WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear decay rate

  1. Influences of the astrophysical environment on nuclear decay rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, E.B.

    1987-09-01

    In many astronomical environments, physical conditions are so extreme that nuclear decay rates can be significantly altered from their laboratory values. Such effects are relevant to a number of current problems in nuclear astrophysics. Experiments related to these problems are now being pursued, and will be described in this talk. 19 refs., 5 figs

  2. Neutrino induced decoherence and variation in nuclear decay rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleton, Douglas; Inan, Nader; Chiao, Raymond Y.

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has proposed that the interaction between ordinary matter and a stochastic gravitational background can lead to the decoherence of large aggregates of ordinary matter. In this work we point out that these arguments can be carried over to a stochastic neutrino background but with the Planck scale of the gravitational decoherence replaced by the weak scale. This implies that it might be possible to observe such neutrino induced decoherence on a small, microscopic system rather than a macroscopic system as is the case for gravitationally induced decoherence. In particular we suggest that neutrino decoherence could be linked with observed variations in the decay rates of certain nuclei. Finally we point out that this proposed neutrino induced decoherence can be considered the complement of the Mikheev–Smirnov–Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. - Highlights: • Review of decoherence arguments for matter moving in a stochastic gravitational background. • Application of these decoherence arguments to neutrinos and the weak interaction scale. • Suggestions of a connection between neutrino decoherence and variable nuclear decay rates. • Connection of neutron decoherence as the inverse of the MSW effect

  3. Radionuclide mass inventory, activity, decay heat, and dose rate parametric data for TRIGA spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterbentz, J.W.

    1997-03-01

    Parametric burnup calculations are performed to estimate radionuclide isotopic mass and activity concentrations for four different Training, Research, and Isotope General Atomics (TRIGA) nuclear reactor fuel element types: (1) Aluminum-clad standard, (2) Stainless Steel-clad standard, (3) High-enrichment Fuel Life Improvement Program (FLIP), and (4) Low-enrichment Fuel Life Improvement Program (FLIP-LEU-1). Parametric activity data are tabulated for 145 important radionuclides that can be used to generate gamma-ray emission source terms or provide mass quantity estimates as a function of decay time. Fuel element decay heats and dose rates are also presented parametrically as a function of burnup and decay time. Dose rates are given at the fuel element midplane for contact, 3.0-feet, and 3.0-meter detector locations in air. The data herein are estimates based on specially derived Beginning-of-Life (BOL) neutron cross sections using geometrically-explicit TRIGA reactor core models. The calculated parametric data should represent good estimates relative to actual values, although no experimental data were available for direct comparison and validation. However, because the cross sections were not updated as a function of burnup, the actinide concentrations may deviate from the actual values at the higher burnups

  4. No evidence for a decrease of nuclear decay rates with increasing heliocentric distance based on radiochronology of meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Matthias M. M.; Wieler, Rainer

    2014-03-01

    It has been argued that the decay rates of several radioactive nuclides are slightly lower at Earth's aphelion than at perihelion, and that this effect might depend on heliocentric distance. It might then be expected that nuclear decay rates be considerably lower at larger distances from the sun, e.g., in the asteroid belt at 2-3 AU from where most meteorites originate. If so, ages of meteorites obtained by analyses of radioactive nuclides and their stable daughter isotopes might be in error, since these ages are based on decay rates determined on Earth. Here we evaluate whether the large data base on nuclear cosmochronology offers any hint for discrepancies which might be due to radially variable decay rates. Chlorine-36 (t1/2 = 301,000 a) is produced in meteorites by interactions with cosmic rays and is the nuclide for which a decay rate dependence from heliocentric distance has been proposed, which, in principle, can be tested with our approach and the current data base. We show that compilations of 36Cl concentrations measured in meteorites offer no support for a spatially variable 36Cl decay rate. For very short-lived cosmic-ray produced radionuclides (half-lives uranium decay rates in different meteorite parent bodies in the asteroid belt. Moreover, the oldest U-Pb ages of meteorites agree with the main-sequence age of the sun derived from helioseismology within the formal ˜1% uncertainty of the latter. Meteorite ages also provide no evidence for a decrease of decay rates with heliocentric distance for nuclides such as 87Rb (decay mode β-) 40K (β- and electron capture), and 147Sm (α).

  5. Induced nuclear beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    Certain nuclear beta decay transitions normally inhibited by angular momentum or parity considerations can be induced to occur by the application of an electromagnetic field. Such decays can be useful in the controlled production of power, and in fission waste disposal

  6. Measuring Uranium Decay Rates for Advancement of Nuclear Forensics and Geochronology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons-Davis, Tashi [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-31

    Radioisotopic dating techniques are highly valuable tools for understanding the history of physical and chemical processes in materials related to planetary sciences and nuclear forensics, and rely on accurate knowledge of decay constants and their uncertainties. The decay constants of U-238 and U-235 are particularly important to Earth science, and often the measured values with lowest reported uncertainties are applied, although they have not been independently verified with similar precision. New direct measurements of the decay constants of U-238, Th-234, U-235, and U-234 were completed, using a range of analytical approaches. An overarching goal of the project was to ensure the quality of results, including metrological traceability to facilitate implementation across diverse disciplines. This report presents preliminary results of these experiments, as a few final measurements and calculations are still in progress.

  7. Excessive leakage measurement using pressure decay method in containment building local leakage rate test at nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Kyu; Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Wang Bae [KHNP, Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    There are two methods for conducting the containment local leakage rate test (LLRT) in nuclear power plants: the make-up flow rate method and the pressure decay method. The make-up flow rate method is applied first in most power plants. In this method, the leakage rate is measured by checking the flow rate of the make-up flow. However, when it is difficult to maintain the test pressure because of excessive leakage, the pressure decay method can be used as a complementary method, as the leakage rates at pressures lower than normal can be measured using this method. We studied the method of measuring over leakage using the pressure decay method for conducting the LLRT for the containment building at a nuclear power plant. We performed experiments under conditions similar to those during an LLRT conducted on-site. We measured the characteristics of the leakage rate under varies pressure decay conditions, and calculated the compensation ratio based on these data.

  8. Calculation of nuclide inventory, decay power, activity and dose rates for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haakansson, Rune

    2000-03-01

    The nuclide inventory was calculated for a BWR and a PWR fuel element, with burnups of 38 and 55 MWd/kg uranium for the BWR fuel, and 42 and 60 MWd/kg uranium for the PWR fuel. The calculations were performed for decay times of up to 300,000 years. Gamma and neutron dose rates have been calculated at a distance of 1 m from a bare fuel element and outside the spent fuel canister. The calculations were performed using the CASMO-4 code

  9. Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

    1996-05-01

    As part of the Department of Energy's spent nuclear fuel acceptance criteria, the mass of uranium and transuranic elements in spent research reactor fuel must be specified. These data are, however, not always known or readily determined. It is the purpose of this report to provide estimates of these data for some of the more common research reactor fuel assembly types. The specific types considered here are MTR, TRIGA and DIDO fuel assemblies. The degree of physical protection given to spent fuel assemblies is largely dependent upon the photon dose rate of the spent fuel material. These data also, are not always known or readily determined. Because of a self-protecting dose rate level of radiation (dose rate greater than 100 ren-x/h at I m in air), it is important to know the dose rate of spent fuel assemblies at all time. Estimates of the photon dose rate for spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are given in this report

  10. Enhanced nuclear level decay in hot dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosselin, G.; Morel, P.

    2004-01-01

    A model of nuclear level decay in a plasma environment is described. Nuclear excitation and decay by photon processes, nuclear excitation by electron capture, and decay by internal conversion are taken into account. The electrons in the plasma are described by a relativistic average atom model for the bound electrons and by a relativistic Thomas-Fermi-Dirac model for the free electrons. Nuclear decay of isomeric level may be enhanced through an intermediate level lying above the isomer. An enhanced nuclear decay rate may occur for temperatures far below the excitation energy of the transition to the intermediate level. In most cases, the enhancement factor may reach several decades

  11. Nuclear structure and double beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, P.

    1988-01-01

    Double beta decay is a rare transition between two nuclei of the same mass number A involving a change of the nuclear charge Z by two units. It has long been recognized that the Oν mode of double beta decay, where two electrons and no neutrinos are emitted, is a powerful tool for the study of neutrino properties. Its observation would constitute a convincing proof that there exists a massive Majorana neutrino which couples to electrons. Double beta decay is a process involving an intricate mixture of particle physics and physics of the nucleus. The principal nuclear physics issues have to do with the evaluation of the nuclear matrix elements responsible for the decay. If the authors wish to arrive at quantitative answers for the neutrino properties the authors have no choice but to learn first how to understand the nuclear mechanisms. The authors describe first the calculation of the decay rate of the 2ν mode of double beta decay, in which two electrons and two antineutrinos are emitted

  12. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses nuclear structure from radioactive decay of the following: Neutron-Deficient Iridium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Platinum Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Gold Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Mercury Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Thallium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Lead Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Samarium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Promethium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Neodymium Isotopes; and Neutron-Deficient Praseodymium Isotopes. Also discussed are Nuclear Systematics and Models

  13. Decay Spectroscopy for Nuclear Astrophysics: {beta}-delayed Proton Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trache, L.; Simmons, E.; Spiridon, A.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Tribble, R. E. [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Saastamoinen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Aysto, J. [University of Jyvaskyla, Jyvaskyla (Finland); Davinson, T.; Woods, P. J. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Pollacco, E.; Kebbiri, M. [CEA/IRFU Saclay (France); Pascovici, G. [IKP, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany)

    2011-11-30

    Decay spectroscopy is one of the oldest indirect methods in nuclear astrophysics. We have developed at TAMU techniques to measure beta- and beta-delayed proton decay of sd-shell, proton-rich nuclei. The short-lived radioactive species are produced in-flight, separated, then slowed down (from about 40 MeV/u) and implanted in the middle of very thin Si detectors. These allowed us to measure protons with energies as low as 200 keV from nuclei with lifetimes of 100 ms or less. At the same time we measure gamma-rays up to 8 MeV with high resolution HPGe detectors. We have studied the decay of {sup 23}Al, {sup 27}P, {sup 31}Cl, all important for understanding explosive H-burning in novae. The technique has shown a remarkable selectivity to beta-delayed charged-particle emission and works even at radioactive beam rates of a few pps. The states populated are resonances for the radiative proton capture reactions {sup 22}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Mg(crucial for the depletion of {sup 22}Na in novae), {sup 26m}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 27}Si and {sup 30}P(p,{gamma}){sup 31}S(bottleneck in novae and XRB burning), respectively. More recently we have radically improved the technique using a gas based detector we call AstroBox.

  14. Decay data evaluation project: Evaluation of 52Mn and 52mMn nuclear decay data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Aurelian

    2017-09-01

    All nuclear decay data within the 52Fe-52m,52Mn-52Cr decay chain have been evaluated at IFIN-HH, Romania, as part of an IAEA coordinated research project (F41029) and incorporated into the Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP). Both 52Fe and daughter 52Mn are two potentially promising radionuclides to be incorporated into suitable radiopharmaceuticals for PET and SPECT imaging. The decay data evaluation of 52Fe has previously been published and reported to the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. Equivalent DDEP evaluations for 52Mn and 52mMn have also been completed recently, and are presented in summary form below. These improved decay data sets have also been reported to the IAEA in detail, and are highly suitable in dose rate calculations for their application in nuclear medicine.

  15. Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.

    2001-02-01

    This report provides a brief description of the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Network in response to a request from the Advisory Group Meeting on ''Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators'' (IAEA, Vienna, 14-17 December 1998, report IAEA(NDS)-399 (1999)). This report supersedes the special issue of the Nuclear Data Newsletter No. 20 published in November 1994. (author)

  16. Precision measurements in nuclear beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar, E-mail: naviliat@nscl.msu.edu [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Precision measurements in nuclear beta decay provide sensitive means to determine the fundamental coupling of charged fermions to weak bosons and to test discrete symmetries in the weak interaction. The main motivation of such measurements is to find deviations from Standard Model predictions as possible indications of new physics. I focus here on two topics related to precision measurements in beta decay, namely: (i) the determination of the V{sub ud} element of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix from nuclear mirror transitions and (ii) selected measurements of time reversal violating correlations in nuclear and neutron decays. These topics complement those presented in other contributions to this conference.

  17. Nuclear decay data: some applications and needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear decay data have broad relevance to a number of basic scientific disciplines as well as to many areas of technology. In this paper we discuss selected applications where decay data are making, or promise to make, important contributions. The following specific illustrations are discussed: the large body of precise new actinide-nuclide decay data produced through the work of the recently concluded IAEA Coordinated Research Program on the Measurement and Evaluation of Transactinium Isotope Nuclear Decay Data; the use of actinide-nuclide half-lives as reference standards in nuclear-data measurements; and the relevance of short-lived fission-product decay data to basic physics and reactor technology and some of the problems and challenges that they present to both theory and experiment

  18. Compilations and evaluations of nuclear structure and decay date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    The material contained in this compilation is sorted according to eight subject categories: 1. General Compilations; 2. Basic Isotopic Properties; 3. Nuclear Structure Properties; 4. Nuclear Decay Processes: Half-lives, Energies and Spectra; 5. Nuclear Decay Processes: Gamma-rays; 6. Nuclear Decay Processes: Fission Products; 7. Nuclear Decay Processes: (Others); 8. Atomic Processes

  19. Decay rates of quarkonia and potential models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Ajay Kumar; Pandya, J N; Vinodkumar, P C

    2005-01-01

    The decay rates of cc-bar and b-barb mesons have been studied with contributions from different correction terms. The corrections based on hard processes involved in the decays are quantitatively studied in the framework of different phenomenological potential models

  20. Radioactive decays at limits of nuclear stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfützner, M.; Karny, M.; Grigorenko, L. V.

    2012-01-01

    , and their relative probabilities. When approaching limits of nuclear stability, new decay modes set in. First, beta decays are accompanied by emission of nucleons from highly excited states of daughter nuclei. Second, when the nucleon separation energy becomes negative, nucleons start being emitted from the ground...

  1. Nuclear beta decay and the weak interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kean, D.C.

    1975-11-01

    Short notes are presented on various aspects of nuclear beta decay and weak interactions including: super-allowed transitions, parity violation, interaction strengths, coupling constants, and the current-current formalism of weak interaction. (R.L.)

  2. Effect of nuclear charge-density distribution, as determined by Hofstadter experiments, on the rate of beta-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badibanga, P.

    1975-01-01

    The Fermi functions F(E,Z) have been obtained in this paper for allowed transitions in the case of negatron emission. The potential used in solving the coupled pair of Dirac equations has been derived from the so-called Fermi-type charge-density distribution, where the parameters rho 0 , c and a are those from high-energy electron scattering experiments of Hofstadter et al. The following nuclei were investigated: 20 40 C, 23 51 V, 27 59 Co, 49 115 In, 51 122 Sb, 79 197 Au and 83 209 Bi. The kinetic energy of the emitted electrons was varied from 10 KeV to 10 MeV at intervals of 10 keV. Tables of the Fermi functions F(E,Z) for these nuclei are given in this paper. Also the corrections to the shape of the beta-decay energy spectra eta/sub F-H/(E,Z) were evaluated for the same values of the kinetic energy of the emitted electrons for the nuclei under investigation. Tables of these corrections are presented in this paper. It appears from the results obtained that both F(E,Z) and eta/sub F-H/(E,Z) are uniform functions of energy E; as for the variable Z, the curves obtained are not smooth, but have several kinks or breaks in them. We have found a large peak occurring at Z = 27 (Co), and for eta/sub F-H/(E,Z) In has larger values than Sb

  3. Hawaii's epidemic dental decay rate in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueda, Stacie T

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if other factors besides community water fluoridation influences the dental decay rate in children. Identical questionnaires were filled out by two groups of parents, both with a sample size of 100, whose healthy children (ages 5-12) were patients of a pediatric dentist practicing in a non-fluoridated water community. Group A had children with zero Decay or Filled Teeth (DFT). Group B had children with at least five DFT. Children were found to have a significantly lower dental decay rate (P disciplining them; 7) the child was are not "strong-willed" or "hard-headed;" 8) someone does not appease (or "give in" to) them when they get upset; 9) they do not live in a single parent household; and 10) at least one parent achieves a higher academic educational level. This study suggests that water fluoridation is not the only way to prevent dental decay.

  4. Beta decay rates of nuclei with 65

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of spectral averaging theory for two-body nuclear Hamiltonian in a large nuclear shell ... Beta decay rates; supernova evolution; spectral distribution method. ... level density formula, Wigner's treatment of spectral fluctuations using matrix en-.

  5. Development of nuclear decay data library JDDL, and nuclear generation and decay calculation code COMRAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka; Ihara, Hitoshi; Katakura, Jun-ichi; Hara, Toshiharu.

    1986-08-01

    For safety evaluation of nuclear fuel facilities, a nuclear decay data library named JDDL and a computer code COMRAD have been developed to calculate isotopic composition of each nuclide, radiation source intensity, energy spectrum of γ-ray and neutron, and decay heat of spent fuel. JDDL has been produced mainly from the evaluated nuclear data file ENSDF to use new nuclear data. To supplement the data file for short life nuclides, the JNDC data set were also used which had been evaluated by Japan Nuclear Data Committee. Using these data, calculations became possible from short period to long period after irradiation. (author)

  6. Rate of decay of auditory sensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, R.

    1964-01-01

    The rate of decay of auditory sensation was investigated by measuring the minimum silent interval that must be introduced between two noise pulses to be perceived. The value of this critical time Δt was determined for difierent intensity levels of both the first and the second pulse. It is shown

  7. Compilations and evaluations of nuclear structure and decay data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1978-10-01

    This is the fourth issue of a report series on published and to-be-published compilations and evaluations of nuclear structure and decay (NSD) data. This compilation is published and distributed by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section every year. The material contained in this compilation is sorted according to eight subject categories: General compilations; basic isotopic properties; nuclear structure properties; nuclear decay processes, half-lives, energies and spectra; nuclear decay processes, gamma-rays; nuclear decay processes, fission products; nuclear decay processes (others); atomic processes

  8. Radial pattern of nuclear decay processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskra, W.; Mueller, M.; Rotter, I.; Technische Univ. Dresden

    1994-05-01

    At high level density of nuclear states, a separation of different time scales is observed (trapping effect). We calculate the radial profile of partial widths in the framework of the continuum shell model for some 1 - resonances with 2p-2h nuclear structure in 16 O as a function of the coupling strength to the continuum. A correlation between the lifetime of a nuclear state and the radial profile of the corresponding decay process is observed. We conclude from our numerical results that the trapping effect creates structures in space and time characterized by a small radial extension and a short lifetime. (orig.)

  9. Decay rate of reindeer pellet-groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Skarin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Counting of animal faecal pellet groups to estimate habitat use and population densities is a well known method in wildlife research. Using pellet-group counts often require knowledge about the decay rate of the faeces. The decay rate of a faecal pellet group may be different depending on e.g. substrate, size of the pellet group and species. Pellet-group decay rates has been estimated for a number of wildlife species but never before for reindeer (Rangifer tarandus. During 2001 to 2005 a field experiment estimating the decay rate of reindeer pellet groups was performed in the Swedish mountains close to Ammarnäs. In total the decay rate of 382 pellet groups in three different habitat types (alpine heath, birch forest and spruce forest was estimated. The slowest decay rate was found in alpine heath and there the pellet groups persisted for at least four years. If decay was assumed to take place only during the bare ground season, the estimated exponential decay rate was -0.027 pellet groups/week in the same habitat. In the forest, the decay was faster and the pellet groups did not persist more than two years. Performing pellet group counts to estimate habitat use in dry habitats, such as alpine heath, I will recommend using the faecal standing crop method. Using this method makes it possible to catch the animals’ general habitat use over several years. Abstract in Swedish / Sammanfattning:Nedbrytningshastighet av renspillningInom viltforskningen har spillningsinventeringar använts under flera årtionden för att uppskatta habitatval och populationstäthet hos olika djurslag. För att kunna använda data från spillningsinventeringar krävs ofta att man vet hur lång tid det tar för spillningen att brytas ner. Nedbrytningshastigheten är olika beroende på marktyp och djurslag. Nedbrytningshastighet på spillning har studerats för bland annat olika typer av hjortdjur, men det har inte studerats på ren (Rangifer tarandus tidigare. I omr

  10. The alpha decay rates of heavy hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakkar, Kaushal; Majethiya, Ajay; Vinodkumar, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Hypernuclear physics is of great interest because it stands at the intersection of nuclear physics, particle physics as well as astro physics. Hypernuclear physics has recently received lot of attention as large number of hypernuclei are produced and studied experimentally. Many future experimental facilities are also planned to study this field of strange matter. For example, the Hyperball collaboration developed an array of germanium detectors with fast electronics for hypernuclear spectroscopy. Details on the progress and scope of this field are available in recent review articles. Here, the paper makes an attempt to identify and study the decay tunneling probability and half life time of energetically allowed Λ - hypernuclei

  11. Weak interaction studies from nuclear beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, M.

    1981-01-01

    The studies performed at the theoretical nuclear physics division of the Laboratory of Nuclear Studies, Osaka University, are reported. Electron spin density and internal conversion process, nuclear excitation by electron transition, beta decay, weak charged current, and beta-ray angular distributions in oriented nuclei have been studied. The relative intensity of internal conversion electrons for the case in which the radial wave functions of orbital electrons are different for electron spin up and down was calculated. The calculated value was in good agreement with the experimental one. The nuclear excitation following the transition of orbital electrons was studied. The calculated probability of the nuclear excitation of Os 189 was 1.4 x 10 - 7 in conformity with the experimental value 1.7 x 10 - 7 . The second class current and other problems on beta-decay have been extensively studied, and described elsewhere. Concerning weak charged current, the effects of all induced terms, the time component of main axial vector, all partial waves of leptons, Coulomb correction for the electrons in finite size nuclei, and radiative correction were studied. The beta-ray angular distribution for the 1 + -- 0 + transition in oriented B 12 and N 12 was investigated. In this connection, investigation on the weak magnetism to include all higher order corrections for the evaluation of the spectral shape factors was performed. Other works carried out by the author and his collaborators are also explained. (Kato, T.)

  12. Calculation of nuclear radius using alpha decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.B. de.

    1988-01-01

    Using a Quantum Theory approach for the Alpha-Decay process, a formula is deduced for determination of the nuclear radius of the s-state, that is, a nuclear model with a spherical shell. The hypothesis that it is possible to individualize the alpha particle and the daughter nucleus at the moment of the alpha particle emission is considered. In considered in these conditions, the treatment of a two body problem considered as point particles, repelling each other by Coulomb's Law. Using the new values of the fundamental physical constants, experimentally determinated, by substitution of their numerical values in the proposed, new values of nuclear radii are obtained. These values are compared with those found in the literature. (author) [pt

  13. Chiral asymmetry in nuclear beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Klinken, J.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear β decay can be instrumental to electroweak unification studies by observation of the degree of longitudinal polarization of β rays from allowed Fermi and from allowed Gamow-Teller decays. Possible deviations from maximality of this polarization bear on a fundamental question: is there a manifest left-right symmetry, indicated by right-handed currents and V+A admixture to a dominant V-A interaction? Discussed are absolute β - and relative β + measurements. The β - measurements are of long-standing age; the β + measurements are recent and not yet fully analyzed. A striking consequence of the polarization may be an intimate relation with the origin of life: can it be that the chirality of biomolecules is determined by the longitudinal polarization of β rays? 20 references, 9 figures

  14. Evidence against solar influence on nuclear decay constants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pommé

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that proximity to the Sun causes variation of decay constants at permille level has been tested and disproved. Repeated activity measurements of mono-radionuclide sources were performed over periods from 200 days up to four decades at 14 laboratories across the globe. Residuals from the exponential nuclear decay curves were inspected for annual oscillations. Systematic deviations from a purely exponential decay curve differ from one data set to another and are attributable to instabilities in the instrumentation and measurement conditions. The most stable activity measurements of alpha, beta-minus, electron capture, and beta-plus decaying sources set an upper limit of 0.0006% to 0.008% to the amplitude of annual oscillations in the decay rate. Oscillations in phase with Earth's orbital distance to the Sun could not be observed within a 10−6 to 10−5 range of precision. There are also no apparent modulations over periods of weeks or months. Consequently, there is no indication of a natural impediment against sub-permille accuracy in half-life determinations, renormalisation of activity to a distant reference date, application of nuclear dating for archaeology, geo- and cosmochronology, nor in establishing the SI unit becquerel and seeking international equivalence of activity standards.

  15. Is nuclear structure relevant to non-mesonic hyper-nuclear weak decay?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, H.C.; Ponce, W.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The focus of existing studies of the non-mesonic hypernuclear weak decay has been on the two-body process ΛN → NN, whereas the investigation on effects of nuclear structure is relatively rare. Some authors even assumed that the nuclear structure is irrelevant to the non mesonic hypernuclear weak decay. In this work we try to reveal the importance of nuclear structure in non mesonic weak decay of the Λ - hypernuclei through examining the relevance of many-body properties as well as the single particle properties of different nuclear models. For hypernucleus 12 Λ C, a comparison between the L-S coupling (realized by the symmetry model SU(4) x SU(3) and the j-j coupling (realized by the single particle shell model) gives an estimate of the range of nuclear structure effects. It has been found that while the total decay rate is almost independent of coupling schemes, the ratio Γn/Γp has a difference of around 30% between the two limits of many-body wave functions. There also exists a strong dependence of the total decay rate and the ratio Γn/Γp on the single particle properties of shell model, such as the binding energy of nucleon and the parameters of harmonic oscillator orbits, etc. Therefore, one may conclude that the nuclear structure is relevant to the non-mesonic hypernuclear weak decay. With the mechanism of ΛN → NN transition being restricted to one pion exchange (OPE) only, the consequences of possible contribution from the ΔI = 3/2 channel is investigated in a phenomenological manner. It has been shown that a mixing of ΔI = 3/2 channel will change the total decay rate as well as the ratio Γn/Γp considerably. (Author)

  16. Compilations and evaluations of nuclear structure and decay data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1977-03-01

    This is the second issue of a report series on published and to-be-published compilations and evaluations of nuclear structure and decay (NSD) data. This compilation of compilations and evaluations is designed to keep the nuclear scientific community informed of the availability of compiled or evaluated NSD data, and contains references to laboratory reports, journal articles and books containing selected compilations and evaluations. It excludes references to ''mass-chain'' evaluations normally published in the ''Nuclear Data Sheets'' and ''Nuclear Physics''. The material contained in this compilation is sorted according to eight subject categories: general compilations; basic isotopic properties; nuclear structure properties; nuclear decay processes; half-lives, energies and spectra; nuclear decay processes: gamma-rays; nuclear decay processes: fission products; nuclear decay processes: (others); atomic processes

  17. Statistical view on nuclear multifragmentation: Primary decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raduta, A.H.; Raduta, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    An overall view on the universe of primary decays appearing in the process of nuclear multifragmentation via a microcanonical Monte Carlo Metropolis type simulation is given. General characteristics like mass and charge distributions, relative probabilities of evaporation, fission, fragmentation and vaporization, average number of fragments and distributions of a number of intermediate mass fragments offer valuable information about the intimacy of the process. The capability of the model to describe unitary very different breakup regimes is pointed out. Predictions for charge distributions, isotopic yields, and fission mass distributions are compared with experimental data. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  18. Exotic nuclear structures and decays: new nuclear collective phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of the properties of exotic nuclei have revealed a surprising richness and diversity in their shapes, structures, and decay modes far exceeding our understandings and expectations of even a decay ago. From studies of far-off-stability exotic nuclei have come evidence for the coexistence of different nuclear shapes in the same nucleus, new regions of unusually large deformation, new ground-state phase transitions from one shape to another, new magic numbers but now for deformed shapes, and for the importance of reinforcing shell gaps. New exotic decay modes include a wide variety of beta delayed particle emission and heavy cluster emissions such as 14 C and 24 Ne. The new deformed magic numbers of 38 and 60 seen far off stability clearly support that there are likely other ''magic'' numbers for protons and neutrons which give stability to different deformed shapes. Perhaps these other new magic shell gap numbers at large deformation could influence the sticking of two very heavy nuclei in collisions such as U on Cm. Finally, another area which could have a bearing on the formation, motions, and structures of giant nuclear systems involves the recent observation of very energetic, light particle (proton, alpha) emission with up to 50% and more of the total incoming energy in a collision, for example in 300 MeV 32 S on Ta. 43 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Decay rates of various bottomonium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.

    1995-01-01

    Using the Bodwin-Braaten-Lepage factorization theorem in heavy quarkonium decay and production processes, the authors calculated matrix elements associated with S- and P-wave bottomonium decays via lattice QCD simulation methods. In this work, they report preliminary results on the operator matching between the lattice expression and the continuum expression at one loop level. Phenomenological implications are discussed using these preliminary MS matrix elements

  20. Precise predictions for inclusive semi-tauonic B decay rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannel, Thomas; Shahriaran, Farnoush [University of Siegen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We get Standard Model prediction for the decay rate of B → X{sub c}τν transitions. The triple differential decay rate has been derived including the nonperturbative corrections of order Λ{sub QCD}{sup 3}/m{sub b}{sup 3} and the leading O(α{sub s}) corrections. The total decay width is obtained by numerical integration with an estimated uncertainty of roughly 5%. We compare our result to the sum of the rates of the exclusive B → Dτν, B → D*τν and B → D**τν decays.

  1. Nuclear decay data measurements at the INEL ISOL facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, R.C.; Helmer, R.G.; Putnam, M.H.; Struttmann, D.A.; Watts, K.D.

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, the use of the mass separation technique coupled on-line to a source of fission product nuclides has provided a wealth of new information on the nuclear decay properties of such nuclides. In addition to their relevance in basic studies of nuclear properties of neutron-rich nuclei, the fission product nuclides as a group, because of their intimate link with energy production in fission reactors, occupy a unique position in the field of applied nuclear decay data. Further, in addition to their critical role in nuclear reactor technology (decay heat source term, environmental concerns, etc.), such data have important applications in astrophysical calculations involving the rapid neutron capture process (r-process) of elemental synthesis in stellar environments. The scope of the nuclear decay data measurements being undertaken using the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL) isotope separation on-line (ISOL) facility is focused on a systematic study of the gross nuclear decay properties of short-lived fission product isotopes, i.e., ground-state half-lives, beta-decay energies and beta-decay feeding (or beta-strength) distributions. In this paper, the authors discuss the results of new measurements of beta-decay energies and feeding distributions

  2. On the nuclear double beta decay: microscopic description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civitarese, Osvaldo

    1989-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the discussion of some problems related with microscopic descriptions of the nuclear double beta decay. It has been organized in the following order: 1) Review of the experimental situation; 2) Brief discussion of the theoretical aspects related to the current algebra, weak interaction, neutrino and majoron's status and 3) Elements of the standard nuclear theory involved in the calculation of transition densities for the nuclear double beta decay. (Author) [es

  3. Is nuclear structure relevant to non-mesonic hyper-nuclear weak decay?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, H.C.; Aristizabal, M.F.; Ponce, W.A.

    2002-01-01

    This work studies the relevance of nuclear structure in the non-mesonic weak decay of Λ-hypernuclei, with the mechanism of ΛN → NN transition being restricted to one pion exchange (OPE) only. As an application, for the hypernucleus Λ 12 C a comparison between the L-S coupling and the j-j coupling gives an estimate of the range of nuclear structure effects. A considerable dependence is found of the total decay rate and the ratio Γ n /Γ p on the single particle properties of nuclear models. The possible contribution from the ΔI = 3/2 channel is investigated in a phenomenological manner. (author)

  4. Searches for exotic interactions in nuclear beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naviliat-Cuncic, O. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, 640 S Shaw Lane, East Lansing MI 48824 (United States)

    2016-07-07

    This contribution presents current efforts in the search for exotic interactions in nuclear β decay using a calorimetric technique for the measurement of the β energy spectrum shape. We describe the criteria for the choice of sensitive candidates in Gamow-Teller transitions and present the status of measurements performed in {sup 6}He and {sup 20}F decay.

  5. Nuclear structure notes on element 115 decay chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudolph, D.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Forsberg, U.

    2015-01-01

    Hitherto collected data on more than hundred α-decay chains stemming from element 115 are combined to probe some aspects of the underlying nuclear structure of the heaviest atomic nuclei yet created in the laboratory

  6. Nuclear structure notes on element 115 decay chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolph, D., E-mail: Dirk.Rudolph@nuclear.lu.se; Sarmiento, L. G.; Forsberg, U. [Department of Physics, Lund University, 22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-10-15

    Hitherto collected data on more than hundred α-decay chains stemming from element 115 are combined to probe some aspects of the underlying nuclear structure of the heaviest atomic nuclei yet created in the laboratory.

  7. How to calculate α-decay rates in the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, B. Gillis; Ward, Daniel E.; Åberg, Sven

    2016-01-01

    New elements discovered during past decades have been created in fusion reactions where a lighter nucleus is collided with a heavier one. The new elements created often decay by emitting α particles. From the half-lives of the decays and the energies of the emitted particles one may extract some properties of the new elements. In this talk the recent work performed by the Lund group to model α decay starting from nuclear density-functional theory is reviewed and a possible extension is mentioned.

  8. Production and decay rates of the iota meson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, M.; O'Donnell, P.J.; Toronto Univ., Ontario

    1984-01-01

    We correlate the results for the mass spectrum of low lying isoscalar-pseudoscalar mesons with the production decay rates from J/psi->γP, with P=eta 1 , eta' 1 , eta 2 and iota and study the radiative decays of the iota meson. We conclude that the iota meson has to be interpreted as having a strong gluonium component. (orig.)

  9. O(α2) corrections to the orthopositronium decay rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faustov, R.N.; Martynenko, A.P.; Saleev, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    Relativistic O(α 2 ) corrections to the orthopositronium decay rate are calculated on the basis of a local quasipotential equation. We take into account the necessary contributions resulting from the amplitude of three-photon decay, the normalization condition of the wave function, and the second-order perturbation theory

  10. Hybrid model for the decay of nuclear giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.

    1986-12-01

    The decay properties of nuclear giant multipole resonances are discussed within a hybrid model that incorporates, in a unitary consistent way, both the coherent and statistical features. It is suggested that the 'direct' decay of the GR is described with continuum first RPA and the statistical decay calculated with a modified Hauser-Feshbach model. Application is made to the decay of the giant monopole resonance in 208 Pb. Suggestions are made concerning the calculation of the mixing parameter using the statistical properties of the shell model eigenstates at high excitation energies. (Author) [pt

  11. Nuclear structure and radioactive decay resources at the US National Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonzogni, A.A.; Burrows, T.W.; Pritychenko, B.; Tuli, J.K.; Winchell, D.F.

    2008-01-01

    The National Nuclear Data Center has a long tradition of evaluating nuclear structure and decay data as well as offering tools to assist in nuclear science research and applications. With these tools, users can obtain recommended values for nuclear structure and radioactive decay observables as well as links to the relevant articles. The main databases or tools are ENSDF, NSR, NuDat and the new Endf decay data library. The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) stores recommended nuclear structure and decay data for all nuclei. ENSDF deals with properties such as: -) nuclear level energies, spin and parity, half-life and decay modes, -) nuclear radiation energy and intensity for different types, -) nuclear decay modes and their probabilities. The Nuclear Science References (NSR) is a bibliographic database containing nearly 200.000 nuclear sciences articles indexed according to content. About 4000 are added each year covering 80 journals as well as conference proceedings and laboratory reports. NuDat is a software product with 2 main goals, to present nuclear structure and decay information from ENSDF in a user-friendly way and to allow users to execute complex search operations in the wealth of data contained in ENSDF. The recently released Endf-B7.0 contains a decay data sub-library which has been derived from ENSDF. The way all these databases and tools have been offered to the public has undergone a drastic improvement due to advancements in information technology

  12. Beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability of improved gross theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for unmeasured nuclei are adopted from the KTUY nuclear mass formula, which is based on the spherical-basis method. Considering the properties of the integrated Fermi function, we can roughly categorized energy region of excited-state of a daughter nucleus into three regions: a highly-excited energy region, which fully affect a delayed neutron probability, a middle energy region, which is estimated to contribute the decay heat, and a region neighboring the ground-state, which determines the beta-decay rate. Some results will be given in the presentation. A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for

  13. Nuclear aspects of double-beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoica, S.; Paun, V.

    2002-01-01

    Calculations of the neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ) matrix elements are performed with the second quasi random phase approximation (SQRPA) method for several nuclei. The results display a weak dependence on the single particle basis used and the Ikeda sum rule is fulfilled with good accuracy. Comparing our calculations with similar ones performed with other QRPA-based methods we estimate the accuracy of these methods in the prediction of the (0νββ) decay matrix elements and neutrino mass parameter, which is settled to about 50% from their calculated values. Taking the most recent experimental limits for the neutrinoless double beta decay half-lives, we also deduced new limits for the neutrino mass parameter. (authors)

  14. Predicting Atomic Decay Rates Using an Informational-Entropic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Jiang, Nan

    2018-06-01

    We show that a newly proposed Shannon-like entropic measure of shape complexity applicable to spatially-localized or periodic mathematical functions known as configurational entropy (CE) can be used as a predictor of spontaneous decay rates for one-electron atoms. The CE is constructed from the Fourier transform of the atomic probability density. For the hydrogen atom with degenerate states labeled with the principal quantum number n, we obtain a scaling law relating the n-averaged decay rates to the respective CE. The scaling law allows us to predict the n-averaged decay rate without relying on the traditional computation of dipole matrix elements. We tested the predictive power of our approach up to n = 20, obtaining an accuracy better than 3.7% within our numerical precision, as compared to spontaneous decay tables listed in the literature.

  15. Predicting Atomic Decay Rates Using an Informational-Entropic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Jiang, Nan

    2018-02-01

    We show that a newly proposed Shannon-like entropic measure of shape complexity applicable to spatially-localized or periodic mathematical functions known as configurational entropy (CE) can be used as a predictor of spontaneous decay rates for one-electron atoms. The CE is constructed from the Fourier transform of the atomic probability density. For the hydrogen atom with degenerate states labeled with the principal quantum number n, we obtain a scaling law relating the n-averaged decay rates to the respective CE. The scaling law allows us to predict the n-averaged decay rate without relying on the traditional computation of dipole matrix elements. We tested the predictive power of our approach up to n = 20, obtaining an accuracy better than 3.7% within our numerical precision, as compared to spontaneous decay tables listed in the literature.

  16. Proton and neutron decay rates in conventional and supersymmetric guts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salati, P.; Wallet, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    We present a general calculation of the two body decay rates of the nucleon, for the most general form of four-fermion ΔB = ΔL operators, in the framework of the SU(6) non-relativistic quark model. We have applied our general formulas to Higgs mediated decays in conventional and in supersymmetric SU(5) models. Lower bounds upon, the exchanged particles masses are given. We point out that the hierarchies of branching ratios in decays mediated by Higgs bosons are different from those of gauge boson decay modes (in the former case, neutrinos modes are dominant). We give, in conclusion, an experimental way to distinguish non-supersymmetric GUTs from supersymmetric ones, if the nucleon decays via Higgs bosons

  17. Method and apparatus for induced nuclear beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, H.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for inducing beta decay transition that are normally inhibited by angular momentum or parity considerations. According to one aspect of this invention a method of inducing nuclear beta decay transition comprises providing a medium which includes atomic nuclei that have forbidden beta decay transition in which the initial and final nuclear states do not have the same intrinsic parity or have total angular momenta which differ by more than one quantum unit of angular momentum, and applying to the medium an electromagnetic field which has an intensity sufficient to provide the angular momentum or intrinsic parity necessary to overcome the forbiddenness of the beta decay transition of the atomic nuclei, thereby to induce the beta decay transitions. According to another aspect of this invention an apparatus for inducing beta decay transition comprises a medium which includes atomic nuclei that have forbidden beta decay transitions in which the initial and final nuclear states do not have the same intrinsic parity or have total angular momenta which differ by more than one quantum unit of angular momentum, field producing means for producing an electromagnetic field in the medium and means for energising the field producing means to establish the field at an intensity sufficient to provide the angular momentum or intrinsic parity necessary to overcome the forbiddenness of the beta decay transitions of the atomic nuclei. The energy released in these induced nuclear transition is useful for the controlled production of power. The induced beta dacay transitions are also useful to reduce the halflives of long-lived fission product wastes from conventional nuclear fission power plants

  18. Compilations and evaluations of nuclear structure and decay data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1977-10-01

    This is the third issue of a report series on published and to-be-published compilations and evaluations of nuclear structure and decay (NSD) data. This compilation is published and distributed by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section approximately every six months. This compilation of compilations and evaluations is designed to keep the nuclear scientific community informed of the availability of compiled or evaluated NSD data, and contains references to laboratory reports, journal articles and books containing selected compilations and evaluations

  19. Double β-decay nuclear matrix elements and lepton conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergados, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    The nuclear matrix elements involved in the double β-decay of 48 Ca, 130 Te, and 128 Te were calculated using realistic nuclear interactions and shell model nuclear wave functions. The double doorway state is not appreciably mixed in the ground state of the final nuclei. So the ground state transitions contain a small fraction of the sum rule. A lepton nonconservation parameter eta -4 was deduced

  20. Beta decay and muon capture rates in a self-consistent relativistic framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marketin, Tomislav; Paar, Nils; Niksic, Tamara; Vretenar, Dario [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb (Croatia); Ring, Peter [Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Muenchen (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    A fully consistent calculation of muon capture and beta decay rates is presented, based on a microscopic theoretical framework describing the semileptonic weak interaction processes. Nuclear ground state is determined using the Relativistic Hartree-Bogolyubov (RHB) model with density dependent meson-nucleon coupling constants, and transition rates are calculated via proton-neutron relativistic quasiparticle RPA using the same interaction as in the RHB equations. Muon capture rates are calculated for a wide range of nuclei along the valley of stability, from {sup 12}C to {sup 244}Pu, with accuracy of approximately 30%, using the interaction DD-ME2. Previous studies of beta decay rates have only taken into account Gamow-Teller transitions. We extend this approach by including forbidden transitions and systematically study their contribution to decay rates of exotic nuclei along the r-process path, which are important for constraining the conditions in which nucleosynthesis takes place.

  1. Proposed experimental test of Bell's inequality in nuclear beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalsey, M.

    1986-01-01

    A β decay experiment is proposed for testing Bell's inequality, related to hidden-variables alternatives to quantum mechanics. The experiment uses Mott scattering for spin polarization analysis of internal conversion electrons. Beta-decay electrons, in cascade with the conversion electrons, are longitudinally polarized due to parity violation in the weak interaction. So simply detecting the β electron direction effectively measures the spin. A two-particle spin-spin correlation can thus be investigated and related, within certain assumptions, to Bell's inequality. The example of 203 Hg decay is used for a calculation of expected results. Specific problems related to nuclear structure and experimental inconsistencies are also discussed

  2. Textbook errors, 135: nuclear beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveland, W.

    1979-01-01

    Most general chemistry textbooks devote a chapter to the discussion of the subject of nuclear chemistry. Unfortunately, over 90% of these chapters contain serious conceptual errors in their treatment of fundamental nuclear processes. A correct but brief treatment of the subject is given

  3. Proton decay in a nucleus: Nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, L.A.; Alvarez-Estrada, R.F.; Sanchez-Gomez, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, proton decay in a large nucleus is studied in the framework of SU(5) grand unification theory (GUT). By using a method based upon the Green's-function technique of many-body physics, nuclear effects on spectator and pole terms are computed. The decay width in the nucleus is found to be practically the same as in free space. However, nuclear effects are of considerable importance concerning the positron spectrum. A density-correlation expansion is introduced which is useful for carrying out a systematic study of nuclear effects in proton decay in a large nucleus. The method presented here can be easily extended to other GUT's or supersymmetric GUT's

  4. Some problems in critical use of nuclear decay data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawada, Yasushi

    1975-01-01

    A great variety of radionuclides are utilized at present and they have been increasing steadly in number with the development of science and technology. Therefore, the parameters such as their decay patterns, half lives, kinds of radioactive ray, ratio of energy emission, coefficients of internal conversion, fluorescence yields, etc. should be grasped for RI utilization. This report gives the outline of the present status and some problems for arranging nuclear decay data from the viewpoint of utilizing radioisotopes. The compilation and evaluation of nuclear decay data prevailing at present are summarized in ''Table of Isotopes'' and ''Nuclear Data Sheets'', but some gaps are found between them. Conspicuous gaps are recognized in such data as half life, γ-ray intensity, radiation energy, coefficient of internal conversion, etc. Some problems are also found in the data of fluorescence yield,

  5. CP violating rate asymmetries in B decays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CP violating rate asymmetries in B decays. N G DESHPANDE. Institute of Theoretical Science, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403-5203, USA. Email: desh@oregon.uoregon.edu. Abstract. We briefly discuss measurements of angles β and α of the unitarity triangle. We then review rate asymmetries using SU´3µ ...

  6. Lifetime and production rate of beauty baryons from Z decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Alvsvaag, S J; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bocci, V; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Buys, A; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carrilho, P; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Daum, A; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; De Boeck, H; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Dupont, F; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fürstenau, H; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gillespie, D; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Haedinger, U; Hahn, F; Hahn, M; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Ioannou, P; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kalmus, George Ernest; Kapusta, F; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köhne, J H; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Królikowski, J; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Lokajícek, M; Loken, J G; López, J M; López-Fernandez, A; López-Aguera, M A; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, M; McNulty, M; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Ostankov, A P; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Squarcia, S; Stäck, H; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stepaniak, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Torassa, E; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Überschär, S; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Wehr, A; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Zach, F; Zacharatou-Jarlskog, C; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1995-01-01

    The production and decay of beauty baryons (b-baryons) have been studied using 1.7 \\times 10^6 Z hadronic decays collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP. Three different techniques were used to identify the b-baryons. The first method used pairs of a \\Lambda and a lepton to tag the b-baryon decay. The second method associated fully reconstructed \\Lambda_c baryons with leptons. The third analysis reconstructed the b-baryon decay points by forming secondary vertices from identified protons and muons of opposite sign. Using these methods the following production rates were measured: \\begin{eqnarray*} f(\\qb \\ra \\Bb) \\times \\BR(\\Bb \\ra \\mLs \\ell\\bar{\

  7. Modeling decay rates of dead wood in a neotropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hérault, Bruno; Beauchêne, Jacques; Muller, Félix; Wagner, Fabien; Baraloto, Christopher; Blanc, Lilian; Martin, Jean-Michel

    2010-09-01

    Variation of dead wood decay rates among tropical trees remains one source of uncertainty in global models of the carbon cycle. Taking advantage of a broad forest plot network surveyed for tree mortality over a 23-year period, we measured the remaining fraction of boles from 367 dead trees from 26 neotropical species widely varying in wood density (0.23-1.24 g cm(-3)) and tree circumference at death time (31.5-272.0 cm). We modeled decay rates within a Bayesian framework assuming a first order differential equation to model the decomposition process and tested for the effects of forest management (selective logging vs. unexploited), of mode of death (standing vs. downed) and of topographical levels (bottomlands vs. hillsides vs. hilltops) on wood decay rates. The general decay model predicts the observed remaining fraction of dead wood (R2 = 60%) with only two biological predictors: tree circumference at death time and wood specific density. Neither selective logging nor local topography had a differential effect on wood decay rates. Including the mode of death into the model revealed that standing dead trees decomposed faster than downed dead trees, but the gain of model accuracy remains rather marginal. Overall, these results suggest that the release of carbon from tropical dead trees to the atmosphere can be simply estimated using tree circumference at death time and wood density.

  8. Decay heat rates calculated using ORIGEN-S and CINDER10 with common data libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, M.C.; Hermann, O.W.; Beard, C.A.; Bohnhoff, W.J.; England, T.R.

    1991-01-01

    A set of two benchmark problems were proposed as part of an international comparison of decay heat codes. Problem specifications included explicit fission-yield, decay and capture data libraries to be used in the calculations. This paper describes the results obtained using these common data to perform the benchmark calculations with two popular depletion codes, ORIGEN-S and CINDER10. Short descriptions of the methods used by each of these codes are also presented. Results from other contributors to the international comparison are discussed briefly. This comparison of decay heat codes using common data libraries demonstrates that discrepant results in calculated decay heat rates are the result of differences in the nuclear data input to the codes and not the method of solution. 15 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs

  9. Workshop on nuclear structure and decay data evaluation. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.; Nichols, A.L.

    2003-01-01

    A summary is given of the aims and contents of the Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluation, including the agenda, lists of participants and their presentations, general comments and recommendations. The 1-week workshop was organized by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, and held in Vienna, Austria, from 18 to 22 November 2002. Workshop material, including participants' presentations, computer codes, manuals and other materials for NSDD evaluators, are freely available on CD-ROM on request. (author)

  10. Decay rate of the false vacuum at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eboli, O.J.P.; Marques, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    We investigate, within the semiclassical approach, the high temperature behaviour of the decay rate (Γ) of the metastable vacuum in Field Theory. We exhibit some exactly soluble (1+1) and (3+1) dimensional examples and develop a formal expression for γ in the high temperature limit. (Author) [pt

  11. Nuclear decay data files of the Dosimetry Research Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Westfall, R.J.; Ryman, J.C.; Cristy, M.

    1993-12-01

    This report documents the nuclear decay data files used by the Dosimetry Research Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the utility DEXRAX which provides access to the files. The files are accessed, by nuclide, to extract information on the intensities and energies of the radiations associated with spontaneous nuclear transformation of the radionuclides. In addition, beta spectral data are available for all beta-emitting nuclides. Two collections of nuclear decay data are discussed. The larger collection contains data for 838 radionuclides, which includes the 825 radionuclides assembled during the preparation of Publications 30 and 38 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and 13 additional nuclides evaluated in preparing a monograph for the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The second collection is composed of data from the MIRD monograph and contains information for 242 radionuclides. Abridged tabulations of these data have been published by the ICRP in Publication 38 and by the Society of Nuclear Medicine in a monograph entitled ''MIRD: Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes.'' The beta spectral data reported here have not been published by either organization. Electronic copies of the files and the utility, along with this report, are available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  12. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The primary focus this year has been the continuing studies of intruder states and shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient Z /approximately/ 82 region. Most notably, an extensive region of odd-mass nuclei is emerging within which low-lying low-energy electric monopole (EO) transitions occur. This is a completely new nuclear structure phenomenon. The empirical results are based on on-line decay scheme spectroscopy of mass-separated isotopes at UNISOR. In particular, many transition multipolarities are determined from conversion electron subshell ratios observed in γ-gated electron coincidence spectra. This is a completely new nuclear spectroscopic technique. To cite a specific example: our studies of the 185 Au → 185 Pt decay scheme reveal at least 11 transitions with EO components. This is unprecedented in nuclear structure. The role of EO transitions is being pursued in the larger framework of a signature of shape coexistence in nuclei

  13. Nuclear beta decay far from stability and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor, H.V.

    1988-01-01

    Beta decay data of nuclei far from stability are one of the most important nuclear physics input for the understanding of the element systhesis in the universe and determination of the age of the universe from cosmochronometers and by the latter have implications also for cosmology. The present status of theoretical predictions of beta decay far from stability will be reviewed and the impact on the above astrophysical questions will be outlined. First results of second generation microscopic calculations of β F half lives, which are at present in progress, will be presented. (orig.)

  14. Atomic and nuclear parameters of single electron capture decaying nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau, A.

    1981-01-01

    Atomic and nuclear parameters of the following nuclides which decay by electron capture have been calculated: 37 A r, 41 C a, 49 V , 53 M n, 55 F e,59 N i, 68Ge,82 S r, 97 T c, 118 T e, 131 C s, 137 L a, 140 N d, 157 T b, 165 E r, 193 p t, 194 H g, and 205 P h The evaluation rules are included in the first part of the paper. The values and the associated uncertainties of the following parameters have been tabulated: decay energy, electron capture probabilities, fluorescence yield, electron emission and X-ray emission. (Author) 27 refs

  15. Beta decay rates of neutron-rich nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marketin, Tomislav; Huther, Lutz; Petković, Jelena; Paar, Nils; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Heavy element nucleosynthesis models involve various properties of thousands of nuclei in order to simulate the intricate details of the process. By necessity, as most of these nuclei cannot be studied in a controlled environment, these models must rely on the nuclear structure models for input. Of all the properties, the beta-decay half-lives are one of the most important ones due to their direct impact on the resulting abundance distributions. In this study we present the results of a large-scale calculation based on the relativistic nuclear energy density functional, where both the allowed and the first-forbidden transitions are studied in more than 5000 neutron-rich nuclei. Aside from the astrophysical applications, the results of this calculation can also be employed in the modeling of the electron and antineutrino spectra from nuclear reactors.

  16. Beta decay rates of neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marketin, Tomislav; Petković, Jelena; Paar, Nils; Huther, Lutz; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Heavy element nucleosynthesis models involve various properties of thousands of nuclei in order to simulate the intricate details of the process. By necessity, as most of these nuclei cannot be studied in a controlled environment, these models must rely on the nuclear structure models for input. Of all the properties, the beta-decay half-lives are one of the most important ones due to their direct impact on the resulting abundance distributions. In this study we present the results of a large-scale calculation based on the relativistic nuclear energy density functional, where both the allowed and the first-forbidden transitions are studied in more than 5000 neutron-rich nuclei. Aside from the astrophysical applications, the results of this calculation can also be employed in the modeling of the electron and antineutrino spectra from nuclear reactors.

  17. Beta decay rates of neutron-rich nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marketin, Tomislav, E-mail: marketin@phy.hr; Petković, Jelena; Paar, Nils [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Huther, Lutz [Institut für Kernphysik (Theoriezentrum), Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel [Institut für Kernphysik (Theoriezentrum), Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerioneneforschung, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-06-21

    Heavy element nucleosynthesis models involve various properties of thousands of nuclei in order to simulate the intricate details of the process. By necessity, as most of these nuclei cannot be studied in a controlled environment, these models must rely on the nuclear structure models for input. Of all the properties, the beta-decay half-lives are one of the most important ones due to their direct impact on the resulting abundance distributions. In this study we present the results of a large-scale calculation based on the relativistic nuclear energy density functional, where both the allowed and the first-forbidden transitions are studied in more than 5000 neutron-rich nuclei. Aside from the astrophysical applications, the results of this calculation can also be employed in the modeling of the electron and antineutrino spectra from nuclear reactors.

  18. Heavy particle decay studies using different versions of nuclear potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Sukumaran, Indu

    2017-10-01

    The heavy particle decay from 212-240Pa , 219-245Np , 228-246Pu , 230-249Am , and 232-252Cm leading to doubly magic 208Pb and its neighboring nuclei have been studied using fourteen versions of nuclear potentials. The study has shown that the barrier penetrability as well as the decay half-lives are found to vary with the nuclear potential used. The investigated decay events of the emission of the clusters 22Ne , 24Ne , 26Mg , 28Mg , 32Si and 33Si are not experimentally detected yet but may be detectable in the future. As most of the half-lives predicted are found to lie within the experimental upper limit, T 1/2 parents with varying slopes and intercepts. Also, it is to be noted that the linearity of the GN plots is unaltered using different nuclear potentials. The universal curve studied ( log10 T 1/2 vs. -ln P for various clusters emitted from various parents shows a linear behavior with the same slope and intercept irrespective of the nuclear potential used.

  19. Decay heat and gamma dose-rate prediction capability in spent LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neely, G.J.; Schmittroth, F.

    1982-08-01

    The ORIGEN2 code was established as a valid means to predict decay heat from LWR spent fuel assemblies for decay times up to 10,000 year. Calculational uncertainties ranged from 8.6% to a maximum of 16% at 2.5 years and 300 years cooling time, respectively. The calculational uncertainties at 2.5 years cooling time are supported by experiment. Major sources of uncertainty at the 2.5 year cooling time were identifed as irradiation history (5.7%) and nuclear data together with calculational methods (6.3%). The QAD shielding code was established as a valid means to predict interior and exterior gamma dose rates of spent LWR fuel assemblies. A calculational/measurement comparison was done on two assemblies with different irradiation histories and supports a 35% calculational uncertainty at the 1.8 and 3.0 year decay times studied. Uncertainties at longer times are expected to increase, but not significantly, due to an increased contribution from the actinides whose inventories are assigned a higher uncertainty. The uncertainty in decay heat rises to a maximum of 16% due to actinide uncertainties. A previous study was made of the neutron emission rate from a typical Turkey Point Unit 3, Region 4 spent fuel assembly at 5 years decay time. A conservative estimate of the neutron dose rate at the assembly surface was less than 0.5 rem/hr

  20. Searches for massive neutrinos in nuclear beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaros, J.A.

    1992-10-01

    The status of searches for massive neutrinos in nuclear beta decay is reviewed. The claim by an ITEP group that the electron antineutrino mass > 17eV has been disputed by all the subsequent experiments. Current measurements of the tritium beta spectrum limit m bar νe < 10 eV. The status of the 17 keV neutrino is reviewed. The strong null results from INS Tokyo and Argonne, and deficiencies in the experiments which reported positive effects, make it unreasonable to ascribe the spectral distortions seen by Simpson, Hime, and others to a 17keV neutrino. Several new ideas on how to search for massive neutrinos in nuclear beta decay are discussed

  1. Alpha-decay within Feshbach theory of nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandulescu, A.; Silisteanu, I.; Wunsch, R.

