as well as cruise missile capabilities. The qualitative as well as quantitative improvements of the Chinese nuclear arsenal raise important questions for the global nuclear balance in 2025 as the United States and Russia implement their nuclear disarmament commitments, further cutting down their nuclear arsenals. But the more critical question to ask is how Beijing views the utility of nuclear weapons and how and to what extent such perspectives influence China's attitudes toward and participation in multilateral nuclear disarmament. This paper begins with a detailed analysis of Chinese positions on the role of nuclear weapons and of its arms control and disarmament policies. This is followed by a preliminary discussion of Chinese responses to the nuclear-free world initiative. Finally, the paper concludes by offering some recommendations on what needs to take place to remove the obstacles and concerns that may prohibit Beijing from endorsing and participating in efforts toward eliminating nuclear weapons. (author)

  6. Defence, disarmament and the United Nations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Ramesh

    2002-01-01

    Norms, not deterrence, have anathematized the use of nuclear weapons as unacceptable, immoral and possibly illegal under any circumstance -even for states that have assimilated them into military arsenals and integrated them into military commands and doctrines.... we face four nuclear choices in the new millennium: the status quo, proliferation, nuclear rearmament, or abolition. ... The only guarantee against the threat of nuclear war is the complete elimination of nuclear weapons. ...the chasm over which we must leap is the belief that world security can rest on weapons of total insecurity. (author)

  7. Nuclear disarmament. Options for the coming non-proliferation treaty surveillance cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Harald

    2011-01-01

    The report is aimed on the nuclear disarmament discussion with respect to the disagreement of nuclear weapon states and those without nuclear weapons, esp. the non-aligned movement (NAM) concerning the non-proliferation treaty. The report covers the following issues: The role of the non-proliferation treaty, nuclear disarmament in the last surveillance conference 2010, the different disarmament philosophies, the possibilities of bridging the disagreement, further disarmament options for the future non-proliferation treaty surveillance cycle, German options for the future surveillance cycle.

  8. Approaches to nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subrahmanyam, K.

    1981-01-01

    The logic behind the approach of the nuclear weapon states (NWS) to the issue of nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation is based on: (1) The assumption that the less the number of decision makers who could initiate a nuclear war less the probability of war, (2) the claim of the NWS that their nuclear weapons are under strict control, and (3) the claim of the NWS who have signed the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) that the Treaty is being scrupulously observed by them. This logic is critically examined in the light of disclosures that indicate that: (1) both vertical and horizontal proliferation is going on without respite among the NWS, and (2) the fissile material is clandestinely being allowed to be diverted to the favoured clients by one or more of the NWS. These NWS are not subject to any safeguards under the NPT. They are using the NPT and the concept of nuclear free zone as a sort of tactic to divert the attention from the correct approach to the disarmament and to impose their hegemony over the Third World Countries. Moreover, the NPT has conferred a sort of legitimacy to the possession of nuclear weapons by the NWS. In these circumstances their preaching to the Third World countries about nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation sounds hypocritical. The correct approach to these issues would be to put the nuclear weapons under the category of weapons of mass destruction and to ban their use under a non-discriminatory international convention as has been done in the case of biological and chemical weapons. (M.G.B.)

  9. President-elect Obama and nuclear disarmament between elimination and restraint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, W.

    2009-01-01

    In the now famous articles of January 2007 and 2008 in the Wall Street Journal, the 'Gang of Four' former US statesmen called on governments to rid the world of nuclear weapons. Their intervention has been followed in the United States by a flurry of conferences and publications on nuclear disarmament, with esteemed organizations such as the Federation of American Scientists, Stanford and Princeton Universities, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, the Stimson Center and the Arms Control Association entering the fray. The force of their ideas became evident when presidential candidates from both the Democratic and Republican Parties felt obliged to issue statements lending at least some support to the Gang of Four and its aspirations. The calls on the next administration to lead the way towards a 'world free of nuclear weapons' mark the emergence of a significant political movement in the United States. Achieving such a world is not just the fancy of groups of idealists that have marginal influence in US politics. Nor is the attention that nuclear disarmament is now receiving primarily a response to longstanding international pressures on the US and other nuclear weapon states to engage with the issue. It is coming from within - from the judgements of an increasingly influential elite on where US and international interests now lie. Although this elite has its critics, it is currently in the ascendant. The pursuit of nuclear disarmament by the US government has been given a blessing of sorts in President-elect Obama's statement that: 'As long as nuclear weapons exist, we will retain a strong deterrent. But we'll make the goal of eliminating all nuclear weapons a central element in our nuclear policy'. There is obvious caution in these words. They imply that the US is unlikely to take radical, unilateral steps to disarm, and that any embrace of nuclear disarmament will have to be collective. They also seem designed to appeal to a broad range of opinion

  10. President-elect Obama and nuclear disarmament between elimination and restraint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, W.

    2009-07-01

    In the now famous articles of January 2007 and 2008 in the Wall Street Journal, the 'Gang of Four' former US statesmen called on governments to rid the world of nuclear weapons. Their intervention has been followed in the United States by a flurry of conferences and publications on nuclear disarmament, with esteemed organizations such as the Federation of American Scientists, Stanford and Princeton Universities, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, the Stimson Center and the Arms Control Association entering the fray. The force of their ideas became evident when presidential candidates from both the Democratic and Republican Parties felt obliged to issue statements lending at least some support to the Gang of Four and its aspirations. The calls on the next administration to lead the way towards a 'world free of nuclear weapons' mark the emergence of a significant political movement in the United States. Achieving such a world is not just the fancy of groups of idealists that have marginal influence in US politics. Nor is the attention that nuclear disarmament is now receiving primarily a response to longstanding international pressures on the US and other nuclear weapon states to engage with the issue. It is coming from within - from the judgements of an increasingly influential elite on where US and international interests now lie. Although this elite has its critics, it is currently in the ascendant. The pursuit of nuclear disarmament by the US government has been given a blessing of sorts in President-elect Obama's statement that: 'As long as nuclear weapons exist, we will retain a strong deterrent. But we'll make the goal of eliminating all nuclear weapons a central element in our nuclear policy'. There is obvious caution in these words. They imply that the US is unlikely to take radical, unilateral steps to disarm, and that any embrace of nuclear disarmament will have to be collective. They also seem designed

  11. Initial Position, Personal Control, and Attributional Augmentation of Persuasive Communication on Nuclear Disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, John H.; Shaver, Kelly G.

    The effectiveness of two alternative attitude change strategies--a traditional persuasive strategy and a combined attributional/persuasive strategy--in altering attitudes toward nuclear disarmament were compared. Seventeen male and 39 female undergraduate students at a small university participated. A nuclear disarmament attitude pretest was…

  12. Nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation in Northeast Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Yong-Sup

    1995-01-01

    This paper attempted to find out ways to facilitate bilateral and regional arms control regarding nuclear issues in Northeast Asia. This is done in order to reduce uncertainties regarding nuclear policy and capabilities of those countries, and thus to enhance transparency and confidence in the region. In order to bring them into the nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation process in an effective way, we revisited the issues that contributed to the acceleration of the arms race. The review provided insights into the future course of China, the two Koreas and Japan regarding their nuclear policy and capabilities. The findings of this study indicate a general likelihood of resistance to outside request for arms control and disarmament in the countries in Northeast Asia. Besides their continuation with the conventional arms race, countries in Northeast Asia are reluctant to go ahead with the programmes to enhance transparency, build confidence in the region, and to forgo intentions to go nuclear. China is slowly but steadily increasing its nuclear arsenals. Its nuclear arms control policy is not well integrated with nuclear policy and strategy, and it is subject to the overarching goal of nuclear policy and strategy to advance China's status and national security interests in the international community. Thus, it will be very difficult for other countries to bring China to the arms control process for the time being. North Korea has intended to develop nuclear weapons in order to hedge against uncertainties. This poses a threat to the NPT regime and the peace and security of Northeast Asia. Clearly, North Korea has shown its reluctance to disclose the entirety of its nuclear programme under the IAEA inspections. Although South Korea has taken a bold initiative to forgo uranium enrichment and reprocessing capabilities, it has still not fully paid off. Japan adds the problem of plutonium surplus to the uncertain security environments surrounding Northeast Asia

  13. The Political and Strategic Conditions of Nuclear Disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tertrais, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    In this lecture on issues related to nuclear disarmament, the author proposes and comments several scenarios under which the end of nuclear weapons could be considered: the 'abolition scenario', the 'interdiction scenario', and the 'elimination scenario'. The first one would be a deliberate decision to get rid of nuclear weapons after a major nuclear event (an act of terrorism or a nuclear war). The second one is that of a deliberate decision to reduce the role and numbers of nuclear weapons with a view of achieving a nuclear weapon-free world in a reasonable time frame (few decades). The third one supposes that the utility of nuclear weapons has been dramatically reduced, allowing first massive and rapid reductions, and then elimination. This last and main scenario is notably discussed with respect to the Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT), and two variants are distinguished: firstly, alternatives to nuclear weapons have been brought to existence, and secondly, nuclear weapons or any equivalent thereof are not needed any more

  14. United Nations regional disarmament workshop for Asia and the Pacific. Disarmament fellowship, training and advisory services programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The main objectives of the Workshop have been to promote a better understanding and awareness of the current disarmament negotiations and issues, particularly those of common concern to the region, and to facilitate conflict resolution, strengthen disarmament efforts and enhance regional security. 19 papers were presented. The Workshop (a) considered the concepts of peace and security in the Asia-Pacific context; (b) assessed the global efforts to achieve a comprehensive ban on chemical weapons and to strengthen the non-proliferation regimes of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction; (c) reviewed regional disarmament efforts in general and examined in detail efforts and proposals from the South Asian, South-East Asian and Pacific perspectives; and (d) discussed, through various case studies, conflict resolution in the Asia-Pacific region. The discussions which followed the presentations could be grouped under the following headings: Perception of the role to be played by the major Powers in Asia and the Pacific; approach to peace and security; NPT; PTBT; the South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty (Treaty of Rarotonga) and the proposal to establish a nuclear-weapon-free zone in South-East Asia (SEANWFZ)

  15. Nuclear disarmament and evolution of the nuclear non-proliferation regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragin, V.; Carlson, J.; Bardsley, J.; Hill, J.

    1999-01-01

    The 1995 NPT Review and Extension Conference reaffirmed 'the ultimate goals of the complete elimination of nuclear weapons and a treaty on general and complete disarmament under strict and effective international control' and endorsed 'universal application of safeguards once the complete elimination of nuclear weapons has been achieved'. Hence strengthening the international non-proliferation regime and incremental broadening of its coverage towards the universal application of international safeguards in all States is a high priority albeit for the medium to long term. A tentative attempt is made in this paper to anticipate how the elements of verification under the NPT, FMCT and other conventions and arrangements related to nuclear non-proliferation will evolve against the background of the disarmament process, with the goal of achieving at some future stage an ultimate convergence of verification regimes under a complete nuclear disarmament. We think, however, that most of the new initiatives in the area of disarmament/non-proliferation should be realised during the current disarmament phase. We do not wish our model to be perceived as a rigid time-bound scheme. New initiatives should be implemented in parallel and as soon as practicable. This paper reflects the personal views of the authors and should not be taken to represent Australian Government policy. (author)

  16. Concept of a nuclear defense and disarmament; Concept d'une defense nucleaire et desarmement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandperrier, Catherine

    2011-02-09

    Today, disarmament and proliferation control stakes have to deal with the economical and political interests of the development of the civil and military nuclear industry. This book addresses the question of the future of the nuclear defense in France and in the rest of the world at a time when two trends, the abolitionist one and the traditional one, are in opposition. Between disarmament and nuclear exaggeration, tomorrow's defense strategy will have to find its way. (J.S.)

  17. Letter dated 18 October 1999 from the Permanent Representative of China to the United Nations addressed to the Secretary-General. Uphold the ABM Treaty, push forward nuclear disarmament process and promote international peace and security. General Assembly. 54. session. First Committee. Agenda item 76. General and complete disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the letter dated 18 October 1999 sent to the Secretary-General by the Permanent Representative of China to the United Nations in connection with the agenda item 76 (General and complete disarmament) of the 54th session of the General Assembly, First Committee. The letter expresses the position of the Chinese delegation concerning the proposed amendment of the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty (ABM Treaty)

  18. The First Committee of the UN General Assembly and nuclear disarmament: what's new?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitt, Bernard

    2012-11-01

    The First Committee of the 67. General Assembly of the United Nations closed its discussion on 7 November. It included its traditional dose of disarmament resolutions: fifty-nine were adopted in all, twenty-nine of which required a vote, with the others being passed by consensus. Fifteen of them were specifically about the multiple facets of nuclear disarmament, but contained nothing new on the subject. However, one of these resolutions is particularly worthy of note given its subject and its novelty. This year the Committee adopted a resolution (A/C.1/67/L.19) that decides to convene, on 26 September 2013, a high-level meeting of all States, organised by the president of the General Assembly with the aim of furthering nuclear disarmament. The resolution, sponsored by Indonesia with the support of the Non-Aligned Movement, was passed with 165 votes in favour, none against and 5 abstentions (USA, France, Israel, the UK, and Ukraine). Such a decision is not just a formal exercise, and translates in concrete terms the mounting pressure on the nuclear powers. It establishes a more restrictive diplomatic timetable, whose legitimacy directly derives from the recommendation inscribed in the Millennium Summit Declaration, following the three-day Millennium Summit in September 2000 that brought together heads of State and government. In addition, the resolution is based on another First Committee resolution (A/C.1/67/L.9), which itself is not new, and which deals with the follow-up to the advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice of July 1996 on the legality of the threat or use of nuclear weapons, or, more simply put, on deterrence. Even whilst admitting that the threat or use of nuclear weapons could be legal 'in an extreme circumstance of self-defence, in which the very survival of a State would be at stake', the Court unanimously acknowledged the existence of 'a general obligation of States to pursue in good faith, and bring to a conclusion, negotiations

  19. Nuclear non proliferation and disarmament; Non-proliferation nucleaire et desarmement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In the framework of the publication of a document on the ''weapons mastership, disarmament and non proliferation: the french action'', by the ministry of Foreign Affairs and the ministry of Defense, the French Documentation organization presents a whole document. This document describes and details the following topics: the conference on the treaty of non proliferation of nuclear weapons, the France, Usa and Non Governmental Organizations position, the threats of the proliferation, the french actions towards the disarmament, the disarmament in the world, a chronology and some bibliographic resources. (A.L.B.)

  20. International humanitarian law, nuclear weapons and the prospects for nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastassov, Anguel

    2013-11-01

    The author first recalls the general principles of the International Humanitarian Law (IHL) and outlines its main gaps (application of the notion of protected person, classification between own territory and occupied territory). Then and in this respect, he comments the various characteristics of nuclear weapons considered as explosive devices, and notably as they are thus addressed by the International Court of Justice (ICJ). He comments the legal status of the ICJ advisory opinions, and more particularly the relationship between the ICJ advisory opinion on nuclear weapons and the IHL. Different aspects are addressed and discussed: the principle of distinction, the prohibition of the use of weapons that cause unnecessary suffering or superfluous injury. The author then comments NATO's nuclear policy in the international environment, and discusses the status and condition of nuclear deterrence. In order to address prospects for nuclear disarmament, the author notably compares differences between the arms control and non-proliferation approach, and the humanitarian disarmament approach

  1. Restart 2.0 of substrategic nuclear weapon disarmament? Negotiation approaches and models; Neustart 2.0 zur Abruestung substrategischer Nuklearwaffen? Verhandlungsansaetze und -modelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Michael

    2011-05-15

    The author discusses the following topics with respect a possible restart of nuclear disarmament negotiations: nuclear disarmament versus nuclear deterrence; substrategic nuclear weapons; initial positions for the negotiations (American position, Russian position, German position); strategic and substrategic nuclear weapon disarmament (including the questions of transparency and verification); imponderables.

  2. Plutonium: key issue in nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshisaki, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    The technical report is a 1993 update on weapons-grade plutonium, a key issue in nuclear disarmament. Its vital significance would again be discussed during the fifth and the last Review Conference on the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) for Nuclear Weapons which would end in 1995. Member States shall decide whether an indefinite or conditional extension of NPT is necessary for world peace and international security. Two Non-NPT States, Russia and U.S.A. are in the forefront working for the reduction of nuclear weapons through nuclear disarmament. Their major effort is focused on the implementation of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty I and II or START I and II for world peace. The eventual implementation of START I and II would lead to the dismantling of plutonium from nuclear warheads proposed to be eliminated by both countries. This report gives three technical options to be derived from nuclear disarmament issues for the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons: (a) indefinite storage - there is no guarantee that these will not be used in the future (b) disposal as wastes - possible only in principle, because of lack of experience in mixing plutonium with high level wastes, and (c) source of energy - best option in managing stored weapons materials, because it satisfies non-proliferation objectives. It means fuel for energy in Light Water Reactors (LWR) or Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR). (author). 8 refs

  3. Conference day - Dissuasion, proliferation, disarmament: the nuclear debate beyond 2010. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    A first set of contributions (round tables) addresses the relationship between NATO, nuclear deterrence and antimissile defence. The second set of contributions addresses nuclear policies of emerging powers (Russia, China, Iran...) and proliferation risks. The third one addresses the perspectives of non proliferation, civil nuclear energy actors, and disarmament

  4. Nuclear deterrence and disarmament after the Cold War

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, R.F. II

    1995-03-01

    During the Cold War, nuclear arms control measures were shaped significantly by nuclear doctrine. Consequently, the negotiation of arms control agreements often became a battleground for different nuclear strategies. The Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union has been declared over. Today, both nuclear weapons policies and arms control objectives are again being reviewed. This document discusses points of this review.

  5. Multilateral Disarmament and the Special Session: Twelfth Conference on the United Nations of the Next Decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley Foundation, Muscatine, IA.

    The report discusses issues relating to multilateral disarmament in the context of the Special Session of the United Nations General Assembly to be convened in 1978. Intended as a forum for the exchange of ideas of government leaders from the United States and other nations about the international peace-keeping role of the United Nations, the…

  6. The American and Russian plans of nuclear disarmament; Les plans americain et sovietique de desarmement nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallois, P.

    2010-07-15

    This text was published in 1991, at the end of the Cold War. The author comments the intentions of the US and Russia leaders, Bush and Gorbachev, on nuclear disarmament and more specifically on limitations and reductions concerning the different nuclear weapons types and vectors (ballistic missiles, submarine launched missiles, Europe-based missiles, nuclear strategic warheads, nuclear weapon movements, short range missiles, cruise missiles). He also evokes the consequences for France of the American propositions

  7. Nuclear Disarmament and the Insanity Defense: What Happened to Political Responsiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, John H.; Shaver, Kelly G.

    A study which explored the degree to which belief in a politically responsive/unresponsive world might be related to opinions concerning nuclear disarmament, the insanity defense, and women's rights is described. A total of 206 male and female undergraduates completed a 63-item questionnaire consisting of 46 Likert-format I-E items and 17 attitude…

  8. Non-proliferation and nuclear disarmament: speech of the president Obama at Prague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautecouverture, B.

    2009-01-01

    Introduced by the Prague speech of april 7 2009, the Obama President program towards the non proliferation and the nuclear disarmament was pointed out by its optimism ambition and determination. But a more detailed lecture shows concurrent positions. The author analyzes the political aspects of the President speech. (A.L.B.)

  9. The 'humanitarian dimension' of nuclear disarmament: a legitimate debate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tertrais, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Since 2010, a debate on the 'humanitarian dimension' of disarmament has been initiated by several governments and non-governmental organisations. It is not unreasonable to measure the potential impact of a major nuclear event on populations and on the biosphere. Yet the grounds for this debate are questionable, and its political conclusions even more so. (author)

  10. Nuclear disarmament and the elimination of nuclear dangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    The question is whether the culture of militarism will be propagated further and whether the elimination of nuclear weapons will be politically feasible and technically practical, when security is still defined and rationalized in military terms, with nuclear weapons continuing to represent the ultimate guarantee of security. ... A new paradigm needs to be developed around policies that will address injustices and promote human security, by alleviating poverty and reversing socio-economic polarization, enhancing sustainable economic development, and controlling weapons proliferation and militarism. The world is bristling with armaments, paid for with resources stolen from schools and hospitals. Even the heavens are about to be assaulted as we contemplate the weaponization of outer space. (author)

  11. Swedish Disarmament Policy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    NPIHP Partners Host Conference on Swedish Disarmament Policy Dec 05, 2012 The Nuclear Proliferation International History Project is pleased to announce a conference on Swedish nuclear disarmament policy, organized and hosted by Stockholm University on 26 november 2012. Organized by Stockholm University Professor Thomas Jonter, Emma Rosengren, Goran Rydeberg, and Stellan Andersson under the aegis of the Swedish Disarmament Resaerch Project, the conference featured keynote addresses by Hans Bl...

  12. Non-proliferation and nuclear disarmament: A status report. Vienna, 14 March 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2001-01-01

    For more than half a century, strategies of national and international security have been intertwined with the concept of nuclear weapons as a strategic deterrent. Further meaningful progress towards a nuclear weapon free world will demand that we re-examine our fundamental concept of what security means and how it can best be achieved. The following specific areas where our attention should be focused are discussed briefly: the historical perspective, current strategies for non-proliferation and disarmament, and the future prospects

  13. From START to NEW START. The dilemma and future of nuclear disarmament; Von START zu NEW START. Das Dilemma und die Zukunft der Nuklearen Abruestung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plettenberg, Lars

    2012-07-01

    The report describes the existing four agreements on nuclear disarmament: START I (1991). START II (1993), SORT (2002) and NEW START (2010). The chapter on the dependence between nuclear disarmament and strategic stability covers the issues mutual assured destruction (MAD), credibility, overkill capacity; the role of nuclear weapons in the national strategies of the USA and NATO, Russia, Great Britain, France, China and the other nuclear states. Ways out of MAD include disarmament, de-alerting and mutual assured protection (MAP).

  14. Putting teeth in the nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament regime. 25 March 2006, Karlsruhe, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2006-01-01

    The factors, contributing to the world's changes in respect to peace, security and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons are presented in the document. Five necessary and urgent measures are proposed in order to meet the current challenges: 1)tighten control for assess to nuclear fuel cycle technology; 2)accelerate global efforts tp protect nuclear material; 3)support effective nuclear verification; 4) reinvigorate disarmament efforts; 5) increase the effectiveness of the UN Security Council. The importance and necessity to place nuclear operations under multinational control is outlined

  15. The United Nations and Disarmament. An analysis of the Spanish positions in the UN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sánchez Cano

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available In 1953 the Franco regime, internationally isolated, signed the Defence and Economic Assistance Treaties with the USA which allowed it to have access to the organs of the United Nations system. Logically, the implicit subordination in defence aspects brought about a complete misunderstanding of the disarmament issues.The democratic transition, which in the foreign and defence fields lasted until 1988, meant a change in the sense of greater participation through progressive incorporation in various western structures : the EC, NATO, WEU...In this new context, this study analyses the Spanish positions with respect to disarmament in the field of the United Nations, from both its own perspective and that of its adequacy with relation to the conduct of its allies.

  16. United Nations-Led Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration (DDR) in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    absorb rebel units into the national army failed to deconstruct previous personal and ideological allegiances to the former rebel movement and thus...victors our outside interveners, such as India in Sri Lanka, the U.S. in Somalia and Haiti, and UN interventions in Albania and Haiti.30 Nevertheless...Reconstructing Masculinities : The Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration of Former Combatants in Colombia.” Human Rights Quarterly, Vol.31

  17. International Legal Framework for Denuclearization and Nuclear Disarmament -- Present Situation and Prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastelum, Zoe N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); OECD NEA International School of Nuclear Law, Paris (France)

    2012-12-01

    This thesis is the culminating project for my participation in the OECD NEA International School of Nuclear Law. This paper will begin by providing a historical background to current disarmament and denuclearization treaties. This paper will discuss the current legal framework based on current and historical activities related to denuclearization and nuclear disarmament. Then, it will propose paths forward for the future efforts, and describe the necessary legal considerations. Each treaty or agreement will be examined in respect to its requirements for: 1) limitations and implementation; 2) and verification and monitoring. Then, lessons learned in each of the two areas (limitations and verification) will be used to construct a proposed path forward at the end of this paper.

  18. NATO's new strategic concept and the future of nuclear disarmament in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dembinski, Matthias; Mueller, Harald

    2010-01-01

    The study on NATO's new strategic concept and the future of nuclear disarmament in Europe covers the following topics: From the Prague speech to the strategic concept - the significance and role of the substrategic nuclear weapons in Europe: the substrategic nuclear weapons (SSNW) in the USA: relict of the Cold war or clamps of the transatlantic security? The future of the SSNW from the Prague speech to the strategic concept. The positions of selected NATO members and Russia. Conclusions and recommendations: From the significance of the US nuclear weapons in Europe. Arms control policy options.

  19. Nuclear disarmament. Options for the coming non-proliferation treaty surveillance cycle; Nukleare Abruestung. Optionen fuer den kommenden Ueberpruefungszyklus des NVV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Harald

    2011-07-01

    The report is aimed on the nuclear disarmament discussion with respect to the disagreement of nuclear weapon states and those without nuclear weapons, esp. the non-aligned movement (NAM) concerning the non-proliferation treaty. The report covers the following issues: The role of the non-proliferation treaty, nuclear disarmament in the last surveillance conference 2010, the different disarmament philosophies, the possibilities of bridging the disagreement, further disarmament options for the future non-proliferation treaty surveillance cycle, German options for the future surveillance cycle.

  20. Disarmament and control of nuclear weapons: Russian positions and their national and international determining factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facon, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    In a context where Russia seems to come back to some key principles which guided its international action since the end of Cold War, and relationships between Russia and the USA have been degraded since the US intervention in Iraq (2003), the author examines whether these new Russian postures also concern strategic disarmament, whether Russia is loosing its interest in traditional arrangements of strategic stability, and what are Moscow's priorities within the perspective of expiry of the START 1 Treaty. Thus, the author discusses the role of nuclear weapons in the Russian defence policy, outlines the paradoxes of Russian negotiation positions in the fields of disarmament and arms control, and highlights indirect approaches adopted by Russia on these issues

  1. [Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker: nuclear disarmament and the search for freedom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuneck, Götz

    2014-01-01

    Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker's comprehensive contributions to nuclear disarmament and arms control, as well as his peace policy impulses are to be understood primarily in the context of his family origin, his comprehensive thinking and the historical circumstances of the emerging nuclear age. They have a scientific, political and a strong philosophical-moral component. Beside the factual problems (nuclear energy, military strategy) he was interested in political power issues and their ambivalence and perception. His actual work is not only based on general academic knowledge, but also serve the immediate political influence on a scientific basis. Weizsäcker was not committed to nuclear disarmament or arms control per se, but about creating a lasting peace policy in the nuclear age. The paper discusses in chronological order of Weizsäcker's work within the policy field peace and disarmament. Family origin, study and work on the nuclear programme by Nazi-Germany laid the foundations for his later career. As a young physicist, he was directly involved in the political and ethical dilemma of the military and civilian use of nuclear energy. After the war, in Göttingen and Hamburg the reflections of the Nazi phase and the discussion of ways out of the dangers of the Cold War followed. The Max-Planck Institute in Starnberg dealt with the science-based treatment of global world problems, including the dangers of nuclear proliferation. Finally, Weizsäcker initiated a Peace Council in 1985. He urged both the perception of the moral responsibility of scientists as well as an ethics of the scientific-technological age. According to him, a general and profound change in the consciousness of humankind is needed to solve the existing power problems and the problem of war.

  2. The prospect of conventional disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeniji, O.

    1989-01-01

    The prospect of conventional disarmament in Europe holds out great consequences not only for the continent but also for the entire world. The arms race both in its nuclear and conventional aspects has been the single most important element of the destabilizing factors in international relations since 1945. Though initially borne out of the ideological division of Europe and the consequent quest for strategic military superiority, it soon developed a technological momentum of its own, becoming more the cause than the effect of the distrust in the relationship of the two alliances. The issue of conventional weapons was raised for negotiations side by side with that of nuclear weapons when the United Nations took up the question of disarmament in 1946. Due, however, to the unforeseen and most dangerous advance in nuclear weaponry, the fear engendered shifted all attention at the multilateral level to nuclear weapons. Except in Europe where the Mutual and Balanced Force Reduction Talks in Central Europe were initiated, conventional weapons disarmament did not attract multilateral attention again until the First Special Session of the United nations General Assembly Devoted to Disarmament in 1978. The Final Document of the Special Session did accord highest priority to negotiations on nuclear weapons. However, it also affirmed that side by side with negotiations on nuclear weapons, the limitation and gradual reduction of armed forces and conventional weapons should be resolutely pursued within the framework of general and complete disarmament. States with the largest military arsenals, it was stated, had a special responsibility in pursuing conventional armaments reduction. Underscoring the central role of Europe further, the Final Document postulated that the achievement of a more stable situation at a lower level of military potential would contribute toward strengthening of security in Europe and constitute a significant step toward international peace and security

  3. Climate change, nuclear risks and nuclear disarmament. From security threats to sustainable peace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffran, Juergen [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Research Group Climate Change and Security

    2009-07-01

    In the future, nuclear and climate risks may interfere with each other in a mutually enforcing way. Con-flicts induced by climate change could contribute to global insecurity and create more incentives for states to rely on military force, including nuclear weapons. Rather than being a direct cause of war, cli-mate change significantly affects the delicate balance between social and environmental systems in a way that could undermine human security and societal stability with potentially grave consequences for international security. Increased reliance on nuclear energy to reduce carbon emissions will contribute to the risks of nuclear proliferation. A renewed nuclear arms race would consume considerable resources and undermine the conditions for tackling the problem of climate change in a cooperative manner. Nuclear war itself would severely destabilize human societies and the environment, not to speak of the possibility of a nuclear winter that would disrupt the atmosphere. On the other hand, finding solutions to one problem area could help to find solutions in the other. Pre-venting the dangers of climate change and nuclear war requires an integrated set of strategies that ad-dress the causes as well as the impacts on the natural and social environment. Institutions are needed to strengthen common, ecological and human security, build and reinforce conflict-resolution mechanisms and low-carbon energy alternatives, and create sustainable lifecycles that respect the capabilities of the living world. This article examines the linkages between nuclear and climate risks, identifies areas where both threats converge, and offers an approach to move from living under these security threats to building sustain-able peace. By bringing to light the multidimensional interplay between climate change, nuclear risks and nuclear disarmament, this study aims to help the reader grasp their interconnectedness and recognize its critical implications for the strategic security

  4. Climate change, nuclear risks and nuclear disarmament. From security threats to sustainable peace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffran, Juergen

    2009-01-01

    In the future, nuclear and climate risks may interfere with each other in a mutually enforcing way. Con-flicts induced by climate change could contribute to global insecurity and create more incentives for states to rely on military force, including nuclear weapons. Rather than being a direct cause of war, cli-mate change significantly affects the delicate balance between social and environmental systems in a way that could undermine human security and societal stability with potentially grave consequences for international security. Increased reliance on nuclear energy to reduce carbon emissions will contribute to the risks of nuclear proliferation. A renewed nuclear arms race would consume considerable resources and undermine the conditions for tackling the problem of climate change in a cooperative manner. Nuclear war itself would severely destabilize human societies and the environment, not to speak of the possibility of a nuclear winter that would disrupt the atmosphere. On the other hand, finding solutions to one problem area could help to find solutions in the other. Pre-venting the dangers of climate change and nuclear war requires an integrated set of strategies that ad-dress the causes as well as the impacts on the natural and social environment. Institutions are needed to strengthen common, ecological and human security, build and reinforce conflict-resolution mechanisms and low-carbon energy alternatives, and create sustainable lifecycles that respect the capabilities of the living world. This article examines the linkages between nuclear and climate risks, identifies areas where both threats converge, and offers an approach to move from living under these security threats to building sustain-able peace. By bringing to light the multidimensional interplay between climate change, nuclear risks and nuclear disarmament, this study aims to help the reader grasp their interconnectedness and recognize its critical implications for the strategic security

  5. The World After Proliferation, Deterrence and Disarmament if the Nuclear Taboo is Broken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.

    2009-01-01

    he nuclear taboo is customarily seen as a black and white norm, separating the world of the familiar from that of an unknowable afterlife.1 Nina Tannenwald argues that 'once the threshold between use and non-use is crossed, one is immediately in a new world with all the unimaginable consequences that could follow'. It is not correct, however, to say that the consequences are 'unimaginable'. They are certainly unpredictable, but one can imagine at least some of the consequences. This article attempts to do so with regard to consequences for proliferation, deterrence and disarmament. If the nuclear taboo were broken, whether by design, accident, miscalculation, or a breakdown of command and control, one of the more easily imagined consequences would be the collapse of the Nuclear Non- Proliferation Treaty (NPT). It is safe to assume that the use of nuclear weapons in war for the first time since 1945 would be a transformational event. But would nuclear use spell the failure of deterrence and doom the prospects of a nuclear-weapons free world, making obsolete much of the current thinking about nuclear disarmament and nuclear deterrence? Not every nuclear use scenario would necessarily break the lock on the nuclear Pandora's Box. A 'demonstration shot', for example, would not have the same impact as nuclear obliteration of a city. Both would be breaches of the taboo, but the use of a single nuclear bomb probably would not disrupt the status quo as thoroughly as would a massive attack or a two-way exchange. Breaching the taboo would not necessarily reverse the powerful norm and tradition that has developed in the last 60+ years against use of nuclear weapons. There is no compelling logic to assume that nuclear weapons would thereby become re-legitimized as instruments of war. The breaking of the nuclear taboo could actually spur either or both of two opposite reactions: an increased salience of nuclear weapons and a stimulus to disarmament. Which impulse prevails will

  6. The World After Proliferation, Deterrence and Disarmament if the Nuclear Taboo is Broken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzpatrick, M.

    2009-07-01

    he nuclear taboo is customarily seen as a black and white norm, separating the world of the familiar from that of an unknowable afterlife.1 Nina Tannenwald argues that 'once the threshold between use and non-use is crossed, one is immediately in a new world with all the unimaginable consequences that could follow'. It is not correct, however, to say that the consequences are 'unimaginable'. They are certainly unpredictable, but one can imagine at least some of the consequences. This article attempts to do so with regard to consequences for proliferation, deterrence and disarmament. If the nuclear taboo were broken, whether by design, accident, miscalculation, or a breakdown of command and control, one of the more easily imagined consequences would be the collapse of the Nuclear Non- Proliferation Treaty (NPT). It is safe to assume that the use of nuclear weapons in war for the first time since 1945 would be a transformational event. But would nuclear use spell the failure of deterrence and doom the prospects of a nuclear-weapons free world, making obsolete much of the current thinking about nuclear disarmament and nuclear deterrence? Not every nuclear use scenario would necessarily break the lock on the nuclear Pandora's Box. A 'demonstration shot', for example, would not have the same impact as nuclear obliteration of a city. Both would be breaches of the taboo, but the use of a single nuclear bomb probably would not disrupt the status quo as thoroughly as would a massive attack or a two-way exchange. Breaching the taboo would not necessarily reverse the powerful norm and tradition that has developed in the last 60+ years against use of nuclear weapons. There is no compelling logic to assume that nuclear weapons would thereby become re-legitimized as instruments of war. The breaking of the nuclear taboo could actually spur either or both of two opposite reactions: an increased salience of nuclear weapons and a stimulus to

  7. Redefining the U.S. Agenda for Nuclear Disarmament, Analysis and Reflections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Lewis A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Global Security Research

    2016-10-01

    With Lewis Dunn’s paper on nuclear disarmament diplomacy, we are inaugurating a new monograph series under the auspices of the Center for Global Security Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The series will explore complex emerging challenges in the emerging security environment as they bear on issues of deterrence, assurance, and strategic stability. Our goal is to explore these issues deeply enough to provide significant new understanding that is technically informed and policy relevant. Our premise is that thoughtful students of international security affairs continue to value such in-depth analysis as a way to help make sense of the large flow of data and opinion that reaches all of us on a daily basis. Our ambition is to generate four to six such papers per year on especially salient topics. The views expressed in these papers are those of the author and should not be attributed to the Center, the Laboratory, or the U.S. government. This inaugural paper addresses one of the key questions facing national leadership seven to eight years after President Obama’s April 2009 remarks in Prague and his commitment to take practical steps towards the long-term goal of the elimination of nuclear weapons. In the interim, some important steps have been taken. But there have also been many disappointments. The new presidential administration will face a security landscape quite different from that of eight years ago and must reassess U.S. priorities and approaches. As Lewis Dunn argues, some will be tempted to walk away entirely from the disarmament agenda, while others will advocate even more forcefully for unilateral U.S. steps to further reduce the role and number of nuclear weapons in its posture. Dr. Dunn sets out his own vision of how to adapt and carry forward the disarmament agenda, in a manner informed by developments in the security environment that point to a continuing role for nuclear deterrence. The result is both fresh and compelling.

  8. Process of nuclear disarmament in the framework of international peace and security, with the objective of the elimination of nuclear weapons. Regional approach to disarmament within the context of global security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steward, V.R.W.

    1993-01-01

    The letter informs on transmission to the Disarmament Commission of the text of a speech delivered by the State President of South Africa, Mr. F.W. de Klerk, to a joint session of Parliament on 24 March 1993, announcing developments relating to South Africa's nuclear capability and accession to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

  9. Brief history of the nuclear weapon - Between proliferation and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagnollaud, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    During the hardest times of the Cold War, like in October 1962 with the Cuba crisis, the World lived in the fear of a nuclear confrontation between the USA and the USSR. If this time seems far away now, the risks of a nuclear conflict are probably greater today because no serious progress has bee done during the last ten years and because, from now on, nine, and maybe ten states possess nuclear weapons. In April 2009, US President Barack Obama, gave a talk in Prague (Czech Republic) in which he stressed again on the enormous risks that this situation was running on humanity and urged the world to get rid of nuclear weapons. The aim of this book is to present the main steps of this process, which started in the 1960's, and the arguments which justify its necessity. (J.S.)

  10. A nuclear-weapon-free world and true disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini, G.

    1999-01-01

    This preliminary note about is important to consider when discussing hopes of achieving a nuclear-weapon-free world. Without a serious effort to establish intelligent, powerful bodies to control and judge the behavior of the nations on Earth, whatever they future weapons may be, the objective to reach a nuclear-weapon-free world may even succeed, but it is not enough to stop wars and death. Even more than that: if taken alone, as the 'Great Way', it could prove negative, for it could slow down the general effort to achieve peace on out planet. A nuclear-weapon-free world is of course a very good idea but two points must be discussed: how to achieve the nuclear-weapon-free world; and what will happen afterwards. Some considerations on the second point are made

  11. Nuclear disarmament: the rebound?; Desarmement nucleaire: le rebond?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, D. [Institut de Documentation et de Recherche sur la Paix - I. D. R. P., 93 - Saint-Ouen (France)

    2010-07-01

    The elimination of nuclear weapons is very often considered as a naive and unrealistic utopia, or as an ethical ambition or requirement but with no possible implementation. In this book, the author shades light on some concrete elements of the existing debate between international actors: governments, institutions, but also non-governmental organizations and opinion movements born during the last non-proliferation treaty conference. (J.S.)

