WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear damage status

  1. Risk in Nuclear Industry. Liability for Nuclear Damage. Status of the Problem in the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalevich, Oleg M.; Gavrilov, Sergey D.; Voronov, Dmitry B.

    2001-01-01

    Russia is one of a few nuclear power states obtaining the whole number of nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) components - from mining of uranium and on-site electricity production, from NPP spent nuclear fuel processing and extracted fissile materials and radionuclides, which are available in industry, in medicine and in other relevant areas, to radioactive waste processing and disposal. For this reason it is very important to solve the problem of nuclear fuel cycle safety as it is a single system task with an adequate approach for all cycle components. The problem is that NFC facilities are technologically various and refer to different industries (mining, machinery engineering, power engineering, chemistry, etc.). Besides, the above facilities need the development of various scientific bases. The most NFC facilities is directly connected with peaceful use of nuclear energy and with military nuclear industry, as the defense orders stimulated the development of NFC. The specific attention to safety problems at the beginning of nuclear complex foundation adversely affected the state attitude towards the risk in nuclear industry, it has left the traces at present. In our paper we touch upon the problems of risk and the liability for nuclear damage for the third persons. The problems of nuclear damage compensation for nuclear facilities personnel and for the owners (operating organizations) are beyond our subject

  2. Present status and prospects of the compensation system for nuclear damage in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z.; Liu, C.

    1993-01-01

    In handling liability for nuclear damage matters, China currently adheres to the rules stipulated in the administrative legal document regarding liability to third parties for nuclear damage enacted by the State Council, in which it is defined that the principles of absolute liability, limitation of liability and single competent court are applicable in China. The Chinese government shall enact state laws on liability for nuclear damage on the basis of the above-mentioned legal document and with active consideration of the function of the state in the compensation for nuclear damage

  3. Vienna convention on civil liability for nuclear damage. Signatures, ratifications, accessions and successions and text of reservations/declarations. Status as of 31 December 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The document refers to the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage (IAEA-INFCIRC-500), giving the status of signatures, ratifications, accessions and successions, and the texts of reservations/declarations as of 31 December 1996

  4. Vienna convention on civil liability for nuclear damage. Signatures, ratifications, accessions and successions and text of reservations/declarations. Status as of 31 December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-28

    The document refers to the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage (IAEA-INFCIRC-500), giving the status of signatures, ratifications, accessions and successions, and the texts of reservations/declarations as of 31 December 1996.

  5. Nuclear damage - civil liability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoes, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is made of the civil liability for nuclear damage since there is a need to adjust the existing rules to the new situations created. The conventions that set up the new disciplining rules not considered in the common law for the liability of nuclear damage are also mentioned. (A.L.) [pt

  6. Risk of nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzl, K.

    1997-01-01

    Following the opening and words of welcome by Mr. Fritz Unterpertinger (unit director at the Austrian Federal Ministry for the Environment, Youth and Family; BMUJF) Mrs Helga Kromp-Kolb (professor at the Institute for Meteorology and Physics of the University of Natural Resources Science Vienna) illustrated the risks of nuclear damage in Europe by means of a nuclear risk map. She explained that even from a scientific or technical point of view the assessment of risks arising from nuclear power stations was fraught with great uncertainties. Estimates about in how far MCAs (maximum credible accident) could still be controlled by safety systems vary widely and so do assessments of the probability of a core melt. But there is wide agreement in all risk assessments conducted so far that MCAs might occur within a - from a human point of view - conceivable number of years. In this connection one has to bear in mind that the occurrence of such a major accident - whatever its probability may be - could entail immense damage and the question arises whether or not it is at all justifiable to expose the general public to such a risk. Klaus Rennings (Centre for European Economic Research, Mannheim, Germany) dealt with the economic aspects of nuclear risk assessment. He explained that there are already a number of studies available aiming to assess the risk of damage resulting from a core melt accident in economic terms. As to the probability of occurrence estimates vary widely between one incident in 3,333 and 250,000 year of reactor operation. It is assumed, however, that a nuclear accident involving a core melt in Germany would probably exceed the damage caused by the Chernobyl accident. The following speakers addressed the legal aspects of risks associated with nuclear installations. Mrs Monika Gimpel-Hinteregger (professor at the Institute for Civil Law in Graz) gave an overview on the applicable Austrian law concerning third party liability in the field of nuclear energy

  7. Research status on radiation damage in nuclear materials and recommendations for IAEA activities. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caro, Alfredo; Caro, Magdalena

    2002-03-01

    This report addresses the synergy between the continuous progress of parallel computing and the spectacular advances in the theoretical framework that describes materials. Together, they contributed to significantly advance our comprehension of materials properties like mechanical behavior. It also highlights its impact on nuclear technology, as it provides physical insight into the complex processes responsible for the degradation of structural materials under neutron irradiation

  8. Fatigue damage of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The conference on the fatigue damage of nuclear facilities, organized by the SFEN (french society of nuclear energy), took place at Paris the 23. of november 2000. Eleven papers were presented, showing the state of the art and the research programs in the domain of the sizing rules, safety, installations damage, examination and maintenance. (A.L.B.)