    1977-01-01

    In the frame of Feshbach theory of nuclear reactions the alpha-decay widths are determined by the alpha-daughter nucleus optical potential and by the formation factors. It is shown that the calculated absolute values of the alpha widths for Po light isotopes are in good agreement with experimental data, if the real part of the optical potential with the parameters fitted by the low energy α-scattering is used

  2. Nuclear data newsletter. No. 20. Nuclear structure and decay data network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This special issue of the Nuclear Data Newsletter dated November 1994 gives information on the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Network established in 1974 under the auspices of the IAEA and comprising 17 laboratories and universities in 10 countries. The procedures for online access to US National Nuclear Data Center, NEA Data Bank in Paris and IAEA Nuclear Data Section in Vienna are presented

  3. Nuclear data newsletter. No. 20. Nuclear structure and decay data network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    This special issue of the Nuclear Data Newsletter dated November 1994 gives information on the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Network established in 1974 under the auspices of the IAEA and comprising 17 laboratories and universities in 10 countries. The procedures for online access to US National Nuclear Data Center, NEA Data Bank in Paris and IAEA Nuclear Data Section in Vienna are presented.

  4. Decay rate of the false vacuum at high tempratures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eboli, O.J.P.; Marques, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Within the semiclassical approach, the high temperaure behaviour of the decay rate of the metastable vacuum in Field Theory is investigated. It is shown that, contrarily to what has been proposed in the literature, the pre-exponential factor exhibits a nontrivial dependence on the temperature. Furthermore, this dependence is such that at very high temperatures it is as important as the exponential factor and consequently it spoils many conclusions drawn up to now on Cosmological Phase Transitions. (Author) [pt

  5. Beta decay rates of neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marketin, Tomislav; Huther, Lutz; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Heavy element nucleosynthesis models involve various properties of thousands of nuclei in order to simulate the intricate details of the process. By necessity, as most of these nuclei cannot be studied in a controlled environment, these models must rely on the nuclear structure models for input. Of all the properties, the beta-decay half-lives are one of the most important ones due to their direct impact on the resulting abundance distributions. Currently, a single large-scale calculation is available based on a QRPA calculation with a schematic interaction on top of the Finite Range Droplet Model. In this study we present the results of a large-scale calculation based on the relativistic nuclear energy density functional, where both the allowed and the first-forbidden transitions are studied in more than 5000 neutron-rich nuclei

  6. Beta decay rates of neutron-rich nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marketin, Tomislav, E-mail: marketin@phy.hr [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Huther, Lutz [Institut für Kernphysik (Theoriezentrum), Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel [Institut für Kernphysik (Theoriezentrum), Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerioneneforschung, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Heavy element nucleosynthesis models involve various properties of thousands of nuclei in order to simulate the intricate details of the process. By necessity, as most of these nuclei cannot be studied in a controlled environment, these models must rely on the nuclear structure models for input. Of all the properties, the beta-decay half-lives are one of the most important ones due to their direct impact on the resulting abundance distributions. Currently, a single large-scale calculation is available based on a QRPA calculation with a schematic interaction on top of the Finite Range Droplet Model. In this study we present the results of a large-scale calculation based on the relativistic nuclear energy density functional, where both the allowed and the first-forbidden transitions are studied in more than 5000 neutron-rich nuclei.

  7. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND DECAY DATA: INTRODUCTION TO RELEVANT WEB PAGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BURROWS, T.W.; MCLAUGHLIN, P.D.; NICHOLS, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    A brief description is given of the nuclear data centres around the world able to provide access to those databases and programs of highest relevance to nuclear structure and decay data specialists. A number of Web-page addresses are also provided for the reader to inspect and investigate these data and codes for study, evaluation and calculation. These instructions are not meant to be comprehensive, but should provide the reader with a reasonable means of electronic access to the most important data sets and programs

  8. Radiative decay rates in Si crystallites with a donor ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbenyova, Natalia V.; Burdov, Vladimir A.

    2018-04-01

    Within the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory, the radiative recombination rates have been calculated for small, ˜1 nm in diameter, hydrogen-passivated silicon crystallites with a single lithium or phosphorus ion. Sharp increase of the radiative recombination rates with increasing temperature was revealed for the crystallites with the lithium ion. No temperature effect was found for the crystallites with the ion of P. It was also shown that the presence of ionized donors in Si crystallites can substantially accelerate the radiative decay compared to the case of pure crystallites.

  9. Decay rates of resonance states at high level density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, E.; Technische Univ. Dresden; Gorin, T.; Technische Univ. Dresden; Rotter, I.; Technische Univ. Dresden

    1996-05-01

    The time dependent Schroedinger equation of an open quantum mechanical system is solved by using the stationary bi-orthogonal eigenfunctions of the non-Hermitean time independent Hamilton operator. We calculate the decay rates at low and high level density in two different formalism. The rates are, generally, time dependent and oscillate around an average value due to the non-orthogonality of the wavefunctions. The decay law is studied disregarding the oscillations. In the one-channel case, it is proportional to t -b with b∼3/2 in all cases considered, including the critical region of overlapping where the non-orthogonality of the wavefunctions is large. Starting from the shell model, we get b∼2 for 2 and 4 open decay channels and all coupling strengths to the continuum. When the closed system is described by a random matrix, b∼1+K/2 for K=2 and 4 channels. This law holds in a limited time interval. The distribution of the widths is different in the two models when more than one channel are open. This leads to the different exponents b in the power law. Our calculations are performed with 190 and 130 states, respectively, most of them in the critical region. The theoretical results should be proven experimentally by measuring the time behaviour of de-excitation of a realistic quantum system. (orig.)

  10. Nuclear decay data for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1977-08-01

    This report gives tabulations of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted by 240 radionuclides. Most of the radionuclides are those expected to occur in routine releases of effluents from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. For each radionuclide are given the half-life and recommended values for the energies, intensities, and equilibrium absorbed-dose constants for each of the atomic and nuclear radiations. Also given are the daughter radionuclides produced and recommended values for decay branching ratios, where applicable. The radioactivity decay chains and branching ratios are displayed in diagram form.

  11. Nuclear decay data for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1977-08-01

    This report gives tabulations of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted by 240 radionuclides. Most of the radionuclides are those expected to occur in routine releases of effluents from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. For each radionuclide are given the half-life and recommended values for the energies, intensities, and equilibrium absorbed-dose constants for each of the atomic and nuclear radiations. Also given are the daughter radionuclides produced and recommended values for decay branching ratios, where applicable. The radioactivity decay chains and branching ratios are displayed in diagram form

  12. Laser enhanced radioactive decay and selective transmutation of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saloman, R.; Aarnio, P.; Ala-Heikkila, J.; Hakola, A.; Santala, M.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated narrow-band coherent laser radiation - ranging from visible to X- and to gamma-ray wave length region - and their interactions both directly with photon-nuclear couplings and indirectly through the photon-electron and electron-nucleus interactions. In particular we discuss various means of selective excitation of nuclear resonance states by narrowband lasers. During the relaxation process the active nucleus may return to its initial ground-state or find another final state. In the latter case the nucleus is transmuted into a state which may have beneficial properties for instance concerning radioactivity. One ideal case would be the destruction of long-lived nuclear waste isotopes into faster decaying ones. The essential presumption is that the excitation process is selective and efficient as regards background processes due to unwanted excitation channels of the primary isotope and due to other surrounding nuclides. The paper consists of 1) a short review of generating short-wave length coherent light sources, 2) a survey of potential photon-induced nuclear states and their decay channels, and 3) a determination of the selectivity of the transmutation process

  13. Nuclear transparency and double beta decay of molybdenum 100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, H.W.

    1992-08-01

    Data taking is now complete on a double beta decay experiment which has been carried out with collaborators from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the University of New Mexico, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and work is continuing on a second collaborative experiment, AGS experiment 850 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory to study nuclear color transparency. In March, the experimental apparatus used to search for double beta decay in molybdenum 100 in the Consil silver mine in Osburn, Idaho was dismantled, and the data analysis is in its final stages. No evidence has been seen for the O + → O + mode of zero neutrino double beta decay collaborators with a 1σ lifetime limit of 3 x 10 22 years. This limit is 7.5 times greater than the limit we published previously in Physical Review Letters in 1989. Backgrounds have been simulated and fits are currently underway to a simulated O + → 2 + mode of zero neutrino double beta decay to improve on a very preliminary 1σ lifetime limit of 2.3 x 10 21 years presented at the April, 1992 meeting of the APS in Washington. A scintillating fiber detector with three Hamamatsu, H4140, 256 channel multianode phototubes has been built, instrumented, and tested in the May--July 1992 run in the EVA detector at Brookhaven Laboratory's AGS. Preliminary results from this detector have been disappointing. it is likely that the detector will have to be substantially redesigned before the 1993 AGS run

  14. Improvement of gross theory of beta-decay for application to nuclear data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koura, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Tadashi; Tachibana, Takahiro; Chiba, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    A theoretical study of β decay and delayed neutron has been carried out with a global β-decay model, the gross theory. The gross theory is based on a consideration of the sum rule of the β-strength function, and gives reasonable results of β-decay rates and delayed neutron in the entire nuclear mass region. In a fissioning nucleus, neutrons are produced by β decay of neutron-rich fission fragments from actinides known as delayed neutrons. The average number of delayed neutrons is estimated based on the sum of the β-delayed neutron-emission probabilities multiplied by the cumulative fission yield for each nucleus. Such a behavior is important to manipulate nuclear reactors, and when we adopt some new high-burn-up reactors, properties of minor actinides will play an important roll in the system, but these data have not been sufficient. We re-analyze and improve the gross theory. For example, we considered the parity of neutrons and protons at the Fermi surface, and treat a suppression for the allowed transitions in the framework of the gross theory. By using the improved gross theory, underestimated half-lives in the neutron-rich indium isotopes and neighboring region increase, and consequently follow experimental trend. The ability of reproduction (and also prediction) of the β-decay rates, delayed-neutron emission probabilities is discussed. With this work, we have described the development of a programming code of the gross theory of β-decay including the improved parts. After preparation finished, this code can be released for the nuclear data community.

  15. Relativistic QRPA Calculation of β-Decay Rates of r-process Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marketin, T.; Paar, N.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.

    2009-01-01

    A systematic, fully self-consistent calculation of β-decay rates is presented, based on a microscopic theoretical framework. Analysis is performed on a large number of nuclei from the valley of β stability towards the neutron drip-line. Nuclear ground state is determined using the Relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model with density-dependent meson-nucleon coupling constants. Transition rates are calculated within the proton-neutron relativistic quasiparticle RPA (pn-RQRPA) using the same interaction that was used in the RHB equations.

  16. New studies of nuclear decay γ-rays from novae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starrfield, S.; Truran, J.W.; Wiescher, M.C.; Sparks, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    The cause of the nova outburst is a thermonuclear runaway (TNR) in hydrogen rich material transferred by a companion onto a white dwarf. Studies of this phenomenon have shown that the TNR produces large concentrations of the short lived positron unstable isotopes of the CNO nuclei which are transported to the surface by convection so that early in the outburst we expect significant numbers of radioactive decays to occur at the surface. The resulting γ-ray emission may be detectable from nearby novae early in their outbursts. The TNR is also expected to produce substantial amounts of 7 Be and 22 Na. Their decays also yield potentially detectable levels of γ-ray emission for relatively nearby novae. We are also interested in the role played by novae in the production of the ∼2M circle-dot of 26 Al found in the galaxy. In order to improve our predictions of this phenomenon, we have performed a new set of calculations of TNR close-quote s on ONeMg and CO white dwarfs with an updated nuclear reaction network and opacities. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  17. Nuclear parameters determination of the 127Te β - decay: a proposal for teaching nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, Wagner Fonseca

    2011-01-01

    A study of the 127 Te β - decay was carried out by means of gamma spectroscopy measurements using high resolution HPGe detector, in the region from 30 keV to 1.0 MeV, aiming to get a better understanding of the 127 Te nuclear structure. The radioactive sources of 12 7Te were obtained from the 126 Te(n,γ) 1 '2 7 Te nuclear reaction produced in the IEA- R1 nuclear reactor at IPEN/CNEN-SP. Five gamma t ransitions previously attributed to this decay were confirmed with a better precision than previously. The half-life of 127 Te was also studied resulting in data with lower uncertainty. Using a set of data selected from gamma spectroscopy measurements was developed and applied a didactic proposal for high school students using the Excel software. (author)

  18. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The primary focus has been studies of intruder states and shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient Z equal to 82 region. Most notably, the structure of the neutron-deficient Au isotopes has been studied by on-line decay scheme spectroscopy of mass-separated isotopes at UNISOR, by on-line low-temperature nuclear orientation of mass-separated isotopes at LISOL, and by on-line laser atomic hyperfine spectroscopy of mass-separated isotopes at ISOLDE. Theoretical studies of neutron-deficient Au isotopes have been made. The most dramatic result is the observation of a sudden large increase in the mean-square charge radius between 187 Au and 186 Au, seen in the laser spectroscopy measurements as ISOLDE

  19. Decay spectroscopy for nuclear astrophysics: β- and β-delayed proton decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trache, L.; Banu, A.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Simmons, E.; Spiridon, A.; Tribble, R. E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Äysto, J.; Davinson, T.; Lotay, G.; Woods, P. J.; Pollacco, E.

    2012-02-01

    In several radiative proton capture reactions important in novae and XRBs, the resonant parts play the capital role. We use decay spectroscopy techniques to find these resonances and study their properties. We have developed techniques to measure beta- and beta-delayed proton decay of sd-shell, proton-rich nuclei produced and separated with the MARS recoil spectrometer of Texas A&M University. The short-lived radioactive species are produced in-flight, separated, then slowed down (from about 40 MeV/u) and implanted in the middle of very thin Si detectors. This allows us to measure protons with energies as low as 200 keV from nuclei with lifetimes of 100 ms or less. At the same time we measure gamma-rays up to 8 MeV with high resolution HPGe detectors. We have studied the decay of 23Al, 27P, 31Cl, all important for understanding explosive H-burning in novae. The technique has shown a remarkable selectivity to beta-delayed charged-particle emission and works even at radioactive beam rates of a few pps. The states populated are resonances for the radiative proton capture reactions 22Na(p,γ)23Mg (crucial for the depletion of 22Na in novae), 26mAl(p,γ)27Si and 30P(p,γ)31S (bottleneck in novae and XRB burning), respectively. Lastly, results with a new detector that allowed us to measure down to about 80 keV proton energy are announced.

  20. Decay spectroscopy for nuclear astrophysics: β- and β-delayed proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trache, L; Banu, A; Hardy, J C; Iacob, V E; McCleskey, M; Roeder, B T; Simmons, E; Spiridon, A; Tribble, R E; Saastamoinen, A; Jokinen, A; Äysto, J; Davinson, T; Lotay, G; Woods, P J; Pollacco, E

    2012-01-01

    In several radiative proton capture reactions important in novae and XRBs, the resonant parts play the capital role. We use decay spectroscopy techniques to find these resonances and study their properties. We have developed techniques to measure beta- and beta-delayed proton decay of sd-shell, proton-rich nuclei produced and separated with the MARS recoil spectrometer of Texas A and M University. The short-lived radioactive species are produced in-flight, separated, then slowed down (from about 40 MeV/u) and implanted in the middle of very thin Si detectors. This allows us to measure protons with energies as low as 200 keV from nuclei with lifetimes of 100 ms or less. At the same time we measure gamma-rays up to 8 MeV with high resolution HPGe detectors. We have studied the decay of 23 Al, 27 P, 31 Cl, all important for understanding explosive H-burning in novae. The technique has shown a remarkable selectivity to beta-delayed charged-particle emission and works even at radioactive beam rates of a few pps. The states populated are resonances for the radiative proton capture reactions 22 Na(p,γ) 23 Mg (crucial for the depletion of 22 Na in novae), 26m Al(p,γ) 27 Si and 30 P(p,γ) 31 S (bottleneck in novae and XRB burning), respectively. Lastly, results with a new detector that allowed us to measure down to about 80 keV proton energy are announced.

  1. A triggerless digital data acquisition system for nuclear decay experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agramunt, J.; Tain, J. L.; Albiol, F.; Algora, A.; Estevez, E.; Giubrone, G.; Jordan, M. D.; Molina, F.; Rubio, B.; Valencia, E. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Centro Mixto C.S.I.C. - Univ. Valencia, Apdo. Correos 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2013-06-10

    In nuclear decay experiments an important goal of the Data Acquisition (DAQ) system is to allow the reconstruction of time correlations between signals registered in different detectors. Classically DAQ systems are based in a trigger that starts the event acquisition, and all data related with the event of that trigger are collected as one compact structure. New technologies and electronics developments offer new possibilities to nuclear experiments with the use of sampling ADC-s. This type of ADC-s is able to provide the pulse shape, height and a time stamp of the signal. This new feature (time stamp) allows new systems to run without an event trigger. Later, the event can be reconstructed using the time stamp information. In this work we present a new DAQ developed for {beta}-delayed neutron emission experiments. Due to the long moderation time of neutrons, we opted for a self-trigger DAQ based on commercial digitizers. With this DAQ a negligible acquisition dead time was achieved while keeping a maximum of event information and flexibility in time correlations.

  2. Co-ordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1991-11-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the ninth meeting of the international nuclear structure and decay data network at Kuwait, 10-14 March 1990. The meeting was attended by 19 scientists from 9 Member States and two international organizations, concerned with the compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. The document contains a summary and the proceedings of the meeting, and in annexes, status reports of activities in nuclear structure and decay data from the participating centers. A separate abstract was prepared for one of the scientific lectures related to the topics of the meeting which is reproduced in full length. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Co-ordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.J.

    1988-10-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the eighth meeting of the international nuclear structure and decay data network at Ghent, Belgium, 16-20 May 1988. The meeting was attended by 21 scientists from 12 Member States and three international organizations, concerned with the compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. This document contains a summary of the meeting, the proceedings of the meeting and in appendices status reports of activities in nuclear structure and decay data from the participating centers. Refs and tabs

  4. Direct vs statistical decay of nuclear giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.

    1986-07-01

    A theoretical framework for the description of the decay of giant multipole resonances is developed. Besides the direct decay, both the pre-equilibrium and statistical (compound) decays are taken into account in a consistent way. It is shown that the statistical decay of the GR is not necessarily correctly described by the Hauser-Feshbach theory owing to the presence of a mixing parameter, which measures the degree of fragmentation. Applications are made to several cases. (Author) [pt

  5. Direct vs statistical decay of nuclear giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Hussein, M.S.; Carlson, B.V.; Merchant, A.C.; Adhikari, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical framework for the description of the decay of giant multipole resonances id developed. Besides the direct decay, both the pre-equilibrium and statistical (compound) decays are taken into account in a consistent way. It is shown that the statistical decay of the giant resonance is not necessarily described by the Hauser-Feshbach theory owing to the presence of a mixing parameter, which measures the degree of fragmentation. Applications are made to several cases. (Author) [pt

  6. Complex degradation processes lead to non-exponential decay patterns and age-dependent decay rates of messenger RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlus Deneke

    Full Text Available Experimental studies on mRNA stability have established several, qualitatively distinct decay patterns for the amount of mRNA within the living cell. Furthermore, a variety of different and complex biochemical pathways for mRNA degradation have been identified. The central aim of this paper is to bring together both the experimental evidence about the decay patterns and the biochemical knowledge about the multi-step nature of mRNA degradation in a coherent mathematical theory. We first introduce a mathematical relationship between the mRNA decay pattern and the lifetime distribution of individual mRNA molecules. This relationship reveals that the mRNA decay patterns at steady state expression level must obey a general convexity condition, which applies to any degradation mechanism. Next, we develop a theory, formulated as a Markov chain model, that recapitulates some aspects of the multi-step nature of mRNA degradation. We apply our theory to experimental data for yeast and explicitly derive the lifetime distribution of the corresponding mRNAs. Thereby, we show how to extract single-molecule properties of an mRNA, such as the age-dependent decay rate and the residual lifetime. Finally, we analyze the decay patterns of the whole translatome of yeast cells and show that yeast mRNAs can be grouped into three broad classes that exhibit three distinct decay patterns. This paper provides both a method to accurately analyze non-exponential mRNA decay patterns and a tool to validate different models of degradation using decay data.

  7. Modification of the rate of β-decay by chiral molecular environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garay, A.S.; Biological Research Center, Szeged

    2000-01-01

    The radioactive isotope 32 P in the form of phosphoric acid (H 3 32 PO 4 ) and 22 Na in the form of sodium chloride ( 22 NaCl), were dissolved in R and S mirror image chiral solvents of 2-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) and diethyltartrate (DET). Then their decay rates were determined and compared to each other, to their decay rates in water and to their decay rates in racemic mixtures. It was found that 32 P decayed significantly faster if dissolved in R-PBA than in S-PBA. Similarly, 22 Na decayed significantly faster if dissolved in R-DET than in S-DET. Evidently the decay rates are sensitive to the right- and left-handed potential fields of the solvent molecules. However, the decay rate of 32 P was insensitive to the chiral senses of the DET solvents. Similarly, the decay rate of 22 Na was insensitive to the chiral senses of the PBA solvents. This can be tentatively explained by the interactions between the solvents and the solutes. It was also observed that in the first ten percent of the half-life time the decay of 32 P and particularly the decay of 22 Na often showed some deviation from the exponential behavior. This effect is chirality-dependent. (author)

  8. Relativistic QRPA calculation of β-decay rates of r-process nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marketin, T.; Paar, N.; Niksic, T.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) is responsible for the creation of many nuclei heavier than iron. To describe the r-process, precise data is needed on a large number of neutron-rich nuclei, most of which are not experimentally reachable. One crucial parameter in modeling the nucleosynthesis are the half-lives of the nuclei through which the r-process runs. Therefore, it is of great importance to develop a reliable predictive model which can be applied to the decay of exotic nuclei. A fully self-consistent calculation of β-decay rates is presented, based on a microscopic theoretical framework. Nuclear ground state is determined using the Relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model with density-dependent meson-nucleon coupling constants. Momentum dependent terms are also included to improve the density of single-particle states around the Fermi level via an increase of the effective nucleon mass [1]. Transition rates are calculated within the proton-neutron relativistic quasiparticle RPA using the same interaction that was used in the RHB equations. In this way no additional parameters are introduced in the RPA calculation. Weak interaction rates are calculated using the current-current formalism previously employed in the study of other astrophysically significant weak processes [2,3], which systematically includes the contributions of forbidden transitions. This theoretical framework will be utilized to study the contributions of forbidden transitions to the total decay rate in several mass regions. We will compare the calculated half-lives for several isotopic chains with previous calculations and experimental data and discuss possible improvements to the model.(author)

  9. Introductory remarks on double beta decay and nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, S.P.

    1986-01-01

    The particle physics aspects of double beta decay and the theory of the phenomenon are briefly reviewed. The distinction between Dirac and Majorana neutrinos is drawn by comparing the neutrino that accompanies a negatively charged lepton in some hadronic decay process with that which accompanies a positively charged lepton in some other decay process. Two modes of double beta decay are examined - one emitting two neutrinos and the other emitting no neutrinos. What can be learned from the existing data on double beta decay is considered, de-emphasizing the question of bounds on neutrino mass and concentrating on the properties of the phenomenon itself. Possible future experiments are anticipated. 16 refs

  10. Phase-space exploration in nuclear giant resonance decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdz, S.; Nishizaki, S.; Wambach, J.; Speth, J.

    1995-01-01

    The rate of phase-space exploration in the decay of isovector and isoscalar giant quadrupole resonances in 40 Ca is analyzed. The study is based on the time dependence of the survival probability and of the spectrum of generalized entropies evaluated in the space of one-particle--one-hole (1p-1h) and 2p-2h states. Three different cases for the level distribution of 2p-2h background states, corresponding to (a) high degeneracy, (b) classically regular motion, and (c) classically chaotic motion, are studied. In the latter case the isovector excitation evolves almost statistically while the isoscalar excitation remains largely localized, even though it penetrates the whole available phase space

  11. Prediction of gamma exposure rates in large nuclear craters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tami, Thomas M; Day, Walter C [U.S. Army Engineer Nuclear Cratering Group, Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-15

    In many civil engineering applications of nuclear explosives there is the need to reenter the crater and lip area as soon as possible after the detonation to carry out conventional construction activities. These construction activities, however, must be delayed until the gamma dose rate, or exposure rate, in and around the crater decays to acceptable levels. To estimate the time of reentry for post-detonation construction activities, the exposure rate in the crater and lip areas must be predicted as a function of time after detonation. An accurate prediction permits a project planner to effectively schedule post-detonation activities.

  12. Isospin and quarks in nuclear beta-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, D.H.

    1991-04-01

    This paper exposes in some detail the technical problems relating to the extraction of the vector coupling constant from the beta decay of complex nuclei. It also considers the extraction of the axial coupling constant from the beta-decay of the neutron. The internal consistency of all data relating to beta-decay, including that of the muon, is also examined, within the standard model, with a view to the possible intervention of W R . (Author) 52 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Measurement of the vacuum decay rate of orthopositronium formed in an MgO-lined cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gidley, D.W.; Zitzewitz, P.W.

    1978-01-01

    Orthopositronium decay rates are measured in MgO-lined cavities with various volumes and entrance apertures. Systematic effects of the entrance aperture, cavity geometry, and collisional pick-off are measured. The vacuum decay rate is determined to be 7.050+-0.013 μs -1 . (Auth.)

  14. Nuclear decay data for dosimetry calculation. Revised data of ICRP Publication 38

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    2005-02-01

    New nuclear decay data used for dose calculation have been compiled for 1034 radionuclides, which are significant in medical, environmental and occupational exposures. The decay data were assembled from decay data sets of the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), the latest version as of 2003. Basic nuclear properties in the ENSDF that are particularly important for calculating energies and intensities of radiations were examined and updated by referring to UNBASE2003/AME2003, the database for nuclear and decay properties of nuclides. In addition, modification of incomplete ENSDF was done for their format errors, level schemes, normalization records, and so on. The energies and intensities of emitted radiations by the nuclear decay and the subsequent atomic process were computed from the ENSDF using the computer code EDISTR04. EDISTR04 is an enhanced version of EDISTR used for assembling ICRP Publication 38 (ICRP38), and incorporates updates of atomic data and computation methods for calculating atomic radiations and spontaneous fission radiations. Quality assurance of the compiled data has been made by comparisons with various experimental data and decay databases prepared from different computer codes and data libraries. A package of the data files, called DECDC2 (Nuclear DECay Data for Dosimetry Calculation, Version 2), will succeed ICRP38 that has been used extensively in dose calculation and will be utilized in various fields. (author)

  15. The human nuclear poly(a-binding protein promotes RNA hyperadenylation and decay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan M Bresson

    Full Text Available Control of nuclear RNA stability is essential for proper gene expression, but the mechanisms governing RNA degradation in mammalian nuclei are poorly defined. In this study, we uncover a mammalian RNA decay pathway that depends on the nuclear poly(A-binding protein (PABPN1, the poly(A polymerases (PAPs, PAPα and PAPγ, and the exosome subunits RRP6 and DIS3. Using a targeted knockdown approach and nuclear RNA reporters, we show that PABPN1 and PAPα, redundantly with PAPγ, generate hyperadenylated decay substrates that are recognized by the exosome and degraded. Poly(A tail extension appears to be necessary for decay, as cordycepin treatment or point mutations in the PAP-stimulating domain of PABPN1 leads to the accumulation of stable transcripts with shorter poly(A tails than controls. Mechanistically, these data suggest that PABPN1-dependent promotion of PAP activity can stimulate nuclear RNA decay. Importantly, efficiently exported RNAs are unaffected by this decay pathway, supporting an mRNA quality control function for this pathway. Finally, analyses of both bulk poly(A tails and specific endogenous transcripts reveals that a subset of nuclear RNAs are hyperadenylated in a PABPN1-dependent fashion, and this hyperadenylation can be either uncoupled or coupled with decay. Our results highlight a complex relationship between PABPN1, PAPα/γ, and nuclear RNA decay, and we suggest that these activities may play broader roles in the regulation of human gene expression.

  16. Observation of Δ+→pπ0 decay in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matulewicz, T.; Aphecetche, L.; Charbonnier, Y.; Delagrange, H.; Martinez, G.; Schutz, Y.; Marques, F.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Δ baryonic resonances production and decay in nuclear matter have been studied. The heavy ion reaction of 180 A MeV Ar beam on Ca target was used to create the Δ resonances (at SIS GSI Darmstadt). The decay of Δ was measured by means of neutral pion π 0 decay product, two gamma quanta, registration. The Δ resonance invariant mass distribution has been determined

  17. Improved decay rates for solutions for a multidimensional generalized Benjamin-Bona-Mahony equation

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the decay rates of solutions for the generalized Benjamin-Bona-Mahony equation in multi-dimensional space. For initial data in some L1-weighted spaces, we prove faster decay rates of the solutions. More precisely, using the Fourier transform and the energy method, we show the global existence and the convergence rates of the solutions under the smallness assumption on the initial data and we give better decay rates of the solutions. This result improves early works in J. Differential Equations 158(2) (1999), 314-340 and Nonlinear Anal. 75(7) (2012), 3385-3392. © 2014-IOS Press.

  18. Nuclear spectroscopic investigations of the decay of /sup 155/Eu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B H

    1974-01-01

    The investigations carried out on the ..beta..-decay of /sup 155/Eu confirm some decay data of this nucleus and explain a few disagreements on the decay scheme. Using the half-life, the ..beta..-boundary energies and branching ratios, the log ft values of the individual ..beta..-transitions were calculated. Finally, by means of ..beta gamma..-coincidence measurements on the semiconductor spectrometer, the inner partial spectra ..beta../sub 3/ and ..beta../sub 4/ were separated for the first time. Form factor investigations were carried out on these spectra which, despite the high log ft values, confirm the allowed character of these transitions.

  19. Large-scale evaluation of β -decay rates of r -process nuclei with the inclusion of first-forbidden transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marketin, T.; Huther, L.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.

    2016-02-01

    Background: r -process nucleosynthesis models rely, by necessity, on nuclear structure models for input. Particularly important are β -decay half-lives of neutron-rich nuclei. At present only a single systematic calculation exists that provides values for all relevant nuclei making it difficult to test the sensitivity of nucleosynthesis models to this input. Additionally, even though there are indications that their contribution may be significant, the impact of first-forbidden transitions on decay rates has not been systematically studied within a consistent model. Purpose: Our goal is to provide a table of β -decay half-lives and β -delayed neutron emission probabilities, including first-forbidden transitions, calculated within a fully self-consistent microscopic theoretical framework. The results are used in an r -process nucleosynthesis calculation to asses the sensitivity of heavy element nucleosynthesis to weak interaction reaction rates. Method: We use a fully self-consistent covariant density functional theory (CDFT) framework. The ground state of all nuclei is calculated with the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model, and excited states are obtained within the proton-neutron relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation (p n -RQRPA). Results: The β -decay half-lives, β -delayed neutron emission probabilities, and the average number of emitted neutrons have been calculated for 5409 nuclei in the neutron-rich region of the nuclear chart. We observe a significant contribution of the first-forbidden transitions to the total decay rate in nuclei far from the valley of stability. The experimental half-lives are in general well reproduced for even-even, odd-A , and odd-odd nuclei, in particular for short-lived nuclei. The resulting data table is included with the article as Supplemental Material. Conclusions: In certain regions of the nuclear chart, first-forbidden transitions constitute a large fraction of the total decay rate and must be

  20. Exponential decay rate of the power spectrum for solutions of the Navier--Stokes equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doering, C.R.; Titi, E.S.

    1995-01-01

    Using a method developed by Foias and Temam [J. Funct. Anal. 87, 359 (1989)], exponential decay of the spatial Fourier power spectrum for solutions of the incompressible Navier--Stokes equations is established and explicit rigorous lower bounds on a small length scale defined by the exponential decay rate are obtained

  1. Update and evaluation of decay data for spent nuclear fuel analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeonov Teodosi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studsvik’s approach to spent nuclear fuel analyses combines isotopic concentrations and multi-group cross-sections, calculated by the CASMO5 or HELIOS2 lattice transport codes, with core irradiation history data from the SIMULATE5 reactor core simulator and tabulated isotopic decay data. These data sources are used and processed by the code SNF to predict spent nuclear fuel characteristics. Recent advances in the generation procedure for the SNF decay data are presented. The SNF decay data includes basic data, such as decay constants, atomic masses and nuclide transmutation chains; radiation emission spectra for photons from radioactive decay, alpha-n reactions, bremsstrahlung, and spontaneous fission, electrons and alpha particles from radioactive decay, and neutrons from radioactive decay, spontaneous fission, and alpha-n reactions; decay heat production; and electro-atomic interaction data for bremsstrahlung production. These data are compiled from fundamental (ENDF, ENSDF, TENDL and processed (ESTAR sources for nearly 3700 nuclides. A rigorous evaluation procedure of internal consistency checks and comparisons to measurements and benchmarks, and code-to-code verifications is performed at the individual isotope level and using integral characteristics on a fuel assembly level (e.g., decay heat, radioactivity, neutron and gamma sources. Significant challenges are presented by the scope and complexity of the data processing, a dearth of relevant detailed measurements, and reliance on theoretical models for some data.

  2. Update and evaluation of decay data for spent nuclear fuel analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Teodosi; Wemple, Charles

    2017-09-01

    Studsvik's approach to spent nuclear fuel analyses combines isotopic concentrations and multi-group cross-sections, calculated by the CASMO5 or HELIOS2 lattice transport codes, with core irradiation history data from the SIMULATE5 reactor core simulator and tabulated isotopic decay data. These data sources are used and processed by the code SNF to predict spent nuclear fuel characteristics. Recent advances in the generation procedure for the SNF decay data are presented. The SNF decay data includes basic data, such as decay constants, atomic masses and nuclide transmutation chains; radiation emission spectra for photons from radioactive decay, alpha-n reactions, bremsstrahlung, and spontaneous fission, electrons and alpha particles from radioactive decay, and neutrons from radioactive decay, spontaneous fission, and alpha-n reactions; decay heat production; and electro-atomic interaction data for bremsstrahlung production. These data are compiled from fundamental (ENDF, ENSDF, TENDL) and processed (ESTAR) sources for nearly 3700 nuclides. A rigorous evaluation procedure of internal consistency checks and comparisons to measurements and benchmarks, and code-to-code verifications is performed at the individual isotope level and using integral characteristics on a fuel assembly level (e.g., decay heat, radioactivity, neutron and gamma sources). Significant challenges are presented by the scope and complexity of the data processing, a dearth of relevant detailed measurements, and reliance on theoretical models for some data.

  3. Decay rate ratios of Υ(5S)→B anti B reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Dae Sung; Son, Hyungsuk

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the decay rate ratios for OZI allowed decays of Υ(5S) to two B mesons by using the decay amplitudes which incorporate the wave function of the Υ(5S) state. We obtain the result that the branching ratio of the Υ(5S) decay to B s * anti B s * is much larger than the branching ratio to B s anti B s * or anti B s B s * , in good agreement with the recent experimental results of CLEO and BELLE. This agreement with the experimental results is made possible since the nodes of the Υ(5S) radial wave function induce the nodes of the decay amplitude. We find that the results for the Υ(5S) decays to B u (*) anti B u (*) or B d (*) anti B d (*) pairs are sensitive to the parameter values used for the potential between heavy quarks. (orig.)

  4. The anharmonic phonon decay rate in group-III nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, G P

    2009-01-01

    Measured lifetimes of hot phonons in group-III nitrides have been explained theoretically by considering three-phonon anharmonic interaction processes. The basic ingredients of the theory include full phonon dispersion relations obtained from the application of an adiabatic bond charge model and crystal anharmonic potential within the isotropic elastic continuum model. The role of various decay routes, such as Klemens, Ridley, Vallee-Bogani and Barman-Srivastava channels, in determining the lifetimes of the Raman active zone-centre longitudinal optical (LO) modes in BN (zincblende structure) and A 1 (LO) modes in AlN, GaN and InN (wurtzite structure) has been quantified.

  5. Stability and decay rates of nonisotropic attractive Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huepe, C.; Tuckerman, L. S.; Metens, S.; Brachet, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    Nonisotropic attractive Bose-Einstein condensates are investigated numerically with Newton and inverse Arnoldi methods. The stationary solutions of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and their linear stability are computed. Bifurcation diagrams are calculated and used to find the condensate decay rates corresponding to macroscopic quantum tunneling, two-three-body inelastic collisions, and thermally induced collapse. Isotropic and nonisotropic condensates are compared. The effect of anisotropy on the bifurcation diagram and the decay rates is discussed. Spontaneous isotropization of the condensates is found to occur. The influence of isotropization on the decay rates is characterized near the critical point

  6. Double beta decays and related subjects for particle and nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu

    1991-01-01

    Present status and some perspectives in 1990's are briefly given on double beta decays and related subjects. Subjects discussed are as follows I) Double beta decays without neutrinos, which require lepton number non-conservations and finite neutrino mass. II) Double beta decays followed by two neutrinos. III) Double weak processes with strangeness change ΔS = 2, leading to the H particle with 6 quarks of ss uu dd. IV) Charge non-conservation and electron decays. These are very rare nuclear processes studied by Ultra RAre-process NUclear Spectroscopy (URANUS). It is shown that URANUS is an important detector frontier of non-accelerator nuclear physics in 1990's. (orig.)

  7. Nuclear power's effects on electric rate making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.S.; Lancaster, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    Government and the electric utility industry are re-evaluating nuclear power's contribution to the total U.S. energy supplies. This article addresses how the recently increased nuclear plant construction and operation costs are translated into the prices that consumers pay for electricity. The electric rates that consumers pay must reflect the costs of producing electricity, as well as the costs of transmission, distribution, metering, and billing. The use of nuclear power for electric production is anticipated to grow rapidly so as to meet a larger portion of our country's electricity needs through the end of the century; so nuclear power costs are expected to be an even larger portion of the total electricity price. There are certain rate-making issues that are actively being discussed in public forums and before state and Federal regulatory bodies. These issues are not unique to nuclear power, but take on added significance when nuclear power is used by utilities to produce electricity because of the technology required and because of the type, timing, and magnitude of the costs involved. These are: (1) inclusion of construction work in progress in the rate base; (2) fuel adjustment clauses and treatment of nuclear fuel cycle costs; (3) treatment of certain taxes under the rate-making method called normalization or deferral accounting (sometimes referred to as ''phantom taxes''); and (4) rate treatment for particular nuclear expense items reflecting costs of delays, plant cancellations, and operational slowdowns

  8. Alpha decay studies on Po isotopes using different versions of nuclear potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K.P.; Sukumaran, Indu [Kannur University, School of Pure and Applied Physics, Payyanur, Kerala (India)

    2017-12-15

    The alpha decays from {sup 186-224}Po isotopes have been studied using 25 different versions of nuclear potentials so as to select a suitable nuclear potential for alpha decay studies. The computed standard deviation of the calculated half-lives in comparison with the experimental data suggested that proximity 2003-I is the apt form of nuclear potential for alpha decay studies as it possesses the least standard deviation, σ = 0.620. Among the different proximity potentials, proximity 1966 (σ = 0.630) and proximity 1977 (σ = 0.636), are also found to work well in alpha decay studies with low deviation. Among other versions of nuclear potentials (other than proximity potentials), Bass 1980 is suggested to be a significant form of nuclear potential because of its good predictive power. However, while the other forms of potentials are able to reproduce the experimental data to some extent, these potentials cannot be considered as apposite potentials for alpha decay studies in their present form. Since the experimental correlation of the models is noticed to be satisfying, the alpha decay half-lives of certain Po isotopes that are not detected experimentally yet have been predicted. (orig.)

  9. Coordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1984-09-01

    This meeting of the International NSDD (Nuclear Structure and Decay Data) Network dealt with problems related to both the coordination of the NSDD network of centres and groups and to physics questions related to the evaluation of NSDD. The status of the mass-chain and nuclear structure data is reviewed and the planned activities are presented

  10. Estimates of wave decay rates in the presence of turbulent currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thais, L. [Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, URA-CNRS 1441, Villenauve d' Ascq (France). Lab. de Mecanique; Chapalain, G. [Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, URA-CNRS 8577, Villenauve d' Ascq (France). Sedimentologie et Geodynamique; Klopman, G. [Albatros Flow Research, Vollenhove (Netherlands); Simons, R.R. [University College, London (United Kingdom). Civil and Environmental Engineering; Thomas, G.P. [University College, Cork (Ireland). Dept. of Mathematical Physics

    2001-06-01

    A full-depth numerical model solving the free surface flow induced by linear water waves propagating with collinear vertically sheared turbulent currents is presented. The model is used to estimate the wave amplitude decay rate in combined wave current flows. The decay rates are compared with data collected in wave flumes by Kemp and Simons [J Fluid Mech, 116 (1982) 227; 130 (1983) 73] and Mathisen and Madsen [J Geophys Res, 101 (C7) (1996) 16,533]. We confirm the main experimental finding of Kemp and Simons that waves propagating downstream are less damped, and waves propagating upstream significantly more damped than waves on fluid at rest. A satisfactory quantitative agreement is found for the decay rates of waves propagating upstream, whereas not more than a qualitative agreement has been observed for waves propagating downstream. Finally, some wave decay rates in the presence of favourable and adverse currents are provided in typical field conditions. (Author)

  11. Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricard-McCutchan, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dimitriou, P. [Intl Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria); Nichols, A. L. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-01

    The 21st meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators was convened at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 20 to 24 April 2015 under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. This meeting was attended by 36 scientists from 15 Member States, plus IAEA staff, concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, data centre reports, various proposals considered, and actions agreed by the participants, as well as recommendations/conclusions are presented within this document.

  12. Fission decay properties of nuclear giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Arruda Neto, J.D.T.; Hussein, M.S.; Carlson, B.V.

    1986-05-01

    The statistical fission decay properties of the giant dipole, quadrupole and monopole resonances in 236 U are investigated with the aid of the Hauser-Feshbach model. It is found, contrary to several recent claims, that the GQR fission decay probability is as large as that of the GDR, at energies higher than the fission barrier. At energies close to the f.b., the GQR fission probability is found to be appreciably larger than that of the GDR. The GMR fission probability follows closely that of the GQR. (Author) [pt

  13. IAEA advisory group meeting on nuclear structure and decay data. IAEA, Vienna 21-25 April 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1980-10-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the fourth meeting of the international nuclear structure and decay data network at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, from 21-25 April 1980. The meeting was attended by 23 Scientists from 11 Member States and 2 international organizations, concerned with the compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. (author)

  14. IAEA advisory group meeting on nuclear structure and decay data, Zeist, The Netherlands, 11-14 May 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1982-08-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the fifth meeting of the international nuclear structure and decay data network at Zeist near Utrecht, in The Netherlands, 11-14 May 1982. The meeting was attended by 24 scientists from 11 Member States and 2 international organizations, concerned with the compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. (author)

  15. Measurement of disintegration rate and decay branching ratio for nuclide 192Ir with β-, EC mixing decays by using 4πβ-γ coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Chunguang; Pei Wulang; Li Wei; Qu Decheng; Xiong Jing; Chang Yongfu

    1995-01-01

    The absolute disintegration rates for nuclide 192 Ir were measured with a 4πβ-γ (HPGe) coincidence apparatus by using parameter method and extrapolation method. The final uncertainties obtained were 0.4% and 0.5% respectively for a confidence level of 99.7%. The method with which both the disintegration rate and the decay branching ratio can be measured for nuclides with β - and EC mixing decays was proposed and described. The β - branching ratio in 192 Ir decays was measured being 0.9572. The final uncertainties of disintegration rates and β - decay branching ratio with this method were 1.5% and 1.8% respectively

  16. Non-leptonic weak decay rate of explicitly flavored heavy mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, M.; California Univ., Berkeley

    1981-01-01

    It is argued quantitatively that a large difference between the D 0 and D + lifetimes is mainly due to non-perturbative long-distance effects. The total non-leptonic weak decay rates are related to the soft limit of short-distance processes. Scaling laws for the decay rates of heavy mesons with respect to mass are inferred from the QCD analysis of the soft limit of fragmentation. It is found that the decay rates are not determined by the disconnected spectator diagrams alone even in the limit of the heavy quark mass M Going to infinity ( 5 exp √ c log M. Some numerical discussion is made for the decay of B mesons and T mesons. (orig.)

  17. Interactive information system on the nuclear physics properties of nuclides and radioactive decay chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plyaskin, V.I.; Kosilov, R.A.; Manturov, G.N.

    2001-01-01

    A brief review is given of a computerized information system on the nuclear physics properties of nuclides and radioactive decay chains. The main difference between the system presented here and those already in existence is that these evaluated databases of nuclear physics constants are linked to a set of programs, thus enabling analysis of a wide range of problems regarding various nuclear physics applications. (author)

  18. Nuclear β decay with a massive neutrino in an external electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternov, I.M.; Rodionov, V.N.; Zhulego, V.G.; Lobanov, A.E.; Pavlova, O.S.; Dorofeev, O.F.

    1986-01-01

    Beta decay in the presence of an external electromagnetic field is investigated, taking into account the non-zero neutrino rest mass. The spectrum of electrons and polarisation effects of different orientations of nuclear spin are considered. It is shown that the electromagnetic wave substantially modifies the boundaries of the spectrum of β electrons. The results, which include an analysis of the total decay probability in intense magnetic fields, may have various astrophysical implications. (author)

  19. Prolonged decay of molecular rate estimates for metazoan mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyna Molak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary timescales can be estimated from genetic data using the molecular clock, often calibrated by fossil or geological evidence. However, estimates of molecular rates in mitochondrial DNA appear to scale negatively with the age of the clock calibration. Although such a pattern has been observed in a limited range of data sets, it has not been studied on a large scale in metazoans. In addition, there is uncertainty over the temporal extent of the time-dependent pattern in rate estimates. Here we present a meta-analysis of 239 rate estimates from metazoans, representing a range of timescales and taxonomic groups. We found evidence of time-dependent rates in both coding and non-coding mitochondrial markers, in every group of animals that we studied. The negative relationship between the estimated rate and time persisted across a much wider range of calibration times than previously suggested. This indicates that, over long time frames, purifying selection gives way to mutational saturation as the main driver of time-dependent biases in rate estimates. The results of our study stress the importance of accounting for time-dependent biases in estimating mitochondrial rates regardless of the timescale over which they are inferred.

  20. ZZ NUCDECAYCALC, Nuclear Decay Data for Radiation Dosimetry Calculation for ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description or function: The Dosimetry Research Group (DRG) of the Health Sciences Research Division at ORNL has for several years maintained data bases of nuclear decay data for use in dosimetric calculations. The data on mean and unique energy plus intensity have been previously published, in abridged form, in Publication 38 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1983). This data base was designed to address the needs in medical, environmental, and occupational radiation protection. DLC-172/NUCDECAY is required by the CCC-620/SEECAL program to calculate age-dependent specific effective energies. 2 - Methods: The unabridged data used in preparing ICRP Publication 38 are distributed in electronic form in this package. The collection consists of data on the energies and intensities of radiations emitted by the 825 radionuclides reported, although abridged, in ICRP Publication 38 plus an additional 13 radionuclides evaluated during preparation of a monograph for the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. Each collection is contained in an ASCII file (INDEXR.DAT) which is a sorted list of the radionuclides containing the decay chain information. The utility code DecayCalc extracts the decay data from the library for radionuclide(s) specified by the user. It computes the activities of radionuclides present after decay and ingrowth over a user-specified time period from 1 minute to 50 years. Decay data for any decay chain may be displayed and printed either in tabular form or graphically. DecayCalc, in a slightly modified version, will be a part of CCC-553/Rascal v3. DecayCalc is a Windows application that runs under Microsoft Windows 95 or 98, or Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 or later. The Compac Fortran 77 compiler was used to compile the code. The full source for DecayCalc is not provided but will be distributed when Rascal V3 is released

  1. Evaluation of beta intensity data in nuclear decay schemes: Comments on some pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, C.W.

    1987-02-01

    Some of the problems that arise in the evaluation of decay-schemes data to obtain values for the intensities of beta transitions are discussed. As examples of these problems, the decay schemes of 87 Br and 233 Pa are examined. No specific solutions to these problems are offered; but by pointing out to the participants in the International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluation Network, and to others, it is hoped that a general understanding of them can be gained, which may ultimately lead to a consistent means of dealing with them. 14 refs., 2 figs

  2. Evaluation of β intensity data in nuclear decay schemes: comments on some pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    Some of the problems which arise in the evaluation of decay-schemes data to obtain values for the intensities of β transitions are discussed. As examples of these problems, the decay schemes of 87 Br and 233 Pa are examined. No specific solutions to these problems are offered; but by pointing them out to the participants in the International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluation Network, it is hoped that a general understanding of them can be gained, which may ultimately lead to a consistent means of dealing with them. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  3. Electromagnetically induced nuclear beta decay calculated by a Green's function method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    The transition probability for enhancement of forbidden nuclear beta decay by an applied plane-wave electromagnetic field is calculated in a nonrelativistic spinless approximation by a Green's function method. The calculation involves a stationary-phase approximation. The stationary phase points in the presence of an intense field are located in very different positions than they are in the field-free case. In order-of-magnitude terms, the results are completely consistent with an earlier, much more complete wave-function calculation which includes spin and relativistic effects. Both the present Green's function calculation and the earlier wave function calculation give electromagnetic contributions in first-forbidden nuclear beta decay matrix elements which are of order (R 0 /lambda-dash-bar/sub C/) 2 with respect to allowed decays, where R 0 is the nuclear radius and lambda-dash-bar/sub C/ is the electron Compton wavelength

  4. Design of cycler trajectories and analysis of solar influences on radioactive decay rates during space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Blake A.

    This thesis investigates the design of interplanetary missions for the continual habitation of Mars via Earth-Mars cyclers and for the detection of variations in nuclear decay rates due to solar influences. Several cycler concepts have been proposed to provide safe and comfortable quarters for astronauts traveling between the Earth and Mars. However, no literature has appeared to show how these massive vehicles might be placed into their cycler trajectories. Trajectories are designed that use either Vinfinity leveraging or low thrust to establish cycler vehicles in their desired orbits. In the cycler trajectory cases considered, the use of Vinfinity leveraging or low thrust substantially reduces the total propellant needed to achieve the cycler orbit compared to direct orbit insertion. In the case of the classic Aldrin cycler, the propellant savings due to Vinfinity leveraging can be as large as a 24 metric ton reduction for a cycler vehicle with a dry mass of 75 metric tons, and an additional 111 metric ton reduction by instead using low thrust. The two-synodic period cyclers considered benefit less from Vinfinity leveraging, but have a smaller total propellant mass due to their lower approach velocities at Earth and Mars. It turns out that, for low-thrust establishment, the propellant required is approximately the same for each of the cycler trajectories. The Aldrin cycler has been proposed as a transportation system for human missions between Earth and Mars. However, the hyperbolic excess velocity values at the planetary encounters for these orbits are infeasibly large, especially at Mars. In a new version of the Aldrin cycler, low thrust is used in the interplanetary trajectories to reduce the encounter velocities. Reducing the encounter velocities at both planets reduces the propellant needed by the taxis (astronauts use these taxis to transfer between the planetary surfaces and the cycler vehicle) to perform hyperbolic rendezvous. While the propellant

  5. Large-scale calculations of the beta-decay rates and r-process nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borzov, I N; Goriely, S [Inst. d` Astronomie et d` Astrophysique, Univ. Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Bruxelles (Belgium); Pearson, J M [Inst. d` Astronomie et d` Astrophysique, Univ. Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Bruxelles (Belgium); [Lab. de Physique Nucleaire, Univ. de Montreal, Montreal (Canada)

    1998-06-01

    An approximation to a self-consistent model of the ground state and {beta}-decay properties of neutron-rich nuclei is outlined. The structure of the {beta}-strength functions in stable and short-lived nuclei is discussed. The results of large-scale calculations of the {beta}-decay rates for spherical and slightly deformed nuclides of relevance to the r-process are analysed and compared with the results of existing global calculations and recent experimental data. (orig.)

  6. Recent status of the studies of nuclear masses and {beta}-decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Masami [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Advanced Research Center for Science and Engineering

    1996-05-01

    The recent status of the above studies was explained, especially, nuclear masses were described from the aspect of probability theory and that of {beta}-decay suggested that the first forbidden transition was hindered between the ground states. We have to study various systematics in order to know the mass surface, Way-Yamada-Matumoto type systematics is better to check the experimental nuclear masses. The gross theory is very useful to understand the general aspect of {beta}-decay. The understanding method of mass surface, systematic check of mass and hindrance of the first forbidden transition at rank 1 were explained. (S.Y.)

  7. Recent status of the studies of nuclear masses and β-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masami

    1996-01-01

    The recent status of the above studies was explained, especially, nuclear masses were described from the aspect of probability theory and that of β-decay suggested that the first forbidden transition was hindered between the ground states. We have to study various systematics in order to know the mass surface, Way-Yamada-Matumoto type systematics is better to check the experimental nuclear masses. The gross theory is very useful to understand the general aspect of β-decay. The understanding method of mass surface, systematic check of mass and hindrance of the first forbidden transition at rank 1 were explained. (S.Y.)

  8. NuDat 2.0: Nuclear Structure and Decay Data on the Internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonzogni, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    NuDat 2.0 is a software product developed by the National Nuclear Data Center. It provides an interface between web users and several NNDC nuclear structure and decay databases. NuDat 2.0 can be used to search for ground and excited states level properties, gamma-ray information, and decay radiation information. In addition to the search capabilities, an interactive chart of nuclei is displayed. Different examples highlighting NuDat 2 search capabilities and display options are presented

  9. Total Absorption Spectroscopy Study of the Beta Decay of 60Mn to Constrain the Neutron Capture Rate of 60Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Debra; Spyrou, Artemis; Dombos, Alex; Couture, Aaron; e15034 Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Interest in 60Fe, a long lived radioisotope synthesized in massive stars, has recently peaked. The signature of its decay allows us to probe astrophysical processes, events such as the early formation of the solar system and nucleosynthesis. To understand these observations a complete understanding of the creation, destruction and nuclear properties of 60Fe in the astrophysical environment are required. Using the beta decay of 60Mn in conjunction with total absorption spectroscopy (TAS), made possible by the high efficiency gamma ray calorimeter SuN (Summing NaI detector) at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), to study the distribution of beta-decay intensity over the daughter-nucleus 60Fe, provides information about the structure of the daughter and improves the predictive power of astrophysical models. In addition to the ongoing TAS analysis, The Beta-Oslo method will be used to extract the nuclear level density and gamma-strength function of 60Fe providing much needed constraints on the neutron capture reaction rate responsible for the creation of this nucleus.

  10. Anatomy of double beta decay nuclear matrix elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Petr, E-mail: pxv@caltech.ed [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory 106-38 Caltech. Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2009-06-01

    The necessary ingredients for a realistic evaluation of the 0vbetabeta nuclear matrix elements are reviewed. It is argued that the short range nucleon correlations, nucleon finite size, and higher order nuclear currents need to be included in the calculation, even though a consensus on the best way to treat all of these effects has not been reached. Another positive development is the realization that the two alternative and complementary methods, the Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation and the Nuclear Shell Model, agree on many aspects of the calculation, in particular on the competition, or cancelation, between the contribution of nuclear pairing on one hand, and the other pieces of interaction that result in admixtures of broken pairs or higher seniority states on the other hand. The relatively short range (r <= 2-3 fm) of the effective 0vbetabeta operator found in both methods is a consequence of that competition.