  12. Terrorism and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    In addressing the General Assembly at the opening of its debate on international terrorism (1 to 5 October 2001), the Secretary-General warned that a single attack involving a nuclear or biological weapon could kill millions. While the world was unable to prevent the II September attacks, there is much we can do to help prevent future terrorist acts carried out with weapons of mass destruction, he emphasized, calling for redoubled efforts to implement key treaties relating to those arms, closer cooperation among international organizations dealing with them, and tighter national legislation covering the exports of goods and technologies used in their production. Many representatives from all countries and all regions echoed the Secretary-General's sentiment during the debate. The general conclusion was that all countries could be affected in some form or another by such a fearful proposition, and all countries must work together to prevent it. To gain a greater understanding of the increased threat of international terrorism today, the Department for Disarmament Affairs sponsored a panel of high-level experts to discuss terrorism and its relationship to disarmament. Two leading experts from the Centre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, Professor Wilkinson and Dr. Gunaratna, put the attacks on the United States in an historical perspective, present some of the repercussions of the unprecedented scope of the attacks and give their views on how international institutions and agreements can assist in combating future acts of this kind. Mr Vladimir P Salov of the Russian Federation addresses the suppression of financing of terrorism and how Russia works towards that end. The IAEA has been trying for almost 50 years to safeguard nuclear materials from diversions to nuclear-weapon users and, in recent years, working more intensively on physical protection of nuclear material. Dr Nilsson's presentation

  13. Nuclear deterrence and disarmament: France in a corner; Dissuasion et desarmement nucleaire: la France dans un corner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, L. [Lyon-3 Univ., 69 (France)

    2010-07-15

    The author comments the implications and consequences of the recent Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference which drew a line between emerging actors and non-aligned countries on one side, and nuclear states on the other. As the United States got some benefits from this review conference, France, because of its involvement on the Iranian issue and of its clumsy reaction to the Brazil's and Turkey's initiative, found itself in an uncomfortable position. The author stresses that nuclear weapon proliferation is presently the biggest threat against peace, and that negotiations on nuclear disarmament must be resumed. He describes France's position and orientations on this issue: to restore the NPT authority, to ratify the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), to implement the Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty (FMCT). He also discusses the importance of talks about nuclear deterrence in Europe, and more particularly about the role and the future of US tactical nuclear weapons and missiles present on the European soil

  14. The case for a United Nations verification agency. Disarmament under effective international control. Working paper 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorn, A.W.

    1990-07-01

    It is now universally recognized that arms control treaties should be effectively verified. The most objective, flexible and cost-effective means to verify the majority of multilateral treaties would be through a new agency under the United Nations. As a cooperative international effort to develop both the technology and the political framework for arms control verification, a United Nations verification agency (UNVA) would speed up and help secure the disarmament process by: verifying a number of existing and future treaties; investigating alleged breaches of treaties; and certifying, upon request, that voluntary arms control and confidence-building measures have been carried out. This paper presents the case for such a proposal, outlines a possible institutional configuration, considers the possibilities for growth and discusses the challenges facing the establishment of such an agency. (author). 16 refs., 1 tab

  15. The case for a United Nations verification agency. Disarmament under effective international control. Working paper 26

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorn, A W

    1990-07-01

    It is now universally recognized that arms control treaties should be effectively verified. The most objective, flexible and cost-effective means to verify the majority of multilateral treaties would be through a new agency under the United Nations. As a cooperative international effort to develop both the technology and the political framework for arms control verification, a United Nations verification agency (UNVA) would speed up and help secure the disarmament process by: verifying a number of existing and future treaties; investigating alleged breaches of treaties; and certifying, upon request, that voluntary arms control and confidence-building measures have been carried out. This paper presents the case for such a proposal, outlines a possible institutional configuration, considers the possibilities for growth and discusses the challenges facing the establishment of such an agency. (author). 16 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Disarmament through regional dialogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Yuhei

    1994-01-01

    The role played by the United Nations in the pursuit of peace and disarmament and in support of the construction of a stable order in the region is very great. The attitude of Japan as a 'peace loving state' shown by its support to Non-proliferation is expressed by its high appreciation of the fact that this Second United Nations Conference in Hiroshima has been convened, as such exchanges of views constitute an important aspect of the process of disarmament

  17. Dreams and realities of disarmament; Reves et realites du desarmement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmas, C.

    2010-07-15

    This text was published in 1978 after the presentation of a disarmament plan to the United Nations assembly by the French president, Giscard d'Estaing. The author comments the differences and the evolutions of the notions of disarmament, arms control and arms limitations, and how these notions appeared or have been used in international conferences, conventions or treaties through history, with either moral or political backgrounds since the sixteenth century, until the situation of nuclear balance after the Second World War. Then appeared the arms control approach and its associated treaties. The author outlines the originality of the French new approach to disarmament according to the President's intervention

  18. Disarmament. Newsletter. V. 11, no. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The newsletter presents materials covering the following subjects: signing of START 2 treaty by Russia and the United States; arms regulation and disarmament in the post-cold war area; accession of new countries to the Non-Proliferation Treaty; trends towards fewer nuclear-weapon tests

  19. Nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament: A long-term perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeckel, E.

    1990-01-01

    International nuclear policy has been determined for a long time by the exigencies of the status quo. The non-proliferation regime draws its legitimacy from the continuation of extant patterns of power in world politics. Such a static policy cannot succeed forever. Overcoming the threat of nuclear proliferation will require innovative strategy that reaches beyond the status quo. It calls for structural change in the international system to be accomodated instead of resisted. If the Non-Proliferation Treaty is to hold, nuclear weapon states will finally have to forgo their privileged status. This cannot, however, be accomplished simply through the abolition or renunciation of nuclear weapons since nuclear weapons themselves continue to be instrumental for war prevention and international stability. Rather, what is needed is a new approach to the management of the nuclear world system under international responsibility. Nonproliferation and disarmament objectives together call for a concept of global security in which multilateral institutions assume an increasingly important role of nuclear diplomacy. (orig.) [de

  20. United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. Ninth Annual Report to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, Washington, DC.

    This annual report surveys activities of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA) and summarizes disarmament developments for the calendar year 1968. An act of Congress states that ACDA must have such a position within the Government that it can provide the President, the Secretary of State, other officials of the executive branch, and the…

  1. The implications of South Asia's nuclear tests for non-proliferation and disarmament regimes. A report of the UNIDIR conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    On 7 and 8 September 1998, fifty experts, drawn from over twenty-five countries and from academia, non-governmental organizations and governments, met in their personal capacities in an off-the-record, 'track one a half' style meeting to discuss the implications of the nuclear tests by India and Pakistan in May 1998. The meeting was hosted by the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research and sponsored by the governments of Australia, Denmark, Italy, Norway, New Zealand and the United States. The conference was divided into five sessions, each beginning with one or two short opening statements from selected experts followed by discussion amongst all the participants. The final session comprised a summary from two of the participants, which was circulated soon after the meeting. This report outlines the various discussions in the meeting and provides a list of possible policy directions that were suggested during the meeting. Not all policy suggestions received the full support of all participants, nor does their inclusion herein imply any endorsement by UNIDIR, the United Nations or any of the sponsoring governments

  2. Education for Disarmament: A Topical Necessity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastase, Adrian

    1982-01-01

    The nature and content of disarmament education, as enunciated by the United Nations and other international groups, is discussed. The link between peace and disarmament is stressed along with alternative means to solve international disputes. (PP)

  3. Information report on the behalf of the foreign affairs, defence and armed forces Commission on France security, nuclear disarmament and non proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This report first gives an overview of nuclear disarmament and non proliferation twenty years after the end of Cold War: evolution and status of Russia's and United States' nuclear weapon arsenals, France's and United Kingdom's trend to reduce their nuclear armament, reinforcement of China's nuclear armament, effects and limitations of the Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT). It notices that the new international context gave birth to some expectations and may lead to a lower nuclear pressure, notably with the influence of START negotiations between Russia and the United States, provided that the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty is ratified by more countries, and that negotiations promote a Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty. The report also outlines the importance of the promotion of better controlled peaceful uses of nuclear energy. It discusses the relationship between maintaining the world nuclear order and the reduction of international and regional tensions, and the importance of struggle against all forms of proliferation. It analyses the French nuclear posture in terms of security requirements, and in front of the zero nuclear option, in a context of ballistic missile proliferation, and in relationship with the issue of tactical nuclear weapons in Europe

  4. Third World and disarmament: shadow and substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husain, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    The progress of world nuclear and conventional disarmament is discussed in relation to Third World countries. Subjects covered include, the Test Ban Treaty, demiliterisation of the sea-bed, chemical and biological weapons, strategic arms limitation, the arms race, disarmament and development, and the attitudes of specific countries - France, China, Israel, Latin America, Southern Asia and Southern Africa towards disarmament. (U.K.)

  5. Disarmament: the African perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, S.C.

    1998-01-01

    Disarmament is now generally accepted as the process of reduction in the size of, and expenditures on, armed forces, the destruction or dismantling of weapons, whether deployed or stockpiled, the progressive elimination of the capacity to produce new weapons and the release and integration into civilian life of military personnel. To realize this objective, the nations of the world have been advocating such measures as the establishment of nuclear weapon-free zones, non-proliferation, limitation of the arms trade, reduction of military budgets, and confidence-building measures. To ensure general and complete elimination of arms, there has been widespread recognition of the need to link the disarmament process with other political as well as socio-economic problems of the world such as the need for security, good relations between states and development of a system of peaceful settlement of disputes. Other measures that have been considered to be relevant in boosting the disarmament process include the role of the general public in putting pressure on their respective governments with a view to accelerating and realizing disarmament objectives. Africans have presented to the world a strong case for global disarmament

  6. Third world and disarmament: shadow and substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husain, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: mirage of disarmament; so-called disarmament; partial and comprehensive test ban; demilitarisation of the sea-bed; chemical and biological weapons; strategic arms limitation; horizontal nuclear proliferation; security guarantees; the arms race; peaceful nuclear explosions; transfer of nuclear technology; China and France; regional conflicts; the South African case; a nuclear Israel (query); the South Asian scene; Latin American perspectives; North American reaction; tightening the screw; UN special session on disarmament; conventional arms transfer; disarmament and development; future prospects. (U.K.)

  7. Max-von-Laue-lecture: Unmaking the bomb: A fissile material approach to nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Hippel, Frank N. [Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The number of operational nuclear weapons in the world has dropped from about 65,000 at the end of the Cold war to about 10,000 and can be driven much lower. But we have a huge amount of highly enriched uranium and separated plutonium from these dismantled Cold War nuclear weapons and from failed civilian plutonium breeder reactor commercialization programs. To make nuclear disarmament irreversible and prevent nuclear terrorism, all this material must be secured and disposed of. We also must abandon the idea of using a nuclear-weapon-usable material as a fuel * that is plutonium in power reactors and highly enriched uranium in naval-propulsion and research reactors. Fortunately, using plutonium as a fuel is uneconomic and research and naval reactors can be designed to use low-enriched uranium. Finally, we must move away from ambiguous national enrichment programs like Iran*s to multinational enrichment programs such as Urenco.

  8. The nuclear weapons inheritance project: student-to-student dialogues and interactive peer education in disarmament activism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhmann, Caecilie Böck

    2007-01-01

    The Nuclear Weapons Inheritance Project is a student run and student initiated project founded in 2001 with the purpose of increasing awareness of health effects of nuclear policies and empowering university students to take action in a local and international context. The project uses dialogues to discuss nuclear disarmament with university students and a method of interactive peer education to train new trainers. The project has met more than 1500 students in nuclear weapon states in dialogue and trained about 400 students from all over the world. This article describes the methods and results of the project and discuss how the experience of the project can be used in other projects seeking to increase awareness of a topic and to initiate action on social injustice.

  9. The nuclear controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walske, C.; Dobkin, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The article deals with the nuclear controversy, especially in the United States. To a certain extent the nuclear debate has become heavily politicised. Public opinion and anti-nuclear groups are mentioned as well as nuclear disarmament

  10. Nuclear disarmament at a standstill; Le desarmement nucleaire dans l`impasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chellaney, B

    1998-10-01

    Considering the pace of major global developments since the fall of the Berlin Wall, the next decade should be equally, if not more dramatic. However, the key principles governing international relations will still be structured on power and force. National interests will continue to override international interests. Political, economic and military rivalries will sharpen. Weapons of mass destruction capabilities will remain the essence of military power. A world based on collective security will remain a fairy tale. Disarmament is expected to remain a complex and endless process that the major powered will continue to employ to their advantage to safeguard their status quo interests. This does not mean that the rest of the world should give up on disarmament or allow the major powers to have their way

  11. The fight against international terrorism and changes in the U.S. nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Marrero Rocha

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how the the fight against international terrorism, as a new organising principle in U.S. foreign policy and security policy, has conditioned and modified the American conception of and strategy for combatting nuclear arms proliferation. On the one hand, it analyses the concepts of “axis of evil” or “rogue states” as instruments of automatic and forced connection between international terrorism and nuclear armsproliferating states. On the other hand, it also deals with the changes in American nonproliferation and disarmament strategy, characterised by a distrust towards international cooperation and a clear preference for using means of a unilateral nature, which challenge, and even scorn, international institutions and the rules of international law in this area.

  12. Target: Disarmament Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haavelsrud, Magnus

    2004-01-01

    Departing from UNESCO disarmament education guidelines, a conceptual framework is presented in which disarmament is seen in relation to the overall question of peace, which also includes problems of development and human rights. The need for disarmament is based on arguments related not only to disarmament "per se", but also to the need for…

  13. Effect of perestroika on disarmament strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyadine, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    The article discusses the effect perestroika has had on the strategy for disarmament, on the assessment of the possibilities, ways and means of implementing it and on the approaches to solving specific problems in the field, and particularly in the area of nuclear disarmament. 10 notes

  14. First start toward nuclear disarmament: CIS openness and compliance. Research report, August 1991-April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casteel, B.

    1992-04-01

    In the last six months we have seen significant changes in the Soviet Union which have radically altered that way we have conducted business. Now, it is no longer the Soviet Union, but the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). We are now making wholesale unilateral cuts in our defense structure as the CIS is viewed as our friend and no longer the Evil Empire. We are supplying the CIS with food, loan credits, and even offering assistance to help them destroy nuclear weapons. Even though the world has changed, the CIS remains the only country on the face of the earth capable of destroying the United States in a nuclear holocaust.

  15. The International Politics of Peace Education: The Conflict between Deterrence and Disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willers, Jack Conrad

    The main impetus for peace education is the arms race, which places peace education in the conflict between conservatives advocating increased nuclear deterrence and liberals supporting nuclear disarmament. In the United States, education for peace is still in its infancy. Other developed nations, such as the Scandinavian countries and to a lesser…

  16. New Approaches and New Technologies for the Verification of Nuclear Disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keir, David

    2013-01-01

    ESARDA’s New Approaches/Novel Technologies Working group has recently begun to take a great interest in technology for use in arms control verification, in parallel with a focus on Nuclear Safeguards technology. A topic-based meeting of members of the NA/NT Subgroup was hosted at Joint Research Centre (JRC), ITU-Nuclear Security Unit in Ispra (Italy), to further explore the technical issues and opportunities presented by the need for new approaches and technologies in a future verified nuclear weapons dismantlement regime. Nuclear warheads must contain radioactive material and, by their nature, gamma rays and neutrons are likely to penetrate to the outside of the warhead casing and even metal containers. Therefore radiation signatures should be detectable by appropriate pieces of equipment. For this reason, researchers in the field of technical verification of nuclear warhead dismantlement have studied and developed technologies for Non-Destructive Assay (NDA). This paper presents a generic dismantlement pathway for verified nuclear warhead dismantlement, based on the scenario employed by the UK-Norway initiative for their exercise in 2008/9. Using this as a framework the types of measurement challenge likely to be presented to a verifying inspector are discussed. The problem of intrusiveness of measurements in relation to the issue of proliferative release of classified information about the warhead attributes is discussed and the concept of ‘information barriers is introduced as a possible solution to this issue. A list of candidate technologies for use in verification activities, with or without information barriers is then presented and, since most of these are new or novel approaches to the issue, an already-established system for classifying them – in terms of state of development and complexity of use in this context – is proposed. Finally, the concept of capturing this information as a library of ‘data sheets’, designed for periodic review as

  17. Transparency in armaments, regional dialogue and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In the face of recent fundamental changes in the international situation, regional and subregional issues have acquired additional urgency and importance in the field of disarmament and international security. The pursuit of regional solutions to regional problems is thus being encouraged by the international community. Towards this end, the United Nations Centre for Disarmament Affairs is seeking to promote regional approaches to disarmament either through the United Nations Regional Centres for Peace and Disarmament or in cooperation with individual Governments. Regional conferences, meetings and seminars to facilitate exchange of ideas and information between governmental and non-governmental sectors, and between governmental and other experts, have been organized as a means of finding common ground, fostering the process of confidence-building and delineating areas of possible future negotiation and agreement. Within this framework, a Conference on the theme 'Transparency in armaments, regional dialogue and disarmament' was held in Hiroshima, Japan. The Conference, the second one held in Hiroshima on disarmament issues, was organized by the Centre for Disarmament Affairs through the Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asia and the Pacific and in collaboration with the Government of Japan and the Prefecture and City of Hiroshima. This publication is based on material presented at that Conference

  18. Text of communication of 14 November 2000 received from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency concerning nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication dated 14 November 2000 from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency concerning nuclear disarmament, attaching a statement by the President of the Russian Federation. The text of the communication and, as requested therein, the text of the President of the Russian Federation, are attached hereto for the information of Member States

  19. Disarmament and arms control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elzen, B.

    1979-01-01

    This report discusses how far science and technology can provide methods of making arms control and disarmament agreements more controlable in an objective way. Two case studies have been considered, the test ban treaty and the verification of the number of strategic nuclear weapons. These lead to the conclusion that both science and politics are closely interwoven and that within what appear to be scientific arguments, political positions are being defended. Consequently scientists and technologists and the contexts in which they work, play a prominent role. (C.F.)

  20. The world at a critical turning point. Edited transcripts of the forums held in the United Nations on 8-9 April, 14 April, 22 October and 27-29 October 1998 and 15 and 22 April 1999 by the NGO Committee on Disarmament, in cooperation with the UN Department for Disarmament Affairs and the UN Department of Public Information, and the 11 May 1999 presentations by NGOs to the third PrepCom for the Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference in 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This publication includes the edited transcripts of the panel discussions held in the United Nations by the NGO Committee on Disarmament in 1998 and early 1999 and the presentations made by NGOs on May 11, 1999 at the third Prep Com for the Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference to be held in the year 2000. NGOs need to be much more active, on a much larger scale, to play an effective role at the UN and with their own governments. The NGO Committee on Disarmament welcomes the membership of all individuals and organizations that have an interest in the activities of the UN in the disarmament, international security and peacekeeping areas. Agreement on the agenda and timing of a fourth Special Session on Disarmament (SSOD IV) was not reached by the working group that met for the fourth year during the Disarmament Commission in April, 1999. The Disarmament Commission operates under rules of consensus, and the objection of India prevented a resolution of this issue. It could be resolved by the First Committee, with a vote. The stumbling block has been the differing views of delegations on the importance of the Final Document of the First Special Session on Disarmament. NGO experts could make a very worthwhile contribution to the discussion on nuclear weapons and on conventional disarmament, UN peacekeeping, peacemaking, and peace enforcing that might Increase the chances of a worthwhile SSOD IV. We welcome your suggestions. The major focus of the First Committee discussion in November, 1998 was on the resolution put forth by Ireland, Sweden, Brazil, Egypt, Mexico, New Zealand and South Africa. That called for a new agenda. Much of the discussion that asked 'How Can We Make Greater Progress Towards Nuclear Disarmament and Prevent Further Proliferation?' focuses on the New Agenda Coalition resolution. Resolution 53/77Y was adopted without the support of the US, UK, France, the Russian Federation, India, Pakistan or Israel (China abstained.) Nevertheless, 114

  1. Increasing transparency of nuclear-warhead and fissile-material stocks as a step toward disarmament -- Proposals for the NPT PrepCom, Geneva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    These proposals made by the International Panel on Fissile Materials IPFM at a conference in Geneva, Switzerland, in April 2013 discuss how increasing transparency can help disarmament efforts. After a short introduction to IPFM and its mission, the action plan on nuclear disarmament is looked at and the various nations involved are listed. A set of baseline declarations proposed are discussed. These include warhead stocks, potential new declarations and fissile material stocks. Monitoring by the International Atomic Energy Authority IAEA is also reviewed. Preparations for future declarations concerning warhead and delivery systems locations, stockpile histories and fissile material production and disposal aspects are reported on. Finally, co-operative verification projects, warhead dismantlement and past fissile material production are examined

  2. U.N. disarmament studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The United Nations General Assembly recently adopted two expert studies relating to arms limitation and disarmament. In March 1987 at the request of the General Assembly, the Secretary-General established a group of scientists to study the ''climatic and potential physical effects of nuclear war, including nuclear winter''. This book (Part I) deals with this study on the climatic and other effects of nuclear war, which was adopted in November 1988. Chapter 1 presents an overview, including findings and conclusions. Chapter 2 is concerned with atmospheric and climatic consequences, including such technical issues as dust, combustion and fuels, fires and smoke emissions, reductions in light, and other factors. Chapter 3 discusses the effects on natural ecosystems and agriculture, and Chapter 4 deals with human health and socioeconomic effects. Part II of the present report covers surveys of the various and evolving consequences of the arms race and military expenditures, carried out with a view to revealing their most recent implications. The present study shows that military expenditures have extensive social and economic consequences. Economic effects are most pronounced in leading military spenders, and in particular in those areas of their economies that are dominated by modern science and technology, which is a key factor in the present arms race. The negative long-term consequences of military expenditures overshadow any positive short-term effects. 5 figs, 8 tabs

  3. Conference day - Dissuasion, proliferation, disarmament: the nuclear debate beyond 2010. Conference proceedings; Journee d'etude - Dissuasion, proliferation, desarmement: le debat nucleaire apres 2010. Actes de la conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-09-15

    A first set of contributions (round tables) addresses the relationship between NATO, nuclear deterrence and antimissile defence. The second set of contributions addresses nuclear policies of emerging powers (Russia, China, Iran...) and proliferation risks. The third one addresses the perspectives of non proliferation, civil nuclear energy actors, and disarmament

  4. No-first-use pledge is a key step for progress in nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jun

    1999-01-01

    At present, nuclear weapons play a less important role globally. People know that nuclear war cannot happen, because no one could win since no one could make a nuclear attack without experiencing a retaliatory strike. But the US strategy has changed little since the Cold War era. The Nuclear Posture Review undertaken by the Clinton Administration concluded that all three legs of the strategic triad should continue to operate, but did not address the future and utility of the nuclear force in the long term. In 1996, the five nuclear weapon states separately pledged that they will not use nuclear weapons to attack the nonnuclear weapon countries. But this is only the first step of Non-first-use Pledge (NFUP)

  5. Uranium, the joint facilities, disarmament and peace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-07-01

    The Australian Government recognises that the only outcome which is ultimately acceptable is total nuclear disarmament. One of the issues addressed in this document is that of the export of Australian uranium. It is argued that by refusing to supply uranium Australia would be making a symbolic gesture which would have the reverse effect to that which was intended. It would weaken the non-proliferation regime and Australia's voice in arms control and disarmament forums

  6. EU’S POLICY OF DISARMAMENT AS PART OF ITS NORMATIVE POWER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana HINCU

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that EU’s policy of Disarmament, Non-Proliferation, and Arms Export Control can be conceptualised into the framework of the normative power. Despite the EU strategies on this policy, such as EU Strategy against the proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction (2003, or Strategy to combat illicit accumulation and trafficking of Small Arms and Light Weapons (2005, the EU is far from being a unitary actor. In the international arena most actions on Disarmament and Non-Proliferation are enhanced by the United Nations and individually by each country that is a nuclear power. The measures taken by the EU in the international forums on Disarmament are analysed with a short historic overview on the issue and with a closer view on the EU’s actions within the United Nations and those taken unilaterally.

  7. France and disarmament from one century to the other

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grand, C.

    2010-01-01

    The author comments the position adopted by France with respect to different disarmament initiatives. While noticing that France has always been a key actor in disarmament and possesses a real expertise in this domain, the author also notices that this country is often perceived as an opponent to disarmament because of its rather conservative position with respect to its own nuclear weapons. However, France has signed several international conventions and treaties dealing with disarmament. France finally joined the Non Proliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, and became extremely active on these issues. But now, its disarmament policy is linked to the European Union framework. Its conservative position on nuclear weapons has to be related to the relationship it perceives between disarmament and security

  8. A report on the UN special session on disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Slow progress in disarmament led many of the United Nations Member States, particularly the non-aligned countries, to request the convening of a Special Session of the General Assembly Devoted to Disarmament. The idea of such a special session had evolved over the past few years as an alternative to a World Disarmament Conference and in contrast to the limited possibilities for discussion provided by a regular session of the General Assembly. A special session was perceived as offering the appropriate opportunity to discuss comprehensive disarmament in a practically universal forum The decision to hold the special session was taken by the General Assembly on 21 December 1976 by resolution 31/189 B, which also established a Preparatory Committee to examine all questions relevant to the special session. Fifty-four countries were appointed members of the Preparatory Committee, which met in five sessions. The United Nations Special Session on Disarmament (SSOD) was held in New York from May 23 to June 30, 1978. One hundred and forty-five nations attended and this was the first time since the Disarmament Conference of 1932 that virtually all countries of the world met to discuss all aspects of disarmament. The agenda for the SSOD included inter alia: a review and appraisal of the present international situation, the adoption of a Declaration on Disarmament, the adoption of a Programme of Action on Disarmament, a review of the role of the UN in disarmament and of the international machinery for negotiations on disarmament, including, in particular, the question of convening a world disarmament conference. The various proposals made at the sessions of the Preparatory Committee and at the SSOD itself were consolidated into one document. Consensus on this Final Document was reached on June 30, the concluding day of the session. The Final Document consists of three major parts: Declaration of Principles, Programme of Action and Disarmament Machinery

  9. Perspectives on Security, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation: Views from the United States and South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    history   and  current... apartheid  eras,  relations  between  the  United   States  and  the  ruling  ANC  have  not  always  been  smooth...post-­‐ apartheid  era.  The  panelist  argued  that  South  Africa  is  the  only  member  of  NAM,  other

  10. Nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament: the President Obama's Prague speech

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautecouverture, B.

    2010-01-01

    The author comments the content and the consequences of President Obama's speech on the future of nuclear weapons in the 21. century. After a recall of the political context, the author shows how this declaration sounded with a real new tone, defined a new direction and introduced a new method, but may reach its objectives only on a long term. Then, he comments how these objectives are challenged by the present context and events, and outlines how the US Nuclear Posture Review will be important

  11. New realities: Disarmament, peace-building and global security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This publication contains excerpts from the conference on new realities: Disarmament, peace-building and global security organized by the Non-Governmental Organization Committee on Disarmament at the United Nations, 20-23 April, 1993, during the regular session of the Disarmament Commission which took place in New York in April-May, 1993. This conference focused on important and topical disarmament and peacemaking issues, and was an opportunity for delegates, non-governmental organization representatives, United Nations staff members and interested individuals to exchange information and discuss the issues in an informal and cordial atmosphere

  12. Nuclear disarmament: France as a model; Desarmement nucleaire: prendre la France pour modele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wodka-Gallien, Philippe [Institut francais d' analyse strategique, 12-14 rue du general Niox, 75016 Paris (France)

    2012-02-15

    The path taken by the French nuclear weapon programme shows unceasing pragmatism combined with a will to maintain the deterrence capability of the arsenal and the position it accords the country in the world's strategic structure. The abolition recommended by the US President would leave military matters open to conventional superpowers

  13. On the fissionable materials management system in the process of nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikharev, S.S.; Mikijchuk, N.B.; Pinaev, V.S.; Sudarushkin, I.S.; Yuferev, V.I.

    1994-01-01

    Various scenarios of nuclear weapons proliferation and goals of fissionable material accounting and control system (FMACS) are considered. Ways of improving FMACS in Russia under a complicated social situation are discussed. This improvement should follow two directions: introduction of non-destructive control methods and accounting and control process automation

  14. Disarmament Verification - the OPCW Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodding, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Chemical Weapons Convention is the only multilateral treaty that bans completely an entire category of weapons of mass destruction under international verification arrangements. Possessor States, i.e. those that have chemical weapons stockpiles at the time of becoming party to the CWC, commit to destroying these. All States undertake never to acquire chemical weapons and not to help other States acquire such weapons. The CWC foresees time-bound chemical disarmament. The deadlines for destruction for early entrants to the CWC are provided in the treaty. For late entrants, the Conference of States Parties intervenes to set destruction deadlines. One of the unique features of the CWC is thus the regime for verifying destruction of chemical weapons. But how can you design a system for verification at military sites, while protecting military restricted information? What degree of assurance is considered sufficient in such circumstances? How do you divide the verification costs? How do you deal with production capability and initial declarations of existing stockpiles? The founders of the CWC had to address these and other challenges in designing the treaty. Further refinement of the verification system has followed since the treaty opened for signature in 1993 and since inspection work was initiated following entry-into-force of the treaty in 1997. Most of this work concerns destruction at the two large possessor States, Russia and the United States. Perhaps some of the lessons learned from the OPCW experience may be instructive in a future verification regime for nuclear weapons. (author)

  15. Multilateral disarmament verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persbo, A.

    2013-01-01

    Non-governmental organisations, such as VERTIC (Verification Research, Training and Information Centre), can play an important role in the promotion of multilateral verification. Parties involved in negotiating nuclear arms accords are for the most part keen that such agreements include suitable and robust provisions for monitoring and verification. Generally progress in multilateral arms control verification is often painstakingly slow, but from time to time 'windows of opportunity' - that is, moments where ideas, technical feasibility and political interests are aligned at both domestic and international levels - may occur and we have to be ready, so the preparatory work is very important. In the context of nuclear disarmament, verification (whether bilateral or multilateral) entails an array of challenges, hurdles and potential pitfalls relating to national security, health, safety and even non-proliferation, so preparatory work is complex and time-greedy. A UK-Norway Initiative was established in order to investigate the role that a non-nuclear-weapon state such as Norway could potentially play in the field of nuclear arms control verification. (A.C.)

  16. Consolidation and improvement of existing multilateral disarmament agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chusei Yamada

    1995-01-01

    Issues of reviewing the legal regimes which the international community has formulated during the last fifty years in the field of disarmament and particularly nuclear disarmament, and considering ways and means of consolidating and improving them for the future are discussed

  17. The role of Brazil in multilateral disarmament efforts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio de Queiroz Duarte

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article examines Brazil’s motivations, objectives, and action in international instances related to nuclear disarmament, non-proliferation, and arms control, particularly the Treaty of Tlatelolco and the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT. The paper describes the evolution of Brazilian attitudes and decisions and discusses prospects for nuclear disarmament opened by the proposal of a treaty prohibiting nuclear weapons.

  18. The role of Brazil in multilateral disarmament efforts

    OpenAIRE

    Sérgio de Queiroz Duarte

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This article examines Brazil’s motivations, objectives, and action in international instances related to nuclear disarmament, non-proliferation, and arms control, particularly the Treaty of Tlatelolco and the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The paper describes the evolution of Brazilian attitudes and decisions and discusses prospects for nuclear disarmament opened by the proposal of a treaty prohibiting nuclear weapons.

  19. Visit of H.E. Mr. S. Marchi, Ambassador and Permanent Representative for Canada to the Office of the United Nations at Geneva and H.E. Mr. Ch. Westdal, Alternate Permanent Representative, Ambassador to the Office of the United Nations Permanent Representative and Ambassador to the United Nations for Disarmament for Canada

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2000-01-01

    Visit of H.E. Mr. S. Marchi, Ambassador and Permanent Representative for Canada to the Office of the United Nations at Geneva and H.E. Mr. Ch. Westdal, Alternate Permanent Representative, Ambassador to the Office of the United Nations Permanent Representative and Ambassador to the United Nations for Disarmament for Canada

  20. Disarmament and Realism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ralph Stuart

    1970-01-01

    International cooperation in the field of disarmament is necessary to make the world a safe place in which to live. Moreover, every additional advance in aerospace technology makes this cooperation more imperative. (CK)

  1. The myth of nuclear deterrence: The lessons of the Cold War

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro

    1997-01-01

    The end of the Cold War has provided a great opportunity and an urgent need for recasting a long-range policy for nuclear weapons. At the moment, however, there is not much prospect of nuclear disarmament by the United States and Russia beyond START II, and no prospect of nuclear disarmament by the other states, while the chances of nuclear proliferation remain high. This paper explores the implications of the Cold War for further nuclear disarmament and preventing future nuclear proliferation, focusing on the notion of nuclear deterrence and the 'crystal ball effect' of nuclear weapons

  2. Ups and downs and perspectives of a world disarmament policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taittinger, P.Ch.

    2010-01-01

    This text was published in 1980 after the invasion of Afghanistan by the Russian troops and the Islamic revolution in Iran. The author recalls the proposition made by the French president to the United Nations assembly which addressed the main principles to achieve disarmament: the right to security for each state, disarmament requires the involvement of every state and will benefit to the poorer ones (there is a link between disarmament and development), and regional situations must be taken into account. The author describes the new structures which have been set up after this special session of the United Nations Assembly (a disarmament commission and a disarmament committee). He stresses the importance of verification, and that of conventional arms reduction

  3. Disarmament and confidence-building in North-East Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Il Nam

    1992-01-01

    Disarmament and confidence building are essential issues to be addressed urgently as they are directly linked with national security. The successful solutions of this issue will ensure world peace and security. These statements have special significance if applied to the situation in North-East Asia and particularly Korean Peninsula. Even under the circumstances of the continued existence of the United States Nuclear Threat, the Government of North Korea has concluded a safeguards agreement and has been inspected by IAEA, thus indicating constant effort to denuclearize the Korean peninsula

  4. The Multilateral Disarmament Process. Conference on the United Nations of the Next Decade (16th, Warwick, Bermuda, June 21-26, 1981).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley Foundation, Muscatine, IA.

    This is a report of a conference held in Bermuda in 1981 to discuss a multilateral approach to disarmament. The conference was an informal, off-the-record exchange of ideas and opinions among 24 diplomats and scholars from 18 countries and two international agencies. Participants considered current disarmament concepts, assessed UN disarmament…

  5. Disarmament and national security in an interdependent world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In the face of improved international relations, regional and subregional issues have acquired additional urgency and importance in the field of disarmament and international security. The pursuit of regional solutions to regional problems is thus being actively encouraged by the international community. Towards this end, the United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs is seeking to promote regional approaches to disarmament either through the United Nations Regional Centres for Peace and Disarmament or in cooperation with individual Governments. Regional conferences, meetings and seminars to facilitate exchange of ideas and information between governmental and non-governmental sectors, and between governmental and other experts, have been organized as a means of finding common ground and delineating areas of possible future negotiation and agreement. Within this framework, a Conference on the theme 'Disarmament and national security in an interdependent world' was held in Kyoto, Japan, from 13 to 16 April 1993. The Conference, the third one in a series held in Kyoto on disarmament issues, was organized by the Office for Disarmament Affairs through the Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asia and the Pacific and in collaboration with the Government of Japan and the Prefecture and City of Kyoto. This publication is based on material presented at that Conference

  6. The NPR, NPT and the prospects for disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilat, Joseph F.

    2010-01-01

    In Prague's Hradcany Square on April 5, 2009, President Barack Obama offered a bold vision of the nuclear future that encompasses both reducing nuclear dangers and pursuing the goal of a world without nuclear weapons while maintaining, as long as nuclear weapons remain, a safe secure, and effective arsenal, to deter potential adversaries and to assure U.S. allies and other security partners that they can count on America's security commitments. The agenda put forward in Prague involves the full range of issues from deterrence to nonproliferation and disarmament. The 2010 Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) report, reflecting the twin objectives of the Prague speech, for the first time places the United States effort to lead expanded international efforts to rebuild and strengthen the global nuclear nonproliferation regime at the top the U.S. nuclear agenda. This attention underscores the fact that the top priority of the United States is to discourage additional states from acquiring nuclear weapon capabilities and to stop terrorist groups from acquiring weapon-usable nuclear materials. It also reinforced the view that positively influencing the 2010 Review Conference (RevCon) of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) was a key objective of the Obama Administration. The NPR developed both the vision and the policy, but details of implementation will need to be developed and better understood. This paper will address the Nuclear Posture Review and its implementation, as well as it's relation to, and impact on, the NPT RevCon and the long term prospects for nonproliferation and disarmament.

  7. The Disarmament Process: Where to Begin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Robert C.

    The purpose of the essay is to stimulate action toward disarmament, defined as arms reductions to the lowest level possible without making internal law enforcement impossible. Intended as a guide for peace activists, the booklet identifies 13 issues that hold promise for leading toward a disarmed world: banning nuclear tests, tests of new…

  8. The lure of disarmament and arms reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paris, H.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear disarmament and arms reduction do not have the same aims. Confusing their definitions means misunderstanding the logic which currently drives the power calculations of yesterday's Great Powers, and their associated approaches to the new strategic actor: China. The author knows the subject well from personal experience. (author)

  9. Initiatives for regional dialogue consideration of regional disarmament guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschik, R.

    1994-01-01

    The General Assembly of the United Nations adopted guidelines and recommendations for regional approaches to disarmament within the context of global security. The guidelines contain 52 principles on: relationship between regional disarmament, arm limitation and global security; general guidelines and recommendations for regional disarmament efforts; possible ways and means to assist and implement these efforts; possible role of the United Nations in aiding these efforts. Experiences gained in Europe and Near East are analysed in the framework of the situation in Northeast, South and Southeast Asia

  10. Information report on the behalf of the foreign affairs, defence and armed forces Commission on France security, nuclear disarmament and non proliferation; Rapport d'information fait au nom de la commission des affaires etrangeres, de la defense et des forces armees (1) sur le desarmement, la non-proliferation nucleaires et la securite de la France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This report first gives an overview of nuclear disarmament and non proliferation twenty years after the end of Cold War: evolution and status of Russia's and United States' nuclear weapon arsenals, France's and United Kingdom's trend to reduce their nuclear armament, reinforcement of China's nuclear armament, effects and limitations of the Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT). It notices that the new international context gave birth to some expectations and may lead to a lower nuclear pressure, notably with the influence of START negotiations between Russia and the United States, provided that the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty is ratified by more countries, and that negotiations promote a Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty. The report also outlines the importance of the promotion of better controlled peaceful uses of nuclear energy. It discusses the relationship between maintaining the world nuclear order and the reduction of international and regional tensions, and the importance of struggle against all forms of proliferation. It analyses the French nuclear posture in terms of security requirements, and in front of the zero nuclear option, in a context of ballistic missile proliferation, and in relationship with the issue of tactical nuclear weapons in Europe

  11. Plutonium Proliferation: The Achilles Heel of Disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leventhal, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Plutonium is a byproduct of nuclear fission, and it is produced at the rate of about 70 metric tons a year in the world's nuclear power reactors. Concerns about civilian plutonium ran high in the 1970s and prompted enactment of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978 to give the United States a veto over separating plutonium from U.S.-supplied uranium fuel. Over the years, however, so-called reactor-grade plutonium has become the orphan issue of nuclear non-proliferation, largely as a consequence of pressures from plutonium-separating countries. The demise of the fast breeder reactor and the reluctance of utilities to introduce plutonium fuel in light-water reactors have resulted in large surpluses of civilian, weapons-usable plutonium, which now approach in size the 250 tons of military plutonium in the world. Yet reprocessing of spent fuel for recovery and use of plutonium proceeds apace outside the United States and threatens to overwhelm safeguards and security measures for keeping this material out of the hands of nations and terrorists for weapons. A number of historical and current developments are reviewed to demonstrate that plutonium commerce is undercutting efforts both to stop the spread of nuclear weapons and to work toward eliminating existing nuclear arsenals. These developments include the breakdown of U.S. anti-plutonium policy, the production of nuclear weapons by India with Atoms-for-Peace plutonium, the U.S.-Russian plan to introduce excess military plutonium as fuel in civilian power reactors, the failure to include civilian plutonium and bomb-grade uranium in the proposed Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty, and the perception of emerging proliferation threats as the rationale for development of a ballistic missile defense system. Finally, immobilization of separated plutonium in high-level waste is explored as a proliferation-resistant and disarmament-friendly solution for eliminating excess stocks of civilian and military plutonium.