  11. Precompound decay models for medium energy nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blann, M.

    1989-11-01

    The formulations used for precompound decay models are presented and explained in terms of the physics of the intranuclear cascade model. Several features of spectra of medium energy (10--1000 MeV) reactions are summarized. Results of precompound plus evaporation calculations from the code ALICE are compared with a wide body of proton, alpha, and heavy ion induced reaction data to illustrate both the power and deficiencies of predicting yield of these reactions in the medium energy regime. 23 refs., 13 figs

  12. Short term memory bowing effect is consistent with presentation rate dependent decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnow, Eugen

    2010-12-01

    I reanalyze the free recall data of Murdock, J Exp Psychol 64(5):482-488 (1962) and Murdock and Okada, J Verbal Learn and Verbal Behav 86:263-267 (1970) which show the famous bowing effect in which initial and recent items are recalled better than intermediate items (primacy and recency effects). Recent item recall probabilities follow a logarithmic decay with time of recall consistent with the tagging/retagging theory. The slope of the decay increases with increasing presentation rate. The initial items, with an effectively low presentation rate, decay with the slowest logarithmic slope, explaining the primacy effect. The finding that presentation rate limits the duration of short term memory suggests a basis for memory loss in busy adults, for the importance of slow music practice, for long term memory deficiencies for people with attention deficits who may be artificially increasing the presentation rates of their surroundings. A well-defined, quantitative measure of the primacy effect is introduced.

  13. Geometrical scaling and modal decay rates in periodic arrays of deeply subwavelength Terahertz resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isić, Goran; Gajić, Radoš

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that due to the high conductivity of noble metals at terahertz frequencies and scalability of macroscopic Maxwell equations, a geometrical downscaling of a terahertz resonator results in the linear upscaling of its resonance frequency. However, the scaling laws of modal decay rates, important for the resonator excitation efficiency, are much less known. Here, we investigate the extent to which the scale-invariance of decay rates is violated due to the finite conductivity of the metal. We find that the resonance quality factor or the excitation efficiency may be substantially affected by scaling and show that this happens as a result of the scale-dependence of the metal absorption rate, while the radiative decay and the dielectric cavity absorption rates are approximately scale-invariant. In particular, we find that by downscaling overcoupled resonators, their excitation efficiency increases, while the opposite happens with undercoupled resonators

  14. Experimental demonstration of highly anisotropic decay rates of single quantum dots inside photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qin; Stobbe, Søren; Nielsen, Henri Thyrrestrup

    We have systematically measured the variation of the spontaneous emission rate with polarization for self-assembled single quantum dots in two-dimensional photonic crystal membranes and obtained a maximum anisotropy factor of 6 between the decay rates of the two nondegenerate bright exciton states....

  15. Improved decay rates for solutions for a multidimensional generalized Benjamin-Bona-Mahony equation

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2014-01-01

    the Fourier transform and the energy method, we show the global existence and the convergence rates of the solutions under the smallness assumption on the initial data and we give better decay rates of the solutions. This result improves early works in J

  16. Upgrade of the SPIRAL identification station for high-precision measurements of nuclear β decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinyer, G. F.; Thomas, J. C.; Blank, B.; Bouzomita, H.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Bucaille, F.; Delahaye, P.; Finlay, P.; Frémont, G.; Gibelin, J.; Giovinazzo, J.; Grinyer, J.; Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Laffoley, A. T.; Leach, K. G.; Lefèvre, A.; Legruel, F.; Lescalié, G.; Perez-Loureiro, D.

    2014-03-01

    The low-energy identification station at SPIRAL (Système de Production d'Ions Radioactifs Accélérés en Ligne) has been upgraded for studying the β decays of short-lived radioactive isotopes and to perform high-precision half-life and branching-ratio measurements for superallowed Fermi and isospin T=1/2 mirror β decays. These new capabilities, combined with an existing Paul trap setup for measurements of β-ν angular-correlation coefficients, provide a powerful facility for investigating fundamental properties of the electroweak interaction through nuclear β decays. A detailed description of the design study, construction, and first results obtained from an in-beam commissioning experiment on the β+ decays 14 O and 17F are presented.

  17. Decay of 132Cs and nuclear structure of 132Xe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, M.T.F. da; Goldman, I.D.

    1989-02-01

    Gamma spectroscopy, coincidence and angular correlation experiments were performed, in an extensive study of 132 Cs decay. The population intensities of states in 132 Ba were measured, some upper limits were determined and the value of the transition to the 4 1 + state of 132 Ba has drastically changed. A new gamma transition of 688 KeV was detected and located in the level scheme of 132 Xe. The angular correlation measurements were performed with a Ge(Li)-NaI(Tl) spectrometer and helped in choosing the spin value for the 1804 KeV state of 132 Xe. Kumar-Baranger-type calculations were performed for the 132 Xe fairly good results. The resulting potential energy surface for 132 Xe is very different from that of Gneuss and Greiner model, suggesting the need for any quadrupole moment measurement for this nucleus. (author) [pt

  18. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The primary focus this year has been studies of intruder states and shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient Z ∼ 82 region. Most notably, the existence and conditions for the occurrence of electric monopole (E0) transitions have been considerably clarified. This has been a topic of considerable confusion. On-line decay scheme spectroscopy of mass-separated isotopes at UNISOR (in a collaboration with LSU) has now completely resolved all points of disagreement. These studies are part of a larger program directed towards building a complete picture of shape coexistence. It is becoming evident that E0 transitions are a key signature to shape coexistence. Thus, their correct identification and location are crucial

  19. Co-ordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1986-10-01

    The seventh meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluators concentrated on the organizational aspects of the coordination of the NSDD network and on the presentation and discussion of papers related to the physics of evaluation of NSDD. The report contains short status reports from NSDD Network members, the status of the mass-chain and nuclear structure data, a discussion of evaluation rules and procedures and a short presentation of the next activities

  20. Retrieval program system of Chinese Evaluated (frequently useful) Nuclear Decay Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xiaolong; Zhou Chunmei

    1995-01-01

    The Chinese Evaluated (frequently useful) Nuclear Decay Database has been set up in MICRO-VAX-11 computer at Chinese Nuclear Data Center (CNDC). For users' convenience, the retrieval program system of the database is written. Retrieval can be carried out for one nucleus or multi-nucleus. The retrieved results can be displayed on terminal screen or output to M3081 printer and laser printer in ENSDF format, table report or scheme diagrams

  1. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of neutron-deficient nuclei around the Z = 82 shell closure, with special emphasis on the levels of the odd-mass Pt, Au, Hg, and Tl isotopes are described. Research on nuclear systematics and models is discussed, and publications are listed

  2. Studies on cluster decay from trans-lead nuclei using different versions of nuclear potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K.P.; Sukumaran, Indu [Kannur University, School of Pure and Applied Physics, Payyanur, Kerala (India)

    2017-06-15

    The cluster decays from various isotopes of trans-lead nuclei have been studied using 12 different nuclear potentials by evaluating decay half-lives and are then compared with the available experimental data. The study has shown that the barrier penetrability as well as the decay half-lives varies with the nuclear potential used. The standard deviation of the estimated half-lives is also calculated for these twelve nuclear potentials in comparison with the experimental data. The potential Bass 1980 is found to be the most appropriate potential for studying cluster radioactivity as the standard deviation obtained is least. Among the different proximity potential versions; proximity 1977, proximity 1988, proximity 2000, and modified proximity 2000, the minimum standard deviation is for proximity 1988. The Geiger-Nuttall (G-N) plots studied for different cluster emissions from various parents are observed to show linear behavior but with different slopes and intercepts. Again, the G-N plots obtained are linear with different slopes and intercepts when plotted for different nuclear potentials. So it is observed that with the inclusion of different nuclear potentials, the linearity of the G-N plot remains unaltered. Irrespective of the nuclear potential used, the universal curve (log{sub 10}T{sub 1/2} vs. -ln P) studied for various clusters emitted from various parents are obtained as linear with same slope and intercept. (orig.)

  3. Energy distribution of antineutrinos originating from the decay of fission products in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudstam, G.; Aleklett, K.

    1979-01-01

    The energy spectrum of antineutrinos around a nuclear reactor has been derived by summing contributions from individual fission products. The resulting spectrum is weaker at energies above approx. 8 MeV than earlier published antineutrino spectra. The reason may be connected to the strong feeding of high-lying daughter states in the beta decay of fission products with high disintegration energies

  4. Parity non-conservation observed in nuclear gamma-decay of (180m) Hf

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zákoucký, Dalibor; Stone, J.R.; Goldring, G.; Stone, N. J.; Severijns, N.; Haas, M.; Giles, T.; Koester, U.; Kraev, I. S.; Lakshmi, S.; Lindroos, M.; Wauters, F.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 2 (2008), s. 411-416 ISSN 0587-4254 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : parity nonconservation * gamma decay Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.767, year: 2008

  5. Decay Rates and Probability Estimatesfor Massive Dirac Particlesin the Kerr-Newman Black Hole Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finster, F.; Kamran, N.; Smoller, J.; Yau, S.-T.

    The Cauchy problem is considered for the massive Dirac equation in the non-extreme Kerr-Newman geometry, for smooth initial data with compact support outside the event horizon and bounded angular momentum. We prove that the Dirac wave function decays in L∞ {loc} at least at the rate t-5/6. For generic initial data, this rate of decay is sharp. We derive a formula for the probability p that the Dirac particle escapes to infinity. For various conditions on the initial data, we show that p = 0, 1 or 0 < p < 1. The proofs are based on a refined analysis of the Dirac propagator constructed in [4].

  6. Current status of nuclear decay data and report on the IAEA Coordinated Research Programme on the measurement and evaluation of transactinium isotope nuclear decay data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, C.W.; Vaninbroukx, R.

    1984-01-01

    In 1977, the IAEA organized a Coordinated Research Programme to address the needs for highly accurate actinide-nuclide decay data identified at the first Advisory Group Meeting on Transactinium Isotope Nuclear Data, held in Karlsruhe in 1975. During the years of its existence, this CRP has made significant strides towards achieving the goals outlined at Karlsruhe and subsequently refined at a second Advisory Group Meeting, held in Cadarache in 1979. In this paper, the make-up of the CRP and its work in the areas of decay-data measurement and evaluation are presented and its significant accomplishments summarized. We also discuss the contents and philosophy of the final report, containing the results of the measurements and evaluations carried out by the CRP participants, to be published following the planned termination of this Programme in November, 1984. 82 references

  7. Development of a water boil-off spent-fuel calorimeter system. [To measure decay heat generation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creer, J.M.; Shupe, J.W. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    A calorimeter system was developed to measure decay heat generation rates of unmodified spent fuel assemblies from commercial nuclear reactors. The system was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested using the following specifications: capacity of one BWR or PWR spent fuel assembly; decay heat generation range 0.1 to 2.5 kW; measurement time of < 12 h; and an accuracy of +-10% or better. The system was acceptance tested using a dc reference heater to simulate spent fuel assembly heat generation rates. Results of these tests indicated that the system could be used to measure heat generation rates between 0.5 and 2.5 kW within +- 5%. Measurements of heat generation rates of approx. 0.1 kW were obtained within +- 15%. The calorimeter system has the potential to permit measurements of heat generation rates of spent fuel assemblies and other devices in the 12- to 14-kW range. Results of calorimetry of a Turkey Point spent fuel assembly indicated that the assembly was generating approx. 1.55 kW.

  8. Workshop on nuclear structure and decay data: Theory and evaluation, 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.; McLaughlin, P.K.

    2008-06-01

    A two-week Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section was organised and held at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy from 28 April to 9 May 2008. This workshop constituted a further development of previous Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Workshops held in 2002, 2003, 2005 and 2006. The aims and contents of the 2008 workshop are summarized, along with the agenda, list of participants, comments and recommendations. All recent workshop material has been assembled in this INDC report, and is also freely available on CD-ROM (all relevant PowerPoint presentations and manuals along with appropriate computer codes). (author)

  9. Ratio of hadronic decay rates of J/ψ and ψ(2S) and the ρπ puzzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Y. F.; Li, X. H.

    2001-01-01

    The so-called ρπ puzzle of J/ψ and ψ(2S) decays is examined using the experimental data available to date. Two different approaches were taken to estimate the ratio of J/ψ and ψ(2S) hadronic decay rates. While one of the estimates could not yield the exact ratio of ψ(2S) to J/ψ inclusive hadronic decay rates, the other, based on a computation of the inclusive ggg decay rate for ψ(2S)(J/ψ) by subtracting other decay rates from the total decay rate, differs by two standard deviations from the naive prediction of perturbative QCD, even though its central value is nearly twice as large as what was naively expected. A comparison between this ratio, upon making corrections for specific exclusive two-body decay modes, and the corresponding experimental data confirms the puzzles in J/ψ and ψ(2S) decays. We find from our analysis that the exclusively reconstructed hadronic decays of the ψ(2S) account for only a small fraction of its total decays, and a ratio exceeding the above estimate should be expected to occur for a considerable number of the remaining decay channels. We also show that the recent new results from the BES experiment provide crucial tests of various theoretical models proposed to explain the puzzle

  10. Combined results on b-hadron production rates, lifetimes, oscillations and semileptonic decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abbaneo, D.; Andreev, V.; Barberio, E.; Battaglia, M.; Blyth, S.; Boix, G.; Bourdarios, C.; Calvi, M.; Checchia, P.; Coyle, P.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Gagnon, P.; Hawkings, R.; Hayes, O.; Henrard, P.; Hessing, T.; Jimack, M.; Kroll, I.J.; Leroy, O.; Lucchesi, D.; Margoni, M.; Mele, S.; Moser, H.G.; Muheim, F.; Palla, F.; Pallin, D.; Parodi, F.; Paulini, M.; Piotto, E.; Privitera, P.; Rosnet, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rousseau, D.; Schneider, O.; Schwick, C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Simonetto, F.; Spagnolo, P.; Stocchi, A.; Su, D.; Usher, T.; Weiser, C.; Wells, P.; Wicklund, B.; Willocq, Stephane

    2000-01-01

    Combined results on b-hadron lifetimes, b-hadron production rates, B&0_d - Bbar^0_d and B^0_s - Bbar^0_s oscillations, the decay width difference between the mass eigenstates of the B^s0_s - Bbar^0_s system, and the values of the CKM

  11. Methods and sensitivity for pass-by measurement of track decay rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittrich, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Track decay rates are measured to characterize the track dynamics for railway noise type testing, but also for other purposes in relation to railway noise. They are often measured statically using hammer response functions on unloaded track, but can also be derived from rail vibrations on loaded

  12. Order-α corrections to the decay rate of orthopositronium in the Fried-Yennie gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adkins, G.S.; Salahuddin, A.A.; Schalm, K.E.

    1992-01-01

    The order-α correction to the decay rate of orthopositronium is obtained using the Fried-Yennie gauge. The result (mα 7 /π 2 ) [-1.987 84(11)] is consistent with but more accurate than the results of previous evaluations

  13. Interplay between spontaneous decay rates and Lamb shifts in open photonic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassalle, Emmanuel; Bonod, Nicolas; Durt, Thomas; Stout, Brian

    2018-05-01

    In this letter, we describe the modified decay rate and photonic Lamb (frequency) shift of quantum emitters in terms of the resonant states of a neighboring photonic resonator. This description illustrates a fundamental distinction in the behaviors of closed (conservative) and open (dissipative) systems: the Lamb shift is bounded by the emission linewidth in closed systems while it overcomes this limit in open systems.

  14. On the radiative corrections α2lnα to the positronium decay rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khriplovich, I.B.; Elkhovskij, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    The radiative corrections ∼α 2 ln α to the positronium decay rate are calculated in the Breit approximation which is shown to be quite adequate for the problem. For orthopositronium the result coincides with the previous one, for parapositronium it differs from the old results. 9 refs

  15. Influence of mRNA decay rates on the computational prediction of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SEARCHU

    To understand the influences, we present a systematic method based on a gene dynamic ... data). The results indicate that mRNA decay rates do not significantly influence the .... For instance, k for a cubic B-spline equals 4 and the fitting.

  16. Inference of RNA decay rate from transcriptional profiling highlights the regulatory programs of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkallas, Rached; Fish, Lisa; Goodarzi, Hani; Najafabadi, Hamed S

    2017-10-13

    The abundance of mRNA is mainly determined by the rates of RNA transcription and decay. Here, we present a method for unbiased estimation of differential mRNA decay rate from RNA-sequencing data by modeling the kinetics of mRNA metabolism. We show that in all primary human tissues tested, and particularly in the central nervous system, many pathways are regulated at the mRNA stability level. We present a parsimonious regulatory model consisting of two RNA-binding proteins and four microRNAs that modulate the mRNA stability landscape of the brain, which suggests a new link between RBFOX proteins and Alzheimer's disease. We show that downregulation of RBFOX1 leads to destabilization of mRNAs encoding for synaptic transmission proteins, which may contribute to the loss of synaptic function in Alzheimer's disease. RBFOX1 downregulation is more likely to occur in older and female individuals, consistent with the association of Alzheimer's disease with age and gender."mRNA abundance is determined by the rates of transcription and decay. Here, the authors propose a method for estimating the rate of differential mRNA decay from RNA-seq data and model mRNA stability in the brain, suggesting a link between mRNA stability and Alzheimer's disease."

  17. Interfaces of nuclear structure studies-decay vs. in-beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grawe, H.; Gorska, M.; Hu, Z.; Roeckl, E.; Lipoglavsek, M.; Fahlander, C.; Rykaczewski, K.

    1999-05-01

    The common interface of β-decay and particle-decay experiments and in-beam studies following fusion, relativistic fission and projectile fragmentation is defined by the search for the best way to extract nuclear structure information. For a few examples selected from the exotic regions of nuclei around 100 Sn and between 68 Ni and 78 Ni it is demonstrated, that complementary spectroscopic data extracted by various methods lead to an understanding of the shell structure at these keypoints of the nuclidic chart. (orig.)

  18. Nuclear Structure of 124Xe Studied with β+/EC-Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radich, A. J.; Garrett, P. E.; Allmond, J. M.; Andreoiu, C.; Ball, G. C.; Bianco, L.; Bildstein, V.; Chagnon-Lessard, S.; Cross, D. S.; Diaz Varela, A.; Dunlop, R.; Finlay, P.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hackman, G.; Hadinia, B.; Jigmeddorj, B.; Laffoley, A. T.; Leach, K. G.; Michetti-Wilson, J.; Orce, J. N.; Rajabali, M. M.; Rand, E.; Starosta, K.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Svensson, C. E.; Triambak, S.; Wang, Z. M.; Wood, J. L.; Wong, J.; Williams, S. J.; Yates, S. W.

    The nuclear structure of 124Xe was investigated using γ-ray spectroscopy following the β+/EC-decay of 124Cs. A very high-statistics data set was collected and γγ coincidence data was analyzed, greatly adding to the 124Xe level scheme. A new decay branch from the high-spin isomer of 124Cs was observed as well as weak E2 transitions into excited 0+ states in 124Xe. B(E2) transition strengths of such low-spin transitions are very important in determining collective properties, which are currently poorly characterized in the region of neutron-deficient xenon isotopes.

  19. Investigating the decay rates of Escherichia coli relative to Vibrio parahemolyticus and Salmonella Typhi in tropical coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choon Weng; Ng, Angie Yee Fang; Bong, Chui Wei; Narayanan, Kumaran; Sim, Edmund Ui Hang; Ng, Ching Ching

    2011-02-01

    Using the size fractionation method, we measured the decay rates of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhi and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the coastal waters of Peninsular Malaysia. The size fractions were total or unfiltered, 0.7 μm) than in the smaller fraction (Vibrio grew well in seawater. There was usually an increase in Vibrio after one day incubation. Our results confirmed that decay or loss rates of E. coli did not match that of Vibrio, and also did not correlate with Salmonella decay rates. However E. coli showed persistence where its decay rates were generally lower than Salmonella. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Controversy and consensus nuclear beta decay 1911-1934

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Carsten

    2000-01-01

    In 1920s, a long-lasting controversy on the interpretation of nuclear beta spectrum arose between Lise Meitner and Charles Drummond Ellis. This controversy, and the reactions from the contending parties when it was settled, reflect clearly the difference between the scientific communities in Berlin and Cambridge at that time. The Meitner-Ellis controversy ended in 1929, and it left an anomaly that attracted leading theoretical physicists. A new dispute, this time between Niels Bohr and Wolfgang Pauli, broke out. It concerned the explanation of the continuity of the primary beta particles and dominated the discussions for the next five years. Pauli argued for a new particle, and Bohr for a new theory; both suggestions were radical steps, but they reflected two different ways of doing physics.

  1. Configuration splitting and gamma-decay transition rates in the two-group shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isakov, V. I.

    2015-01-01

    Expressions for reduced gamma-decay transition rates were obtained on the basis of the twogroup configuration model for the case of transitions between particles belonging to identical groups of nucleons. In practical applications, the present treatment is the most appropriate for describing decays for odd–odd nuclei in the vicinity of magic nuclei or for nuclei where the corresponding subshells stand out in energy. Also, a simple approximation is applicable to describing configuration splitting in those cases. The present calculations were performed for nuclei whose mass numbers are close to A ∼ 90, including N = 51 odd—odd isotones

  2. Strong intercation corrections to semiweak decays: calculation of the V → Hγ decay rate with αsub(s) accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vysotskij, M.I.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of the search for the Higgs boson in the V → Hγ decay, where V is a vector particle built of anti QQ heavy quark pair is considered. The V → Hγ decay proposed by Wilczek gives possibility to avoid experimental dificulties in detecting Higgs bosons. The probability of this decay and one loop gluan strong corrections to this process have been calculated

  3. Effect of chemical structure on the radioactive decay rate of 71Ge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makariunas, K.; Makariuniene, E.; Dragunas, A.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of the chemical structure on the electron capture radioactive decay rate of 71 Ge was observed. 71 Ge nuclei in bivalent sulphide GeS decay faster than in quadrivalent sulphide GeS 2 . The relative change Δlambda/lambda of the decay constant lambda is + (11.4 +- 1.7) X 10 -4 . A possibility to use the experimental values of Δlambda/lambda to determine the chemical changes in the electron density at germanium nuclei in germanium chemical compounds is discussed. Quantitative determination of the changes in the electron density is complicated because of insufficient reliability of the published values of exchange and overlap corrections to the electron capture probabilities. (Auth.)

  4. Leaching of radionuclides from decaying blueberry leaves: Relative rate independent of concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Evenden, W.G.

    1990-01-01

    Leaching of radionuclides from decaying vegetation has not been extensively investigated, especially for radionuclides other than 137 Cs. The authors obtained leaves of blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium x V. corymbosum) that contained over 25-fold ranges in Se, Cs, and I concentrations, as well as a small quantity of leaves containing detectable U. All were contaminated by way of root uptake. Leaching took place for a period of 1 yr in the laboratory, using leach water from forest litter. Monthly, measurements were made of the radionuclide contents and decaying leaf dry weights. The data conformed to an exponential decay model with two first-order components. In no case did the relative loss rates vary systematically with the initial tissue radionuclide concentrations. Loss rates decreased in the order Cs > I > U > dry wt. > Se. Because of the low leaching rate of Se relative to the loss of dry weight, decaying litter may actually accumulate elements such as Se. Accumulation of radionuclides in litter could have important implications for lateral transport, recycling, and direct incorporation into edible mushrooms

  5. Leaching of radionuclides from decaying blueberry leaves: Relative rate independent of concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Evenden, W.G. (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada))

    Leaching of radionuclides from decaying vegetation has not been extensively investigated, especially for radionuclides other than {sup 137}Cs. The authors obtained leaves of blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium {times} V. corymbosum) that contained over 25-fold ranges in Se, Cs, and I concentrations, as well as a small quantity of leaves containing detectable U. All were contaminated by way of root uptake. Leaching took place for a period of 1 yr in the laboratory, using leach water from forest litter. Monthly, measurements were made of the radionuclide contents and decaying leaf dry weights. The data conformed to an exponential decay model with two first-order components. In no case did the relative loss rates vary systematically with the initial tissue radionuclide concentrations. Loss rates decreased in the order Cs > I > U > dry wt. > Se. Because of the low leaching rate of Se relative to the loss of dry weight, decaying litter may actually accumulate elements such as Se. Accumulation of radionuclides in litter could have important implications for lateral transport, recycling, and direct incorporation into edible mushrooms.

  6. Measuring nuclear reaction cross sections to extract information on neutrinoless double beta decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Agodi, C.; Acosta, L.; Auerbach, N.; Bellone, J.; Bijker, R.; Bonanno, D.; Bongiovanni, D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Boztosun, I.; Branchina, V.; Bussa, M. P.; Calabrese, S.; Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Calvo, D.; Carbone, D.; Chávez Lomelí, E. R.; Coban, A.; Colonna, M.; D'Agostino, G.; De Geronimo, G.; Delaunay, F.; Deshmukh, N.; de Faria, P. N.; Ferraresi, C.; Ferreira, J. L.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fisichella, M.; Foti, A.; Gallo, G.; Garcia, U.; Giraudo, G.; Greco, V.; Hacisalihoglu, A.; Kotila, J.; Iazzi, F.; Introzzi, R.; Lanzalone, G.; Lavagno, A.; La Via, F.; Lay, J. A.; Lenske, H.; Linares, R.; Litrico, G.; Longhitano, F.; Lo Presti, D.; Lubian, J.; Medina, N.; Mendes, D. R.; Muoio, A.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Pakou, A.; Pandola, L.; Petrascu, H.; Pinna, F.; Reito, S.; Rifuggiato, D.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Russo, A. D.; Russo, G.; Santagati, G.; Santopinto, E.; Sgouros, O.; Solakci, S. O.; Souliotis, G.; Soukeras, V.; Spatafora, A.; Torresi, D.; Tudisco, S.; Vsevolodovna, R. I. M.; Wheadon, R. J.; Yildirin, A.; Zagatto, V. A. B.

    2018-02-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0vββ) is considered the best potential resource to access the absolute neutrino mass scale. Moreover, if observed, it will signal that neutrinos are their own anti-particles (Majorana particles). Presently, this physics case is one of the most important research “beyond Standard Model” and might guide the way towards a Grand Unified Theory of fundamental interactions. Since the 0vββ decay process involves nuclei, its analysis necessarily implies nuclear structure issues. In the NURE project, supported by a Starting Grant of the European Research Council (ERC), nuclear reactions of double charge-exchange (DCE) are used as a tool to extract information on the 0vββ Nuclear Matrix Elements. In DCE reactions and ββ decay indeed the initial and final nuclear states are the same and the transition operators have similar structure. Thus the measurement of the DCE absolute cross-sections can give crucial information on ββ matrix elements. In a wider view, the NUMEN international collaboration plans a major upgrade of the INFN-LNS facilities in the next years in order to increase the experimental production of nuclei of at least two orders of magnitude, thus making feasible a systematic study of all the cases of interest as candidates for 0vββ.

  7. Two-electron one-photon decay rates in doubly ionized atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, G.B.

    1984-01-01

    The transion rate for the two-electron one-photon and one-electron one-photon decaying processes in atoms bearing initially two K-shell vacancies were evaluated for Ne up to Zr. The two-electron one-photon decay process is considered to be the result of the interaction between the jumping electrons and their interaction with the radiation field. The calculation is performed in second order perturbation theory and the many particle states are constructed from single particle solutions. The present approach allows one to discuss several aspects of the decaying process. The results obtained for the branching ratio between the two processes reproduces reasonably well available experimental data and show an almost linear dependence on the second power of the atomic number. A comparison with other theoretical predictions is also presented for the two decaying processes and the strong dependence of the branching ratio on the initial configuration of the decaying atom is pointed out. (Author) [pt

  8. Correlation effects on the nonmesonic weak decay of the Λ hyperon in nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, N. J.; Dickhoff, W. H.

    2005-08-01

    The nonmesonic weak decay of a Λ hyperon is studied in nuclear matter. Special emphasis is placed on a consistent treatment of correlations introduced by the strong interaction on its weak counterpart. The latter is described by the exchange of mesons between the initial ΛN state and the final NN one. The weak decay is studied in terms of the weak self-energy, which allows a systematic evaluation of short-range and tensor correlation effects that are determined by a realistic hyperon-nucleon interaction. The admixture of ΣN components through the strong interaction is also included in the calculation of the Λ decay properties. Calculations for the ratio of the neutron-induced partial width to the corresponding proton-induced one, Γn/Γp, are discussed in connection with recent experimental results.

  9. Double beta decay, neutrino physics, nuclear structure and isospin and spin-isospin symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krmpotic, F.

    1989-12-01

    Prominent features of the double beta decay processes are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the neutrino masses and the quasiparticle random phase approximation (GRPA). The suppression mechanism for the ββ-decay transition rates, proposed by Vogel and Zirnbauer, is found to be closely related to the restoration of SU(4) symmetry. It is suggested that the extreme sensitivity of the ββ-decay amplitude on the proton-neutron coupling is a consequence of the explicit violation of the SU(4) symmetry and therefore an artifact of the model. A prescription is given for fixing this interaction strength within the GRPA itself, which in this way acquires predicting power on both single and double β-decay lifetimes. (author) [pt

  10. EDISTR: a computer program to obtain a nuclear decay data base for radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, L.T.

    1980-01-01

    This report provides documentation for the computer program EDISTR. EDISTR uses basic radioactive decay data from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File developed and maintained by the Nuclear Data Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as input, and calculates the mean energies and absolute intensities of all principal radiations associated with the radioactive decay of a nuclide. The program is intended to provide a physical data base for internal dosimetry calculations. The principal calculations performed by EDISTR are the determination of (1) the average energy of beta particles in a beta transition, (2) the beta spectrum as function of energy, (3) the energies and intensities of x-rays and Auger electrons generated by radioactive decay processes, (4) the bremsstrahlung spectra accompanying beta decay and monoenergetic Auger and internal conversion electrons, and (5) the radiations accompanying spontaneous fission. This report discusses the theoretical and empirical methods used in EDISTR and also practical aspects of the computer implementation of the theory. Detailed instructions for preparing input data for the computer program are included, along with examples and discussion of the output data generated by EDISTR

  11. Double Beta Decay and Neutrino Masses Accuracy of the Nuclear Matrix Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faessler, Amand

    2005-01-01

    The neutrinoless double beta decay is forbidden in the standard model of the electroweak and strong interaction but allowed in most Grand Unified Theories (GUT's). Only if the neutrino is a Majorana particle (identical with its antiparticle) and if it has a mass, the neutrinoless double beta decay is allowed. Apart of one claim that the neutrinoless double beta decay in 76 Ge is measured, one has only upper limits for this transition probability. But even the upper limits allow to give upper limits for the electron Majorana neutrino mass and upper limits for parameters of GUT's and the minimal R-parity violating supersymmetric model. One further can give lower limits for the vector boson mediating mainly the right-handed weak interaction and the heavy mainly right-handed Majorana neutrino in left-right symmetric GUT's. For that one has to assume that the specific mechanism is the leading one for the neutrinoless double beta decay and one has to be able to calculate reliably the corresponding nuclear matrix elements. In the present contribution, one discusses the accuracy of the present status of calculating the nuclear matrix elements and the corresponding limits of GUT's and supersymmetric parameters

  12. Evaluation of induced activity, decay heat and dose rate distribution after shutdown in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maki, Koichi [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi Research Lab.; Satoh, Satoshi; Hayashi, Katsumi; Yamada, Koubun; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Iida, Hiromasa

    1997-03-01

    Induced activity, decay heat and dose rate distributions after shutdown were estimated for 1MWa/m{sup 2} operation in ITER. The activity in the inboard blanket one day after shutdown is 1.5x10{sup 11}Bq/cm{sup 3}, and the average decay heating rate 0.01w/cm{sup 3}. The dose rate outside the 120cm thick concrete biological shield is two order higher than the design criterion of 5{mu}Sv/h. This indicates that the biological shield thickness should be enhanced by 50cm in concrete, that is, total thickness 170cm for workers to enter the reactor room and to perform maintenance. (author)

  13. Fluorescence decay data analysis correcting for detector pulse pile-up at very high count rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patting, Matthias; Reisch, Paja; Sackrow, Marcus; Dowler, Rhys; Koenig, Marcelle; Wahl, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Using time-correlated single photon counting for the purpose of fluorescence lifetime measurements is usually limited in speed due to pile-up. With modern instrumentation, this limitation can be lifted significantly, but some artifacts due to frequent merging of closely spaced detector pulses (detector pulse pile-up) remain an issue to be addressed. We propose a data analysis method correcting for this type of artifact and the resulting systematic errors. It physically models the photon losses due to detector pulse pile-up and incorporates the loss in the decay fit model employed to obtain fluorescence lifetimes and relative amplitudes of the decay components. Comparison of results with and without this correction shows a significant reduction of systematic errors at count rates approaching the excitation rate. This allows quantitatively accurate fluorescence lifetime imaging at very high frame rates.

  14. Nuclear opponents sentenced to pay electricity rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    In its decison of March 19, 1980 the Local Court of Hamburg sentenced a nuclear opponent to pay the sum withheld to the electricity supply utility. He had remitted 10 per cent of the rate on a blocked account. A right to refuse payment cannot be founded on Art. 4 of the Basic Law, since the freedom of conscience is not unilimited but may be restricted by the legal system or by obligations undertaken by oneself. Nor does the defendant have a right to withhold, since he is not entitled to a counter-claim from the power supply contract. Against the right to refuse payment in good faith speaks the fact that the plaintiff operates the nuclear power plant legally persuant to a licence. Even if the licence was withdrawn by an administrative court, this would not abolish with retroactive effect the existing reasonability of payment. (HSCH) [de

  15. Experimental validation of decay heat calculation codes and associated nuclear data libraries for fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Fujio; Wada, Masayuki; Ikeda, Yujiro

    2001-01-01

    Validity of decay heat calculations for safety designs of fusion reactors was investigated by using decay heat experimental data on thirty-two fusion reactor relevant materials obtained at the 14-MeV neutron source facility of FNS in JAERI. Calculation codes developed in Japan, ACT4 and CINAC version 4, and nuclear data bases such as JENDL/Act-96, FENDL/A-2.0 and Lib90 were used for the calculation. Although several corrections in algorithms for both the calculation codes were needed, it was shown by comparing calculated results with the experimental data that most of activation cross sections and decay data were adequate. In cases of type 316 stainless steel and copper which were important for ITER, prediction accuracy of decay heat within ±10% was confirmed. However, it was pointed out that there were some problems in parts of data such as improper activation cross sections, e,g., the 92 Mo(n, 2n) 91g Mo reaction in FENDL, and lack of activation cross section data, e.g., the 138 Ba(n, 2n) 137m Ba reaction in JENDL. Modifications of cross section data were recommended for 19 reactions in JENDL and FENDL. It was also pointed out that X-ray and conversion electron energies should be included in decay data. (author)

  16. Experimental validation of decay heat calculation codes and associated nuclear data libraries for fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Fujio; Wada, Masayuki; Ikeda, Yujiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-01-01

    Validity of decay heat calculations for safety designs of fusion reactors was investigated by using decay heat experimental data on thirty-two fusion reactor relevant materials obtained at the 14-MeV neutron source facility of FNS in JAERI. Calculation codes developed in Japan, ACT4 and CINAC version 4, and nuclear data bases such as JENDL/Act-96, FENDL/A-2.0 and Lib90 were used for the calculation. Although several corrections in algorithms for both the calculation codes were needed, it was shown by comparing calculated results with the experimental data that most of activation cross sections and decay data were adequate. In cases of type 316 stainless steel and copper which were important for ITER, prediction accuracy of decay heat within {+-}10% was confirmed. However, it was pointed out that there were some problems in parts of data such as improper activation cross sections, e,g., the {sup 92}Mo(n, 2n){sup 91g}Mo reaction in FENDL, and lack of activation cross section data, e.g., the {sup 138}Ba(n, 2n){sup 137m}Ba reaction in JENDL. Modifications of cross section data were recommended for 19 reactions in JENDL and FENDL. It was also pointed out that X-ray and conversion electron energies should be included in decay data. (author)

  17. Nuclear Data and Reaction Rate Databases in Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippuner, Jonas

    2018-06-01

    Astrophysical simulations and models require a large variety of micro-physics data, such as equation of state tables, atomic opacities, properties of nuclei, and nuclear reaction rates. Some of the required data is experimentally accessible, but the extreme conditions present in many astrophysical scenarios cannot be reproduced in the laboratory and thus theoretical models are needed to supplement the empirical data. Collecting data from various sources and making them available as a database in a unified format is a formidable task. I will provide an overview of the data requirements in astrophysics with an emphasis on nuclear astrophysics. I will then discuss some of the existing databases, the science they enable, and their limitations. Finally, I will offer some thoughts on how to design a useful database.

  18. Laser assisted nuclear decay spectroscopy: A new method for studying neutron-deficient francium

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Kara Marie

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive decay studies of rare isotopes produced at radioactive ion beam facilities have often been hindered by the presence of isobaric and isomeric contamination. The Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at ISOLDE, CERN uses laser radiation to stepwise excite and ionize an atomic beam in a particular isomeric state. Deflection of this selectively ionized beam of exotic nuclei, from the remaining neutral contaminants, allows ultra-sensitive detection of rare isotopes and nuclear structure measurements in background-free conditions.\

  19. Workshop on nuclear structure and decay data: Theory and evaluation manual - Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.; McLaughlin, P.K.; p.mclaughlin@iaea.org

    2004-11-01

    A two-week Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data: Theory and Evaluation was organized and administrated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, and hosted at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy from 17 to 28 November 2003. The aims and contents of this workshop are summarized, along with the agenda, list of participants, comments and recommendations. Workshop materials are also included that are freely available on CD-ROM (all relevant PowerPoint presentations and manuals along with appropriate computer codes). (author)

  20. Workshop on nuclear structure and decay data: Theory and evaluation manual - Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.; McLaughlin, P.K.; p.mclaughlin@iaea.org

    2004-11-01

    A two-week Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data: Theory and Evaluation was organized and administrated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, and hosted at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy from 17 to 28 November 2003. The aims and contents of this workshop are summarized, along with the agenda, list of participants, comments and recommendations. Workshop materials are also included that are freely available on CD-ROM (all relevant PowerPoint presentations and manuals along with appropriate computer codes). (author)

  1. Search of the chemical change of the sup(119m)Sn (Tsub(1/2) = 293 days) radioactive decay rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makariunas, K.; Makariuniene, E.; Dragunas, A.

    1983-01-01

    The differences in decay rates of the nuclear isomer sup(119m)Sn (Tsub(1/2) = 293 days; the strongly converted M4 transition) have been measured for different chemical compounds. The experimental results show that the sup(119m)Sn nuclei in the telluride SnTe decay faster than in the metal β-Sn and in the dioxide SnO 2 [the relative change Δlambda/lambda the decay probability lambda is +(3.6+-1.4)x10 -4 ]. No measurable difference between the decay rates of sup(119m)Sn in β-Sn and SnO 2 has been observed [Δlambda/lambda = -(0.1+-1.2)x10 -4 ], irrespective of the great difference in electronic structure of the tin atoms. The results cannot be explained by considering the internal conversion of the valence electrons only. It is necessary to assume that the chemical changes of the decay rate are strongly influenced by the chemical changes of the probabilities of the internal conversion of electrons of the inner shells of the atom. This conclusion is confirmed by theoretical calculations. (Auth.)

  2. Reliability analysis of emergency decay heat removal system of nuclear ship under various accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Takeshi

    1984-01-01

    A reliability analysis is given for the emergency decay heat removal system of the Nuclear Ship ''Mutsu'' and the emergency sea water cooling system of the Nuclear Ship ''Savannah'', under ten typical nuclear ship accident conditions. Basic event probabilities under these accident conditions are estimated from literature survey. These systems of Mutsu and Savannah have almost the same reliability under the normal condition. The dispersive arrangement of a system is useful to prevent the reduction of the system reliability under the condition of an accident restricted in one room. As for the reliability of these two systems under various accident conditions, it is seen that the configuration and the environmental condition of a system are two main factors which determine the reliability of the system. Furthermore, it was found that, for the evaluation of the effectiveness of safety system of a nuclear ship, it is necessary to evaluate its reliability under various accident conditions. (author)

  3. New limits for the 2 νββ decay of 96Zr to excited nuclear states of 96Mo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Sean; Tornow, Werner

    2015-10-01

    The final results from our search for the 2 νββ decay of 96Zr to excited 0+ and 2+ states of 96Mo are presented. Such measurements provide valuable test cases for 2 νββ -decay nuclear matrix element calculations, which in turn are used to tune 0 νββ -decay nuclear matrix element calculations. After undergoing double- β decay to an excited state, the excited daughter nucleus decays to the ground state, emitting two coincident γ rays. These two γ rays are detected in coincidence by two HPGe detectors sandwiching the 96Zr sample, with a NaI veto in anti-coincidence. This experimental apparatus, located at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), has previously measured the 2 νββ decay of 100Mo and 150Nd to excited nuclear states. Experimental limits on the T1 / 2 and corresponding nuclear matrix element are presented for each of these decays. As a byproduct of this experiment, limits were also set on the single- β decay of 96Zr. Supported by DOE Grant: DE-FG02-97ER41033.

  4. The aims and activities of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.; Tuli, J.K.

    2008-01-01

    The International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) experts consists of a number of evaluation groups and data service centres in several countries that appreciate the merits of working together to maintain and ensure the quality and comprehensive content of the ENSDF database (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File). Biennial meetings of the network are held under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to assign evaluation responsibilities, monitor progress, discuss improvements and emerging difficulties, and agree on actions to be undertaken by individual members. The evaluated data and bibliographic details are made available to users via various media, such as the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets, the World Wide Web, on CD-Rom, wall charts of the nuclides and Nuclear Wallet Cards. While the ENSDF master database is maintained by the US National Nuclear Data Center at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, these data are also available from other nuclear data centres including the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy, in cooperation with the IAEA, organizes workshops on NSDD at regular intervals. The primary aims of these particular workshops are to provide hands-on training in the data evaluation processes, and to encourage new experts to participate in NSDD activities. The technical contents of these NSDD workshops are described, along with the rationale for the inclusion of various topics. (authors)

  5. Measurement of HOx· production rate due to radon decay in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Huiling.

    1993-08-01

    Radon in indoor air may cause the exposure of the public to excessive radioactivity. Radiolysis of water vapor in indoor air due to radon decay could produce (·OH and HO 2 ·) that may convert atmospheric constituents to compounds of lower vapor pressure. These lower vapor pressure compounds might then nucleate to form new particles in the indoor atmosphere. Chemical amplification was used to determine HO x · production rate in indoor air caused by radon decay. Average HO x · production rate was found to be (4.31±0.07) x 10 5 HO x · per Rn decay per second (Bq) 3.4 to 55.0% at 22C. This work provided G (HO x ·) -value, 7.86±0.13 No./100 eV in air by directly measuring [HO x ·] formed from the radiolysis procedure. This G value implies that HO x · produced by radon decay in air might be formed by multiple processes and may be result of positive ion-molecule reactions, primary radiolysis, and radical reactions. There is no obvious relation between HO x · production rate and relative humidity. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been used for ·OH production rate measurement; it consists of an excimer laser, a dye laser, a frequency doubler, a gaseous fluorescence chamber, and other optical and electronic parts. This system needs to be improved to eliminate the interferences of light scattering and artificial ·OH produced from the photolysis of O 3 /H 2 O

  6. Measurement of the Production Rate of Charm Quark Pairs from Gluons in Hadronic $Z^{0}$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Alexander, Gideon; Allison, J; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bock, P; Böhme, J; Boeriu, O; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Ciocca, C; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couchman, J; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Dallison, S; Davis, R; De Jong, S; de Roeck, A; Dervan, P J; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanfani, A; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fleck, I; Frey, A; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Graham, K; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hargrove, C K; Harin-Dirac, M; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hobson, P R; Höcker, Andreas; Hoffman, K; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Jawahery, A; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J I; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klier, A; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Liebisch, R; Lillich, J; List, B; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Lü, J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mader, W F; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Marchant, T E; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Méndez-Lorenzo, P; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, I; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Okpara, A N; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Polok, J; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rembser, C; Rick, Hartmut; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rosati, S; Roscoe, K; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spagnolo, S; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Surrow, B; Talbot, S D; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trefzger, T M; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Van Kooten, R; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Waller, D; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; Wetterling, D; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    2000-01-01

    The rate of secondary charm-quark-pair production has been measured in 4.4 million hadronic Z0 decays collected by OPAL. By selecting events with three jets and tagging charmed hadrons in the gluon jet candidate using leptons and charged D* mesons, the average number of secondary charm-quark pairs per hadronic event is found to be (3.20+-0.21+-0.38)x10-2.

  7. Canonical Poly(A Polymerase Activity Promotes the Decay of a Wide Variety of Mammalian Nuclear RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan M Bresson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human nuclear poly(A-binding protein PABPN1 has been implicated in the decay of nuclear noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs. In addition, PABPN1 promotes hyperadenylation by stimulating poly(A-polymerases (PAPα/γ, but this activity has not previously been linked to the decay of endogenous transcripts. Moreover, the mechanisms underlying target specificity have remained elusive. Here, we inactivated PAP-dependent hyperadenylation in cells by two independent mechanisms and used an RNA-seq approach to identify endogenous targets. We observed the upregulation of various ncRNAs, including snoRNA host genes, primary miRNA transcripts, and promoter upstream antisense RNAs, confirming that hyperadenylation is broadly required for the degradation of PABPN1-targets. In addition, we found that mRNAs with retained introns are susceptible to PABPN1 and PAPα/γ-mediated decay (PPD. Transcripts are targeted for degradation due to inefficient export, which is a consequence of reduced intron number or incomplete splicing. Additional investigation showed that a genetically-encoded poly(A tail is sufficient to drive decay, suggesting that degradation occurs independently of the canonical cleavage and polyadenylation reaction. Surprisingly, treatment with transcription inhibitors uncouples polyadenylation from decay, leading to runaway hyperadenylation of nuclear decay targets. We conclude that PPD is an important mammalian nuclear RNA decay pathway for the removal of poorly spliced and nuclear-retained transcripts.

  8. Change of nuclear configurations in the neutrinoless double-β decay of 130Te →130Be and 136Xe136Ba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entwisle, J. P.; Kay, B. P.; Tamii, A.; Adachi, S.; Aoi, N.; Clark, J. A.; Freeman, S. J.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Furuno, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Hoffman, C. R.; Ideguchi, E.; Ito, T.; Iwamoto, C.; Kawabata, T.; Liu, B.; Miura, M.; Ong, H. J.; Schiffer, J. P.; Sharp, D. K.; Süsoy, G.; Suzuki, T.; Szwec, S. V.; Takaki, M.; Tsumura, M.; Yamamoto, T.

    2016-06-01

    The change in the configuration of valence protons between the initial and final states in the neutrinoless double-β decay of 130Te → 130Be and of 136Xe136Ba has been determined by measuring the cross sections of the (d ,3He) reaction with 101-MeV deuterons. Together with our recent determination of the relevant neutron configurations involved in the process, a quantitative comparison with the latest shell-model and interacting-boson-model calculations reveals significant discrepancies. These are the same calculations used to determine the nuclear matrix elements governing the rate of neutrinoless double-β decay in these systems.

  9. Compilation of nuclear decay data used for dose calculation. Revised data for radionuclides listed in ICRP Publication 38

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    2001-03-01

    New nuclear decay data used for dose calculation have been compiled for 817 radionuclides that are listed in ICRP Publication 38 (Publ. 38) and for 6 additional isomers. The decay data were prepared using decay data sets from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), the latest version in August 1997. Basic nuclear properties in the decay data sets that are particularly important for calculating energies and intensities of emissions were examined and updated by referring to NUBASE, the database for nuclear and decay properties of nuclides. The reviewed and updated data were half-life, decay mode and its branching ratio, spin and parity of the ground and isomeric states, excitation energy of isomers, and Q value. In addition, possible revisions of partial and incomplete decay data sets were done for their format and syntax errors, level schemes, normalization records, and so on. After that, the decay data sets were processed by EDISTR in order to compute the energies and intensities of α particles, β particles, γ rays, internal conversion electrons, X rays, and Auger electrons emitted in nuclear transformation. For spontaneously fissioning nuclides, the average energies and intensities of neutrons, fission fragments, prompt γ rays, delayed γ rays, and β particles were also calculated. The compiled data were prepared in two different types of format: Publ. 38 and NUCDECAY formats. Comparison of the compiled decay data with those in Publ. 38 was also presented. The decay data will be widely used for internal and external dose calculations in radiation protection and will be beneficial to a future revision of ICRP Publ. 38. (author)

  10. Compilation of nuclear decay data used for dose calculation. Revised data for radionuclides listed in ICRP Publication 38

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    New nuclear decay data used for dose calculation have been compiled for 817 radionuclides that are listed in ICRP Publication 38 (Publ. 38) and for 6 additional isomers. The decay data were prepared using decay data sets from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), the latest version in August 1997. Basic nuclear properties in the decay data sets that are particularly important for calculating energies and intensities of emissions were examined and updated by referring to NUBASE, the database for nuclear and decay properties of nuclides. The reviewed and updated data were half-life, decay mode and its branching ratio, spin and parity of the ground and isomeric states, excitation energy of isomers, and Q value. In addition, possible revisions of partial and incomplete decay data sets were done for their format and syntax errors, level schemes, normalization records, and so on. After that, the decay data sets were processed by EDISTR in order to compute the energies and intensities of {alpha} particles, {beta} particles, {gamma} rays, internal conversion electrons, X rays, and Auger electrons emitted in nuclear transformation. For spontaneously fissioning nuclides, the average energies and intensities of neutrons, fission fragments, prompt {gamma} rays, delayed {gamma} rays, and {beta} particles were also calculated. The compiled data were prepared in two different types of format: Publ. 38 and NUCDECAY formats. Comparison of the compiled decay data with those in Publ. 38 was also presented. The decay data will be widely used for internal and external dose calculations in radiation protection and will be beneficial to a future revision of ICRP Publ. 38. (author)

  11. Nuclear Structure Calculations for Two-Neutrino Double-β Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sarriguren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the two-neutrino double-β decay in 76Ge, 116Cd, 128Te, 130Te, and 150Nd, as well as the two Gamow-Teller branches that connect the double-β decay partners with the states in the intermediate nuclei. We use a theoretical microscopic approach based on a deformed self-consistent mean field with Skyrme interactions including pairing and spin-isospin residual forces, which are treated in a proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We compare our results for Gamow-Teller strength distributions with experimental information obtained from charge-exchange reactions. We also compare our results for the two-neutrino double-β decay nuclear matrix elements with those extracted from the measured half-lives. Both single-state and low-lying-state dominance hypotheses are analyzed theoretically and experimentally making use of recent data from charge-exchange reactions and β decay of the intermediate nuclei.

  12. Neutrino nuclear responses for double beta decays and astro neutrinos by charge exchange reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu

    2014-09-01

    Neutrino nuclear responses are crucial for neutrino studies in nuclei. Charge exchange reactions (CER) are shown to be used to study charged current neutrino nuclear responses associated with double beta decays(DBD)and astro neutrino interactions. CERs to be used are high energy-resolution (He3 ,t) reactions at RCNP, photonuclear reactions via IAR at NewSUBARU and muon capture reactions at MUSIC RCNP and MLF J-PARC. The Gamow Teller (GT) strengths studied by CERs reproduce the observed 2 neutrino DBD matrix elements. The GT and spin dipole (SD) matrix elements are found to be reduced much due to the nucleon spin isospin correlations and the non-nucleonic (delta isobar) nuclear medium effects. Impacts of the reductions on the DBD matrix elements and astro neutrino interactions are discussed.

  13. Combined results on b-hadron production rates and decay properties

    CERN Document Server

    Abbaneo, D.; Andreev, V.; Barberio, E.; Battaglia, M.; Byth, S.; Boix, G.; Calvi, M.; Checchia, P.; Coyle, P.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Gagnon, P.; Hawkings, R.; Hayes, O.; Henrard, P.; Hessing, T.; Kroll, I.J.; Leroy, O.; Lucchesi, D.; Margoni, M.; Mele, S.; Moser, H.G.; Muheim, F.; Palla, F.; Pallin, D.; Parodi, F.; Paulini, M.; Piotto, E.; Privitera, P.; Rosnet, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rousseau, D.; Schneider, O.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Simonetto, F.; Spagnolo, P.; Stocchi, A.; Su, D.; Usher, T.; Weiser, C.; Wicklund, B.; Willocq, Stephane; CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    Combined results on b-hadron lifetimes, b-hadron production rates, B^0_d - \\bar{B^0_d} and B^0_S - \\bar{B^0_s} oscillations, the decay width difference between the mass eigenstates of the B^0_s - \\bar{B^0_s} system, the average number of c and \\bar{c} quarks in b-hadron decays, and searches for CP violation in the B^0_d - \\bar{B-0_d} system are presented. They have been obtained from published and preliminary measurements available in Summer 2000 from the ALEPH, CDF, DELPHI, L3, OPAL and SLD Collaborations. These results have been used to determine the parameters of the CKM unitarity triangle.

  14. Convexity and Weighted Integral Inequalities for Energy Decay Rates of Nonlinear Dissipative Hyperbolic Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alabau-Boussouira, Fatiha

    2005-01-01

    This work is concerned with the stabilization of hyperbolic systems by a nonlinear feedback which can be localized on a part of the boundary or locally distributed. We show that general weighted integral inequalities together with convexity arguments allow us to produce a general semi-explicit formula which leads to decay rates of the energy in terms of the behavior of the nonlinear feedback close to the origin. This formula allows us to unify for instance the cases where the feedback has a polynomial growth at the origin, with the cases where it goes exponentially fast to zero at the origin. We also give three other significant examples of nonpolynomial growth at the origin. We also prove the optimality of our results for the one-dimensional wave equation with nonlinear boundary dissipation. The key property for obtaining our general energy decay formula is the understanding between convexity properties of an explicit function connected to the feedback and the dissipation of energy

  15. First Lattice Calculation of the QED Corrections to Leptonic Decay Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, D.; Lubicz, V.; Tarantino, C.; Martinelli, G.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Sanfilippo, F.; Simula, S.; Tantalo, N.

    2018-02-01

    The leading-order electromagnetic and strong isospin-breaking corrections to the ratio of Kμ 2 and πμ 2 decay rates are evaluated for the first time on the lattice, following a method recently proposed. The lattice results are obtained using the gauge ensembles produced by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration with Nf=2 +1 +1 dynamical quarks. Systematic effects are evaluated and the impact of the quenched QED approximation is estimated. Our result for the correction to the tree-level Kμ 2/πμ 2 decay ratio is -1.22 (16 )%, to be compared to the estimate of -1.12 (21 )% based on chiral perturbation theory and adopted by the Particle Data Group.

  16. Nuclear structure and weak rates of heavy waiting point nuclei under rp-process conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Böyükata, Mahmut

    2017-01-01

    The structure and the weak interaction mediated rates of the heavy waiting point (WP) nuclei 80Zr, 84Mo, 88Ru, 92Pd and 96Cd along N = Z line were studied within the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1) and the proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA). The energy levels of the N = Z WP nuclei were calculated by fitting the essential parameters of IBM-1 Hamiltonian and their geometric shapes were predicted by plotting potential energy surfaces (PESs). Half-lives, continuum electron capture rates, positron decay rates, electron capture cross sections of WP nuclei, energy rates of β-delayed protons and their emission probabilities were later calculated using the pn-QRPA. The calculated Gamow-Teller strength distributions were compared with previous calculation. We present positron decay and continuum electron capture rates on these WP nuclei under rp-process conditions using the same model. For the rp-process conditions, the calculated total weak rates are twice the Skyrme HF+BCS+QRPA rates for 80Zr. For remaining nuclei the two calculations compare well. The electron capture rates are significant and compete well with the corresponding positron decay rates under rp-process conditions. The finding of the present study supports that electron capture rates form an integral part of the weak rates under rp-process conditions and has an important role for the nuclear model calculations.

  17. Calculation of β-decay rates in a relativistic model with momentum-dependent self-energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marketin, T.; Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.

    2007-01-01

    The relativistic proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (PN-RQRPA) is applied in the calculation of β-decay half-lives of neutron-rich nuclei in the Z≅28 and Z≅50 regions. The study is based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov calculation of nuclear ground states, using effective Lagrangians with density-dependent meson-nucleon couplings, and also extended by the inclusion of couplings between the isoscalar meson fields and the derivatives of the nucleon fields. This leads to a linear momentum dependence of the scalar and vector nucleon self-energies. The residual QRPA interaction in the particle-hole channel includes the π+ρ exchange plus a Landau-Migdal term. The finite-range Gogny interaction is employed in the T=1 pairing channel, and the model also includes a proton-neutron particle-particle interaction. The results are compared with available data, and it is shown that an extension of the standard relativistic mean-field framework to include momentum-dependent nucleon self-energies naturally leads to an enhancement of the effective (Landau) nucleon mass, and thus to an improved PN-QRPA description of β - -decay rates

  18. Nuclear reaction rates and the nova outburst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starrfield, S.G.; Iliadis, C.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we examined the consequences of improving the nuclear reaction library on our simulations of TNRs on 1.25M, WD and 1.35M, WDS. We have found that the changes in the rates have affected the nucleosynthesis predictions of our calculations but not, to any great extent, the gross features. In addition, we have used a lower mass accretion rate than in our previous studies in order to accrete (and eject) more material. This has, as expected, caused the peak values of some important parameters to increase over our previous studies at the same WD mass. However, because some important reaction rates have declined in the new compilation this has not increased the abundances for nuclei above aluminum and, in fact, they have declined while the abundances of both 26 Al and 27 Al have increased at both WD masses. In contrast, the abundance of 22 Na has declined at both WD masses over the values predicted in our earlier work. This has important implications with respect to predictions of the observability of novae with INTEGRAL

  19. Signals of Bose Einstein condensation and Fermi quenching in the decay of hot nuclear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, P., E-mail: marini@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds, Bd. Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 Caen (France); Zheng, H. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX-77843 (United States); Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, via Santa Sofia, 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Boisjoli, M. [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds, Bd. Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 Caen (France); Laboratoire de Physique Nucléaire, Université Laval, Québec, G1V 0A6 (Canada); Verde, G. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS-IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); INFN – Sezione di Catania, via Santa Sofia, 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Chbihi, A. [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds, Bd. Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 Caen (France); Napolitani, P.; Ademard, G. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS-IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Augey, L. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen Basse Normandie, CNRS/IN2P3, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France); Bhattacharya, C. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Center, Kolkata (India); Borderie, B. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS-IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Bougault, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen Basse Normandie, CNRS/IN2P3, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France); and others

    2016-05-10

    We report on first experimental observations of nuclear fermionic and bosonic components displaying different behaviours in the decay of hot Ca projectile-like sources produced in mid-peripheral collisions at sub-Fermi energies. The experimental setup, constituted by the coupling of the INDRA 4π detector array to the forward angle VAMOS magnetic spectrometer, allowed to reconstruct the mass, charge and excitation energy of the decaying hot projectile-like sources. By means of quantum-fluctuation analysis techniques, temperatures and local partial densities of bosons and fermions could be correlated to the excitation energy of the reconstructed system. The results are consistent with the production of dilute mixed systems of bosons and fermions, where bosons experience higher phase-space and energy density as compared to the surrounding fermionic gas. Our findings recall phenomena observed in the study of Bose condensates and Fermi gases in atomic traps despite the different scales.

  20. Column: Factors Affecting Data Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Fairbanks

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear physics, the phrase decay rate is used to denote the rate that atoms and other particles spontaneously decompose. Uranium-235 famously decays into a variety of daughter isotopes including Thorium and Neptunium, which themselves decay to others. Decay rates are widely observed and wildly different depending on many factors, both internal and external. U-235 has a half-life of 703,800,000 years, for example, while free neutrons have a half-life of 611 seconds and neutrons in an atomic nucleus are stable.We posit that data in computer systems also experiences some kind of statistical decay process and thus also has a discernible decay rate. Like atomic decay, data decay fluctuates wildly. But unlike atomic decay, data decay rates are the result of so many different interplaying processes that we currently do not understand them well enough to come up with quantifiable numbers. Nevertheless, we believe that it is useful to discuss some of the factors that impact the data decay rate, for these factors frequently determine whether useful data about a subject can be recovered by forensic investigation.(see PDF for full column

  1. Measurement of fake rates for hadronically decaying τ leptons in the ATLAS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyer, Timo; Janus, Michel; Lai, Stan [II. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The τ lepton is the heaviest lepton in the standard model and an important probe of physics at high energy scales. The joint observation of the H → ττ signal in 2015 by the CMS and ATLAS experiments, for example, was the first direct observation of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions. For signatures involving hadronically decaying τ leptons, it is important to have a good understanding of the τ reconstruction and identification algorithms that are used for data analysis in the ATLAS experiment. In particular, the probability for jets originating from quarks and gluons to be misidentified as hadronically decaying τ leptons (the so-called fake rate), is important for background estimation from a variety of sources. This fake rate depends on many kinematic variables, as well as the quark-gluon composition of the process in question. This talk presents an approach using 13 TeV ATLAS data, to measure the fake rate using the tag-and-probe technique. The dependence of the fake rate on the above mentioned factors is also discussed.

  2. Nuclear beta decay induced by intense electromagnetic fields: Forbidden transition examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, H.R.

    1983-01-01

    A formalism developed earlier for the effect on nuclear beta decay of an intense plane-wave electromagnetic field is applied to three examples of forbidden beta transitions. The examples represent cases where the nuclear ''fragment'' contains one, two, and three nucleons; where the nuclear fragment is defined to be that smallest sub-unit of the nucleus containing the nucleon which undergoes beta decay plus any other nucleons directly angular-momentum coupled to it in initial or final states. The single-nucleon-fragment example is 113 Cd, which has a fourth-forbidden transition. The two-nucleon-fragment example is 90 Sr, which is first-forbidden. The three-nucleon-fragment example is 87 Rb, which is third-forbidden. An algebraic closed-form transition probability is found in each case. At low external-field intensity, the transition probability is proportional to z/sup L/, where z is the field intensity parameter and L is the degree of forbiddenness. At intermediate intensities, the transition probability behaves as z/sup L/-(1/2). At higher intensities, the transition probability contains the z/sup L/-(1/2) factor, a declining exponential factor, and an alternating polynomial in z. This high-intensity transition probability possesses a maximum value, which is found for each of the examples. A general rule, z = q 2 (2L-1), where q is the number of particles in the fragment, is found for giving an upper limit on the intensity at which the maximum transition probability occurs. Field-induced beta decay half-lives for all the examples are dramatically reduced from natural half-lives when evaluated at the optimum field intensity. Relative half-life reduction is greater the higher the degree of forbiddenness

  3. Sum rule approach to the study of statistical decay properties of nuclear giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.K.; Hussein, M.S.

    1987-03-01

    Corrections to the well-known statistical sum rule that relates the summed transmission coefficients on the one hand and 2πΓ C.N. .ρ C.N. On the other, in the context of the statistical decay properties of nuclear giant resonances, are discussed. These corrections arise both from pre-equilibrium processes as well as from the giant resonance itself. It is shown that the compound nucleus average width is reduced as a result of these corrections. (Author) [pt

  4. $\\beta$- decay of the N=Z, rp-process waiting points: $^{64}$Ge, $^{68}$Se and the N=Z+2: $^{66}$Ge, $^{70}$Se for accurate stellar weak-decay rates

    CERN Multimedia

    The contribution of electron capture to weak-decay rates has been neglected in model calculations of Type I X-ray bursts so far. Nucleosynthesis in these astrophysical events eventually proceeds through the rp-process near the proton drip-line. In particular, several N=Z nuclei such as $^{64}$Ge and $^{68}$Se act as waiting points in the nuclear flow due to the low S${_P}$ values of their Z+1 neighbours. Recent theoretical calculations have shown that, in these high density ($\\thicksim10^{6}$ g/cm$^3$) and high temperature (1 - 2 GK) scenarios, continuum electron capture rates might play an important role, in particular for species at and around these waiting point nuclei. This proposal is aimed at the study of the $\\beta^{+}$/EC-decay of the waiting point nuclei $^{64}$Ge, $^{68}$Se and their N=Z+2 second neighbours $^{66}$Ge and $^{70}$Se with the Total Absorption Spectroscopy method. This will allow for a detailed analysis of their contribution to the EC-decay rates in X-Ray burst explosions. The proposed ...

  5. β-decay rates of r-process nuclei in the relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niksic, T.; Marketin, T.; Vretenar, D.; Paar, N.; Ring, P.

    2004-01-01

    The fully consistent relativistic proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (PN-RQRPA) is employed in the calculation of β-decay half-lives of neutron-rich nuclei in the N∼50 and N∼82 regions. A new density-dependent effective interaction, with an enhanced value of the nucleon effective mass, is used in relativistic Hartree-Bogolyubov calculation of nuclear ground states and in the particle-hole channel of the PN-RQRPA. The finite range Gogny D1S interaction is employed in the T=1 pairing channel, and the model also includes a proton-neutron particle-particle interaction. The theoretical half-lives reproduce the experimental data for the Fe, Zn, Cd, and Te isotopic chains, but overestimate the lifetimes of Ni isotopes and predict a stable 132 Sn. (orig.)

  6. β-decay rates of r-process nuclei in the relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niksic, T.; Marketin, T.; Vretenar, D.; Paar, N.; Ring, P.

    2005-01-01

    The fully consistent relativistic proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (PN-RQRPA) is employed in the calculation of β-decay half-lives of neutron-rich nuclei in the N≅50 and N≅82 regions. A new density-dependent effective interaction, with an enhanced value of the nucleon effective mass, is used in relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov calculation of nuclear ground states and in the particle-hole channel of the PN-RQRPA. The finite range Gogny D1S interaction is employed in the T=1 pairing channel, and the model also includes a proton-neutron particle-particle interaction. The theoretical half-lives reproduce the experimental data for the Fe, Zn, Cd, and Te isotopic chains but overestimate the lifetimes of Ni isotopes and predict a stable 132 Sn

  7. {beta}-decay rates of r-process nuclei in the relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niksic, T.; Marketin, T.; Vretenar, D. [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Faculty of Science, Physics Dept.; Paar, N. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Ring, P. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department

    2004-12-08

    The fully consistent relativistic proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (PN-RQRPA) is employed in the calculation of {beta}-decay half-lives of neutron-rich nuclei in the N{approx}50 and N{approx}82 regions. A new density-dependent effective interaction, with an enhanced value of the nucleon effective mass, is used in relativistic Hartree-Bogolyubov calculation of nuclear ground states and in the particle-hole channel of the PN-RQRPA. The finite range Gogny D1S interaction is employed in the T=1 pairing channel, and the model also includes a proton-neutron particle-particle interaction. The theoretical half-lives reproduce the experimental data for the Fe, Zn, Cd, and Te isotopic chains, but overestimate the lifetimes of Ni isotopes and predict a stable {sup 132}Sn. (orig.)

  8. Measurement of the $K_{L} \\to e^{+}e^{-}e^{+} e^{-}$ Decay Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, A; Marras, D; Batley, J Richard; Dosanjh, R S; Gershon, T J; Kalmus, George Ernest; Lazzeroni, C; Munday, D J; Olaiya, E; Parker, M A; White, T O; Wotton, S A; Arcidiacono, R; Barr, G; Bocquet, G; Ceccucci, Augusto; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Cundy, Donald C; Doble, Niels T; Falaleev, V P; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Gorini, B; Grafström, P; Kubischta, Werner; Lacourt, A; Norton, A; Panzer-Steindel, B; Tatishvili, G T; Wahl, H; Cheshkov, C; Khristov, P Z; Kekelidze, V D; Madigozhin, D T; Molokanova, N A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Zinchenko, A I; Martin, V; Rubin, P; Sacco, R; Walker, A; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Duclos, J; Frabetti, P L; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Savrié, M; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Martelli, F; Veltri, M; Eppard, M; Hirstius, A; Holtz, K; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Köpke, L; Lopes da Silva, P; Marouelli, P; Mestvirishvili, I; Pellmann, I A; Peters, A; Schmidt, S A; Schönharting, V; Schué, Yu; Wanke, R; Winhart, A; Wittgen, M; Chollet, J C; Fayard, Louis; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Unal, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Lubrano, P; Mestvirishvili, A; Nappi, A; Pepé, M; Piccini, M; Casali, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Fiorini, Luca; Giudici, Sergio; Mannelli, I; Pierazzini, G M; Sozzi, M; Chèze, J B; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Derue, F; Formica, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Gouge, G; Marel, Gérard; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Turlay, René; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Maier, A; Ziolkowski, M; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Pastrone, N; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, Ewa; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, Günther; Pernicka, Manfred; Taurok, Anton; Widhalm, L; Beavis, D; Besliu, C; Budick, B; Bøggild, H; Chasman, C; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Cibor, J; Debbe, R; Enger, E; Gaardhøje, J J; Germinario, M; Hagel, K; Ito, H; Jipa, A; Jundt, F; Jordre, J I; Jorgensen, C E; Karabowicz, R; Kim, E J; Kozik, T; Larsen, T M; Lee, J H; Lee, Y K; Lindal, S; Lystad, R; Løvhøiden, G; Majka, Z; Makeev, A; Mikelsen, M; Murray, M; Natowitz, J B; Neumann, B; Nielsen, B S; Ouerdane, D; Planeta, R; Rami, F; Ristea, C; Ristea, O; Röhrich, D; Samset, B H; Sandberg, D; Sanders, S J; Scheetz, R A; Staszel, P; Tveter, T S; Videbaek, F; Wada, R; Yin, Z; Zgura, I S

    2005-01-01

    The decay rate of the long-lived neutral K meson into the e^+ e^- e^+ e^- final state has been measured with the NA48 detector at the CERN SPS. Using data collected in 1998 and 1999, a total of 200 events has been observed with negligible background. This observation corresponds to a branching ratio of Br(K_L -> e^+ e^- e^+ e^-) = (3.30 + - 0.24_stat + - 0.23_sys + - 0.10_norm) x 10^-8.

  9. Coordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, D.W.; Pronyaev, V.G.

    1998-03-01

    The international network of nuclear structure and decay data (NSDD) evaluators aims at a complete and periodic nuclear structure and decay data evaluation of all nuclides, the continuous publication of these evaluations and their dissemination to the scientific community. The evaluated data resulting from this concerted international effort are introduced in the Evaluated Structure and Decay Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets. Periodic meetings of this network are held in order to maintain the coordination of all centres and groups participating in the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of NSDD, to maintain and improve the standards and rules governing NSDS evaluation, and to review the development and common use of the computerized systems and databases maintained specifically for this activity. This document is a summary report of the twelfth Meeting on the Coordination of the NSDD Evaluators held between 14-18 October 1996 in Budapest, Hungary

  10. Testing the count rate performance of the scintillation camera by exponential attenuation: Decaying source; Multiple filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.; Mena, I.

    1988-01-01

    An algorithm and two fortrAN programs have been developed to evaluate the count rate performance of scintillation cameras from count rates reduced exponentially, either by a decaying source or by filtration. The first method is used with short-lived radionuclides such as 191 /sup m/Ir or 191 /sup m/Au. The second implements a National Electrical Manufacturers' Association (NEMA) protocol in which the count rate from a source of 191 /sup m/Tc is attenuated by a varying number of copper filters stacked over it. The count rate at each data point is corrected for deadtime loss after assigning an arbitrary deadtime (tau). A second-order polynomial equation is fitted to the logarithms of net count rate values: ln(R) = A+BT+CT 2 where R is the net corrected count rate (cps), and T is the elapsed time (or the filter thickness in the NEMA method). Depending on C, tau is incremented or decremented iteratively, and the count rate corrections and curve fittings are repeated until C approaches zero, indicating a correct value of the deadtime (tau). The program then plots the measured count rate versus the corrected count rate values

  11. Global observation of Omori-law decay in the rate of triggered earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, T.

    2001-12-01

    Triggered earthquakes can be large, damaging, and lethal as evidenced by the 1999 shocks in Turkey and the 2001 events in El Salvador. In this study, earthquakes with M greater than 7.0 from the Harvard CMT catalog are modeled as dislocations to calculate shear stress changes on subsequent earthquake rupture planes near enough to be affected. About 61% of earthquakes that occurred near the main shocks are associated with calculated shear stress increases, while ~39% are associated with shear stress decreases. If earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases are interpreted as triggered, then such events make up at least 8% of the CMT catalog. Globally, triggered earthquakes obey an Omori-law rate decay that lasts between ~7-11 years after the main shock. Earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases occur at higher rates than background up to 240 km away from the main-shock centroid. Earthquakes triggered by smaller quakes (foreshocks) also obey Omori's law, which is one of the few time-predictable patterns evident in the global occurrence of earthquakes. These observations indicate that earthquake probability calculations which include interactions from previous shocks should incorporate a transient Omori-law decay with time. In addition, a very simple model using the observed global rate change with time and spatial distribution of triggered earthquakes can be applied to immediately assess the likelihood of triggered earthquakes following large events, and can be in place until more sophisticated analyses are conducted.

  12. Search for D0-D(-)0 mixing and a measurement of the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay rate in D0-->Kpi decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dorsten, M P; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Bozzi, C; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Back, J J; Bellodi, G; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Pulliam, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Ernst, J A; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Lodovico, F Di; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-10-24

    We present results of a search for D0-D(-)0 mixing and a measurement of R(D), the ratio of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays to Cabibbo-favored decays, using D0-->K+pi- decays from 57.1 fb(-1) of data collected near sqrt[s]=10.6 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. At the 95% confidence level, allowing for CP violation, we find the mixing parameters x('2)<0.0022 and -0.056rate R(M)<0.16%. In the limit of no mixing, R(D)=[0.357+/-0.022(stat)+/-0.027(syst)]% and the CP-violating asymmetry A(D)=0.095+/-0.061(stat)+/-0.083(syst).

  13. Summary Report of a Specialized Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Alan L. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Dimitrious, P. [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Kondev, F. G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ricard-McCutchan, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-04-27

    A three-day specialised workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluations was organised and held at the headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria, from 27 to 29 April 2015. This workshop covered a wide range of important topics and issues addressed when evaluating and maintaining the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The primary aim was to improve evaluators’ abilities to identify and understand the most appropriate evaluation processes to adopt in the formulation of individual ENSDF data sets. Participants assessed and reviewed existing policies, procedures and codes, and round-table discussions included the debate and resolution of specific difficulties experienced by ENSDF evaluators (i.e., all workshop participants). The contents of this report constitute a record of this workshop, based on the presentations and subsequent discussions.

  14. Summary Report of a Specialized Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, Alan L.; Dimitrious, P.; Kondev, F. G.; Ricard-McCutchan, E.

    2015-01-01

    A three-day specialised workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluations was organised and held at the headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria, from 27 to 29 April 2015. This workshop covered a wide range of important topics and issues addressed when evaluating and maintaining the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The primary aim was to improve evaluators' abilities to identify and understand the most appropriate evaluation processes to adopt in the formulation of individual ENSDF data sets. Participants assessed and reviewed existing policies, procedures and codes, and round-table discussions included the debate and resolution of specific difficulties experienced by ENSDF evaluators (i.e., all workshop participants). The contents of this report constitute a record of this workshop, based on the presentations and subsequent discussions.

  15. Application of atomic mutations included in nuclear reactions, 40Ar(γ, p)39Cl(β decay)39Ar, to surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkuma, Juzo

    1987-01-01

    It has been found that the nuclear transformation processes which are initiated by photonuclear reactions can be used for studying the adsorption and chemical reactions taking place on solid surfaces. Chemically reactive 39 Cl was produced by irradiating 40 Ar with high-energy bremsstrahlung, and its blow was directed onto several material surfaces. The amount of chlorine adsorption was ascertained by detecting its radioactivity. Desorption without heating the adsorber samples inevitably occurred owing to the nuclear decay of 39 Cl. The adsorption and desorption rates were compared for several elements. A fast growth of oxide islands on sample surfaces was observed during the adsorption-desorption process. (author)

  16. Nuclear structure data from in beam and decay studies around 254No

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.

    2005-01-01

    The study of trans-fermium nuclei, the heaviest nuclei for which in-beam spectroscopy studies are possible has provided over recent years a rich tapestry of data. These have enhanced the mean field theories important for the prediction of nuclear properties at the limits of the nuclear chart. Developments in spectrometer and data-acquisition techniques at the Department of Physics, University of Jyvaskyla have further enhanced the studies. Utilising the RITU gas-filled spectrometer, the GREAT focal plane spectrometer, the identification recoils and their subsequent decay modes (alpha-, fission-, and gamma-ray decay) have been studied. The JUROGAM gamma-ray array of 43 Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors has been employed in the in-beam spectroscopy of the trans-fermium region. In-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy studies of trans-fermium nuclei 253 No, 254 No, 250 Fm, 251 Md, 253 No and 255 Lr have been performed, as well as detailed focal plane spectroscopy. Selected highlights of the work will be presented

  17. Superallowed Beta Decay Studies at TRIUMF --- Nuclear Structure and Fundamental Symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zganjar, E. F.; Achtzehn, T.; Albers, D.; Andreoiu, C.; Andreyev, A. N.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Behr, J. A.; Biosvert, G. C.; Bricault, P.; Bishop, S.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Churchman, R.; Cross, D.; Cunningham, E.; D'Auria, J. M.; Dombsky, M.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hackman, G.; Hanemaayer, V.; Hardy, J. C.; Hodgson, D. F.; Hyland, B.; Iacob, V.; Klages, P.; Koopmans, K. A.; Kulp, W. D.; Lassen, J.; Lavoie, J. P.; Leslie, J. R.; Linder, T.; MacDonald, J. A.; Mak, H.-B.; Melconian, D.; Morton, A. C.; Ormand, W. E.; Osborne, C. J.; Pearson, C. J.; Pearson, M. R.; Phillips, A. A.; Piechaczek, A.; Ressler, J.; Sarazin, F.; Savard, G.; Schumaker, M. A.; Scraggs, H. C.; Svensson, C. E.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Towner, I. S.; Waddington, J. C.; Walker, P. M.; Wendt, K.; Wood, J. L.

    2007-04-01

    Precision measurement of the beta -decay half-life, Q-value, and branching ratio between nuclear analog states of Jpi = 0+ and T=1 can provide critical and fundamental tests of the Standard Model's description of electroweak interactions. A program has been initiated at TRIUMF-ISAC to measure the ft values of these superallowed beta transitions. Two Tz = 0, A > 60 cases, 74Rb and 62Ga, are presented. These are particularly relevant because they can provide critical tests of the calculated nuclear structure and isospin-symmetry breaking corrections that are predicted to be larger for heavier nuclei, and because they demonstrate the advance in the experimental precision on ft at TRIUMF-ISAC from 0.26% for 74Rb in 2002 to 0.05% for 62Ga in 2006. The high precision world data on experimental ft and corrected Ft values are discussed and shown to be consistent with CVC at the 10-4 level, yielding an average Ft = 3073.70(74) s. This Ft leads to Vud = 0.9737(4) for the up-down element of the Standard Model's CKM matrix. With this value and the Particle Data Group's 2006 values for Vus and Vub, the unitarity condition for the CKM matrix is met. Additional measurements and calculations are needed, however, to reduce the uncertainties in that evaluation. That objective is the focus of the continuing program on superallowed-beta decay at TRIUMF-ISAC.

  18. Nuclear Matrix Elements for the $\\beta\\beta$ Decay of the $^{76}$Ge

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, B A; Horoi, M

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear matrix elements for two-neutrino double-beta (2 n$\\beta\\beta$ ) and zero-neutrino double-beta (0 n$\\beta\\beta$) decay of 76 Ge are evaluated in terms of the configuration interaction (CI), quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA) and interacting boson model (IBM) methods. We show that the decomposition of the matrix elements in terms of interemediate states in 74 Ge is dominated by ground state of this nucleus. We consider corrections to the CI results that arise from configurations admixtures involving orbitals out-side of the CI configuration space by using results from QRPA, many-body-perturbation theory, and the connections to related observables. The CI two-neutrino matrix element is reduced due to the inclusion of spin-orbit partners, and to many-body correlations connected with Gamow-Teller beta decay. The CI zero-neutrino matrix element for the heavy neutrino is enhanced due to particle-particle correlations that are connected with the odd-even oscillations in the nuclear masse...

  19. ELECTRON-CAPTURE AND β-DECAY RATES FOR sd-SHELL NUCLEI IN STELLAR ENVIRONMENTS RELEVANT TO HIGH-DENSITY O–NE–MG CORES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Toshio [Department of Physics and Graduate School of Integrated Basic Sciences, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Toki, Hiroshi [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Nomoto, Ken’ichi, E-mail: suzuki@phys.chs.nihon-u.ac.jp [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    Electron-capture and β-decay rates for nuclear pairs in the sd-shell are evaluated at high densities and high temperatures relevant to the final evolution of electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg cores of stars with initial masses of 8–10 M{sub ⊙}. Electron capture induces a rapid contraction of the electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg core. The outcome of rapid contraction depends on the evolutionary changes in the central density and temperature, which are determined by the competing processes of contraction, cooling, and heating. The fate of the stars is determined by these competitions, whether they end up with electron-capture supernovae or Fe core-collapse supernovae. Since the competing processes are induced by electron capture and β-decay, the accurate weak rates are crucially important. The rates are obtained for pairs with A = 20, 23, 24, 25, and 27 by shell-model calculations in the sd-shell with the USDB Hamiltonian. Effects of Coulomb corrections on the rates are evaluated. The rates for pairs with A = 23 and 25 are important for nuclear Urca processes that determine the cooling rate of the O–Ne–Mg core, while those for pairs with A = 20 and 24 are important for the core contraction and heat generation rates in the core. We provide these nuclear rates at stellar environments in tables with fine enough meshes at various densities and temperatures for studies of astrophysical processes sensitive to the rates. In particular, the accurate rate tables are crucially important for the final fates of not only O–Ne–Mg cores but also a wider range of stars, such as C–O cores of lower-mass stars.

  20. ELECTRON-CAPTURE AND β-DECAY RATES FOR sd-SHELL NUCLEI IN STELLAR ENVIRONMENTS RELEVANT TO HIGH-DENSITY O–NE–MG CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Toshio; Toki, Hiroshi; Nomoto, Ken’ichi

    2016-01-01

    Electron-capture and β-decay rates for nuclear pairs in the sd-shell are evaluated at high densities and high temperatures relevant to the final evolution of electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg cores of stars with initial masses of 8–10 M ⊙ . Electron capture induces a rapid contraction of the electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg core. The outcome of rapid contraction depends on the evolutionary changes in the central density and temperature, which are determined by the competing processes of contraction, cooling, and heating. The fate of the stars is determined by these competitions, whether they end up with electron-capture supernovae or Fe core-collapse supernovae. Since the competing processes are induced by electron capture and β-decay, the accurate weak rates are crucially important. The rates are obtained for pairs with A = 20, 23, 24, 25, and 27 by shell-model calculations in the sd-shell with the USDB Hamiltonian. Effects of Coulomb corrections on the rates are evaluated. The rates for pairs with A = 23 and 25 are important for nuclear Urca processes that determine the cooling rate of the O–Ne–Mg core, while those for pairs with A = 20 and 24 are important for the core contraction and heat generation rates in the core. We provide these nuclear rates at stellar environments in tables with fine enough meshes at various densities and temperatures for studies of astrophysical processes sensitive to the rates. In particular, the accurate rate tables are crucially important for the final fates of not only O–Ne–Mg cores but also a wider range of stars, such as C–O cores of lower-mass stars

  1. $\\beta$-asymmetry measurements in nuclear $\\beta$-decay as a probe for non-standard model physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Roccia, S

    2002-01-01

    We propose to perform a series of measurements of the $\\beta$-asymmetry parameter in the decay of selected nuclei, in order to investigate the presence of possible time reversal invariant tensor contributions to the weak interaction. The measurements have the potential to improve by a factor of about four on the present limits for such non-standard model contributions in nuclear $\\beta$-decay.

  2. Papers presented at the IAEA specialists' meeting on the development of an international nuclear decay data and cross-section database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1994-12-01

    The present report contains 20 papers presented at the IAEA meeting on the Development of an International Nuclear Decay Data and Cross-Section Database, Vienna, 24-28 October 1994, covering the following topics: Wall-charts of nuclides, PC systems presenting nuclear data, nuclear decay-data and uncertainties, nuclear spectroscopy, thermal neutron cross-sections and resonance-integrals, reactor-neutron activation analysis, nuclear data standards. (author). Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Papers presented at the IAEA specialists` meeting on the development of an international nuclear decay data and cross-section database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmel, H D [ed.

    1994-12-01

    The present report contains 20 papers presented at the IAEA meeting on the Development of an International Nuclear Decay Data and Cross-Section Database, Vienna, 24-28 October 1994, covering the following topics: Wall-charts of nuclides, PC systems presenting nuclear data, nuclear decay-data and uncertainties, nuclear spectroscopy, thermal neutron cross-sections and resonance-integrals, reactor-neutron activation analysis, nuclear data standards. (author). Refs, figs and tabs.

  4. Cost of nuclear power generation judged by power rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, Takaharu

    1981-01-01

    According to estimation guidance, power rates in general are the proper cost plus the specific compensation and adjustment addition. However, the current system of power rates is of power-source development promotion type involving its tax. The structure of power rate determination must be restudied now especially in connection of nuclear power generation. The cost of nuclear power generation as viewed from power rate is discussed as follows: the fear of military application of power plants, rising plant construction costs, the loophole in fuel cost calculation, unreasonable unit power cost, depreciation and repair cost, business compensation, undue business compensation in nuclear power, the costs of nuclear waste management, doubt concerning nuclear power cost, personnel, pumping-up and power transmission costs in nuclear power, energy balance analysis, nuclear power viewed in entropy, the suppression of power consumption. (J.P.N.)

  5. Estimation of groundwater flow rate using the decay of 222Rn in a well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Hiromasa

    1999-01-01

    A method of estimating groundwater flow rate using the decay of 222 Rn in a well was investigated. Field application revealed that infiltrated water (i.e., precipitation, pond water and irrigation water) accelerated groundwater flow. In addition, the depth at which groundwater was influenced by surface water was determined. The velocity of groundwater in a test well was estimated to be of the order of 10 -6 cm s -1 , based on the ratio of 222 Rn concentration in groundwater before and after it flowed into the well. This method is applicable for monitoring of groundwater flow rate where the velocity in a well is from 10 -5 to 10 -6 cm s -1

  6. ENDF/B-VII.1 Nuclear Data for Science and Technology: Cross Sections, Covariances, Fission Product Yields and Decay Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmiotti, G.

    2011-01-01

    The ENDF/B-VII.1 library is our latest recommended evaluated nuclear data file for use in nuclear science and technology applications, and incorporates advances made in the five years since the release of ENDF/B-VII.0. These advances focus on neutron cross sections, covariances, fission product yields and decay data, and represent work by the US Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in nuclear data evaluation that utilizes developments in nuclear theory, modeling, simulation, and experiment. The principal advances in the new library are: (1) An increase in the breadth of neutron reaction cross section coverage, extending from 393 nuclides to 418 nuclides; (2) Covariance uncertainty data for 185 of the most important nuclides, as documented in companion papers in this edition; (3) R-matrix analyses of neutron reactions on light nuclei, including isotopes of He, Li, and Be; (4) Resonance parameter analyses at lower energies and statistical high energy reactions at higher energies for isotopes of F, Cl, K, Ti, V, Mn, Cr, Ni, Zr and W; (5) Modifications to thermal neutron reactions on fission products (isotopes of Mo, Tc, Rh, Ag, Cs, Nd, Sm, Eu) and neutron absorber materials (Cd, Gd); (6) Improved minor actinide evaluations for isotopes of U, Np, Pu, and Am (we are not making changes to the major actinides 235,238U and 239Pu at this point, except for delayed neutron data, and instead we intend to update them after a further period of research in experiment and theory), and our adoption of JENDL-4.0 evaluations for isotopes of Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Fm, and some other minor actinides; (7) Fission energy release evaluations; (8) Fission product yield advances for fission-spectrum neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons incident on 239Pu; and (9) A new Decay Data sublibrary. Integral validation testing of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library is provided for a variety of quantities: For nuclear criticality, the VII.1 library maintains the generally-good performance seen for VII.0 for a wide

  7. Determination of the Wrong Sign Decay Rate D0 -> K+pi- and the Sensitivity to D0-D0bar Mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egede, Ulrik

    2001-01-01

    The D 0 meson can decay to the wrong sign K + π - state either through a doubly Cabibbo suppressed decay or via mixing to the (bar D) 0 state followed by the Cabibbo favoured decay (bar D) 0 → K + π - . We measure the rate of wrong sign decays relative to the Cabibbo favoured decay to (0.383 ± 0.044 ± 0.022)% and give our sensitivity to a mixing signal

  8. Compilation of nuclear decay data used for dose calculations. Data for radionuclides not listed in ICRP publication 38

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Tamura, Tsutomu

    1999-07-01

    Nuclear decay data used for dose calculations were compiled for 162 nuclides with half-lives greater than or equal to 10 min that are not listed in ICRP Publication 38 (Publ. 38) and their 28 daughter nuclides. Additional 14 nuclides that are considered to be important in fusion reactor facilities were also included. The data were compiled using decay data sets of the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), the latest version in August 1997. Investigations of the data sets were performed to check their consistency by referring to recent literature and NUBASE, the database for nuclear and decay properties of nuclides, and by using the utility programs of ENSDF. Possible revisions of the data sets were made for their format and syntax errors, level schemes, normalization records, and so on. The revised data sets were processed by EDISTR in order to calculate the energies and intensities of {alpha} particles, {beta} particles, {gamma} rays including annihilation photons, internal conversion electrons, X rays, and Auger electrons emitted in nuclear transformations of the radionuclides. For spontaneously fissioning nuclides, the average energies and intensities of neutrons, fission fragments, prompt {gamma} rays, delayed {gamma} rays, and {beta} particles were also calculated. The compiled data were presented in two types of format; Publ. 38 and NUCDECAY formats. This report provides the decay data in the Publ. 38 format along with decay scheme drawings. The data will be widely used for internal and external dose calculations in radiation protection. (author)

  9. Improved predictions of nuclear reaction rates with the TALYS reaction code for astrophysical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A.J

    2008-01-01

    Context. Nuclear reaction rates of astrophysical applications are traditionally determined on the basis of Hauser-Feshbach reaction codes. These codes adopt a number of approximations that have never been tested, such as a simplified width fluctuation correction, the neglect of delayed or multiple-particle emission during the electromagnetic decay cascade, or the absence of the pre-equilibrium contribution at increasing incident energies. Aims. The reaction code TALYS has been recently updated to estimate the Maxwellian-averaged reaction rates that are of astrophysical relevance. These new developments enable the reaction rates to be calculated with increased accuracy and reliability and the approximations of previous codes to be investigated. Methods. The TALYS predictions for the thermonuclear rates of relevance to astrophysics are detailed and compared with those derived by widely-used codes for the same nuclear ingredients. Results. It is shown that TALYS predictions may differ significantly from those of previous codes, in particular for nuclei for which no or little nuclear data is available. The pre-equilibrium process is shown to influence the astrophysics rates of exotic neutron-rich nuclei significantly. For the first time, the Maxwellian- averaged (n, 2n) reaction rate is calculated for all nuclei and its competition with the radiative capture rate is discussed. Conclusions. The TALYS code provides a new tool to estimate all nuclear reaction rates of relevance to astrophysics with improved accuracy and reliability. (authors)

  10. Quantitative theoretical analysis of lifetimes and decay rates relevant in laser cooling BaH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Keith; Lane, Ian C.

    2018-05-01

    Tiny radiative losses below the 0.1% level can prove ruinous to the effective laser cooling of a molecule. In this paper the laser cooling of a hydride is studied with rovibronic detail using ab initio quantum chemistry in order to document the decays to all possible electronic states (not just the vibrational branching within a single electronic transition) and to identify the most populated final quantum states. The effect of spin-orbit and associated couplings on the properties of the lowest excited states of BaH are analysed in detail. The lifetimes of the A2Π1/2, H2Δ3/2 and E2Π1/2 states are calculated (136 ns, 5.8 μs and 46 ns respectively) for the first time, while the theoretical value for B2 Σ1/2+ is in good agreement with experiments. Using a simple rate model the numbers of absorption-emission cycles possible for both one- and two-colour cooling on the competing electronic transitions are determined, and it is clearly demonstrated that the A2Π - X2Σ+ transition is superior to B2Σ+ - X2Σ+ , where multiple tiny decay channels degrade its efficiency. Further possible improvements to the cooling method are proposed.

  11. HyperCP: A high-rate spectrometer for the study of charged hyperon and kaon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnstein, R.A.; Chakravorty, A.; Chan, A.; Chen, Y.C.; Choong, W.-S.; Clark, K.; Dukes, E.C.; Durandet, C.; Felix, J.; Fuzesy, R.; Gidal, G.; Gu, P.; Gustafson, H.R.; Ho, C.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, M.; James, C.; Jenkins, C.M.; Jones, T.D.; Kaplan, D.M.; Lederman, L.M.; Leros, N.; Longo, M.J.; Lopez, F.; Lu, L.C.; Luebke, W.; Luk, K.-B.; Nelson, K.S.; Park, H.K.; Perroud, J.-P.; Rajaram, D.; Rubin, H.A.; Teng, P.K.; Turko, B.; Volk, J.; White, C.G.; White, S.L.; Zyla, P.

    2005-01-01

    The HyperCP experiment (Fermilab E871) was designed to search for rare phenomena in the decays of charged strange particles, in particular CP violation in Ξ and Λ hyperon decays with a sensitivity of 10 -4 . Intense charged secondary beams were produced by 800GeV/c protons and momentum selected by a magnetic channel. Decay products were detected in a large-acceptance, high-rate magnetic spectrometer using multiwire proportional chambers, trigger hodoscopes, a hadronic calorimeter, and a muon-detection system. Nearly identical acceptances and efficiencies for hyperons and antihyperons decaying within an evacuated volume were achieved by reversing the polarities of the channel and spectrometer magnets. A high-rate data-acquisition system enabled 231 billion events to be recorded in 12 months of data-taking

  12. Exponential rate of correlation decay for characters in a three-parameter class of toral skew endomorphisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siboni, S.

    1998-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the correlation decay for characters in a three-parameter class of mappings of the 2-torus onto itself is presented. Being these mappings the natural extension of toral transformations previously considered with regard to a model of modulated diffusion, they show the structure of a skew product between the Bernoulli endomorphism B p (x) and a translation on T 1 . The family of characters for which correlation decay occurs is fully characterized for any choice of the parameters, and the decay is proved to be exponential, with a rate analytically computable. This improves a previous result by W. Parry, provides a lower bound to the spectral radius of a Perron-Frobenius operator introduced by the same author in his proof and answers positively to the conjecture that the poorest is the rational approximation of the coupling parameter of the map the fastest is the decay rate

  13. Specific outcomes of the research on the radiation stability of the French nuclear glass towards alpha decay accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuget, S.; Delaye, J.-M.; Jégou, C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the main results of the French research on the long-term behavior of SON68 nuclear glass towards alpha decay accumulation. The effect of the radiation damage induced by alpha decay and also helium build-up were investigated by examining glass specimens, doped with a short-lived actinide 244Cm, irradiated by light and heavy ions. Additionally, atomistic simulations by molecular dynamics have provided further information on the atomic-scale effects of the macroscopic phenomena observed. These studies have shown that some macroscopic properties vary with the accumulation of alpha decay, but then stabilize after integrated doses of the order of 4 × 1018 α g-1. For example, the glass density diminishes by about 0.6%, its Young's modulus by about 15%, and its hardness by about 30%, while its fracture toughness increases by around 50%. The SEM and TEM characterization showed that the glass is still homogeneous. No phase separation, crystallization or bubbles formation was noticed up to an alpha decay dose corresponding to several thousand years of disposal of nuclear glass canister. Moreover the initial alteration rate of the glass is not significantly affected by the glass damage induced by alpha decays or heavy ions irradiations. The comparison of the macroscopic evolutions of the Cm doped glass with those obtained for glasses irradiated with light or heavy ions (from either experimental and molecular dynamic studies) suggests that the macroscopic evolutions are induced by the nuclear interactions induced by the recoil nuclei of alpha decay. The analysis of the behavior of the glass structure subjected to ballistic effects with various spectroscopic studies, together with the results of atomistic modeling by molecular dynamics, have identified some slight changes in the local order around some cations. Moreover a modification of the medium-range order has also been demonstrated through changes in the bond angles between network

  14. Specific outcomes of the research on the radiation stability of the French nuclear glass towards alpha decay accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peuget, S., E-mail: sylvain.peuget@cea.fr; Delaye, J.-M.; Jégou, C.

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents an overview of the main results of the French research on the long-term behavior of SON68 nuclear glass towards alpha decay accumulation. The effect of the radiation damage induced by alpha decay and also helium build-up were investigated by examining glass specimens, doped with a short-lived actinide {sup 244}Cm, irradiated by light and heavy ions. Additionally, atomistic simulations by molecular dynamics have provided further information on the atomic-scale effects of the macroscopic phenomena observed. These studies have shown that some macroscopic properties vary with the accumulation of alpha decay, but then stabilize after integrated doses of the order of 4 × 10{sup 18} α g{sup −1}. For example, the glass density diminishes by about 0.6%, its Young’s modulus by about 15%, and its hardness by about 30%, while its fracture toughness increases by around 50%. The SEM and TEM characterization showed that the glass is still homogeneous. No phase separation, crystallization or bubbles formation was noticed up to an alpha decay dose corresponding to several thousand years of disposal of nuclear glass canister. Moreover the initial alteration rate of the glass is not significantly affected by the glass damage induced by alpha decays or heavy ions irradiations. The comparison of the macroscopic evolutions of the Cm doped glass with those obtained for glasses irradiated with light or heavy ions (from either experimental and molecular dynamic studies) suggests that the macroscopic evolutions are induced by the nuclear interactions induced by the recoil nuclei of alpha decay. The analysis of the behavior of the glass structure subjected to ballistic effects with various spectroscopic studies, together with the results of atomistic modeling by molecular dynamics, have identified some slight changes in the local order around some cations. Moreover a modification of the medium-range order has also been demonstrated through changes in the bond angles

  15. Uncertainty of decay heat calculations originating from errors in the nuclear data and the yields of individual fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudstam, G.

    1979-01-01

    The calculation of the abundance pattern of the fission products with due account taken of feeding from the fission of 235 U, 238 U, and 239 Pu, from the decay of parent nuclei, from neutron capture, and from delayed-neutron emission is described. By means of the abundances and the average beta and gamma energies the decay heat in nuclear fuel is evaluated along with its error derived from the uncertainties of fission yields and nuclear properties of the inddividual fission products. (author)

  16. Tracing nitrogen accumulation in decaying wood and examining its impact on wood decomposition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, Katja T.; Rajala, Tiina; Peltoniemi, Krista; Chen, Janet; Smolander, Aino; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2016-04-01

    Decomposition of dead wood, which is controlled primarily by fungi is important for ecosystem carbon cycle and has potentially a significant role in nitrogen fixation via diazotrophs. Nitrogen content has been found to increase with advancing wood decay in several studies; however, the importance of this increase to decay rate and the sources of external nitrogen remain unclear. Improved knowledge of the temporal dynamics of wood decomposition rate and nitrogen accumulation in wood as well as the drivers of the two processes would be important for carbon and nitrogen models dealing with ecosystem responses to climate change. To tackle these questions we applied several analytical methods on Norway spruce logs from Lapinjärvi, Finland. We incubated wood samples (density classes from I to V, n=49) in different temperatures (from 8.5oC to 41oC, n=7). After a common seven day pre-incubation period at 14.5oC, the bottles were incubated six days in their designated temperature prior to CO2 flux measurements with GC to determine the decomposition rate. N2 fixation was measured with acetylene reduction assay after further 48 hour incubation. In addition, fungal DNA, (MiSeq Illumina) δ15N and N% composition of wood for samples incubated at 14.5oC were determined. Radiocarbon method was applied to obtain age distribution for the density classes. The asymbiotic N2 fixation rate was clearly dependent on the stage of wood decay and increased from stage I to stage IV but was substantially reduced in stage V. CO2 production was highest in the intermediate decay stage (classes II-IV). Both N2 fixation and CO2 production were highly temperature sensitive having optima in temperature 25oC and 31oC, respectively. We calculated the variation of annual levels of respiration and N2 fixation per hectare for the study site, and used the latter data together with the 14C results to determine the amount of N2 accumulated in wood in time. The proportion of total nitrogen in wood

  17. Cooperative Lamb shift and the cooperative decay rate for an initially detuned phased state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2010-01-01

    The cooperative Lamb shift (CLS) is hard to measure because in samples much larger than a resonant wavelength it is much smaller, for an initially prepared resonantly phased state, than the cooperative decay rate (CDR). We show, however, that if the phasing of the initial state is detuned so that the spatial wave vector is k 1 congruent with k 0 ±O((1/R)) (where k 0 =ω 0 /c is the resonant frequency), the CLS grows to 'giant' magnitudes making it comparable to the CDR. Moreover, for certain controlled values of detuning, the initial CDR becomes small so that the dynamical Lamb shift (DLS) can be measured over a considerable period of time.

  18. Indoor acrolein emission and decay rates resulting from domestic cooking events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Vincent Y.; Bennett, Deborah H.; Cahill, Thomas M.

    2009-12-01

    Acrolein (2-propenal) is a common constituent of both indoor and outdoor air, can exacerbate asthma in children, and may contribute to other chronic lung diseases. Recent studies have found high indoor levels of acrolein and other carbonyls compared to outdoor ambient concentrations. Heated cooking oils produce considerable amounts of acrolein, thus cooking is likely an important source of indoor acrolein. A series of cooking experiments were conducted to determine the emission rates of acrolein and other volatile carbonyls for different types of cooking oils (canola, soybean, corn and olive oils) and deep-frying different food items. Similar concentrations and emission rates of carbonyls were found when different vegetable oils were used to deep-fry the same food product. The food item being deep-fried was generally not a significant source of carbonyls compared to the cooking oil. The oil cooking events resulted in high concentrations of acrolein that were in the range of 26.4-64.5 μg m -3. These concentrations exceed all the chronic regulatory exposure limits and many of the acute exposure limits. The air exchange rate and the decay rate of the carbonyls were monitored to estimate the half-life of the carbonyls. The half-life for acrolein was 14.4 ± 2.6 h, which indicates that indoor acrolein concentrations can persist for considerable time after cooking in poorly-ventilated homes.

  19. Disordered nuclear pasta, magnetic field decay, and crust cooling in neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Cumming, A.; Schneider, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear pasta, with non-spherical shapes, is expected near the base of the crust in neutron stars. Large scale molecular dynamics simulations of pasta show long lived topological defects that could increase electron scattering and reduce both the thermal and electrical conductivities. We model a possible low conductivity pasta layer by increasing an impurity parameter Qimp. Predictions of light curves for the low mass X-ray binary MXB 1659-29, assuming a large Qimp, find continued late time cooling that is consistent with Chandra observations. The electrical and thermal conductivities are likely related. Therefore observations of late time crust cooling can provide insight on the electrical conductivity and the possible decay of neutron star magnetic fields (assuming these are supported by currents in the crust). This research was supported in part by DOE Grants DE-FG02-87ER40365 (Indiana University) and DE-SC0008808 (NUCLEI SciDAC Collaboration).

  20. A study on the characteristics of the decay heat removal capacity for a large thermal rated LMR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uh, J. H.; Kim, E. K.; Kim, S. O.

    2003-01-01

    The design characteristics and the decay heat removal capacity according to the type of DHR (Decay Heat Removal) system in LMR are quantitatively analyzed, and the general relationship between the rated core thermal power and decay heat removal capacity is created in this study. Based on these analyses results, a feasibility of designing a larger thermal rating KALIMER plant is investigated in view of decay heat removal capacity, and DRC (Direct Reactor Cooling) type DHR system which rejects heat from the reactor pool to air is proper to satisfy the decay heat removal capacity for a large thermal rating plant above 1,000 MWth. Some defects, however, including the heat loss under normal plant operation and the lack of reliance associated with system operation should be resolved in order to adopt the total passive concept. Therefore, the new concept of DHR system for a larger thermal rating KALIMER design, named as PDRC (passive decay heat removal circuit), is established in this study. In the newly established concept of PDRC, the Na-Na heat exchanger is located above the sodium cold pool and is prevented from the direct sodium contact during normal operation. This total passive feature has the superiority in the aspect of the minimizing the normal heat loss and the increasing the operation reliance of DHR system by removing either any operator action or any external operation signal associated with system operation. From this study, it is confirmed that the new concept of PDRC is useful to the designing of a large thermal rating power plant of KALIMER-600 in view of decay heat removal capability

  1. Non-Markovian dynamics of quantum systems: decay rate, capture and pure states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanokov, Z.; Palchikov, Yu.V.; Antonenko, N.V.; Adamian, G.G.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G.G.; Scheid, W.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: With the exact numerical solution of the equation for the reduced density matrix we found a minor role of the time dependence of the friction and diffusion coefficients in the escape rate from a potential well [1]. Since the used friction and diffusion coefficients were self- consistently under certain approximations derived, they preserve the positivity of the density matrix at any time. The mixed diffusion coefficient leads to a decrease of the escape rate. Since the used value of quantum diffusion coefficient in momentum is larger than the one following from a 'classic' treatment, the obtained escape rate is close to the rate calculated with the 'classic' set of diffusion coefficients. If the regime of motion is close to the under damped case or the temperature is small, the quasi-stationary escape rate can increase with friction. This is explained by the larger role of the increasing diffusion in the decay process. The agreement of the escape rate obtained with the analytical expressions in comparison to numerically calculated data depends on the characteristics of the considered system. The agreement is better in the overdamped regime. However, for any regime the deviations are not larger than in the case of the classical Kramers formula. Therefore, the analytical expressions can be applied in a large range of parameters for the potential and diffusion coefficients. We demonstrated that the uncertainty function is related to the linear entropy. The diffusion coefficients supplying the purity of states were elaborated for the non-Markovian dynamics. The obtained dependences of the capture probability on the friction proves that the quantum nature of this process should be taken into consideration when one calculates the capture cross section in nucleus-nucleus collisions

  2. Spin-dependent energy distribution of B-hadrons from polarized top decays considering the azimuthal correlation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Moosavi Nejad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Basically, the energy distribution of bottom-flavored hadrons produced through polarized top quark decays t(↑→W++b(→Xb, is governed by the unpolarized rate and the polar and the azimuthal correlation functions which are related to the density matrix elements of the decay t(↑→bW+. Here we present, for the first time, the analytical expressions for the O(αs radiative corrections to the differential azimuthal decay rates of the partonic process t(↑→b+W+ in two helicity systems, which are needed to study the azimuthal distribution of the energy spectrum of the hadrons produced in polarized top decays. These spin-momentum correlations between the top quark spin and its decay product momenta will allow the detailed studies of the top decay mechanism. Our predictions of the hadron energy distributions also enable us to deepen our knowledge of the hadronization process and to test the universality and scaling violations of the bottom-flavored meson fragmentation functions.

  3. Decay Rates of Interactive Hyperbolic-Parabolic PDE Models with Thermal Effects on the Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasiecka, I.; Lebiedzik, C.

    2000-01-01

    We consider coupled PDE systems comprising of a hyperbolic and a parabolic-like equation with an interface on a portion of the boundary. These models are motivated by structural acoustic problems. A specific prototype consists of a wave equation defined on a three-dimensional bounded domain Ω coupled with a thermoelastic plate equation defined on Γ 0 -a flat surface of the boundary Ω. Thus, the coupling between the wave and the plate takes place on the interface Γ 0 . The main issue studied here is that of uniform stability of the overall interactive model. Since the original (uncontrolled) model is only strongly stable, but not uniformly stable, the question becomes: what is the 'minimal amount' of dissipation necessary to obtain uniform decay rates for the energy of the overall system? Our main result states that boundary nonlinear dissipation placed only on a suitable portion of the part of the boundary which is complementary to Γ 0 , suffices for the stabilization of the entire structure. This result is new with respect to the literature on several accounts: (i) thermoelasticity is accounted for in the plate model; (ii) the plate model does not account for any type of mechanical damping, including the structural damping most often considered in the literature; (iii) there is no mechanical damping placed on the interface Γ 0 ; (iv) the boundary damping is nonlinear without a prescribed growth rate at the origin; (v) the undamped portions of the boundary partial Ω are subject to Neumann (rather than Dirichlet) boundary conditions, which is a recognized difficulty in the context of stabilization of wave equations, due to the fact that the strong Lopatinski condition does not hold. The main mathematical challenge is to show how the thermal energy is propagated onto the hyperbolic component of the structure. This is achieved by using a recently developed sharp theory of boundary traces corresponding to wave and plate equations, along with the analytic

  4. ENDF/B-VII.1 Nuclear Data for Science and Technology: Cross Sections, Covariances, Fission Product Yields and Decay Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, M.B.; Herman, M.; Author(s): Chadwick,M.B.; Herman,M.; Oblozinsky,P.; Dunn,M.E.; Danon,Y.; Kahler,A.C.; Smith,D.L.; Pritychenko,B.; Arbanas,G.; Arcilla,R.; Brewer,R.; Brown,D.A.; Capote,R.; Carlson,A.D.; Cho,Y.S.; Derrien,H.; Guber,K.; Hale,G.M.; Hoblit,S.; Holloway,S.: Johnson,T.D.; Kawano,T.; Kiedrowski,B.C.; Kim,H.; Kunieda,S.; Larson,N.M.; Leal,L.; Lestone,J.P.; Little,R.C.; McCutchan,E.A.; MacFarlane,R.E.; MacInnes,M.; Mattoon,C.M.; McKnight,R.D.; Mughabghab,S.F.; Nobre,G.P.A.; Palmiotti,G.; Palumbo,A.; Pigni,M.T.; Pronyaev,V.G.; Sayer,R.O.; Sonzogni,A.A.; Summers,N.C.; Talou,P.; Thompson,I.J.; Trkov,A.; Vogt,R.L.; van der Marck,S.C.; Wallner,A.; White,M.C.; Wiarda,D.; Young,P.G.

    2011-12-01

    The ENDF/B-VII.1 library is our latest recommended evaluated nuclear data file for use in nuclear science and technology applications, and incorporates advances made in the five years since the release of ENDF/B-VII.0. These advances focus on neutron cross sections, covariances, fission product yields and decay data, and represent work by the US Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in nuclear data evaluation that utilizes developments in nuclear theory, modeling, simulation, and experiment. The principal advances in the new library are: (1) An increase in the breadth of neutron reaction cross section coverage, extending from 393 nuclides to 423 nuclides; (2) Covariance uncertainty data for 190 of the most important nuclides, as documented in companion papers in this edition; (3) R-matrix analyses of neutron reactions on light nuclei, including isotopes of He, Li, and Be; (4) Resonance parameter analyses at lower energies and statistical high energy reactions for isotopes of Cl, K, Ti, V, Mn, Cr, Ni, Zr and W; (5) Modifications to thermal neutron reactions on fission products (isotopes of Mo, Tc, Rh, Ag, Cs, Nd, Sm, Eu) and neutron absorber materials (Cd, Gd); (6) Improved minor actinide evaluations for isotopes of U, Np, Pu, and Am (we are not making changes to the major actinides {sup 235,238}U and {sup 239}Pu at this point, except for delayed neutron data and covariances, and instead we intend to update them after a further period of research in experiment and theory), and our adoption of JENDL-4.0 evaluations for isotopes of Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Fm, and some other minor actinides; (7) Fission energy release evaluations; (8) Fission product yield advances for fission-spectrum neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons incident on {sup 239}Pu; and (9) A new decay data sublibrary. Integral validation testing of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library is provided for a variety of quantities: For nuclear criticality, the VII.1 library maintains the generally-good performance seen for VII.0

  5. α-decay half-lives of some nuclei from ground state to ground state using different nuclear potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akrawy Dashty T.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical α-decay half-lives of some nuclei from ground state to ground state are calculated using different nuclear potential model including Coulomb proximity potential (CPPM, Royer proximity potential and Broglia and Winther 1991. The calculated values comparing with experimental data, it is observed that the CPPM model is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. The limits of the nuclear chart set by fission and alpha decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Möller Peter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available I will review how our picture of heavy-element nuclear structure has evolved through remarkably simple ideas and related models. It is well known that the Bethe-Weizsäcker semi-empirical mass model had an important role in unraveling radioactive decay and element transmutation in the heavy-element region in the 1930s. A remarkable aspect is that this model could immediately after the discovery of fission be generalized to explain this phenomenon through the consideration of deformation of a charged liquid drop. Bethe and Bacher already raised the possibility that shell structure (by them calculated in terms of a single-particle oscillator potential could give rise to noticeable deviations between results of the macroscopic mass model and experiment but limited data prevented firm conclusions. In the 1950s the single-particle models took a realistic form and also included deformation. The possibility of the existence of a relatively stable “island” of superheavy elements was raised already then. But it was not until the work by Strutinsky in the mid 1960s that a quantitative model for the nuclear potential-energy emerged in the form of the macroscopic-microscopic model. Although new elements have been discovered at an almost steady pace since 1940, theory indicates that we are close to the end of this era: repulsive Coulomb effects will set the limit of observable elements to near Z = 120.