  12. Disarmament in the last half century and its future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    In the face of recent fundamental changes in the international situation, regional and subregional issues have acquired additional urgency and importance in the field of disarmament and international security. The pursuit of regional solutions to regional problems is thus being encouraged by the international community. Towards this end, the United Nations Centre for Disarmament Affairs is seeking to promote regional approaches to disarmament either through the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament or in cooperation with individual Governments. Regional conferences, meetings and seminars to facilitated exchange of ideas and information between governmental and non-governmental sectors, and between governmental and other experts, have been organized as a means of finding common ground, fostering the process of confidence-building and delineating areas of possible future negotiation and agreement. On the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the United Nations, the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the end of the Second World War, a Conference on the theme ''Disarmament in the last half century and its future prospects'' was held in Nagasaki, Japan, from 12 to 16 June 1995. The Conference was organized by the Centre for Disarmament Affairs through the Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asia and the Pacific and in collaboration with the Government of Japan and the Prefecture and City of Nagasaki. This publication is based on material presented at that Conference

  13. NATO's new strategic concept and the future of nuclear disarmament in Europe; Das Neue Strategische Konzept der NATO und die Zukunft der nuklearen Abruestung in Europa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dembinski, Matthias; Mueller, Harald

    2010-07-01

    The study on NATO's new strategic concept and the future of nuclear disarmament in Europe covers the following topics: From the Prague speech to the strategic concept - the significance and role of the substrategic nuclear weapons in Europe: the substrategic nuclear weapons (SSNW) in the USA: relict of the Cold war or clamps of the transatlantic security? The future of the SSNW from the Prague speech to the strategic concept. The positions of selected NATO members and Russia. Conclusions and recommendations: From the significance of the US nuclear weapons in Europe. Arms control policy options.

  14. World Disarmament Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woito, Robert, Ed.

    This kit presents a comprehensive introduction for students to arms control and disarmament issues. Included are copies of published and unpublished articles for each topic. Section I provides a self-survey to enable students to assess their own attitudes, values, and knowledge. The survey poses questions for which students select one of several…

  15. Documents on Disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, Washington, DC.

    This publication, latest in a series of volumes issued annually since 1960, contains primary source documents on arms control and disarmament developments during 1969. The main chronological arrangement is supplemented by both chronological and topical lists of contents. Other reference aids include a subject/author index, and lists of…

  16. Disarmament and Peace Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Betty

    1978-01-01

    Questions of disarmament and the legitimacy of the nation-state system should be the core of peace education and should comprise a major aspect of citizenship education. The approach to peace education should be cognitive and affective, intellectual and political, and should be initiated in the early elementary years. (Author/KC)

  17. The Impact of Non-nuclear Factors on the Follow-up Nuclear Disarmament Negotiations between the U.S.and Russia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mou; Changlin

    2014-01-01

    <正>In April 2010,the United States and Russia officially signed the New START Treaty in Prague,the capital of Czech.According to the Treaty,both the United States and Russia should reduce their deployed strategic nuclear warheads to 1550 and reduce their strategic delivery vehicles to 800(among which the deployed strategic vehicles should be reduced to 700.).

  18. Disarmament Education as World Order Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Betty

    1982-01-01

    Disarmament education has been exposed to wider public attention because of the launching of the World Disarmament Campaign, an education effort intended to involve the world's citizens in thinking about disarmament. Factors important to this movement are discussed. (CJ)

  19. 1996: Disarmament at a critical juncture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The document contains edited transcript of the presentations made by Joseph Rotblat, winner of the Nobel Prize, and by Minoru Ohmuta and Hidehiko Yoko-o, speaking for the Mayors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, at the United Nations on 25 April 1996, excerpts from the panel discussion on South Asia at a Critical Turning Point held on 24 September 1996, and extensive excerpts from the panel discussions held 22-24 October 1996 during Disarmament Week at the United Nations

  20. Nuclear weapons and the search for security. 6 October 2004, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Statement at the 54th Pugwash conference on science and world affairs: 'Bridging a divided world through international cooperation and disarmament'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) remains the global anchor for humanity's efforts to curb nuclear proliferation and move towards nuclear disarmament. There is no doubt that the implementation of the NPT continues to provide important security benefits - by providing assurance that, in the great majority of non-nuclear-weapon States, nuclear energy is not being misused for weapon purposes. The NPT is also the only binding agreement in which all five of the nuclear-weapon States have committed themselves to move forward on disarmament. Although the NPT is sometimes mis-perceived as a Western project, its benefits extend across any North-South or East-West geopolitical divide. Still, for those who have worked as 'custodians' of the Treaty for over three decades, it is clear that the events of the past few years have placed the NPT and the regime supporting it under unprecedented stress, exposing some of its limitations and pointing to areas that need to be strengthened and adjusted. This statement discusses some of the lessons that can be taken from the experience of the IAEA in verifying undeclared nuclear programmes in Iraq, Iran, Libya and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. And, since the audience shares my conviction that international peace and security cannot be achieved without effective arms control, I will share a few ideas on the roles each of us can play - as scientists, policy makers and other members of civil society

  1. Arms control and disarmament: A new conceptual approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In the frame of the Millennium Assembly of the UN, the Secretary-General urged the global community to seize a sense of the occasion that comes from the turning of the century, to step back from today's headlines and take a broader, longer-term view of the state of the world and the challenges it poses. In partnership with the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), the Department for Disarmament Affairs (DDA) is taking up precisely that challenge. This panel discussion is part of a series of events sponsored by the Department to deepen the discussion on topical disarmament and security related issues. It is also part of the constant search for a new approach, a new concept, a new paradigm or vision for disarmament and arms control since the end of the cold war, the end of the post-cold war period and the beginning of the new century. It is axiomatic that progress in disarmament is closely linked to the evolution of the security environment. Disarmament cannot be separated from the new geo-political and security configurations in Europe, new demonstrations of nuclear capability in Asia, the emergence of new conflicts that are being driven mainly by internal and ethnic strife and that are outrageous in their brutality in Europe, Asia and Africa. Today's agenda is still full and diverse in the traditional areas of disarmament, nuclear, chemical and biological disarmament as well as ballistic missile defense and proliferation and conventional disarmament including landmines. Like many organizations, research institutes, researchers and individuals in the field of security, DDA has set store on the reliability and credibility of the research and publications produced by SIPRI. As an independent international institute for research on problems for peace and conflict, disarmament and arms control founded in 1966, SIPRI's primary research has been consistently objective, timely, comprehensive and clearly presented. SIPRI's Yearbook has been a reference

  2. Transparency in armaments, regional dialogue and disarmament: The new agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, D.

    1994-01-01

    The themes chosen for this Conference are highly topical and timely. They reflect the new disarmament agenda, an agenda that is far more fluid and offers greater scope for innovation than in recent decades. The linkage of the three themes, disarmament, transparency in armaments and regional dialogue, is also prescient. For it is only through addressing security and disarmament issues together that we can hope to take advantage of the new remarkable opportunities to make progress and to break new ground that are presented by the change in the global security climate. This Conference will make an important contribution to advancing understanding and moulding new ways of thinking on these issues. That is much to the credit of the United Nations Centre for Disarmament Affairs, the Government of Japan, and the authorities of the city of Hiroshima

  3. Disarmament processes for a world at peace in twenty years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toernudd, K.

    1998-01-01

    Disarmament is not an end in itself. Security - or more accurately peace and security - is usually regarded as the real objective of both disarmament and the possession of arms. The most desirable road to international peace and security, however goes through disarmament. Disarmament programmes and strategies may include a wide range of partial or collateral measures, such as control, conversion, destruction, detection, dismantlement, inspection, limitation, non-proliferation, redeployment, reduction, removal, restriction, storage, verification. The more comprehensive concept to cover the whole range would probably be arms regulation. (The United Nations Charter mentions ''regulation of armaments'' in Articles 11 and 47). Whatever terms are used, the overall objective of strengthening international peace and security must be kept in sight. (author)

  4. Advancing Disarmament Verification Tools: A Task for Europe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Göttsche, Malte; Kütt, Moritz; Neuneck, Götz; Niemeyer, Irmgard

    2015-01-01

    A number of scientific-technical activities have been carried out to establish more robust and irreversible disarmament verification schemes. Regardless of the actual path towards deeper reductions in nuclear arsenals or their total elimination in the future, disarmament verification will require new verification procedures and techniques. This paper discusses the information that would be required as a basis for building confidence in disarmament, how it could be principally verified and the role Europe could play. Various ongoing activities are presented that could be brought together to produce a more intensified research and development environment in Europe. The paper argues that if ‘effective multilateralism’ is the main goal of the European Union’s (EU) disarmament policy, EU efforts should be combined and strengthened to create a coordinated multilateral disarmament verification capacity in the EU and other European countries. The paper concludes with several recommendations that would have a significant impact on future developments. Among other things, the paper proposes a one-year review process that should include all relevant European actors. In the long run, an EU Centre for Disarmament Verification could be envisaged to optimize verification needs, technologies and procedures.

  5. Cooperation in the maintenance of peace and security, and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In the face of recent fundamental changes in the international situation, regional and subregional issues have acquired additional urgency and importance in the field of disarmament and international security. The pursuit of regional solutions to regional problems is thus being encouraged by the international community. Towards this end, the United Nations Centre for Disarmament Affairs is seeking to promote regional approaches to disarmament either through the United Nations Regional Centres for Peace and Disarmament or in cooperation with individual Governments. Regional conferences, meetings and seminars to facilitate an exchange of ideas and information between governmental and non-governmental sectors, and between governmental and other experts, have been organized as a means of finding common ground, fostering the process of confidence-building and delineating areas of possible future negotiation and agreement. This publication is based on material presented at the regional meeting on the Cooperation in the maintenance of peace and security, held at the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asia and the Pacific, in Kathmandu, Nepal, from 31 January to 2 February 1994

  6. International Commission on Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament - A possible international regime to cover radiological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautecouverture, Benjamin

    2009-10-01

    Even if a 'dirty bomb' has never been used to date, the perception of the existence of a threat is shared by many. Four main types of radiological and nuclear terrorist attacks can be outlined: - acquisition and use of a nuclear weapon, - attacks and acts of sabotage against a nuclear reactor or another nuclear facility, - acquisition of fissile material for the elaboration of an Improvised Nuclear Device, - terrorist use of radiological materials for the elaboration of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD). This paper seeks to evaluate the probability for a terrorist group to acquire and make use of radiological materials in the objective of detonating a RDD, and the current international framework put into place to address such a threat. Is an international regime to cover radiological materials already in place? How comprehensive / integrated is it? Does a new and/or separate system need to be set up? Before 9/11, two events in particular served to illustrate the threat of a radiological or nuclear terrorist attack: Moscow in 1996, Argun in 1998. Since the 9/11 attacks, a few other radiological events have occurred, which could suggest that the threat is becoming more pressing. It must be noted that the use of a dirty bomb by a terrorist group would most probably be aimed at the contamination of a given geographical area, rather than mass destruction and killing. Indeed, the lethal impact of such weapons remains limited. For this reason, dirty bombs are considered by analysts as weapons of mass disruption rather than weapons of mass destruction. Impacts would be more important in the psychological or economic realms: - targeting highly populated environments, such as cities, would most probably not result in a high death toll; - compared with impacts on health, psychological impacts of such an attack would be much more serious, both within and outside the targeted population; - economic damage is probably the greatest threat posed by such attacks, particularly

  7. Disarmament between timeless and temporal, between ideal and pragmatism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gere, F.

    2010-01-01

    As the appearance of the nuclear weapon has been a new triggering factor for the disarmament process, the author describes the first two ways of this process: the reinforcement of an always more radical requirement of a global disarmament on the one hand, and arms control on the other hand (with its failures and successes with the ABM, SALT and START treaties). He outlines that disarmament and arms control cannot reach their objectives without considering the relationship between technology and strategy, and more precisely a better management and control of human knowledge on these weapons. Then, the author comments the evolution of the Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and of the role of the IAEA, and the importance of verification possibilities as a trust building condition. He comments the recent Obama's approach and initiative. Within this new context, he describes and discusses the French strategic posture

  8. Architecture of nuclear power units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaniuk, B.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear units with circulation cooling using cooling towers are dominating points of the landscape. The individual cooling towers or pairs of cooling towers should be situated in the axes of double units and should also linearly be arranged, rhythmically in the respective zone. Examples are shown of the architectural designs of several nuclear power plants in the USA, the UK, the USSR, France, the FRG and Italy. (H.S.)

  9. 10 February 2012 - Permanent Representative of the Republic of India to the Conference on Disarmament, United Nations Office at Geneva Ambassador Mehta signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser R. Voss;in the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and ALICE underground experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    10 February 2012 - Permanent Representative of the Republic of India to the Conference on Disarmament, United Nations Office at Geneva Ambassador Mehta signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser R. Voss;in the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and ALICE underground experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz.

  10. Evolutionary disarmament in interspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisdi, E; Geritz, S A

    2001-12-22

    Competitive asymmetry, which is the advantage of having a larger body or stronger weaponry than a contestant, drives spectacular evolutionary arms races in intraspecific competition. Similar asymmetries are well documented in interspecific competition, yet they seldom lead to exaggerated traits. Here we demonstrate that two species with substantially different size may undergo parallel coevolution towards a smaller size under the same ecological conditions where a single species would exhibit an evolutionary arms race. We show that disarmament occurs for a wide range of parameters in an ecologically explicit model of competition for a single shared resource; disarmament also occurs in a simple Lotka-Volterra competition model. A key property of both models is the interplay between evolutionary dynamics and population density. The mechanism does not rely on very specific features of the model. Thus, evolutionary disarmament may be widespread and may help to explain the lack of interspecific arms races.

  11. Non-proliferation through effective international control, with particular reference to peaceful uses of nuclear material as a result of nuclear disarmament and international control of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Ryukichi

    1993-01-01

    The role of nuclear factors in the international political situation has changed. The emphasis is now on the new circumstance of the post cold-war world. Non-proliferation is dealt with through effective international control, with particular reference to peaceful uses of nuclear material as a result of nuclear weapons dismantling and international control of plutonium

  12. Development Education and Disarmament Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Robin

    1981-01-01

    Discusses development education as an educational process aimed at preparing people for participation in change and examines the implications for disarmament education. Development education is interpreted to include adult literacy education as well as a system of spreading basic concepts and encouraging and developing local initiatives. (DB)

  13. Disarmament and security in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This publication contains 11 selected papers presented at the seminars on African Disarmament and Security, which were held in Cairo, Egypt, from 20 to 23 march 1989 and from 6 to 10 May 1990. Seven of these papers were indexed separately for INIS

  14. France and disarmament from one century to the other; La France et le desarmement d'un siecle a l'autre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grand, C. [Fondation pour la Recherche Strategique (FRS), 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-07-15

    The author comments the position adopted by France with respect to different disarmament initiatives. While noticing that France has always been a key actor in disarmament and possesses a real expertise in this domain, the author also notices that this country is often perceived as an opponent to disarmament because of its rather conservative position with respect to its own nuclear weapons. However, France has signed several international conventions and treaties dealing with disarmament. France finally joined the Non Proliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, and became extremely active on these issues. But now, its disarmament policy is linked to the European Union framework. Its conservative position on nuclear weapons has to be related to the relationship it perceives between disarmament and security

  15. Joint experiment on verification of the treaty on the limitation of underground nuclear tests and its value in nuclear disarmament problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, V.N.

    1998-01-01

    This conference commemorates the 10th anniversary of the Joint Verification Experiment. The experiment was performed in order to specify methods controlling yield of underground explosions in the USA and the USSR. Basic of the the experiment were coordinated and formulated in the Agreement signed by Heads of departments of foreign policies in Moscow on 31 May 1988. The tasks can be briefly revealed the following way: - each of the parties can measure (on mutual basis) the explosion yield in the course of the experiment performed on the test site of the other party using tele seismic and hydrodynamic methods; - each party also makes tele seismic measurement of both explosions of the experiment with the help of its national net of seismic stations; - each party makes hydrodynamic measurements of explosion yield in the course of the experiment in a special additional borehole; - each party performs tele-seismic measurements of both explosions' yield at its five seismic stations with which the parties exchanged data on the explosions made earlier. In the course of the experiment the parties exchanged the data obtained in the same volume. The analysis showed: 1. The experiment conformed to all the requirements of the Agreement in spite of all the complexity of the procedures and differences in conditions of the experiment performance. 2. The experiment became an example of an unprecedented level of cooperation between two countries in one of the most significant for national security fields of defense activity. 3. The experiment gave the basis for concrete coordination of underground test yield control measures. It also considerable advanced the elaboration of protocols to treaties of 1974 and 1976. 4. In the course of the experiment there appeared an opportunity to compare scientific-technical level of hydrodynamic and seismic measurements and safety provision for nuclear tests of both countries. Cooperative development of anti intrusive devices for hydrodynamic method

  16. The independent nuclear state. The United States, Britain and the military atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.

    1983-01-01

    A chronological account and overview are presented of the 40-year history of British military research, development and production work in atomic energy. The United Kingdom's efforts in this field have always had close links with equivalent activities in the United States, and have often been conducted on a mutually co-operative basis. This book contains descriptions of the technical evolution of British nuclear weapon designs and production models, estimates of annual output figures for fissile material and weapon types, and indications of the nature of the weapon-testing programme. Decision-points are charted. The impact of the agreements with the United States, both upon weapon development and production programmes and upon stockpiling, is analysed, as well as their effects upon the nuclear submarine programme. The impact of later events upon Anglo-American relations is identified, together with the recent British attempts to move to a closer political association with Europe. The study concludes by evaluating the essential nature of four decades of United Kingdom military nuclear development, and identifying the practical limits imposed by past policies upon any attempt by a British government to implement a policy of unilateral nuclear disarmament. (author)

  17. Disarmament and national security in an interdependent world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovsky, V.

    1993-01-01

    The three notions, disarmament, national security and interdependence, which are well known, need a new reading in the today's mission for the United Nations, to facilitate the democratic, evolutionary renewal of the the interdependent world, in which disarmament could play an important role without putting at risk national security, which is of primary concern for the majority of Member States. The recognition of the unity of the wold and its interdependence is the main focal point in the process of transition of the international community to the new world system of peace, cooperation and security based on United Nations Charter. This system was outlined at the Forty-fourth session of the General Assembly, and adopted by Member States as a resolution entitled 'Enhancing international peace, security and international cooperation in all its aspects in accordance with the Charter of United Nations'

  18. Verification and disarmament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blix, H. [IAEA, Vienna (Austria)

    1998-07-01

    The main features are described of the IAEA safeguards verification system that non-nuclear weapon states parties of the NPT are obliged to accept. Verification activities/problems in Iraq and North Korea are discussed.

  19. Verification and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1998-01-01

    The main features are described of the IAEA safeguards verification system that non-nuclear weapon states parties of the NPT are obliged to accept. Verification activities/problems in Iraq and North Korea are discussed

  20. Treze passos para o juízo final: a nova era do desarmamento nuclear dos Estados Unidos e da Rússia Thirteen steps to judgement day: the new era of Russian and North American nuclear disarmament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Santos Vieira de Jesus

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo procura explicar por que os líderes dos EUA e da Rússia não implementaram total e efetivamente o plano de ação de treze pontos práticos para o desarmamento nuclear, estabelecido na Conferência de Revisão do Tratado de Não-Proliferação Nuclear em 2000. As decisões relacionadas aos treze pontos, tomadas pelos membros dos Executivos das duas maiores potências nucleares, são vistas como resultado da conciliação de imperativos internos e externos por esses indivíduos, que enfrentam oportunidades e dilemas estratégicos distintos simultaneamente nos âmbitos doméstico e internacional. São consideradas as escolhas políticas de membros dos Executivos nacionais e estrangeiros, Legislativos e principais grupos de interesse desses países, bem como a distribuição de poder sobre a formulação da decisão nacional, estabelecida pelas instituições políticas domésticas. As hipóteses apontam que os membros dos Executivos desses países - apoiados por grande parte dos membros dos Legislativos e dos principais grupos de interesse envolvidos, como as Forças Armadas - procuraram garantir autonomia para definir a estrutura e a composição de forças estratégicas e táticas, modernizar arsenais atômicos e operar uma força capaz de lidar com contingências que envolvam não apenas potências nucleares tradicionais, mas principalmente novos Estados detentores de armas de destruição em massa e organizações terroristas.This article aims to explain why U.S. and Russian leaders have not implemented totally and effectively the thirteen practical-step plan of action on nuclear disarmament agreed at the 2000 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference. The decisions with regard to the thirteen steps, taken by members of U.S. and Russian Executives, are seen as the result of the conciliation of internal and external imperatives by those individuals, who face distinctive strategic opportunities and dilemmas simultaneously

  1. Statement at Inauguration Ceremony for Vienna Center for Disarmament and Non-Proliferation, 25 February 2011, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2011-01-01

    I was a member of the Group of Governmental Experts which drafted the United Nations Study on Disarmament and Non proliferation Education in 2002. In my new role at the IAEA, I continue to attach great importance to education. I believe it is vital that we educate the people of the world about how devastating nuclear weapons are and build awareness of the importance of nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation. I have no doubt that the new Vienna Center for Disarmament and Non-Proliferation will make an important contribution in this area. The recent conclusion of the new START Treaty between the Russian Federation and the United States was a welcome development in the nuclear disarmament field. Reducing the role and numbers of nuclear weapons is a positive step towards a safe and peaceful world free of nuclear weapons which can impact positively on nuclear non-proliferation efforts. But, of course, further steps are needed. Disarmament and non-proliferation education have an essential role to play in maintaining and strengthening the momentum towards achieving a world free of nuclear weapons. The IAEA has for decades been actively involved in promoting nuclear non-proliferation education. My colleagues and I speak about nuclear non-proliferation throughout the world. We organize briefings here in Vienna for members of parliament, government officials, think tanks, academics and other groups. We host educational seminars for NGOs, diplomats and journalists on the Agency's non-proliferation activities - the latest one was held this week. The IAEA also provides opportunities for on-the-job training and work experience to students and young professionals. Indeed, several Monterey Institute graduates are currently working with us. This is an excellent example of how disarmament and non-proliferation education can contribute to promoting international peace and security. The 9/11 terrorist attacks in the United States took place during my time with Monterey in

  2. The Asia-Pacific region: non-proliferation and other disarmament issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In the past few years, the United States and the former Soviet Union began to adjust their force structures in Asia-Pacific region. In this respect, a large range of issues have been raised in discussions on the non-proliferation of nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction. Apart from the issues and trends related to proliferation, military expenditure, arms transfer and other disarmament matters, the specific situations in the respective subregions of South-East Asia, South Asia and North-East Asia were discussed. Comprehensive and verified commitments not to possess any such weapons is stressed as the main goal of the meeting. It is vitally important that opportunities that were opened should be seized to prevent the spread of nuclear, chemical, biological as well as highly destabilizing conventional weapons

  3. Disarmament, Security and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Provided is a summary of the 26th Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs held August 26-31, 1976, in Muhlhausen, East Germany. World problems discussed included: arms limitations, military research and development, nuclear test ban, alternative energy sources, and genetic engineering. (SL)

  4. Virtual nuclear capabilities and deterrence in a world without nuclear weapons. VERTIC research report no. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paloczi-Horvath, G.

    1998-01-01

    'Virtual nuclear capabilities' (VNC) can be defined as the ability of a state not equipped wth nuclear weapons to produce them within a matter of months or years, using fissile material and/or technological skills and materials available to it. 'Virtual nuclear deterrence' (VND) would use these capabilities to a specific end. It could be a temporary posture adopted by former nuclear weapon states as a guarantee against nuclear weapon 'break out'. VND could hence reinforce a temporary security architecture, even if in this instance 'temporary' might mean up to around ten years. In the context of getting to 'zero', VND could not be an end in itself, but rather serve as an element of the security architecture of a world free of nuclear weapons. VND would only be adopted by the acknowledged nuclear weapon states (NWS) - China, France, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom and the United States of America - after the commit to complete nuclear disarmament, sign the appropriate treaties and perceive the temporary adoption of this form of deterrence to be in their political and security interests. As with the NWS, VND will only be accepted as an interim form of security by the de facto nuclear weapon states (DFNWS) - India, Israel and Pakistan - when they can be assured that their virtual security interests would be guaranteed by other means after they sign a nuclear disarmament treaty. There are several alternative approaches to VND. These range from various types of precise or explicit virtual deterrence to more implicit or tacit forms. An explicit VND posture might allow materials and capabilities relevant to the construction of a nuclear weapon to be retained under verified arrangements for a limited time. This report explains why explicit VND would not be a reliable tool for reinforcing a nuclear disarmament treaty, as it could undermine the treaty's whole purpose. An implicit VND posture would not permit the retention of any weapons-related fissile material or

  5. Practical disarmament measures to consolidate peace in post-conflict environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, M.

    1998-01-01

    At the 51st Session of the United Nations General Assembly, one of the many resolutions passed was entitled 'Consolidation of peace through practical disarmament measures'. The resolution stresses the relevance of certain practical disarmament measures - such as the control of small arms and light weapons, confidence building measures and the demobilization and reintegration of former combatants - for the consolidation of peace in areas that have suffered conflict. With the intention of building on this promising beginning, the United Nations Disarmament Commission (UNDC), at its 1997 session, began the first of a three-year effort to formulate guidelines for a comprehensive approach to the development and implementation of such practical measures. As a co-sponsor of the General Assembly resolution and a strong supporter of the UNDC follow up activity, Canada made available a Background Paperi on the design and implementation of an effective disarmament, demobilization and reintegration programme in post-conflict environments, in an effort to facilitate discussions in the Disarmament Commission. Once completed and circulated, it led to the tabling of a formal Canadian Working Paper, containing the principle findings and recommendations from the Background Paper. It is the purpose of this paper to discuss the subject of practical disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration measures to consolidate peace in post-conflict environments by (1) drawing from the Background Paper and updating where necessary; (2) reviewing other recent developments in the subject area and (3) identifying future policy action, especially relevant research needs. (author)

  6. Which progress review of the world disarmament?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    The author proposes an assessment of international efforts for disarmament through international decisions taken either to regulate and to control different types of weapons (by avoiding their proliferation), or to reduce their quantity, or even to eliminate some categories. He first addresses arms of massive destruction, i.e. chemical weapons (issues raised by their use by some countries, creation of the Chemical Weapons Convention, an exemplary international agreement), biological weapons (examples of use, creation of the BWC convention which has a relatively limited efficiency and raises issues other than military), and nuclear weapons (nuclear States, existing treaties, the possibly utopian character of its interdiction). Then, the author addresses the issue of space demilitarisation, missiles and nuclear-free zones (evolution of space militarization, missile proliferation, emergence and application of the concept of nuclear-free zone). The third part addresses conventional weapons (including light weapons) and arms trade with the existence of a regime of control of missile technology, a convention on the interdiction or limitation of use of some conventional weapons, some initiatives for the marking and traceability of light weapons, and some agreements on the control of arm transfer. The case of mines and sub-munitions is then addressed with the signature of the Inhumane Weapon Convention, the Ottawa Treaty. The author finally discusses some new issues raised by new military technologies such as armed UAVs, killer robots, and other technologies

  7. Editorial: disarmament, non proliferation, confidence-building measures, armament control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soutou, Georges-Henri

    2015-01-01

    After having described the vicious circle existing between disarmament and security as it appeared before and during the first World War, the author deals with the specific case of nuclear disarmament as it was first addressed just after the Second World War, and was then not accepted by the Russians. He comments the political and strategical approach adopted by the Kennedy administration, notably within the context of severe crises (Berlin and Cuba). This resulted in the re-establishment of a relationship between war and policy as defined by Clausewitz, but based on a trilogy of three inseparable pairs: deterrence and armament control, armament control and non proliferation, armament control and confidence-building measures. The author shows that this trilogy has been somehow operating until the end of Cold War, and that nothing works anymore since the end of Cold War and of the bipolar world

  8. The disarmament cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattaneo, M.

    1996-01-01

    War is costly. But peace cost is even higher. The destruction of weapons (mines, nuclear weapons, chemical weapons) is much more expensive than their manufacturing. The soldiers demobilization cost is enormous, for instance in Angola, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Zimbabwe the demobilization of 270000 soldiers cost 2.5 10 9 francs. The measures intended to reduce the war risk are also expensive. That is why the arsenal of ex USSR is still intact. Today no international agency is entirely dedicated to peace building. The question is how would cost such an agency? (O.L.). 5 refs., 2 figs

  9. Nuclear Deterrence in a New Nuclear Era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miraillet, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Within an unstable international environment and an unpredictable future, nuclear weapons will continue to play a major role in defense policies. Indeed, since disarmament currently seems an unlikely objective, nuclear weapons remain as a security guarantee. Within this context, talk of the global abolition of nuclear weapons remains essentially rhetorical and the supposed link between disarmament and non-proliferation is a tenuous one. The foremost purpose of both disarmament and nuclear deterrence must be security

  10. India’s Disarmament Initiative 1988: Continuing Relevance, Valid Pointers for an NWFW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manpreet Sethi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The run up to the NPT Review Conference in 2010 brought nuclear disarmament into focus. Transitory though this trend turned out to be, it nevertheless became a trigger for India to re-examine its own position on disarmament. In order to take a considered view on the subject, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh instituted an Informal Group in October 2010 with the specific mandate to examine the relevance of the Action Plan that had been presented by Rajiv Gandhi in 1988. Were there any specific elements of that plan that were worth pursuing in the new security environment? What role could and should India play as a state with nuclear weapons in the pursuit of disarmament? Should India make the drive towards universal nuclear disarmament a priority in its diplomatic initiatives? Did India have the moral standing to do so after she herself had acquired the weapon? Has anything changed in the international climate to suggest that the Indian lead would attract like-minded nations? How should India approach other nations on this issue? These were some of the questions that the Informal Group considered before presenting its report to the Prime Minister in August 2011. It firmly conveyed the conviction that “India can and must play an effective and credible role as the leader of a campaign for the goal of universal nuclear disarmament, both because India can bring to the campaign its moral strength deriving from six decades of consistently campaigning for nuclear disarmament but also now the weight of its growing presence in the international system.”

  11. Non Proliferation of Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambang S Irawan

    2004-01-01

    Non-Proliferation Treaty of Nuclear Weapons is the international community's efforts to maintain the security of the world, in order to prevent the spread of nuclear technology and the use of nuclear weapons, promoting cooperation for the use of nuclear peaceful purposes, build mutual trust (Confidence Building Measures) as well as to achieve the ultimate goal of disarmament overall (General and Complete Disarmament). Addressing the post-WTC tragedy, 11 September 2001, the Indonesian government should set up a National Measures (National Action Plan), among others formed the National Security Council and NBC Counter Proliferation Unit, or the National Authority for Nuclear Treaty, preparing national legislation, to prevent the abuse nuclear materials for terrorist acts, prevent Illicit Trafficking of Nuclear materials, developed a National Preparedness and Emergency Response Management in the event of a nuclear accident or attack by the use of nuclear terrorism. Importance of a National Action Plan meant the existence of a national commitment in the context of compliance with treaties and conventions which have been ratified relating to safety, security, safeguards towards a general and complete disarmament, to safeguard national security and maintain peace (safeguards) international

  12. Physical protection of nuclear operational units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    The general principles of and basic requirements for the physical protection of operational units in the nuclear field are established. They concern the operational units whose activities are related with production, utilization, processing, reprocessing, handling, transport or storage of materials of interest for the Brazilian Nuclear Program. (I.C.R.) [pt

  13. ARMAMENT AND DISARMAMENT IN NIGERIA: JUXTAPOSING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NGOZI

    scholarly publications and internet works, this study looks at armament and disarmament in .... chunk of Nigeria's yearly budget to security and armament. This implies the ..... Haram too. This is believed to be successful if among other things,.

  14. United Campuses to Prevent Nuclear War: Nuclear War Course Summaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Briefly describes 46 courses on nuclear war available from United Campuses to Prevent Nuclear War (UCAM). These courses are currently being or have been taught at colleges/universities, addressing effects of nuclear war, arms race history, new weapons, and past arms control efforts. Syllabi (with assignments/reading lists) are available from UCAM.…

  15. Disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesnik, Alice J.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the effects one teacher experienced when her students asked for silent time in the classroom to read ahead in the assigned adolescent novel. Suggests that a key goal of literature instruction should be getting students to read with interest and engagement, without the interference of the instructor. (HB)

  16. Nuclear power in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    All over the world except in the United States, nuclear energy is a low cost, secure, environmentally acceptable form of energy. In the United States, civilian nuclear power is dead. 112 nuclear power plants have been abandoned or cancelled in the last decade, and there has been no new order for nuclear plants since 1978. It will be fortunate to have 125 operating nuclear plants in the United States in the year 2000. There are almost 90 completed nuclear power plants and about 45 under construction in the United States, but several of those under construction will eventually be abandoned. About 20 % of the electricity in the United States will be generated by nuclear plants in 2000 as compared with 13 % supplied in the last year. Under the present regulatory and institutional arrangement, American electric utilities would not consider to order a new nuclear power plant. Post-TMI nuclear plants became very expensive, and there is also ideological opposition to nuclear power. Coal-firing plants are also in the similar situation. The uncertainty about electric power demand, the cost of money, the inflation of construction cost and regulation caused the situation. (Kako, I.)

  17. Ups and downs and perspectives of a world disarmament policy; Les vicissitudes et les perspectives d'une politique mondiale de desarmement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taittinger, P.Ch.

    2010-07-15

    This text was published in 1980 after the invasion of Afghanistan by the Russian troops and the Islamic revolution in Iran. The author recalls the proposition made by the French president to the United Nations assembly which addressed the main principles to achieve disarmament: the right to security for each state, disarmament requires the involvement of every state and will benefit to the poorer ones (there is a link between disarmament and development), and regional situations must be taken into account. The author describes the new structures which have been set up after this special session of the United Nations Assembly (a disarmament commission and a disarmament committee). He stresses the importance of verification, and that of conventional arms reduction

  18. The nuclear energy in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-02-01

    With challenges like the climatic change, the hydrocarbons prices increase and the energy supply security, the nuclear park is becoming a decisive and an urgent question in the United Kingdom. The author proposes an historical aspect of the nuclear energy in UK, the actors of the today nuclear industry and the technologies used in 2006, the radioactive wastes management, the programs of the future and the british opinion on the nuclear. (A.L.B.)

  19. Brief history of the nuclear weapon - Between proliferation and disarmament; Breve histoire de l'arme nucleaire - Entre proliferation et desarmament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chagnollaud, Jean-Paul

    2011-05-24

    During the hardest times of the Cold War, like in October 1962 with the Cuba crisis, the World lived in the fear of a nuclear confrontation between the USA and the USSR. If this time seems far away now, the risks of a nuclear conflict are probably greater today because no serious progress has bee done during the last ten years and because, from now on, nine, and maybe ten states possess nuclear weapons. In April 2009, US President Barack Obama, gave a talk in Prague (Czech Republic) in which he stressed again on the enormous risks that this situation was running on humanity and urged the world to get rid of nuclear weapons. The aim of this book is to present the main steps of this process, which started in the 1960's, and the arguments which justify its necessity. (J.S.)

  20. Humble Expectations (on Non-proliferation and Disarmament)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persbo, Andreas

    2014-04-01

    The last few years have been, to paraphrase Charles Dickens, an epoch of belief and an epoch of incredulity. The optimistic tide triggered in the spring of 2009 by President Obama's Prague speech appears to be receding. Recent developments in Ukraine provide ammunition for those who doubted the value and wisdom of nuclear arms reductions. It is easy, indeed comfortable, to point to the value of deterrence in times of political fears and tension between those who are nuclear armed. However, Ukraine is not a validation of nuclear weapons possession, nor is it proof that deterrence works. If it were, it carries with it the uncomfortable thought that nuclear weapons deter countries from stepping up in the defence of smaller nations. The consequences of such a chain of thought are unsettling: by extension, it may well be that nuclear force - while securing the borders of those states that can wield it - ultimately undermines the principle of collective security embodied in Article I of the UN Charter. The Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs recently stated, 'disarmament in its classic 'meaning' is more and more of the past'. But what has really changed? The prospects for multilateral disarmament efforts have been slim throughout the nuclear age. Disarmament, even a simple reduction of nuclear arms not required for defence needs, has always been a long-term effort, requiring patience and careful planning, and is not suitable for people more who prefer high rhetoric, lofty ambition, and quixotic goals. Things are progressing, albeit slowly. The P-5 process is making small but important advances in formulating joint terminology. While the outcome (expected in 2015) is likely to be under-whelming for many, the effort should not be dismissed, but encouraged. Further work is required to lay the substratum on which disarmament can occur, especially so in regards to the mechanics of multilateral verification, and the future role of international

  1. Nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament: the President Obama's Prague speech; Non-proliferation et desarmement nucleaires: discours de Prague du president Obama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hautecouverture, B. [Centre d' Etudes de Securite Internationale et de Maitrise des Armements (CESIM), 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-07-15

    The author comments the content and the consequences of President Obama's speech on the future of nuclear weapons in the 21. century. After a recall of the political context, the author shows how this declaration sounded with a real new tone, defined a new direction and introduced a new method, but may reach its objectives only on a long term. Then, he comments how these objectives are challenged by the present context and events, and outlines how the US Nuclear Posture Review will be important

  2. Next Generation Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Muggah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The process of disarming, demobilizing and reintegrating ex-soldiers at conflict’s end is as old as war itself. The results of these efforts are far from even. Even so, disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR has assumed a central place in the imagination of the peace, security and development communities. It is frequently advanced as a key pillar of multilateral and bilateral stabilization and reconstruction efforts at war’s end. Yet, the contexts in which DDR is conducted are also changing. As the United Nations and others grapple with the new geographies of organized violence, it is hardly surprising that they are also adapting their approaches. Organizations operating in war zones (and also outside of them are struggling to identify ways of ‘disengaging’ Al Shabaab in Somalia or northern Kenya, Jihadi fighters in Syria and Iraq, Taliban remnants in Afghanistan and Pakistan, and Boko Haram militia in Nigeria. There are increasingly complex legal and operational challenges for those involved in DDR about when, how and with whom to engage. In order to effectively engage with these dilemmas, this article considers the evolving form and character of DDR programs. In the process, it considers a host of opportunities and obstacles confronting scholars and practitioners in the twenty first century, offering insights on future trajectories.

  3. Nuclear safety philosophy in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Development of the United Kingdom (UK) nuclear safety philosophy is described in the context of the UK nuclear power program since 1959 and of its legislative framework. Basic to the philosophy is that the licensee is wholly responsible for nuclear safety. The licensing process and safety assessment principles used by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate are discussed, and examples from the assessment of the proposed UK pressurized-water reactor are used to illustrate how the approach works in practice. The UK siting policy and regulatory developments since 1979 are also discussed. Recent, current, and future issues of interest to the regulatory authority are described against the development nuclear scene in the UK

  4. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 1, Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This is unit 1 in a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear powerplants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  5. Challenges to multilateral disarmament in the post-cold-war and post-Gulf-war period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    In May 1991, the United Nations Department for Disarmament Affairs organized a conference in Kyoto which provided nearly a hundred participants with a unique opportunity to examine the challenges facing the world today, and to explore a possible common course of action that could be taken by the international community. Among other issues, the Conference focused its attention on global security and disarmament in reference to regional approaches; proliferation of weapons systems; and problems arising from the implementation of disarmament measures. Deliberations at the Kyoto Conference reveal a remarkable convergence of views among the participants that security is mutually interdependent as well as multi-dimensional, and that it cannot be achieved through the excessive accumulation of armaments

  6. Problems of Disarmament at the end of XXth - beginning of XXIst century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Protopopov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the Soviet Union position on disarmament negotiations in the second half of the twentieth century. The authors noted the role and importance of the policy of the USSR and Russia on the strengthening of the international situation in solving disarmament issues, strengthening international security during that period. The documents and materials disclosed actual position of the USSR/Russia and the United States on the issue of security in general and the specific aspects related to the rarefaction.

  7. Does Britain need nuclear weapons?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.R.; Pease, R.S.; Peierls, R.E.; Rotblat, J.

    1995-01-01

    This report from the British Pugwash Group follows up a detailed international study of the desirability and feasibility of a world free from nuclear weapons with an analysis of issues particular to British nuclear weapons and the associated defense policies. United Kingdom nuclear weapons are reviewed historically, as are the nuclear weapons policies of other countries. A critique of present government policy is presented, with alternative uses for nuclear weapons in the post-Cold war world. The document concludes with a summary of the text and suggests how a British government could move towards global nuclear disarmament. (UK)

  8. Nuclear development in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, S.

    1983-01-01

    The history of the nuclear development in the United States has been one of international cooperation relations so far. The United States is to offer the technical information on atomic energy utilization to foreign countries in exchange for the guarantee that they never attempt to have or develop nuclear weapons. Actually, the United States has supplied the technologies on nuclear fuel cycle and other related fields to enable other countries to achieve economical and social progress. The Department of Energy clarified the public promise of the United States regarding the idea of international energy community. The ratio of nuclear power generation to total electric power supply in the United States exceeded 12%, and will exceed 20% by 1990. Since 1978, new nuclear power station has not been ordered, and some of the contracted power stations were canceled. The atomic energy industry in the United States prospered at the beginning of 1970s, but lost the spirit now, mainly due to the institutional problems rather than the technical ones. As the policy of the government to eliminate the obstacles, the improvement of the procedure for the permission and approval, the establishment of waste disposal capability, the verification of fast breeder reactor technology and the promotion of commercial fuel reprocessing were proposed. The re-establishment of the United States as the reliable supplier of atomic energy service is the final aim. (Kako, I.)

  9. Statement to the fifty-fifth session of the United Nations General Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2000-01-01

    In his statement to the fifty-fifth session of the United Nations General Assembly, the Director General of the IAEA briefly presented the three fundamental functions of the IAEA, namely: its role as a catalyst for the development and transfer of peaceful nuclear technologies, the efforts to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons and move towards nuclear disarmament, and the work to build and maintain a global nuclear safety regime

  10. The United Nuclear Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, D.

    1978-01-01

    The UNRI, the only common institute of the socialist countries was founded in 1956 in Dubna. The scientists of small countries have the opportunity to take part in fundamental research with very expensive devices which are usually not available for them. There are six research laboratories and one department in the UNRI namely: the theoretical physical laboratory; the laboratory of high energies - there is a synchrophasotron of 1a GeV there; the laboratory of nuclear problems - there is a synchrocyclotron of 680 MeV there; the laboratory of nuclear reactions with the cyclotron U-300 which can accelerate heavy ions; the neutronphysical laboratory with the impulse reactor IBM-30; the laboratory of computation and automatization with two big computers; the department of new acceleration methods. The main results obtained by Hungarian scientist in Dubna are described. (V.N.)

  11. State nuclear initiatives in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, P.L.; Stoiber, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    The paper deals with State nuclear initiatives regarding the role of nuclear power in the energy future of the United States. The question of whether and under what circumstances nuclear facilities should be used to generate electricity was put to the popular vote in several States in 1976. Some general principles of Federal-State relations are discussed with specific reference to nuclear regulations. The initiative mechanism itself is described as well as its legal form and background. The parallel developments in the State and Federal legislative consideration of nuclear issues is reviewed and the suggested reasons for the defeat of the proposals in the seven States concerned are discussed. Finally, the author draws some conclusions on the effects of the 1976 initiatives on future decision-making in the US on energy policy in general and nuclear power in particular. (NEA) [fr

  12. The relationship between disarmament and development in the current international context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The report of the Group of Governmental Experts provides a reappraisal of the disarmament-development relationship and the role of the Organization in this connection, taking into account all the major international changes that have taken place since the adoption of the Final Document of the International Conference on the Relationship between Disarmament and Development in 1987. In particular, the review dwells on the pivotal role of security, the costs and consequences of military expenditure, the release of resources for development, the importance of multilateralism and the role of the United Nations, as well as other international organizations and institutions. The report makes numerous recommendations. Notably, it calls for mainstreaming the disarmament-development relationship; raising awareness of this relationship within the international community; engaging in a wide range of conflict-prevention measures, including those related to illicit small arms and light weapons; promoting security through greater openness, transparency and confidence; and strengthening further the role of the United Nations and other international institutions, as well as the donor community, towards these ends. The recommendations also include specific topics for further research by specialized United Nations bodies and non-governmental organizations in order to enhance understanding of the relationship between disarmament and development

  13. Arms Control, Disarmament, and Peace Newsletters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Stephen

    1986-01-01

    Considers the research value of four types of newsletters on arms control, disarmament, and peace: direct-action, informational, scholarly, and single-issue. An annotated list of 58 newsletters includes those considered most significant of their type and recommended for library collections. (EM)

  14. Kamarovsky about the problems of disarmament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaev Nikolay Yurievich

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the views of the well-known international law expert L.A. Kamarovsky (1846–1912 on the disarmament problem and analyses the scientist’s detailed proposals dealing with the fight with any militarism manifestation. The author of the article has come to a conclusion that Kamarovsky considered the process of disarmament to be the most important and necessary stage of appeasement of Europe which could be concluded with international organization foundation. At the same time he urged to carry out the disarmament gradually and simultaneously by a number of representative governmental conferences owing to which the most difficult international conflicts could be regulated and the final result of the conferences could be subscription of the binding treaty on disarmament. At the same time it is clear that Kamarovsky underestimated the profundity and complexity of modern regional conflicts. Besides, criticizing the militarist opponents the scientist permitted the possibility of “just” defensive wars and active colonial expansion.

  15. New steam generators slated for nuclear units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This article is a brief discussion of Duke Power's plans to replace steam generators at its McGuire and Catawba nuclear units. A letter of intent to purchase (from Babcock and Wilcox) the 12 Westinghouse steam generators has been signed, but no constructor has been selected at this time. This action is brought about by the failures of more than 3000 tubes in these units

  16. Exploring the gender gap on nuclear disarmament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherrin, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    This research explores the relationship between sex/gender factors and attitudes toward peace and militarism to determine whether more women than men favor non-military solutions to peace to examine the effect of gender identity on these attitudes. The investigation also looks at participation in a peace group, a military setting, child care, and the traditional homemaker role, to see what effect these activities might have on attitudes toward peace and militarism. In addition, the study explores whether there is a correlation between attitudes favorable to feminism and orientation toward war and peace issues. This study is guided by the sociological perspective which assumes that sex and gender differences, to the extent they exist, may be influenced by the social roles defined as appropriate for women and men. In this exploration there is not a sex gap on peace and military attitudes. A feminine gender identity does not have an effect on the direction of attitudes toward peace or militarism. However, an overall identification with masculine traits, plus believing oneself to be dominant, competitive and aggressive is correlated with a non-pacifist world view. Results of this study show that participation in a peace group is the best determinant of a pro-peace attitude, whereas participation in a military setting tends to be associated with a pro-military attitude.

  17. Nuclear instrument maintenance and technical training in Nuclear Energy Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Nasir Abdul Wahid

    1987-01-01

    Instrument maintenance service is a necessity in a Nuclear Research Institute, such as the Nuclear Energy Unit (NEU) to ensure the smooth running of our research activities. However, realising that maintenance back-up service for either nuclear or other scientific equipment is a major problem in developing countries such as Malaysia, NEU has set up an Instrumentation and Control Department to assist in rectifying the maintenance problem. Beside supporting in house activities in NEU, the Instrumentation and Control Department (I and C) is also geared into providing services to other organisations in Malaysia. This paper will briefly outline the activities of NEU in nuclear instrument maintenance as well as in technical training. (author)

  18. Operating performance of LWR nuclear generating units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pia, S.

    1984-01-01

    This work aims at reviewing, on the basis of historical data, the operational problem areas which explain the degree of availability and productivity achieved up to now by nuclear power plants in commercial operation in the world. The operating performance data of nuclear power plants area analysed with respect to plant type, size and other significant reference parameters and they are evaluated also by comparison with fossil generating unit data. Major performance indices data are presented for both nuclear and fossil units type and distribution of outage causes. Unplanned full outages caused by nuclear power plant equipment and components failure are particulary emphasized. The trend for unplanned full outages due to the failure of components shows decreasing numerical values in 1981 with respect to the previous years. But this result should be weighed with the increasing plant unavailability hours needed for maintenance and repair action (chiefly preventive maintenance on critical components). This means that the number and downtime of forced outage must be drastically reduced for economic reasons (production losses and problems associated with the unavailable unit unplanned replacement) as well as for plant safe and reliable operation (sudden unavailability of key components and frequency of transients associated with plant shutdown and routine startup operation)

  19. The global non-proliferation and disarmament regime. Challenges and prospects for the future. Interview with Mr. Ambassador Jayantha Dhanapala, President of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs, November 26, 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautecouverture, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    President of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs since November 2007, Mr. Jayantha Dhanapala has had a long career as a Sri Lankan diplomat and leader in the field of international security. Among his numerous appointments, Mr. Dhanapala headed the Geneva-based UNIDIR. He chaired the widely acclaimed 1995 NPT Review and Extension Conference. He was Under-Secretary-General for Disarmament Affairs in the United Nations from 1998 to 2003. In this interview, Mr. Dhanapala gives us his thoughts about the nuclear non-proliferation regime, a few months before the 8. NPT Review Conference. (author)

  20. Nuclear engineering education in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    In discussing nuclear engineering education in the United States it is shown that the most critical issue facing the nuclear engineering education community today is enrolment in a time of increasing demand for graduate engineers. Related to the issue of enrolment is support for graduate students, whether it be fellowships, traineeships, or research assistantships. Other issues are those of maintaining a vital faculty in the face of a competitive job market, of maintaining research facilities and developing new ones, and of determining the directions of educational efforts in the future. (U.K.)

  1. Nuclear weapons: new threats, new challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, D.

    2005-01-01

    After a brief history of the Iranian nuclear crisis since 2003, the author discusses the four aspects of this crisis which make it a textbook case: a country which wants to control the whole nuclear process and therefore may reach the capacity to produce military-grade uranium (this raises the question of the relationship between nuclear energy and disarmament), the validity and efficiency of international controls is at stake, divergence may appear on the ways to have international treaties respected (different approaches between Europe and the USA), a country which is looking for nuclear weapon for matters of regional security and power (this raises the issue of a new approach to security). Then, the author describes the new nuclear threats: proliferating states, terrorist groups, and states with nuclear weapons (attitude of the USA, China, Russia, France and the United Kingdom, perspective of a nuclear disarmament of Europe). He gives an overview of the current status of disarmament and of treaties (START, NPT), and discusses the opportunities to save the non proliferation treaty from collapsing in 2005

  2. Disarmament between timeless and temporal, between ideal and pragmatism; Le desarmement: entre intemporel et temporel, entre ideal et pragmatisme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gere, F. [Paris-3 Univ., 75 (France); Institut francais d' analyse strategique, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-07-15

    As the appearance of the nuclear weapon has been a new triggering factor for the disarmament process, the author describes the first two ways of this process: the reinforcement of an always more radical requirement of a global disarmament on the one hand, and arms control on the other hand (with its failures and successes with the ABM, SALT and START treaties). He outlines that disarmament and arms control cannot reach their objectives without considering the relationship between technology and strategy, and more precisely a better management and control of human knowledge on these weapons. Then, the author comments the evolution of the Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and of the role of the IAEA, and the importance of verification possibilities as a trust building condition. He comments the recent Obama's approach and initiative. Within this new context, he describes and discusses the French strategic posture

  3. The lure of disarmament and arms reduction; Le leurre du desarmement et de la reduction des armements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paris, H.

    2011-03-15

    Nuclear disarmament and arms reduction do not have the same aims. Confusing their definitions means misunderstanding the logic which currently drives the power calculations of yesterday's Great Powers, and their associated approaches to the new strategic actor: China. The author knows the subject well from personal experience. (author)

  4. Achieving a nuclear weapons ban treaty is possible. United Nations have proposed it, we can obtain it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nivet, Roland

    2017-01-01

    As member of an activist association, the author shows that, after the adoption of a UN resolution in favour of the elaboration of a nuclear weapons ban treaty, reaching such a treaty is possible. The action of the civil society and the mobilization of the public opinion seems necessary. In appendix, the resolution adopted by the UN general assembly on December 23, 2016 is attached. It summarizes the advances of multilateral negotiations for a comprehensive nuclear disarmament and expresses some recommendations

  5. The action of NGOs in the field of disarmament (between ambitions and limitations) and the British example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marret, Jean-Luc

    2002-01-01

    The author first tries to characterize the various NGOs committed in the struggle for disarmament (countries of origin, size, organisation, ties with a political party or a trade union, typology). Then, by addressing different aspects of disarmament (anti-personnel mines, extraordinary sessions of the UN General Assembly dedicated to disarmament, Freeze campaign, or the National Missile Defense), the author identifies and discusses the various strengths and failures of NGOs in their ability to influence the States diplomatic activity or in their legitimacy to intervene. In a second part, the author more particularly addresses the British example. He proposes a sociological analysis of British NGOs (occurrence of the words 'peace' and 'nuclear' in their names, religious or professional dimension), and briefly presents some of them (Acronym Institute, British American Security Information Council, International Security Information Service - UK, Vertic, Programme for Promoting the nuclear non-proliferation or PPNN, Pugwash, Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, Labour Action for Peace). He comments the evolution of the Labour Party into the New Labour created by Tony Blair

  6. Non-proliferation and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter von Wagner, A.

    1993-01-01

    In 1995 the Conference on the prolongation of the Non-Proliferation Treaty will take place. Will it be extended for a long term, indefinitely or only for a fixed period? The Federal Government of Germany advocates an unlimited extension of the Non-Proliferation Treaty. Others have different ideas alleging that the Treaty is imperfect and discriminating. It is a thorn in the side of many States, in particular of the Third World, which no longer want to put up with being treated as second-class states. One argument which is considered especially embarrassing by developing countries as a visible expression of such discrimination, are the nuclear tests which are still carried out by nuclear weapon states. Is the political situation still such that one needs those weapons? Strategists gradually find it difficult to argument; over and over again they claim that an abandonment of nuclear weapons would make the world unsafer. But development has gradually passed over them. Nevertheless, one finds it hard to throw overboard considerations which for years have determined one's thinking. (orig./HSCH) [de

  7. Disarmament and Employment: Background for a Research Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabolo, Yves

    1983-01-01

    As background to a series of articles on the effects of disarmament on employment, the author assesses the present importance of armaments industries in the world economy, including the number of people directly or indirectly employed in military equipment production and services. He also discusses employment problems posed by disarmament.…

  8. Strengthening political co-operation through multilateral disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekeus, R.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Sweden discussed how the multilateral disarmament concept has contributed and still can contribute to strengthen political co-operation. This approach is the opposite to the usual question on how to achieve multilateral disarmament through political co-operation

  9. Nuclear material control in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, C.; Waddoups, I.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy has defined a safeguards system to be an integrated system of physical protection, material accounting and material control subsystems designed to deter, prevent, detect, and respond to unauthorized possession, use, or sabotage of SNM. In practice, safeguards involve the development and application of techniques and procedures dealing with the establishment and continued maintenance of a system of activities. The system must also include administrative controls and surveillance to assure that the procedures and techniques of the system are effective and are being carried out. The control of nuclear material is critical to the safeguarding of nuclear materials within the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy includes as part of material control four functional performance areas. They include access controls, material surveillance, material containment and detection/assessment. This paper will address not only these areas but also the relationship between material control and other safeguards and security functions

  10. The United States nuclear merchant ship program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, E.V.

    1978-01-01

    The issues of financial protection contemplate appropriate financing to permit construction of the involved vessels. In addition, the licensing process will require a demonstrated ability for financial response in the event of injury to persons or damage to property. Since the thrust in the United States is to use the Price-Anderson framework for Insurance and Indemnity, much attention is devoted to this legislation. The pre-existing regime is related to the distinguishing requirements of the Maritime field with proposals being advanced to more nearly parallel the insurance coverage philosophy of Europe, i.e., to utilize insurance pools for the nuclear risks and utilize the conventional insurance market for non-nuclear risks. Public affairs issues impact heavily on legislation efforts and thusly become significant in developing a program for Financial Protection

  11. Global disarmament and disposal of surplus weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Global disarmament in the mid-1990s is unabated. The trend of reduction of military resource use has continued, although at a slower pace. Compared to the average (not the peak) for the period 1985-1993, global military sectors were 21 per cent smaller - or more than on fifth - in 1995. The large reductions among industrialized countries caused by the end of the cold war have given way to smaller cuts. Many developing countries are continuing to cut their military sectors and some have actually abolished their armed forces altogether. However, throughout the developing world, some countries are actually building up military sectors, generally parallel to the growth of their economies. (author)

  12. 76 FR 40754 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; McGuire Nuclear Station, Units...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0100; Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414; Docket Nos. 50-369 and 50-370; Docket Nos. 50-269, 50-270, And 50-287] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Oconee Nuclear Station, Units 1, 2, and 3; Notice...

  13. How we think about peace and security. The ABCs of initiatives for disarmament and non-proliferation education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toki, Masako; Potter, William C.

    2005-01-01

    Education and training are among the most important but underutilized tools for promoting disarmament and non-proliferation. Although few national governments or international organizations have invested significantly in such training programs, there is a growing recognition among States of the need to rectify this situation. This positive development is reflected in the broad support for recommendations of a UN study on Disarmament and Non-Proliferation Education and in related initiatives within the review process of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). In view of the forthcoming 2005 NPT Review Conference, it is useful to take stock of the implementation of the UN study's recommendations. In particular, it is important to observe the progress that has been made within the context of the NPT review process, as well as the obstacles that must be overcome if the full potential for disarmament and non-proliferation education is to be realized. Resources on disarmament and non-proliferation education are increasingly available on the Internet. The UN Department for Disarmament Affairs has launched new features on its web site that include links to academic institutes, governmental centers, NGOs and other bodies engaged in educational efforts. As part of its mission to combat the spread of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) by training the next generation of nonproliferation specialists and raising global public awareness on WMD issues, the Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) has developed a series of tutorials for non-proliferation and disarmament education. Among these tutorials, the NPT Tutorial has been designed to educate and provide useful material about the treaty through interactive text and enriched multimedia segments, including timelines, maps, and numerous links to relevant resources. Among other resources are teaching guides developed by the Monterey Institute's Center for Nonproliferation Studies through its Critical Issues Forum (CIF). More

  14. Disarmament and arms control in the policy of the two great powers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.

    2010-01-01

    This text was published in 1992. The author comments the results of the START agreement which specified a 30 per cent objective for strategic weapon reduction. He also comments the consequences and implication of the USSR splitting where some states possess nuclear arms and warheads, the cooperation for transportation, storage, security and destruction of chemical and nuclear weapons in USSR, and the perspectives of more ambitious disarmament propositions because of the USSR collapse and of the disappearance of its military threat on the USA

  15. United States - Japanese nuclear relations: implications for the pacific region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suttmeier, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    The initiation of a new approach to non-proliferation policy by the United States in 1977 was the most upsetting development in the history of US-Japanese nuclear relations. The policy has seemingly altered Japanese views of its own nuclear future very little, yet it has altered the tone of the nuclear relationship with the United States. Recent Japanese nuclear power developments, both technical and administrative, are outlined and the prospects for the future of the United States-Japanese nuclear relationship and for Pacific regional cooperation assessed. Issues of importance in the relationship include reprocessing - enrichment, plutonium management, spent fuel and waste management and uranium supplies

  16. Nonproliferation, disarmament and the security link

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja Mohan, C.

    1997-01-01

    It is obvious that nuclear weapons are here to stay for a long time to come. Many nation states are likely to operate on the premise that the combination of nuclear weapons and long range missile provides an unrivalled source of power. The United States and India cannot hope to structure cooperation on the hope that nuclear weapons can be marginalised and eventually eliminated from the international calculus of power. Nor can they go by the premise that the existing structure of international power can be frozen through the strengthening of the current nonproliferation regime. Continued diffusion of power and the spread of technology as well as the political dynamics could break the current order. This bleak assessment does not however imply that there are no prospects for cooperation between India and the United States. If both the nations move towards a more realistic policy positions and locate their nuclear dialogue in a broader strategic context, it should not be impossible to develop areas of cooperation

  17. Disarmament and national security in an interdependent world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrella, F.

    1993-01-01

    Paper deals with a new emerging international system of security with the emphasis on the regional contribution, especially position of Argentina, non-proliferation policy, comprehensive safeguards, safeguards agreements, technology developments and responsibilities and opportunities related to the disarmament issues

  18. Disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration: opportunities in post-conflict settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Marwah

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The international community has learned much over recent years about the need and potential for integration of HIV awareness into the disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration process.

  19. Rethinking Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Munive

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the special issue on DDR and ‘Armed Non-Statutory Actors’ (ANSAs which we prefer to the less precise label of Armed Non-State Actors. The understanding that disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR programs are essential in helping to prevent the recurrence of war in post-conflict situations is at the heart of current peacebuilding practice and the academic literature on peacekeeping and stabilization. But the changing strategic context of DDR programs and in particular the proliferation of ANSAs presents new challenges, the responses to which have been characterized as ‘second generation’ DDR. The changing context poses new questions and forces us to rethink assumptions and templates of DDR as the concept is blurred and expanded. The question is if it makes sense to hold on to the concept or whether the assumptions associated with it will get in the way of rethinking templates for violence reduction in the future.

  20. Improving nuclear safety of VVER-440 units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nochev, T.; Sabinov, S.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper authors deals with improvement of nuclear safety of WWER-440 units in Kozloduy NPP. Main directions for improving nuclear safety of WWER-440 units were: - to expand number of the design accident; - to increase reliability of equipment important for the safety; - to decrease the probability of initiating events; - improvements the integrity of the primary circuit (application LBB concept, qualification of the pressure safety valves to avoid pressurized thermal shock); - improvement of the fire protection; - improvement of the operation including upgrading and improvement of operational documents, implementation of new system for training the operators and etc.; - reassessment of the seismic response of the plant. Main actions were made at NPP Kozloduy to increase nuclear safety of VVER-440 units. 1. Modernization of Emergency High Pressure Safety Injection System. The modernization includes dividing of independent channels with reservation of active elements. Pumps were exchanged with more effective and reliable ones. HPSIS was increased reliability in general through decrease number of active elements and exchanged with passive. 2. For the purpose of avoiding fast cooling at the primary circuit and obtaining thermal shock of reactor vessel, Main Safety Insulation Valves are installed at NPP Kozloduy. 3. Modernization of Emergency power supplies AC. Oil breakers VMP-10 are exchanged with gas FS-4. 4. Generator breakers are installed to decrease probability of loss power supply and blackout. They provide reliable power supply to the system important for the safety in case of failure on generator. 5. I and C system has been qualified and optimized. 6. Reassessments of Limiting Conditions of Operation and new scram signals have been introduced. 7. An operators-oriented Informational System has been developed. It includes ensuring and updating of equipment data, new informational support of operator and etc. 8. A new auxiliary independent system for

  1. In defiance of nuclear deterrence: anti-nuclear New Zealand after two decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitzig, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    In 1984, nuclear-armed and nuclear-powered vessels were banned from New Zealand to express the country's rejection of the nuclear deterrence concept. This led to a disagreement with the United States. Today, the ban on nuclear-powered ships is the only element of the nuclear-free legislation that still strains US-New Zealand relations. This article presents the reasons for the ban on nuclear-powered ships, which include scientific safety concerns, a symbolic rejection of the nuclear deterrence posture, and patriotic factors such as a nuclear-free national identity. The military and economic consequences of the ban are also examined. Since the ban on nuclear-powered vessels appears to be neither widely known abroad nor commonly recognised as a supportive disarmament measure outside New Zealand, it is concluded that whatever the future of this ban will be, New Zealand's anti-nuclear image will remain known internationally through the ban on nuclear arms.

  2. Can abolition of nuclear weapons be adequately verified?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotblat, J.

    1993-01-01

    Speaking on the problems of preventing proliferations of nuclear weapons and nuclear disarmament the author suggests the following measures to reach these goals: signing a treaty that binds all the nuclear weapon states to the no-first-use principle as a basic policy; the United Nations should put the elimination of nuclear weapons on its agenda; having the treaty safeguarded two-pronged verification regime, one would be technological verification, the second one - so called societal verification which means that not just a group of experts but everybody would be asked to take part in ensuring that the treaty would not be violated

  3. Nuclear fuel element recovery using PEDSCO RMI Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.G.; Pedersen, B.V.

    1984-01-01

    In September 1982, a PEDSCO Remote Mobile Investigation Unit was used to recover damaged irradiated fuel elements from a fueling machine and trolley deck at Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A'. This Canadian-made remote controlled vehicle was originally designed for explosive ordinance disposal by law enforcement agencies. This paper describes its adaptation to nuclear service and its first mission, within a nuclear facility

  4. Nuclear Systems (NS): Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nuclear Systems Project demonstrates nuclear power technology readiness to support the goals of NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate. To this end, the...

  5. China's position on nuclear non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jiadong.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses China's position on nuclear non-proliferation, in view of the fact that China does not subscribe to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). China refuses to accede to the NPT because it considers the treaty to be discriminatory, and reasons are given for this point of view. However its stand for nuclear disarmament and disapproval of nuclear proliferation are declared. Nuclear arms race, prevention of nuclear war, and nuclear disarmament are also considered. (UK)

  6. New United States policies regarding international nuclear cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, H.R. Jr.

    1981-10-01

    This paper discusses the United States policy on international nuclear power development in the light of the priorities established by President Reagan in the guidelines for his Administration's nuclear co-operation policy. The aim is to establish a framework allowing for co-operation in peaceful nuclear development while remaining committed to the objective of preventing the further spread of nuclear weapons, in particular by supporting the Non-Proliferation Treaty, the IAEA Safeguards System and the Tlatelolco Treaty (NEA) [fr

  7. Nonproliferation, arms control and disarmament and extended deterrence in the new security environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    vision of a nuclear-free world is powerful, both existing nuclear powers and proliferators are unlikely to forego nuclear weapons entirely in a world that is dangerous and uncertain. And the emerging world would not necessarily be more secure and stable without nuclear weapons. Even if nuclear weapons were given up by the United States and other nuclear-weapon states, there would continue to be concerns about the proliferation of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons, which would not disappear and could worsen. WMD terrorism would remain a concern that was largely unaffected by US and other nuclear-weapon decisions. Conventional capabilities would not disappear and the prospects for warfare could rise. In addition, new problems could arise if rogue states or other non-status-quo powers attempted to take advantage of moves toward disarmament, while friends and allies who are not reassured as in the past could reconsider their options if deterrence declined. To address these challenges, non- and counter-proliferation and counterterrorismincluding defenses and consequence management-are priorities, especially in light of an anticipated 'renaissance' in civil nuclear power. The current agenda of the United States and others includes efforts to: (1) Strengthen International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its safeguards system; (2) Strengthen export controls, especially for sensitive technologies, by limiting the development of reprocessing and enrichment technologies and by requiring the Additional Protocol as a condition of supply; (3) Establish a reliable supply regime, including the possibility of multilateral or multinational ownership of fuel cycle facilities, as a means to promote nuclear energy without increasing the risks of proliferation or terrorism; (4) Implement effectively UN Security Council Resolution 1540; and (5) Strengthen and institutionalize the Proliferation Security Initiative and the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism. These and

  8. Nonproliferation, arms control and disarmament and extended deterrence in the new security environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilat, Joseph F.

    2009-01-01

    nuclear-free world is powerful, both existing nuclear powers and proliferators are unlikely to forego nuclear weapons entirely in a world that is dangerous and uncertain. And the emerging world would not necessarily be more secure and stable without nuclear weapons. Even if nuclear weapons were given up by the United States and other nuclear-weapon states, there would continue to be concerns about the proliferation of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons, which would not disappear and could worsen. WMD terrorism would remain a concern that was largely unaffected by US and other nuclear-weapon decisions. Conventional capabilities would not disappear and the prospects for warfare could rise. In addition, new problems could arise if rogue states or other non-status-quo powers attempted to take advantage of moves toward disarmament, while friends and allies who are not reassured as in the past could reconsider their options if deterrence declined. To address these challenges, non- and counter-proliferation and counterterrorismincluding defenses and consequence management-are priorities, especially in light of an anticipated 'renaissance' in civil nuclear power. The current agenda of the United States and others includes efforts to: (1) Strengthen International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its safeguards system; (2) Strengthen export controls, especially for sensitive technologies, by limiting the development of reprocessing and enrichment technologies and by requiring the Additional Protocol as a condition of supply; (3) Establish a reliable supply regime, including the possibility of multilateral or multinational ownership of fuel cycle facilities, as a means to promote nuclear energy without increasing the risks of proliferation or terrorism; (4) Implement effectively UN Security Council Resolution 1540; and (5) Strengthen and institutionalize the Proliferation Security Initiative and the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism. These and other activities are

  9. Nuclear safety risk control in the outage of CANDU unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Mingliang; Zheng Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear fuel remains in the core during the outage of CANDU unit, but there are still nuclear safety risks such as reactor accidental criticality, fuel element failure due to inability to properly remove residual heat. Furthermore, these risks are aggravated by the weakening plant system configuration and multiple cross operations during the outage. This paper analyzes the phases where there are potential nuclear safety risks on the basis of the typical critical path arrangement of the outage of Qinshan NPP 3 and introduces a series of CANDU-specific risk control measures taken during the past plant outages to ensure nuclear safety during the unit outage. (authors)

  10. Status of nuclear engineering education in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear engineering education in the United States is reflective of the perceived health of the nuclear electric power industry within the country. Just as new commercial reactor orders have vanished and some power plants have shut down, so too have university enrollments shrunk and research reactors closed. This decline in nuclear trained specialists and the disappearance of the nuclear infrastructure is a trend that must be arrested and reversed if the United States is to have a workforce capable of caring for a nuclear power industry to not only meet future electric demand but to ensure that the over 100 existing plants, their supporting facilities and their legacy in the form of high level waste and facility clean-up are addressed. Additionally, the United States has an obligation to support and maintain its nuclear navy and other defence needs. And, lastly, if the United States is to have a meaningful role in the international use of nuclear power with regard to safety, non-proliferation and the environment, then it is imperative that the country continues to produce world-class nuclear engineers and scientists by supporting nuclear engineering education at its universities. The continued support of the federal government. and industry for university nuclear engineering and nuclear energy research and development is essential to sustain the nuclear infrastructure in the United States. Even with this support, and the continued excellent operation of the existing fleet of nuclear electric power plants, it is conceivable that nuclear engineering as an academic discipline may fall victim to poor communications and a tarnished public image. What is needed is a combination of federal and industrial support along with the creativity of the universities to expand their offerings to include more than power production. The objective is a positive message on careers in nuclear related fields, and recognition of the important role of nuclear energy in meeting the country

  11. The Nuclear Renaissance in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear power currently provides 20% of the electricity generation in the U.S. and about 16% worldwide. As a carbon-free energy source, nuclear is receiving a lot of attention by industry, lawmakers and environmental groups, as they attempt to resolve the issue of man-made climate change. For the first time in 30 years several U.S. electric utilities have applied for construction and operation licenses of new nuclear power plants. This talk will review the safety, operational and economic record of the existing U.S. commercial reactor fleet, will provide an overview of the reactor designs considered for the new wave of plant construction, and will discuss several research projects being conducted at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to support the expansion of nuclear power in the U.S. and overseas.

  12. Operational behaviour of WWER nuclear power units after Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milivojevic, S.; Spasojevic, D.

    2000-01-01

    The indicators of effectiveness of WWER operation, in 1987-1998 were analyzed. For three groups of nuclear units (WWER, NPP Kozloduy, NPP Paks), the trends of Indicators flow were established. The comparative analysis of forced outage rate, and load factor of WWERs and nuclear units all in the world was carried out; it gives the general picture of accident influence on the states and the relations of these indicators in considered period (author)

  13. Nuclear engineering education in the United States: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Spinrad, B.I.

    1986-01-01

    The executive summary of the White Paper entitled The Revitalization of Nuclear Energy Education in the United States is the major component of this paper. The White Paper was completed under the auspices of the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO). The presentation highlights events and program changes that have occurred in 1985-1986 following publication of the NEDHO White Paper. Many of these events provide optimism for the revitalization of nuclear engineering education

  14. United States nuclear tests, July 1945 through September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    This document lists chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Several tests conducted during Operation Dominic involved missile launches from Johnston Atoll. Several of these missile launches were aborted, resulting in the destruction of the missile and nuclear device either on the pad or in the air.

  15. Site selection and evaluation of nuclear power units in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnefille, R.

    1980-01-01

    The selection of sites for nuclear power units in Egypt by SOFRATOME for Nuclear Plants Authority is carried on using a method based on interaction between different criteria. The method and the main results on criterion 'radio-ecological impact' are sketched briefly [fr

  16. Choices: A Unit on Conflict and Nuclear War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massachusetts Teachers Association, Boston.

    Ten lessons on the evolution of the nuclear arms race, the nature and consequences of using nuclear weapons, and new ways that conflicts among nations might be resolved are presented for the junior high school level. The unit contains age-appropriate materials to equip students with skills and knowledge to understand what choices can be made to…

  17. Nuclear information and education experience in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginniff, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    The presentation discusses the importance of public information and education in the field of energy and particularly in the field of nuclear energy development. The attempt is made to explain some issues connected with the nuclear fuel cycle. Appendix contains comments on the United Kingdom educational materials in this area

  18. Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste: Nuclear Waste, Unit 1. Teacher Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC.

    This guide is Unit 1 of the four-part series Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The goal of this unit is to help students establish the relevance of the topic of nuclear waste to their everyday lives and activities. Particular attention is…

  19. The nuclear dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, Colin.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses nuclear war, disarmament and national defence policies. The author argues that in spite of the obvious advantages of nuclear power in many parts of the world, the world cannot afford the risk of continuing with it because of the demonstrated close and deadly association of nuclear power and nuclear reactors with nuclear weapons

  20. A new Finnish nuclear power unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    In Finland, nuclear power is considered a natural part of a sustainable energy system. The Finnish Parliament has decided that development of nuclear power is consistent with the overall interests of society when climate issues, environmental targets, supply security and stable and competitive prices of electric power are considered as a whole. In 2002, the Finnish Parliament approved the Government's decision in principle to build a fifth nuclear power plant. The new project is the most advanced energy project in the Nordic countries with respect to the availability of energy free of carbon dioxide. The decision is also welcomed by the EU. The new reactor will be of the EPR (European Pressurized Water Reactor) type. In addition to supplying power to the Finnish industries, the plant is considered necessary if Finland is to comply with international conventions on CO 2 emissions

  1. The nuclear deterrence a topical interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetaille, C.

    2009-01-01

    The author aims to explain with the today world situation favors the nuclear deterrence. The nuclear disarmament of the main european countries will deprive them of a great asset, which will guarantee the international stability. (A.L.B.)

  2. IAEA Completes Nuclear Security Review Mission in United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: A team of nuclear security experts led by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) today completed a mission to review nuclear security practices of civil nuclear facilities licensed by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Conducted at the U.S. Government's request, the two-week International Physical Protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) mission reviewed the United States' nuclear security-related legislative and regulatory framework. As part of this work, the IPPAS team, led by John O'Dacre of Canada and comprising nine experts from eight IAEA Member States, met with NRC officials and reviewed the physical protection systems at the Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The IPPAS team concluded that nuclear security within the U.S. civil nuclear sector is robust and sustainable and has been significantly enhanced in recent years. The team identified a number of good practices in the nation's nuclear security regime and at the NCNR. The IPPAS team also made a recommendation and some suggestions for the continuing improvement of nuclear security overall. The mission in the United States was the 60th IPPAS mission organized by the IAEA. 'Independent international peer reviews such as IAEA IPPAS missions are increasingly being recognized for their value as a key component for exchanges of views and advice on nuclear security measures', said Khammar Mrabit, Director of the IAEA Office of Nuclear Security. 'The good practices identified during this mission will contribute to the continuous improvements of nuclear security in other Member States'. The IPPAS team provided a draft report to the NRC and will submit a final report soon. Because it contains security-related information about a specific nuclear site, IPPAS reports are not made public. 'The IPPAS programme gives us a chance to learn from the experience and perspective of our international partners', said NRC Chairman Allison M

  3. SIPRI's new conceptual approach to arms control and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotfeld, Adam Daniel

    2000-01-01

    The end of the cold war deprioritized arms control and disarmament, and progress in the field was no longer a measure of relations among the major powers. In that context, the future of arms control and disarmament was discussed at the Nobel Symposium in October 1999. Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) views arms control as an instrument for shaping a new inclusive and cooperative security order. The author questions whether arms control challenges today can and should be resolved in the institutions established and the procedures elaborated in the bipolar framework. (author)

  4. Disarmament and security issues in the Asia-Pacific region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The main issues of the conference were focused on current political trends related to outstanding disputes between the state in Asia-Pacific region. Second cluster od issues which merits careful examination was concerned with the relevance of various arms control and disarmament measures. The tools of arms control and disarmament are proving to be more versatile, flexible instruments for security-building than was the case during the cold-war period. The third item of interest for many states in the Asia-Pacific region is the question of promoting new forums for regional dialogues on security matters

  5. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 2, Ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    ''Science, Society and America's Nuclear Waste'' is a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear powerplants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  6. India and the nuclear test ban

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, J.

    1998-01-01

    India has sought a nuclear-test ban for the last 42 years bur is now unable to sign the Comprehensive Test ban Treaty (CTBT) when it is in its final form and moved to block its transmittal from the Conference on Disarmament to the UN General assembly. The negotiating mandate for the CTBT required it to effectively contribute to the process of disarmament. It is towards this end that India proposed amendments. Nuclear disarmament is fundamental for India's strategic and security interests. The only viable solution to India's security concerns related to nuclear weapons is in pursuing total elimination of nuclear weapons from national arsenals

  7. Western Option - Disarmament of Russian Weapon Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveiten, B.; Petroll, M.R.