  7. A model independent determination of the B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} decay rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernlochner, Florian U. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Lacker, Heiko [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Ligeti, Zoltan [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Stewart, Iain W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Theoretical Physics; Tackmann, Frank J.; Tackmann, Kerstin [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    The goal of the SIMBA collaboration is to provide a global fit to the available measurements of inclusive B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} and B{yields}X{sub u}l{nu} decays. By performing a global fit one is able to simultaneously determine the relevant normalizations, i.e. the total B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} rate and the CKM-matrix element vertical stroke Vub vertical stroke, together with the required hadronic parameters, most importantly the b-quark mass and the b-quark distribution function in the B-meson, called the shape function. In this talk, the current status on the model-independent determination of the shape function and vertical stroke C{sub 7}{sup incl}V{sub tb}V{sub ts}{sup *} vertical stroke, which parametrizes the total B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} rate, from a global fit to the available B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} measurements from Babar and Belle is presented. In particular, the theoretical uncertainties originating from variations of the different factorization scales are evaluated.

  8. Exponential decay of GC content detected by strand-symmetric substitution rates influences the evolution of isochore structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karro, J E; Peifer, M; Hardison, R C; Kollmann, M; von Grünberg, H H

    2008-02-01

    The distribution of guanine and cytosine nucleotides throughout a genome, or the GC content, is associated with numerous features in mammals; understanding the pattern and evolutionary history of GC content is crucial to our efforts to annotate the genome. The local GC content is decaying toward an equilibrium point, but the causes and rates of this decay, as well as the value of the equilibrium point, remain topics of debate. By comparing the results of 2 methods for estimating local substitution rates, we identify 620 Mb of the human genome in which the rates of the various types of nucleotide substitutions are the same on both strands. These strand-symmetric regions show an exponential decay of local GC content at a pace determined by local substitution rates. DNA segments subjected to higher rates experience disproportionately accelerated decay and are AT rich, whereas segments subjected to lower rates decay more slowly and are GC rich. Although we are unable to draw any conclusions about causal factors, the results support the hypothesis proposed by Khelifi A, Meunier J, Duret L, and Mouchiroud D (2006. GC content evolution of the human and mouse genomes: insights from the study of processed pseudogenes in regions of different recombination rates. J Mol Evol. 62:745-752.) that the isochore structure has been reshaped over time. If rate variation were a determining factor, then the current isochore structure of mammalian genomes could result from the local differences in substitution rates. We predict that under current conditions strand-symmetric portions of the human genome will stabilize at an average GC content of 30% (considerably less than the current 42%), thus confirming that the human genome has not yet reached equilibrium.

  9. CP non-invariance and the K/sub s/ to mu /sup +/ mu /sup -/ decay rate

    CERN Document Server

    Dass, G V

    1972-01-01

    Christ and Lee suggested CP non-invariance as an explanation of the low experimental K/sub L/ to mu /sup +/ mu /sup -/ decay rate. The authors discuss Hamiltonian realizations of this mechanism, and the lower bounds on the K/sub S/ to mu /sup +/ mu /sup -/ decay rate implied by them. The lower bound on the K/sub S/ to mu /sup +/ mu /sup -/ branching ratio varies in these models from 10 * 10/sup -7/ (for the most economical model) to 2 * 10/sup -7/. (20 refs).

  10. Anomalous effects of radioactive decay rates and capacitance values measured inside a modified Faraday cage: Correlations with space weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholkmann, F.; Milián-Sánchez, V.; Mocholí-Salcedo, A.; Milián, C.; Kolombet, V. A.; Verdú, G.

    2017-03-01

    Recently we reported (Milián-Sánchez V. et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods A, 828 (2016) 210) our experimental results involving 226Ra decay rate and capacitance measurements inside a modified Faraday cage. Our measurements exhibited anomalous effects of unknown origin. In this letter we report new results regarding our investigation into the origins of the observed effects. We report preliminary findings of a correlation analysis between the radioactive decay rates and capacitance time series and space weather related variables (geomagnetic field disturbances and cosmic-ray neutron counts). A significant correlation was observed for specific data sets. The results are presented and possible implications for future work discussed.

  11. The NUMEN project: NUclear Matrix Elements for Neutrinoless double beta decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Agodi, C.; Cavallaro, M.; Carbone, D.; Tudisco, S.; Lo Presti, D.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Finocchiaro, P.; Colonna, M.; Rifuggiato, D.; Calabretta, L.; Calvo, D.; Pandola, L.; Acosta, L.; Auerbach, N.; Bellone, J.; Bijker, R.; Bonanno, D.; Bongiovanni, D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Boztosun, I.; Brunasso, O.; Burrello, S.; Calabrese, S.; Calanna, A.; Chávez Lomelí, E. R.; D'Agostino, G.; De Faria, P. N.; De Geronimo, G.; Delaunay, F.; Deshmukh, N.; Ferreira, J. L.; Fisichella, M.; Foti, A.; Gallo, G.; Garcia-Tecocoatzi, H.; Greco, V.; Hacisalihoglu, A.; Iazzi, F.; Introzzi, R.; Lanzalone, G.; Lay, J. A.; La Via, F.; Lenske, H.; Linares, R.; Litrico, G.; Longhitano, F.; Lubian, J.; Medina, N. H.; Mendes, D. R.; Moralles, M.; Muoio, A.; Pakou, A.; Petrascu, H.; Pinna, F.; Reito, S.; Russo, A. D.; Russo, G.; Santagati, G.; Santopinto, E.; Santos, R. B. B.; Sgouros, O.; da Silveira, M. A. G.; Solakci, S. O.; Souliotis, G.; Soukeras, V.; Spatafora, A.; Torresi, D.; Magana Vsevolodovna, R.; Yildirim, A.; Zagatto, V. A. B.

    2018-05-01

    The article describes the main achievements of the NUMEN project together with an updated and detailed overview of the related R&D activities and theoretical developments. NUMEN proposes an innovative technique to access the nuclear matrix elements entering the expression of the lifetime of the double beta decay by cross section measurements of heavy-ion induced Double Charge Exchange (DCE) reactions. Despite the fact that the two processes, namely neutrinoless double beta decay and DCE reactions, are triggered by the weak and strong interaction respectively, important analogies are suggested. The basic point is the coincidence of the initial and final state many-body wave functions in the two types of processes and the formal similarity of the transition operators. First experimental results obtained at the INFN-LNS laboratory for the 40Ca(18O,18Ne)40Ar reaction at 270MeV give an encouraging indication on the capability of the proposed technique to access relevant quantitative information. The main experimental tools for this project are the K800 Superconducting Cyclotron and MAGNEX spectrometer. The former is used for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavy-ion beams and the latter is the large acceptance magnetic spectrometer for the detection of the ejectiles. The use of the high-order trajectory reconstruction technique, implemented in MAGNEX, allows to reach the experimental resolution and sensitivity required for the accurate measurement of the DCE cross sections at forward angles. However, the tiny values of such cross sections and the resolution requirements demand beam intensities much larger than those manageable with the present facility. The on-going upgrade of the INFN-LNS facilities in this perspective is part of the NUMEN project and will be discussed in the article.

  12. Q/sub 1/(1290) and Q/sub 2/(1400) decay rates and their SU(3) implications. [Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnegie, R K; Cashmore, R J; Dunwoodie, W M; Lasinski, T A; Leith, D W.G.S. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Calif. (USA)

    1977-06-06

    The known information on the decay rates of the strangeness-one axial vector mesons, Q/sub 1/ and Q/sub 2/ is summarized and combined. From this information and the rate for B..--> omega pi.., the Qsub(A)-Qsub(B) mixing angle and the S-wave symmetric and antisymmetric octet couplings for vector-pseudoscalar decays of axial vector mesons are determined. If the D(1285) and the E(1420) belong to the fsup(PC)=1/sup + +/ nonet, the A/sub 1/ is found to have a mass of approximately 1.47 GeV and a large (>0.3 GeV) width.

  13. Influence of the nuclear electric field on processes of annihilation of positrons emitted at β+-decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Fedotkin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The process of atomic shell ionization during annihilation of positron, emitted at β+-decay, with K-electron of daughter's atom is considered. The role of nuclear Coulomb field at calculation of the probability of this process is investigated. It is shown that the correct account of the influence of this factor on the states of electron and posi-tron changes the probability of atomic ionization appreciably. The ratio of the probabilities of processes of atom-ic ionization and usual β+- decay is notably changed.

  14. Method for measuring the decay rate of a radionuclide emitting β-rays in a liquid sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horrocks, D.

    1977-01-01

    With this method the decay rate of a radionuclide emitting β-rays, e.g. 3 H or 14 C, in a liquid sample can be measured by means of liquid scintillation counters, at least two different versions of the sample being used with quench effect (shifting of the Compton spectrum). For this purpose each sample is counted with and without a radioactive standard source, e.g. 137 Cs. Then a pulse height will be determined corresponding to a selected point in the pulse height spectrum if the standard source is present. The determination of a zero-threshold sample count rate is then performed by counting the sample in a counting window. In addition standardized values of the measured pulse heights are derived and put in mathematical relation to corresponding pulse count rates, the pulse count rate for a standardized pulse height value thus becoming zero and the sample decay rate in this way being determined. (DG) 891 HP [de

  15. Relative rates of B meson decays into psi(2S) and J/psi mesons

    OpenAIRE

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a study of the relative rates of B meson decays into ψ(2S) and J/ψ mesons using 1.3  fb-1 of pp̅ collisions at √s=1.96  TeV recorded by the D0 detector operating at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We observe the channels Bs0→ψ(2S)ϕ, Bs0→J/ψϕ, B±→ψ(2S)K±, and B±→J/ψK± and we measure the relative branching fractions for these channels to be B(Bs0→ψ(2S)ϕ)/B(Bs0→J/ψϕ)=0.53±0.10(stat)±0.07(syst)±0.06(B), B(B±→ψ(2S)K±)/B(B±→J/ψK±)=0.63±0.05(stat)±0.03(syst)±0.07(B),where the final erro...

  16. Minimally allowed neutrinoless double beta decay rates within an anarchical framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, James

    2009-01-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ0ν) is the only realistic probe of the Majorana nature of the neutrino. In the standard picture, its rate is proportional to m ee , the e-e element of the Majorana neutrino mass matrix in the flavor basis. I explore minimally allowed m ee values within the framework of mass matrix anarchy where neutrino parameters are defined statistically at low energies. Distributions of mixing angles are well defined by the Haar integration measure, but masses are dependent on arbitrary weighting functions and boundary conditions. I survey the integration measure parameter space and find that for sufficiently convergent weightings, m ee is constrained between (0.01-0.4) eV at 90% confidence. Constraints from neutrino mixing data lower these bounds. Singular integration measures allow for arbitrarily small m ee values with the remaining elements ill-defined, but this condition constrains the flavor structure of the model's ultraviolet completion. ββ0ν bounds below m ee ∼5x10 -3 eV should indicate symmetry in the lepton sector, new light degrees of freedom, or the Dirac nature of the neutrino.

  17. Co-ordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.

    1999-03-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the thirteenth meeting of the International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators Network at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 14-17 December 1998. The meeting was attended by 30 scientists from 10 Member States and 2 international organizations concerned with compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. The present document contains a meeting summary, the conclusions and recommendations, the data center reports and proposals considered by the participants. (author)

  18. Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.; Tuli, J.K.

    2007-09-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the 17th meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation, 11-15 June 2007. This meeting was attended by 27 scientists from 13 Member States concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, recommendations/conclusions, data centre reports, and various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants are contained within this document. (author)

  19. Co-ordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA advisory group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronyaev, V G

    2001-02-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the fourteenth meeting of the International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators Network at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 4-7 December 2000. The meeting was attended by 22 scientists from 7 Member States and 1 international organization concerned with compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. The present document contains a meeting summary, the recommendations, the data center reports and proposals considered by the participants. (author)

  20. Background for a new standard on pass-by measurement of combined roughness, track decay rate and vibroacoustic transfer functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittrich, M.G.; Létourneaux, F.; Dupuis, H.

    2013-01-01

    A measurement method for combined roughness, track decay rates and transfer functions derived from rail vibration during a train pass-by was initially developed in the late nineties [1]. This method has been then later implemented in software tools [2] and applied in several countries for various

  1. Nuclear quantum effects on the nonadiabatic decay mechanism of an excited hydrated electron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgis, Daniel; Rossky, Peter J.; Turi, László

    2007-11-01

    We present a kinetic analysis of the nonadiabatic decay mechanism of an excited state hydrated electron to the ground state. The theoretical treatment is based on a quantized, gap dependent golden rule rate constant formula which describes the nonadiabatic transition rate between two quantum states. The rate formula is expressed in terms of quantum time correlation functions of the energy gap and of the nonadiabatic coupling. These gap dependent quantities are evaluated from three different sets of mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations of a hydrated electron equilibrated (a) in its ground state, (b) in its first excited state, and (c) on a hypothetical mixed potential energy surface which is the average of the ground and the first excited electronic states. The quantized, gap dependent rate results are applied in a phenomenological kinetic equation which provides the survival probability function of the excited state electron. Although the lifetime of the equilibrated excited state electron is computed to be very short (well under 100fs), the survival probability function for the nonequilibrium process in pump-probe experiments yields an effective excited state lifetime of around 300fs, a value that is consistent with the findings of several experimental groups and previous theoretical estimates.

  2. Improved predictions of nuclear reaction rates for astrophysics applications with the TALYS reaction code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear reaction rates for astrophysics applications are traditionally determined on the basis of Hauser-Feshbach reaction codes, like MOST. These codes use simplified schemes to calculate the capture reaction cross section on a given target nucleus, not only in its ground state but also on the different thermally populated states of the stellar plasma at a given temperature. Such schemes include a number of approximations that have never been tested, such as an approximate width fluctuation correction, the neglect of delayed particle emission during the electromagnetic decay cascade or the absence of the pre-equilibrium contribution at increasing incident energies. New developments have been brought to the reaction code TALYS to estimate the Maxwellian-averaged reaction rates of astrophysics relevance. These new developments give us the possibility to calculate with an improved accuracy the reaction cross sections and the corresponding astrophysics rates. The TALYS predictions for the thermonuclear rates of astrophysics relevance are presented and compared with those obtained with the MOST code on the basis of the same nuclear ingredients for nuclear structure properties, optical model potential, nuclear level densities and γ-ray strength. It is shown that, in particular, the pre-equilibrium process significantly influences the astrophysics rates of exotic neutron-rich nuclei. The reciprocity theorem traditionally used in astrophysics to determine photo-rates is also shown no to be valid for exotic nuclei. The predictions obtained with different nuclear inputs are also analyzed to provide an estimate of the theoretical uncertainties still affecting the reaction rate prediction far away from the experimentally known regions. (authors)

  3. Neutrinoless ββ decay mediated by the exchange of light and heavy neutrinos: the role of nuclear structure correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, J.

    2018-01-01

    Neutrinoless β β decay nuclear matrix elements calculated with the shell model and energy-density functional theory typically disagree by more than a factor of two in the standard scenario of light-neutrino exchange. In contrast, for a decay mediated by sterile heavy neutrinos the deviations are reduced to about 50%, an uncertainty similar to the one due to short-range effects. We compare matrix elements in the light- and heavy-neutrino-exchange channels, exploring the radial, momentum transfer and angular momentum-parity matrix element distributions, and considering transitions that involve correlated and uncorrelated nuclear states. We argue that the shorter-range heavy-neutrino exchange is less sensitive to collective nuclear correlations, and that discrepancies in matrix elements are mostly due to the treatment of long-range correlations in many-body calculations. Our analysis supports previous studies suggesting that isoscalar pairing correlations, which affect mostly the longer-range part of the neutrinoless β β decay operator, are partially responsible for the differences between nuclear matrix elements in the standard light-neutrino-exchange mechanism.

  4. Exact evaluation of the rates of electrostatic decay and scattering off thermal ions for an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layden, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-08-15

    Electrostatic decay of Langmuir waves into Langmuir and ion sound waves (L→L′+S) and scattering of Langmuir waves off thermal ions (L+i→L′+i′, also called “nonlinear Landau damping”) are important nonlinear weak-turbulence processes. The rates for these processes depend on the quadratic longitudinal response function α{sup (2)} (or, equivalently, the quadratic longitudinal susceptibility χ{sup (2)}), which describes the second-order response of a plasma to electrostatic wave fields. Previous calculations of these rates for an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma have relied upon an approximate form for α{sup (2)} that is valid where two of the wave fields are fast (i.e., v{sub φ}=ω/k≫V{sub e} where ω is the angular frequency, k is the wavenumber, and V{sub e} is the electron thermal speed) and one is slow (v{sub φ}≪V{sub e}). Recently, an exact expression was derived for α{sup (2)} that is valid for any phase speeds of the three waves in an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma. Here, this exact α{sup (2)} is applied to the calculation of the three-dimensional rates for electrostatic decay and scattering off thermal ions, and the resulting exact rates are compared with the approximate rates. The calculations are performed using previously derived three-dimensional rates for electrostatic decay given in terms of a general α{sup (2)}, and newly derived three-dimensional rates for scattering off thermal ions; the scattering rate is derived assuming a Maxwellian ion distribution, and both rates are derived assuming arc distributions for the wave spectra. For most space plasma conditions, the approximate rate is found to be accurate to better than 20%; however, for sufficiently low Langmuir phase speeds (v{sub φ}/V{sub e}≈3) appropriate to some spatial domains of the foreshock regions of planetary bow shocks and type II solar radio bursts, the use of the exact rate may be necessary for accurate calculations. The relative rates of electrostatic decay

  5. Effect of nuclear reaction rates on primordial abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Abhishek; Basu, D.N.

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical predictions of the primordial abundances of elements in the big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) are dominated by uncertainties in the input nuclear reaction rates. The effect of modifying these reaction rates on light element abundance yields in BBN by replacing the thirty-five reaction rates out of the existing eighty-eight has been investigated. Also the study have been taken of these yields as functions of evolution time or temperature. Here it has been found that using these new reaction rates results in only a little increase in helium mass fraction over that obtained previously in BBN calculations. This allows insights into the role of the nuclear reaction rates in the setting of the neutron-to-proton ratio during the BBN epoch. We observe that most of these nuclear reactions have minimal effect on the standard BBN abundance yields of 6 Li and 7 Li

  6. A new scanning system for alpha decay events as calibration sources for range-energy relation in nuclear emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, J.; Kinbara, S.; Mishina, A.; Nakazawa, K.; Soe, M. K.; Theint, A. M. M.; Tint, K. T.

    2017-03-01

    A new scanning system named "Vertex picker" has been developed to rapid collect alpha decay events, which are calibration sources for the range-energy relation in nuclear emulsion. A computer-controlled optical microscope scans emulsion layers exhaustively, and a high-speed and high-resolution camera takes their micrographs. A dedicated image processing picks out vertex-like shapes. Practical operations of alpha decay search were demonstrated by emulsion sheets of the KEK-PS E373 experiment. Alpha decays of nearly 28 events were detected in eye-check work on a PC monitor per hour. This yield is nearly 20 times more effective than that by the conventional eye-scan method. The speed and quality is acceptable for the coming new experiment, J-PARC E07.

  7. A new scanning system for alpha decay events as calibration sources for range-energy relation in nuclear emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, J.; Kinbara, S.; Mishina, A.; Nakazawa, K.; Soe, M.K.; Theint, A.M.M.; Tint, K.T.

    2017-01-01

    A new scanning system named “Vertex picker” has been developed to rapid collect alpha decay events, which are calibration sources for the range-energy relation in nuclear emulsion. A computer-controlled optical microscope scans emulsion layers exhaustively, and a high-speed and high-resolution camera takes their micrographs. A dedicated image processing picks out vertex-like shapes. Practical operations of alpha decay search were demonstrated by emulsion sheets of the KEK-PS E373 experiment. Alpha decays of nearly 28 events were detected in eye-check work on a PC monitor per hour. This yield is nearly 20 times more effective than that by the conventional eye-scan method. The speed and quality is acceptable for the coming new experiment, J-PARC E07.

  8. Dynamic aspects of the nuclear decay: from the fission to the multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruyer, Diego

    2014-01-01

    In this work we study the evolution and nature of reaction and decay mechanisms of hot nuclei produced in heavy ion collisions from E = 8 to 25 MeV/A measured with INDRA. In central Xe+Sn collisions from E = 8 to 25 MeV/A, three-fragment events present a significant cross section without the underlying production mechanism being clearly established. We have shown that fragments arise from two successive binary splittings. The time interval between these two splittings decreases with increasing incident energy, becoming compatible with a simultaneous three-body break-up above E = 20 MeV/A, which was interpreted as the signature of the onset of multifragmentation. Then we have investigated the nature of the multifragmentation process. A statistical analysis of the largest fragment charge (Zmax) distribution produced in central Xe+Sn collisions at E = 25-50 MeV/A allowed us to establish that multifragmentation is a dynamical aggregation process. It also demonstrates the effects of collective radial expansion on multifragmentation partitions through the link between the timescale of the process and the shape of the Zmax distribution. The comparison of fragmentation patterns of comparable size systems produced in symmetric (Xe+Sn) and asymmetric (Ta+Zn) central collisions, which are supposed to follow different trajectories in the nuclear phase diagram, confirm the link between collective radial expansion and fragment partitions in multifragmentation. (author) [fr

  9. Is neutrinoless double beta decay suppressed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomoda, T.

    1989-01-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the study of nuclear double beta decay, since the observation of a neutrinoless double beta (OνΒΒ) decay would be clear evidence that the electron neutrino is a Majorana particle. The OνΒΒ decay is caused by a finite Majorana neutrino mass and/or an admixture of right-handed leptonic currents. In order to relate these quantities to OνΒΒ decay rates, we need nuclear matrix elements, which are model dependent. One of the possibilities of testing nuclear models employed in such analysis is to calculate the experimentally known rates of ΒΒ decay with emission of two neutrinos (2νΒΒ decay) which occurs independently of the nature of the neutrino. There was a long-standing difficulty in such attempts that the calculated 2νΒΒ decay rates turned out to be always too large by one to two orders of magnitude. Trying to overcome such difficulty, Klapdor and Grotz as well as Vogel and Zirnbauer showed in their calculation using schematic effective interactions such that 2νΒΒ decay rates can get reduced considerably due to the nuclear ground state correlations. This paper reports that the suppression is ascribed to that of the virtual Gamow-Teller transitions from the excited 1 + states of the intermediate odd-odd -even nucleus

  10. ENDF/B-VII.1 Nuclear Data for Science and Technology: Cross Sections, Covariances, Fission Product Yields and Decay Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, M. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Herman, Micheal W [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Oblozinsky, Pavel [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Dunn, Michael E [ORNL; Danon, Y. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); Kahler, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Smith, Donald L. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Pritychenko, B [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Arbanas, Goran [ORNL; Arcilla, r [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Brewer, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brown, D A [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Capote, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Carlson, A. D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Cho, Y S [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute; Derrien, Herve [ORNL; Guber, Klaus H [ORNL; Hale, G. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hoblit, S [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Holloway, Shannon T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Johnson, T D [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Kawano, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kiedrowski, B C [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kim, H [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute; Kunieda, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Larson, Nancy M [ORNL; Leal, Luiz C [ORNL; Lestone, J P [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Little, R C [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Mccutchan, E A [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Macfarlane, R E [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); MacInnes, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Matton, C M [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Mcknight, R D [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Mughabghab, S F [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Nobre, G P [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Palmiotti, G [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Palumbo, A [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Pigni, Marco T [ORNL; Pronyaev, V. G. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Sayer, Royce O [ORNL; Sonzogni, A A [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Summers, N C [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Talou, P [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Thompson, I J [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Trkov, A. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Slovenia; Vogt, R L [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Van der Marck, S S [Nucl Res & Consultancy Grp, Petten, Netherlands; Wallner, A [University of Vienna, Austria; White, M C [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wiarda, Dorothea [ORNL; Young, P C [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01

    The ENDF/B-VII.1 library is our latest recommended evaluated nuclear data file for use in nuclear science and technology applications, and incorporates advances made in the five years since the release of ENDF/B-VII.0. These advances focus on neutron cross sections, covariances, fission product yields and decay data, and represent work by the US Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in nuclear data evaluation that utilizes developments in nuclear theory, modeling, simulation, and experiment. The principal advances in the new library are: (1) An increase in the breadth of neutron reaction cross section coverage, extending from 393 nuclides to 423 nuclides; (2) Covariance uncertainty data for 190 of the most important nuclides, as documented in companion papers in this edition; (3) R-matrix analyses of neutron reactions on light nuclei, including isotopes of He; Li, and Be; (4) Resonance parameter analyses at lower energies and statistical high energy reactions for isotopes of Cl; K; Ti, V, Mn, Cr, Ni, Zr and W; (5) Modifications to thermal neutron reactions on fission products (isotopes of Mo, Tc, Rh, Ag, Cs, Nd, Sm, Eu) and neutron absorber materials (Cd, Gd); (6) Improved minor actinide evaluations for isotopes of U, Np, Pu, and Am (we are not making changes to the major actinides (235,238)U and (239)Pu at this point, except for delayed neutron data and covariances, and instead we intend to update them after a further period of research in experiment and theory), and our adoption of JENDL-4.0 evaluations for isotopes of Cm, Bk, Cf, Es; Fm; and some other minor actinides; (7) Fission energy release evaluations; (8) Fission product yield advances for fission-spectrum neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons incident on (239)Pu; and (9) A new decay data sublibrary. Integral validation testing of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library is provided for a variety of quantities: For nuclear criticality, the VII.1 library maintains the generally-good performance seen for VII.0 for a wide

  11. Decay rates of Gaussian-type I-balls and Bose-enhancement effects in 3+1 dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yamada, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    I-balls/oscillons are long-lived spatially localized lumps of a scalar field which may be formed after inflation. In the scalar field theory with monomial potential nearly and shallower than quadratic, which is motivated by chaotic inflationary models and supersymmetric theories, the scalar field configuration of I-balls is approximately Gaussian. If the I-ball interacts with another scalar field, the I-ball eventually decays into radiation. Recently, it was pointed out that the decay rate of I-balls increases exponentially by the effects of Bose enhancement under some conditions and a non-perturbative method to compute the exponential growth rate has been derived. In this paper, we apply the method to the Gaussian-type I-ball in 3+1 dimensions assuming spherical symmetry, and calculate the partial decay rates into partial waves, labelled by the angular momentum of daughter particles. We reveal the conditions that the I-ball decays exponentially, which are found to depend on the mass and angular momentum of daughter particles and also be affected by the quantum uncertainty in the momentum of daughter particles

  12. Hierarchical Bayesian calibration of tidal orbit decay rates among hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier Cameron, Andrew; Jardine, Moira

    2018-05-01

    Transiting hot Jupiters occupy a wedge-shaped region in the mass ratio-orbital separation diagram. Its upper boundary is eroded by tidal spiral-in of massive, close-in planets and is sensitive to the stellar tidal dissipation parameter Q_s^'. We develop a simple generative model of the orbital separation distribution of the known population of transiting hot Jupiters, subject to tidal orbital decay, XUV-driven evaporation and observational selection bias. From the joint likelihood of the observed orbital separations of hot Jupiters discovered in ground-based wide-field transit surveys, measured with respect to the hyperparameters of the underlying population model, we recover narrow posterior probability distributions for Q_s^' in two different tidal forcing frequency regimes. We validate the method using mock samples of transiting planets with known tidal parameters. We find that Q_s^' and its temperature dependence are retrieved reliably over five orders of magnitude in Q_s^'. A large sample of hot Jupiters from small-aperture ground-based surveys yields log _{10} Q_s^' }=(8.26± 0.14) for 223 systems in the equilibrium-tide regime. We detect no significant dependence of Q_s^' on stellar effective temperature. A further 19 systems in the dynamical-tide regime yield log _{10} Q_s^' }=7.3± 0.4, indicating stronger coupling. Detection probabilities for transiting planets at a given orbital separation scale inversely with the increase in their tidal migration rates since birth. The resulting bias towards younger systems explains why the surface gravities of hot Jupiters correlate with their host stars' chromospheric emission fluxes. We predict departures from a linear transit-timing ephemeris of less than 4 s for WASP-18 over a 20-yr baseline.

  13. Search for CP violation in K/sup + -/. --> pi. /sup + -/. pi. /sup 0/. gamma. decays. [Charge asymmetry, rates, Dalitz plot distribution, 55 to 90 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K M [Glasgow Univ. (UK). Dept. of Natural Philosophy; Booth, P S.L.; Renshall, H R [Liverpool Univ. (UK); Jones, P B; Salmon, G L; Williams, W S.C. [Oxford Univ. (UK). Nuclear Physics Lab.; Duke, P J; Evans, W M; Hill, R E; Holley, W R

    1976-06-21

    A search has been made for a charge asymmetry in the decay rates for K/sup + -/..--> pi../sup + -/..pi../sup 0/..gamma.., which would indicate a CP violating transition. No asymmetry has been found in the Dalitz plot distribution for the decay, nor has any asymmetry been found in the decay rate for the charged pion kinetic energy range 55 to 90 MeV, to a precision of +-2.9%.

  14. Nuclear parameters determination of the {sup 127}Te {beta} {sup -} decay: a proposal for teaching nuclear physics; Determinacao de parametros nucleares do nucleo de {sup 127}Te: uma proposta para o ensino de fisica nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Wagner Fonseca

    2011-07-01

    A study of the {sup 127}Te {beta}{sup -} decay was carried out by means of gamma spectroscopy measurements using high resolution HPGe detector, in the region from 30 keV to 1.0 MeV, aiming to get a better understanding of the {sup 127}Te nuclear structure. The radioactive sources of {sup 12}7Te were obtained from the {sup 126}Te(n,{gamma}){sup 1}'2{sup 7}Te nuclear reaction produced in the IEA- R1 nuclear reactor at IPEN/CNEN-SP. Five gamma {sup t}ransitions previously attributed to this decay were confirmed with a better precision than previously. The half-life of {sup 127}Te was also studied resulting in data with lower uncertainty. Using a set of data selected from gamma spectroscopy measurements was developed and applied a didactic proposal for high school students using the Excel software. (author)

  15. Calculation of the decay rate of tachyonic neutrinos against charged-lepton-pair and neutrino-pair Cerenkov radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentschura, Ulrich D.; Nándori, István; Ehrlich, Robert

    2017-10-01

    We consider in detail the calculation of the decay rate of high-energy superluminal neutrinos against (charged) lepton pair Cerenkov radiation, and neutrino pair Cerenkov radiation, i.e., against the decay channels ν \\to ν {e}+ {e}- and ν \\to ν \\overline{ν } ν . Under the hypothesis of a tachyonic nature of neutrinos, these decay channels put constraints on the lifetime of high-energy neutrinos for terrestrial experiments as well as on cosmic scales. For the oncoming neutrino, we use the Lorentz-covariant tachyonic relation {E}ν =\\sqrt{{p}2-{m}ν 2}, where m ν is the tachyonic mass parameter. We derive both threshold conditions as well as on decay and energy loss rates, using the plane-wave fundamental bispinor solutions of the tachyonic Dirac equation. Various intricacies of rest frame versus lab frame calculations are highlighted. The results are compared to the observations of high-energy IceCube neutrinos of cosmological origin.

  16. Decay tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Seiichi; Tagishi, Akinori; Sakata, Yuji; Kontani, Koji; Sudo, Yukio; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kameyama, Iwao; Ando, Koei; Ishiki, Masahiko.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns an decay tank for decaying a radioactivity concentration of a fluid containing radioactive material. The inside of an decay tank body is partitioned by partitioning plates to form a flow channel. A porous plate is attached at the portion above the end of the partitioning plate, that is, a portion where the flow is just turned. A part of the porous plate has a slit-like opening on the side close to the partitioning plate, that is, the inner side of the flow at the turning portion thereof. Accordingly, the primary coolants passed through the pool type nuclear reactor and flown into the decay tank are flow caused to uniformly over the entire part of the tank without causing swirling. Since a distribution in a staying time is thus decreased, the effect of decaying 16 N as radioactive nuclides in the primary coolants is increased even in a limited volume of the tank. (I.N.)

  17. Nuclear fusion rate of the muonic T3 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, F.; Eskandari, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    The ground state binding energy, size and effective nuclear charge of the muonic T 3 molecule are calculated using Born-Oppenheimer adiabatic approximation. The system possesses two minimum positions, one at typically muonic and the second at the atomic distances. A symmetric planar vibrational model between two minima is assumed and the approximated potential are calculated. Moreover, nuclear fusion rate calculations of the short-life molecule is carried out due to the overlap integral of the resonance nuclear compound nucleus and the molecular wave functions

  18. Effect of gravity on false-vacuum decay rates for O(4)-symmetric bubble nucleation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, D.A.; Hiscock, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    The self-gravity of quantum fields is often considered to be a negligible perturbation upon a background spacetime and not of much physical interest. Its importance is determined by the ratio of the mass of the field to the Planck mass, this ratio being very small for those fields that we are most familiar in dealing with. However, it is conceivable that either in the very early Universe or even today a false-vacuum decay could occur associated with a field of appreciable mass. The effect of self-gravity upon false-vacuum decay was initially studied within the ''thin-wall'' approximation by Coleman and De Luccia. Their analysis involved the approximate solution of the coupled Euclideanized field and Einstein equations with the assumption of O(4)-symmetric bubble nucleation. In this paper we consider the range of validity of the ''thin-wall'' approximation by comparing the Coleman--De Luccia results with exact numerical results for a quartic polynomial potential. We also extend the analysis into regimes for which the ''thin-wall'' approximation is inapplicable. In the case of an initially de Sitter space decaying into Minkowski space, we find a smooth transition between the Coleman--De Luccia mode of bubble formation and the Hawking-Moss transition, wherein the entire spacetime tunnels ''at once'' to the maximum of the potential. In the case of the decay of an initially Minkowski space to an anti--de Sitter space, we find that there is a ''forbidden region'' of vacuum potential parameters for which decay is not possible. At energies far below the Planck scale, the boundary of this region is accurately described by the thin-wall prediction obtained by Coleman and De Luccia. At energies near the Planck scale, however, the actual ''forbidden region'' is significantly smaller than predicted by the thin-wall approximation; thus, vacuum decays are possible which appear to be forbidden by thin-wall calculations

  19. Shell-model calculations of beta-decay rates for s- and r-process nucleosyntheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, K.; Mathews, G.J.; Bloom, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    Examples of large-basis shell-model calculations of Gamow-Teller β-decay properties of specific interest in the astrophysical s- and r- processes are presented. Numerical results are given for: (1) the GT-matrix elements for the excited state decays of the unstable s-process nucleus 99 Tc; and (2) the GT-strength function for the neutron-rich nucleus 130 Cd, which lies on the r-process path. The results are discussed in conjunction with the astrophysics problems. 23 refs., 3 figs

  20. Accelerated decay rates drive soil organic matter persistence and storage in temperate forests via greater mineral stabilization of microbial residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R.; Craig, M.; Turner, B. L.; Liang, C.

    2017-12-01

    Climate predicts soil organic matter (SOM) stocks at the global scale, yet controls on SOM stocks at finer spatial scales are still debated. A current hypothesis predicts that carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) storage in soils should be greater when decomposition is slow owing to microbial competition for nutrients or the recalcitrance of organic substrates (hereafter the `slow decay' hypothesis). An alternative hypothesis predicts that soil C and N storage should be greater in soils with rapid decomposition, owing to the accelerated production of microbial residues and their stabilization on soil minerals (hereafter the `stabilization hypothesis'). To test these alternative hypotheses, we quantified soil C and N to 1-m depth in temperate forests across the Eastern and Midwestern US that varied in their biotic, climatic, and edaphic properties. At each site, we sampled (1) soils dominated by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) tree species, which typically have fast decay rates and accelerated N cycling, (2) soils dominated by ectomycorrhizal (ECM) tree species, which generally have slow decay rates and slow N cycling, and (3) soils supporting both AM and ECM trees. To the extent that trees and theor associated microbes reflect and reinforce soil conditions, support for the slow decay hypothesis would be greater SOM storage in ECM soils, whereas support for the stabilization hypothesis would be greater SOM storage in AM soils. We found support for both hypotheses, as slow decomposition in ECM soils increased C and N storage in topsoil, whereas fast decomposition in AM soils increased C and N storage in subsoil. However, at all sites we found 57% greater total C and N storage in the entire profile in AM- soils (P stabilization hypothesis. Amino sugar biomarkers (an indicator of microbial necromass) and particle size fractionation revealed that the greater SOM storage in AM soils was driven by an accumulation of microbial residues on clay minerals and metal oxides. Taken together

  1. Reaction theory for analysis of nuclear giant resonances production and decay processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foglia, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    The existence of mixing parameters connected to the different decay forms of the giant resonances was theoretically justified, and their energy dependence determined as well using a reaction theory which treats in a consistent manner the giant multipolar resonances formation and their different decay modes. (L.C.J.A.)

  2. Astrophysical Nuclear Reaction Rates in the Dense Metallic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Ali Ihsan

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear reaction rates can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude in dense and relatively cold astrophysical plasmas such as in white dwarfs, brown dwarfs, and giant planets. Similar conditions are also present in supernova explosions where the ignition conditions are vital for cosmological models. White dwarfs are compact objects that have both extremely high interior densities and very strong local magnetic fields. For the first time, a new formula has been developed to explain cross section and reaction rate quantities for light elements that includes not only the nuclear component but also the material dependence, magnetic field, and crystal structure dependency in dense metallic environments. I will present the impact of the developed formula on the cross section and reaction rates for light elements. This could have possible technological applications in energy production using nuclear fusion reactions.

  3. Roles of nuclear weak rates on the evolution of degenerate cores in stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Toshio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron-capture and β-decay rates in stellar environments are evaluated with the use of new shell-model Hamiltonians for sd-shell and pf-shell nuclei as well as for nuclei belonging to the island of inversion. Important role of the nuclear weak rates on the final evolution of stellar degenerate cores is presented. The weak interaction rates for sd-shell nuclei are calculated to study nuclear Urca processes in O-Ne-Mg cores of stars with 8-10 M⊙ (solar mass and their effects on the final fate of the stars. Nucleosynthesis of iron-group elements in Type Ia supernova explosions are studied with the weak rates for pf-shell nuclei. The problem of the neutron-rich iron-group isotope over-production compared to the solar abundances is shown to be nearly solved with the use of the new rates and explosion model of slow defraglation with delayed detonation. Evaluation of the weak rates is extended to the island of inversion and the region of neutron-rich nuclei near 78Ni, where two major shells contribute to their configurations.

  4. Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Decay Rate Asymmetry of B to D_pi+ pi- pi0 K-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-06-10

    The authors report the observation of the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}}K{sup -}, where D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}} indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, excluding K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. This doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay chain can be used to measure the CKM phase {gamma}. Using about 229 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring, they measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup -}}) = (5.5 {+-} 1.0 (stat.) {+-} 0.7 (syst.)) x 10{sup -6} and the decay rate asymmetry A = -0.02 {+-} 0.16 (stat.) {+-} 0.03 (syst.) for the full decay chain.

  5. Global survey of mRNA levels and decay rates of Chlamydia trachomatis trachoma and lymphogranuloma venereum biovars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Ferreira

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Interpreting the intricate bacterial transcriptomics implies understanding the dynamic relationship established between de novo transcription and the degradation of transcripts. Here, we performed a comparative overview of gene expression levels and mRNA decay rates for different-biovar (trachoma and lymphogranuloma venereum strains of the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. By using RNA-sequencing to measure gene expression levels at mid developmental stage and mRNA decay rates upon rifampicin-based transcription blockage, we observed that: i 60–70% of the top-50 expressed genes encode proteins with unknown function and proteins involved in “Translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis” for all strains; ii the expression ranking by genes' functional categories was in general concordant among different-biovar strains; iii the median of the half-life time (t1/2 values of transcripts were 15–17 min, indicating that the degree of transcripts’ stability seems to correlate with the bacterial intracellular life-style, as these values are considerably higher than the ones observed in other studies for facultative intracellular and free-living bacteria; iv transcript decay rates were highly heterogeneous within each C. trachomatis strain and did not correlate with steady-state expression levels; v only at very few instances (essentially at gene functional category level was possible to unveil dissimilarities potentially underlying phenotypic differences between biovars. In summary, the unveiled transcriptomic scenario, marked by a general lack of correlation between transcript production and degradation and a huge inter-transcript heterogeneity in decay rates, likely reflects the challenges underlying the unique biphasic developmental cycle of C. trachomatis and its intricate interactions with the human host, which probably exacerbate the complexity of the bacterial transcription regulation.

  6. Global survey of mRNA levels and decay rates of Chlamydia trachomatis trachoma and lymphogranuloma venereum biovars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rita; Borges, Vítor; Borrego, Maria José; Gomes, João Paulo

    2017-07-01

    Interpreting the intricate bacterial transcriptomics implies understanding the dynamic relationship established between de novo transcription and the degradation of transcripts. Here, we performed a comparative overview of gene expression levels and mRNA decay rates for different-biovar (trachoma and lymphogranuloma venereum) strains of the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis . By using RNA-sequencing to measure gene expression levels at mid developmental stage and mRNA decay rates upon rifampicin-based transcription blockage, we observed that: i ) 60-70% of the top-50 expressed genes encode proteins with unknown function and proteins involved in "Translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis" for all strains; ii ) the expression ranking by genes' functional categories was in general concordant among different-biovar strains; iii ) the median of the half-life time (t 1/2 ) values of transcripts were 15-17 min, indicating that the degree of transcripts' stability seems to correlate with the bacterial intracellular life-style, as these values are considerably higher than the ones observed in other studies for facultative intracellular and free-living bacteria; iv ) transcript decay rates were highly heterogeneous within each C. trachomatis strain and did not correlate with steady-state expression levels; v ) only at very few instances (essentially at gene functional category level) was possible to unveil dissimilarities potentially underlying phenotypic differences between biovars. In summary, the unveiled transcriptomic scenario, marked by a general lack of correlation between transcript production and degradation and a huge inter-transcript heterogeneity in decay rates, likely reflects the challenges underlying the unique biphasic developmental cycle of C. trachomatis and its intricate interactions with the human host, which probably exacerbate the complexity of the bacterial transcription regulation.

  7. Applications of Rajeval technique for the evaluation of discrepant nuclear decay data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, M.U.

    2006-11-01

    There are 4 levels 95NB below the decay energy in the Adopted Levels of the 93 micro 08 evaluation that are not reported in this decay scheme: these are 730 6 (5/2+), 799 5 (3/2), 1011 8 (5/2), and 1088keV. These levels have only been reported in reaction studies and their lemma decay modes are not known the 730 level would be fed fed by and allowed beta decay, so this evaluator suggests it is actually the 724 level and the J* assignment is incorrect. The failure to observe decays to the possible 799 and 1011 levels is surprising since these would be 1st forbidden decays and from beta decay systematics (73Ra10) could have branches of several percent. Therefore, one must rely on the fact that other lemda rays have not been reported to support the completeness of this scheme. If one leaves the values of 65F102 in the data set, it is desirable to use either the RAJEVAL or Normalized Residual method to treat this discrepancy. The RAJEVAL method increase the uncertainty for the 65F102 value from 0.2 to 0.88 and gives the resulting value of 64.032(6) while the Normalized Residual method increase this uncertainty to 0.58 and give a result of 64.032(6). So, the adopted value is the same for each of these three methods. (author)

  8. AIDA: A 16-channel amplifier ASIC to read out the advanced implantation detector array for experiments in nuclear decay spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, D. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Coleman-Smith, P. J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Davinson, T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I. H. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Page, R. D. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Thomas, S. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    We have designed a read-out ASIC for nuclear decay spectroscopy as part of the AIDA project - the Advanced Implantation Detector Array. AIDA will be installed in experiments at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in GSI, Darmstadt. The AIDA ASIC will measure the signals when unstable nuclei are implanted into the detector, followed by the much smaller signals when the nuclei subsequently decay. Implant energies can be as high as 20 GeV; decay products need to be measured down to 25 keV within just a few microseconds of the initial implants. The ASIC uses two amplifiers per detector channel, one covering the 20 GeV dynamic range, the other selectable over a 20 MeV or 1 GeV range. The amplifiers are linked together by bypass transistors which are normally switched off. The arrival of a large signal causes saturation of the low-energy amplifier and a fluctuation of the input voltage, which activates the link to the high-energy amplifier. The bypass transistors switch on and the input charge is integrated by the high-energy amplifier. The signal is shaped and stored by a peak-hold, then read out on a multiplexed output. Control logic resets the amplifiers and bypass circuit, allowing the low-energy amplifier to measure the subsequent decay signal. We present simulations and test results, demonstrating the AIDA ASIC operation over a wide range of input signals. (authors)

  9. Comment on anomalous dispersion and scattering rates for multiphonon spontaneous decay in He II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haavasoja, T.; Narayanamurti, V.; Chin, M. A.

    1984-10-01

    We report on new measurements of the spontaneous decay threshold energy E c for high-frequency phonon propagation in He II at saturated vapor pressure at T=0.1 K. Superconducting tin tunnel generators and aluminum tunnel detectors were used in this study. The measurements show that the mean free path becomes much larger than the propagation length of 1.1 mm for a value of E c =9.8±0.15 K. This agrees with the value originally reported ( E c =9.5±0.4 K) by Dynes and Narayanamurti using aluminum tunnel generators, but is shown to correspond to the point where the phase velocity equals the sound velocity, when the phonons become stable, as first proposed by Pitayevski and Levinson. Evidence for n-phonon decay at energies lower than E c is presented for n≳2 with a short mean free path (neutron data due to Donnelly, Donnelly, and Hills.

  10. Evidence for CP violation in time-integrated $D^0 \\rightarrow h^-h^+$ decay rates

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koopman, R; Koppenburg, P; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalorav Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    A search for time-integrated $CP$ violation in $D^0 \\rightarrow h^-h^+$ ($h=K$, $\\pi$) decays is presented using 0.62~fb$^{-1}$ of data collected by LHCb in 2011. The flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the slow pion in the $D^{*+} \\rightarrow D^0 \\pi^+$ and $D^{*-} \\rightarrow \\overline{D}^0 \\pi^-$ decay chains. The difference in $CP$ asymmetry between $D^0 \\rightarrow K^- K^+$ and $D^0 \\rightarrow \\pi^- \\pi^+$, $\\Delta A_{CP} \\equiv A_{CP}(K^-K^+) \\, - \\, A_{CP}(\\pi^-\\pi^+)$, is measured to be $\\left[ -0.82 \\pm 0.21 (\\mathrm{stat.}) \\pm 0.11 (\\mathrm{syst.}) \\right]\\%$. This differs from the hypothesis of $CP$ conservation by $3.5$ standard deviations.

  11. Computing decay rates for new physics theories with FEYNRULES and MADGRAPH 5_AMC@NLO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwall, Johan; Duhr, Claude; Fuks, Benjamin; Mattelaer, Olivier; Öztürk, Deniz Gizem; Shen, Chia-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    We present new features of the FEYNRULES and MADGRAPH 5_AMC@NLO programs for the automatic computation of decay widths that consistently include channels of arbitrary final-state multiplicity. The implementations are generic enough so that they can be used in the framework of any quantum field theory, possibly including higher-dimensional operators. We extend at the same time the conventions of the Universal FEYNRULES Output (or UFO) format to include decay tables and information on the total widths. We finally provide a set of representative examples of the usage of the new functions of the different codes in the framework of the Standard Model, the Higgs Effective Field Theory, the Strongly Interacting Light Higgs model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model and compare the results to available literature and programs for validation purposes.

  12. Nuclear fragmentation with secondary decay in the context of conventional percolation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, A.J.

    1989-09-01

    Mass and energy spectra arising from proton-nucleus collisions at energies between 80 and 350 GeV were studied, using the conventional percolation model coupled with secondary decay of the clusters. (L.C.J.A.)

  13. Relative radiative decay rates of vacancies in L-subshells of heavy elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros Leite, C.V. de; Pinho, A.G. de; Castro Faria, N.V. de.

    1977-01-01

    Relative radiative decay of vacancies in L-subshells were measured for a large number of heavy elements with a Si(Li) detection system. A graphical method was employed to analyze the x-ray spectra so obtained. Systematic results are presented together with other already published results obtained in our laboratories in recent years. This covers the interval 74<=Z<=93. Results are compared with theoretical predictions and experimental data from other authors and some general features are noted

  14. Isotensor Axial Polarizability and Lattice QCD Input for Nuclear Double- β Decay Phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanahan, Phiala E.; Tiburzi, Brian C.; Wagman, Michael L.; Winter, Frank; Chang, Emmanuel; Davoudi, Zohreh; Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Savage, Martin J.

    2017-08-01

    The potential importance of short-distance nuclear effects in double-$\\beta$ decay is assessed using a lattice QCD calculation of the $nn\\rightarrow pp$ transition and effective field theory methods. At the unphysical quark masses used in the numerical computation, these effects, encoded in the isotensor axial polarisability, are found to be of similar magnitude to the nuclear modification of the single axial current, which phenomenologically is the quenching of the axial charge used in nuclear many-body calculations. This finding suggests that nuclear models for neutrinoful and neutrinoless double-$\\beta$ decays should incorporate this previously neglected contribution if they are to provide reliable guidance for next-generation neutrinoless double-$\\beta$ decay searches. The prospects of constraining the isotensor axial polarisabilities of nuclei using lattice QCD input into nuclear many-body calculations are discussed.

  15. Work of the IAEA Coordinated Research Programme on the measurement and evaluation of transactinium-isotope nuclear-decay data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, C.W.

    1982-01-01

    In 1977, the IAEA organized a Coordinated Research Program to address the needs for precise actinide-isotope decay data identified at the first Advisory Group Meeting on Transactinium Isotope Nuclear Data, held in Karlsruhe in 1975. During the years of its existence, this CRP has made significant strides toward achieving the goals outlined at Karlsruhe. In this paper, we discuss the make-up of the CRP and its work in the areas of decay-data evaluation and measurement. The objectives of the evaluation effort and some of the results to date are summarized. The measurement activity being carried out within the various participating laboratories is presented. Finally, the significant accomplishments resulting from the work of the CRP participants are discussed, together with those tasks which remain to be done in order to be fully responsive to the goals of the Program as envisioned at Karlsruhe

  16. Reply to ''Comment on enhancement of forbidden nuclear beta decay by high-intensity radio-frequency fields''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    The negative conclusion in the Comment of Becker, Schlicher, and Scully about electromagnetic enhancement of beta decay is shown to be faulty. They have found an algebraic oversight in my paper, but correction of that oversight yields results strongly resembling the original. Becker, Schlicher, and Scully fail to find this. They then conduct an analysis which is highly implicit and incomplete. In attempting to analyze their very complicated expressions they claim not to find significant electromagnetic effects. Yet they also lose completely the electron retardation term of conventional forbidden beta decay. When they attempt to explain the difference between their results and mine, they misconstrue the momentum-translation technique and end up in a logical contradiction. They attempt also to apply a ''no-go'' theorem applicable only to plane-wave particles to my theory, which is built around the use of bound-state nuclear wave functions. This makes the no-go theorem inapplicable

  17. A variable reaction rate model for chlorine decay in drinking water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Pei; Vasyukova, Ekaterina; Uhl, Wolfgang

    2015-05-15

    A second order kinetic model for simulating chlorine decay in bulk water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter (DOM) was developed. It takes into account the decreasing reactivity of dissolved organic matter using a variable reaction rate coefficient (VRRC) which decreases with an increasing conversion. The concentration of reducing species is surrogated by the maximum chlorine demand. Temperature dependency, respectively, is described by the Arrhenius-relationship. The accuracy and adequacy of the proposed model to describe chlorine decay in bulk water were evaluated and shown for very different waters and different conditions such as water mixing or rechlorination by applying statistical tests. It is thus very well suited for application in water quality modeling for distribution systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence factors on etching rate of PET nuclear pore membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Zhenzhong; Wu Zhendong; Liang Haiying; Ju Wei; Chen Dongfeng; Fu Yuanyong; Qu Guopu

    2014-01-01

    Background: The nuclear pore membrane is a kind of liquid filtration material manufactured by irradiation and chemical etching. Various conditions in etch process have a great influence on etch rate. Purpose: The influence factors of concentration and temperature of etch solution and the irradiation energy of heavy ions on etch rate was studied. Methods: Four layers of PET (polyethylene terephthalate) films were stacked together and were irradiated with 140-MeV 32 S ions at room temperature under vacuum conditions. Utilizing conductivity measurement technique, the electrical current changes through the u:radiated PET film were monitored during etching, from which the breakthrough time and therefore the track etching rate was calculated. Results: The results show that there is an exponential correlation between etch rate and temperature, and a linear correlation between etch rate and concentration. The track etching rate increases linearly with energy loss rate. Empirical formula for the bulk etching rate as a function of etchant concentration and temperature was also established via fitting of measurements. Conclusion: It is concluded that by using 1.6-MeV·u -1 32 S ions, PET nuclear pore membrane with cylindrical pore shape can be prepared at 85℃ with etchant concentration of l mol·L -1 . (authors)

  19. Comparison of the predictions of the LQ and CRE models for normal tissue damage due to biologically targeted radiotherapy with exponentially decaying dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donoghue, J.A.; West of Schotland Health Boards, Glasgow

    1989-01-01

    For biologically targeted radiotherapy organ dose rates may be complex functions of time, related to the biodistribution kinetics of the delivery vehicle and radiolabel. The simples situation is where dose rates are exponentially decaying functions of time. Two normal tissue isoeffect models enable the effects of exponentially decaying dose rates to be addressed. These are the extension of the linear-quadratic model and the cumulative radiation effect model. This communication will compare the predictions of these models. (author). 14 refs.; 1 fig

  20. Nuclear-decay studies of neutron-rich rare-earth nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chasteler, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron-rich rare-earth nuclei were produced in multinucleon transfer reactions of 170 Er and 176 Yb projectiles on nat W targets at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory SuperHILAC and their radioactive decays properties studied at the on-line mass separation facility OASIS. Two unknown isotopes, 169 Dy (t 1/2 = 39 ± 8 s) and 174 Er(t 1/2 = 3.3 ± 0.2 m) were discovered and their decay characteristics determined. The decay schemes for two previously identified isotopes, 168 Dy (t 1/2 = 8.8 ± 0.3 m) and 171 Ho (t 1/2 = 55 ± 3 s), were characterized. Evidence for a new isomer of 3.0 m 168 Ho g , 168 Ho m (t 1/2 = 132 ± 4 s) which decays by isomeric transition (IT) is presented. Beta particle endpoint energies were determined for the decay of 168 Ho g , 169 Dy, 171 Ho, and 174 Er, the resulting Qβ-values are: 2.93 ± 0.03, 3.2 ± 0.3, 3.2 ± 0.6, and 1.8 ± 0.2 MeV, respectively. These values were compared with values calculated using recent atomic mass formulae. Comparisons of various target/ion source geometries used in the OASIS mass separator facility for these multinucleon transfer reactions were performed. 73 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs

  1. Nuclear Weak Rates and Detailed Balance in Stellar Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misch, G. Wendell, E-mail: wendell@sjtu.edu, E-mail: wendell.misch@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dong Chuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2017-07-20

    Detailed balance is often invoked in discussions of nuclear weak transitions in astrophysical environments. Satisfaction of detailed balance is rightly touted as a virtue of some methods of computing nuclear transition strengths, but I argue that it need not necessarily be strictly obeyed in astrophysical environments, especially when the environment is far from weak equilibrium. I present the results of shell model calculations of nuclear weak strengths in both charged-current and neutral-current channels at astrophysical temperatures, finding some violation of detailed balance. I show that a slight modification of the technique to strictly obey detailed balance has little effect on the reaction rates associated with these strengths under most conditions, though at high temperature the modified technique in fact misses some important strength. I comment on the relationship between detailed balance and weak equilibrium in astrophysical conditions.

  2. Nuclear effects on bremsstrahlung neutrino rates of astrophysical interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoica, Sabin; Horvath, J.E.