    2002-01-01

    The Western Option concept describes an approach to the conversion of weapon-grade plutonium from Russian nuclear warheads under the special aspects of meeting the criteria of irreversible utilization. Putting this concept of plutonium conversion into non-weapon-grade material into effect would make a major contribution to improving security worldwide. This study is based on an agreement between the Russian Federation and the United States of America concluded in September 2000. It provides for the conversion of 34 t of weapon-grade plutonium in each of the two states. This goal is also supported by other G8 countries. While the United States performs its part of the agreement under its sole national responsibility, the Russian program needs financial support by Western states. Expert groups have pointed out several options as a so-called basic scenario. The funds of approx. US Dollar 2 billion required to put them into effect have not so far been raised. The Western Option approach described in this contribution combines results of the basic scenario with other existing experience and with technical solutions available for plutonium conversion. One of the attractions of the Western Option lies in its financial advantages, which are estimated to amount to approx. US Dollar 1 billion. (orig.) [de

  8. Unconventional wisdom [Entergy's economic management of five disparate nuclear units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.

    1996-01-01

    The conventional wisdom is that a competitive nuclear power programme requires standard plants, multi-unit sites and economies of scale. Entergy Operations, Inc (EOI) in the USA has five nuclear units of two reactor types, acquired from five vendors and located on four sites separated by hundreds of miles. EOI set two bench marks in its aim to deliver electricity at the market price from each of its nuclear units while meeting the costs of O and M, fuel, capital investment and overheads. The first was to become the best operator of each type of its differently designed units. The second was to combine the sense of ownership and expertise of single unit operators with the flexibility and efficiency of multi-unit sites. In order to achieve this, EOI aims to operate the five units as though they were on one site. Central to this plan is a set of peer groups, each of which deals with an aspect of plant operation, sharing good practice across all the units. Building on this, increasingly during outages, employees are brought in from other units rather than employing outside contractors. Although EOI employees are more expensive on an hourly basis they are two to three times more efficient than outside contractors. The peer group concept is also leading to rationalisation of expertise as groups become identified with particular specialisations which back-up teams working on other units. (U.K.)

  9. The future of nuclear power in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1990-01-01

    The arguments that have been put forward in the United Kingdom to justify the contention by its opponents that nuclear power should not be seen as a safe, economic, strategically desirable and environmentally attractive energy source are examined. Counter arguments are presented to support the belief that these are wholly wrong. In the short to medium term, however, economic and political considerations suggest that the prospects for nuclear power in the United Kingdom are not optimistic. The long term evolution of nuclear power is uncertain but it is possible that the security of energy supply, comparative economics and environmental attractions associated with nuclear power will become more apparent and work in its favour eventually. The conviction is expressed that, by the middle of the next century, the United Kingdom will be reaping the benefits of the fast reactor on a significant scale. (UK)

  10. Non proliferation and disarmament: the 'golden age' of the Irish diplomacy (1957-1961) - Historical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautecouverture, Benjamin

    2007-06-01

    The author proposes an analysis of the Irish diplomatic actions and policy with respect to non proliferation and disarmament at the end of the 1950's. Inspired by the Swedish international posture, this policy notably produced the so-called 'Irish resolution'. The author first comments the origin of this resolution, and then describes the negotiation process which lasted about two years to finally produce this resolution which was voted by the United Nations General Assembly. The last part of the article comments the content of the resolution which stated that the NPT had to be considered as a first step on the way to disarmament. While evoking the evolution of the Irish diplomatic action during the following years, the author comments the implications and influence of this Irish resolution

  11. Knowledge acquisition for nuclear power plant unit diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaodong; Xi Shuren

    2003-01-01

    The process of acquiring knowledge and building a knowledge base is critical to realize fault diagnostic system at unit level in a nuclear power plant. It directly determines whether the diagnostic system can be applied eventually in a commercial plant. A means to acquire knowledge and its procedures was presented in this paper for fault diagnostic system in a nuclear power plant. The work can be carried out step by step and it is feasible in a commercial nuclear power plant. The knowledge base of the fault diagnostic system for a nuclear power plant can be built after the staff finish the tasks according to the framework presented in this paper

  12. New generation nuclear power units of PWR type integral reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitenkov, F.M.; Kurachen Kov, A.V.; Malamud, V.A.; Panov, Yu.K.; Runov, B.I.; Flerov, L.N.

    1997-01-01

    Design bases of new generation nuclear power units (nuclear power plants - NPP, nuclear co-generation plants - NCP, nuclear distract heating plants - NDHP), using integral type PWPS, developed in OKBM, Nizhny Novgorod and trends of design decisions optimization are considered in this report. The problems of diagnostics, servicing and repair of the integral reactor components in course of operation are discussed. The results of safety analysis, including the problems of several accident localization with postulated core melting and keeping corium in the reactor vessel and guard vessel are presented. Information on experimental substantiation of the suggested plant design decisions is presented. (author)

  13. Commercial Nuclear Reprocessing in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherrill, Charles Leland [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Balatsky, Galya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-09

    The short presentation outline: Reprocessing Overview; Events leading up to Carter’s Policy; Results of the decision; Policy since Nuclear Nonproliferation Act. Conclusions reached: Reprocessing ban has become an easy and visible fix to the public concern about proliferation, but has not completely stopped proliferation; and, Reprocessing needs to become detached from political considerations, so technical research can continue, regardless of the policy decisions we decide to take.

  14. 76 FR 1469 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2 Environmental Assessment... Plant, LLC, the licensee, for operation of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2... Impact Statement for License Renewal of Nuclear Plants, Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (NUREG-1437...

  15. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 3, The Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This teachers guide is unit 3, the nuclear waste policy act, in a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear power plants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  16. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 3, The Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This is the 3rd unit, (The Nuclear Waste Policy Act) a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear powerplants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  17. Nuclear accidents. Three mile Island (United States)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duco, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the accident of Three Miles Island power plant which occurred the 28 march 1979 in the United States. The accident scenario, the consequences and the reactor core and vessel, after the accident, are analyzed. (A.L.B.)

  18. Preparing nuclear power plant units for operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudcovic, R.; Telgarsky, K.; Kmosena, J.

    1984-01-01

    The factors are listed which have to be taken into consideration for planning the unit operation, i.e., the implementation of planned repairs, checks of equipment and refuellings. All basic input data were evaluated as the basic for drawing up the schedule of routine repairs and overhauls for the coming period. (E.S.)

  19. Fuqing nuclear power of nuclear steam turbine generating unit No.1 at the implementation and feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Yuhua; Xiao Bo; He Liu; Huang Min

    2014-01-01

    The article introduces the Fuqing nuclear power of nuclear steam turbine generating unit no.l purpose, range of experience, experiment preparation, implementation, feedback and response. Turn of nuclear steam turbo-generator set flush, using the main reactor coolant pump and regulator of the heat generated by the electric heating element and the total heat capacity in secondary circuit of reactor coolant system (steam generator secondary side) of saturated steam turbine rushed to 1500 RPM, Fuqing nuclear power of nuclear steam turbine generating unit no.1 implementation of the performance of the inspection of steam turbine and its auxiliary system, through the test problems found in the clean up in time, the nuclear steam sweep turn smooth realization has accumulated experience. At the same time, Fuqing nuclear power of nuclear steam turbine generating unit no.1 at turn is half speed steam turbine generator non-nuclear turn at the first, with its smooth realization of other nuclear power steam turbine generator set in the field of non-nuclear turn play a reference role. (authors)

  20. Arms Limitation and Disarmament: Seventeenth Strategy for Peace Conference Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley Foundation, Muscatine, IA.

    The report discusses issues relating to arms limitation and disarmament. Leaders in U. S. government, professionals from a wide spectrum of disciplines, and other international statesmen participated in the conference in an attempt to define a more enlightened foreign policy. Six major topics were discussed. The first report considered five…

  1. Nuclear engineering education in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    The critical issue facing the nuclear engineering education community today is first and foremost enrollment in a time of increasing demand for graduate engineers. Related to the issue of enrollment is support for graduate students, whether it be fellowships, traineeships, or research assistantships. Other issues are those of maintaining a vital faculty in the face of competitive job market, of maintaining research facilities and developing new ones, and last and certainly not least that of determining the directions of our educational efforts in the future. These issues are examined in the paper. (author)

  2. Uranium enrichment services in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelinek, P.; Lenders, M.

    1994-01-01

    The United States of America is the world's largest market for uranium enrichment services. After the disintegration of the Soviet Union, Russian uranium is entering the world market on an increasing scale. The U.S. tries to protect its market and, in this connection, also the European market from excessive price drops by taking anti-dumping measures. In order to become more competitive, American companies have adapted modern enrichment techniques from Europe. European - U.S. joint ventures are to help, also technically and economically, to integrate military uranium, accumulating as a consequence of worldwide disarmament, into the commercial fuel cycle for the peaceful use of nuclear power. (orig.) [de

  3. The nuclear renaissance in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simard, R.

    1999-01-01

    This document is not a true report but a succession of transparencies listing the main titles of subjects that have been developed in oral form at the international topical meeting: TopFuel'99. The different subjects developed during the lecture were: -why a renaissance? -how is the market place changing? -how is nuclear generation changing? -growing awareness of clean air contributions -what has changed for the existing U.S. plants -what has changed for future U.S. plants. A plot is given presenting the capacity factor (in %) for the operating and the all plants for the years 1980 to 1998. A chart presenting the costs (including the 1994-1996 production costs + estimated capital + general and administrative costs) in cents/kWh per plant is given. It shows how the plants are positioned relative to an assumed market clearing price of 2.0-3.0 cents/kWh. A few plants would be competitive at market clearing prices below 2.0 cents/kWh, a few would not be competitive even in a 3.0 cent/kWh market. The majority of U.S. nuclear power plants would be competitive if markets clear between 2.0 cents and 3.0 cents/kWh. (O.M.)

  4. Control unit of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desfontaines, Guy; Le Helloco, Michel.

    1981-01-01

    Control unit comprising multiple leak-tight vessels, in communication with the inside of the reactor vessel, extending this vessel above its cover, in the vertical direction and each one enclosing a mechanism for moving a cluster of material absorbing the neutrons in the reactor core, actuated by a motor. This control unit is of reduced height above the vessel cover and provides efficient protection of the leak tight containments and the mechanisms in the event of earthquakes, easy removal and refitting of the vessel cover, good ventilation of the power devices of the mechanisms without the use of a complex ventilation system, efficient thermal insulation of the leak-tight containments assembly, as well as easy access to the motors and mechanism located in the leak-tight containment for carrying out any maintenance and repairs that might be required [fr

  5. Role and services of the Nuclear Energy Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Tajuddin bin Ali

    1985-01-01

    This article contains the research and development activities planned to be undertaken, and the services to be provided by the Nuclear Energy Unit. The fields of research have been selected to aid the development in the use of Nuclear Science and Technology, whilst the proposed services are geared towards widening the use to this technology in socio-economic development. Objectives in the research fields have been identified following a number of consultations with IAEA, foreign and local experts, and involved careful study of local requirements. The services provided will cater for all, especially institutions involved in nuclear technology both from the public and private sectors. This effort is in line with the role of the Unit as the national promoter and coordinator in the utilization of nuclear technology in the country

  6. Changing Perceptions of Nuclear Power in The United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, John

    1989-01-01

    Although many new nuclear power plants have been brought on line in that time, resulting in a capacity of 110 plants with operating permits and another twelve in the last stages of completion, all of these plants were authorized before 1978. The fundamental reason for this moratorium in new orders was the precipitous reduction in electricity demand, arising from the OPEC embargo and Iran revolution, which created excess electric capacity throughout the United States. In fact, many nuclear and coal plants were cancelled to minimize the over capacity problem and no large base load generating units have been ordered of any kind in the past decade. So the 'moratorium' is not really unique to nuclear power. Progress, coupled with increased awareness that nuclear power is one of the keys to solving atmospheric environmental problems, will swing political and public acceptance back to being favorable. Successful progress in these matters will be of benefit to public acceptance around the world and, conversely, serious technical difficulties, particularly entailing any major incident with a nuclear power plants anywhere in the world, will adversely affect the improvement in political and public acceptance in the United States. It is vitally important, therefore, that we continue to further enhance international cooperation in nuclear power. We are pleased the Korea Electric power Corporation and the Korea Advanced Energy Research Institute are participating in EPRI development programs, and hope that cooperation will increase in the future. We're most encouraged by the formation of the World Association of Nuclear Operators, which will be initiated in Moscow next month. The nuclear electric utilities and their governments around the world, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and the Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD should be commended for their initiative in international cooperation

  7. Inspection of licensed nuclear power plants in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornburg, H. D.

    1977-01-01

    Inspection of licensed nuclear power plants in the United States is performed by the Office of Inspection and Enforcement (IE), United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. IE has several key functions : a) Inspection of licensees and investigation of incidents, occurrences and allegations. b) Detection and correction of safety and security problems. c) Enforcement of rules, regulations, and Commission orders. d) Feedback to the industry and others regarding safety experience. e) Informing the public and others. Major enforcement actions and events involving operating power reactors for the past several years will be summarized. (author)

  8. Nuclear power reactor licensing and regulation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapar, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    The report is devoted to four subjects: an explanation of the origins, statutory basis and development of the present regulatory system in the United States; a description of the various actions which must be taken by a license applicant and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission before a nuclear power plant can be constructed and placed on-line, an account of the current regulatory practices followed by the US NRC in licensing nuclear power reactors; an identification of some of the 'lessons learned' from the Three Mile Island accident and some proposed regulatory and legislative solutions. (NEA) [fr

  9. Nuclear cooperation: challenges and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollapally, Deepa; Rajagopal, S.

    1997-01-01

    In this era of globalisation and technology flows, the nuclear field continues to retain strong barriers to international collaboration. From nuclear energy to non-proliferation however, the potential for concerted action exists. The International and Strategic Studies Unit of the National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS) held a two day seminar exploring the challenges and prospects for achieving mutual cooperation between states relating to all aspects of nuclear technology. This volume is based on the proceedings of the seminar. The broad themes that the seminar considered included disarmament and the security link; implementation and verification of nonproliferation regimes; transfer of technology and nuclear energy. The seminar culminated with a round table on confidence building

  10. Project for construction of a new nuclear unit in Armenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    WorleyParsons Project Description Scope of work: Management Services for Implementation of the Project on Construction of New Nuclear Unit(s) in the Republic of Armenia. Client: Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources (MENR), Republic of Armenia •Contract signed on 29 of May 2009 •Project divided into 4 Phases. Addendum 1 covers phase I and II signed on 27 of July. Contract entered into force 7 of August

  11. Preoperation of Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Unit No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyo, Tadashi; Kurata, Satoshi

    1994-01-01

    Chubu Electric Power Co. finished preoperation of Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Unit No. 4 in September, 1993. Although unit 4 has the same reactor design as unit 3, its rated electrical output (1,137MW) is 37MW more than that of unit 3. This increase was achieved mainly by adopting a Moisture Separater Heater in the turbine system. We started preoperation of unit 4 in November 1992 and performed various tests at electrical outputs of 20%, 50%, 75%, and 100%. We finished preoperation without any scram or other major problems and obtained satisfactory results for the functions and performance of the plant. This paper describes the major results of unit 4 preoperation. (author)

  12. 75 FR 66802 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2; Notice of Withdrawal of...) has granted the request of Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC, the licensee, to withdraw its... for the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2, located in Calvert County, MD. The...

  13. Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste: The Nuclear Waste Policy Act, Unit 3. Teacher Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC.

    This guide is Unit 3 of the four-part series, Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The goal of this unit is to identify the key elements of the United States' nuclear waste dilemma and introduce the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and the role of the…

  14. FIND: Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, M.M.

    1975-12-01

    This index is presented as a guide to microfiche items 1 through 136 in Docket 50448, which was assigned to Potomac Electric Power Company's Application for Licenses to construct and operate Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1 and 2. Information received from August, 1973 through July, 1975 is included

  15. Evaluating Russian space nuclear reactor technology for United States applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polansky, G.F.; Schmidt, G.L.; Voss, S.S.; Reynolds, E.L.

    1994-01-01

    Space nuclear power and nuclear electric propulsion are considered important technologies for planetary exploration, as well as selected earth orbit applications. The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) was intended to provide an early flight demonstration of these technologies at relatively low cost through extensive use of existing Russian technology. The key element of Russian technology employed in the program was the Topaz II reactor. Refocusing of the activities of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO), combined with budgetary pressures, forced the cancellation of the NEPSTP at the end of the 1993 fiscal year. The NEPSTP was faced with many unique flight qualification issues. In general, the launch of a spacecraft employing a nuclear reactor power system complicates many spacecraft qualification activities. However, the NEPSTP activities were further complicated because the reactor power system was a Russian design. Therefore, this program considered not only the unique flight qualification issues associated with space nuclear power, but also with differences between Russian and United States flight qualification procedures. This paper presents an overview of the NEPSTP. The program goals, the proposed mission, the spacecraft, and the Topaz II space nuclear power system are described. The subject of flight qualification is examined and the inherent difficulties of qualifying a space reactor are described. The differences between United States and Russian flight qualification procedures are explored. A plan is then described that was developed to determine an appropriate flight qualification program for the Topaz II reactor to support a possible NEPSTP launch

  16. Simulator of nuclear power plant with WWER-440 units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krcek, V.

    1985-01-01

    The use is discussed of simulators in the training of qualified personnel for the construction and operation of nuclear power plants. Simulators are used for training all activities and thinking processes related to the control of a nuclear reactor in the course of quasi-steady and non-steady states. The development and implementation is summed up of the construction of such a simulator for WWER-440 nuclear power plants. The main parts of the simulator include the unit control room, the computer system, the teacher's workplace and the interface system. The possibility of simulating the functions of the unit for personnel training is based on the description of the behaviour of the simulated object in form of mathematical models of its basic technological subsystems and their interrelations within the range of operating patterns. (J.C.)

  17. Evaluation of Perry Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, D.E.; Bruske, S.J.

    1985-11-01

    This document was prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assist them in determining whether the Perry Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 Technical Specifications (T/S), which govern plant systems configurations and operations, are in conformance with the requirements of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) as amended, and the requirements of the Safety Evaluation Report (SER) as supplemented. A comparative audit of the FSAR as amended, and the SER as supplemented was performed with the Perry T/S. Several discrepancies were identified and subsequently resolved through telephone conversations with the staff reviewer and the utility representative. Pending completion of the resolutions noted in Parts 3 and 4 of this report, the Perry Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 T/S, to the extent reviewed, are in conformance with the FSAR and SER

  18. Evaluation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant Unit 1 Technical Specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, D.E.; Bruske, S.J.

    1985-08-01

    This document was prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assist them in determining whether the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant Unit 1 Technical Specifications (T/S), which govern plant systems configurations and operations, are in conformance with the assumption of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) as amended, and the requirements of the Safety Evaluation Report (SER) as supplemented. A comparative audit of the FSAR as amended, and the SER as supplemented was performed with the Watts Bar T/S. Several discrepancies were identified and subsequently resolved through discussions with the cognizant NRC reviewer, NRC staff reviewers and/or utility representatives. The Watts Bar Nuclear Plant Unit 1 T/S, to the extent reviewed, are in conformance with the FSAR and SER

  19. Evaluation of Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1 technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, D.E.; Bruske, S.J.

    1985-08-01

    This document was prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assist them in determining whether the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 Technical Specifications (T/S), which govern plant systems configurations and operations, are in conformance with the assumptions of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) as amended, and the requirements of the Safety Evaluation Report (SER) as supplemented. A comparative audit of the FSAR as amended, and the SER as supplemented was performed with the Shoreham T/S. Several discrepancies were identified and subsequently resolved through discussions with the cognizant NRC reviewer, NRC staff reviewers and/or utility representatives. The Shoreham Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 T/S, to the extent reviewed, are in conformance with the FSAR and SER

  20. Data acquisition and treatment unit for use in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annaix, C; Prieur, G; Vilayleck, S; Jallet, P [C.H.R., Angers (France)

    1981-01-01

    Here is below a one-channel data acquisition unit piloted through a minicomputer programmed by means of an advanced language of the Basic type. This unit allows, especially in nuclear medicine, pulse counts from a spectrometer according to a programmed sequence. Moreover, it provides treatment of measures as well as printing and filing of interpreted results. The acquisition unit is linked to the minicomputer through a RS 232 C serial mode, which ensures both easy operation and universal use of the system here described. Accuracy of measurement is also examined.

  1. The nuclear complex. Bonds between the civil and the military atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrillot, B.

    2005-02-01

    Facing the nuclear armament of Iran, this book deals with the nonproliferation policy in the world and more specially in France. It shows how the development of the civil nuclear is holding up the nuclear disarmament. (A.L.B.)

  2. The political economy of nuclear energy in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nivola, P.S.

    2004-05-01

    A tendency among commentators, even experts like the author of the sentence above, is to regard the complicated story of nuclear energy in the United States as exceptionally troubled and frustrating. The root cause of the troubles and frustrations, moreover, is commonly thought to be more political than economic. The promise of nuclear power in this country is said to have been dimmed primarily by an eccentrically risk-averse public and an unusually hostile regulatory climate. Practically nowhere else, it is said, have political and legal institutions been so uncooperative. Supposedly the central governments of most other advanced countries have lent far more support to their nuclear industries. And because those governments are assumed to be more aggressive in combating pollution, including greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels, surely 'the rest of the world' has been doing much more than America to level the playing field for the development of nuclear energy. The following paper challenges this conventional picture. (author)

  3. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment; 6. Radiation Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-Proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities (Department of Trade and Industry - DTI; Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the Secretary of State for Health; Secretary of State for Transport; Secretary of State for Education); 2. Advisory Bodies (Medical Research Council - MRC; Nuclear Safety Advisory Committee; Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee); 3. Public and Semi-Public Agencies (United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority - UKAEA; Health and Safety Commission and Executive - HSC/HSE; National Radiological Protection Board - NRPB; Environment Agencies; British Nuclear Fuels plc. - BNFL; Amersham International plc.; The National Nuclear Corporation Ltd. - NNC; United Kingdom Nirex Ltd.; Magnox Electric plc.; British Energy Generation Ltd.; Scottish Electricity Generator Companies; British Energy Generation Ltd.; Regional Electricity Companies in England and Wales)

  4. United Kingdom: Procurement Related Nuclear Experience (Operating Experience)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Procurement of nuclear facilities in the United Kingdom is subject to nuclear site licence conditions issued by the Government through the Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR). Each nuclear facility in the United Kingdom must have a nuclear site licence and must comply with the 36 general conditions that are set out in the Licence Condition Handbook (October 2014). In addition, the ONR has published a technical assessment guide for the procurement of nuclear safety related items or services; a guide on intelligent customers and a guide on records management also apply to the procurement phase, and ONR interventions look across all three of these documents. Procurement governance arrangements need to be developed (including a policy, manual, procedures and template documents) and approved within the utility company. The ONR monitors the arrangements via interventions and deems the arrangements to be ‘adequate’. Some procurement contracts become lifetime records for nuclear safety related systems and need to be retained while the plant is in place. A formal record retention schedule needs to be created and managed by the procurement organization. The utility company may elect to set hold points during the various procurement stages and, importantly, obtain approval for the contract and its content from all technical stakeholders (with particular emphasis on the engineering, project management and design authority quality functions before contract award). For contracts with high nuclear safety significance, the ONR may enforce additional hold points before and/or after contract award. There is a general requirement that the utility puts in place adequate arrangements to ensure that suitably qualified and experienced personnel are employed to implement adequate management arrangements and to act as an intelligent customer. This includes being able to demonstrate that any contractor or supplier is suitable, capable and experienced, and has the necessary processes and

  5. Public acceptance of nuclear power generation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liverman, J.L.; Thorne, R.D.

    1977-01-01

    Within the United States environmental awareness has spread and matured since the early 1960's. Evidence of this is found in cautious attitudes toward the installation of nuclear power reactors and other components of the nuclear fuel cycle. Hazards associated with nuclear energy technologies appear to attract a greater share of public attention than the hazards of nonnuclear counterparts. The association of nuclear power with nuclear weapons may be at the root of this concern. The explicit identification of increased incidences of cancer and genetic effects in humans as potential consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation and knowledge that radiation exposures and health consequences arising from nuclear power operations might occur many generations after operations cease also underlie this concern. Based in large part on these concerns, a number of actions have been taken in the United States to prevent and to delay installation and development of nuclear technology. These actions are reviewed and analyzed with emphasis on the 1976 California nuclear moratorium referendum and other more recent actions at state and national levels. They are compared with the status and outcome of similar actions in other nations as is possible. Additionally, ERDA's current approaches to public involvement in the decision making process is discussed, including the value of comprehensive analyses of health, environmental, and socioeconomic aspects of alternative energy sources in responding to public needs. U.S. plans for providing such analyses for all installed and developing energy technologies are presented with special reference to areas which require international cooperation for implementation. The value of international analysis and internationally accepted environmental control strategies for all energy technologies is also addressed

  6. 76 FR 81994 - UniStar Nuclear Energy; Combined License Application for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 52-016; NRC-2008-0250] UniStar Nuclear Energy; Combined License Application for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 3; Exemption 1.0 Background: UniStar Nuclear Energy (UNE) submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission ) a...

  7. 78 FR 22347 - GPU Nuclear Inc., Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2, Exemption From Certain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-320; NRC-2013-0065] GPU Nuclear Inc., Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2, Exemption From Certain Security Requirements AGENCY: Nuclear... and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission...

  8. Security and disarmament in Northeast Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung-Joo Han

    1995-01-01

    The new international environment embodies several characteristics: multi-polarisation of the international order, political reconciliation and cooperation between nation-states; the rising importance of economic relations; the wider dissemination of liberal democracy and market economy; and increasing interdependence and globalization. The Northeast Asian region is also undergoing transformation. Despite repeated assurances to the contrary USA's ability and willingness to maintain a significant military in the region is often called into question. The danger of arms proliferation in the region calls for arms control and eventual elimination. Related to this Korea strongly supports efforts to stop nuclear proliferation beyond 1995 through the extension of the Non-Proliferation Treaty and supports the strengthening of the IAEA safeguards as the primary device to ensure the effectiveness of the Treaty. At the same time Korea urges the nuclear-weapon states not only to accelerate their efforts to reduce their nuclear arsenal but to realise a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty

  9. Experience with HEPA filters at United States nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    Part 50 of Title 10 of the United States Code of Federal Regulations requires that a number of atmosphere cleanup systems be included in the design of commercial nuclear power plants to be licensed in the United States. These filtering systems are to contain high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters for removal of radioactive particulate matter generated during normal and accident conditions. Recommendations for the design, testing and maintenance of the filtering systems and HEPA filter components are contained in a number of United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission documents and industry standards. This paper will discuss this published guidance available to designers of filtering systems and the plant operators of U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. The paper will also present a survey of published reports of experience with HEPA filters, failures and possible causes for the failures, and other abnormal occurrences pertaining to HEPA filters installed in U.S. nuclear power installations. A discussion will be included of U.S. practices for qualification of HEPA filters before installation, and verification of continued performance capability at scheduled intervals during operation

  10. 76 FR 24538 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; McGuire Nuclear Station...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414; NRC-2011-0100; Docket Nos. 50-369 and 50-370; Docket Nos. 50-269, 50-270, and 50-287] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Oconee Nuclear Station, Units 1, 2, and 3...

  11. Nuclear power generation costs in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    Increasing world energy prices and shortages of fuel resources make the utilization of nuclear power extremely important. The United States nuclear power industry represents the largest body of nuclear power experience in the world. Analysis of the recent United States experience of substantial increases in the cost of nuclear power generation provides good insight into the interdependence of technological, financial, and institutional influences and their combined impact on the economic viability of nuclear power generation. The various factors influencing ultimate generation costs, including construction cost, fuel cost, regulatory reviews, and siting considerations are discussed, and their relative impacts are explored, including discussion of design complexity and related regulatory response. A closer look into the recent relatively high escalation of nuclear plant construction costs shows how differing economic conditions can affect the relative cost effectiveness of various methods of power generation. The vulnerability of capital-intensive, long-lead-time projects to changes in economic conditions and uncertainty in future power demands is discussed. Likewise, the pitfalls of new designs and increased sophistication are contrasted to the advantages which result from proven designs, reliable engineering, and shorter lead times. The value of reliable architect-engineers experienced in the design and construction of the plant is discussed. A discussion is presented of additional regulatory requirements stemming from public safety aspects of nuclear power. These include recognition of requirements for the very large effort for quality assurance of materials and workmanship during plant construction and operation. Likewise, a discussion is included of the demanding nature of operations, maintenance, and modification of plants during the operational phase because of the need for highly qualified operations and maintenance personnel and strict quality assurance

  12. Toward an Europe without nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collin, J.M.

    2003-10-01

    Where it is exposed that France and Great Britain could propose a progressive and controlled disarmament agenda on beginning by Europe, because of their special situation of only nuclear powers in Europe. (N.C.)

  13. The collection of the information on peaceful use of atomic energy and nuclear now proliferation and its summaries and analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, S.; Takeda, Hiroshi [PESCO Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    This report summarizes the monthly topics on peaceful uses of atomic energy and management of nuclear materials and its proliferation. The topics are based on the 127 related articles appeared in the newspapers of Japan; those are the Yomiuri, the Asahi, the Mainichi and the Sankei in ten months from May 1998 to February 1999. The most frequent topics are (1) nuclear inspection of Iraq and suspicion for nuclear weapon, (2) nuclear experiments, economic sanctions and CTBT in India and Pakistan, (3) underground nuclear facilities of North Korea and discussions on KEDO. The United Nations Security Council, IAEA and each country have responded on the issues of nuclear disarmament, nuclear non-proliferation, a resolution on suspension of nuclear test, reinforcement of IAEA security actions and an organization of NPT. The next topic is disarmament talks of nuclear weapon and nuclear waste disposal between USA and Russian Federation. Noteworthy issues are promotion of international cooperation on disposal of dismantled nuclear material of Russian Federation and supports for commercial use of plutonium. The fundamental concept is the timing of the pace between USA and Russian Federation on nuclear weapon disarmament. The point is how to realize the plan in the economical difficulty of Russian Federation. Other topics in the newspapers are disposal of Russian atomic submarines, sub-critical nuclear experiments of USA and Russian Federation, tritium production of USA, commercial uses of highly enriched uranium, nuclear of Iran, missile issues, transportation of plutonium. Technical terms and abbreviations are explained after the monthly topics with its background. The total 127 references of the newspaper articles are attached after the topics. (Y. Tanaka)

  14. SIPRI yearbook 1987: World armaments and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The aim of the Yearbook is to provide the general public with an objective picture of what has happened in world political-military affairs in the past year (1986). It is divided into four parts. Part one has five chapters on weapons and technology including nuclear, conventional and chemical and biological warfare. One chapter looks at the military uses of outer space. Part 2 covers military expenditure, the arms trade and armed conflicts. There are tables giving facts and figures with these two chapters. Part 3 looks at developments in arms control: US-Soviet nuclear arms control, conventional arms control and the biological warfare convention. Part four has two chapters, one on the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident and its consequences which is indexed separately and the other on arms control verification technology which has many facts and figures. (U.K.)

  15. Between Shadow and Light: The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons Forty Years On

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, Biad

    2010-01-01

    The NPT was negotiated during the Cold War period to prevent the emergence of new nuclear players by distinguishing between 'nuclear-weapon states' (NWS) which had carried out nuclear testing before 1 January 1967, that is the United States, Russia, the United Kingdom, France and China, and 'non-nuclear-weapon states' (NNWS). Under the NPT, the two groups of states commit to comply with a series of commitments formulated around 'three pillars': 1 - Non-proliferation: the NWSs undertake under Article I not to transfer nuclear weapons or control over such weapons and not in any way to assist, encourage or induce any NNWS to acquire them, while the NNWSs are bound under Article II to neither develop or acquire nuclear weapons or 'other nuclear explosive devices' nor to receive any assistance in that connection. 2 - Peaceful use of nuclear energy: Article IV guarantees the 'inalienable right' to 'develop research, production and use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes without discrimination'. 3 - Nuclear disarmament: each state party to the treaty undertakes under Article VI 'to pursue negotiations in good faith on effective measures relating to cessation of the nuclear arms race at an early date and to nuclear disarmament'. The treaty entered in force in March 1970 and has since become universal, with 189 states parties in May 2010. At five-year intervals, parties to the treaty convene review conferences in order to review the operation of the treaty, Article VIII(3). The 1975, 1985 and 2000 review conferences culminated in the adoption of a final declaration and the 1995 review conference decided to extend the treaty indefinitely. The preparatory committee (PrepCom) for the 2010 review conference, which met from April 2007 to May 2009, did not adopt any recommendations, in absence of a consensus on essential issues concerning the operation of the treaty. Hence the importance of this 8. review conference of the parties held in New York from 3 to 28 May 2010 in a

  16. Nuclear nonproliferation: The long haul

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    The policy of the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency rests upon the recognition that nuclear proliferation would profoundly threaten international stability and global order. Suspicions among traditional rivals would be exacerbated, regional disputes made more complex, and the possibility of local conflict increased. The security and well-being of the United Sttes and its close friends and allies, but also the security and well-being of the countries acquiring these weapons, would be threatened. Indeed, the greatest chance of use of nuclear weapons stems not from the US-Soviet strategic balance but from the possible emergence of small, unstable nuclear arsenals in many regions of the world characterized by crises and periodic military conflict

  17. US policies on combating proliferation of nuclear weapons after the cold war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosaki, Hirofumi

    2005-01-01

    Combating nuclear proliferation has been one of the top priorities for the international community in the post post-Cold War era, and the United States has been taking initiative for tackling the problems. The current Bush administration has placed value high on the effective and concrete actions - including the use of military forces - for such efforts. It is imperative that such actions should be taken in resolving the nuclear proliferation. However, the United States has been criticized that it has disregarded the existing nuclear non-proliferation regime, and that its non-proliferation policy has given negative implications to the regime. Combating nuclear proliferation should be pursued in balanced approach with legitimacy, in consideration of the discriminately nature of the regime as well as of its three pillars - nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear disarmament and peaceful use of nuclear energy. (author)

  18. Psychology of the nuclear balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonntag, P

    1981-10-01

    The balance of military forces is meant to prevent war. But it is a very precarious balance, which becomes all the more dubious when the deterrent is no longer psychologically effective: when the country attacked is deterred from striking back with nuclear weapons. A unilateral disarmament above the overkill level would be possible without endangering the balance. It would improve the climate for mutual disarmament.

  19. Nuclear material control and accounting safeguards in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woltermann, H.A.; Rudy, C.R.; Rakel, D.A.; DeVer, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    Material control and accounting (MC and A) of special nuclear material (SNM) must supplement physical security to protect SNM from unlawful use such as terrorist activities. This article reviews MC and A safeguards of SNM in the United States. The following topics are covered: a brief perspective and history of MC and A safeguards, current MC and A practices, measurement methods for SNM, historical MC and A performance, a description of near-real-time MC and A systems, and conclusions on the status of MC and A in the United States

  20. Main messages for the new nuclear unit in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikula, Anneli

    2001-01-01

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) submitted last year, on 15th November, to the Council of State an application for a decision in principle concerning the construction of additional nuclear capacity. In this presentation, the main messages to decision makers for the new unit are discussed. Also the studies, which the messages are based on, are described. According to the Finnish Nuclear Energy Act, a company considering a nuclear plant project must apply for a decision in principle from the Government beforehand. The Government then decides whether the project is in accordance with the overall good of the society. If the decision is positive, it needs ratification by the Parliament. Before the Government decision, various interested parties are heard, including the municipality of location and the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority. The phase of statements is underway and they all will be ready by the end of March 2001. The entire application process takes approximately 1-2 years. The main messages arguing for more nuclear power in Finland were as follows. The new nuclear power plant unit replaces old fossil power plants and satisfies the need for additional demand of electricity; makes possible to meet the requirements of the Kyoto agreement; reduces the dependence on the imported energy and assures a stable and predictable electricity price. Messaging concerning a new nuclear power plant unit is made in co-operation with several organisations. The most important of them, in addition to the company shareholders, are the companies which have shown interested in the new project as well as the Finnish Energy Industries Federation (Finergy) and the Confederation of Finnish Industry and Employers. A transparency folder 'Nuclear electricity 2000' was put together of the messages in collaboration with the organisations. The folder was distributed to about 400 opinion leaders in the energy field. To ensure the consistency of the messages, several interest group meetings

  1. Nuclear units operating improvement by using operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, I.; Bilegan, I.C.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents how the information experience can be used to improve the operation of nuclear units. This areas include the following items: conservative decision making; supervisory oversight; teamwork; control room distraction; communications; expectations and standards; operator training and fundamental knowledge, procedure quality and adherence; plant status awareness. For each of these topics, the information illustrate which are the principles, the lessons learned from operating experience and the most appropriate exemplifying documents. (authors)

  2. A Preliminary Study of the Obstacles to, the Status of and Potential for Education for the Promotion of Disarmament. Seminar on the Obstacles to Disarmament and the Ways of Overcoming Them (3-7 April 1978).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Betty

    The booklet assesses the present status of education for the promotion of disarmament in various grade levels and learning environments throughout the world. It also identifies and recommends ways to make disarmament education more effective. Disarmament is interpreted as the process leading from the present system of armed nation states to an…

  3. The role of Nuclear Energy Unit in gathering, organizing and disseminating of nuclear information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsurdin Ahamad

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Unit (UTN) was established with an aim to promote the application of Nuclear Science and Technology in industries, agriculture and medicine in Malaysia. Therefore UTN represents Malaysia in INIS so as to share the available information for collection, merging and dissemination of information. In UTN a variety of activities are being carried out, especially by the Information Science Department whereby a library, equipped with reading materials and a computerized information system (SMBK) is set up as the information centre. A number of publications have also been made so as to keep the technical officers and other staff aware of the developments in Nuclear Science and Technology. To provide a better understanding of the latest techniques and nuclear technological procedures, courses, seminars and workshops for officers involved are carried out. Talks and exhibitions are also organized in order to promote Nuclear Science and Technology amongst the layman. (author)

  4. Previewing the 2010 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomper, Miles A.

    2010-01-01

    Despite groundbreaking disarmament pledges and substantial effort, the Obama administration's hopes for a successful Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference may not be fully realised. Many developing countries are in no mood to grant new non-proliferation concessions, such as tightened rules on access to sensitive nuclear technologies, tougher inspection rules, or limits on withdrawing from the treaty. The non-nuclear weapon states (NNWS) remain angered by the failure to move forward on many disarmament commitments pledged at the 1995 and 2000 Conferences. Moreover, progress on disarmament measures under Obama has been slower than hoped, as he faces considerable scepticism in Washington about his strategy. (author)

  5. The Evolution of India's Nuclear Program: Implications for the United States

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Creasman, David J

    2008-01-01

    Since India began developing its nuclear program it has continually encountered issues with the United States and other nuclearized countries over whether India should be able to establish a nuclear...

  6. An operating nuclear utility's experience with the ALARA design of a new nuclear unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    This talk presents a review of how operating experience at Northeast Utilities has been factored into the design of a new nuclear unit and the development and management of the radiation protection program. Their operational experience has indicated that there are two facets to keeping radiation exposures ALARA. The first is the proper ALARA design of the unit. The other facet is the design of a comprehensive radiation protection program. The author discusses these facets in some detail

  7. 77 FR 29701 - Impact of Construction (Under a Combined License) of New Nuclear Power Plant Units on Operating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ... New Nuclear Power Plant Units on Operating Units at Multi-Unit Sites AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... construct and operate new nuclear power plants (NPPs) on multi-unit sites to provide an evaluation of the... License) of New Nuclear Power Plants on Operating Units at Multi-Unit Sites (Package). ML112630039 Federal...

  8. Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 and Romanian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mocanu Horia

    2001-01-01

    On 18 May 2001, in the presence of Mr. Adrian Nastase, the Prime-Minister of Romania, the presidents of AECL, ANSALDO and Director General of SN Nuclearelectrica, the commercial and management contract for completing the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 was signed. This document stipulates the goal and the partners' commitments, leadership organization, the SN Nuclearelectrica's control of the Budget, costs for the technical assistance (around 180 specialists from abroad), as well as the costs of equipment supplied from Canada and Italy. Services and equipment supplied by Canada and Italy amounts up to around USD 300 millions. Efforts are currently undertaken to obtain a loan of USD 300 millions from EURATOM, beginning from 2003. An auction process, implying around 10 companies, is underway and by the completion of the process, in February 2002, the practical delivery of equipment will start. The so-far invested capital amounts around USD 650 millions while the capital funds remaining to be invested amounts up to about USD 689 millions. From the latter figure, around USD 100 millions represent the costs for heavy water and the initial nuclear fuel charging. The personnel dynamics is presented as well as problems relating with recruitment and salary policy. Romanian nuclear industry is engaged for supply of a series of important components. General Turbo SA, supplied already components of some tens USD millions for the turbogenerator complex. PETROTUB company from Roman, Romania supplied already one thousand tones of non-nuclear carbon steel tubing valued at about USD 300 millions. ARIO, Bistrita, Romania, has signed contracts valued at about USD 400,000 for non-nuclear reinforcing materials. Other companies like AVERSA SA and Ventilatorul SA supplied reliable equipment for Unit 1 and will continue to do the same for Unit 2. Contracts of over one million USD are carried on with VULCAN for carbon steel fittings and with TITAN Nuclear Equipment for components of the fueling

  9. 78 FR 77726 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Exemption... License No. DPR-50, which authorizes operation of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1 (TMI-1... Facility Operating License No. DPR-50, which authorizes operation of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station...

  10. 75 FR 6223 - PSEG Nuclear LLC; Hope Creek Generating Station and Salem Nuclear Generating Station, Unit Nos. 1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-272, 50-311 and 50-354; NRC-2010-0043] PSEG Nuclear LLC; Hope Creek Generating Station and Salem Nuclear Generating Station, Unit Nos. 1 and 2...-70, and DPR-75, issued to PSEG Nuclear LLC (PSEG, the licensee), for operation of the Hope Creek...

  11. Humanitarian Approach to Nuclear Disarmament and the Marshall Islands Cases

    OpenAIRE

    山田, 寿則

    2016-01-01

    2015年は広島・長崎への原爆投下から70年の節目であった。今日でもなお核兵器は存在し続けており、国際社会における脅威となっている。同年核不拡散条約の第9 回再検討会議が開催されたが、具体的成果を得ることなく閉幕した。その背景には2010年の第8 回再検討会議のころから主張され始めた核軍縮への人道的アプローチをめぐる核兵器国と非核兵器国との厳しい対立がある。この対立は2015年後半の国連総会第1 委員会における核軍縮関連諸決議の採択をめぐって顕在化した。2016年には国連総会の下に設置された核軍縮に関するオープンエンド作業部会(OEWG)において、核兵器禁止条約を追求する議論が提起されており、これをめぐり非核兵器国と核兵器依存国との主張の対立がみられる。 本稿は、この人道的アプローチに基づく核兵器禁止条約の追求の在り方につき現行の国際法の観点から考察を行っている。第1 部では生物兵器禁止条約や化学兵器禁止条約の教訓から核兵器禁止条約形成においても人道の主張に基づく条約形成が有効であることを論じるとともに、現行法を再確認する規定が必要であることを主張している。第2 部では国際司法裁...

  12. 75 FR 36700 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC; Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ...; Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact... Company, LLC (the licensee), for operation of Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1 (TMI-1), located... Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, NUREG-0552, dated December 1972, and Generic...

  13. Nuclear Data Unit correspondents for the exchange of nuclear data information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1968-04-15

    This list serves as a basis for the distribution of documents originated by or for the International Nuclear Data Committee, and includes the names of all INDC members, liaison officers and correspondents of the Nuclear Data Unit. The IAEA Nuclear Data Unit tries to maintain this list up-to-date in order to facilitate an efficient interchange of information on nuclear data topics. The recipients of this list are encouraged to inform the Nuclear Data Unit of any corrections, additions and deletions deemed necessary. Because of the variety of document origins and functions, and the number of countries served by this list, each addressee is assigned a seven-letter distribution code, shown to the left of each name, which indicates the categories of documents he receives. The names appear under three categories, member states, international organizations and non-member states, and are listed in alphabetical order within each state or organization. The main list is followed by seven shorter lists, indicating the names of individuals in each distribution category, and the total number of individuals in each category.

  14. Nuclear Data Unit correspondents for the exchange of nuclear data information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-04-01

    This list serves as a basis for the distribution of documents originated by or for the International Nuclear Data Committee, and includes the names of all INDC members, liaison officers and correspondents of the Nuclear Data Unit. The IAEA Nuclear Data Unit tries to maintain this list up-to-date in order to facilitate an efficient interchange of information on nuclear data topics. The recipients of this list are encouraged to inform the Nuclear Data Unit of any corrections, additions and deletions deemed necessary. Because of the variety of document origins and functions, and the number of countries served by this list, each addressee is assigned a seven-letter distribution code, shown to the left of each name, which indicates the categories of documents he receives. The names appear under three categories, member states, international organizations and non-member states, and are listed in alphabetical order within each state or organization. The main list is followed by seven shorter lists, indicating the names of individuals in each distribution category, and the total number of individuals in each category

  15. Nuclear links

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The subject is dealt with in sections: introduction; energy and the third world; world energy consumption 1978; oil -the energy dilemma; nuclear chains - introduction; uranium; Namibia; enrichment and reprocessing; countries with enrichment and reprocessing facilities; waste; conclusion; why take the nuclear option; third world countries with nuclear reactors; the arms connection; government spending and human resources 1977 (by countries); nuclear power - the final solution; the fascists; world bank; campaigns; community action in Plogoff; Australian labour movement; NUM against nuclear power; Scottish campaign; students against nuclear energy; anti-nuclear campaign; partizans; 3W1 disarmament and development; campaign ATOM; CANUC; 3W1; SANE. (U.K.)

  16. Nuclear electric power and the proliferation of nuclear weapon states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walske, C.

    1977-01-01

    Control and elimination of the strategic nuclear weapons held by the nuclear weapon states remains the central problem in the arms control and disarmament field. Whether the proliferation of nations with nuclear weapons can be stopped is dubious. A sovereign nation will launch a nuclear weapons program if it has the motivation and resource. Motivation depends on military and political considerations. The necessary resources are economic and technological. Conditions in some sovereign states explain this issue. A survey of commercial nuclear power programs outside the USA lists 45 countries using or planning to use nuclear reactors for power generation. There are currently 112 reactors now operating outside the United States, 117 more under construction, 60 on order, and 180 planned. The U. S. as of December 1976 has 64 operating reactors, 72 under construction, 84 on order, and 8 planned. Nuclear trade and export policies are discussed. In this article, Mr. Walske says that American industry is convinced that the need for nuclear energy abroad is more urgent than in the United States; that in the long run, the breeder reactor must be developed to enable the supply of nuclear fuel to last for centuries; and that the experience of American industry abroad has convinced it that emphasis on restrictive, denial type policies will almost certainly fail--a collapse of what has been gained through the test ban treaty and the nonproliferation treaty

  17. United Kingdom procedures in case of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalfont, L.

    1988-01-01

    From the United Kingdom experience, general principles for establishing emergency plans are drawn. Every country with nuclear plant should have such emergency arrangements capable of dealing with the largest scale that can be envisaged as a practical possibility. While the effects of accidents cannot be anticipated in detail these plans should form a good flexible basis for providing the resources, communications and procedures that are likely to be needed. They encompass the administrative infrastructure of the area surrounding the nuclear installation and involve co-ordination with the police, fire services and ambulance services, the local and county authorities, the authorities responsible for food, agriculture, fisheries and water, and the health authorities including hospitals and medical services. Special training and procedures have to be established for the personnel that are involved and exercises graduating from the exercising of special procedures to large scale simulated accidents need to be carried out periodically. Good communication systems have to be established between the nuclear installations, the operational support centres or equivalent, the field and headquarters units of the relevant organizations, and the central government departments so that whatever additional resources and support are needed can be marshalled quickly and efficiently. (author)

  18. India's draft nuclear doctrine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapur, A.

    2000-01-01

    India's draft nuclear doctrine and its nuclear and missile testing are a response to recent international, regional and domestic developments. Nehru's policy of nuclear disarmament, non-discriminatory international arrangements and unilateral restraint has been overturned in favour of self-reliant security and negotiated nuclear restraints. The draft nuclear doctrine is aimed at transparency and formalization of existing capacities. It is anchored in the United Nations Charter, based on the legitimacy of self-defence and espouses minimum nuclear deterrence. After the launching of Pokhran II, the debate in India has been settled on weaponization and deployment. The doctrine is not country-specific with respect to threat perceptions, but the author posits that the long-term focus is on China and the short-term on Pakistan. The doctrine emphasizes civilian command and control. India's decision to test incurred diplomatic and other economic costs, but afforded new opportunities for the country to assert itself militarily and politically in Asia and in the world. There were no diplomatic costs in issuing the draft nuclear doctrine, but the author estimates the economic costs of a full-blown (triad) Indian nuclear deterrent. (author)

  19. Security, cooperation and disarmament: The unfinished agenda for the 1990's. Proceedings of the forty-sixth Pugwash conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotblat, J.

    1998-01-01

    For 40 years, the Pugwash Conference on Science and world affairs has been making unremitting efforts to achieve it main objectives the struggle to eliminate nuclear weapons, the elimination of wars and maintenance of world peace. The end of the Cold War vigorously encouraged world efforts in arms control and disarmament. Besides this main concern of Pugwash, another issue of concern was the negative attitude towards nuclear energy being not only futile, but counterproductive as it misses opportunities to appropriately influence its development. Since nuclear energy cannot be abandoned for ecological (decrease in greenhouse gases emission) and economic reasons as a long term energy source, then efforts should be devoted to make it safe from proliferation, which is possible from scientific and technological point of view

  20. Diffusion of nuclear power generation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommers, P.E.

    1978-01-01

    This dissertation is a study of nuclear power as an innovation diffusing through the utility industry in the United States. Chapter 1 notes that the industry studied, the innovation and the diffusion process have several characteristics not typical of the classical diffusion of innovations literature in economics. Uncertainty about the true characteristics of the innovation persists well into the diffusion process. The characteristics of the innovation appear to change over time. Thus the classic S-shaped transition path from the old, pre-innovation equilibrium to a new post-diffusion equilibrium is not found for this innovation and this industry. A generalized diffusion model is developed in Chapter 1 which allows these peculiarities of the utility industry and of nuclear power to be taken into account. Chapter 2 traces the development of the innovation, the consequences of the demonstration plant program, and the history of the diffusion process from 1963 to the present. Chapter 3 analyses the structure and sources and consequences of regulation of the industry. Chapter 4 develops a logit discrete choice model of the adoption decision. Chapter 5 investigates the determinants of the proportion of industry output provided by nuclear plants using a modified version of the Baughman--Joskow Regional Electricity Model. Salient aspects of uncertainty shift the expected average cost of nuclear plant output in the modified model

  1. Emergency plans for civil nuclear installations in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronow, W.S.

    1984-01-01

    The operators of nuclear installations in the United Kingdom have plans to deal with accidents or emergencies at their nuclear sites. These plans provide for any necessary action, both on and off the nuclear site, to protect members of the public and are regularly exercised. The off-site actions involve the emergency services and other authorities which may be called upon to implement measures to protect the public in any civil emergency. In a recent review of these plans by Government Departments and agencies and the nuclear site operators, a number of possible improvements were identified. These improvements are concerned mainly with the provisions made for liaison with local and national authorities and for public information and have been incorporated into existing plans. An outline is given of the most likely consequences of an accidental release of radioactive material and the scope of emergency plans. Details are also provided on the responsibilities and functions of the operator and other organizations with duties under the plans and the arrangements made for public information. (author)

  2. Second unit scheduling concerns on a dual-unit nuclear project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, H.R.; Mazzini, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    This paper explores the planning and scheduling problems of Unit 2 of the Susquehanna steam electric station. The causes of these problems and methods to avoid or mitigate their consequences are discussed. The Susquehanna steam electric station has two boiling water reactors rated at 1,100 MW each. Topics considered include cost factors, structures, equipment, engineering and home office, construction services, completion data phasing, work sequencing, structural dependences, and segregation. Substatial cost and schedule benefits can result if two nuclear units are designed and constructed as one integral station, and if maximum sharing of facilities and services between the units occurs. It is concluded that the cost benefits of highly integrated dual unit construction outweigh the schedule and logistical problems caused by that approach

  3. Regional disarmament and security issues. Report of working group II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravenhill, J.

    1994-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in building cooperation in the Asia-pacific region in remarkably short period of time. Problems of regional disarmament are analysed by linking the economic and security issues. International cooperation regimes, whether in the military sphere, such as the Non-proliferation treaty, or in the trade sphere such as the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, inevitably impose restrictions on the autonomy of member States. The integrity of the regime depends on countries' acceptance of the obligations it imposes. The task ahead is to convince all countries in the region that cooperation in the security sphere will be of even greater long-term benefit

  4. The New Triad, Disarmament and Strategic Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruselle, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    After a comment of the evolution contained by the Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) published in 2001 by the US government and which proposed a new definition of the fundamentals of the US defence strategy, the author gives an overview of options, progress and perspectives of the new Triad. He discusses the progress status of American systems belonging to this new Triad (a global antimissile defence, development of a conventional strategic component, possible international cooperation and deployments), and the influence of arms control mechanisms on this new Triad (legal constraints, ambiguity of strategic missile conversion and alarm capacities, definition of a new framework for the conventional strategic strike programme). In the second part, the author analyses the consequences of the existence of this new Triad on strategic situations. He discusses the emergence of a new competition with Russia, the impact of Chinese modernisation, the impact on proliferating countries and on terrorist actions, and the perspective of a new paradigm for arms control

  5. Nuclear energy in the United States: prospects, designs and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olds, F.C.

    1981-01-01

    Only an American, an old observer of the American scene, could make an analysis in depth of so complex a subject. The author bases his arguments on statistics and documents available to the public but, his conclusions only reflect his own personal opinion on the energy future of the United States. He shows the difficulties that the development of the nuclear programme has come up against since 1977 and the predictable economic and political effects. A new policy slows down the technological transfer, brings back into question the 'peaceful atom' and makes the task all the easier for the antinuclear movement. The nuclear future and public opinion after the Three Mile Island accident is an ever burning issue [fr

  6. ATWS analysis for Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallman, R.J.; Jouse, W.C.

    1985-01-01

    Analyses of postulated Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) were performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 1 (BFNP1) was selected as the subject of this work because of the cooperation of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The work is part of the Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) Program of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A Main Steamline Isolation Valve (MSIV) closure served as the transient initiator for these analyses, which proceeded a complete failure to scram. Results from the analyses indicate that operator mitigative actions are required to prevent overpressurization of the primary containment. Uncertainties remain concerning the effectiveness of key mitigative actions. The effectiveness of level control as a power reduction procedure is limited. Power level resulting from level control only reduce the Pressure Suppression Pool (PSP) heatup rate from 6 to 4 0 F/min

  7. The Aboliton of Nuclear Weapons: Implications for U.S. Security Interests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weber, Timothy

    1998-01-01

    .... The nuclear disarmament movement has grown considerably since the end of the Cold War. As the idea of abolishing nuclear weapons gains influence, it may have an increasing impact upon national security policy...

  8. The nuclear deterrence a topical interest; La dissuasion nucleaire reste d'actualite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetaille, C. [Commandant d' un sous-marin d' attaque, 83 (France)

    2009-12-15

    The author aims to explain with the today world situation favors the nuclear deterrence. The nuclear disarmament of the main european countries will deprive them of a great asset, which will guarantee the international stability. (A.L.B.)

  9. NATO and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nal, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    The author gives a fine analysis of NATO's nuclear posture in Europe and considers its technical complexity in the context of modernization of the weapons and their launch systems, the political aspect of the nuclear disarmament question and the link with the ABM defensive shield. He demonstrates that we must not neglect the traditional element of relationships with Russia. (author)

  10. Nuclear power plant life extension in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodison, D.; Seddon, J.W.; Pape, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    The safety cases for the United Kingdom's older nuclear power plant have been reviewed by their utilities in order to justify continued operation of the reactors up to an age of at least 30 year. These 'long term safety reviews' have identified worthwhile plant modifications and aspects where further studies or plant inspections are required. As the plants approach the age of 30 years, 'life extension reviews' are now being undertaken, concentrating on management of ageing, to support operation to at least 40 years. (author)

  11. Use of Planalog at Arkansas Nuclear One, Unit One

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, T.

    1979-01-01

    The outage management system of the Arkansas Nuclear One, Unit one is summarized. With limited manpower the outage procedure must be streamlined but still be able to meet the requirements and needs of both the plant structure and the corporate structure. The functions and responsibilities of the outage coordinator are outlined. Outage preparation and control using the Planalog system are discussed. According to the author, even with the disadvantages of the Planalog system listed, it remains a field-proven, reliable tool for major outage activity control. 6 figures

  12. Nuclear energy and education in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginniff, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The thesis of this paper is that sources of energy for a country must be dependable and their use from the production of the basic fuel to the disposal of the wastes should be up to standards which people can understand and accept. In the United Kingdom, the educational system is the source of basic information on sources of energy that are available and which sources are currently being developed to supply present and future energy needs. THe author provides a synopsis of educational techniques and materials which are used to educate the public about nuclear energy production

  13. Reframing the debate against nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyson, Rhianna

    2005-01-01

    'Some 35,000 nuclear weapons remain in the arsenals of the nuclear powers, with thousands still deployed on hair-trigger alert. Whatever rationale these weapons may once have had has long since dwindled. Political, moral, and legal constraints on actually using them further undermine their strategic utility without, however, reducing the risks of inadvertent war or proliferation. The objective of nuclear non-proliferation is not helped by the fact that the nuclear weapon States continue to insist that those weapons in their hands enhance security, while in the hands of others they are a threat to world peace. If we were making steady progress towards disarmament, this situation would be less alarming. Unfortunately, the reverse is true.' - United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan. 'Something is wrong with the nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation regime. Although seemingly well-equipped with an arsenal of legal and political mechanisms, such as the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the 1996 Advisory Opinion of the International Court of Justice (ICJ), decades' worth of General Assembly (GA) resolutions and even a recent slew of ad-hoc, plurilateral initiatives such as the Proliferation Security Initiative, the regime created to prevent the catastrophe of nuclear war remains inadequate. This insufficiency is even starker when viewed in relation to the regimes controlling other weapons of mass destruction. Despite its own challenges, the Organization for the Prohibition on Chemical Weapons remains relatively well-funded and well-situated to facilitate the implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). Even the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC), while still lacking the necessary verification mechanisms, has managed to effectively criminalize not just the use and threat of use of biological weapons, but also their production, development and stockpiling. Meanwhile, the anti-nuclear regime seems to be faltering. Progress made in

  14. Heat balance calculation and feasibility analysis for initial startup of Fuqing nuclear turbine unit with non-nuclear steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Liu; Xiao Bo; Song Yumeng

    2014-01-01

    Non-nuclear steam run up compared with nuclear steam run up, can verify the design, manufacture, installation quality of the unit, at the same time shorten the follow-up duration of the entire group ready to start debugging time. In this paper, starting from the first law of thermodynamics, Analyzed Heat balance Calculation and Feasibility analysis for Initial startup of Fuqing nuclear Turbine unit with Non-nuclear steam, By the above calculation, to the system requirements and device status on the basis of technical specifications, confirmed the feasibility of Non-nuclear steam running up in theory. After the implementation of the Non-nuclear turn of Fuqing unit, confirmed the results fit with the actual process. In summary, the Initial startup of Fuqing turbine unit with Non-nuclear steam is feasible. (authors)

  15. Principles and foundation: national standards on quantities and units in nuclear science field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lishu

    1993-11-01

    The main contents of National Standards on Quantities and units of atomic and nuclear physics (GB 3102.9) and Quantities and Units of nuclear reactions and ionizing radiations (GB 310.10) are presented in which most important quantities with their symbols and definitions in the nuclear scientific field are given. The principles and foundation, including the International System of Units (SI) and its application to the nuclear scientific field, in the setting of the National Standards are explained

  16. Cleaning device for steam units in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasamuro, Takemi.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent radioactive contamination upon dismantling and inspection of steam units such as a turbine to a building containing such units and the peripheral area. Constitution: A steam generator indirectly heated by steam supplied from steam generating source in a separate system containing no radioactivity is provided to produce cleaning steam. A cleaning steam pipe is connected by way of a stop valve between separation valve of a nuclear power plant steam pipe and a high pressure turbine. Upon cleaning, the separation valve is closed, and steam supplied from the cleaning steam pipe is flown into a condenser. The water thus condensated is returned by way of a feed water heater and a condenser to a water storage tank. (Nakamura, S.)

  17. Control system for a nuclear power producing unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrant, O.W.

    1978-01-01

    The invention provides in a control system for a nuclear power producing unit comprising a pressurized water reactor, a once-through steam generator provided with feedwater supply means, a turbine-generator supplied with steam from the steam generator and means maintaining a flow of pressurized water through the reactor and steam generator. The combination comprising; means generating a feed forward control signal proportional to the desired power output of the power producing unit, a second means for adjusting the reactor heat release, a third means for adjusting the rate of flow of feedwater to the steam generator, the second and third means solely responsive to and operated in parallel from the feed forward control signal whereby the reactor heat release and the rate of flow of feedwater to the steam generator are each maintained in a discrete functional relationship to the feed forward control signal

  18. Quality control of radiopharmaceutical dose calibrators in nuclear medicine unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.F.M.; Lucindo Junior, C.R.; Lopes Filho, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the program to ensure quality in nuclear medicine unit, in addition to diagnostic procedures, are evaluated activity meters, which is intended to measure the aliquot of radiation of radionuclides and / or radiopharmaceuticals that are administered to patients undergoing diagnostic investigation and / or therapeutic treatment. The good operating condition of dose calibrators is essential to ensure efficiency, safety and reliability of the measurements, once the lack of accuracy in the responses of these equipments can cause significant errors in the activity administered to the patient and may result in poor quality images resulting in the repetition of examis and interference in the successful treatment of the patient. This study aims to, considering the need for constant evaluation of the functioning of the activity meters and the fact that this issue be part the responsibilities of the professional of radiology, perform quality control testing of these instruments in relation to the most recent norm of National Commission of nuclear Energy (CNEN-NN 3:05) in Brazil, that is also in according to the international standards and reference values established during acceptance testing of these instruments in a nuclear medicine service. For this, was made a review of specific literature and the use of barium, cobalt and cesium to the tests in a nuclear medicine service of the state of Pernambuco in Brazil. The obtained results of the specific tests utilized to verify the correct working of the dose calibrators show coherency with the resolutions of the CNEN-NN 3:05 and are also in agreement with the international standards to that the measurement of activities be made with accurate results and thereby contribute to the proper functioning of nuclear medicine service. (authors)

  19. Nuclear liability insurance in the United States: an insurer's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quattrocchi, J.

    2000-01-01

    By the mid-1950's the United States recognised that it was in the interest to promote commercial development of nuclear energy. But the uncertainties of the technology and the potential for severe accidents were clear obstacles to commercial development. Exposure to potentially serious uninsured liability inhibited the private sector. These impediments led Congress to enact the Price-Anderson Act in 1957. The Act had several purposes: the first was to encourage private development of nuclear power; the second was to establish a legal framework for handling potential liability claims; and the third was to provide a ready source of funds to compensate injured victims of a nuclear accident. Insurers chose the pooling technique by creating in the US the American Nuclear Insurers. ANI acts as a managing agent for its members insurance companies. The accident of three Miles Island occurred on 28 March 1979 and with came the claims experience in US. The 1988 amendments to the Price-Anderson Act directed the President to establish a Commission for the purpose of developing a means to assure full compensation of victims of a catastrophic nuclear accident that exceeds the limitation on aggregate public liability, or currently just over US$ 9.7 billion. The Presidential Commission issued its report in August 1990, in which it reached a number of conclusions and offered a number of recommendations.The US Congress has not acted on the Commission's report, but may revisit its recommendations as debate begins this year (1999) or next on the renewal of the Price-Anderson Act. (N.C.)

  20. Challenges to regional security and disarmament measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, K.P.

    1993-01-01

    The new agenda for peace is providing an extremely useful road map for current international and regional discussions about new ways and means of securing and maintaining peace and security. It underlines the central role of the United nations Security Council in relation to international conflicts and the maintenance of the peace, but it underlines an increasingly important role of the regional organisations as well. In all, there is a recognition that the end of the cold war has generated possibilities for peace-building that have not existed before. To take advantage of these opportunities requires an enhancement of consultation and dialogue at national, regional and global levels so that all nations and all peoples feel and know that they have a stake in the new peace and security architecture that will govern international relations into the twenty first century

  1. Potential advantages and disadvantages of sequentially building small nuclear units instead of a large nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feretic, D.; Cavlina, N.; Grgic, D.

    2008-01-01

    Renewal of nuclear power programs in countries with modest electricity consumptions and weak electrical grid interconnections has raised the question of optimal nuclear power plants sizes for such countries. The same question would be also valid for isolated or weakly connected regions within a large country. Building large size nuclear power plant could be prevented by technical or financial limits. Research programs have been initiated in the International Atomic Energy Agency and in the USA (within the framework of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program) with the aim to inspect under which circumstances small and medium reactors could be the preferred option compared to large nuclear plants. The economy of scale is a clear advantage of large plants. This paper compares, by using probabilistic methods, the net cash flow of large and medium size plants, taking as example a large nuclear plant (around 1200 MW) and four sequentially built smaller plants (300 MW). Potential advantages and disadvantageous of both options have been considered. Main advantages of the sequential construction of several identical small units could be the reduced investor risk and reduced investment costs due to the learning effect. This analysis is a part of studies for the Croatian power generating system development. (orig.)

  2. Negotiating Disarmament and Demobilisation: A Descriptive Review of the Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Muggah

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration (DDR are considered a mainstay of peace and stability operations. Yet, there is surprisingly limited critical examination of how they are negotiated in peace processes or grafted into peace agreements. Given the growing criticism over the design and effectiveness of DDR, it is important to take account of the ways in which it is negotiated to begin with, how it is sequenced, what is included and excluded, and the types of alternative arrangements that are intended to promote confidence among parties. Drawing on existing datasets, this article finds that provisions of DDR are present in over half of all documented comprehensive peace agreements and less than ten per cent of all peace accords, protocols and related resolutions. Moreover, conflict mediators and parties to peace talks seldom regard disarmament and demobilisation as preconditions for negotiations, wary of derailing negotiations. They are nevertheless key considerations in relation to wider security sector transformation and transitional justice in the aftermath of war.

  3. Concrete works in Igata Nuclear Power Station Unit-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanase, Hidemasa

    1981-01-01

    The construction of Igata Nuclear Power Station Unit-2 was started in February, 1978, and is scheduled to start the commercial operation in March, 1982. Construction works are to be finished by August, 1981. The buildings of Igata Nuclear Power Station are composed of large cross section concrete for the purpose of shielding and the resistance to earth quakes. In response to this, moderate heat Portland cement has been employed, and in particular, the heat of hydration has been controlled. In this report, also fine and coarse aggregates, admixtures and chemical admixtures, and further, the techniques to improve the quality are described. Concrete preparation plant was installed in the power station site. Fresh concrete was carried with agitator body trucks from the preparation plant to the unloading point, and from there with pump trucks. Placing of concrete was carried out, striving to obtain homogeneous and dense concrete by using rod type vibrators. Further, concrete was placed in low slump (8 - 15 cm) to reduce water per unit volume, and its temperature was also carefully controlled, e.g., cold water (temperature of mixing water was about 10 deg C) was used in summer season (end of June to end of September). As a result, the control target was almost satisfied. As for testing and inspection, visual appearance test was done as well as material testing in compliance with JIS and other standards. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  4. Spring unit especially intended for a nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, S.J.; Gorholt, Wilhelm.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a spring unit or a group of springs bearing up a sprung mass against an unsprung mass. For instance, a gas cooled high temperature nuclear reactor includes a core of relatively complex structure supported inside a casing or vessel forming a shielded cavity enclosing the reactor core. This core can be assembled from a large number of graphite blocks of different sizes and shapes joined together to form a column. The blocks of each column can be fixed together so as to form together a loose side support. Under the effect of thermal expansion and contraction, shrinkage resulting from irradiation, the effects of pressure and the contraction and creep of the reactor vessel, it is not possible to confine all the columns of the reactor core in a cylindrical rigid structure. Further, the working of the nuclear reactor requires that the reactivity monitoring components may be inserted at any time in the reactor core. A standard process consists in mounting this loosely assembled reactor core in a floating manner by keeping it away from the vessel enclosure around it by means of a number of springs fitted between the lateral surfaces of the core unit and the reactor vessel. The core may be considered as a spring supported mass whereas, relatively, the reactor vessel is a mass that is not flexibly supported [fr

  5. Indemnification for nuclear damages - recent developments in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapar, H.K.

    1981-10-01

    Public liability for nuclear damages in the United States is dealt with by a Federal statutory system. The Price-Anderson Act provides a system of compensation for such damages with an overall limit of $560 million. This fund is composed of private insurance, a utility assessment pool, and Federal government indemnity. The 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear station resulted in a less-than-full-scale test of the system. For the most part, the system has performed as intended although certain problems have been brought to light. Legislative proposal since the accident have focused on increasing the $560 million limitation on liability, but so far none of these proposals has been acted upon by the U.S. Congress. In the next several years, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and possibly Congress will consider application of the Price-Anderson system to high-level waste facilities. The Commission must file with the Congress within two years a comprehensive report on the Price-Anderson Act, including recommendations for its continuation and amendment. (NEA) [fr

  6. Constraints on nuclear power development in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandfon, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. nuclear option appears, at this time, to be disappearing. Determinants of energy supply seem to be changing from engineering and economic factors to other considerations. Regulatory and financial constraints now appear to be dominating the guidelines for electrical energy expansion. American electric utilities, for the most part, have not been able to obtain sufficient revenues to cover their costs of production. What price increases that they are being allowed to charge their customers come too late to keep up with inflation. They require increasing quantities of outside funding in the form of debt and equity capital. This they can only obtain at record high rates, if at all. Most utilities are not even earning what their regulators have determined are fair returns. Financial problems and regulatory tangles severely affect nuclear power, despite its proven technology and environmental and economic benefits. If the United States loses the nuclear alternative, the economic consequences of limiting fuels for electric base load generation to coal only will be severe; analogous to a monopoly situation in fuel supply. It is doubtful, despite the huge resources of coal, that the coal industry can satisfy even a reduced future demand. The question then becomes whether the technological leader of the world may in the future be faced with blackouts and rationing of electricity

  7. The status of nuclear inspections in Iraq. New York, 27 January 2003. Statement to the United Nations Security Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2003-01-01

    For the past 60 days, the inspectors of the IAEA have been engaged in the process of verifying the existence or absence of a nuclear weapons programme in Iraq. Today, pursuant to paragraph 5 of resolution 1441, I have submitted to the President of the Security Council an update report on progress since our nuclear verification activities in Iraq were resumed - in terms of the approach we adopted, the tools being used, the specific results achieved, the degree of co-operation received, and finally the view on how the inspectors should proceed. This statement outlines the key aspects of this report. To date no evidence was found that Iraq has revived its nuclear weapons programme since the elimination of the programme in the 1990s. However, the work is steadily progressing and should be allowed to run its natural course. With the IAEA verification system now in place, barring exceptional circumstances, and provided there is sustained proactive cooperation by Iraq, the IAEA should be able within the next few months to provide credible assurance that Iraq has no nuclear weapons programme. These few months would be a valuable investment in peace because they could help to avoid a war. We trust that we will continue to have your support as we make every effort to verify Iraq's nuclear disarmament through peaceful means, and to demonstrate that the inspection process can and does work, as a central feature of the international nuclear arms control regime

  8. Overview of the United States' nuclear waste repository programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surles, T.G.

    2002-01-01

    Regardless of the future of civilian or defense-based nuclear materials, the United States will be responsible for a vast array of these materials for generations to come. The cornerstone programme for the disposal of waste materials is the Yucca Mountain Programme. Based on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended in 1987, it has been the United States' policy to develop a geological repository for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste materials. This presentation will discuss the process and strategy leading to the present and will include the scientific and management activities required to support the recent Viability Assessment. Also to be discussed are the timeline and milestones leading to the opening of the repository. The focus will be on the scientific and engineering studies required for a successful Site Recommendation, and then for a similarly successful License Application. Both of these activities will require considerable management efforts in addressing legal and regulatory issues. Finally, the presentation will discuss projections for the future operation of the facility, including emplacement projections, coupled with the required locations of nuclear materials. Additional scientific research and engineering studies will also be conducted to determine the longer-term viability of the facility, which is designed, by policy, for permanent storage. Retrievability is currently not an option, although access to the facility will be maintained for several decades. The focus of the discussion will be on the scientific and engineering advances made on understanding the natural systems for preventing migration of radionuclides, coupled with new developments in engineered systems in areas such as cask cladding, drip shields, and related materials engineering developments. The coupling of engineered and natural systems is designed to offer safety factors that are several orders of magnitude greater than what is estimated to be necessary

  9. Notice to exporters on products prohibited from export (nuclear material, equipment and large nuclear units)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In order to ensure that the policy to avoid the proliferation of nuclear weapons is complied with, the French Administration applies stricter controls over the export of certain sensitive products, materials and equipment. To this effect, lists of such products, materials and equipment are published in the form of Notices to exporters and periodically revised. This Notice repeals and replaces the previous Notice published in the Official Gazette of 21 January 1986. Annex I contains the list of materials whose export is subject to nuclear non-proliferation controls. Annex II lists the equipment whose export is subject to the same controls. Annex III includes the list of large nuclear units for which an application for prior approval of export must be submitted to the Administrations concerned. (NEA) [fr

  10. The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (United Kingdom) Nuclear Archive: The importance of stakeholder engagement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, Simon; Wisbey, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This presentation sketched how the United Kingdom's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) deals with its obligation of identification, storage, preservation, sharing and destruction of records related to the memory of the UK civilian nuclear industry. Based on the experience of the ongoing establishment of a National Nuclear Archive, the speaker reflected on who the main actors are and how they could contribute; to what extent their work should be co-ordinated; whether there are guidelines; whether 'stories' are being generated out of these archives for the benefits of all readerships; and whether there are issues of secrecy. It was highlighted that to successfully maintain the interest and the knowledge, it will be necessary to go beyond the technical and legislative areas and reach out to the wider society, for instance to the fields of education and culture

  11. Disarmament and arms control in the policy of the two great powers; Desarmement et maitrise des armements dans la politique des deux Grands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J. [Paris-1 Univ. Sorbonne, 75 (France); Institut Francais des Relations Internationales (Ifri), 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-07-15

    This text was published in 1992. The author comments the results of the START agreement which specified a 30 per cent objective for strategic weapon reduction. He also comments the consequences and implication of the USSR splitting where some states possess nuclear arms and warheads, the cooperation for transportation, storage, security and destruction of chemical and nuclear weapons in USSR, and the perspectives of more ambitious disarmament propositions because of the USSR collapse and of the disappearance of its military threat on the USA

  12. 75 FR 80547 - Carolina Power & Light Company, Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant, Unit No. 1; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ..., Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant, Unit No. 1; Exemption 1.0 Background Carolina Power & Light Company... operation of the Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant (HNP), Unit 1. The license provides, among other things... request to generically extend the rule's compliance date for all operating nuclear power plants, but noted...

  13. 76 FR 19148 - PSEG Nuclear, LLC, Hope Creek Generating Station and Salem Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-272, 50-311, 50-354; NRC-2009-0390 and NRC-2009-0391] PSEG Nuclear, LLC, Hope Creek Generating Station and Salem Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1 and 2..., DPR-70, and DPR-75 for an additional 20 years of operation for the Hope Creek Generating Station (HCGS...

  14. The psychology of the nuclear balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonntag, P.

    1981-01-01

    The balance of military forces is meant to prevent war. But it is a very precarious balance, which becomes all the more dubious when the deterrent is no longer psychologically effective: when the country attacked is deterred from striking back with nuclear weapons. A unilateral disarmament above the overkill level would be possible without endangering the balance. It would improve the climate for mutual disarmament. (orig.) [de

  15. Planning for decommissioning of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant Unit-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poskas, P.; Poskas, R.; Zujus, R.

    2002-01-01

    In accordance to Ignalina NPP Unit 1 Closure Law, the Government of Lithuania approved the Ignalina NPP Unit 1 Decommissioning Program until 2005. For enforcement of this program, the plan of measures for implementation of the program was prepared and approved by the Minister of Economy. The plan consists of two parts, namely technical- environmental and social-economic. Technical-environmental measures are mostly oriented to the safe management of spent nuclear fuel and operational radioactive waste stored at the plant and preparation of licensing documents for Unit 1 decommissioning. Social-economic measures are oriented to mitigate the negative social and economic impact on Lithuania, inhabitants of the region, and, particularly, on the staff of Ignalina NPP by means of creating favorable conditions for a balanced social and economic development of the region. In this paper analysis of planned radioactive waste management technologies, licensing documents for decommissioning, other technical-environmental and also social-economic measures is presented. Specific conditions in Lithuania important for defining the decommissioning strategy are highlighted. (author)

  16. Reactor control and protection of full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jinping; Sun Jiliang

    1996-01-01

    The control and protection simulation of Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit, including the nuclear control, the pressurizer pressure control, the pressurizer level control, the rod control, the reactor shutdown protection and engineered safety feature etc are briefly introduced

  17. Financing Nuclear Projects. Case Study: Unit 2 Cernavoda NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, Teodor; Constantin, Carmencita; Dobrin, Marian

    2003-01-01

    The implementation of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is a major undertaking for all entities involved, due to the necessity of planning work and coordination of the implementation process of the different fields of interest, starting with the governmental authorities and ending with the public. Having in view the specific investment costs (relatively high) for a NPP, finding an adequate financing structure is possible through an iterative process that involves first an assessment of the technical performances of the project and secondly, the mathematical modelling of the financing structure effects on the projects. In this respect, the paper will be focused on the main steps needed in order to promote an investment project in nuclear field, starting with the decision phase, providing the documentation requested by the local and international authorities to promote the project and ending with the negotiation of the contracts (commercial contract, financing contract, purchase contract, etc). The case study will be focused on the phases achieved in order to promote the Unit 2 NPP Cernavoda completion works project. (authors)

  18. Millstone Unit 1 plant vulnerabilities during postulated severe nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Y.F.