    2002-01-01

    We calculate in this work the rates for the neutrino pair production by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung taking into account the full contribution from a nuclear one-pion-exchange potential. It is shown that if the temperatures are low enough (T≤20 MeV), the integration over the nuclear part can be done for the general case, ranging from the completely degenerate (D) to the nondegenerate (ND) regime. We find that the inclusion of the full nuclear contribution enhances the neutrino pair production by nn and pp bremsstrahlung by a factor of about 2 in both the D and ND limits when compared with previous calculations. This result may be relevant for the physical conditions of interest in the semitransparent regions near the neutrinosphere in type II supernovae, cooling of neutron stars, and other astrophysical situations

  3. High-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy: a versatile tool for nuclear β-decay studies at TRIUMF-ISAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, G. C.; Achtzehn, T.; Albers, D.; Khalili, J. S. Al; Andreoiu, C.; Andreyev, A.; Ashley, S. F.; Austin, R. A. E.; Becker, J. A.; Bricault, P.; Chan, S.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Churchman, R.; Coombes, H.; Cunningham, E. S.; Daoud, J.; Dombsky, M.; Drake, T. E.; Eshpeter, B.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Geppert, C.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hackman, G.; Hanemaayer, V.; Hyland, B.; Jones, G. A.; Koopmans, K. A.; Kulp, W. D.; Lassen, J.; Lavoie, J. P.; Leslie, J. R.; Litvinov, Y.; Macdonald, J. A.; Mattoon, C.; Melconian, D.; Morton, A. C.; Osborne, C. J.; Pearson, C. J.; Pearson, M.; Phillips, A. A.; Ressler, J. J.; Sarazin, F.; Schumaker, M. A.; Schwarzenberg, J.; Scraggs, H. C.; Smith, M. B.; Svensson, C. E.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Waddington, J. C.; Walker, P. M.; Wendt, K.; Williams, S. J.; Wood, J. L.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2005-10-01

    High-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy is essential to fully exploit the unique, high-quality beams available at the next generation of radioactive ion beam facilities such as the TRIUMF isotope separator and accelerator (ISAC). The 8π spectrometer, which consists of 20 Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors, has recently been reconfigured for a vigorous research programme in weak interaction and nuclear structure physics. With the addition of a variety of ancillary detectors it has become the world's most powerful device dedicated to β-decay studies. This paper provides a brief overview of the apparatus and highlights from recent experiments.

  4. On the possibility to measure 0νββ-decay nuclear matrix element for 48Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodin, Vadim

    2011-01-01

    As shown in Ref. [2], the Fermi part M F 0ν of the total 0νββ-decay nuclear matrix element M 0ν can be related to the single Fermi transition matrix element between the isobaric analog state (IAS) of the ground state of the initial nucleus and the ground state of the final nucleus. The latter matrix element could be measured in charge-exchange reactions. Here we discuss a possibility of such a measurement for 48 Ca and estimate the cross-section of the reaction 48 Ti(n,p) 48 Sc(IAS).

  5. Comparisons of experimental beta-ray spectra important to decay heat predictions with ENSDF [Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File] evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.

    1990-03-01

    Graphical comparisons of recently obtained experimental beta-ray spectra with predicted beta-ray spectra based on the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File are exhibited for 77 fission products having masses 79--99 and 130--146 and lifetimes between 0.17 and 23650 sec. The comparisons range from very poor to excellent. For beta decay of 47 nuclides, estimates are made of ground-state transition intensities. For 14 cases the value in ENSDF gives results in very good agreement with the experimental data. 12 refs., 77 figs., 1 tab

  6. Development of an international nuclear decay data and cross-section database. Summary report of an IAEA specialists` meeting, Vienna, 24-28 October 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmel, H D [ed.

    1994-12-01

    An IAEA Specialists` Meeting proposes procedures describing how an internationally accepted database of high-priority nuclear decay data and thermal neutron cross-sections can be developed through a network of experts coordinated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author).

  7. Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators; Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abriola, D.; Tuli, J.

    2009-03-23

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the 18th meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 23 to 27 March 2009. This meeting was attended by 22 scientists from 14 Member States, plus IAEA staff, concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, recommendations/conclusions, data centre reports, and various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants are contained within this document. The International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluators holds biennial meetings under the auspices of the IAEA, and consists of evaluation groups and data service centres in several countries. This network has the objective of providing up-to-date nuclear structure and decay data for all known nuclides by evaluating all existing experimental data. Data resulting from this international evaluation collaboration is included in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets (NDS).

  8. Development of an international nuclear decay data and cross-section database. Summary report of an IAEA specialists' meeting, Vienna, 24-28 October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1994-12-01

    An IAEA Specialists' Meeting proposes procedures describing how an internationally accepted database of high-priority nuclear decay data and thermal neutron cross-sections can be developed through a network of experts coordinated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  9. β-Decay half-lives and nuclear structure of exotic proton-rich waiting point nuclei under rp-process conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Böyükata, Mahmut

    2016-03-01

    We investigate even-even nuclei in the A ∼ 70 mass region within the framework of the proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) and the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1). Our work includes calculation of the energy spectra and the potential energy surfaces V (β , γ) of Zn, Ge, Se, Kr and Sr nuclei with the same proton and neutron number, N = Z. The parametrization of the IBM-1 Hamiltonian was performed for the calculation of the energy levels in the ground state bands. Geometric shape of the nuclei was predicted by plotting the potential energy surfaces V (β , γ) obtained from the IBM-1 Hamiltonian in the classical limit. The pn-QRPA model was later used to compute half-lives of the neutron-deficient nuclei which were found to be in very good agreement with the measured ones. The pn-QRPA model was also used to calculate the Gamow-Teller strength distributions and was found to be in decent agreement with the measured data. We further calculate the electron capture and positron decay rates for these N = Z waiting point (WP) nuclei in the stellar environment employing the pn-QRPA model. For the rp-process conditions, our total weak rates are within a factor two compared with the Skyrme HF +BCS +QRPA calculation. All calculated electron capture rates are comparable to the competing positron decay rates under rp-process conditions. Our study confirms the finding that electron capture rates form an integral part of the weak rates under rp-process conditions and should not be neglected in the nuclear network calculations.

  10. Atomic and nuclear parameters of single electron capture decaying nuclides; Constantes atomicas y nucleares de nucleidos que se desintegran por captura electronica pura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau, A

    1981-07-01

    Atomic and nuclear parameters of the following nuclides which decay by electron capture have been calculated: 37{sup A}r, 41{sup C}a, 49{sup V}, 53{sup M}n, 55{sup F}e,59{sup N}i, 68Ge,82{sup S}r, 97{sup T}c, 118{sup T}e, 131{sup C}s, 137{sup L}a, 140{sup N}d, 157{sup T}b, 165{sup E}r, 193{sup p}t, 194{sup H}g, and 205{sup P}h The evaluation rules are included in the first part of the paper. The values and the associated uncertainties of the following parameters have been tabulated: decay energy, electron capture probabilities, fluorescence yield, electron emission and X-ray emission. (Author) 27 refs.

  11. Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abriola, D.; Tuli, J.K.

    2009-10-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the 18th meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 23 to 27 March 2009. This meeting was attended by 22 scientists from 14 Member States, plus IAEA staff, concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, recommendations/conclusions, data centre reports, and various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants are contained within this document. (author)

  12. Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting on Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abriola, D [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Nichols, A L [Departments of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Tuli, J K [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Brookhaven, Upton, NY (United States)

    2011-10-15

    The 19th meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators was convened at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 4 to 8 April 2011, by the staff members of IAEA, Nuclear Data Section. This meeting was attended by 35 scientists from 20 Member States, plus IAEA staff, concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, data centre reports, various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants, and recommendations/conclusions are presented within this document. (author)

  13. Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting on Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abriola, D.; Nichols, A.L.; Tuli, J.K.

    2011-10-01

    The 19th meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators was convened at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 4 to 8 April 2011, by the staff members of IAEA, Nuclear Data Section. This meeting was attended by 35 scientists from 20 Member States, plus IAEA staff, concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, data centre reports, various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants, and recommendations/conclusions are presented within this document. (author)

  14. Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA technical meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, A L; Tuli, J K [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria)

    2005-09-15

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the 16th meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators at the Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada, 6-10 June 2005. This meeting was attended by 33 scientists from 12 Member States concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, recommendations/conclusions, data centre reports, and various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants are contained within this document. (author)

  15. Estimation of delayed neutron emission probability by using the gross theory of nuclear β-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Takahiro

    1999-01-01

    The delayed neutron emission probabilities (P n -values) of fission products are necessary in the study of reactor physics; e.g. in the calculation of total delayed neutron yields and in the summation calculation of decay heat. In this report, the P n -values estimated by the gross theory for some fission products are compared with experiment, and it is found that, on the average, the semi-gross theory somewhat underestimates the experimental P n -values. A modification of the β-decay strength function is briefly discussed to get more reasonable P n -values. (author)

  16. Nuclear structure effects in the exotic decay of $^{225}$Ac via $^{14}$C emission

    CERN Document Server

    Bonetti, R; Guglielmetti, A; Matheoud, R; Migliorino, C; Pasinetti, A L; Ravn, H L

    1993-01-01

    By using a $^{225}$Ac source produced at the electromagnetic separator Isolde we collected on our track-recording glass detectors 305 $^{14}$C events from the radioactive decays of $^{225}$Ac and its daughter $^{221}$Fr and obtained, for $^{225}$Ac, a branching ratio B($^{14}$C/$\\alpha$)=(6.0 $\\pm$ 1.3) x 10$^{-12}$. Our result suggests that such a decay from an odd proton nucleus is dominated by transition to the ground or to the first excited state of daughter nucleus.

  17. Genetic effects of decay of radionuclides, products of nuclear fission, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, V.G.; Gracheva, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    Decay of 89 Sr incorporated in yeast cells produces a pronounced inactivating effect. The transmutation mainly contributes (about 80%) to cell inactivation. Haploid cells are more sensitive to 89 Sr disintegration than diploid and tetraploid ones. A radiosensitive mutant XRS2, that is particularly sensitive to the transmutation effect of radionuclides, has proved to be sensitive to 89 Sr transmutation as well. At the same time, another radiosensitive mutant, rad 54, does not virtually differ from the wild-type strain by its sensitivity to 89 Sr decay

  18. Radionuclide release rate inversion of nuclear accidents in nuclear facility based on Kalman filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xiuhuan; Bao Lihong; Li Hua; Wan Junsheng

    2014-01-01

    The rapidly and continually back-calculating source term is important for nuclear emergency response. The Gaussian multi-puff atmospheric dispersion model was used to produce regional environment monitoring data virtually, and then a Kalman filter was designed to inverse radionuclide release rate of nuclear accidents in nuclear facility and the release rate tracking in real time was achieved. The results show that the Kalman filter combined with Gaussian multi-puff atmospheric dispersion model can successfully track the virtually stable, linear or nonlinear release rate after being iterated about 10 times. The standard error of inversion results increases with the true value. Meanwhile extended Kalman filter cannot inverse the height parameter of accident release as interceptive error is too large to converge. Kalman filter constructed from environment monitoring data and Gaussian multi-puff atmospheric dispersion model can be applied to source inversion in nuclear accident which is characterized by static height and position, short and continual release in nuclear facility. Hence it turns out to be an alternative source inversion method in nuclear emergency response. (authors)

  19. The Influence of Clay on the Rate of Decay of Amino Acid Metabolites Synthesized in Soils during Decomposition of Cellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1975-01-01

    caused by the treatments in the different soils was, however, not related to the amount of silt + clay, and a high content of this material did not protect organic material against the effect of the treatments. is concluded that the silt + clay fraction ensures stabilization of amino acid metabolites...... produced during the period of intense biological activity that follows the addition of decomposable, energy rich material to the soil. The amount of amino acid metabolites stabilized increased with increasing concentration of silt + clay, but the rate of decay of the amino acid material during later stages......14C-labelled cellulose was added to seven different soils containing silt + clay (particles

  20. Nuclear Structure Effects in the Exotic Decay of $^{225}$Ac via $^{14}$C Emission

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS323 \\\\ \\\\ We propose to build at Isolde a high intensity $^{225}$Ac source by $\\beta$-decay of $^{225}$(Ra+Fr) beam, to be used at the superconducting spectrometer SOLENO of IPN-Orsay in order to study a possible fine structure in the spectrum of $^{14}$C ions spontaneously emitted by $^{225}$Ac.

  1. Survival analysis approach to account for non-exponential decay rate effects in lifetime experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, K.J., E-mail: kevincoakley@nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Dewey, M.S.; Huber, M.G. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8461, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Huffer, C.R.; Huffman, P.R. [North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, 116 Science Drive, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Marley, D.E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8461, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Mumm, H.P. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8461, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); O' Shaughnessy, C.M. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 120 E. Cameron Ave., CB #3255, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, 116 Science Drive, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Schelhammer, K.W. [North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, 116 Science Drive, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Thompson, A.K.; Yue, A.T. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8461, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2016-03-21

    In experiments that measure the lifetime of trapped particles, in addition to loss mechanisms with exponential survival probability functions, particles can be lost by mechanisms with non-exponential survival probability functions. Failure to account for such loss mechanisms produces systematic measurement error and associated systematic uncertainties in these measurements. In this work, we develop a general competing risks survival analysis method to account for the joint effect of loss mechanisms with either exponential or non-exponential survival probability functions, and a method to quantify the size of systematic effects and associated uncertainties for lifetime estimates. As a case study, we apply our survival analysis formalism and method to the Ultra Cold Neutron lifetime experiment at NIST. In this experiment, neutrons can escape a magnetic trap before they decay due to a wall loss mechanism with an associated non-exponential survival probability function.

  2. A Measurement of the Rate of Charm Production in W Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Ainsley, C.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Baumann, S.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauke, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Stumpf, L.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tarem, S.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Toya, D.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Vachon, B.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    Using data recorded at centre-of-mass energies around 183 GeV and 189 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP, the fundamental coupling of the charm quark to the W boson has been studied. The ratio Rc^W = Gamma(W -> cX)/Gamma(W -> hadrons) has been measured from jet properties, lifetime information, and leptons produced in charm decays. A value compatible with the Standard Model expectation of 0.5 is obtained: Rc^W = 0.481 +- 0.042(stat.) +- 0.032(syst.). By combining this result with measurements of the W boson total width and hadronic branching ratio, the magnitude of the CKM matrix element Vcs is determined to be |Vcs| = 0.969 +- 0.058.

  3. Survival analysis approach to account for non-exponential decay rate effects in lifetime experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coakley, K.J.; Dewey, M.S.; Huber, M.G.; Huffer, C.R.; Huffman, P.R.; Marley, D.E.; Mumm, H.P.; O'Shaughnessy, C.M.; Schelhammer, K.W.; Thompson, A.K.; Yue, A.T.

    2016-01-01

    In experiments that measure the lifetime of trapped particles, in addition to loss mechanisms with exponential survival probability functions, particles can be lost by mechanisms with non-exponential survival probability functions. Failure to account for such loss mechanisms produces systematic measurement error and associated systematic uncertainties in these measurements. In this work, we develop a general competing risks survival analysis method to account for the joint effect of loss mechanisms with either exponential or non-exponential survival probability functions, and a method to quantify the size of systematic effects and associated uncertainties for lifetime estimates. As a case study, we apply our survival analysis formalism and method to the Ultra Cold Neutron lifetime experiment at NIST. In this experiment, neutrons can escape a magnetic trap before they decay due to a wall loss mechanism with an associated non-exponential survival probability function.

  4. β-decay properties in the Cs decay chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzoni, G.; Lică, R.; Borge, M. J. G.; Fraile, L. M.; IDS Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    The study of the decay of neutron-rich Cs isotopes has two main objectives: on one side β decay is a perfect tool to access the low-spin structures in the daughter Ba nuclei, where the evolution of octupole deformed shapes can be followed, while, on the other hand, the study of the gross properties of these decays, in terms of decay rates and branching to delayed-neutron emission, are fundamental inputs for the modelling of the r-process in the Rare-Earth Elements peak. Results obtained at CERN-ISOLDE are discussed within this framework and compared to existing data and predictions from state-of-the-art nuclear models.

  5. Measurement of the spin-forbidden decay rate (3s3d)1D2¿(3s3p)3 P2,1 in 24Mg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, K. T.; Jensen, Brian Bak; Ryder, C. P.

    2009-01-01

    We have measured the spin-forbidden decay rate from (3s3d)D12¿(3s3p)P32,1 in M24g atoms trapped in a magneto-optical trap. The total decay rate, summing up both exit channels (3s3p)P31 and (3s3p)P32 , yields 196±10s-1 in excellent agreement with resent relativistic many-body calculations of Porse...

  6. Extracting rephase-invariant CP and CPT violating parameters from asymmetries of time-ordered integrated rates of correlated decays of entangled mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Zhijie; Shi, Yu.

    2012-01-01

    We present a general model-independent formalism of measuring CP and CPT violating parameters through time-ordered integrated rates of correlated decays of C=±1 entangled states of neutral pseudoscalar mesons. We give the general formulae of CP and CPT violating parameters in terms of four measurable asymmetries defined for the time-ordered integrated rates, applicable to all kinds of decay product. Two special cases which are often realized in experiments are discussed specifically. (orig.)

  7. Utility decay rates of T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast based on redox-sensitive paramagnetic nitroxyl contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    The availability and applicability of the combination of paramagnetic nitroxyl contrast agent and T 1 -weighted gradient echo (GE)-based dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement for redox imaging are described. The time courses of T 1 -weighted GE MRI signal intensities according to first-order paramagnetic loss of a nitroxyl contrast agent were simulated for several experimental conditions. The apparent decay rate calculated based on decreasing T 1 -weighted MRI contrast (k MRI ) can show an approximate value of the original decay rate (k true ) discretionarily given for simulation with suitable experimental parameters. The difference between k MRI and k true can be sufficiently small under T 1 -weighted spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) scan conditions (repetition time=75 ms, echo time=3 ms, and flip angle=45deg), with a conventional redox-sensitive nitroxyl contrast agent, such as 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6,-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL) and/or 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-N-oxyl (carbamoyl-PROXYL), and with intravenous (i.v.) doses of below 1.5 γmol/g body weight (b.w.) for mice. The results of this simulation suggest that the k MRI of nitroxyl contrast agents can be the primary index of redox status under biological conditions. (author)

  8. Between atomic and nuclear physics: radioactive decays of highly-charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atanasov, Dinko; Bosch, Fritz; Brandau, Carsten; Chen, Xiangcheng; Dillmann, Iris; Gao, Bingshui; Geissel, Hans; Hagmann, Siegbert; Hillenbrand, Pierre-Michel; Kozhuharov, Christophor; Litvinov, Sergey A; Litvinov, Yuri A; Münzenberg, Gottfried; Blaum, Klaus; Bühler, Paul; Faestermann, Thomas; Gernhäuser, Roman; Izumikawa, Takuji; Kurcewicz, Jan; Ma, Xinwen

    2015-01-01

    Highly charged radioactive ions can be stored for extended periods of time in storage rings which allows for precision measurements of their decay modes. The straightforward motivation for performing such studies is that fully ionised nuclei or few-electron ions can be viewed as clean quantum-mechanical systems, in which the interactions of the many electrons can be either excluded or treated precisely. Thus, the influence of the electron shell on the decay probability can be investigated. Another important motivation is stellar nucleosynthesis, which proceeds at high temperatures and the involved atoms are therefore highly ionised. Presented here is a compact review of the relevant experiments conducted at heavy-ion storage rings. Furthermore, we outline the perspectives for future experiments at new-generation storage-ring facilities. (paper)

  9. Evidence for the emission of a massive neutrino in nuclear beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, E.B.; Sur, B.; Lesko, K.T.; Larimer, R.M.; Witort, J.T.; Haller, E.E.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA

    1990-10-01

    We have studied the β-spectrum of 14 C using a germanium detector containing a crystal with 14 C dissolved in it. We find a feature in the β-spectrum 17 keV below the endpoint which can be explained by the hypothesis that there is a heavy neutrino emitted in the β-decay of 14 C with a mass of 17 ± 2 keV and an emission probability of 1.40 ± 0.45%. In addition, we have studied the inner bremsstrahlung spectrum of 55 Fe and also find indications of the emission of a ∼ 17-keV neutrino. These results are consistent with observations of similar anomalies in the β-decays of 3 H and 35 S. 29 refs., 7 figs

  10. Fission yields data generation and benchmarks of decay heat estimation of a nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Choong-Sup; Kim, Do Heon; Yoo, Jae Kwon; Lee, Jounghwa

    2017-09-01

    Fission yields data with the ENDF-6 format of 235U, 239Pu, and several actinides dependent on incident neutron energies have been generated using the GEF code. In addition, fission yields data libraries of ORIGEN-S, -ARP modules in the SCALE code, have been generated with the new data. The decay heats by ORIGEN-S using the new fission yields data have been calculated and compared with the measured data for validation in this study. The fission yields data ORIGEN-S libraries based on ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.1, and JENDL/FPY-2011 have also been generated, and decay heats were calculated using the ORIGEN-S libraries for analyses and comparisons.

  11. Nuclear transparency, B physics, and double beta decay. Annual report, February 1, 1996 - January 31, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, H.W.

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the publication of results of a search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of molybdenum 100 and preparation of a paper on statistical analysis techniques used, developments related to purification techniques for the molybdenum, and other related work; progress in redesign, rebuilding, and installation of the Brookhaven EVA detector's superconducting magnet and cryogenic system; and the testing of detector components for SLAC's BaBar experiment. 3 refs

  12. Report on the workshop "Decay spectroscopy at CARIBU: advanced fuel cycle applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics". 14-16 April 2011, Argonne National Laboratory, USA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondev, F.; Carpenter, M.P.; Chowdhury, P.; Clark, J.A.; Lister, C.J.; Nichols, A.L.; Swewryniak, D. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (Univ. of Massachusetts); (Univ. of Surrey)

    2011-10-06

    A workshop on 'Decay Spectroscopy at CARIBU: Advanced Fuel Cycle Applications, Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics' will be held at Argonne National Laboratory on April 14-16, 2011. The aim of the workshop is to discuss opportunities for decay studies at the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS facility with emphasis on advanced fuel cycle (AFC) applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics research. The workshop will consist of review and contributed talks. Presentations by members of the local groups, outlining the status of relevant in-house projects and availabile equipment, will also be organized. time will also be set aside to discuss and develop working collaborations for future decay studies at CARIBU. Topics of interest include: (1) Decay data of relevance to AFC applications with emphasis on reactor decay heat; (2) Discrete high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy following radioactive decya and related topics; (3) Calorimetric studies of neutron-rich fission framgents using Total ABsorption Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (TAGS) technique; (4) Beta-delayed neutron emissions and related topics; and (5) Decay data needs for nuclear astrophysics.

  13. Determination of the disintegration rate and gamma emission probabilities per decay of 182 Ta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Eliezer Antonio da

    2008-01-01

    In this work the procedure developed for the standardization of 182 Ta sources produced by irradiation at the IPEN IEA-R1 research reactor is presented. The 182 Ta decays with a half-life of 114 days by β - emission, populating the excited levels of 182 W. It emits gamma rays with several energies mainly between 31 keV and 264 keV and between 1001 keV and 1453 keV. The measurements were performed in a 4πβ-γ coincidence system by using the extrapolation technique. The coincidence system is composed of a 4 π proportional counter coupled to a NaI(Tl) cristal. The measurements were undertaken selecting two windows in the γ-channel, in order to check the consistency of the results. A Monte Carlo calculation was performed in order to predict the behavior of the observed activity as a function of 4πβ the detector efficiency and the results were compared to experimental values. The most intense gamma-ray emission probabilities of 182 Ta were determined by means of an HPGe gamma spectrometer, the germanium efficiency curve was obtained by using sources 152 Eu, 241 Am, 60 Co, 133 Ba and 166m Ho standardized in a primary system. The uncertainties involved in the measurements were treated by the covariance methodology. The results obtained are in good agreement with the experimental uncertainty compared with literature values. (author)

  14. Experimental validation of the decay power calculation code and nuclear databases - FISPACT-97 and EAF-97 and FENDL/A-2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sublet, J.

    1998-01-01

    The calculation of activation inventories is a key input to virtually all aspects of the safety and environmental assessment of fusion power devices, such as ITER. For the licensing of such devices, regulatory authorities will require proof that the calculations of activation, and calculations to which activation quantities are inputs, are either correct or conservative. An important aspect of activation is decay heat power. In fusion power plants, decay power arises after shutdown from the energy released in the decay of the products of neutron activation, mainly from gamma and beta rays. Computation of the decay power is performed by sophisticated computer codes which solve the large number of coupled differential equations which govern the generation and decay chains for the many nuclides involved. They rely on a large volume of nuclear data, both neutron activation cross-sections and radioactive decay data. Validation of decay power code predictions by means of direct comparison with integral data measurements of sample structural materials under fusion-typical neutron spectra generates confidence in the decay power values calculated. It also permits an assessment of the adequacy of the methods and nuclear data and indicates any inaccuracy or omission that may have led to erroneous results. No experimental data on decay power existed for fusion reactor structural materials and irradiation conditions before a series of experiments were performed using the Fusion Neutron Source FNS facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute JAERI. Fusion relevant material samples were irradiated in a simulated D-T neutron field for times up to 7 hours and the decay power so generated measured for cooling times up to three months. Using the highly sensitive Whole Energy Absorption Spectrometer (WEAS) method, both β and γ rays decay energies were measured at selected cooling times as early as one minute after the irradiation ended. Coupled to the experiments, and at

  15. NESSY, a relational PC database for nuclear structure and decay data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boboshin, I.N.; Varlamov, V.V.; Trukhanov, S.K.

    1994-11-01

    The universal relational database NESSY (New ENSDF Search SYstem) based on the international ENSDF system (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File) is described. NESSY, which was developed for IBM compatible PC, provides high efficiency processing of ENSDF information for searches and retrievals of nuclear physics data. The principle of the database development and examples of applications are presented. (author)

  16. Sensitivity tests on the rates of the excited states of positron decays during the rapid proton capture process of the one-zone X-ray burst model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Rita

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the sensitivities of positron decays on a one-zone model of type-I X-ray bursts. Most existing studies have multiplied or divided entire beta decay rates (electron captures and beta decay rates) by 10. Instead of using the standard Fuller & Fowler (FFNU) rates, we used the most recently developed weak library rates [1], which include rates from Langanke et al.'s table (the LMP table) (2000) [2], Langanke et al.'s table (the LMSH table) (2003) [3], and Oda et al.'s table (1994) [4] (all shell model rates). We then compared these table rates with the old FFNU rates [5] to study differences within the final abundances. Both positron decays and electron capture rates were included in the tables. We also used pn-QRPA rates [6,7] to study the differences within the final abundances. Many of the positron rates from the nuclei's ground states and initial excited energy states along the rapid proton capture (rp) process have been measured in existing studies. However, because temperature affects the rates of excited states, these studies should have also acknowledged the half-lives of the nuclei's excited states. Thus, instead of multiplying or dividing entire rates by 10, we studied how the half-lives of sensitive nuclei in excited states affected the abundances by dividing the half-lives of the ground states by 10, which allowed us to set the half-lives of the excited states. Interestingly, we found that the peak of the final abundance shifted when we modified the rates from the excited states of the 105Sn positron decay rates. Furthermore, the abundance of 80Zr also changed due to usage of pn-QRPA rates instead of weak library rates (the shell model rates).

  17. A measurement of the 2 neutrino double beta decay rate of Te-130 in the CUORICINO experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogler, Laura K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-11-30

    CUORICINO was a cryogenic bolometer experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay and other rare processes, including double beta decay with two neutrinos (2vββ). The experiment was located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and ran for a period of about 5 years, from 2003 to 2008. The detector consisted of an array of 62 TeO2 crystals arranged in a tower and operated at a temperature of 10 mK. Events depositing energy in the detectors, such as radioactive decays or impinging particles, produced thermal pulses in the crystals which were read out using sensitive thermistors. The experiment included 4 enriched crystals, 2 enriched with 130Te and 2 with 128Te, in order to aid in the measurement of the 2vββ rate. The enriched crystals contained a total of 350 g 130Te. The 128-enriched (130-depleted) crystals were used as background monitors, so that the shared backgrounds could be subtracted from the energy spectrum of the 130- enriched crystals. Residual backgrounds in the subtracted spectrum were fit using spectra generated by Monte-Carlo simulations of natural radioactive contaminants located in and on the crystals. The 2vββ half-life was measured to be T2v1/2 = [9.81± 0.96(stat)± 0.49(syst)] x1020 y.

  18. Review of oxidation rates of DOE spent nuclear fuel : Part 1 : nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    The long-term performance of Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a mined geologic disposal system depends highly on fuel oxidation and subsequent radionuclide release. The oxidation rates of nuclear fuels are reviewed in this two-volume report to provide a baseline for comparison with release rate data and technical rationale for predicting general corrosion behavior of DOE SNF. The oxidation rates of nuclear fuels in the DOE SNF inventory were organized according to metallic, Part 1, and non-metallic, Part 2, spent nuclear fuels. This Part 1 of the report reviews the oxidation behavior of three fuel types prototypic of metallic fuel in the DOE SNF inventory: uranium metal, uranium alloys and aluminum-based dispersion fuels. The oxidation rates of these fuels were evaluated in oxygen, water vapor, and water. The water data were limited to pure water corrosion as this represents baseline corrosion kinetics. Since the oxidation processes and kinetics discussed in this report are limited to pure water, they are not directly applicable to corrosion rates of SNF in water chemistry that is significantly different (such as may occur in the repository). Linear kinetics adequately described the oxidation rates of metallic fuels in long-term corrosion. Temperature dependent oxidation rates were determined by linear regression analysis of the literature data. As expected the reaction rates of metallic fuels dramatically increase with temperature. The uranium metal and metal alloys have stronger temperature dependence than the aluminum dispersion fuels. The uranium metal/water reaction exhibited the highest oxidation rate of the metallic fuel types and environments that were reviewed. Consequently, the corrosion properties of all DOE SNF may be conservatively modeled as uranium metal, which is representative of spent N-Reactor fuel. The reaction rate in anoxic, saturated water vapor was essentially the same as the water reaction rate. The long-term intrinsic

  19. Plutonium Discharge Rates and Spent Nuclear Fuel Inventory Estimates for Nuclear Reactors Worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian K. Castle; Shauna A. Hoiland; Richard A. Rankin; James W. Sterbentz

    2012-09-01

    This report presents a preliminary survey and analysis of the five primary types of commercial nuclear power reactors currently in use around the world. Plutonium mass discharge rates from the reactors’ spent fuel at reload are estimated based on a simple methodology that is able to use limited reactor burnup and operational characteristics collected from a variety of public domain sources. Selected commercial reactor operating and nuclear core characteristics are also given for each reactor type. In addition to the worldwide commercial reactors survey, a materials test reactor survey was conducted to identify reactors of this type with a significant core power rating. Over 100 material or research reactors with a core power rating >1 MW fall into this category. Fuel characteristics and spent fuel inventories for these material test reactors are also provided herein.

  20. Roles of configuration mixing and exchange currents in nuclear magnetic moments and beta decays. Chapter 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arima, A.; Hyuga, H.

    1979-01-01

    The authors review systematically several important mechanisms which affect magnetic moments, magnetic dipole transitions and allowed beta-decays. They are first order configuration mixing, second order configuration mixing, the Sachs moment and other exchange magnetic moments, the contribution of the Sachs moment and other exchange magnetic moments with first order configuration mixing. It is shown that first order configuration mixing and the Sachs moment are important for heavy nuclei, and that all the effects except first order mixing are important for light nuclei. (Auth.)

  1. Nuclear Fusion Rate Study of a Muonic Molecule via Nuclear Threshold Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, F.; Eskandari, M. R.

    This work follows our previous calculations of the ground state binding energy, size, and the effective nuclear charge of the muonic T3 molecule, using the Born-Oppenheimer adiabatic approximation. In our past articles, we showed that the system possesses two minimum positions, the first one at the muonic distance and the second at the atomic distance. Also, the symmetric planner vibrational model assumed between the two minima and the approximated potential were calculated. Following from the previous studies, we now calculate the fusion rate of the T3 muonic molecule according to the overlap integral of the resonance nuclear compound nucleus and the molecular wave functions.

  2. Joint Inversion of Gravity and Gravity Tensor Data Using the Structural Index as Weighting Function Rate Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ialongo, S.; Cella, F.; Fedi, M.; Florio, G.

    2011-12-01

    Most geophysical inversion problems are characterized by a number of data considerably higher than the number of the unknown parameters. This corresponds to solve highly underdetermined systems. To get a unique solution, a priori information must be therefore introduced. We here analyze the inversion of the gravity gradient tensor (GGT). Previous approaches to invert jointly or independently more gradient components are by Li (2001) proposing an algorithm using a depth weighting function and Zhdanov et alii (2004), providing a well focused inversion of gradient data. Both the methods give a much-improved solution compared with the minimum length solution, which is invariably shallow and not representative of the true source distribution. For very undetermined problems, this feature is due to the role of the depth weighting matrices used by both the methods. Recently, Cella and Fedi (2011) showed however that for magnetic and gravity data the depth weighting function has to be defined carefully, under a preliminary application of Euler Deconvolution or Depth from Extreme Point methods, yielding the appropriate structural index and then using it as the rate decay of the weighting function. We therefore propose to extend this last approach to invert jointly or independently the GGT tensor using the structural index as weighting function rate decay. In case of a joint inversion, gravity data can be added as well. This multicomponent case is also relevant because the simultaneous use of several components and gravity increase the number of data and reduce the algebraic ambiguity compared to the inversion of a single component. The reduction of such ambiguity was shown in Fedi et al, (2005) decisive to get an improved depth resolution in inverse problems, independently from any form of depth weighting function. The method is demonstrated to synthetic cases and applied to real cases, such as the Vredefort impact area (South Africa), characterized by a complex density

  3. Measurement of the shape of the Lambda(0)(b) ->+ Lambda(+)(c) mu(-)(nu)over-bar mu differential decay rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alfonso Albero, A.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Romeu, J. Arnau; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Baranov, A.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baryshnikov, F.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Beiter, A.; Bel, L. J.; Beliy, N.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Beranek, S.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Berninghoff, D.; Bertholet, E.; Bertolin, A.; Betancourt, C.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjoern, M. B.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Borysova, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brundu, D.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Byczynski, W.; Cadeddu, S.; Cai, H.; Calabrese, R.; Calladine, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. H. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Chamont, D.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Cheung, S. F.; Chitic, S. -G.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Chubykin, A.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Colombo, T.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Sobral, C. M. Costa; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; Davis, A.; Francisco, O. De Aguiar; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Del Buono, L.; Dembinski, H. -P.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Douglas, L.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Deleage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Federici, L.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez, G.; Declara, P. Fernandez; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Lima, V. Franco; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Funk, W.; Furfaro, E.; Farber, C.; Gabriel, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Govorkova, E.; Grabowski, J. P.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greim, R.; Grillo, L.; Gruber, L.; Cazon, B. R. Gruberg; Gruenberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Gobel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hancock, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.; Hecker, M.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, P. H.; Huard, Z. -C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Kopecna, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Lefevre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Lionetto, F.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Macko, V.; Maddock, B.; Maddrell-Mander, S.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Maisuzenko, D.; Majewski, M. W.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Marangotto, D.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marinangeli, M.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurice, E.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; Mcnab, A.; McNulty, R.; Mead, J. V.; Meadows, B.; Meaux, C.; Meier, F.; Meinert, N.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Millard, E.; Minard, M. -N.; Minzoni, L.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morello, M. J.; Morgunova, O.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mussini, M.; Mueller, D.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nogay, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Ossowska, A.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Placinta, V.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Lener, M. Poli; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Ponce, S.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Pullen, H.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Quintana, B.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Ratnikov, F.; Raven, G.; Salzgeber, M. Ravonel; Reboud, M.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Lopez, J. A. Rodriguez; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Ruiz Vidal, J.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Gonzalo, D.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarpis, G.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schreiner, H. F.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Siddi, B. G.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Soares Lavra, L.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevens, H.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; Szymanski, M.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R.; Tournefier, E.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagner, A.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Verlage, T. A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Barbosa, J. V. Viana; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Viemann, H.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vitti, M.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Winn, M. A.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Yin, H.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhukov, V.; Zonneveld, J. B.; Zucchelli, S.

    2017-01-01

    A measurement of the shape of the differential decay rate and the associated Isgur-Wise function for the decay Λ 0 b→Λ + cμ− ¯ νμ is reported, using data corresponding to 3  fb−1 collected with the LHCb detector in proton-proton collisions. The Λ + cμ− ¯ νμ(+anything) final states are reconstructed

  4. Apparatus and method for depressurizing, degassing, and affording decay of the radioactivity of weakly radioactive condensates in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.; Plotz, J.

    1976-01-01

    Described is an apparatus for depressurizing, degassing and affording decay of weakly radioactive condensates in nuclear power plants having a turbine and a main condenser turbine wherein exhaust steam of the turbine is condensed and forms a main condensate, and includes a collecting tank for the condensate situated below the condenser. A plurality of horizontal degassing channels, each having a lateral overflow, are disposed in the upper part of the condensate collecting tank and are filled with the main condensate up to the level of the overflow. At least one feedwater preheater which is heated by bleeder steam from the turbine provides a secondary condensate. Below the overflow height of the degassing channels extend horizontal feed pipes for the secondary condensate. The feed pipes are connected to the output of pressure relieving expanding devices and are provided on their underside with discharge openings for the bubbling of the secondary condensate into the main condensate to thereby degass the main condensate. The condensate collecting tank has mutually offset partitions therein providing an adequately long path for the decay of the main and secondary condensates. The condensate which is discharged from the condensate collecting tank is returned into the cycle as feedwater. Also disclosed is a method of operating the foregoing apparatus

  5. ORIGEN2.1 Cycle Specific Calculation of Krsko Nuclear Power Plant Decay Heat and Core Inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, J.; Grgic, D.; Konjarek, D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents ORIGEN2.1 computer code calculation of Krsko Nuclear Power Plant core for Cycle 24. The isotopic inventory, core activity and decay heat are calculated in one run for the entire core using explicit depletion and decay of each fuel assembly. Separate pre-ori application which was developed is utilized to prepare corresponding ORIGEN2.1 inputs. This application uses information on core loading pattern to determine fuel assembly specific depletion history using 3D burnup which is obtained from related PARCS computer code calculation. That way both detailed single assembly calculations as well as whole core inventory calculations are possible. Because of the immense output of the ORIGEN2.1, another application called post-ori is used to retrieve and plot any calculated property on the basis of nuclide, element, summary isotope or group of elements for activation products, actinides and fission products segments. As one additional possibility, with the post-ori application it is able to calculate radiotoxicity from calculated ORIGEN2.1 inventory. The results which are obtained using the calculation model of ORIGEN2.1 computer code are successfully compared against corresponding ORIGEN-S computer code results.(author).

  6. Device for measuring flow rate in a nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamano, Jiro.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To always calculate core flow rate automatically and accurately in BWR type nuclear power plants. Constitution: Jet pumps are provided to the recycling pump and to the inside of the pressure vessel of a nuclear reactor. The jet pumps comprise a plurality of calibrated jet pumps for forcively convecting the coolants and a plurality of not calibrated jet pumps in order to cool the heat generated in the reactor core. The difference in the pressures between the upper and the lower portions in both of the jet pumps is measured by difference pressure transducers. Further, a thermo-sensitive element is provided to measure the temperature of recycling water at the inlet of the recycling pump. The output signal from the difference pressure transducer is inputted to a process computer, calculated periodically based on predetermined calculation equations, compensated for the temperature by a recycling water temperature signal and outputted as a core flow rate signal to a recoder. The signal is also used for the power distribution calculation in the process computer and the minimum limit power ratio as the thermal limit value for the fuels is outputted. (Furukawa, Y.)

  7. Exponential decay and exponential recovery of modal gains in high count rate channel electron multipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, S.F.; Burch, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    A series of data on high count rate channel electron multipliers revealed an initial drop and subsequent recovery of gains in exponential fashion. The FWHM of the pulse height distribution at the initial stage of testing can be used as a good criterion for the selection of operating bias voltage of the channel electron multiplier

  8. Thermal decay rate of a metastable state with two degrees of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I I Gontchar

    2017-06-01

    Jun 1, 2017 ... expected to agree with the long time limit of the escape rate obtained using ..... distribution with zero averages and variances equal to 2. Although in the fission ... Here (t) is the probability that the metastable state has ..... the (kt)−1/2 dependence and has been adjusted to εR at some intermediate points.

  9. Report on the IAEA coordinated research program on the measurement and evaluation of transactinium isotope nuclear decay data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    As one result of the First IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on Transactinium Isotope Nuclear Data, held in November 1975 at Karlsruhe, an IAEA Coordinated Research Program was set up to address certain identified actinide-isotope decay-data needs in reactor technology. At present, laboratories from five nations are involved in this effort. This paper gives an overview of this program, including its origin and the present status of the measurements being carried out. The current status of the actinide-nuclide half-life, spontaneous-fission branching ratio, α-intensity and γ-intensity data of concern to the Coordinated Research Program is presented and briefly discussed. 3 figures, 9 tables

  10. Co-ordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA technical meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronyaev, V G; Nichols, A L; Tuli, J [eds.

    2004-03-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the 15th meeting of the Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 10-14 November 2003. This meeting was attended by 23 scientists from 11 Member States concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, the recommendations, data centre reports and the various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants are contained within this document. Nuclear data are essential to the development, implementation and maintenance of all nuclear technologies. The international network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluators is sponsored by the IAEA, and consists of evaluation groups and data service centers in several countries. This network has the objective of providing up-to-date nuclear structure and decay data for all known nuclides by evaluating all existing experimental data. Data resulting from this international evaluation collaboration is included in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets. The results represent the recommended 'best values' for the various nuclear structure and decay data parameters. Recommended values are made available to users by means of various media, such as the world wide web, CD-ROMs, wall charts of the nuclides, handbooks, nuclear wallet cards and others. Participants discussed a wide range of technical matters, and the recommendations of improving the quality of NSDD evaluations. A list of actions was also prepared for implementation during the course of the next two years. NSDD members prepared many recommendations for the IAEA and the major evaluation centers, which are aimed at improving the technical support towards the network and streamlining the organization of work. These consensus conclusions include: the development and exchange of programming products; revision of

  11. 3D representation of radioisotopic dose rates within nuclear plants for improved radioprotection and plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vabo, Rune; Rindahl, Grete; Piotrowski, Leon

    2010-01-01

    A better awareness of the origin and nature of gamma doses in nuclear environments is demonstrated by visualizing the dose maps created by individual radionucleides that are present in radioactive contaminations. This isotopic representation of doses is much more informative than showing a map of the measured total doses. Two practical examples are given : (a) the placing of protections, and (b) using radiation decay to help plan dismantling operations. The necessary radionucleide information can be easily obtained by the new EDF CZT gamma spectrometer that is now used by all its NPPs. Defining radioactive sources based on such information enables the reconstruction of the radiation situation in a virtual 3-D environment. In such a virtual environment, dose rates can be calculated in any position in space and information about how much each radionucleide contributes can be extracted. Such 3D visualisations increase the awareness and knowledge of the distribution of radiation in a nuclear facility and can be considered as an educational tool for training and improved ALARA procedures. (author)

  12. Measurement of J/ψ→γη{sub c} decay rate and η{sub c} parameters at KEDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anashin, V.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Lavrentiev prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Aulchenko, V.M.; Baldin, E.M. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Lavrentiev prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova street, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Barladyan, A.K. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Lavrentiev prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Barnyakov, A.Yu.; Barnyakov, M.Yu.; Baru, S.E. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Lavrentiev prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova street, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Basok, I.Yu.; Bedny, I.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Lavrentiev prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Blinov, A.E. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Lavrentiev prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova street, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Blinov, V.E. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Lavrentiev prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova street, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20, Karl Marx prospect, Novosibirsk, 630092 (Russian Federation); Bobrov, A.V.; Bobrovnikov, V.S. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Lavrentiev prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Bogomyagkov, A.V.; Bondar, A.E. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Lavrentiev prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova street, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Buzykaev, A.R. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Lavrentiev prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); and others

    2014-11-10

    Using the inclusive photon spectrum based on a data sample collected at the J/ψ peak with the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M e{sup +}e{sup −} collider, we measured the rate of the radiative decay J/ψ→γη{sub c} as well as η{sub c} mass and width. Taking into account an asymmetric photon lineshape we obtained Γ{sub γη{sub c}{sup 0}}=2.98±0.18{sub −0.33}{sup +0.15}keV, M{sub η{sub c}}=2983.5±1.4{sub −3.6}{sup +1.6}MeV/c{sup 2}, Γ{sub η{sub c}}=27.2±3.1{sub −2.6}{sup +5.4}MeV.

  13. The Decay of Communism: Managing Spent Nuclear Fuel in the Soviet Union, 1937-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegselius, Per

    2010-09-01

    The historical evolution of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) decision-making in Western Europe and North America is already fairly well-known. For the former socialist countries of Eastern Europe, and in particular the Soviet Union, we know less. There have recently been several good studies of Soviet nuclear power history (e.g. Schmid 2004, 2006, Josephson 2005), but none of them has gone into any depth when it comes to SNF, but rather focused on nuclear power reactors, public acceptance, the role of the media, etc. There are also several good overviews available that problematize the radioactive legacy of the Soviet Union, including the SNF and waste issue, but these studies do not address the historical dynamics and evolution of SNF management over a longer period of time; in other words, they fail to explain how and why the present state of affairs have actually come into being. The aim of this paper is to provide historical insight into the dynamics of SNF decision-making in the Soviet Union, from the origins of nuclear engineering in the 1930s to the collapse of the country in 1991. The nuclear fuel system can be described as a large technical system with a variety of interrelated components. The system is 'large' both because it involves key links between geographically disperse activities, and because it involves a variety of technologies, organizations and people that influence the dynamics and evolution of the system. Soviet SNF history is of particular interest in this context, with a nuclear fuel system that was the most complex in the world. The USSR was a pioneer within nuclear power and developed a variety of reactor designs and technologies for uranium mining, conversion and enrichment, as well as for transport, treatment, storage and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. It explored both military and civil uses of the atom, and an enormous amount of people and organizations were involved in realizing highly ambitious nuclear programmes. The USSR is of

  14. The Decay of Communism: Managing Spent Nuclear Fuel in the Soviet Union, 1937-1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoegselius, Per (History of Science and Technology, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)), e-mail: perho@kth.se

    2010-09-15

    The historical evolution of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) decision-making in Western Europe and North America is already fairly well-known. For the former socialist countries of Eastern Europe, and in particular the Soviet Union, we know less. There have recently been several good studies of Soviet nuclear power history (e.g. Schmid 2004, 2006, Josephson 2005), but none of them has gone into any depth when it comes to SNF, but rather focused on nuclear power reactors, public acceptance, the role of the media, etc. There are also several good overviews available that problematize the radioactive legacy of the Soviet Union, including the SNF and waste issue, but these studies do not address the historical dynamics and evolution of SNF management over a longer period of time; in other words, they fail to explain how and why the present state of affairs have actually come into being. The aim of this paper is to provide historical insight into the dynamics of SNF decision-making in the Soviet Union, from the origins of nuclear engineering in the 1930s to the collapse of the country in 1991. The nuclear fuel system can be described as a large technical system with a variety of interrelated components. The system is 'large' both because it involves key links between geographically disperse activities, and because it involves a variety of technologies, organizations and people that influence the dynamics and evolution of the system. Soviet SNF history is of particular interest in this context, with a nuclear fuel system that was the most complex in the world. The USSR was a pioneer within nuclear power and developed a variety of reactor designs and technologies for uranium mining, conversion and enrichment, as well as for transport, treatment, storage and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. It explored both military and civil uses of the atom, and an enormous amount of people and organizations were involved in realizing highly ambitious nuclear programmes. The USSR is

  15. Intermediate nuclear structure for 2ν2β decay of 48Ca studied by (p, n) and (n, p) reactions at 300 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, H.; Yako, K.

    2009-01-01

    The two neutrino double beta (2ν2β) decay proceeds through a sequence of Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions, namely from the parent nucleus to the intermediate nucleus and then from the intermediate nucleus to the final daughter nucleus. The nuclear matrix element M 2ν for the 2ν2β - decay thus consists of the 2β - decay matrix elements for the parent nucleus decay and the 2β - decay matrix elements for the intermediate nucleus decay. These 2β - decay matrix elements can be studied experimentally through the (p, n) reaction for the parent nucleus decay and the (n, p) reaction for the intermediate nucleus decay. The 2ν2β-decay nucleus, 4 8C a is studied. The charge exchange (p, n) and (n, p) measurements at 300 MeV were performed using the neutron time-of-flight facility and the (n,p) facility, respectively, at RCNP. The (p, n) measurement on 4 8C a and the (n,p) measurement on 4 8T i provided us, for the first time, reliable B(GT - ) and B(GT + ) strength distributions up to high excitation energy of 30 MeV of the intermediate nucleus 4 8S c. The multipole decomposition analysis was applied to the angular distributions of the cross section spectra to extract the ΔL = 0 components, which are used to deduce B(GT ± ). Figure shows the double differential cross Nb sections for 4 8C a(p, n)4 8S c (left panel) and 4 8T i(n,p)4 8S c (right panel) reactions. The histograms show the results of the multi-pole decomposition analyses. It is very surprising to find sizable amount of ΔL = 0 yield, i.e. B(GT + ) strength in the highly excited energy region (> 10 MeV). The obtained B(GT ± ) distribution in 4 8S c as well as corresponding nuclear matrix elements M 2ν are compared with theoretical shell model calculation. In this talk, new results will be presented and their implication to the nuclear matrix elements for the 2ν2β-decay will be discussed (author)

  16. Back decay of muonic molecular resonances and the measured value of dμd - formation rate in muon-catalyzed fusion in deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gula, A.; Adamczak, A.; Bubak, M.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the experimental values of dμd formation rate, obtained without taking into account the decay of the μ-molecular resonance compound [(dμd) + dee] * back to the formation channel dμ+D 2 , are underestimated.The correction depends on the rate of this resonance back decay and the rates of processes leading to fusion in dμd. For their current estimates the correction significantly exceeds the experimental error of the uncorrected dμd formation rate λ m obs = 2.76 ± 0.08 μs -1 reported recently. It is argued that back decay may lead to variation of λ m obs with target density which may provide useful information on the parameters of muon-catalyzed fusion. 18 refs., 2 figs. (author)

  17. Radiation dose rates from adult patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountford, P.J.; O'Doherty, M.J.; Forge, N.I.; Jeffries, A.; Coakley, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Adult patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations may subsequently come into close contact with members of the public and hospital staff. In order to expand the available dosimetry and derive appropriate recommendations, dose rates were measured at 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 m from 80 adult patients just before they left the nuclear medicine department after undergoing one of eight 99 Tc m studies, an 123 I thyroid, an 111 In leucocyte or a 201 Tl cardiac scan. The maximum departure dose rates at these distances of 150, 30 and 7.3 μSv h -1 were greater than those found in similar published studies of adult and paediatric patients. To limit the dose to an infant to less than 1 mSv, an 111 In leucocyte scan is the only investigation for which it may be necessary to restrict close contact between the infant and a radioactive parent, depending on the dose rate near the surface of the patient, the parent's habits and how fretful is the infant. It is unlikely that a ward nurse will receive a dose of 60 μSv in a working day if caring for just one radioactive adult patient, unless the patient is classified as totally helpless and had undergone a 99 Tc m marrow, bone or brain scan. The data and revised calculations of effective exposure times based on a total close contact time of 9 h in every 24 h period should allow worst case estimates of radiation dose to be made and recommendations to be formulated for other circumstances, including any future legislative changes in dose limits or derived levels. (author)

  18. Alpha decay and nuclear deformation: the case for favoured alpha transitions of even-even emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, F. [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Rodriguez, O.; Guzman, F. [Instituto Superior de Ciencias y Tecnologia Nucleares (ISCTN), La Habana (Cuba); Goncalves, M. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria IRD/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Duarte, S.B.; Tavares, O.A.P. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). E-mail: sbd@cbpf.br

    2000-02-01

    Alpha-decay half-life for ground-state transitions of 174 even-even alpha emitters has been calculated from a simple, Gamow-like model in which the quadrupole deformation of the product nucleus (assumed to have an ellipsoidal shape) is taken into account. The assumption made is that before tunneling through a purely Coulomb potential barrier the two-body system oscillates isotropically, thus giving rise to an equivalent, average polar direction {theta} (referred to the symmetry axis of the ellipsoid) for alpha emission. It is shown that the experimental half-life data are much better reproduced by the present description than in the spherical-shaped approximation for the daughter nucleus. (author)

  19. Alpha decay and nuclear deformation: the case for favoured alpha transitions of even-even emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, F.; Goncalves, M.; Duarte, S.B.; Tavares, O.A.P.

    2000-02-01

    Alpha-decay half-life for ground-state transitions of 174 even-even alpha emitters has been calculated from a simple, Gamow-like model in which the quadrupole deformation of the product nucleus (assumed to have an ellipsoidal shape) is taken into account. The assumption made is that before tunneling through a purely Coulomb potential barrier the two-body system oscillates isotropically, thus giving rise to an equivalent, average polar direction θ (referred to the symmetry axis of the ellipsoid) for alpha emission. It is shown that the experimental half-life data are much better reproduced by the present description than in the spherical-shaped approximation for the daughter nucleus. (author)

  20. Method and device to remove the decay heat produced in the core of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loimann, E.; Reutler, H.

    1977-01-01

    For decay haet removal of the HTGR the heat absorbed by the top reflector is discharged by means of heat exchangers. For this purpose the heat exchangers are arranged between the top bricks consisting of graphite blocks. By convection or forced circulation with the aid of pumps the liquid coolant is flowing in a cycle between the individual heat exchangers connected in parallel and a heat sink arranged outside the containment. The distributing and collection pipes are mounted between the upper and lower thermal shield. The heat exchanger compartments themselves consist of double-walled hollow bodies with a disc-shaped section and a columnar part extending from there to one side respectively. (RW) [de

  1. Constraining nuclear photon strength functions by the decay properties of photo-excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, J.; Savran, D.; Krtička, M.; Ahmed, M. W.; Beller, J.; Fiori, E.; Glorius, J.; Kelley, J. H.; Löher, B.; Pietralla, N.; Romig, C.; Rusev, G.; Scheck, M.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Silva, J.; Sonnabend, K.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Weller, H. R.; Zweidinger, M.

    2013-12-01

    A new approach for constraining the low-energy part of the electric dipole Photon Strength Function (E1-PSF) is presented. Experiments at the Darmstadt High-Intensity Photon Setup and the High Intensity γ→-Ray Source have been performed to investigate the decay properties of 130Te between 5.50 and 8.15 MeV excitation energy. In particular, the average γ-ray branching ratio to the ground state and the population intensity of low-lying excited states have been studied. A comparison to the statistical model shows that the latter is sensitive to the low-energy behavior of the E1-PSF, while the average ground state branching ratio cannot be described by the statistical model in the energy range between 5.5 and 6.5 MeV.

  2. Optimization of irradiation decay and counting times in nuclear activation analysis using short-lived nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernstad, T.

    This work describes a method and outlines a procedure for optim- ization of an activation analysis with respect to the experimental times, irradiation time, t(subi), decay time and counting time. The method is based on the 'minimum relative standard deviation criterion', and specially designed for the use on short-lived nuclides. A computer program, COMB1, is written in the BASIC language in order to make the calculations easier and faster. It is intended to be understandable, and easily applicable on a computer of modest size. Time and cost are important factors, especially for routine analysis on a service basis. In such cases one can often allow a controlled reduction in the analysis quality (through a higher relative standard deviation). The procedure outlined can therefore help find acceptable conditions by calculation of the 'best practical' (or reasonable) experimental time values, and the minimum number of accumulation cycles necessary to fulfil the requirements given. (Auth.)

  3. SpecBit, DecayBit and PrecisionBit. GAMBIT modules for computing mass spectra, particle decay rates and precision observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athron, Peter; Balazs, Csaba [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Tera-scale (Australia); Dal, Lars A.; Gonzalo, Tomas E. [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, Oslo (Norway); Edsjoe, Joakim; Farmer, Ben [AlbaNova University Centre, Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Stockholm University, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Kvellestad, Anders [NORDITA, Stockholm (Sweden); McKay, James; Scott, Pat [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, London (United Kingdom); Putze, Antje [Universite de Savoie, CNRS, LAPTh, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Rogan, Chris [Harvard University, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Weniger, Christoph [University of Amsterdam, GRAPPA, Institute of Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); White, Martin [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Tera-scale (Australia); University of Adelaide, Department of Physics, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Collaboration: The GAMBIT Models Workgroup

    2018-01-15

    We present the GAMBIT modules SpecBit, DecayBit and PrecisionBit. Together they provide a new framework for linking publicly available spectrum generators, decay codes and other precision observable calculations in a physically and statistically consistent manner. This allows users to automatically run various combinations of existing codes as if they are a single package. The modular design allows software packages fulfilling the same role to be exchanged freely at runtime, with the results presented in a common format that can easily be passed to downstream dark matter, collider and flavour codes. These modules constitute an essential part of the broader GAMBIT framework, a major new software package for performing global fits. In this paper we present the observable calculations, data, and likelihood functions implemented in the three modules, as well as the conventions and assumptions used in interfacing them with external codes. We also present 3-BIT-HIT, a command-line utility for computing mass spectra, couplings, decays and precision observables in the MSSM, which shows how the three modules can easily be used independently of GAMBIT. (orig.)