    1993-01-01

    Generic Letter 88-20, Supplement No. 1 (Ref. 1), issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested all licensees holding operating licenses and construction permits for nuclear power reactor facilities to perform Individual Plant Examinations (IPE) of their plant(s) for severe accident vulnerabilities and to submit the results to the Commission. This paper summarizes the major Front-End (Level-1 PRA) and Back-End (Level-2 PRA) insights gained from the Millstone Unit 1 (MP-1) IPE study. No major plant vulnerabilities have been identified from a Front-End perspective. The Back-End analysis, however, has identified two potential containment vulnerabilities during postulated events that progress beyond the Design Basis Accidents (DBAs), namely, (1) MP-1 is dominated by early source term releases that would occur within a six-hour time frame from time of accident initiation, or reactor trip, and (2) MP-1 containment is somewhat vulnerable to leak-type failure through the drywell head. As a result of the second finding, a recommendation currently under evaluation, has been made to increase the drywell head bolt's preload from 54 Kips to resist the containment design pressure value (62 psig)

  19. Financing nuclear projects. Case study: Unit 2 Cernavoda NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, T.; Pall, S.; Lebedev, A.; Dobrin, M.

    2003-01-01

    The implementation of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in a country is a major undertaking for all entities involved, due to the necessity of planning work and co-ordination of the implementation process of the different fields of interest, starting with the governmental authorities and ending with the people. Having in view the specific investment cost (relatively high) for a NPP, to find an adequate financing structure is possible through an iterative process that involves first an assessment of the technical performances of the project and second, the mathematical modelling of the financing structure effects on the project. In this respect, the paper proposed will be focused on the main steps needed in order to promote an investment project in nuclear field, starting with the decision phase, providing the documentations requested by the local and international authorities to promote the project and ending with the negotiation of the contracts (commercial contract, financing contract, power purchase contract, etc.) The case study will be focused on the phases achieved in order to promote the Unit 2 Cernavoda NPP completion works project. (author)

  20. Disarmament verification and its contribution to the theory of international control: A legal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayed Anwar Abou Ali.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the Deputy Director of the Department of International Organizations in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Egypt, discusses the legal aspects related to the international control for verification of disarmament

  1. Nuclear arms control in the post-Cold War era. New conditions, new requirements, and nonproliferation (with special emphasis on Japan and East Asia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Ryukichi

    1994-01-01

    The paper starts with a general survey of post-Cold War nuclear disarmament, pointing out Japan's positions, policies, and problems in the process. The discussion is not Japan-centered, nor is it an explanation of the Japanese view. It is useful, in this context, to recall that during the Cold War period, Japan was firmly in the ''Western Camp'', relying on the protection of the extended nuclear deterrence provided by the United States. This article is written with that history very much in mind, and by an author who for some years was in a position to represent Japan in such a context. (orig./DG)

  2. Disarmament: preserving heritage, re-launching enterprise. The quarrel between ancients and moderns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahan, P.

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of new threats and the progress of proliferation of weapons of mass destruction raises several questions about the future of multilateral disarmament and the about all these treaties which have built up the architecture of the international security. This article analyzes the possibilities of preserving this heritage through the search of a better efficiency of existing means and the re-launching of the disarmament and non-proliferation enterprises thanks to the search for a relevance goal. (J.S.)

  3. Interim reliability evaluation program: analysis of the Arkansas Nuclear One. Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, G.J.; Kunsman, D.M.; Bell, B.J.

    1982-06-01

    This report represents the results of the analysis of Arkansas Nuclear One (ANO) Unit 1 nuclear power plant which was performed as part of the Interim Reliability Evaluation Program (IREP). The IREP has several objectives, two of which are achieved by the analysis presented in this report. These objectives are: (1) the identification, in a preliminary way, of those accident sequences which are expected to dominate the public health and safety risks; and (2) the development of state-of-the-art plant system models which can be used as a foundation for subsequent, more intensive applications of probabilistic risk assessment. The primary methodological tools used in the analysis were event trees and fault trees. These tools were used to study core melt accidents initiated by loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) of six different break size ranges and eight different types of transients

  4. Nuclear design report for Yonggwang nuclear power plant unit 2 cycle 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, Sung Kyun; Choi, Gyoo Hwan; Lee, Ki Bog; Park, Sang Yoon

    1993-02-01

    This report presents nuclear design calculations for Cycle 7 of Yonggwang Unit 2. Information is given on fuel loading, power density distributions, reactivity coefficients, control rod worths and operational limits. In addition, the report contains all necessary data for the startup tests including predicted values for the comparison with the measured data. The reload consists of 64 KOFA's enriched by nominally 3.70 w/o U235. Among the KOFA's, 40 fuel assemblies contain gadolinia rods. The fuel assemblies in the core are arranged in a low leakage loading pattern. The cycle length of Cycle 7 amounts to 367 EFPD corresponding to a cycle burnup of 14770 MWD/MTU. (Author)

  5. Position paper on nuclear proliferation issues preventing nuclear proliferation. A duty for the nuclear community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, Pierre; Bonin, Bernard [ENS High Scientific Council, Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-06-15

    The production of electricity from nuclear power plants is widely seen today as having an increasing role to play in meeting global energy requirements in a sustainable manner. Conscious of the inherently sensitive nature of nuclear technology and materials the ENS-HSC (European Nuclear Society - High Scientific Council) is well aware that a severe safety, security, environmental or proliferation mishap stemming from nuclear energy anywhere in the world would undermine the potential for nuclear energy to contribute to the global energy supply and the minimization of harmful carbon emissions. While the safety of nuclear power plants has continuously improved over the last three decades, the same degree of success cannot be claimed when it comes to the achievements of the international community in stemming the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation. This unfortunate situation is due to both technical and political reasons. The European nuclear industry is committed to the exclusively peaceful use of nuclear energy and to export nuclear facilities and related materials, equipment and technology solely in accordance with relevant national export laws and regulations, Nuclear Suppliers Group guidelines and pertinent United Nations Security Council Resolutions. The ENS-HSC considers that, as a manifestation of their strong commitment to nonproliferation, it is important for the nuclear industry to pay special attention to and promote proliferation-resistant designs and to take IAEA safeguards requirements into account at the design stage. Preventing nuclear proliferation is primarily the responsibility of states but, as major stakeholders, the nuclear industry and scientific community should actively support nuclear disarmament as foreseen in the Non-Proliferation Treaty and measures necessary to strengthen the non-proliferation regime, particularly the international control of the flux of nuclear material and technology. (orig.)

  6. Position paper on nuclear proliferation issues preventing nuclear proliferation. A duty for the nuclear community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, Pierre; Bonin, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The production of electricity from nuclear power plants is widely seen today as having an increasing role to play in meeting global energy requirements in a sustainable manner. Conscious of the inherently sensitive nature of nuclear technology and materials the ENS-HSC (European Nuclear Society - High Scientific Council) is well aware that a severe safety, security, environmental or proliferation mishap stemming from nuclear energy anywhere in the world would undermine the potential for nuclear energy to contribute to the global energy supply and the minimization of harmful carbon emissions. While the safety of nuclear power plants has continuously improved over the last three decades, the same degree of success cannot be claimed when it comes to the achievements of the international community in stemming the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation. This unfortunate situation is due to both technical and political reasons. The European nuclear industry is committed to the exclusively peaceful use of nuclear energy and to export nuclear facilities and related materials, equipment and technology solely in accordance with relevant national export laws and regulations, Nuclear Suppliers Group guidelines and pertinent United Nations Security Council Resolutions. The ENS-HSC considers that, as a manifestation of their strong commitment to nonproliferation, it is important for the nuclear industry to pay special attention to and promote proliferation-resistant designs and to take IAEA safeguards requirements into account at the design stage. Preventing nuclear proliferation is primarily the responsibility of states but, as major stakeholders, the nuclear industry and scientific community should actively support nuclear disarmament as foreseen in the Non-Proliferation Treaty and measures necessary to strengthen the non-proliferation regime, particularly the international control of the flux of nuclear material and technology. (orig.)

  7. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff practice and procedure digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This Revision 9 of the fifth edition of the NRC Staff Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period from July 1, 1972 to September 30, 1990 interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2. This Revision 9 replaces in part earlier editions and revisions and includes appropriate changes reflecting the amendments to the Rules of Practice effective through September 30, 1990. This edition of the Digest was prepared by attorneys from Aspen Systems Corporation pursuant to Contract number 18-89-346. Persons using this Digest are placed on notice that it may not be used as an authoritative citation in support of any position before the Commission or any of its adjudicatory tribunals. Persons using this Digest are also placed on notice that it is intended for use only as an initial research tool, that it may, and likely does, contain errors, including errors in analysis and interpretation of decisions, and that the user should not rely on the Digest analyses and interpretations but must read, analyze and rely on the user's own analysis of the actual Commission, Appeal Board and Licensing Board decisions cited. Further, neither the United States, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Aspen Systems Corporation, nor any of their employees makes any expressed or implied warranty or assumes liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any material presented in the Digest. The Digest is roughly structured in accordance with the chronological sequence of the nuclear facility licensing process as set forth in Appendix A to 10 CFR Part 2. Those decisions which did not fit into that structure are dealt with in a section on general matters. Where appropriate, particular decisions are indexed under more than one heading. (JF)

  8. The United States nuclear regulatory commission license renewal process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holian, B.E.

    2009-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license renewal process establishes the technical and administrative requirements for the renewal of operating power plant licenses. Reactor ope-rating licenses were originally issued for 40 years and are allowed to be renewed. The review process for license renewal applications (L.R.A.) provides continued assurance that the level of safety provided by an applicant's current licensing basis is maintained for the period of extended operation. The license renewal review focuses on passive, long-lived structures and components of the plant that are subject to the effects of aging. The applicant must demonstrate that programs are in place to manage those aging effects. The review also verifies that analyses based on the current operating term have been evaluated and shown to be valid for the period of extended operation. The NRC has renewed the licenses for 52 reactors at 30 plant sites. Each applicant requested, and was granted, an extension of 20 years. Applications to renew the licenses of 20 additional reactors at 13 plant sites are under review. As license renewal is voluntary, the decision to seek license renewal and the timing of the application is made by the licensee. However, the NRC expects that, over time, essentially all U.S. operating reactors will request license renewal. In 2009, the U.S. has 4 plants that enter their 41. year of ope-ration. The U.S. Nuclear Industry has expressed interest in 'life beyond 60', that is, requesting approval of a second renewal period. U.S. regulations allow for subsequent license renewals. The NRC is working with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on research related to light water reactor sustainability. (author)

  9. Give up the nuclear deterrence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoyant, L.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear deterrence question is always today the subject of a large consensus in spite of the evolution of its creation conditions. Taking into account the proliferation risk, the France could play a role in the disarmament process including the whole renouncement to the nuclear deterrence. (A.L.B.)

  10. United States panel presentations[Nuclear power technology in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyea, J [National Audubon Society, New York, NY (United States)

    1990-07-01

    Before I begin I have to make a disclaimer. That is that I am going to be talking about public perception because I think that is very important. But I do not want to give the impression that I think the public is wrong. I happen to agree with the public's perception of nuclear power, and I want to make that clear. I do not like the current generation of nuclear plants as I have made clear in many statements that I have made. On the other hand, in the long term, I feel that we have only two choices on the supply side, and that is nuclear power and solar electricity. And although I think solar electricity has the best chance, I am realistic enough to know that technologies do not always work the way I want. And so I think it is necessary to have at least some kind of nuclear option available. On the other hand, I do not think just any kind of nuclear technology will do. I want to talk to you about the conditions that I think you have to take into account when you try to design reactors that are publicly acceptable. I look at this as an insurance policy. Again, I do not want to be misquoted: I think nuclear power should be considered as an insurance policy, not as our first line of defense. Having made those disclaimers, what we need to do is set out a problem statement. The problem statement I set out is, 'How could one design and demonstrate a nuclear reactor that would regain public confidence in the United States, if one chose to do that?' By regaining confidence, I mean regaining sufficient confidence to site reactors at a number of locations. It is a pretty heavy task because the public cannot judge the technical issues. They have to judge the players by their characters and their histories, just as the way we calibrate anyone that knows things that we do not. I have three theses that I think are crucial. The first is that people do not believe in the claims of advocates, of any point of view, not just nuclear power, once the advocates have been proved wrong on

  11. The nuclear threat, ethics and Pugwash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.B.

    1999-01-01

    When nuclear weapon states had succeeded in guaranteeing their continued, unchallenged, monopoly on the possession of nuclear weapons in the negotiations for a Comprehensive Test Ban, the process of achieving nuclear disarmament was slowed down. Fortunately when some 60 retired generals and admirals from all over the world called for elimination of nuclear weapons there arose some hope. The role of Pugwash movement concerning disarmament an be concisely formulated by the following oath: I will not use my scientific training for any purpose which I believe is intended to harm human beings; I shall strive for peace, justice, freedom and the betterment of the human condition

  12. 75 FR 8757 - Nebraska Public Power District, Cooper Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Notice of Availability of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ..., Cooper Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplement 41 to the Generic... Renewal of Cooper Nuclear Station, Unit 1 Notice is hereby given that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory... operating license DPR-46 for an additional 20 years of operation for Cooper Nuclear Station, Unit 1 (CNS-1...

  13. United States nuclear regulatory commission program for inspection of decommissioning nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, P.W.

    2001-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC or Commission) has been inspecting decommissioning commercial nuclear power plants in the United States (U.S.) since the first such facility permanently shutdown in September 1967. Decommissioning inspections have principally focused on the safe storage and maintenance of spent reactor fuel; occupational radiation exposure; environmental radiological releases; the dismantlement and decontamination of structures, systems, and components identified to contain or potentially contain licensed radioactive material; and the performance of final radiological survey of the site and remaining structures to support termination of the USNRC-issued operating license. Over the last 5 years, USNRC inspection effort in these areas has been assessed and found to provide reasonable confidence that decommissioning can be conducted safely and in accordance with Commission rules and regulations. Recently, the staff has achieved a better understanding of the risks associated with particular decommissioning accidents 1 and plans to apply these insights to amendments proposed to enhance decommissioning rules and regulations. The probabilities, scenarios, and conclusions resulting from this effort are being assessed as to their applicability to the inspection of decommissioning commercial power reactors. (author)

  14. United States nuclear regulatory commission program for inspection of decommissioning nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, P.W. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC or Commission) has been inspecting decommissioning commercial nuclear power plants in the United States (U.S.) since the first such facility permanently shutdown in September 1967. Decommissioning inspections have principally focused on the safe storage and maintenance of spent reactor fuel; occupational radiation exposure; environmental radiological releases; the dismantlement and decontamination of structures, systems, and components identified to contain or potentially contain licensed radioactive material; and the performance of final radiological survey of the site and remaining structures to support termination of the USNRC-issued operating license. Over the last 5 years, USNRC inspection effort in these areas has been assessed and found to provide reasonable confidence that decommissioning can be conducted safely and in accordance with Commission rules and regulations. Recently, the staff has achieved a better understanding of the risks associated with particular decommissioning accidents 1 and plans to apply these insights to amendments proposed to enhance decommissioning rules and regulations. The probabilities, scenarios, and conclusions resulting from this effort are being assessed as to their applicability to the inspection of decommissioning commercial power reactors. (author)

  15. Nuclear power. Its development in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pocock, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    The subject is covered chronologically in chapters, entitled: from war to peace; the Atomic Energy Authority and the first nuclear power station; a civil power programme; Windscale - the need for caution; research for the future; the new (Magnox) power stations; revision of the nuclear power programme; supply of nuclear fuels; nuclear power for ship propulsion; completion of first programme; Dungeness B and second programme, political assessment of (nuclear) industry's structure; reorganization of the industry; nuclear power in the environment; completion of second programme; the energy crisis; decision on third programme. (U.K.)

  16. 76 FR 69120 - Regulatory Changes To Implement the United States/Australian Agreement for Peaceful Nuclear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... Government of the United States of America Concerning Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy'' (the Agreement). The... applicable requirements. Environmental Assessment: Finding of No Significant Environmental Impact The NRC has... and the Government of the United States of America Concerning Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy, dated...

  17. Perspectives on NATO Nuclear Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunn, Simon [Royal United Services Institute for Defense and Security Studies - RUSI, Whitehall, London, SW1A 2ET (United Kingdom); Larsen, Jeffrey [Larsen Consulting Group, 3710 Woodland Dr Ste 2100, Anchorage, AK 99517 (United States); Yost, David [Naval Postgraduate School, 1 University Circle, Monterey, CA 93943 (United States); Kamp, Karl-Heinz [NATO Defense College, Via Giorgio Pelosi 1, 00143, Roma (Italy); Edelman, Eric [Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments - CSBA, 1667 K Sreet NW, Suite 900, Washington, DC, 20006 (United States); Valasek, Tomas [Centre for European Reform - CER, 14 Great College Street, Westminster, London, SW1P 3RX (United Kingdom); Garcia Cantalapiedra, David [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-05-26

    NATO will shortly revisit the question of its nuclear policy and posture as part of the ongoing deterrence and defense posture review (DDPR). This assessment of its nuclear requirements will be take place against the background of two parallel and potentially competing commitments: first, the general support for the goal of reducing and eventually eliminating nuclear weapons with the related question of how NATO should contribute to this goal; second, the commitment that in considering the role of nuclear weapons the priority for NATO members is the maintenance of solidarity and cohesion and the consequent determination that decisions on nuclear policy will be taken by the Alliance collectively. There are forcefully expressed arguments on both sides of the debate over whether to maintain or eliminate the remaining arsenal of U.S. nuclear weapons assigned to NATO. On the one hand, they provide coupling, transatlantic links, military capabilities against an uncertain future, and risk and burden sharing. On the other, some allies see benefits to further reductions in the remaining arsenal in the cause of global disarmament. This study presents first the questions and issues for NATO and the future alternatives for NATO nuclear policy. Then, the views from United States, Germany, Turkey, Central and Eastern Europe, Italy and Spain are successively reviewed

  18. Perspectives on NATO Nuclear Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunn, Simon; Larsen, Jeffrey; Yost, David; Kamp, Karl-Heinz; Edelman, Eric; Valasek, Tomas; Garcia Cantalapiedra, David

    2011-01-01

    NATO will shortly revisit the question of its nuclear policy and posture as part of the ongoing deterrence and defense posture review (DDPR). This assessment of its nuclear requirements will be take place against the background of two parallel and potentially competing commitments: first, the general support for the goal of reducing and eventually eliminating nuclear weapons with the related question of how NATO should contribute to this goal; second, the commitment that in considering the role of nuclear weapons the priority for NATO members is the maintenance of solidarity and cohesion and the consequent determination that decisions on nuclear policy will be taken by the Alliance collectively. There are forcefully expressed arguments on both sides of the debate over whether to maintain or eliminate the remaining arsenal of U.S. nuclear weapons assigned to NATO. On the one hand, they provide coupling, transatlantic links, military capabilities against an uncertain future, and risk and burden sharing. On the other, some allies see benefits to further reductions in the remaining arsenal in the cause of global disarmament. This study presents first the questions and issues for NATO and the future alternatives for NATO nuclear policy. Then, the views from United States, Germany, Turkey, Central and Eastern Europe, Italy and Spain are successively reviewed

  19. Nuclear Strategy and World Order: The United States Imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beres, Louis Rene

    The current U.S. nuclear strategy goes beyond the legitimate objective of survivable strategic forces to active preparation for nuclear war. The Reagan administration strategy rejects minimum deterrence and prepares for a nuclear war that might be protracted and controlled. The strategy reflects the understanding that a combination of counterforce…

  20. Nuclear war-fighting strategy for the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martel, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    This dissertation concerns a strategy for fighting and winning a nuclear war. Despite the conventional wisdom that nuclear war is suicidal and occurs only as a result of irrationality, this study analyzes nuclear war as a rational policy option. It is necessary to suggest the radical proposition that nuclear war, like traditional military campaigns, is a political action. Thus, nuclear war can be in the national interest. Further, the countervalue strategy of Mutually Assured Destruction is questioned because city destruction serves no conceivable political or military objective

  1. United States Department of Energy Nuclear Materials Stewardship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy launched the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in January 2000 to accelerate the work of achieving integration and cutting long-term costs associated with the management of the Department's nuclear materials, with the principal focus on excess materials. Management of nuclear materials is a fundamental and enduring responsibility that is essential to meeting the Department's national security, nonproliferation, energy, science, and environmental missions into the distant future. The effective management of nuclear materials is important for a set of reasons: (1) some materials are vital to our national defense; (2) the materials pose physical and security risks; (3) managing them is costly; and (4) costs are likely to extend well into the future. The Department currently manages nuclear materials under eight programs, with offices in 36 different locations. Through the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative, progress was during calendar year 20 00 in achieving better coordination and integration of nuclear materials management responsibilities and in evaluating opportunities to further coordinate and integrate cross-program responsibilities for the treatment, storage, and disposition of excess nuclear materials. During CY 2001 the Departmental approach to nuclear materials stewardship changed consistent with the business processes followed by the new administration. This paper reports on the progress of the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in evaluating and implementing these opportunities, and the remaining challenges in integrating the long-term management of nuclear materials

  2. Nuclear power and deregulation in the United Kingdom. Chapter 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.

    2001-01-01

    This article (Chapter Three) reviews the development of the British nuclear industry and the country's experience with privatised and liberalized electricity markets - an experience that is much earlier than Canada's. The U.K. industry is of special interest because a British firm, British Energy, has leased the Bruce A and B nuclear stations until 2018. This article tries to explain how the economic transformation of nuclear power has been achieved, and why nuclear power and a competitive electricity market are so hard to reconcile. The article gives a brief history of nuclear power in Britain up to 1987; a summary of the main events relating to nuclear power; a discussion of why nuclear power could not be privatised in 1990, but could be in 1996; examines the improvements in cost and competitiveness since 1990; a discussion of the issues surrounding the discharge of nuclear liabilities; the future for British Energy, Britain's leading nuclear company, and nuclear power in Britain; and finally, changes to other nuclear companies in Britain

  3. The future of the NPT and measures to reduce nuclear dangers in the age of Trump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Daryl G.

    2017-11-01

    Through the decades, the international nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation enterprise, though imperfect, has curbed nuclear proliferation and limited the number of nuclear-armed states to nine, forced reductions in major-power nuclear arsenals, ended nuclear testing by all but one state, and created an informal taboo against nuclear weapons use.

  4. An example of a United States Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    Under the likely scenario in which public support for nuclear energy remains low and fossil fuels continue to be abundant and cheap, government supported nuclear research centers must adapt their missions to ensure that they tackle problems of current significance. It will be critical to be multidisciplinary, to generate economic value, and to apply nuclear competencies to current problems. Addressing problems in nuclear safety, D and D, nuclear waste management, nonproliferation, isotope production are a few examples of current needs in the nuclear arena. Argonne's original mission, to develop nuclear reactor technology, was a critical need for the U.S. in 1946. It would be wise to recognize that this mission was a special instance of a more general one--to apply unique human and physical capital to long term, high risk technology development in response to society's needs. International collaboration will enhance the collective chances for success as the world moves into the 21st century

  5. Third Party Nuclear Liability: The Case of a Supplier in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, A.; Heffron, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    The law surrounding third party nuclear liability is important to all parties in the nuclear supply chain whether they are providing decommissioning services, project management expertise or a new reactor. This paper examines third party nuclear liability, and in particular, in relation to a Supplier in the nuclear energy sector in the United Kingdom (UK). The term “Supplier” is used in this paper and, depending on the context, is intended to cover all parties in the supply chain providing se...

  6. The nuclear energy in the United Kingdom; L'energie nucleaire au Royaume-Uni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-02-15

    With challenges like the climatic change, the hydrocarbons prices increase and the energy supply security, the nuclear park is becoming a decisive and an urgent question in the United Kingdom. The author proposes an historical aspect of the nuclear energy in UK, the actors of the today nuclear industry and the technologies used in 2006, the radioactive wastes management, the programs of the future and the british opinion on the nuclear. (A.L.B.)

  7. IAEA verification of weapon-origin fissile material in the Russian Federation and the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Secretary of Energy of the United States, Spencer Abraham, Minister of the Russian Federation on Atomic Energy, Alexander Rumyantsev, and Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Mohamed ElBaradei, met in Vienna on 18 September 2001 to review progress on the Trilateral Initiative. The Initiative was launched in 1996 to develop a new IAEA verification system for weapon-origin material designated by the United States and the Russian Federation as released from their defence programmes. The removal of weapon-origin fissile material from the defence programmes of the Russian Federation and the United States is in furtherance of the commitment to disarmament undertaken by the two States pursuant to Article VI of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). IAEA verification under this Initiative is intended to promote international confidence that fissile material made subject by either of the two States to Agency verification remains irreversibly removed from nuclear weapon programmes

  8. Consistent adoption of the International System of Units (SI) in nuclear science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klumpar, J; Kovar, Z [Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Prague. Laborator Radiologicke Dozimetrie; Sacha, J [Slovenska Akademia Vied, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Fyzikalny Ustav

    1975-11-01

    The principles are stressed behind a consistent introduction of the International System of Units (SI) in Czechoslovakia complying with the latest edition of the Czechoslovak Standard CSN 01 1300 on the prescribed system of national and international units. The use of special and auxiliary units in nuclear physics and technology is discussed, particular attention being devoted to the units of activity and to the time units applied in radiology. Conversion graph and tables are annexed.

  9. Nuclear design report for Yonggwang nuclear power plant unit 4 cycle 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chan Oh; Park, Sang Yoon; Yoo, Choon Sung; Ryu, Hyo Sang; Park, Jin Ha; Cho, Young Chul; Song, Jae Woong; Lee Chung Chan.

    1996-10-01

    This report presents nuclear design calculations for Cycle 2 of Yonggwang Unit 4. Information is given on fuel loading, power density distributions, reactivity coefficients, control rod worths, and operational limits. In addition, the report contains necessary data for the startup tests and for the assurance of shutdown margin during reactor operation. The reload core consists of 48 fresh KSFAs. Among the 48 fresh KSFAs, 32 fuel assemblies contain burnable poison rods. The fuel assemblies in the core are arranged in a low leakage loading pattern. The cycle length of Cycle 2 amounts to 275 EFPD corresponding to a cycle burnup of 10,100 MWD/MTU. (author). 31 tabs., 92 figs., 7 refs

  10. Nuclear design report for Yonggwang nuclear power plant unit 3 cycle 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zee, Sung Kyun; Song, Jae Woong; Song, Jae Seung; Park, Sang Yoon; Yoo, Choon Sung; Baek, Byung Chan; Ryu, Hyo Sang; Park, Jin Ha; Cho, Young Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    This report presents nuclear design calculations for Cycle 2 of Yonggwang Unit 3. Information is given on fuel loading, power density distributions, reactivity coefficients, control rod worths, and operational limits. In addition, the report contains necessary data for the startup tests and for the assurance of shutdown margin during reactor operation. The reload core consists of 48 fresh Korean Standard Fuel Assemblies (KSFAs)and 129 burned KSFAs. Among the 48 fresh KSFAs, 32 fuel assemblies contain burnable poison rods. The fuel assemblies in the core are arranged in a low leakage loading pattern. The cycle length of Cycle 2 amounts to 276 EFPD corresponding to a cycle burnup of 10,160 MWD/MTU. 95 figs., 31 tabs., 7 refs. (Author) .new.

  11. Nuclear design report for Ulchin nuclear power plant unit 1, cycle 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Rae; Park, Yong soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-04-01

    This report presents nuclear design calculations for Cycle 7 of Ulchin Unit 1. Information is given on fuel loading, power density distributions, reactivity coefficients, control rod worths and operational limits. In addition, the report contains all necessary data for the startup tests including predicted values for the comparison with the measured data. The reload consists of 56 KOFA`s enriched by nominally 4.00 w/o U{sub 235}. Among the KOFA`s 36 fuel assemblies contain gadolinia rods. The fuel assemblies in the core are arranged in a low leakage loading pattern. The cycle length of Cycle 7 amounts to 355 EFPD corresponding to a cycle burnup of 14280 MWD/MTU. (Author) 8 refs., 55 figs., 21 tabs.

  12. Nuclear design report for Kori nuclear power plant unit 4 cycle 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zee, Sung Kyoon; Jung, Yil Sub; Kim, Si Yung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-01

    This report presents nuclear design calculations for cycle 8 of Kori unit 4. Information is given on fuel loading, power density distributions, reactivity coefficients, control rod worths and operational limits. In addition, the report contains all necessary data for the startup tests including predicted values for the comparison with the measured data. The reload consists of 76 KOFA`s enriched by nominally 3.70 w/o U{sub 235}. Among the KOFA`s 48 fuel assemblies contain gadolinia rods. The fuel assemblies in the core are arranged in a low leakage loading pattern. The cycle length of cycle 8 amounts to 421 EFPD corresponding to a cycle burnup of 16950 MWD/MTU. (Author) 8 refs., 55 figs., 17 tabs.

  13. Nuclear design report for Ulchin nuclear power plant unit 2 cycle 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Ha; Park, Yong Soo; Cho, Byeong Ho; Zee, Sung Kyun; Lee, Sang Keun; Ahn, Dawk Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-09-01

    This report presents nuclear design calculations for cycle 5 of Ulchin unit it 2. Information is given on fuel loading, power density distributions, reactivity coefficients, control rod worths and operational limits. In addition, the report contains all necessary data for the startup tests including predicted values for the comparison with the measured data. The reload consists of 48 KOFA`s enriched by nominally 3.50 w/o U{sub 235}. Among the KOFA`s, 20 fuel assemblies contain gadolinia rods. The fuel assemblies in the core are arranged in a low leakage loading pattern. The cycle length of cycle 5 amounts to 293 EFPD corresponding to a cycle burnup of 11780 MWD/MTU. (Author) 8 refs., 55 figs., 16 tabs.

  14. Nuclear design report for Kori nuclear power plant unit 1, cycle 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zee, Sung Kyun; Moon, Bok Ja; Cho, Byeong Ho; Jung, Yil Sup [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-04-01

    This report presents nuclear design calculations for cycle 13 of Kori unit 1. Information is given on fuel loading, power density distributions, reactivity coefficients, control rod worths and operational limits. In addition, the report contains all necessary data for the startup tests including predicted values for the comparison with the measured data. The reload consists of 44 KOFA`s enriched by nominally 3.70 w/o U{sub 235}. Among the KOFA`s, 16 fuel assemblies contain gadolinia rods. The fuel assemblies in the core are arranged in a low leakage loading pattern. The cycle length of cycle 13 amounts to 355 EFPD corresponding to a cycle burnup of 13240 MWD/MTU. (Author) 8 refs., 55 figs., 16 tabs.

  15. Nuclear design report for Yonggwang nuclear power plant unit 1 cycle 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young chul; Kim, Jae Hak; Song, Jae Woong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-03-01

    This report presents nuclear design calculations for Cycle 6 of Yonggwng Unit 1. Information is given on fuel loading, power density distributions, reactivity coefficients, control rod worths and operational limits. In addition, the report contains all necessary data for the startup tests including predicted values for the comparison with the measured data. The reload consists of 76 KOFA`s enriched by nominally 4.00 w/o U{sub 235}. Among the KOFA`s, 60 fuel assemblies contain gadolinia rods. The fuel assemblies in the core are arranged in a low leakage loading pattern. The cycle length of Cycle 9 amounts to 434 EFPD corresponding to a cycle burnup of 17470 MWD/MTU. (Author) 8 refs., 55 figs., 19 tabs.

  16. Nuclear design report for Ulchin nuclear power plant unit 1, cycle 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zee, Sung Kyun; Kim, Yong Rae; Park, Yong Soo; Cho, Byeong Ho; Lee, Sang Keun; Ahn, Dawk Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-01

    This report presents nuclear design calculations for cycle 6 of Ulchin unit 1. Information is given on fuel loading, power density distributions, reactivity coefficients, control rod worths and operational limits. In addition, the report contains all necessary data for the startup tests including predicted values for the comparison with the measured data. The reload consists of 64 KOFA`s enriched by nominally 3.70 w/o U{sub 235}. Among the KOFA`s, 32 fuel assemblies contain gadolinia rods. The fuel assemblies in the core are arranged in a low leakage loading pattern. The cycle length of cycle 6 amounts to 369 EFPD corresponding to a cycle burnup of 14850 MWD/MTU. (Author) 8 refs., 55 figs., 17 tabs.

  17. Nuclear design report for Ulchin nuclear power plant unit 2, cycle 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chan Oh; Park, Jin Ha; Kim, Yong Rae; Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Jong Chul; Baik, Joo Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-08-01

    This report presents nuclear design calculations for cycle 6 of Ulchin unit 2. Information is given on fuel loading, power density distributions, reactivity coefficients, control rod worths and operational limits. In addition, the report contains all necessary data for the startup tests including predicted values for the comparison with the measured data. The reload consists of 64 KOFA`s enriched by nominally 3.80 w/o U{sub 235}. Among the KOFA`s, 36 fuel assemblies contain gadolinia rods. The fuel assemblies in the core are arranged in a low leakage loading pattern. The cycle length of cycle 6 amounts to 388 EFPD corresponding to a cycle burnup of 15610 MWD/MTU. (Author) 8 refs., 55 figs., 17 tabs.

  18. Nuclear design report for Ulchin nuclear power plant unit 2 cycle 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Ha; Park, Yong Soo; Cho, Byeong Ho; Zee, Sung Kyun; Lee, Sang Keun; Ahn, Dawk Hwan

    1993-09-01

    This report presents nuclear design calculations for cycle 5 of Ulchin unit it 2. Information is given on fuel loading, power density distributions, reactivity coefficients, control rod worths and operational limits. In addition, the report contains all necessary data for the startup tests including predicted values for the comparison with the measured data. The reload consists of 48 KOFA's enriched by nominally 3.50 w/o U 235 . Among the KOFA's, 20 fuel assemblies contain gadolinia rods. The fuel assemblies in the core are arranged in a low leakage loading pattern. The cycle length of cycle 5 amounts to 293 EFPD corresponding to a cycle burnup of 11780 MWD/MTU. (Author) 8 refs., 55 figs., 16 tabs

  19. Nuclear design report for Yonggwang nuclear power plant unit 1, cycle 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Chul; Kim, Jae Hak; Park, Sang Yoon; Zee, Sung Kyun; Lee, Sang Keun; Ahn, Dawk Hwan

    1993-10-01

    This report presents nuclear design calculations for cycle 8 of Kori unit 1. Information is given on fuel loading, power density distributions, reactivity coefficients, control rod worths and operational limits. In addition, the report contains all necessary data for the startup tests including predicted values for the comparison with the measured data. The reload consists of 76 KOFA's enriched by nominally 3.70 w/o U 235 . Among the KOFA's, 56 fuel assemblies contain gadolinia rods. The fuel assemblies in the core are arranged in a low leakage loading pattern. The cycle length of cycle 8 amounts to 447 EFPD corresponding to a cycle burnup of 18020 MWD/MTU. (Author) 8 refs., 39 figs., 17 tabs

  20. Nuclear design report for Yonggwang nuclear power plant unit 1, cycle 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Chul; Kim, Jae Hak; Park, Sang Yoon; Zee, Sung Kyun; Lee, Sang Keun; Ahn, Dawk Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-10-01

    This report presents nuclear design calculations for cycle 8 of Kori unit 1. Information is given on fuel loading, power density distributions, reactivity coefficients, control rod worths and operational limits. In addition, the report contains all necessary data for the startup tests including predicted values for the comparison with the measured data. The reload consists of 76 KOFA`s enriched by nominally 3.70 w/o U{sub 235}. Among the KOFA`s, 56 fuel assemblies contain gadolinia rods. The fuel assemblies in the core are arranged in a low leakage loading pattern. The cycle length of cycle 8 amounts to 447 EFPD corresponding to a cycle burnup of 18020 MWD/MTU. (Author) 8 refs., 39 figs., 17 tabs.

  1. Abstracts of 3. congress of global anti-nuclear alliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The 3 congress of global anti-nuclear alliance was held on 18-20 May, 2000 in Astana. There were 55 reports on different aspects of nuclear disarmament; nuclear safeguards; safe operation of nuclear power plants; rehabilitation of population and lands, damaged from many-years tests in Semipalatinsk site; radiobiological monitoring of ecosystems and others presented at the congress

  2. Safety aspects of nuclear plants coupled with seawater desalination units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this publication is to address the safety and licensing aspects of nuclear power plants for which a significant portion of the heat energy produced by the reactor is intended for use in heat utilization applications. Although intended to cover the broad spectrum of nuclear heat applications, the focus of the discussion will be the desalination of sea water using nuclear power plants as the energy source for the desalination process

  3. Comparison of nuclear cardiology in the United States and Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.; Giubbini, R.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear Cardiology is a widely available and a widely accepted tool for diagnosis and management of coronary artery disease both in the US and in Europe. Although the most common indications for nuclear studies are similar in the US and Europe, different social and economical environments may affect the practice of Nuclear Cardiology. The aim of this paper is to identify key issues and to provide some information on the similarities and differences which characterize the practice of Nuclear Cardiology in the US and Europe. This paper takes into account the training requirements, the relationships between different professional societies, the accessibility, the choice of imaging protocols, tracers and stressors, the impact of managed care and the role of cardiologists, nuclear physicians and technologists in nuclear labs. The economical differences which may affect the field of high technology, imply a wide range of variability concerning the availability of nuclear cardiology studies in different countries (1:1/10). Moreover the legislation which regulates the practice of nuclear medicine may differ from country. Thus in our opinion there are several important factors both in the US and Europe limiting the development of nuclear cardiology independently of its intrinsic clinical value

  4. United-States: the forefront of new nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc, B.

    2015-01-01

    In the U.S. there are about 50 enterprises developing new concepts in the nuclear sector specially in power production (smaller reactors) and waste management. These enterprises require important technological and financial means to engage experts and build prototypes so U.S. authorities have developed a platform named GAIN (Gateway for Accelerated Innovation on Nuclear) for providing technological support and financing. The American Department of Energy (DoE) will keep on financing research in the nuclear sector. The American 2016 finance law provides a 9% increase for financing nuclear programmes. Research on Small Modular Reactors (SMR) with a power output ranging from 50 to 300 MW will be favored.