  4. SpecBit, DecayBit and PrecisionBit: GAMBIT modules for computing mass spectra, particle decay rates and precision observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athron, Peter; Balázs, Csaba; Dal, Lars A.; Edsjö, Joakim; Farmer, Ben; Gonzalo, Tomás E.; Kvellestad, Anders; McKay, James; Putze, Antje; Rogan, Chris; Scott, Pat; Weniger, Christoph; White, Martin

    2018-01-01

    We present the GAMBIT modules SpecBit, DecayBit and PrecisionBit. Together they provide a new framework for linking publicly available spectrum generators, decay codes and other precision observable calculations in a physically and statistically consistent manner. This allows users to automatically run various combinations of existing codes as if they are a single package. The modular design allows software packages fulfilling the same role to be exchanged freely at runtime, with the results presented in a common format that can easily be passed to downstream dark matter, collider and flavour codes. These modules constitute an essential part of the broader GAMBIT framework, a major new software package for performing global fits. In this paper we present the observable calculations, data, and likelihood functions implemented in the three modules, as well as the conventions and assumptions used in interfacing them with external codes. We also present 3-BIT-HIT, a command-line utility for computing mass spectra, couplings, decays and precision observables in the MSSM, which shows how the three modules can easily be used independently of GAMBIT.

  5. Elevated tropospheric CO2 and O3 may not alter initial wood decomposition rate or wood-decaying fungal community composition of Northern hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel Ebanyenle; Andrew J. Burton; Andrew J. Storer; Dana L. Richter; Jessie A. Glaeser

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of elevated CO2 and/or O3 on the wood-decaying basidiomycete fungal community and wood decomposition rates at the Aspen Free-Air CO2 and O3 Enrichment (Aspen FACE) project. Mass loss rates were determined after one year of log decomposition on the soil...

  6. Measurements of observables in the pion-nucleon system, nuclear a- dependence of heavy quark production and rare decays of D and B mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadler, M.E.; Isenhower, L.D.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research on the following topics: pion-nucleon interactions; detector tomography facility; nuclear dependence of charm and beauty quark production and a study of two-prong decays of neutral D and B mesons; N* collaboration at CEBAF; and pilac experiments

  7. Design and development of microcontroller based programmable ramp generator for AC-DC converter for simulating decay power transient in experimental facility for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Gaurava Deep; Kulkarni, R.D.

    2015-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, fuel is subjected to a wide range of power and temperature transients during normal and abnormal conditions. The reactor setback and step-back power pattern, fast temperature profile occurred during Loss of Coolant Accident and decay power followed by shutdown of power plant are the typical transients in nuclear power plant. For a variety of reactor engineering and reactor safety related study, one needs to simulate these transients in experimental facility. In experimental facilities, high response AC-DC converters are used to handle these power and temperature transients safely in a controlled manner for generating a database which is utilized for design of thermal hydraulic system, development of computer codes, study of reliability of reactor safety system, etc. for nuclear power plants. The paper presents the methodology developed for simulating the typical reactor decay power transient in an experimental facility. The design and simulation of AC-DC power electronic converter of 3 MW capacity is also presented. The microcontroller based programmable ramp generator is designed and hardware implemented for feeding reference voltage to the closed loop control system of AC-DC converter for obtaining the decay power profile at the converter output. The typical decay power transient of the nuclear power plant is divided into several small power ramps for simulating the transient. The signal corresponding to each power ramp is generated by programmable ramp generator and fed to the comparator for generating control signal for the converter. The actual decay power transient obtained from the converter is compared with the theoretical decay power transient. (author)

  8. Nuclear transparency and double beta decay of molybdenum 100. Annual progress report, February 1, 1994--January 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, H.W.

    1994-07-01

    During the past year, work has been nearly completed on a Physical Review paper with final results of a search for neutrinoless double-β decay of molybdenum 100 with collaborators from LBL, the University of New Mexico, and the Idaho Engineering Laboratory. Major part of this work was to carry out an extensive statistical analysis of the data. During the spring of 1994, Sean Sutton spent the majority of this time at Orsay, France working on NEMO 3, a next generation double-β decay experiment involving molybdenum 100 and other isotopes. Nicholson and Sutton have designed and built a scintillating fiber hadoscope used in the May--July AGS high energy physics run at BNL in AGS experiment 850 to measure color transparency. Professor Nicholson has had primary responsibility for the design, construction, and installation of this hodoscope and for overseeing the construction and installation of two scintillating counter upstream hodoscopes. To date, the fiber hodoscope had handled total beam rates exceeding 20 MHz with beam rates as high as 10 MHz on a single fiber. Light intensification and readout electronics to be used in the CsI(Tl) calorimeter in the SLAC B factory has just begun this summer

  9. Enhancement of nuclear reaction rates in asymmetric binary ionic mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clerouin, J.; Arnault, P.; Desbiens, N. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); White, A.; Ticknor, C.; Kress, J.D.; Collins, L.A. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Using orbital-free molecular dynamics simulations we study the structure and dynamics of increasingly asymmetric mixtures such as hydrogen-carbon, hydrogen-aluminium, hydrogen-copper, and hydrogen-silver. We show that, whereas the heavy component structure is close to an effective one-component plasma (OCP), the light component appears more structured than the corresponding OCP. This effect is related to the crossover towards a Lorentz-type diffusion triggered by strongly coupled, highly charged heavy ions, and witnessed by the change of temperature scaling laws of diffusion. This over-correlation translates into an enhancement of nuclear reaction rates much higher than its classical OCP counterpart. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Discount rates for social cost benefit analysis of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, P.A.

    1978-01-01

    The question that this paper addresses is how decisions affecting many citizens should be made when there are uncertain outcomes in the distant future. By distant is meant beyond the lifetimes of individuals alive now. Thus the proposed methodology would apply to many decisions in nuclear energy from the investment in new energy sources such as fusion, to the long-term storage of wastes. Decisions of this type have usually been analyzed using cost benefit analysis. In this case, future outcomes are discounted at the so-called social discount rate. By comparison, the proposed methodology uses information on individual citizen's preferences and willingness to pay to make a future generation better off. The connection between the proposed approach and more traditional discounting techniques is examined using the government decision about storing helium for the future as an example

  11. Non extensive corrections to stellar nuclear reactions rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assuncao, M. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (DCET/UNIFESP), Diadema, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra; Silveira, F.E.M. [Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas; Lima, J.A.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IAG/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Stellar nucleosynthesis is widely accepted as the basic mechanism for creation of chemical elements in the Universe. In particular, nuclear reactions occurring in the Sun are recognized as responsible for its energy generation. The problem of to determine the energy generation mechanism in stars was firstly attacked by Gamow in the framework of his quantum mechanical theory of potential barrier penetration. According to that approach, the reactions rate is calculated by averaging the penetration factor over the velocity distribution of the plasma particles. A randomization of that distribution is expected as a consequence of the reactions. However, diffusion processes in the macroscopic environment should balance the resulting particles number depletion. Therefore, matter, energy, and momentum might steadily flow. In other words, a quasi-stationary equilibrium state must be attained. In this work, the potential barrier penetration approach to stellar nuclear reactions rate has been rediscussed with basis on Tsallis nonextensive statistics. The investigation has been restricted to non-resonant reactions, for which the S-factor can be regarded as a constant. It has been found that, within the extended formulation, the nonextensive q-parameter is constrained to a maximum value. Accordingly, the q-energy has been shown to exhibit a minimum. The q-Gamow peak has been derived and, in connection with the usual Gaussian approximation, the corresponding half q-width has been also estimated. Plots of the q-energy, q-Gamow peak and half q-width for some reactions with stellar physics interest have been produced. (author)

  12. Sensitivity of coronal loop sausage mode frequencies and decay rates to radial and longitudinal density inhomogeneities: a spectral approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cally, Paul S.; Xiong, Ming

    2018-01-01

    Fast sausage modes in solar magnetic coronal loops are only fully contained in unrealistically short dense loops. Otherwise they are leaky, losing energy to their surrounds as outgoing waves. This causes any oscillation to decay exponentially in time. Simultaneous observations of both period and decay rate therefore reveal the eigenfrequency of the observed mode, and potentially insight into the tubes’ nonuniform internal structure. In this article, a global spectral description of the oscillations is presented that results in an implicit matrix eigenvalue equation where the eigenvalues are associated predominantly with the diagonal terms of the matrix. The off-diagonal terms vanish identically if the tube is uniform. A linearized perturbation approach, applied with respect to a uniform reference model, is developed that makes the eigenvalues explicit. The implicit eigenvalue problem is easily solved numerically though, and it is shown that knowledge of the real and imaginary parts of the eigenfrequency is sufficient to determine the width and density contrast of a boundary layer over which the tubes’ enhanced internal densities drop to ambient values. Linearized density kernels are developed that show sensitivity only to the extreme outside of the loops for radial fundamental modes, especially for small density enhancements, with no sensitivity to the core. Higher radial harmonics do show some internal sensitivity, but these will be more difficult to observe. Only kink modes are sensitive to the tube centres. Variation in internal and external Alfvén speed along the loop is shown to have little effect on the fundamental dimensionless eigenfrequency, though the associated eigenfunction becomes more compact at the loop apex as stratification increases, or may even displace from the apex.

  13. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, M.; Cherubini, P.; Fravolini, G.; Ascher, J.; Schärer, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Bertoldi, D.; Camin, F.; Larcher, R.; Egli, M.

    2015-09-01

    Due to the large size and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the time scales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests have been poorly investigated and are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the five-decay class system commonly employed for forest surveys, based on a macromorphological and visual assessment. For the decay classes 1 to 3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) and some others not having enough tree rings, radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model. In the decay classes 1 to 3, the ages of the CWD were similar varying between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative for deadwood age. We found, however, distinct tree species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were 0.012 to 0.018 yr-1 for spruce and 0.005 to 0.012 yr-1 for larch. Cellulose and lignin time trends half-lives (using a multiple-exponential model) could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 yr for spruce and 50 yr for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than 100 years in larch CWD.

  14. Effects of alpha decays on nuclear waste glasses, simulation through atomistic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaleb, D.; Delaye, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    In a simplified (SiO 2 , B 2 O 3 , Na 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 ) nuclear glass we have simulated, by Molecular Dynamics simulations, the effects of displacement cascades created by the slowing-down of the recoil nucleus. The methodology employed to construct and validate the used Molecular Dynamics model representing the basis matrix of the 'light-water' French nuclear glass (R77) and the manner which are simulated atomic displacements are described. Although the energies given to recoil nucleus were relatively low (≤ 1/10 of actual energies) the study has yielded a number of interesting results. Notably we have: - identified the main mechanisms responsible for the depolymerization of the network; - observed, at the atomic level, the kinetic of the structure evolution; - detailed the behavior and displacement mechanisms of every atomic species during the cascade sequences; - made a link with the experimentation through the calculation of some physical properties. (authors)

  15. Nuclear structure properties and stellar weak rates for 76Se: Unblocking of the Gamow Teller strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Ishfaq, Mavra; Böyükata, Mahmut; Riaz, Muhammad

    2017-10-01

    At finite temperatures (≥ 107K), 76Se is abundant in the core of massive stars and electron capture on 76Se has a consequential role to play in the dynamics of core-collapse. The present work may be classified into two main categories. In the first phase we study the nuclear structure properties of 76Se using the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1). The IBM-1 investigations include the energy levels, B (E 2) values and the prediction of the geometry. We performed the extended consistent-Q formalism (ECQF) calculation and later the triaxial formalism calculation (constructed by adding the cubic term to the ECQF). The geometry of 76Se can be envisioned within the formalism of the potential energy surface based on the classical limit of IBM-1 model. In the second phase, we reconfirm the unblocking of the Gamow-Teller (GT) strength in 76Se (a test case for nuclei having N > 40 and Z fashion. Results are compared with experimental data and previous calculations. The calculated GT distribution fulfills the Ikeda sum rule. Rates for β-delayed neutrons and emission probabilities are also calculated. Our study suggests that at high stellar temperatures and low densities, the β+-decay on 76Se should not be neglected and needs to be taken into consideration along with electron capture rates for simulation of presupernova evolution of massive stars.

  16. Build-up and decay of fuel actinides in the fuel cycle of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, Kanji; Kikuchi, Yasuyuki; Shindo, Ryuichi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Yasukawa, Shigeru

    1976-05-01

    For boiling water reactors, pressurized light-water reactors, pressure-tube-type heavy water reactors, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors, and sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors, uranium fueled and mixed-oxide fueled, each of 1000 MWe, the following have been studied: (1) quantities of plutonium and other fuel actinides built up in the reactor, (2) cooling behaviors of activities of plutonium and other fuel actinides in the spent fuels, and (3) activities of plutonium and other fuel actinides in the high-level reprocessing wastes as a function of storage time. The neutron cross section and decay data of respective actinide nuclides are presented, with their evaluations. For effective utilization of the uranium resources and easy reprocessing and high-level waste management, a thermal reactor must be fueled with uranium; the plutonium produced in a thermal reactor should be used in a fast reactor; and the plutonium produced in the blanket of a fast reactor is more appropriate for a fast reactor than that from a thermal reactor. (auth.)

  17. Short term memory decays and high presentation rates hurry this decay: The Murdock free recall experiments interpreted in the Tagging/Retagging model

    OpenAIRE

    Tarnow, Dr. Eugen

    2009-01-01

    I show that the curious free recall data of Murdock (1962) can be explained by the Tagging/Retagging model of short term memory (Tarnow, 2009 and 2008) in which a short term memory item is a tagged long term memory item. The tagging (linear in time) corresponds to the synaptic process of exocytosis and the loss of tagging (logarithmic in time) corresponds to synaptic endocytosis. The Murdock recent item recall probabilities follow a logarithmic decay with time of recall. The slope of the d...

  18. REVEALING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PHYSICS WITH COSMIC RATES AND NUCLEAR GAMMA RAYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Beacom, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) remain mysterious despite their central importance in cosmology and their rapidly increasing discovery rate. The progenitors of SNe Ia can be probed by the delay time between progenitor birth and explosion as SNe Ia. The explosions and progenitors of SNe Ia can be probed by MeV nuclear gamma rays emitted in the decays of radioactive nickel and cobalt into iron. We compare the cosmic star formation and SN Ia rates, finding that their different redshift evolution requires a large fraction of SNe Ia to have large delay times. A delay-time distribution of the form t -α with α = 1.0 ± 0.3 provides a good fit, implying that 50% of SNe Ia explode more than ∼1 Gyr after progenitor birth. The extrapolation of the cosmic SN Ia rate to z = 0 agrees with the rate we deduce from catalogs of local SNe Ia. We investigate prospects for gamma-ray telescopes to exploit the facts that escaping gamma rays directly reveal the power source of SNe Ia and uniquely provide tomography of the expanding ejecta. We find large improvements relative to earlier studies by Gehrels et al. in 1987 and Timmes and Woosley in 1997 due to larger and more certain SN Ia rates and advances in gamma-ray detectors. The proposed Advanced Compton Telescope, with a narrow-line sensitivity ∼60 times better than that of current satellites, would, on an annual basis, detect up to ∼100 SNe Ia (3σ) and provide revolutionary model discrimination for SNe Ia within 20 Mpc, with gamma-ray light curves measured with ∼10σ significance daily for ∼100 days. Even more modest improvements in detector sensitivity would open a new and invaluable astronomy with frequent SN Ia gamma-ray detections.

  19. Trophic position and metabolic rate predict the long-term decay process of radioactive cesium in fish: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Doi

    Full Text Available Understanding the long-term behavior of radionuclides in organisms is important for estimating possible associated risks to human beings and ecosystems. As radioactive cesium (¹³⁷Cs can be accumulated in organisms and has a long physical half-life, it is very important to understand its long-term decay in organisms; however, the underlying mechanisms determining the decay process are little known. We performed a meta-analysis to collect published data on the long-term ¹³⁷Cs decay process in fish species to estimate biological (metabolic rate and ecological (trophic position, habitat, and diet type influences on this process. From the linear mixed models, we found that 1 trophic position could predict the day of maximum ¹³⁷Cs activity concentration in fish; and 2 the metabolic rate of the fish species and environmental water temperature could predict ecological half-lives and decay rates for fish species. These findings revealed that ecological and biological traits are important to predict the long-term decay process of ¹³⁷Cs activity concentration in fish.

  20. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Marta; Cherubini, Paolo; Fravolini, Giulia; Marchetti, Marco; Ascher-Jenull, Judith; Schärer, Michael; Synal, Hans-Arno; Bertoldi, Daniela; Camin, Federica; Larcher, Roberto; Egli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Due to the large size (e.g. sections of tree trunks) and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the timescales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the chronosequence approach and the five-decay class system that is based on a macromorphological assessment. For the decay classes 1-3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose, and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model, a regression approach, and the stage-based matrix model. In the decay classes 1-3, the ages of the CWD were similar and varied between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch, with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative of deadwood age. This seems to be due to a time lag between the death of a standing tree and its contact with the soil. We found distinct tree-species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were estimated to be in the range 0.018 to 0.022 y-1 for spruce and to about 0.012 y-1 for larch. Snapshot sampling (chronosequences) may overestimate the age and mean residence time of CWD. No sampling bias was, however, detectable using the stage-based matrix model. Cellulose and lignin time trends could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 years for spruce and 50 years for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than

  1. Disordered nuclear pasta, magnetic field decay, and crust cooling in neutron stars

    OpenAIRE

    Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Cumming, A.; Schneider, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear pasta, with non-spherical shapes, is expected near the base of the crust in neutron stars. Large scale molecular dynamics simulations of pasta show long lived topological defects that could increase electron scattering and reduce both the thermal and electrical conductivities. We model a possible low conductivity pasta layer by increasing an impurity parameter Q_{imp}. Predictions of light curves for the low mass X-ray binary MXB 1659-29, assuming a large Q_{imp}, find continued late ...

  2. The effect of CaCl2 on growth rate, wood decay and oxalic acid accumulation in Serpula lacrymans and related brown-rot fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastrup, Anne Christine Steenkjær; Jensen, Bo; Clausen, Carol. A.

    2006-01-01

    The dry rot fungus, Serpula lacrymans, is one of the most destructive copper-tolerant fungi causing timber decay in buildings in temperate regions. Calcium and oxalic acid have been shown to play important roles in the mechanism of wood decay. The effect of calcium on growth and decay was evaluated...... for 12 strains of S. lacrymans and compared to five brown-rot fungi. This was done by treating copper citrate (CC)-treated Southern yellow pine (SYP) wood with a CaCl2 solution and estimating the decay rate and amount of soluble oxalic acid in an ASTM soil block test. Decay by S. lacrymans was found....... In summary, a marked decrease was observed in the decay capacity of S. lacrymans in pine treated with CC+CaCl2. The amount of soluble oxalic acid was measured in CC-treated blocks and blocks also treated with CaCl2. Of the comparative brown-rot fungi, both Antrodia vaillantii (TFFH 294) and Postia placenta...

  3. Structure and reconstitution of yeast Mpp6-nuclear exosome complexes reveals that Mpp6 stimulates RNA decay and recruits the Mtr4 helicase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasmuth, Elizabeth V. [Structural Biology Program, Sloan Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, United States; Zinder, John C. [Structural Biology Program, Sloan Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, United States; Tri-Institutional Training Program in Chemical Biology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, United States; Zattas, Dimitrios [Structural Biology Program, Sloan Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, United States; Das, Mom [Structural Biology Program, Sloan Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, United States; Lima, Christopher D. [Structural Biology Program, Sloan Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, United States; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, United States

    2017-07-25

    Nuclear RNA exosomes catalyze a range of RNA processing and decay activities that are coordinated in part by cofactors, including Mpp6, Rrp47, and the Mtr4 RNA helicase. Mpp6 interacts with the nine-subunit exosome core, while Rrp47 stabilizes the exoribonuclease Rrp6 and recruits Mtr4, but it is less clear if these cofactors work together. Using biochemistry with Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins, we show that Rrp47 and Mpp6 stimulate exosome-mediated RNA decay, albeit with unique dependencies on elements within the nuclear exosome. Mpp6-exosomes can recruit Mtr4, while Mpp6 and Rrp47 each contribute to Mtr4-dependent RNA decay, with maximal Mtr4-dependent decay observed with both cofactors. The 3.3 Å structure of a twelve-subunit nuclear Mpp6 exosome bound to RNA shows the central region of Mpp6 bound to the exosome core, positioning its Mtr4 recruitment domain next to Rrp6 and the exosome central channel. Genetic analysis reveals interactions that are largely consistent with our model.

  4. Hypernuclear weak decay puzzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbero, C.; Horvat, D.; Narancic, Z.; Krmpotic, F.; Kuo, T.T.S.; Tadic, D.

    2002-01-01

    A general shell model formalism for the nonmesonic weak decay of the hypernuclei has been developed. It involves a partial wave expansion of the emitted nucleon waves, preserves naturally the antisymmetrization between the escaping particles and the residual core, and contains as a particular case the weak Λ-core coupling formalism. The extreme particle-hole model and the quasiparticle Tamm-Dancoff approximation are explicitly worked out. It is shown that the nuclear structure manifests itself basically through the Pauli principle, and a very simple expression is derived for the neutron- and proton-induced decays rates Γ n and Γ p , which does not involve the spectroscopic factors. We use the standard strangeness-changing weak ΛN→NN transition potential which comprises the exchange of the complete pseudoscalar and vector meson octets (π,η,K,ρ,ω,K * ), taking into account some important parity-violating transition operators that are systematically omitted in the literature. The interplay between different mesons in the decay of Λ 12 C is carefully analyzed. With the commonly used parametrization in the one-meson-exchange model (OMEM), the calculated rate Γ NM =Γ n +Γ p is of the order of the free Λ decay rate Γ 0 (Γ NM th congruent with Γ 0 ) and is consistent with experiments. Yet the measurements of Γ n/p =Γ n /Γ p and of Γ p are not well accounted for by the theory (Γ n/p th p th > or approx. 0.60Γ 0 ). It is suggested that, unless additional degrees of freedom are incorporated, the OMEM parameters should be radically modified

  5. Decay and Transmutation of Nuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Aarnio, Pertti A

    1999-01-01

    We present a computer code DeTra which solves analytically the Bateman equations governing the decay, build-up and transmutation of radionuclides. The complexity of the chains and the number of nuclides are not limited. The nuclide production terms considered include transmutation of the nuclides inside the chain, external production, and fission. Time dependent calculations are possible since all the production terms can be re-defined for each irradiation step. The number of irradiation steps and output times is unlimited. DeTra is thus able to solve any decay and transmutation problem as long as the nuclear data i.e. decay data and production rates, or cross sections, are known.

  6. Nuclear plant power up-rate study: feedwater heater evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, Eric; Catapano, Michael; Coakley, Michael; Thomas, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Given today's nuclear industry business climate, it has become common for Utility companies to consider increasing unit capacities through turbine replacement and power up-rates. An integral part of the studies conducted by many towards this end, involve the generation of a set of turbine cycle heat balances with predicted performance parameters for the up-rated condition. Once these tentative operating values are established, it becomes necessary to evaluate the suitability of the existing components within each system to ensure they are capable of continued safe and reliable operation. The ultimate cost for the up-rate, including the cost for any major required modifications or significant replacements is weighed against increased revenue generated from the up-rate over time. Exelon's Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station (PBAPS) is currently planning for an Extended Power up-rate (EPU) for both units. To ensure the existing Feedwater Heaters (FWH) could maintain the operating and transient response margins at the EPU condition, an engineering study was conducted. Powerfect Inc. in conjunction with SPX Heat Transfer LLC were contracted to provide engineering services to analyze the design, thermal performance, reliability and operating conditions at projected EPU conditions. Specifically, to address the following with regard to the station's Feedwater Heaters (FWHs): 1. Evaluate Drain Cooler (DC) Velocities - including zone inlet velocity, cross and window velocities and outlet velocities. 2. Evaluate Drain Cooler Zone Pressure Drop for effect on drain cooler margins to flashing. 3. Evaluate differential pressure allowable across the pass partition plate. 4. Evaluate Drain Cooler Tube Vibration Potential. 5. Perform detailed steam dome velocity calculations. The goal of the study was to identify the most susceptible areas within the heaters for problems and potential failures when operating at the higher duty of the EPU condition for the remaining life

  7. Population decay time and distribution of exciton states analyzed by rate equations based on theoretical phononic and electron-collisional rate coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Kensuke; Ma, Bei; Ishitani, Yoshihiro

    2017-11-01

    Population distributions and transition fluxes of the A exciton in bulk GaN are theoretically analyzed using rate equations of states of the principal quantum number n up to 5 and the continuum. These rate equations consist of the terms of radiative, electron-collisional, and phononic processes. The dependence of the rate coefficients on temperature is revealed on the basis of the collisional-radiative model of hydrogen plasma for the electron-collisional processes and theoretical formulation using Fermi's "golden rule" for the phononic processes. The respective effects of the variations in electron, exciton, and lattice temperatures are exhibited. This analysis is a base of the discussion on nonthermal equilibrium states of carrier-exciton-phonon dynamics. It is found that the exciton dissociation is enhanced even below 150 K mainly by the increase in the lattice temperature. When the thermal-equilibrium temperature increases, the population fluxes between the states of n >1 and the continuum become more dominant. Below 20 K, the severe deviation from the Saha-Boltzmann distribution occurs owing to the interband excitation flux being higher than the excitation flux from the 1 S state. The population decay time of the 1 S state at 300 K is more than ten times longer than the recombination lifetime of excitons with kinetic energy but without the upper levels (n >1 and the continuum). This phenomenon is caused by a shift of population distribution to the upper levels. This phonon-exciton-radiation model gives insights into the limitations of conventional analyses such as the ABC model, the Arrhenius plot, the two-level model (n =1 and the continuum), and the neglect of the upper levels.

  8. Fluorescence from gaseous UF/sub 6/ excited by a near-UV dye laser. [Decay time,quenching rate,room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benetti, P [Pavia Univ. (Italy); Cubeddu, R; Sacchi, C A; Svelto, O; Zaraga, F [Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

    1976-06-01

    Preliminary data are reported on the visible fluorescence of gaseous UF/sub 6/ excited by a dye laser at 374 nm. A decay time of 500 ns at p = 0 and a quenching rate of 5.7 x 10/sup -12/cm/sup 3/molec/sup -1/s/sup -1/ have been measured at room temperature.

  9. Measurement of the B$^{0}_{s}$ lifetime and production rate with D$^{-}_{s}$ l$^{+}$ combinations in Z decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Meinhard, H; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stierlin, U; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Duarte, H; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Si Mohand, D; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1995-01-01

    The lifetime of the \\bs meson is measured in approximately 3 million hadronic Z decays accumulated using the ALEPH detector at LEP from 1991 to 1994. Seven different \\ds decay modes were reconstructed and combined with an opposite sign lepton as evidence of semileptonic \\bs decays. Two hundred and eight \\dsl candidates satisfy selection criteria designed to ensure precise proper time reconstruction and yield a measured \\bs lifetime of \\mbox{\\result .} Using a larger, less constrained sample of events, the product branching ratio is measured to be \\mbox{\\pbrresult .

  10. Decay heat power of spent nuclear fuel of power reactors with high burnup at long-term storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternovykh, Mikhail; Tikhomirov, Georgy; Saldikov, Ivan; Gerasimov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Decay heat power of actinides and fission products from spent nuclear fuel of power VVER-1000 type reactors at long-term storage is calculated. Two modes of storage are considered: mode in which single portion of actinides or fission products is loaded in storage facility, and mode in which actinides or fission products from spent fuel of one VVER reactor are added every year in storage facility during 30 years and then accumulated nuclides are stored without addition new nuclides. Two values of fuel burnup 40 and 70 MW·d/kg are considered for the mode of storage of single fuel unloading. For the mode of accumulation of spent fuel with subsequent storage, one value of burnup of 70 MW·d/kg is considered. Very long time of storage 105 years accepted in calculations allows to simulate final geological disposal of radioactive wastes. Heat power of fission products decreases quickly after 50-100 years of storage. The power of actinides decreases very slow. In passing from 40 to 70 MW·d/kg, power of actinides increases due to accumulation of higher fraction of 244Cm. These data are important in the back end of fuel cycle when improved cooling system of the storage facility will be required along with stronger radiation protection during storage, transportation and processing.

  11. Decay heat power of spent nuclear fuel of power reactors with high burnup at long-term storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ternovykh Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Decay heat power of actinides and fission products from spent nuclear fuel of power VVER-1000 type reactors at long-term storage is calculated. Two modes of storage are considered: mode in which single portion of actinides or fission products is loaded in storage facility, and mode in which actinides or fission products from spent fuel of one VVER reactor are added every year in storage facility during 30 years and then accumulated nuclides are stored without addition new nuclides. Two values of fuel burnup 40 and 70 MW·d/kg are considered for the mode of storage of single fuel unloading. For the mode of accumulation of spent fuel with subsequent storage, one value of burnup of 70 MW·d/kg is considered. Very long time of storage 105 years accepted in calculations allows to simulate final geological disposal of radioactive wastes. Heat power of fission products decreases quickly after 50-100 years of storage. The power of actinides decreases very slow. In passing from 40 to 70 MW·d/kg, power of actinides increases due to accumulation of higher fraction of 244Cm. These data are important in the back end of fuel cycle when improved cooling system of the storage facility will be required along with stronger radiation protection during storage, transportation and processing.

  12. Progress Report on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Activities at MTA Atomki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timar, J.; Elekes, Z. [Atomki, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2013-08-15

    The center at the Institute for Nuclear Research (MTA Atomki) consists of two evaluators who devote altogether 0.5 FTE to mass-chain evaluation work. We have been working on mass-chain evaluation since 2009. Until now we have been working on mass chains that were temporarily assigned to us. Now we have permanent responsibilities, which are the A=101-105 mass chains. Our evaluation work is funded mainly by MTA Atomki, but we have also received considerable financial support from IAEA through Research Contract No. 15902/R0, and from the McMaster University. Besides financial supports, we received great help from Balraj Singh to start and build up our evaluation work. Mass-chain evaluation in the 2011-2012 period: In the covered period, we evaluated the A=128, A=129 and A=46 mass chains. 1) The evaluation of the A=129 mass chain had started in the previous period, however due to appearance of new important published and unpublished data after the review of the NDS manuscript, we decided to include them into the new evaluation. It is in post review status. 2) The evaluation of the A=128 mass chain has been finished, and it has been submitted to NNDC. It is in pre review status. 3) The evaluation of the A=46 mass chain is still in progress, but it is close to be finished and to be submitted to NNDC. Plans for the next period: The group plans to continue the mass-chain evaluation on a basis of about one mass chain per year. For the next period we plan to finish and publish the A=129, 128 and 46 mass chains. Also, as the mass chains of A=105 and A=101, from our permanently assigned mass chains, has been updated last in 2004 and 2006, respectively, we plan to evaluate these two mass chains starting with A=105.

  13. Nuclear Power Learning and Deployment Rates; Disruption and Global Benefits Forgone

    OpenAIRE

    Peter A. Lang

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents evidence of the disruption of a transition from fossil fuels to nuclear power, and finds the benefits forgone as a consequence are substantial. Learning rates are presented for nuclear power in seven countries, comprising 58% of all power reactors ever built globally. Learning rates and deployment rates changed in the late-1960s and 1970s from rapidly falling costs and accelerating deployment to rapidly rising costs and stalled deployment. Historical nuclear global capacit...

  14. Studies on the separation of rare earth elements and the nuclear decay properties of short lived rare-earth nuclides in U-235 fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyoshi, Akira; Ohyoshi, Emiko.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of a complex-forming agent, with which rare earths consecutively form the complexes, on the separation of a pair of adjacent rare earths by electromigration has been investigated. The relation between the separation factor for two complexes and the ligand-ion concentration was examined in the separation of La-Ce and Ce-Pr pairs with nitrilotriacetic acid. Rare earths were able to be isolated rapidly at the optimum ligand-ion concentration in lower one, and this method was applied to study the nuclear decay properties of the short lived isotopes of La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Yt formed in the fission of U-235. This method permits the direct measurement of the decay of La-144 without the interference from the radiation of other fission products. The gamma-ray spectrum of La-144 was measured with a high resolution Ge(Li) detector, and the gamma-transition was observed. From the decay plots of two strong photopeaks, the half-life of La-144 was determined. In the case of Ce fraction, the photopeaks assigned to respective isotopes were observed. In the studies on the decay properties of Pr-148 and Pr-149, the decay plot of the strong photopeak showed good linearity, and the accurate half-life of Pr-148 was determined. Similarly, the half-life of Pr-149 was longer than the previously reported value. (Kako, I.)

  15. Nuclear spectroscopy of neutron rich A = 147 nuclides: decay of 147Cs, 147Ba and 147La

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmid, M.; Chu, Y.Y.; Gowdy, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the beta decay of neutron rich nuclides of the A = 147 chain was carried out at the TRISTAN isotope separator. Half lives of 14 'Cs, 147 Ba and 147 La were measured. Six gamma lines are assigned to 147 Cs decay. A decay scheme for 147 Ba with levels up to 2 MeV is proposed for the first time. A partial decay scheme for 147 La is proposed, which confirms the previously existing one, with five new levels added from the present work

  16. Two-photon decay rates of hydrogenlike ions revisited by using Dirac-Coulomb Sturmian expansions of the first order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bona, Zachée; Nganso, Hugues Merlain Tetchou; Ekogo, Thierry Blanchard; Njock, Moïse Godfroy Kwato

    2014-02-01

    A fully relativistic multipole scheme is formulated to study two-photon emission processes in hydrogenlike ions with an infinitely heavy, pointlike, and spinless nucleus of charge up to 100. By making use of the Sturmian expansion of the Dirac-Coulomb Green function of the first order constructed by Szmytkowski, closed-form expressions are derived for arbitrary multipole channels. In the nonrelativistic limit, well-known formulas established previously are retrieved. For the sake of assessing the effectiveness of our approach, numerical applications are then carried out for two-photon decay rates of the selected 2s1/2 and 2p1/2 atomic states. To this end, radial integrals, the most crucial quantities involved in the matrix elements, are treated with great care by means of two suitable techniques that agree with each other quite closely so that very accurate values are obtained regardless of the choice of parameters, such as radial quantum numbers and orders of spherical Bessel functions of the first kind. In addition, the convergence and stability of computations are checked in connection with the intermediate-state summation, which appears within the second-order perturbation theory. As expected, the gauge invariance of our fully relativistic multipole numbers is confirmed. Relativistic effects, and the influence of the negative spectrum of the complete set of Dirac-Coulomb Sturmians of first order and retardation truncations in the transition operator are examined. Finally, a comparison is undertaken of our two-photon relativistic calculations with refined predictions of other authors based on finite basis-set methods widely employed over the past decades.

  17. AN HISTORICAL OVERVIEW OF THE IMPORTANCE OF THE WEAK DECAY OF HYPERNUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GIBSON, B.F.

    2001-01-01

    Weak decay of hypernuclei, first cousin to the β-decay of conventional, nonstrange nuclei, was initially observed in the 1950s. Pionic decay rates have proven a challenge--to reconcile nuclear decay rates with that of free λ decay. Pauli blocking of the decay nucleon plays an important role. Nonmesonic decay provides our only practical means of exploring the four-fermion, strangeness-changing NΛ → NN weak interaction. The NΛρ vertex can be investigated in no other way. The large momentum transfer in the nonmesonic decay process suggests a means to probe short distance aspects of the interaction, possibly revealing baryon substructure effects. Whether the ΔI = 1/2 rule, which governs free Λ decay, also applies to the nonmesonic decay process remains an open question. The free Λ does not decay by emission of a π + ; the π + decay of 4 He is a puzzle. Finally, the weak decay of strangeness -2 hypernuclei is an important topic, because the pionic decay process is central to current efforts to seek and identify ΛΛ hypernuclei

  18. Analysis of D0 -> K+ pi- pi0 Decays: Search for D0-D0bar Mixing, and Measurements of the Doubly Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay Rate and Resonance Contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Michael Galante

    2005-12-13

    Analyzing D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays, herein are presented the methods and results of a search for D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing, a measurement of the branching ratio R {equivalent_to} {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}), and measurements of the contributions from D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{rho}{sup -}, K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, K*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}; 230.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected from the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider during 2000-2004 (Runs 1-4) are analyzed. An event-level tagging technique is developed, which facilitates the accurate determination of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed resonance contributions by suppressing background from Cabibbo-favored decays. The branching ratio is measured as R = (0.214 {+-} 0.008 (stat) {+-} 0.008 (syst))%, with (46.1 {+-} 3.3 (stat) {+-} 2.9 (syst))% of D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays proceeding through the channel D{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The data are consistent with the null-D-mixing hypothesis at a confidence level of 10%, and the expected value of {+-} {radical}(x{sup 2} + y{sup 2}) is measured as -0.013 {+-} 0.010 (stat), indicating negative interference between mixing and doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay. The expected value of the integrated mixing rate is (x{sup 2} + y{sup 2})/2 = (0.013 {+-} 0.013 (stat))%.

  19. An investigation of multi-rate sound decay under strongly non-diffuse conditions: The crypt of the Cathedral of Cadiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martellotta, Francesco; Álvarez-Morales, Lidia; Girón, Sara; Zamarreño, Teófilo

    2018-05-01

    Multi-rate sound decays are often found and studied in complex systems of coupled volumes where diffuse field conditions generally apply, although the openings connecting different sub-spaces are by themselves potential causes of non-diffuse behaviour. However, in presence of spaces in which curved surfaces clearly prevent diffuse field behaviour from being established, things become more complex and require more sophisticated tools (or, better, combinations of them) to be fully understood. As an example of such complexity, the crypt of the Cathedral of Cadiz is a relatively small space characterised by a central vaulted rotunda, with five radial galleries with flat and low ceiling. In addition, the crypt is connected to the main cathedral volume by means of several small openings. Acoustic measurements carried out in the crypt pointed out the existence of at least two decay processes combined, in some points, with flutter echoes. Application of conventional methods of analysis pointed out the existence of significant differences between early decay time and reverberation time, but was inconclusive in explaining the origin of the observed phenomena. The use of more robust Bayesian analysis permitted the conclusion that the late decay appearing in the crypt had a different rate than that observed in the cathedral, thus excluding the explanation based on acoustic coupling of different volumes. Finally, processing impulse responses collected by means of a B-format microphone to obtain directional intensity maps demonstrated that the late decay was originated from the rotunda where a repetitive reflection pattern appeared between the floor and the dome causing both flutter echoes and a longer reverberation time.

  20. Estimation of decay rates for fecal indicator bacteria and bacterial pathogens in agricultural field-applied manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field-applied manure is an important source of pathogenic exposure in surface water bodies for humans and ecological receptors. We analyzed the persistence and decay of fecal indicator bacteria and bacterial pathogens from three sources (cattle, poultry, swine) for agricultural f...

  1. Post shut-down decay heat removal from nuclear reactor core by natural convection loops in sodium pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajamani, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Sundararajan, T., E-mail: tsundar@iitm.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Prasad, B.V.S.S.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Parthasarathy, U.; Velusamy, K. [Nuclear Engineering Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Transient simulations are performed for a worst case scenario of station black-out. • Inter-wrapper flow between various sub-assemblies reduces peak core temperature. • Various natural convection paths limits fuel clad temperatures below critical level. - Abstract: The 500 MWe Indian pool type Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) has a passive core cooling system, known as the Safety Grade Decay Heat Removal System (SGDHRS) which aids to remove decay heat after shut down phase. Immediately after reactor shut down the fission products in the core continue to generate heat due to beta decay which exponentially decreases with time. In the event of a complete station blackout, the coolant pump system may not be available and the safety grade decay heat removal system transports the decay heat from the core and dissipates it safely to the atmosphere. Apart from SGDHRS, various natural convection loops in the sodium pool carry the heat away from the core and deposit it temporarily in the sodium pool. The buoyancy driven flow through the small inter-wrapper gaps (known as inter-wrapper flow) between fuel subassemblies plays an important role in carrying the decay heat from the sub-assemblies to the hot sodium pool, immediately after reactor shut down. This paper presents the transient prediction of flow and temperature evolution in the reactor subassemblies and the sodium pool, coupled with the safety grade decay heat removal system. It is shown that with a properly sized decay heat exchanger based on liquid sodium and air chimney stacks, the post shutdown decay heat can be safely dissipated to atmospheric air passively.

  2. Refractive index effects on the oscillator strength and radiative decay rate of 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Jyotirmayee; Nau, Werner M

    2004-01-01

    The photophysical properties of 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene (DBO) were determined in 15 solvents, two supramolecular hosts (cucurbit[7]uril and beta-cyclodextrin) as well as in the gas phase. The oscillator strength and radiative decay rate of DBO as a function of refractive index i.e. polarizability have been analyzed. The oscillator strength increases by a factor of 10 upon going from the gas phase to the most polarizable carbon disulfide, while the corresponding radiative decay rates increase by a factor of 40. There is a good empirical correlation between the oscillator strength of the weakly allowed n,pi* transition of DBO and the reciprocal bulk polarizability, which can be employed to assess the polarizability of unknown microheterogeneous environments. A satisfactory correlation between the radiative decay rate and the square of the refractive index is also found, as previously documented for chromophores with allowed transitions. However, the correlation improves significantly when the oscillator strength is included in the correlation, which demonstrates the importance of this factor in the Strickler-Berg equation for chromophores with forbidden or weakly allowed transitions, for which the oscillator strength may be strongly solvent dependent. The radiative decay rate of DBO in two supramolecular assemblies has been determined, confirming the very low polarizability inside the cucurbituril cavity, in between perfluorohexane and the gas phase. The fluorescence quantum yield of DBO in the gas phase has been remeasured (5.1 +/- 0.5%) and was found to fall one full order of magnitude below a previously reported value.

  3. Neutron decay, semileptonic hyperon decay and the Cabibbo model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebert, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    The decay rates and formfactor ratios of neutron decay and semileptonic hyperon decays are compared in the framework of the Cabibbo model. The results indicate SU(3) symmetry breaking. The Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V us determined from these decays is in good agreement with the value determined from K→πeν decays, and with unitarity of the KM-matrix. (orig.)

  4. Investigation of the influence of nuclear charge on the internal Bremsstrahlung accompanying the β-decay of 45Ca and 141Ce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, E.I.; Basha, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The internal Bremsstrahlung (IB) spectrum accompanying the allowed β-decay of 141 Ce was measured using NaI (TI) scintillation spectrometer. The corrected IB distribution was compared with the theories for allowed β-transition of Knipp and Uhlenbeck as well as of Bloch (KUB), Lewis and Ford and Nilsson. Further, for 141 Ce isotope the corrected IB distribution was compared with the Ford and Martin theory (for detour β-transition) and modified KUB theory (where the shape correction factor suggested by Konopinski and Uhlenbeck on the Fermi β-decay theory was applied to the calculated IB based on Nilsson theory). This comparison between experiment and theory, and between the measurements of the two isotopes reflects the role played by the nuclear charge and the degree of forbiddenness on the IB spectrum. (author). 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  5. Recoil ion momentum spectroscopy in atomic and nuclear physics: applications to low energy ion-atom/molecule collisions and to beta-neutrino angular correlation in beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechard, X.

    2012-12-01

    Since the early 1990's, Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy is an ideal tool for ion-atom and ion-molecule collisions study. We detail here the development of this experimental technique during the last twenty years, illustrated with some of the most striking results obtained at GANIL (Caen) and J.R. Mac Donald Laboratory (Kansas State University). Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy is also particularly well suited for β-ν angular correlation measurements in nuclear β decay. The LPCTrap experiment, installed at GANIL, is based on this technique, coupled to the use of a Paul trap for the radioactive ions confinement. The precise measurements performed with this setup allow both, to test specific aspects of the Standard Model of elementary particles, and to study the electron shake-off process following β decay. (author)

  6. Transition in the decay rates of stationary distributions of Lévy motion in an energy landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleta, Kamil; Lőrinczi, József

    2016-02-01

    The time evolution of random variables with Lévy statistics has the ability to develop jumps, displaying very different behaviors from continuously fluctuating cases. Such patterns appear in an ever broadening range of examples including random lasers, non-Gaussian kinetics, or foraging strategies. The penalizing or reinforcing effect of the environment, however, has been little explored so far. We report a new phenomenon which manifests as a qualitative transition in the spatial decay behavior of the stationary measure of a jump process under an external potential, occurring on a combined change in the characteristics of the process and the lowest eigenvalue resulting from the effect of the potential. This also provides insight into the fundamental question of what is the mechanism of the spatial decay of a ground state.

  7. Transition in the decay rates of stationary distributions of Lévy motion in an energy landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleta, Kamil; Lőrinczi, József

    2016-02-01

    The time evolution of random variables with Lévy statistics has the ability to develop jumps, displaying very different behaviors from continuously fluctuating cases. Such patterns appear in an ever broadening range of examples including random lasers, non-Gaussian kinetics, or foraging strategies. The penalizing or reinforcing effect of the environment, however, has been little explored so far. We report a new phenomenon which manifests as a qualitative transition in the spatial decay behavior of the stationary measure of a jump process under an external potential, occurring on a combined change in the characteristics of the process and the lowest eigenvalue resulting from the effect of the potential. This also provides insight into the fundamental question of what is the mechanism of the spatial decay of a ground state.

  8. Measurements of Rates, Asymmetries, and Angular Distributions in B -> K l+ l- and B -> K* l+ l- Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollar, Jonathan; /SLAC /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-09-21

    This dissertation describes studies of the rare decays B{sub d} {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and B{sub d} {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, where {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} is either an e{sup +}e{sup -} or a {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} pair. These decays are highly suppressed in the Standard Model, and could be strongly affected by physics beyond the Standard Model. The authors measure the total branching fractions {Beta}(B{sub d} {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) = (0.34 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.03) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sub d} {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) = (0.78{sub -0.17}{sup +0.19} {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -6}. In addition, they measure the partial branching fractions, relative abundance of muons to electrons, direct CP asymmetry, dilepton forward-backward asymmetry, and longitudinal polarization of the K* in these modes. They also search for the lepton flavor-violating decays B{sub d} {yields} Ke{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}} and B{sub d} {yields} K*e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}}. The measurements were performed at the SLAC PEP II storage ring running at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance.

  9. QED based on self-energy: The relativistic 2S1/2→1S1/2+1γ decay rates of hydrogenlike atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barut, A.O.; Salamin, Y.I.

    1991-01-01

    Within the framework of the recently advanced formulation of QED based on self-energy, we calculate the relativistic rates of the 2S 1/2 →1S 1/2 +1γ transition in the hydrogen isoelectronic sequence for values of Z ranging between 1 and 92. We compare our results with those of Johnson [Phys. Rev. Lett. 29, 1123 (1972)] and Parpia and Johnson [Phys. Rev. A 26, 1142 (1982)], analytically and numerically. Although the two approaches are quite different, the formulas for decay rates are shown to be equivalent

  10. Method and system of simulating nuclear power plant count rate for training purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alliston, W.H.; Koenig, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    A method and system are described for the real-time simulation of the dynamic operation of a nuclear power plant in which nuclear flux rate counters are provided for monitoring the rate of nuclear fission of the reactor. The system utilizes apparatus that includes digital computer means for calculating data relating to the rate of nuclear fission of a simulated reactor model, which rate is controlled in accordance with the operation of control panel devices. A digital number from the computer corresponding to the flux rate controls an oscillator driven counter means to produce a pulse after a predetermined count. This pulse controls an oscillator driven polynomial counter to count a random number that controls a third counter in accordance with pulse from the first counter to produce a random fission count for operating the meters. (U.S.)

  11. The required rate of return for new nuclear investment, and the choice between nuclear and gas plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimson, E.; Staunton, M.

    1995-01-01

    The British Government is in the process of reviewing its strategy for nuclear power, which is largely in the hands of Nuclear Electric, a candidate for early privatisation. We estimate that the after-tax real return which must be earned on new investment by Nuclear Electric is at least 11 percent. The corresponding pre-tax required rate of return is at least 13 percent in real terms. The fact that some of the investment risks of nuclear power can be shifted onto competitors or consumers should not, in a regulated industry, be allowed to lower the discount rate. Nuclear Electric's current required rate of return of 8 percent before tax is too low, and leads to an overstatement of the value of the Sizewell C and Hinkley Point C proposals. Based on Nuclear Electric's own plant parameter assumptions, going ahead with both stations will be some Pound 4 billion more expensive than the gas alternative. Incorporating best estimates of capital cost and plant performance, we estimate the two proposals would result in a combined loss in value of approximately Pound 6-7 billion. (author)

  12. Two loop O(αsGFmt2) corrections to the fermionic decay rates of the standard-model Higgs boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniehl, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    Low- and intermediate mass Higgs bosons decay preferably into fermion pairs. The one-loop electroweak corrections to the respective decay rates are dominated by a flavour-independent term of O(G F m t 2 ). We calculate the two-loop gluon correction to this term. It turns out that this correction screens the leading high-m t behaviour of the one-loop result by roughly 10%. We also present the two-loop QCD correction to the contribution induced by a pair of fourth-generation quarks with arbitrary masses. As expected, the inclusion of the QCD correction considerably reduces the renormalization-scheme dependence of the prediction. (orig.)

  13. Determination of the Production Rate of $D^{*0}$ Mesons and of the Ratio V/(V+P) in $Z^{0} \\to c\\overline{c}$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; de Roeck, A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanfani, A; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Feld, L; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Höcker, Andreas; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J I; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; List, B; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markopoulos, C; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rembser, C; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    In e^+e^- collisions at centre-of-mass energies around 91 GeV, D^*0 mesons have been reconstructed using data collected with the OPAL detector at LEP. The hadronisation fraction has been measured to be f(c -> D^*0) = 0.218 +/- 0.054 +/- 0.045 +/- 0.007, where the errors correspond to the statistical and systematic errors specific to this analysis, and to systematic uncertainties from externally measured branching fractions, respectively. Together with previous OPAL measurements of the hadron isation fractions of other charmed mesons, this value is used to investigate the relative production of observed vector and pseudoscalar charmed mesons in Z^0 -> cc(bar) decays. The production ratio production rate in hadronic Z^0 decays is presented.

  14. Theoretical aspects of the weak decay of hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubach, J.

    1986-01-01

    The present status of theoretical descriptions of mesonic (Λ → Nπ) and non-mesonic (ΛN → NN) decay modes of hypernuclei is reviewed. Calculations for the non-mesonic mode are discussed in some detail within the context of a model which describes the strangeness-changing, parity-violating, ΛN → NN ''transition potential'' in terms of π, rho, ω, eta, K, K*, and ''sigma'' exchanges. Results are presented for the total decay rate, the ratio of proton- to neutron-stimulated decay rates, and the as yet unmeasured ratio of parity-violating to parity-conserving decay rates. Calculations for nuclear matter, which are in reasonable agreement with experiment, suggest that these rates (particularly the two ratios) can provide important tests of the form of the transition potential. Considerations of finite hypernuclei are also discussed. Finally, other theoretical approaches and the present experimental situation are briefly summarized. 17 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Nuclear Enterprises portable dose rate meter type PDR 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, P.H.; Iles, W.J.

    1978-06-01

    This instrument is a portable battery powered dose rate meter covering the dose rate range from 0.05 to 500 mrad h -1 . It is designed to measure X- and γ-radiation dose rates over the energy range from 35 keV to 3 MeV. The radiation detector is an MX 164/S GM tube provided with a compensation sheath. The report describes the instrument under the headings: facilities and controls; radiation characteristics; electrical characteristics; environmental characteristics; mechanical characteristics; the manual; summary of performance. (U.K.)

  16. Regional stressing rate appears to control duration and decay of off-fault aftershocks in the 2011 M=9.0 Tohoku-oki, Japan, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, S.; Stein, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    The 11 March 2001 M=9.0 Tohoku-oki, Japan, earthquake brought the unprecedented broad increase in seismicity over inland Japan and far offshore. The seismicity rate increase was observed at distances of up to 425 km from the locus of high seismic slip on the megathrust, which roughly corresponds to the areas over 0.1 bar Coulomb stress increase (e.g., Toda et al., 2011). Such stress perturbation in the entire eastern Honshu island gives us a great opportunity to test one of the hypotheses in rate and state friction of Dieterich (1994): aftershock duration (ta) is inversely proportional to fault stressing rate. The Tohoku-oki mainshock indeed started a stopwatch simultaneously for all the off-fault and on-fault aftershocks in various tectonic situations. We have carefully examined the aftershock decays fitting the Omori-Utsu formula in several activated regions, including on the 2011 source fault, several inland areas of Tohoku (Akita, Iwaki, northern Sendai, and Fukushima), Tokyo metropolitan area, Choshi (east of Tokyo), Izu Peninsula, and areas along the most active Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line (ISTL) central Honshu. Comparing the regional aftershock decays with the background rates of seismicity estimated from the JMA catalog from 2000 to 2010, we measured ta. One of the extreme short duration was measured at the Izu Peninsula where the heightened seismicity was rapidly toned down to the normal in one month. Overall seismicity in the Tohoku mainshock zone has been mostly closing to normal in 2 - 3 years. Both regions are characterized by high loading rate due to plate collision and subduction. Seismicity beneath Tokyo, also characterized by complex plate interfaces and brought average 1 bar closer to failure, has not followed the simple Omori decay but being settled a new higher rate after a rapid decay. In contrast to these highly deformed regions, current seismicity in slowly loading Tohoku inland regions are still much higher than background rate, which

  17. Effect of a generalized particle momentum distribution on plasma nuclear fusion rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong E.; Zubarev, Alexander L.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the effect of a generalized particle momentum distribution derived by Galitskii and Yakimets (GY) on nuclear reaction rates in plasma. We derive an approximate semi-analytical formula for nuclear fusion reaction rate between nuclei in a plasma (quantum plasma nuclear fusion; or QPNF). The QPNF formula is applied to calculate deuteron-deuteron fusion rate in a plasma, and the results are compared with the results calculated with the conventional Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution. As an application, we investigate the deuteron-deuteron fusion rate for mobile deuterons in a deuterated metal/alloy. The calculated deuteron-deuteron fusion rates at low energies are enormously enhanced due to the modified tail of the GY's generalized momentum distribution. Our preliminary estimates indicate also that the deuteron-lithium (D+Li) fusion rate and the proton-lithium (p+Li) fusion rate in a metal/alloy at ambient temperatures are also substantially enhanced. (author)

  18. Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting on Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abriola, D.; Dimitriou, P.; Ricard-McCutchan, E.; Tuli, J.K.

    2013-08-01

    Biennial meetings of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) evaluators are held under the auspices of the IAEA. The Network consists of evaluation groups and data service centres in several countries. This Network has the objective of providing up-to-date nuclear structure and decay data for all known nuclides by evaluating all existing experimental data. Data resulting from this international evaluation collaboration are included in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets (NDS). The results represent the recommended 'best values' for the various nuclear structure and decay data properties. These data and bibliographic details are also available through the World Wide Web, CD-ROM, wall charts of the nuclides, Nuclear Wallet Cards and other such media. The US efforts are coordinated by the Coordinating Committee of the US Nuclear Data Program. The ENSDF master database is maintained by the US National Nuclear Data Centre at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and these data are also available from other distribution centres including the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. Biennial meetings of the Network are sponsored by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, and have the following objectives: (a) coordination of the work of all centres and groups participating in the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of NSDD; (b) maintenance of and improvements to the standards and rules governing NSDD evaluations; (c) review of the development and common use of computerized systems and databases maintained specifically for this activity. In those meetings detailed studies and discussions are undertaken over a five-day period. This document represents a summary of the Network meeting held at the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Sciences (KFAS), Safat, Kuwait, from 27 to 31 January 2013. Thirty-six nuclear data specialists from seventeen countries attended this meeting to

  19. Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting on Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abriola, D.; Dimitriou, P. [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Ricard-McCutchan, E.; Tuli, J. K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Biennial meetings of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) evaluators are held under the auspices of the IAEA. The Network consists of evaluation groups and data service centres in several countries. This Network has the objective of providing up-to-date nuclear structure and decay data for all known nuclides by evaluating all existing experimental data. Data resulting from this international evaluation collaboration are included in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets (NDS). The results represent the recommended 'best values' for the various nuclear structure and decay data properties. These data and bibliographic details are also available through the World Wide Web, CD-ROM, wall charts of the nuclides, Nuclear Wallet Cards and other such media. The US efforts are coordinated by the Coordinating Committee of the US Nuclear Data Program. The ENSDF master database is maintained by the US National Nuclear Data Centre at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and these data are also available from other distribution centres including the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. Biennial meetings of the Network are sponsored by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, and have the following objectives: (a) coordination of the work of all centres and groups participating in the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of NSDD; (b) maintenance of and improvements to the standards and rules governing NSDD evaluations; (c) review of the development and common use of computerized systems and databases maintained specifically for this activity. In those meetings detailed studies and discussions are undertaken over a five-day period. This document represents a summary of the Network meeting held at the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Sciences (KFAS), Safat, Kuwait, from 27 to 31 January 2013. Thirty-six nuclear data specialists from seventeen countries attended this meeting to

  20. Air sampling by pumping through a filter: effects of air flow rate, concentration, and decay of airborne substances

    OpenAIRE

    Šoštarić, Marko; Petrinec, Branko; Babić, Dinko

    2016-01-01

    This paper tackles the issue of interpreting the number of airborne particles adsorbed on a filter through which a certain volume of sampled air has been pumped. This number is equal to the product of the pumped volume and particle concentration in air, but only if the concentration is constant over time and if there is no substance decomposition on the filter during sampling. If this is not the case, one must take into account the inconstancy of the concentration and the decay law for a give...

  1. A measurement of the gluon splitting rate into $b\\overline{b}$ pairs in hadronic Z decays

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Alemany, R; Boix, G; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Casper, David William; Cattaneo, M; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Marinelli, N; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Robertson, N A; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Etienne, F; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Lütjens, G; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Schune, M H; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Boccali, T; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Foà, L; Forti, F; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Savaira, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    A measurement of the fraction of hadronic Z decays in which a gluon splits into a $b \\bar{b}$ pair, \\gbb, is presented using data collected by {\\t extsc ALEPH} from 1992 to 1995 at the Z resonance. The selection is based on four-jet events. Events are selected by means of topo logical cuts and a lifetime tag. The result is $g_{b \\bar{b}}=(2.77 \\pm 0.42 \\rm {(stat)} \\pm 0.57 \\rm{(syst)}) \\tim es 10^{-3}$.

  2. Radiative Decay Rates for Electric Dipole, Magnetic Dipole and Electric Quadrupole Transitions in Triply Ionized Thulium (Tm IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saturnin Enzonga Yoca

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A new set of radiative decay parameters (oscillator strengths, transition probabilities for spectral lines in triply ionized thulium (Tm IV has been obtained within the framework of the pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock (HFR approach. The effects of configuration interaction and core-polarization have been investigated in detail and the quality of the results has been assessed through a comparison between different HFR physical models. The spectroscopic data listed in the present paper cover electric dipole as well as magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole transitions in a wide range of wavelengths from extreme ultraviolet to near infrared.

  3. A Simple Correlation for Neutron Capture Rates from Nuclear Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, Aaron Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-30

    Recent studies of neutron capture performed at LANL have revealed a previously unrecognized connection between nuclear masses and the average neutron capture cross section. A team of three scientists from Los Alamos (P-27), Yale Univ., and Istanbul Univ. (Turkey) recently discovered this connection and have published their results as a Rapid Communication in Physical Review C. Neutron capture is a reaction in which a free neutron is absorbed by the nucleus, keeping the element unchanged, but changing isotopes. This reaction is typically exothermic. As a result, the reaction can proceed even when many other reaction channels are closed. In an astrophysical environment, this means that neutron capture is the primary mechanism by which all of the elements with atomic number greater than nickel are produced is neutron capture.

  4. Probing nuclear rates with Planck and BICEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Lesgourgues, Julien; Mangano, Gianpiero; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Miele, Gennaro; Pisanti, Ofelia

    2014-01-01

    Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) relates key cosmological parameters to the primordial abundance of light elements. In this paper, we point out that the recent observations of Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies by the Planck satellite and by the BICEP2 experiment constrain these parameters with such a high level of accuracy that the primordial deuterium abundance can be inferred with remarkable precision. For a given cosmological model, one can obtain independent information on nuclear processes in the energy range relevant for BBN, which determine the eventual ^2H/H yield. In particular, assuming the standard cosmological model, we show that a combined analysis of Planck data and of recent deuterium abundance measurements in metal-poor damped Lyman-alpha systems provides independent information on the cross section of the radiative capture reaction d(p,\\gamma)^3He converting deuterium into helium. Interestingly, the result is higher than the values suggested by a fit of present experimental data in the B...

  5. Airborne release fractions/rates and respirable fractions for nonreactor nuclear facilities. Volume 2, Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    This document contains compiled data from the DOE Handbook on Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear facilities. Source data and example facilities utilized, such as the Plutonium Recovery Facility, are included

  6. Measuring the linear heat generation rate of a nuclear reactor fuel pin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    A miniature gamma thermometer is described which is capable of travelling through bores distributed in an array through a nuclear reactor core and measure the linear heat generation rate of the fuel pins. (U.K.)

  7. Corrosion rate of nuclear glass in saturated media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillet, S.; Vernaz, E.; Nogues, J.L.; Jacquet-Francillon, N.

    1986-01-01

    Leaching experiments under a static mode have shown that, after a given time, the concentration of the solubilized elements reaches an apparent steady state which can be detected by a plateau in the curve of cumulated leach rates vs time. Since the real slope of this plateau is a key datum to modernize the source term, works related to the evaluation of this slope and based on a statistical approach have been necessary. Twelve static leaching experiments carried out for one year at 90 0 C were scrutinized. Various glasses, both active and nonactive, akin to the LWR French reference glass were involved. Previously, an abnormally high corrosion rate had been found after 12 months of testing. This feature could have been interpreted as a further leaching step occuring after the plateau period. The corrosion rates at 90 0 C with deionized water are compared to those gained from integral tests at 90 0 C

  8. Pulse pile-up in nuclear particle detection systems with rapidly varying counting rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datlowe, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    Pulse pile-up in nuclear particle detection systems is the distortion of the measured pulse height distribution which occurs when there is a significant probability that more than one particle will arrive within the detector resolving time. This paper treats the problem in cases where the probability of pile-up varies on a time scale comparable to the rise time of the detector system electronics. These variations introduce structure into the pulse height distributions which cannot occur for a time-independent pile-up probability. Three classes of problems which exemplify these effects are as follows: 1) Pile-up rejection circuits. 2) Cascaded nuclear decays, in which the lifetime for emission of a second X-ray is comparable to the detector rise time. 3) Bursts of particles where the intensity is modulated on a time scale comparable to the detector rise time. These problems are solved computationally by an extension of a numerical technique previously developed. (Auth.)

  9. Double beta decay: A theoretical overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews the theoretical possibility of double beta decay. The titles of the main sections of this paper are: Nuclear physics setting; Particle physics requirements; Kinematical features of the decay modes; Nuclear matrix elements; the Shell model and two-neutrino decay; Quasi-particle random phase approximation; and Future considerations. 18 refs., 7 tabs

  10. Study of $\\eta-\\eta'$ mixing from measurement of $B^0_{(s)}\\to J/\\psi\\eta^{(')}$ decay rates

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew Christopher; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Polikarpov, Sergey; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    A study of $B^0$and $B^0_s$ meson decays into $J/\\psi\\eta$ and $J/\\psi\\eta^{\\prime}$ final states is performed using a data set of proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8TeV, collected by the LHCb experiment and corresponding to 3.0fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. The decay $B^0 \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\eta^{\\prime}$ is observed for the first time. The following ratios of branching fractions are measured: $ \\frac{\\mathcal{B}(B^0 \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\eta^{\\prime})}{\\mathcal{B}(B^0_s \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\eta^{\\prime})} = (2.28\\pm0.65\\,(stat)\\,\\pm0.10\\,(syst)\\,\\pm0.13\\,(f_{s}/f_{d}))\\times10^{-2},$ $ \\frac{\\mathcal{B}(B^0 \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\eta)}{\\mathcal{B}(B^0_s \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\eta)} = (1.85\\pm0.61\\,(stat)\\,\\pm0.09\\,(syst)\\,\\pm0.11\\,(f_{s}/f_{d}))\\times10^{-2},$ where the third uncertainty is related to the present knowledge of $f_{s}/f_{d}$, the ratio between the probabilities for a $b$ quark to form a $B^0_s$ or $B^0$ meson. The branching fraction ratios are used to determine the para...

  11. Effect of construction time, interest rate, and inflation on the capital cost of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abel, P.S.; Greybeck, E.M.; Omberg, R.P.

    1981-09-01

    Cost estimates for nuclear power plants currently under construction are on the order of four billion dollars. It will be shown, in this paper, that this is a direct consequence of relatively high inflation rates and relatively long construction times. If either inflation rates or construction times, or a combination thereof, should decrease significantly, cost estimates for nuclear power plants could return to approximately two billion dollars

  12. Shell and explosive hydrogen burning. Nuclear reaction rates for hydrogen burning in RGB, AGB and Novae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeltzig, A. [Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Bruno, C.G.; Davinson, T. [University of Edinburgh, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Cavanna, F.; Ferraro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Genova (Italy); INFN, Genova (Italy); Cristallo, S. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, INAF, Teramo (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy); Depalo, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); INFN, Padova (Italy); DeBoer, R.J.; Wiescher, M. [University of Notre Dame, Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Notre Dame, Indiana (United States); Di Leva, A.; Imbriani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy); Marigo, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Terrasi, F. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica Seconda Universita di Napoli, Caserta (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    The nucleosynthesis of light elements, from helium up to silicon, mainly occurs in Red Giant and Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and Novae. The relative abundances of the synthesized nuclides critically depend on the rates of the nuclear processes involved, often through non-trivial reaction chains, combined with complex mixing mechanisms. In this paper, we summarize the contributions made by LUNA experiments in furthering our understanding of nuclear reaction rates necessary for modeling nucleosynthesis in AGB stars and Novae explosions. (orig.)

  13. Precise calculation of the dilepton invariant-mass spectrum and the decay rate in B±→π±μ+μ- in the SM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Ahmed; Parkhomenko, Alexander Ya.; Rusov, Aleksey V.

    2013-12-01

    We present a precise calculation of the dilepton invariant-mass spectrum and the decay rate for B ± →π ± l + l - (l ± =e ± ,μ ± ) in the Standard Model (SM) based on the effective Hamiltonian approach for the b→dl + l - transitions. With the Wilson coefficients already known in the next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) accuracy, the remaining theoretical uncertainty in the short-distance contribution resides in the form factors f + (q 2 ), f 0 (q 2 ) and f T (q 2 ). Of these, f + (q 2 ) is well measured in the charged-current semileptonic decays B→πlν l and we use the B-factory data to parametrize it. The corresponding form factors for the B→K transitions have been calculated in the Lattice-QCD approach for large-q 2 and extrapolated to the entire q 2 -region using the so-called z-expansion. Using an SU(3) F -breaking Ansatz, we calculate the B→π tensor form factor, which is consistent with the recently reported lattice B→π analysis obtained at large q 2 . The prediction for the total branching fraction B(B ± →π ± μ + μ - )=(1.88 +0.32 -0.21 ) x 10 -8 is in good agreement with the experimental value obtained by the LHCb collaboration. In the low q 2 -region, the Heavy-Quark Symmetry (HQS) relates the three form factors with each other. Accounting for the leading-order symmetry-breaking effects, and using data from the charged-current process B→πlν l to determine f + (q 2 ), we calculate the dilepton invariant-mass distribution in the low q 2 -region in the B ± →π ± l + l - decay. This provides a model-independent and precise calculation of the partial branching ratio for this decay.

  14. Nuclear transparency and double beta decay of molybdenum 100. Annual report, February 1, 1995 - January 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, H.W.

    1995-07-01

    This report describes progress in data analysis for a search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of molybdenum 100 and related work, Brookhaven National Laboratory's Experiment 850 on color transparency, and work on Brookhaven's EVA detector and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's B factory experiment. 6 refs

  15. Radioactive Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  16. Prediction on corrosion rate of pipe in nuclear power system based on optimized grey theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yonghong; Zhang Dafa; Chen Dengke; Jiang Wei

    2007-01-01

    For the prediction of corrosion rate of pipe in nuclear power system, the pre- diction error from the grey theory is greater, so a new method, optimized grey theory was presented in the paper. A comparison among predicted results from present and other methods was carried out, and it is seem that optimized grey theory is correct and effective for the prediction of corrosion rate of pipe in nuclear power system, and it provides a fundamental basis for the maintenance of pipe in nuclear power system. (authors)

  17. A Novel Pulse-Chase SILAC Strategy Measures Changes in Protein Decay and Synthesis Rates Induced by Perturbation of Proteostasis with an Hsp90 Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro-Monti, Ivo; Racle, Julien; Hernandez, Celine; Waridel, Patrice; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Quadroni, Manfredo

    2013-01-01

    Standard proteomics methods allow the relative quantitation of levels of thousands of proteins in two or more samples. While such methods are invaluable for defining the variations in protein concentrations which follow the perturbation of a biological system, they do not offer information on the mechanisms underlying such changes. Expanding on previous work [1], we developed a pulse-chase (pc) variant of SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture). pcSILAC can quantitate in one experiment and for two conditions the relative levels of proteins newly synthesized in a given time as well as the relative levels of remaining preexisting proteins. We validated the method studying the drug-mediated inhibition of the Hsp90 molecular chaperone, which is known to lead to increased synthesis of stress response proteins as well as the increased decay of Hsp90 “clients”. We showed that pcSILAC can give information on changes in global cellular proteostasis induced by treatment with the inhibitor, which are normally not captured by standard relative quantitation techniques. Furthermore, we have developed a mathematical model and computational framework that uses pcSILAC data to determine degradation constants kd and synthesis rates Vs for proteins in both control and drug-treated cells. The results show that Hsp90 inhibition induced a generalized slowdown of protein synthesis and an increase in protein decay. Treatment with the inhibitor also resulted in widespread protein-specific changes in relative synthesis rates, together with variations in protein decay rates. The latter were more restricted to individual proteins or protein families than the variations in synthesis. Our results establish pcSILAC as a viable workflow for the mechanistic dissection of changes in the proteome which follow perturbations. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000538. PMID:24312217

  18. A novel pulse-chase SILAC strategy measures changes in protein decay and synthesis rates induced by perturbation of proteostasis with an Hsp90 inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Fierro-Monti

    Full Text Available Standard proteomics methods allow the relative quantitation of levels of thousands of proteins in two or more samples. While such methods are invaluable for defining the variations in protein concentrations which follow the perturbation of a biological system, they do not offer information on the mechanisms underlying such changes. Expanding on previous work [1], we developed a pulse-chase (pc variant of SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture. pcSILAC can quantitate in one experiment and for two conditions the relative levels of proteins newly synthesized in a given time as well as the relative levels of remaining preexisting proteins. We validated the method studying the drug-mediated inhibition of the Hsp90 molecular chaperone, which is known to lead to increased synthesis of stress response proteins as well as the increased decay of Hsp90 "clients". We showed that pcSILAC can give information on changes in global cellular proteostasis induced by treatment with the inhibitor, which are normally not captured by standard relative quantitation techniques. Furthermore, we have developed a mathematical model and computational framework that uses pcSILAC data to determine degradation constants kd and synthesis rates Vs for proteins in both control and drug-treated cells. The results show that Hsp90 inhibition induced a generalized slowdown of protein synthesis and an increase in protein decay. Treatment with the inhibitor also resulted in widespread protein-specific changes in relative synthesis rates, together with variations in protein decay rates. The latter were more restricted to individual proteins or protein families than the variations in synthesis. Our results establish pcSILAC as a viable workflow for the mechanistic dissection of changes in the proteome which follow perturbations. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000538.

  19. The lambda mechanism of the 0nbb-decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimkovic, Fedor; Štefánik, Dušan; Dvornický, Rastislav

    2017-11-01

    The lambda mechanism (WL-WR exchange) of the neutrinoless double beta decay (0nbb-decay), which has origin in left-right symmetric model with right-handed gauge boson at TeV scale, is investigated. The revisited formalism of the 0nbb-decay, which includes higher order terms of nucleon current, is exploited. The corresponding nuclear matrix elements are calculated within quasiparticle random phase approximation with partial restoration of the isospin symmetry for nuclei of experimental interest. A possibility to distinguish between the conventional light neutrino mass (WL-WL exchange) and lambda mechanisms by observation of the 0nbb-decay in several nuclei is discussed. A qualitative comparison of effective lepton number violating couplings associated with these two mechanisms is performed. By making viable assumption about the seesaw type mixing of light and heavy neutrinos it is concluded that there is a dominance of the conventional light neutrino mass mechanism in the decay rate.

  20. Measuring pion beta decay with high-energy pion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, W.K.; Hoffman, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    Improved measurements of the pion beta decay rate are possible with an intense high-energy pion beam. The rate for the decay π + → π 0 e + vε is predicted by the Standard Model (SM) to be R(π + → π 0 e + vε) = 0.3999±0.0005 s -1 . The best experimental number, obtained using in-flight decays, is R(π + → π 0 e + vε) = 0.394 ± 0.015 s -1 . A precise measurement would test the SM by testing the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix for which one analysis of the nuclear beta decay data has shown a 0.4% discrepancy. Several nuclear correction factors, needed for nuclear decay, are not present for pion beta decay, so that an experiment at the 0.2% level would be a significant one. Detailed study of possible designs will be needed, as well as extensive testing of components. The reduction of systematic errors to the 0.1% level can only be done over a period of years with a highly stable apparatus and beam. At a minimum, three years of occupancy of a beam line, with 800 hours per year, would be required

  1. Low leach rate glasses for immobilization of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Buckwalter, C.Q.

    1980-10-01

    Improved defense and commercial waste glass have about one order of magnitude lower leach rates at 90 0 C in static deionized water than reference glasses. This durability difference diminishes as the leaching temperature is raised, but at repository temperature less than 150 0 C, the improved compositions would have considerable advantages over reference glases. At the melting temperatures necessary for most of the high-durability glasses, volatility was found to be higher than that experienced in processing current reference glases. Higher volatilities might be compensated for by specific design of the off-gas system for improved off-gas treatment and volatile materials recovery. 6 figures, 2 tables

  2. DEPENDENCE OF X-RAY BURST MODELS ON NUCLEAR REACTION RATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cyburt, R. H.; Keek, L.; Schatz, H. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Amthor, A. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States); Heger, A.; Meisel, Z.; Smith, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Johnson, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2016-10-20

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear flashes on the surface of accreting neutron stars, and reliable burst models are needed to interpret observations in terms of properties of the neutron star and the binary system. We investigate the dependence of X-ray burst models on uncertainties in (p, γ ), ( α , γ ), and ( α , p) nuclear reaction rates using fully self-consistent burst models that account for the feedbacks between changes in nuclear energy generation and changes in astrophysical conditions. A two-step approach first identified sensitive nuclear reaction rates in a single-zone model with ignition conditions chosen to match calculations with a state-of-the-art 1D multi-zone model based on the Kepler stellar evolution code. All relevant reaction rates on neutron-deficient isotopes up to mass 106 were individually varied by a factor of 100 up and down. Calculations of the 84 changes in reaction rate with the highest impact were then repeated in the 1D multi-zone model. We find a number of uncertain reaction rates that affect predictions of light curves and burst ashes significantly. The results provide insights into the nuclear processes that shape observables from X-ray bursts, and guidance for future nuclear physics work to reduce nuclear uncertainties in X-ray burst models.

  3. Weak decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcicki, S.

    1978-11-01

    Lectures are given on weak decays from a phenomenological point of view, emphasizing new results and ideas and the relation of recent results to the new standard theoretical model. The general framework within which the weak decay is viewed and relevant fundamental questions, weak decays of noncharmed hadrons, decays of muons and the tau, and the decays of charmed particles are covered. Limitation is made to the discussion of those topics that either have received recent experimental attention or are relevant to the new physics. (JFP) 178 references

  4. Material composition and nuclear data libraries' influence on nickel-chromium alloys activation evaluation: a comparison with decay heat experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Cepraga, D G

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the activation analyses on Inconel-600 nickel-chromium alloy. Three activation data libraries, namely the EAF-4.1, the EAF-97 and the FENDL/A-2, and the FENDL/D-2 decay data library, have been used to perform the calculation with the European activation code ANITA-4/M. The neutron flux distribution into the material samples was provided by JAERI as results of 3D Monte-Carlo MCNP transport code experiment simulation. A comparison with integral decay heat measurement performed at the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS), JAERI, Tokai, Japan, is used to validate the computational approach. The calculation results are given and discussed. The impact of the material composition, including impurities, on the decay heat of samples irradiated in fusion-like neutron spectra is assessed and discussed. The discrepancies calculations-experiments are within the experimental errors, that is between 6% and 10%, except for the short cooling times (less than 40 min after the end of irradiation). To improve calcul...

  5. Common cause failure rate estimates for diesel generators in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steverson, J.A.; Atwood, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    Common cause fault rates for diesel generators in nuclear power plants are estimated, using Licensee Event Reports for the years 1976 through 1978. The binomial failure rate method, used for obtaining the estimates, is briefly explained. Issues discussed include correct classification of common cause events, grouping of the events into homogeneous data subsets, and dealing with plant-to-plant variation

  6. Compilation and R-matrix analysis of Big Bang nuclear reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descouvemont, Pierre; Adahchour, Abderrahim; Angulo, Carmen; Coc, Alain; Vangioni-Flam, Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    We use the R-matrix theory to fit low-energy data on nuclear reactions involved in Big Bang nucleosynthesis. Special attention is paid to the rate uncertainties which are evaluated on statistical grounds. We provide S factors and reaction rates in tabular and graphical formats

  7. Calorimeter measures high nuclear heating rates and their gradients across a reactor test hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwell, D.; Coombe, J. R.; Mc Bride, J.

    1970-01-01

    Pedestal-type calorimeter measures gamma-ray heating rates from 0.5 to 7.0 watts per gram of aluminum. Nuclear heating rate is a function of cylinder temperature change, measured by four chromel-alumel thermocouples attached to the calorimeter, and known thermoconductivity of the tested material.

  8. Tau decays into kaons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkemeier, M.; Mirkes, E.

    1995-04-01

    Predictions for semi-leptonic decay rates of the τ lepton into two meson final states and three meson final states are derived. The hadronic matrix elements are expressed in terms of form factors, which can be predicted by chiral Lagrangians supplemented by informations about all possible low-lying resonances in the different channels. Isospin symmetry relations among the different final states are carefully taken into account. The calculated brancing ratios are compared with measured decay rates where data are available

  9. Dynamics of warm power-law plateau inflation with a generalized inflaton decay rate: predictions and constraints after Planck 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jawad, Abdul [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan); Videla, Nelson [FCFM, Universidad de Chile, Departamento de Fisica, Santiago (Chile); Gulshan, Faiza [Lahore Leads University, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2017-05-15

    In the present work, we study the consequences of considering a new family of single-field inflation models, called power-law plateau inflation, in the warm inflation framework. We consider the inflationary expansion is driven by a standard scalar field with a decay ratio Γ having a generic power-law dependence with the scalar field φ and the temperature of the thermal bath T given by Γ(φ,T) = C{sub φ}(T{sup a})/(φ{sup a-1}). Assuming that our model evolves according to the strong dissipative regime, we study the background and perturbative dynamics, obtaining the most relevant inflationary observable as the scalar power spectrum, the scalar spectral index and its running and the tensor-to-scalar ratio. The free parameters characterizing our model are constrained by considering the essential condition for warm inflation, the conditions for the model evolves according to the strong dissipative regime and the 2015 Planck results through the n{sub s}-r plane. For completeness, we study the predictions in the n{sub s}-dn{sub s}/d ln k plane. The model is consistent with a strong dissipative dynamics and predicts values for the tensor-to-scalar ratio and for the running of the scalar spectral index consistent with current bounds imposed by Planck and we conclude that the model is viable. (orig.)

  10. Dynamics of warm power-law plateau inflation with a generalized inflaton decay rate: predictions and constraints after Planck 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jawad, Abdul; Videla, Nelson; Gulshan, Faiza

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we study the consequences of considering a new family of single-field inflation models, called power-law plateau inflation, in the warm inflation framework. We consider the inflationary expansion is driven by a standard scalar field with a decay ratio Γ having a generic power-law dependence with the scalar field φ and the temperature of the thermal bath T given by Γ(φ,T) = C_φ(T"a)/(φ"a"-"1). Assuming that our model evolves according to the strong dissipative regime, we study the background and perturbative dynamics, obtaining the most relevant inflationary observable as the scalar power spectrum, the scalar spectral index and its running and the tensor-to-scalar ratio. The free parameters characterizing our model are constrained by considering the essential condition for warm inflation, the conditions for the model evolves according to the strong dissipative regime and the 2015 Planck results through the n_s-r plane. For completeness, we study the predictions in the n_s-dn_s/d ln k plane. The model is consistent with a strong dissipative dynamics and predicts values for the tensor-to-scalar ratio and for the running of the scalar spectral index consistent with current bounds imposed by Planck and we conclude that the model is viable. (orig.)

  11. Improvement to the gross theory of β decay by inclusion of change in parity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koura, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Satoshi

    2017-06-01

    An improvement to the single-particle structure is made to the gross theory, which is a global β -decay model. The gross theory is based on the sum rule of the intensity of the β -decay transition and a strength function. This model provides reasonable results for β -decay rates and delayed neutrons for the entire nuclear mass region. An attempt is made to improve the gross theory of nuclear β decay by considering the change in parity at the single-particle level of ground-state nuclei. In this treatment, the nuclear matrix elements are suppressed when the parity of the single neutron and proton levels is different for the allowed transition. The assignment of parity is performed using the Woods-Saxon-type single-particle potential. The discrepancies from experimental half-lives, which appeared in the vicinity of the magic numbers of neutrons and protons, are systematically improved in the nuclear mass region.

  12. Review on transactinium isotope build-up and decay in reactor fuel and related sensitivities to cross section changes and results and main conclusions of the IAEA-Advisory Group Meeting on Transactinium Nuclear Data, held at Karlsruhe, November 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuesters, H.; Lalovic, M.

    1976-04-01

    In this report a review is given on the actinium isotope build-up and decay in LWRs, LMFBRs and HTRs. The dependence of the corresponding physical aspects on reactor type, fuel cycle strategy, calculational methods and cross section uncertainties is discussed. Results from postirradiation analyses and from integral experiments in fast zero power assemblies are compared with theoretical predictions. Some sensitivity studies about the influence of actinium nuclear data uncertainties on the isotopic concentration, decay heat, and the radiation out-put in fuel and waste are presented. In a second part, the main results of the IAEA-Advisory Group Meeting on Transactinium Nuclear Data are summarized and discussed. (orig.) [de

  13. The Small Nuclear Genomes of Selaginella Are Associated with a Low Rate of Genome Size Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniaga, Anthony E; Arrigo, Nils; Barker, Michael S

    2016-06-03

    The haploid nuclear genome size (1C DNA) of vascular land plants varies over several orders of magnitude. Much of this observed diversity in genome size is due to the proliferation and deletion of transposable elements. To date, all vascular land plant lineages with extremely small nuclear genomes represent recently derived states, having ancestors with much larger genome sizes. The Selaginellaceae represent an ancient lineage with extremely small genomes. It is unclear how small nuclear genomes evolved in Selaginella We compared the rates of nuclear genome size evolution in Selaginella and major vascular plant clades in a comparative phylogenetic framework. For the analyses, we collected 29 new flow cytometry estimates of haploid genome size in Selaginella to augment publicly available data. Selaginella possess some of the smallest known haploid nuclear genome sizes, as well as the lowest rate of genome size evolution observed across all vascular land plants included in our analyses. Additionally, our analyses provide strong support for a history of haploid nuclear genome size stasis in Selaginella Our results indicate that Selaginella, similar to other early diverging lineages of vascular land plants, has relatively low rates of genome size evolution. Further, our analyses highlight that a rapid transition to a small genome size is only one route to an extremely small genome. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  14. Double Beta Decay Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepke, A.

    2005-01-01

    The experimental observation of neutrino oscillations and thus neutrino mass and mixing gives a first hint at new particle physics. The absolute values of the neutrino mass and the properties of neutrinos under CP-conjugation remain unknown. The experimental investigation of the nuclear double beta decay is one of the key techniques for solving these open problems

  15. Gamow-Teller decay and nuclear deformation: implementing of a new total absorption spectrometer, study of isotopes N ≅ Z krypton and strontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, E.

    2002-12-01

    Nuclei with A ∼ 70 along the N=Z line are known to be the scene of phenomena closely related to the nuclear deformation and are of particular interest since theoretical mean field calculations predict that a large part of the Gamow-Teller resonance might be located below the ground state of the mother nucleus and then be accessible through β-decay studies. These results have shown the effect of the shape of the ground state on the intensity of the Gamow-Teller strength. Thus, the experimental determination, through δ-decay, of the Gamow-Teller strength distribution and the comparison to the theoretical predictions allow to pin down the quadrupolar deformation parameter of the ground state of the parent nucleus. In order to study the neutron deficient isotopes of krypton (A=72,73,74,75) and strontium (A=76,77,78) and to establish the β-strength on the full energy range, a new total absorption spectrometer (TAgS) has been built in the frame of an international collaboration and installed at the (SOLDE/CERN mass separator. For the data analysis, the response function R of the spectrometer has been calculated by means of Monte-Carlo simulations, based on the GEANT4 code, and of a statistical description of the level scheme in the daughter nucleus. The β-feeding distribution has been obtained from experimental spectra through a method based on Bayes theorem and then converted into Gamow-Teller strength. The results coming from the 74 Kr decay analysis allow to describe the ground state of such a nucleus as the coexistence of an oblate shape and of a prolate shape. In the case of 76 Sr, the experimental Gamow-Teller strength distribution strongly indicates a prolate deformation. (author)

  16. Classification of decays involving variable decay chains with convolutional architectures

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Vidyo contribution We present a technique to perform classification of decays that exhibit decay chains involving a variable number of particles, which include a broad class of $B$ meson decays sensitive to new physics. The utility of such decays as a probe of the Standard Model is dependent upon accurate determination of the decay rate, which is challenged by the combinatorial background arising in high-multiplicity decay modes. In our model, each particle in the decay event is represented as a fixed-dimensional vector of feature attributes, forming an $n \\times k$ representation of the event, where $n$ is the number of particles in the event and $k$ is the dimensionality of the feature vector. A convolutional architecture is used to capture dependencies between the embedded particle representations and perform the final classification. The proposed model performs outperforms standard machine learning approaches based on Monte Carlo studies across a range of variable final-state decays with the Belle II det...

  17. Optimization in the nuclear fuel cycle I: Temporal variation of dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, W.S.; Silva, A.X.; Lopes, J.M.; Carmo, A.S.; Fernandes, T.S.; Mello, C.R.; Kelecom, A.

    2017-01-01

    Radioprotection aims to protect man and the environment from the harmful effects of radiation. Radioprotection is based on three fundamental principles: justification, dose limitation and optimization. Optimization is a complementary principle to dose limitation and should be applied in all phases of development, and even in unregulated situations. The aim of this work is to use the exposure rate as a tool to optimize radioprotection. The exposure rate at a nuclear facility was monitored at 15 points for one year and statistical tools for data analysis were proposed as auxiliary tools for the process of optimizing the dose rates measured at the facility. A total of 9,125 exposure-rate measures were performed during 2014. The monthly averages were organized by sampling point and by month of the year. No statistical difference was observed in the monthly variation of the dose rate. Therefore, this variable can not be used in the optimization process in this nuclear installation

  18. An analytical method for estimating the 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of organic compounds with complex free induction decays for radiation effects studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iselin, L.H.

    1992-01-01

    The use of 14 N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as a radiation dosimetry tool has only recently been explored. An analytical method for analyzing 14 N NQR complex free induction decays is presented with the background necessary to conduct pulsed NQR experiments. The 14 N NQR energy levels and possible transitions are derived in step-by-step detail. The components of a pulsed NQR spectrometer are discussed along with the experimental techniques for conducting radiation effects experiments using the spectrometer. Three data analysis techniques -- the power spectral density Fourier transform, state space singular value decomposition (HSVD), and nonlinear curve fitting (using the downhill simplex method of global optimization and the Levenberg-Marquart method) -- are explained. These three techniques are integrated into an analytical method which uses these numerical techniques in this order to determine the physical NQR parameters. Sample data sets of urea and guanidine sulfate data are used to demonstrate how these methods can be employed to analyze both simple and complex free induction decays. By determining baseline values for biologically significant organics, radiation effects on the NQR parameters can be studied to provide a link between current radiation dosimetry techniques and the biological effects of radiation

  19. An analytical method for estimating the 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of organic compounds with complex free induction decays for radiation effects studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iselin, Louis Henry [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The use of 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as a radiation dosimetry tool has only recently been explored. An analytical method for analyzing 14N NQR complex free induction decays is presented with the background necessary to conduct pulsed NQR experiments. The 14N NQR energy levels and possible transitions are derived in step-by-step detail. The components of a pulsed NQR spectrometer are discussed along with the experimental techniques for conducting radiation effects experiments using the spectrometer. Three data analysis techniques -- the power spectral density Fourier transform, state space singular value decomposition (HSVD), and nonlinear curve fitting (using the downhill simplex method of global optimization and the Levenberg-Marquart method) -- are explained. These three techniques are integrated into an analytical method which uses these numerical techniques in this order to determine the physical NQR parameters. Sample data sets of urea and guanidine sulfate data are used to demonstrate how these methods can be employed to analyze both simple and complex free induction decays. By determining baseline values for biologically significant organics, radiation effects on the NQR parameters can be studied to provide a link between current radiation dosimetry techniques and the biological effects of radiation.

  20. Aspects of B decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faller, Sven

    2011-01-01

    B-meson decays are a good probe for testing the flavour sector of the standard model of particle physics. The standard model describes at present all experimental data satisfactorily, although some ''tensions'' exist, i.e. two to three sigma deviations from the predictions, in particular in B decays. The arguments against the standard model are thus purely theoretical. These tensions between experimental data and theoretical predictions provide an extension of the standard model by new physics contributions. Within the flavour sector main theoretical uncertainties are related to the hadronic matrix elements. For exclusive semileptonic anti B → D (*) l anti ν decays QCD sum rule techniques, which are suitable for studying hadronic matrix elements, however, with substantial, but estimable hadronic uncertainties, are used. The exploration of new physics effects in B-meson decays is done in an twofold way. In exclusive semileptonic anti B → D (*) l anti ν decays the effect of additional right-handed vector as well as left- and right-handed scalar and tensor hadronic current structures in the decay rates and the form factors are studied at the non-recoil point. As a second approach one studied the non-leptonic B 0 s →J/ψφ and B 0 →J/ψK S,L decays discussing CP violating effects in the time-dependent decay amplitudes by considering new physics phase in the B 0 - anti B 0 mixing phase. (orig.)

  1. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A; Illman, Walter A

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Modification of erbium photoluminescence decay rate due to ITO layers on thin films of SiO{sub 2}:Er doped with Si-nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojdak, M., E-mail: m.wojdak@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Jayatilleka, H. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3G4 (Canada); Shah, M. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Kenyon, A.J., E-mail: t.kenyon@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Gourbilleau, F.; Rizk, R. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique (CIMAP), ENSICAEN, CNRS, CEA/IRAMIS, Université de Caen, 14050 CAEN cedex (France)

    2013-04-15

    During the fabrication of MOS light emitting devices, the thin film of active material is usually characterized by photoluminescence measurements before electrical contacts are deposited. However, the presence of a conductive contact layer can alter the luminescent properties of the active material. The local optical density of states changes due to the proximity of luminescent species to the interface with the conductive medium (the top electrode), and this modifies the radiative rate of luminescent centers within the active layer. In this paper we report enhancement of the observed erbium photoluminescence rate after deposition of indium tin oxide contacts on thin films of SiO{sub 2}:Er containing silicon nanoclusters, and relate this to Purcell enhancement of the erbium radiative rate. -- Highlights: ► We studied photoluminescence of Er in SiO{sub 2} thin films doped with Si nanoclusters. ► Presence of ITO layer on the top enhances photoluminescence decay rate of Er. ► The effect depends on the thickness of active film. ► Radiative rate change in proximity of ITO layer was calculated theoretically. ► The calculation results are compared with the experiment and discussed.

  3. Preliminary results on food consumption rates for off-site dose calculation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gab Bock; Chung, Yang Geun; Bang, Sun Young; Kang, Duk Won

    2005-01-01

    The Internal dose by food consumption mostly account for radiological dose of public around nuclear power plants(NPP). But, food consumption rate applied to off-site dose calculation in Korea which is the result of field investigation around Kori NPP by the KAERI in 1988. is not reflected of the latest dietary characteristics. The Ministry of Health and Welfare Affairs has investigated the food and nutrition of nations every 3 years based on the Law of National Health Improvement. To update the food consumption rates of the maximum individual, the analysis of the national food investigation results and field surveys around nuclear power plant sites have been carried out

  4. Use of insecticide quantification kits to investigate the quality of spraying and decay rate of bendiocarb on different wall surfaces in Kagera region, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thawer, Narjis G; Ngondi, Jeremiah M; Mugalura, Frances E; Emmanuel, Isaac; Mwalimu, Charles D; Morou, Evangelia; Vontas, John; Protopopoff, Natacha; Rowland, Mark; Mutagahywa, Joshua; Lalji, Shabbir; Molteni, Fabrizio; Ramsan, Mahdi M; Willilo, Ritha; Wright, Alexandra; Kafuko, Jessica M; Ndong, Isaiah; Reithinger, Richard; Magesa, Stephen Masingili

    2015-04-22

    Bendiocarb was introduced for the first time for Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS) in Tanzania in 2012 as part of the interim national insecticide resistance management plan. This move followed reports of increasingly alarming levels of pyrethroid resistance across the country. This study used the insecticide quantification kit (IQK) to investigate the intra-operational IRS coverage and quality of spraying, and decay rate of bendiocarb on different wall surfaces in Kagera region. To assess intra-operational IRS coverage and quality of spraying, 104 houses were randomly selected out of 161,414 sprayed houses. A total of 509 samples (218 in Muleba and 291 in Karagwe) were obtained by scraping the insecticide samples from wall surfaces. To investigate decay rate, 66 houses (36 in Muleba and 30 in Karagwe) were selected and samples were collected monthly for a period of five months. Laboratory testing of insecticide concentration was done using IQK(TM) [Innovative Vector Control Consortium]. Of the 509 samples, 89.5% met the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended concentration (between 100-400 mg/m(2)) for IRS target dosage. The proportion of samples meeting WHO standards varied between Karagwe (84.3%) and Muleba (96.3%) (p house level revealed that Muleba (84.8%) had a significantly higher proportion of households that met the expected target dosage (100-400 mg/m(2)) compared to Karagwe (68.9%) (p houses with recommended concentration declined from 96.9%, 93.5% and 76.2% at months one, two, and three post IRS, respectively (p-trend = 0.03). The rate of decay increased in the fourth and fifth month post spraying with only 55.9% and 26.3% houses meeting the WHO recommendations, respectively. IQK is an important tool for assessing IRS coverage and quality of spraying. The study found adequate coverage of IRS; however, residual life of bendiocarb was observed to be three months. Results suggest that in order to maintain the recommended concentrations with

  5. 37-Active rods fuel element for Atucha 1 nuclear power plant. Effects of this change in design over the neutronic behavior, decay power and radioactive inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, Javier E.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of the use of 37-rods fuel element on the behavior of the Atucha 1 nuclear power plant homogeneous core with slightly enriched fuel to 0.85 w % were studied through representative parameters such as average discharge burnup, channel powers, reactivity coefficients, kinetic parameters, radioactive inventory and decay power. In general, the values of mentioned parameters are similar to those corresponding to a core with the 36-rods fuel element actually in use, although it must be emphasized a decrease both in linear power and, in minor degree, in the efficiency of shut-off and control rods and a slight increase in the discharge burnup. The fuel management strategy developed for a core with 36-rods elements can be maintained. (author)

  6. Investigation of parity admixtures in nuclear states by measuring the β-γ directional correlation of the 203Hg → 203Tl decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dydak, F.

    1972-01-01

    As a consequence of a weak nucleon-nucleon interaction parity admixtures in nuclear states give rise to a small forward-backward asymmetry of γ-quanta with respect to the direction of β-particle emission. A highly accurate arrangement using four β- and two γ-detectors has been developed to determine the odd Legendre term A cos(theta) in the β-γ directional correlation of the cascade decay 203 Hg→ 203 Tl as well as a control value which should be zero. The electronic equipment is a specially designed nanosecond system. The sources were prepared by means of a mass separator. Possible systematic distortions of the experimental data were carefully examined. A generalized least squares fit method symmetric in all variables was deduced for a correct data evaluation. The measurements yielded the coefficient A 1 = -(2,7+-0,7).10 -4 and the control value +(0,7+-0,8).10 -4 . (author)

  7. Measurement of air dose rates over a wide area around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant through a series of car-borne surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andoh, Masaki; Nakahara, Yukio; Tsuda, Shuichi; Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Matsuda, Norihiro; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Mikami, Satoshi; Kinouchi, Nobuyuki; Sato, Tetsuro; Tanigaki, Minoru; Takamiya, Koichi; Sato, Nobuhiro; Okumura, Ryo; Uchihori, Yukio; Saito, Kimiaki

    2015-01-01

    A series of car-borne surveys using the Kyoto University RAdiation MApping (KURAMA) and KURAMA-II survey systems has been conducted over a wide area in eastern Japan since June 2011 to evaluate the distribution of air dose rates around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant and to evaluate the time-dependent trend of decrease in air dose rates. An automated data processing system for the KURAMA-II system was established, which enabled rapid analysis of large amounts of data obtained using about 100 KURAMA-II units. The initial data used for evaluating the migration status of radioactive cesium were obtained in the first survey, followed by other car-borne surveys conducted over more extensive and wider measurement ranges. By comparing the measured air dose rates obtained in each survey (until December 2012), the decreasing trend of air dose rates measured through car-borne surveys was found to be more pronounced than those expected on the basis of the physical decay of radioactive cesium and of the air dose rates measured using NaI (Tl) survey meters in the areas surrounding the roadways. In addition, it was found that the extent of decrease in air dose rates depended on land use, wherein it decreased faster for land used as building sites than for forested areas. - Highlights: • Air dose rates distribution maps were constructed by Car-borne surveys. • KURAMA and KURAMA-II systems have been used for the measurement since 2011. • An automated data processing system for the KURAMA-II system was established. • Decreasing of the dose rates was more pronounced than those of the physical decay. • The dose rates decreased faster for building sites than for forested areas

  8. On-line validation of feedwater flow rate in nuclear power plants using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadem, M.; Ipakchi, A.; Alexandro, F.J.; Colley, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    On-line calibration of feedwater flow rate measurement in nuclear power plants provides a continuous realistic value of feedwater flow rate. It also reduces the manpower required for periodic calibration needed due to the fouling and defouling of the venturi meter surface condition. This paper presents a method for on-line validation of feedwater flow rate in nuclear power plants. The method is an improvement of the previously developed method which is based on the use of a set of process variables dynamically related to the feedwater flow rate. The online measurements of this set of variables are used as inputs to a neural network to obtain an estimate of the feedwater flow rate reading. The difference between the on-line feedwater flow rate reading, and the neural network estimate establishes whether there is a need to apply a correction factor to the feedwater flow rate measurement for calculation of the actual reactor power. The method was applied to the feedwater flow meters in the two feedwater flow loops of the TMI-1 nuclear power plant. The venturi meters used for flow measurements are susceptible to frequent fouling that degrades their measurement accuracy. The fouling effects can cause an inaccuracy of up to 3% relative error in feedwater flow rate reading. A neural network, whose inputs were the readings of a set of reference instruments, was designed to predict both feedwater flow rates simultaneously. A multi-layer feedforward neural network employing the backpropagation algorithm was used. A number of neural network training tests were performed to obtain an optimum filtering technique of the input/output data of the neural networks. The result of the selection of the filtering technique was confirmed by numerous Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) tests. Training and testing were done on data from TMI-1 nuclear power plant. The results show that the neural network can predict the correct flow rates with an absolute relative error of less than 2%

  9. Estimation of component failure rates for PSA on nuclear power plants 1982-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirimoto, Yukihiro; Matsuzaki, Akihiro; Sasaki, Atsushi

    2001-01-01

    Probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) on nuclear power plants has been studied for many years by the Japanese industry. The PSA methodology has been improved so that PSAs for all commercial LWRs were performed and used to examine for accident management.On the other hand, most data of component failure rates in these PSAs were acquired from U.S. databases. Nuclear Information Center (NIC) of Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) serves utilities by providing safety- , and reliability-related information on operation and maintenance of the nuclear power plants, and by evaluating the plant performance and incident trends. So, NIC started a research study on estimating the major component failure rates at the request of the utilities in 1988. As a result, we estimated the hourly-failure rates of 47 component types and the demand-failure rates of 15 component types. The set of domestic component reliability data from 1982 to 1991 for 34 LWRs has been evaluated by a group of PSA experts in Japan at the Nuclear Safety Research Association (NSRA) in 1995 and 1996, and the evaluation report was issued in March 1997. This document describes the revised component failure rate calculated by our re-estimation on 49 Japanese LWRs from 1982 to 1997. (author)

  10. Iconic decay in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Britta; Kappenman, Emily S; Robinson, Benjamin M; Fuller, Rebecca L; Luck, Steven J; Gold, James M

    2011-09-01

    Working memory impairment is considered a core deficit in schizophrenia, but the precise nature of this deficit has not been determined. Multiple lines of evidence implicate deficits at the encoding stage. During encoding, information is held in a precategorical sensory store termed iconic memory, a literal image of the stimulus with high capacity but rapid decay. Pathologically increased iconic decay could reduce the number of items that can be transferred into working memory before the information is lost and could thus contribute to the working memory deficit seen in the illness. The current study used a partial report procedure to test the hypothesis that patients with schizophrenia (n = 37) display faster iconic memory decay than matched healthy control participants (n = 28). Six letters, arranged in a circle, were presented for 50 ms. Following a variable delay of 0-1000 ms, a central arrow cue indicated the item to be reported. In both patients and control subjects, recall accuracy decreased with increasing cue delay, reflecting decay of the iconic representation of the stimulus array. Patients displayed impaired memory performance across all cue delays, consistent with an impairment in working memory, but the rate of iconic memory decay did not differ between patients and controls. This provides clear evidence against faster loss of iconic memory representations in schizophrenia, ruling out iconic decay as an underlying source of the working memory impairment in this population. Thus, iconic decay rate can be added to a growing list of unimpaired cognitive building blocks in schizophrenia.

  11. Measurements of the nuclear reaction rates and spectral indices along the radius of the fuel pellets of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitelli, Ulysses d'Utra; Mura, Luis Felipe L.; Fanaro, Leda C.C.B.

    2009-01-01

    This work presents the measures of the nuclear reaction rates along of the radial direction of the fuel pellet by irradiation and posterior gamma spectrometry of a thin slice of fuel pellet of UO 2 at 4.3% enrichment. From its irradiation the rate of radioactive capture and fission are measures as a function of the radius of the pellet disk using a HPGe detector. Diverse lead collimators of changeable diameters have been used for this purpose. Simulating the fuel pellet in the pin fuel of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, a thin disk is used, being inserted in the interior of a dismountable fuel rod. This fuel rod is then placed in the central position of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor core and irradiated during 1 hour under a neutron flux of 5.10 8 n/cm 2 s. The nuclear reaction of radioactive capture occurs in the atoms of U- 238 that when absorbs a neutron transmutes into U- 239 of half-life of only 23 minutes. Thus, it is opted for the detection of the Np- 239 , radionuclide derivative of the radioactive decay of the U- 239 and that has a measurable half-life (2.335 days). In gamma spectrometry 11 collimators with different diameters have been used, consequently, the gamma spectrometry is made in function of the diameter (radius) of the irradiated UO 2 fuel pellet disk, thus is possible to get the average value of the counting for each collimator in function of the specific pellet radius. These values are directly proportional to the radioactive capture nuclear reaction rates. The same way the nuclear fission rate occurs in the atoms of the U- 235 that produce different fission products such as Ce- 143 with a yield fission of 5.9% and applying the same procedure the fission nuclear reaction rate is obtained. This work presents some calculated values of nuclear reaction rate of radioactive capture and fission along of the radial direction of the fuel pellet obtained by Monte Carlo methodology using the MCNP-4C code. The relative values obtained are compared with experimental

  12. Tau decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golutvin, A.

    1994-09-01

    The most recent experimental results of τ physics are reviewed. The covered topics include precision measurements of semihadronic τ decay and their impact on tau branching ratio budget, the current status of the tau consistency test, a determination of Michel parameters and τ neutrino helicity, and upper limits on lepton-number violating τ decays. (orig.)

  13. Experimental study of nuclear models. I. Decay schemes and nuclear reactions. II. Muonic x-ray studies. Progress report, October 1, 1974--September 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheline, R.K.

    1975-01-01

    Progress on the research on our AT-(40-1)-2434 Contract is summarized for the twelve month contract year beginning October 1, 1974, and ending September 30, 1975. The main emphasis of our research continues to be an experimental study of nuclear models. Some change of emphasis is occurring. In the past, the emphasis has been overwhelmingly nuclear reaction spectroscopy and comparison with theoretical models. This year an increasing percentage of the emphasis (perhaps 25 percent) is on the study of nuclear structure from the view point of muonic x-ray spectroscopy. A list of publications is included. (U.S.)

  14. Branching ratio and direct CP-violating rate asymmetry of the rare decays B →K*γand B→ργ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greub, C.; Simma, H.; Wyler, D.

    1994-06-01

    We calculate CP-violating rate asymmetries in the rare radiative decays B ± →K* ± γ and B ± →ρ ± γ. They arise because of the interference between leading-order penguin amplitudes and one-gluon corrections with absorptive phases, and provide unambiguous evidence for direct CP violation. Complementing earlier studies, we also investigate gluon exchange with the 'spectator' quark. The bound state effects in the exclusive matrix elements are taken into account by a covariant model, which yields a branching ratio BR(B→K*γ)=(4-5)x10 -5 in good agreement with the observed value. The bound state effects increase the CP asymmetry, which is of order 1% in the channel B→K*γ and 15% for B→ργ. (orig.)

  15. Rapid heating tensile tests of high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel containing internal helium from radioactive decay of absorbed tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosley, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. This austenitic stainless steel is frequently used in the high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) metallurgical condition to take advantage of increased strength produced by cold work introduced by this process. Proper design of tritium-handling equipment will require an understanding of how helium-3, the product of radioactive decay of tritium, affects mechanical properties. This report describes results of elevated-temperature tensile testing of HERF 316L stainless steel specimens containing helium concentrations of 171 (calculated) atomic parts per million (appm). Results are compared with those reported previously for specimens containing 0 and 94 (measured) appm helium

  16. Calculation of the nuclear vertex constant for the virtual decay 6LI→α + d in the three- body model and its astrophysical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokhintsev, L.D.; Igamov, S.B.; Nishonov, MM; Yarmukhamedov, R; Kamimura, M.

    2003-01-01

    The d(α, γ) 6 Li reaction is one of the sources of 6 Li production in the Big-Bang nuclear synthesis. At present extremely large uncertainties exist on this prediction mainly due to the absence of reliable directly measured cross section (or astrophysical S-factor, S(E)) at astrophysical relevant energies E, including E=0. As far theoretical calculation of the S(E) that have rather large spread. On the other hand, the d(α, γ) 6 Li reaction is predominantly of peripheral character at extremely low energies. Therefore the calculated S(E) at extremely low energies is mainly determined by the nuclear vertex constant (NVC) (or respective asymptotic normalization constant (ANC)) for the virtual decay 6 Li→α + d. Taking into account this circumstance we develop a method of calculation of the NVC for the virtual decay 6 Li→α + d for the subsequent application of the calculated one to the direct radiative capture d(α, γ) 6 Li cross - section (or astrophysical S-factor) calculation at extremely low energies E, including E=0. The developed method is based on the three-body Faddeev approach which is applied for the α-d scattering by using different forms of the NN- and αN-potentials. As a result the values of NVC and respective ANC for 6 Li→α + d virtual decay are obtained using two forms both for NN- and for αN-potential. They are the separable potentials with Yamaguchi type form factor and Paris potential with PEST 16 form factor for the NN- potential and Yamaguchi type form factor and Sack-Biedenharn-Breit potential for the αN- potential. A noticeable sensitivity to used forms of the NN- and αN- potential occurs both for the calculated NVC (or ANC) and astrophysical S- factor S(E) of the direct radiative capture d(α, γ) 6 Li reaction at extremely low energies E (≤100 keV), including the value E=0. The calculated S(E) have been obtained using the information about the NVC values. The obtained values of NVC and S(E) are compared with those of obtained

  17. A proposed Regulatory Guide basis for spent fuel decay heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, O.W.; Parks, C.V.; Renier, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    A proposed revision to Regulatory Guide 3.54, ''Spent Fuel Heat Generation in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation'' has been developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The proposed revision includes a data base of decay heat rates calculated as a function of burnup, specific power, cooling time, initial fuel 235 U enrichment and assembly type (i.e., PWR or BWR). Validation of the calculational method was done by comparison with existing measured decay heat rates. Procedures for proper use of the data base, adjustment formulae accounting for effects due to differences in operating history and initial enrichment, and a defensible safety factor were derived. 15 refs., 6 tabs

  18. Thermonuclear Reaction Rate Libraries and Software Tools for Nuclear Astrophysics Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Michael S.; Cyburt, Richard; Schatz, Hendrik; Smith, Karl; Warren, Scott; Ferguson, Ryan; Wiescher, Michael; Lingerfelt, Eric; Buckner, Kim; Nesaraja, Caroline D.

    2008-01-01

    Thermonuclear reaction rates are a crucial input for simulating a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A new collaboration has been formed to ensure that astrophysical modelers have access to reaction rates based on the most recent experimental and theoretical nuclear physics information. To reach this goal, a new version of the REACLIB library has been created by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA), now available online at http://www.nscl.msu.edu/~nero/db. A complementary effort is the development of software tools in the Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics, online at nucastrodata.org, to streamline, manage, and access the workflow of the reaction evaluations from their initiation to peer review to incorporation into the library. Details of these new projects will be described

  19. Evaluation of radiation shielding rate of lead aprons in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sang Hyun; Han, Beom Heui; Lee, Sang Ho; Hong, Dong Heui; Kim, Gi Jin

    2017-01-01

    Considering that the X-ray apron used in the department of radiology is also used in the department of nuclear medicine, the study aimed to analyze the shielding rate of the apron according to types of radioisotopes, thus γ ray energy, to investigate the protective effects. The radioisotopes used in the experiment were the top 5 nuclides in usage statistics "9"9"mTc, "1"8F, "1"3"1I, "1"2"3I, and "2"0"1Tl, and the aprons were lead equivalent 0.35 mmPb aprons currently under use in the department of nuclear medicine. As a result of experiments, average shielding rates of aprons were "9"9"mTc 31.59%, "2"0"1Tl 68.42%, and "1"2"3I 76.63%. When using an apron, the shielding rate of "1"3'1I actually resulted in average dose rate increase of 33.72%, and "1"8F showed an average shielding rate of –0.315%, showing there was almost no shielding effect. As a result, the radioisotopes with higher shielding rate of apron was in the descending order of "1"2"3I, "2"0"1Tl, "9"9"mTc, "1"8F, "1"3"1I. Currently, aprons used in the nuclear medicine laboratory are general X-ray aprons, and it is thought that it is not appropriate for nuclear medicine environment that utilizes γ rays. Therefore, development of nuclear medicine exclusive aprons suitable for the characteristics of radioisotopes is required in consideration of effective radiation protection and work efficiency of radiation workers

  20. Evaluation of radiation shielding rate of lead aprons in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Hyun; Han, Beom Heui; Lee, Sang Ho [Dept. of Radiological Science, Seonam University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Dong Heui [Dept. of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gi Jin [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Konyang University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Considering that the X-ray apron used in the department of radiology is also used in the department of nuclear medicine, the study aimed to analyze the shielding rate of the apron according to types of radioisotopes, thus γ ray energy, to investigate the protective effects. The radioisotopes used in the experiment were the top 5 nuclides in usage statistics {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 18}F, {sup 131}I, {sup 123}I, and {sup 201}Tl, and the aprons were lead equivalent 0.35 mmPb aprons currently under use in the department of nuclear medicine. As a result of experiments, average shielding rates of aprons were {sup 99m}Tc 31.59%, {sup 201}Tl 68.42%, and {sup 123}I 76.63%. When using an apron, the shielding rate of {sup 13}'1I actually resulted in average dose rate increase of 33.72%, and {sup 18}F showed an average shielding rate of –0.315%, showing there was almost no shielding effect. As a result, the radioisotopes with higher shielding rate of apron was in the descending order of {sup 123}I, {sup 201}Tl, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 18}F, {sup 131}I. Currently, aprons used in the nuclear medicine laboratory are general X-ray aprons, and it is thought that it is not appropriate for nuclear medicine environment that utilizes γ rays. Therefore, development of nuclear medicine exclusive aprons suitable for the characteristics of radioisotopes is required in consideration of effective radiation protection and work efficiency of radiation workers.