  5. Changing prospects for nuclear energy in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, H.F.

    2005-01-01

    'President Bush is the most pro-nuclear President since Eisenhower.' These are the words of Clay Sell, a fellow Texan and the recently appointed Deputy Secretary of Energy at last week's American Nuclear Society meeting in San Diego. Greenpeace founder Patrick Moore recently testified before Congress, saying 'There is now a great deal of scientific evidence showing nuclear power to be an environmentally sound and safe choice.' There is bi-partisan congressional support of financial incentives for U.S. industry to invest in technologies that will produce energy without producing large amounts of greenhouse gases - and at long last nuclear's role has been recognized. The improving situation in the U.S. is dynamic; all that I can do here today is to provide a snapshot of the evolving outlook for nuclear energy. If you will bear with me, I will try to highlight what is going on in the U.S. power industry, R and D, education, nuclear policy, space exploration and of course the American Nuclear Society. As most of you know, the outlook for the U.S. nuclear program in the late 1990's was bleak. Most energy analysts were predicting that plants would shut down at the end of their license period. The Advanced Light Water Reactor Program was completed in the mid-1990's. Most prognosticators figured that these evolutionary reactor designs would not be built in the U.S. At best, would be built offshore, in Asia and the Pacific Rim. Nuclear engineering education programs faced declining enrollments. Both the programs and their research reactors were being closed. At the same time, the Government's investment in nuclear energy research and development declined officially to zero, kept alive only under the guise of necessary nuclear waste management R and D. But what a difference just a few years can make. (author)

  6. Environmental Impact Assessment for Olkiluoto 4 Nuclear Power Plant Unit in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dersten, Riitta; Gahmberg, Sini; Takala, Jenni

    2008-01-01

    In order to improve its readiness for constructing additional production capacity, Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO) initiated in spring 2007 the environmental impact assessment procedure (EIA procedure) concerning a new nuclear power plant unit that would possibly be located at Olkiluoto. When assessing the environmental impacts of the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant extension project, the present state of the environment was first examined, and after that, the changes caused by the projects as well as their significance were assessed, taking into account the combined impacts of the operations at Olkiluoto. The environmental impact assessment for the planned nuclear power plant unit covers the entire life cycle of the plant unit. (authors)

  7. Environmental Impact Assessment for Olkiluoto 4 Nuclear Power Plant Unit in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dersten, Riitta; Gahmberg, Sini; Takala, Jenni [Teollisuuden Voima Oyj, Olkiluoto, FI-27160 Eurajoki (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    In order to improve its readiness for constructing additional production capacity, Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO) initiated in spring 2007 the environmental impact assessment procedure (EIA procedure) concerning a new nuclear power plant unit that would possibly be located at Olkiluoto. When assessing the environmental impacts of the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant extension project, the present state of the environment was first examined, and after that, the changes caused by the projects as well as their significance were assessed, taking into account the combined impacts of the operations at Olkiluoto. The environmental impact assessment for the planned nuclear power plant unit covers the entire life cycle of the plant unit. (authors)

  8. Nuclear technology and ecology in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisch, R.R.; Vance, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents to the worldwide nuclear community the challenge of how to gain maximum ecological benefit with limited resources. The remediation of current environmental contamination and minimizing of future damage to the environment is a worthy cause. The cost of remediation projects at nuclear facilities and problems due to wastes being mixed and not just hazardous are discussed

  9. Subsidence analysis Forsmark nuclear power plant - unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bono, Nancy; Fredriksson, Anders; Maersk Hansen, Lars

    2010-12-01

    On behalf of SKB, Golder Associates Ltd carried out a risk analysis of subsidence during Forsmark nuclear power plant in the construction of the final repository for spent nuclear fuel near and below existing reactors. Specifically, the effect of horizontal cracks have been studied

  10. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff practice and procedure digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This document contains procedures for review by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for reviewing and deciding on matters pertaining to nuclear power plant licensing. Also, contained within the document are decisions the Commission has made between July 1972 to September 1989. (F.S.D.)

  11. Nuclear export criteria and controls in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapar, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the export licensing procedure and the modifications made to it under the 1978 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act (NNPA) to achieve greater control over exports of nuclear material and facilities. Export licences from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are now required for certain items connected with nuclear plant construction and the procedure for obtaining the views of the Executive Branch have been formalised. The President is enabled to override the denial of an export licence by the NRC. Amongst the new criteria on the export licensing procedure added to the 1954 Atomic Energy Act, the NNPA provides that the IAEA Safeguards under the Non-Proliferation Treaty are applicable to exported nuclear material or facilities, together with adequate physical protection measures. (NEA) [fr

  12. Situation and development trend of nuclear power and uranium industry in the united states and Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Chenglong

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the situation, trend of nuclear electrical and uranium industry in the United States and Russia. The United States and Russia are the two biggest countries in the world which generated nuclear power earliest. After 40 years' development, nuclear power in the United States and Russia are approximately 20%, 11% respectively of the total generation capacity in 2001. In the United States, only 6% of the nuclear power consumed uranium resource is domestic, in Russia about half of its uranium production is for export. Due to the collision between the energy development and environment protection, nuclear power in USA is still strong, but the uranium industry declines. In the future, uranium production for nuclear power in the United States will depend on the international market and the uranium storage of different levels. On the basis of pacifying people and making the country prosper, Russia has established their great plans for nuclear power with their substantial uranium resources. The author considers the supply and demand of uranium industry will remain balanced in the future decade on the whole, despite the United States and Russia's trend of uranium industry could take a major effect on uranium industry to the world. (authors)

  13. Nuclear hydrogen production programme in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sink, C.

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) is focused on demonstrating the economic, commercial-scale production of hydrogen using process heat derived from nuclear energy. NHI-supported research has concentrated to date on three technologies compatible with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP): high temperature steam electrolysis (HTE); sulphur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical; and hybrid sulphur (HyS) thermochemical. In 2009 NHI will down select to a single technology on which to focus its future development efforts, for which the next step will be a pilot-scale experiment. (author)

  14. The United States nuclear liability regime under the Price-Anderson Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, O. F.

    2011-01-01

    The 1958 U. S. Price-Anderson Act created the worlds first national nuclear liability regime. It now provides US $12,6 Billion of nuclear liability coverage for the 104 nuclear power plants in the United States, by far the highest monetary coverage of any nuclear liability regime in the world. Each power plant operator provides nuclear hazards coverage for anyone liable through a combination of private insurance from the American nuclear insurance pool (now US$ 375 million) and a retrospective assessment (now US$111,9 million per power plant per incident plus 5 percent for claims and costs). The United States in 2008 ratified the International Atomic Energy Agency's Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC). and is promoting it as the basis for a more global nuclear liability regime uniting States that are party to the Vienna Convention or the Paris Convention, or have a domestic law consistent with the CSC Annex. The CSC Annex was written to grad father the Price-Anderson Acts economic channeling of liability to the installation operator. The omnibus feature of Price-Anderson is similar to the legal channeling of all liability to the installation operator under the international nuclear liability conventions and domestic laws of many other countries. The Price-Anderson system (like the Vienna and Paris Conventions) does not provide liability coverage for nuclear damage to or loss of use of on-site property. (Author)

  15. “Many Countries Will Have the Bomb: There Will Be Hell”: Edoardo Amaldi and the Italian Physicists Committed to Disarmament, Arms Control and Détente

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavarino, Lodovica

    2017-01-01

    The chapter analyzes Edoardo Amaldi’s commitment to disarmament and détente in Italy during the Cold War and in particular during the debate about the signing of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). Amaldi (1908-1989) can be considered one of the leading Italian scientists involved in the national and international campaign against nuclear proliferation. In the mid-1960s, a strong civil commitment began to emerge among physicists, as they claimed a voice in Italian security policy, in order to increase public opinion’s awareness about the dangers of the nuclear age and to promote Italian accession to the NPT. While it is difficult to assess to what extent Italian scientists’ efforts in favor of arms control succeeded in influencing Italian politics during the Cold War, their strong involvement in their country’s security policy is in itself a relevant issue for the history of the Italian nuclear experience.

  16. Nuclear power in the United Arab Emirates: Legal framework and regulatory cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasquez-Maignan, X.

    2012-01-01

    As part of a decision to diversify its energy mix, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) has begun construction of its first nuclear power plant. In that context, it has also taken a number of important steps to integrate itself into the international regime for nuclear safety: adoption of the UAE's Federal Law No. 6 of 2009 on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, establishment of the Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation (FANR), establishment of the Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation (ENEC), awarding of the first contract for nuclear power plants in the UAE, etc. The UAE nuclear liability regime is then presented, with details on the basic principles that form the foundation of the nuclear liability conventions, followed by the participation of the FANR in the Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) in September 2012

  17. Economic impacts of electricity liberalization on the status of nuclear power generation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Toru

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the economic impact of electricity liberalization on the status of nuclear power generation in the United States. Nuclear power plants have been treated equally with other types of power plants in the liberalized electricity market. The existing nuclear power plants were thought to be competitive in liberalized wholesale electricity market. Competitive pressure from the market also facilitated efficiency improvement among the existing nuclear power plants. Although it was difficult to build new reactor, the U.S. nuclear power generators expanded capacity through up rates. In recent years, however, nuclear power plants suffer from the decline in wholesale power prices and some of them are forced to retire early. Although there are some market design issues that could be improved to maintain the efficient nuclear power plants in competitive environment, it is now argued that some additional arrangements to mitigate the investment risks of the nuclear power plants are necessary. (author)

  18. The regulatory process, nuclear safety research and the fuel cycle in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, P.

    1996-01-01

    The main legislation governing the safety of nuclear installations in the United Kingdom is the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 (HSWA) and the associated relevant statutory provisions of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965 (as amended). The HSWA sought to simplify and unify all industrial safety legislation and set in place the Health and Safety Commission (HSC) and its executive arm, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). The Health and Safety Executive's Nuclear Safety Division (NSD) regulates the nuclear activities on such sites through HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII). Under the Nuclear Installations Act (NIA) no corporate body may use any site for the purpose of installing or operating any reactor, other than such a reactor comprised in a means of transport, or other prescribed installation unless the operator has been granted a nuclear site licence by the Health and Safety Executive. Nuclear fuel cycle facilities are examples of such prescribed installations. (J.P.N.)

  19. A study of the public opinion concerning nuclear power generation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oiso, Shinichi

    2008-01-01

    In this study, I surveyed the outcome of opinion poll about people's attitude toward nuclear power and analysed their awareness of nuclear power generation in the United States. As a result, it was found that percentage of the people who have positive attitude toward nuclear power has been over 60% since 1998. This result corresponds to the fact that people's preference is tending more toward nuclear power generation which is called the nuclear power Renaissance in the United States. Furthermore, analysis of the outcome of the opinion poll in power stations site region was also conducted and it was found that attitude of the people in the site region was more positive than that of average level in the United States. (author)

  20. US central station nuclear electric generating units: significant milestones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    Listings of US nuclear power plants include significant dates, reactor type, owners, and net generating capacity. Listings are made by state, region, and utility. Tabulations of status, schedules, and orders are also presented

  1. Nuclear safety inspection in treatment process for SG heat exchange tubes deficiency of unit 1, TNPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunming; Song Chenxiu; Zhao Pengyu; Hou Wei

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes treatment process for SG heat exchange tubes deficiency of Unit 1, TNPS, nuclear safety inspection of Northern Regional Office during treatment process for deficiency and further inspection after deficiency had been treated. (authors)

  2. United States Nuclear Tests, July 1945 through September 1992, December 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-12-01

    This document list chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Revision 15, dated December 2000.

  3. United States Nuclear Tests, July 1945 through September 1992, September 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-09-01

    This document lists chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. This is Revision 16, dated September 2015.

  4. The economics of nuclear power programs in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents an economic evaluation of both coal and nuclear-fueled electricity-generating plants on the basis of the social costs incurred from the operation of one additional plant. The author investigates the technology involved in operating a nuclear plant and its environmental impact, analyzes the international uranium market and the reprocessing plant under construction at Windscale, and appraises future investment in generating plants that will be required in the UK to supply four different electricity demand scenarios

  5. The nuclear problem in Northeast Asia and ways to resolve it: A North Korean perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pae Sang Hak

    1995-01-01

    The end of the Cold War worldwide has added new momentum to the process of nuclear disarmament. However, vestiges of the Cold War have yet to be removed from Northeast Asia, where the nuclear threat has snowballed. This chapter examines potential nuclear dangers in Northeast Asia - a region which has the greatest concentration of nuclear weapons bases and nuclear weapons in the world

  6. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 4, The waste management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This is the teachers guide to unit 4, (The Waste Management System), of a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear powerplants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  7. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 4, The waste management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This is unit 4 (The Waste Management System) in a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear powerplants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  8. 78 FR 4467 - UniStar Nuclear Energy, Combined License Application for Calvert Cliffs Power Plant, Unit 3...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 52-016; NRC-2008-0250] UniStar Nuclear Energy, Combined License Application for Calvert Cliffs Power Plant, Unit 3, Exemption 1.0 Background UniStar Nuclear Energy (UNE), on behalf of Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Project, LLC and UniStar Nuclear Operating Services...

  9. NO global warming = YES nuclear energy. The International Nuclear Forum and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornish, Emma

    2000-01-01

    The nuclear industry sits along side the renewable energy sector in its role as a non carbon emitting technology. But persuading international political leaders of this fact presents a challenge. Generating electricity from nuclear fuel avoids at least 2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide every year through its 16% share of world wide electricity generation. Nuclear energy is essential to minimising greenhouse gas emissions. This presentation highlights the main issues resulting from the climate change negotiations that are highly relevant to the industry; explains the activities of the International Nuclear Forum and our interaction with the delegates to the process; outlines future activities. The International Nuclear Forum (INF) was formed to provide a collective voice lobbying for nuclear at the climate change negotiations. It's internationally representative of the industry and comprises of: the Uranium Institute; the Nuclear Energy Institute; the Japan Atomic Industry Forum; the Canadian Nuclear Association; the European Nuclear Society, and Foratom. All are accredited non governmental observers to the negotiations of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

  10. Sweden, United States and nuclear energy. The establishment of a Swedish nuclear materials control 1945-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonter, T.

    1999-05-01

    This report deals mainly with the United States nuclear energy policy towards Sweden 1945-1960. Although Sweden contained rich uranium deposits and retained high competence in the natural sciences and technology, the country had to cooperate with other nations in order to develop the nuclear energy. Besides developing the civil use of nuclear power, the Swedish political elite also had plans to start a nuclear weapons programme. From the beginning of the 1950s up to 1968, when the Swedish parliament decided to sign the non-proliferation treaty, the issue was widely debated. In this report, American policy is analyzed in two periods. In the first period, 1945-1953, the most important aim was to prevent Sweden from acquiring nuclear materials, technical know-how, and advanced equipment which could be used in the production of nuclear weapons. The Swedish research projects were designed to contain both a civil and military use of nuclear energy. The first priority of the American administration was to discourage the Swedes from exploiting their uranium deposits, especially for military purposes. In the next period, 1953-1960, the American policy was characterized by extended aid to the development of the Swedish energy programme. Through the 'Atoms for Peace'-programme, the Swedish actors now received previously classified technical information and nuclear materials. Swedish companies and research centers could now buy enriched uranium and advanced equipment from the United States. This nuclear trade was, however, controlled by the American Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). The American help was shaped to prevent the Swedes from developing nuclear weapons capability. From mid-50s Swedish politicians and defence experts realised that a national production of nuclear bombs would cost much more money than was supposed 4-5 years earlier. As a consequence, Swedish officials started to explore the possibilities of acquiring nuclear weapons from United States. The American

  11. The Department of Energy's nuclear R and D programmes [United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This Consultation Document reviews how the United Kingdom Department of Energy's nuclear R and D programmes support the Government's nuclear policy and reaches preliminary conclusions about their future direction. It describes the changes the Department has adopted, and is proposing, to ensure that it is better informed about the nuclear R and D it commissions and that the work is carried out cost-effectively. The areas of research reviewed are: safety; radiological protection; safeguards; reactor technology; fusion; decommissioning and waste management. (author)

  12. 75 FR 52045 - Arizona Public Service Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 3; Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 3; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No.... NPF-74, issued to Arizona Public Service Company (APS, the licensee), for operation of Palo Verde... Statement for the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, NUREG-0841, dated February 1982. Agencies and...

  13. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned in the Unites States as of June 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulden, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of June 30, 1981, which are capable of sustaining a nuclear chain reaction. Information is presented in five parts, each of which is categorized by primary function or pupose: civilian, military, production, export, and critical assembly facilities

  14. 75 FR 18572 - Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for Sequoyah Nuclear Plant Units 1 and 2 License...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ... TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for Sequoyah Nuclear Plant... National Environmental Policy Act. TVA will prepare a supplemental environmental impact statement (SEIS) to update information in the 1974 Final Environmental Statement for Sequoyah Nuclear Plant Units 1 and 2...

  15. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned in the United States as of December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1980, which are capable of sustaining a nuclear chain reaction. Information is presented in five parts, each of which is categorized by primary function or purpose: civilian, military, production, export, and critical assembly facilities

  16. Nuclear design report for Kori nuclear power plant unit 1, cycle 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chan Oh; Kim, Joo Young; Park, Sang Yoon; Song, Jae Woong; Lee, Chong Chul; Baik, Joo Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-06-01

    This report presents nuclear design calculations for cycle 14 of Kori unit 1. Information is given on fuel loading, power density distributions, reactivity coefficients, control rod worths and operational limits. In addition, the report contains all necessary data for the startup tests including predicted values for the comparison with the measured data. The reload consists of 44 KOFA`s enriched by nominally 3.70 w/o U{sub 235}. Among the KOFA`s, 16 fuel assemblies contain gadolinia rods. The fuel assemblies in the core are arranged in a low leakage loading pattern. The cycle length of cycle 14 amounts to 366 EFPD corresponding to a cycle burnup of 13680 MWD/MTU. (Author) 8 refs., 55 figs., 16 tabs. nozzle by vortex formation during mid-loop operation condition are experimentally investigated. The critical submergence is determined for various types of suction nozzle, and the measurements of velocity distribution are performed in the flow fields near the t-shaped suction nozzle. (Author) 11 refs., 41 figs., 13 tabs.

  17. The economics of nuclear power programmes in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    In Chapter 1 an overview of the technology involved in the operation of various nuclear reactor types, both thermal and fast breeder, is provided, and the operations that comprise the alternative nuclear fuel cycles examined. Chapter 2 traces the historical development of the uranium market and highlights the effect that institutional arrangements such as the formation of a cartel has had on the market price of uranium. The prospects for increased uranium exploration activity and likely demand scenarios are then reviewed. In Chapter 3 the economic viability of reprocessing 'spent' nuclear fuel in the UK is analysed within the context of the decision to proceed with the construction of the thermal-oxide reprocessing plant (THORP) at Windscale in Cumbria. The various radioactive waste substances emanating from nuclear fuel-cycle operations undertaken in the UK are described in Chapter 4 and the prospects for their safe management and disposal examined. Chapter 5 provides an economic appraisal of both coal and nuclear-fuelled electricity generating plant based on the criterion of social cost. The results are used as the data-input for an appraisal of the investment in generating plant that will be required in the UK to supply four different electricity demand scenarios. The conclusions are discussed in Chapter 6. (author)

  18. The United States experience in the transfer of nuclear tecnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorne, R.D.

    1977-01-01

    The paper surveys U.S. public policies and program for nuclear energy development. In the U.S., nuclear technology has been applied for public benefit. Today it is being relied on to meet electrical power requirements. Radioisotope technology is being applied in industry, agriculture and medicine. In 1947 when AEC was established, nuclear technologies moved from research and development phase to useful products and processes. After energy shortages in 1974, a new agency (ERDA) was created, which brought together research and development programs in solar, geothermal and fossil, as well as energy systems. The Atomic Energy Act was amended in 1954 to permit cooperation with foreign countries. Domestically, the AEC engaged in a series of Power Reactor Demonstration with U.S. industry that in a decade led to the demonstration of proven and economic light-water reactors. In 1957 IAEA was established, and then the whole series of AEC policy changed by a strong information dissemination program. ERDA unified the Government's effort to provide a variety of energy choices in nuclear and non-nuclear areas

  19. Weapons of Mass Destruction Commission, final report, 'Weapons of Terror: Freeing the World of Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Arms', Stockholm, Sweden, 1 June 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    Nuclear, biological and chemical weapons are rightly called weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Designed to terrify as well as destroy, they have the potential to kill thousands and thousands of people in a single attack, and their effects may persist in the environment and in our bodies, in some cases indefinitely. Many efforts have been made to free the world from the threat of these weapons and some progress has been made. Paradoxically, despite the end of the Cold War, the past decade has seen more setbacks than successes. States have failed to comply with their disarmament and non-proliferation commitments, and terrorist groups have emerged that recognize no restraints. In September 2005, the United Nations World Summit was unable to agree on a single recommendation on disarmament and non-proliferation. It is time for all to wake up to the awesome reality that many of the old threats continue to hang over the world and that many new ones have emerged. It is time for all governments to revive their cooperation and to breathe new life into the disarmament work of the United Nations. Efforts to eradicate poverty and to protect the global environment must be matched by a dismantling of the world's most destructive capabilities. The gearshift now needs to be moved from reverse to drive. Biological and chemical weapons have been comprehensively outlawed through global conventions, but these need to be universally accepted and fully implemented. Nuclear weapons must also be outlawed. Before this aim is realized, there must be new initiatives to reduce the number of nuclear weapons and the threat posed by them. It is equally urgent to prevent proliferation and to take special measures to ensure that terrorists do not acquire any weapons of mass destruction. This report presents ideas and recommendations on what the world community - including national governments and civil society - can and should do.

  20. Weapons of Mass Destruction Commission, final report, 'Weapons of Terror: Freeing the World of Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Arms', Stockholm, Sweden, 1 June 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear, biological and chemical weapons are rightly called weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Designed to terrify as well as destroy, they have the potential to kill thousands and thousands of people in a single attack, and their effects may persist in the environment and in our bodies, in some cases indefinitely. Many efforts have been made to free the world from the threat of these weapons and some progress has been made. Paradoxically, despite the end of the Cold War, the past decade has seen more setbacks than successes. States have failed to comply with their disarmament and non-proliferation commitments, and terrorist groups have emerged that recognize no restraints. In September 2005, the United Nations World Summit was unable to agree on a single recommendation on disarmament and non-proliferation. It is time for all to wake up to the awesome reality that many of the old threats continue to hang over the world and that many new ones have emerged. It is time for all governments to revive their cooperation and to breathe new life into the disarmament work of the United Nations. Efforts to eradicate poverty and to protect the global environment must be matched by a dismantling of the world's most destructive capabilities. The gearshift now needs to be moved from reverse to drive. Biological and chemical weapons have been comprehensively outlawed through global conventions, but these need to be universally accepted and fully implemented. Nuclear weapons must also be outlawed. Before this aim is realized, there must be new initiatives to reduce the number of nuclear weapons and the threat posed by them. It is equally urgent to prevent proliferation and to take special measures to ensure that terrorists do not acquire any weapons of mass destruction. This report presents ideas and recommendations on what the world community - including national governments and civil society - can and should do

  1. Calculating the Unit Cost Factors for Decommissioning Cost Estimation of the Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwan Seong; Lee, Dong Gyu; Jung, Chong Hun; Lee, Kune Woo

    2006-01-01

    The estimated decommissioning cost of nuclear research reactor is calculated by applying a unit cost factor-based engineering cost calculation method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning cost of nuclear research reactor is composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Labor cost of decommissioning costs in decommissioning works are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects. In this paper, the unit cost factors and work difficulty factors which are needed to calculate the labor cost in estimating decommissioning cost of nuclear research reactor are derived and figured out.

  2. Commerical electric power cost studies. Capital cost addendum multi-unit coal and nuclear stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    This report is the culmination of a study performed to develop designs and associated capital cost estimates for multi-unit nuclear and coal commercial electric power stations, and to determine the distribution of these costs among the individual units. This report addresses six different types of 2400 MWe (nominal) multi-unit stations as follows: Two Unit PWR Station-1139 MWe Each, Two Unit BWR Station-1190 MWe Each, Two Unit High Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-1232 MWe Each, Two Unit Low Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-1243 MWe Each, Three Unit High Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-794 MWe Each, Three Unit Low Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-801 MWe Each. Recent capital cost studies performed for ERDA/NRC of single unit nuclear and coal stations are used as the basis for developing the designs and costs of the multi-unit stations. This report includes the major study groundrules, a summary of single and multi-unit stations total base cost estimates, details of cost estimates at the three digit account level and plot plan drawings for each multi-unit station identified

  3. Advances in multi-unit nuclear power plant probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modarres, Mohammad; Zhou, Taotao; Massoud, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi accident highlighted the importance of risks from multiple nuclear reactor unit accidents at a site. As a result, there has been considerable interest in Multi-Unit Probabilistic Risk Assessment (MUPRA) in the past few years. For considerations in nuclear safety, the MUPRA estimates measures of risk and identifies contributors to risk representing the entire site rather than the individual units in the site. In doing so, possible unit-to-unit interactions and dependencies should be modeled and accounted for in the MUPRA. In order to effectively account for these risks, six main commonality classifications—initiating events, shared connections, identical components, proximity dependencies, human dependencies, and organizational dependencies—may be used. This paper examines advances in MUPRA, offers formal definitions of multi-unit site risk measures and proposes quantitative approaches and data to account for unit-to-unit dependencies. Finally, a parametric approach for the multi-unit dependencies has been discussed and a simple example illustrates application of the proposed methodology. - Highlights: • This paper will discuss the technical aspects of an integrated MUPRA, including consideration of dependencies and assessment of the multi-unit dependency data and models for quantifying such dependencies. • The paper also provides discussions on formal definitions and metrics for multi-unit site risks. • The parametric methods are used to address multi-unit dependency situations. • A conceptual two-unit logic example is used to demonstrate the application of proposed methodology.

  4. Costs of disarmament - Rethinking the price tag: A methodological inquiry into the costs and benefits of arms control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willett, S.

    2002-06-01

    The growing number of arms control and disarmament treaties agreed on over the past decades as well as rising concerns about harmful environmental and public health effects of weapons disposal, have understandably led to an increase in the cost of implementing arms control agreements. As a result, the expenses associated with treaty compliance have emerged as a contentious issue within the realm of arms control and disarmament discussions. In particular, opponents of arms control and disarmament point to perceived rising costs of meeting current and proposed treaty obligations in an attempt to limit and undermine such activities. Yet determining just how much arms control and disarmament cost remains very much an ambiguous task. In Costs of Disarmament - Rethinking the Price Tag: A Methodological Inquiry into the Costs and Benefits of Arms Control, Susan Willett addresses the question of how the cost of arms control ought to be measured. Emphasizing the proper allocation of costs associated with arms control treaty implementation to the life cycle costs of weapon systems and their correct weighing against the benefits they procure in terms of averted arms races and increased international security, Willett argues for a revised methodology of costing arms control and disarmament that gives a more accurate - and significantly lower - estimate of the latter. Adopting such a revised methodology concludes the author, might dispel considerable misunderstanding and help point decisions over arms control and disarmament in the right direction

  5. 77 FR 50533 - Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc.; Millstone Power Station, Unit 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ....; Millstone Power Station, Unit 3 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Environmental assessment and... search, select ``ADAMS Public Documents'' and then select ``Begin Web- based ADAMS Search.'' For problems... Optimized ZIRLO\\TM\\ fuel rod cladding in future core reload applications for Millstone Power Station, Unit 3...

  6. 76 FR 78805 - Regulatory Changes To Implement the United States/Australian Agreement for Peaceful Nuclear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... Implement the United States/Australian Agreement for Peaceful Nuclear Cooperation; Corrections AGENCY... the Government of Australia and the Government of the United States of America Concerning Peaceful... action is unnecessary. List of Subjects in 10 CFR Part 40 Criminal penalties, Government contracts...

  7. Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste: The Waste Management System, Unit 4. Teacher Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC.

    This guide is Unit 4 of the four-part series, Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The goal of this unit is to explain how transportation, a geologic repository, and the multi-purpose canister will work together to provide short-term and long-term…

  8. Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste: Ionizing Radiation, Unit 2. Teacher Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC.

    This guide is Unit 2 of the four-part series, Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The goal of this unit is to convey factual information relevant to radioactivity and radiation and relate that information both to the personal lives of students…

  9. Accident analysis of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masahide; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Tsuji, Masashi; Chiba, Go; Nagata, Yasunori; Shimoe, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    As a result of the Great East Japan Earthquake that occurred on 11 March 2011, all AC and DC power at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP units 1 to 3 were lost soon after the tsunami. The core cooling function was lost, and the cores of units 1 to 3 were damaged. The purpose of this work is to clarify the progress of the accident in unit 1, which was damaged the earliest among the 3 units. Therefore, an original severe accident analysis code was developed, and the progress of the accident was evaluated from the analysis results and the actual data. As a result, the leakage path from a pressure vessel was clarified, and some lessons and knowledge were gained. (author)

  10. Renovation of the 'old' NPP units as an economically effective way of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zrodnikov, A.V.; Toshinsky, G.I.; Komlev, O.G.; Dragunov, Yu.G.; Stepanov, V.S.; Klimov, N.N.; Kopytov, I.I.; Krushelnitsky, V.N.

    2005-01-01

    In the process of nuclear power development there comes a phase when the old' power-units, which reactor installations have expired the designed and extended service lifetime are withdrawn from operating. At this phase in the case of the same annual investments into nuclear power, the increase of the total set up capacity of the nuclear power will be terminated because introduction of capacities due to construction of 'new' power-units only compensates for the reduction of capacities caused by withdrawing from operating the 'old' power-units. Along with this, taking into account a sizeable difference in the service lifetime of the nuclear steam supplying systems and the rest infrastructure of the nuclear power plants, it is an opportunity to find the solution to the problem of compensating for the withdrawn capacities without considerable increasing the annual investments. This opportunity is connected with use of the innovative nuclear power technology based on multipurpose small power modular fast reactors with lead-bismuth coolant for replacement of the withdrawn capacities (renovation of power-units). The features of the innovative nuclear power technology based on the SVBR-76/100 reactor installations, the results of the technical and economical investigations that demonstrate the high economical efficiency of use of the renovation technology using the SVBR-75/100 reactor modules are presented in the Paper. (author)

  11. Summary revaluation of energetic start-up of the unit 1 of nuclear power plant Mochovce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarvaic, I.; Miskolci, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document contents stage revaluation of energetic start-up of the unit 1 of nuclear power plant Mochovce. Test results of the stage of energetic start-up are summarized in the document, valuation of important systems and block devices as well as fulfilling the operation limits and conditions has been performed. On that base conclusions and recommendations for start-up the unit 2 and for commercial operation of the unit 1 are elaborated. The valuation has been elaborated by a scientific management for start-up nuclear power plant Mochovce of nuclear safety of nuclear power facilities. Scientific management for start-up of nuclear power plant Mochovce performed continuous valuation of individual power levels after ending of each individual level and it gave its valuation to energy power level with recommendations and conditions for further start-up process and operation. Scientific management finished its activity at the unit 1 of nuclear power plant Mochovce according to a statute of scientific management for start-up after successful completion of conclusive block run. Scientific management group was founded in February 1998 at nuclear power plant Mochovce. Its members are experts from Slovak, Czech, Russian and French organizations which are participating in power plant completion. Members are listed in a supplement No. 2

  12. Prevention of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Removing the threat of a nuclear war-as the General Assembly formally stated in the Final Document of its first special session devoted to disarmament, in 1978-is considered to be the task of the present day. In that Document, the General Assembly sought to establish principles, guidelines and procedures for preventing nuclear war. It declared that to that end, it was imperative to remove the threat of nuclear weapons, to halt and reverse the nuclear-arms race until the total elimination of nuclear weapons and their delivery systems had been achieved (see chapter iv), and to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons (see chapter VII). At the same time, it called for other measures designed to prevent the outbreak of nuclear war and to lessen the danger of the treat or use of nuclear weapons. The Assembly's clear call for action was dictated by the awareness that there was no insuperable barrier dividing peace from war and that, unless nations brought the spiralling nuclear-arms race to an end, the day might come when nuclear weapons would actually be used, with catastrophic consequences. In adopting the Final Document, the international community achieved, for the first time, a consensus on an international disarmament strategy having as its immediate goal the elimination of the danger of a nuclear war and the implementation of measures to halt and reverse the arms race. The General Assembly, at its second special session on disarmament, in 1982, reaffirmed the validity of the 1978 Final Document. This paper reports that nuclear issues and in particular the prevention of nuclear war remain, however, major concerns of all States. Undoubtedly, all nations have a vital interest in the negotiation of effective measures for her prevention of nuclear war, since nuclear weapons pose a unique threat to human survival. If nuclear war were to occur, its consequences would be global, not simple regional

  13. The United States nuclear plant reliability data program: Its description and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, M.J.

    1975-01-01

    The American National Standards Institute Subcommittee N18-20 has developed and implemented the United States Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS). The NPRDS is designed to accumulate, store, analyse, and report reliability and failure statistics on systems and components of nuclear power plants related to nuclear safety. Input data to the NPRDS consist of engineering, operating, and failure information submitted on a voluntary basis by participating utilities. Prior to entry into the computerized data base, the data are thoroughly checked for accuracy by both the submitting organizations and the NPRDS operating contractor. The data base is the source of various periodic output reports to the nuclear power industry and is utilized to produce special reports upon request. The present data base represents data accumulated from about thirty nuclear units with additional units expected to begin submitting data immediately. The objective is to have essentially all operating nuclear units in the United States of America participating in the program by the end of 1975. The first NPRDS annual reports containing meaningful reliability and failure statistics are expected to be produced following the end of 1975. (author)

  14. Control and automation technology in United States nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, B.K.H.

    1997-01-01

    The need to use computers for nuclear power plant design, engineering, operation and maintenance has been growing since the inception of commercial nuclear power electricity generation in the 1960s. The needs have intensified in recent years as the demands of safety and reliability, as well as economic competition, have become stronger. The rapid advance of computer hardware and software technology in the last two decades has greatly enlarged the potential of computer applications to plant instrumentation and control of future plants, as well as those needed for operation of existing plants. The traditional role of computers for mathematical calculations and data manipulation has been expanded to automate plant control functions and to enhance human performance and productivity. The major goals of using computers for instrumentation and control of nuclear power plants are (1) to improve safety; (2) to reduce challenges to the power plant; (3) to reduce the cost of operations and maintenance; (4) to enhance power production, and (5) to increase productivity of people. Many functions in nuclear power plants are achieved by a combination of human action and automation. Increasingly, computer-based systems are used to support operations and maintenance personnel in the performance of their tasks. There are many benefits which can accrue from the use of computers but it is important to ensure that the design and implementation of the support system and the human task places the human in the correct role in relation to the machine; that is, in a management position, with the computer serving the human. In addition, consideration must be given to computer system integrity, software validation and verification, consequences of error, etc., to ensure its reliability for nuclear power plant applications. (author). 31 refs

  15. Control and automation technology in United States nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, B.K.H.

    1995-01-01

    The need to use computers for nuclear power plant design, engineering, operation and maintenance has been growing since the inception of commercial nuclear power electricity generation in the 1960s. The needs have intensified in recent years as the demands of safety and reliability, as well as economic competition, have become stronger. The rapid advanced of computer hardware and software technology in the last two decades has greatly enlarged the potential of computer applications to plant instrumentation and control of future plants, as well as those needed for operation of existing plants. The traditional role of computers for mathematical calculations and data manipulation has been expanded to automate plant control functions and to enhance human performance and productivity. The major goals of using computers for instrumentation and control of nuclear power plants are: (1) to improve safety; (2) to reduce challenges to capital investments; (3) to reduce the cost of operations and maintenance; (4) to enhance power production; and (5) to increase productivity of people. Many functions in nuclear power plants are achieved by a combination of human action and automation. Increasingly, computer-based systems are used to support operations and maintenance personnel in the performance of their tasks. There are many benefits which can accrue from the use of computers but it is important to ensure that the design and implementation of the support system, and the human task places the human in the correct role in the relation to the machine; that is, in a management position, with the computer serving the human. In addition, consideration must be given to computer system integrity, software validation and verification, consequences of error, etc., to ensure its reliability for nuclear power plant applications. (author). 31 refs

  16. Control and automation technology in United States nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, B K.H. [Sunutech, Inc., Los Altos, CA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The need to use computers for nuclear power plant design, engineering, operation and maintenance has been growing since the inception of commercial nuclear power electricity generation in the 1960s. The needs have intensified in recent years as the demands of safety and reliability, as well as economic competition, have become stronger. The rapid advance of computer hardware and software technology in the last two decades has greatly enlarged the potential of computer applications to plant instrumentation and control of future plants, as well as those needed for operation of existing plants. The traditional role of computers for mathematical calculations and data manipulation has been expanded to automate plant control functions and to enhance human performance and productivity. The major goals of using computers for instrumentation and control of nuclear power plants are (1) to improve safety; (2) to reduce challenges to the power plant; (3) to reduce the cost of operations and maintenance; (4) to enhance power production, and (5) to increase productivity of people. Many functions in nuclear power plants are achieved by a combination of human action and automation. Increasingly, computer-based systems are used to support operations and maintenance personnel in the performance of their tasks. There are many benefits which can accrue from the use of computers but it is important to ensure that the design and implementation of the support system and the human task places the human in the correct role in relation to the machine; that is, in a management position, with the computer serving the human. In addition, consideration must be given to computer system integrity, software validation and verification, consequences of error, etc., to ensure its reliability for nuclear power plant applications. (author). 31 refs.

  17. Treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons: Review conference of the States Parties Geneva 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The Third Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons will be held in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1985 with a view to assuring that the purposes and provisions of the Treaty are being realized. The Treaty, commonly referred to as the non-proliferation Treaty, is the fundamental instrument to avert the danger of proliferation of nuclear weapons and is, perhaps, the most important multilateral arms regulation agreement of our time. It was negotiated in the 1960s in the Eighteen-Nation Committee on Disarmament in Geneva and in the United Nations General Assembly. The Treaty was opened for signature in London, Moscow and Washington on July 1, 1968. On that date, it was signed by the three Depositary Governments - the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom and the United States - and by 58 other States. As of December 31, 1983 the number of States parties to the Treaty had risen to 119

  18. An advanced NSSS integrity monitoring system for Shin-Kori nuclear units 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Y. G.; Kim, H. B.; Galin, S. R.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    The advanced design features of NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) Integrity Monitoring System for Shin-Kori Nuclear Units 3 and 4 are summarized herein. During the overall system design and detailed component design processes, many design improvements have been made for the system. The major design changes are: 1) the application of a common software platform for all subsystems, 2) the implementation of remote access, control and monitoring capabilities, and 3) the equipment redesign and rearrangement that has simplified the system architecture. Changes give an effect on cabinet size, number of cables, cyber-security, graphic user interfaces, and interfaces with other monitoring systems. The system installation and operation for Shin-Kori Nuclear Units 3 and 4 will be more convenient than those for previous Korean nuclear units in view of its remote control capability, automated test functions, improved user interface functions, and much less cabling. (authors)

  19. An Advanced NSSS Integrity Monitoring System for Shin-Kori Nuclear Units 3 and 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yang Gyun; Galin, Scott R.; Lee, Sang Jeong

    2010-12-01

    The advanced design features of NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) Integrity Monitoring System for Shin-Kori Nuclear Units 3 and 4 are summarized herein. During the overall system design and detailed component design processes, many design improvements have been made for the system. The major design changes are: 1) the application of a common software platform for all subsystems, 2) the implementation of remote access, control and monitoring capabilities, and 3) the equipment redesign and rearrangement that has simplified the system architecture. Changes give an effect on cabinet size, number of cables, cyber-security, graphic user interfaces, and interfaces with other monitoring systems. The system installation and operation for Shin-Kori Nuclear Units 3 and 4 will be more convenient than those for previous Korean nuclear units in view of its remote control capability, automated test functions, improved user interface functions, and much less cabling.

  20. Standardization of nuclear power plants in the United States: recent regulatory developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, B.Z.; Tourtellotte, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    On April 18, 1989, the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) amended the regulations governing the process for licensing nuclear power plants in the United States to provide for issuance of early site permits, standard design certifications and combined construction permits and operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. The new regulations are designed to achieve early resolution of licensing issues and facilitate standardization of nuclear power plants in the United States. The program for design standardization is central to efforts mounted by the U.S. government and industry to ensure that there will be a next generation of nuclear power facilities in the U.S. The most significant changes are provisions for certification of standard designs and for issuance prior to start of construction of combined licenses which incorporate a construction permit and an operating license with conditions. Such certifications and combined licenses must contain tests, inspections and analyses, and acceptance criteria, which are necessary and sufficient to provide reasonable assurance that the facility has been constructed and will operate in accordance with the combined license. A number of significant implementation issues have arisen. In addition a major court case brought by several anti-nuclear groups is pending, challenging NRC authority to issue combined licenses. It is the goal of the U.S. nuclear industry to have the first of the next generation of standardized nuclear power plants ordered, licensed, constructed and on-line by the year 2000. (author)