  9. Third party liability for nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crancher, D.W.

    1976-12-01

    Basic principles of nuclear liability legislation are discussed including absolute and limited liability and the role of the Sovereign State in idemnifying the operator for damage in excess of limited liability. European counrties realised the need for unifying the law of nuclear instability and efforts were made accordingly towards producing workable international conventions. The world's first legislation on nuclear liability - the USA Price-Anderson Act - is described in detail and a digest of nuclear liability claims experience is given. Observations of the present status of nuclear third party liability are outlined. (Author)

  10. Nuclear power status 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document gives statistical information on nuclear power plants status in the world in 1999, including the number of reactors in operation or under construction, the electricity supplied by nuclear power reactors and the respective percentage of electricity produced by nuclear energy in 1999, and the total operating experience to 31 December 1999, by country

  11. Terrorism and nuclear damage coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horbach, N. L. J. T.; Brown, O. F.; Vanden Borre, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with nuclear terrorism and the manner in which nuclear operators can insure themselves against it, based on the international nuclear liability conventions. It concludes that terrorism is currently not covered under the treaty exoneration provisions on 'war-like events' based on an analysis of the concept on 'terrorism' and travaux preparatoires. Consequently, operators remain liable for nuclear damage resulting from terrorist acts, for which mandatory insurance is applicable. Since nuclear insurance industry looks at excluding such insurance coverage from their policies in the near future, this article aims to suggest alternative means for insurance, in order to ensure adequate compensation for innocent victims. The September 11, 2001 attacks at the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Washington, DC resulted in the largest loss in the history of insurance, inevitably leading to concerns about nuclear damage coverage, should future such assaults target a nuclear power plant or other nuclear installation. Since the attacks, some insurers have signalled their intentions to exclude coverage for terrorism from their nuclear liability and property insurance policies. Other insurers are maintaining coverage for terrorism, but are establishing aggregate limits or sublimits and are increasing premiums. Additional changes by insurers are likely to occur. Highlighted by the September 11th events, and most recently by those in Madrid on 11 March 2004, are questions about how to define acts of terrorism and the extent to which such are covered under the international nuclear liability conventions and various domestic nuclear liability laws. Of particular concern to insurers is the possibility of coordinated simultaneous attacks on multiple nuclear facilities. This paper provides a survey of the issues, and recommendations for future clarifications and coverage options.(author)

  12. Analysis and research status of severe core damage accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    The Severe Core Damage Research and Analysis Task Force was established in Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai Research Establishment, JAERI, in May, 1982 to make a quantitative analysis on the issues related with the severe core damage accident and also to survey the present status of the research and provide the required research subjects on the severe core damage accident. This report summarizes the results of the works performed by the Task Force during last one and half years. The main subjects investigated are as follows; (1) Discussion on the purposes and necessities of severe core damage accident research, (2) proposal of phenomenological research subjects required in Japan, (3) analysis of severe core damage accidents and identification of risk dominant accident sequences, (4) investigation of significant physical phenomena in severe core damage accidents, and (5) survey of the research status. (author)

  13. Civil liability for nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    An international Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage was adopted in Vienna on 19 May 1963 by a sixty-nation conference convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Convention, which is subject to ratification by the States signing it, will come into force three months after the deposit of the fifth instrument of ratification. The Convention is designee only to establish minimum rules regarding civil liability for nuclear damage; it may thus well be described as a framework convention, the main provisions of which represent the essential common denomination acceptable to as many States as possible. It leaves wide scope for national legislation and regional arrangements with a view to implementing these provisions The Convention does not purport to create a uniform civil law in this field, but it contains the minimal essential for protection of the public and forms the legal basis for uniform world-wide liability rules

  14. Nuclear damage compensation and energy reform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokemoto, Masafumi

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear damage compensation and energy reform were closely related. Nuclear damage compensation cost should be part of generation cost of nuclear power. Extend of nuclear damage compensation was limited by compensation standard of Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) following guidelines of Dispute Reconciliation Committee for Nuclear Damage Compensation. TEPCO had already paid compensation of about two trillion yen until now, which was only a part of total damage compensation cost. TEPCO had been provided more than 3.4 trillion yen by Nuclear Damage Liability Facilitation Cooperation, which would be put back by nuclear operators including TEPCO. TEPCO could obtain present raising funds and try to reconstruct business with restart of nuclear power, which might disturb energy reform. Present nuclear damage compensation scheme had better be reformed with learning more from Minamata disease case in Japan. (T. Tanaka)

  15. Legal protection against nuclear damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-04-15

    The IAEA Director General appointed an international Panel of Experts to go into the question of Civil Liability and State Responsibility for Nuclear Hazards. The Panel had before it certain basic postulates formulated after a preliminary and tentative consideration of the subject. From the viewpoint of the public, the first postulate is, of course, that the use of nuclear energy be regulated by adequate licensing and control mechanisms so as to prevent any accidents. To the extent, however, that nuclear damage cannot be prevented, there must be liability on the part of the enterprise which caused the damage and, where damage exceeds its liability or its financial resources there should be some assurance of compensation by the State. This should be so not only within the borders of one State, but especially also on an international basis. Security should be required for the possible liability of the enterprises connected with a nuclear incident. Litigation with respect to liability should be concentrated in the most convenient tribunal and be governed by a single clearly defined law. The methods of distribution should meet general standards of equity and be as expeditious as possible. Emergency measures, especially evacuation, first aid and decontamination, should be organized and financed without delay. At the same time, the liability of an enterprise should not exceed its reasonable financial capabilities. This means that a ceiling should be imposed upon the amount of third party liability to which an enterprise could be held. And the liability should generally be such as can be covered by adequate financial security. Uniformity in the treatment of victims of nuclear incidents in all these fields is a desirable goal. Yet, if a rule adopted on an international level or suggested by uniform legislation were to be viable, it should adapt itself to the social, economic and legal order already existing in individual States. This may mean that in certain fields it

  16. Legal protection against nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    The IAEA Director General appointed an international Panel of Experts to go into the question of Civil Liability and State Responsibility for Nuclear Hazards. The Panel had before it certain basic postulates formulated after a preliminary and tentative consideration of the subject. From the viewpoint of the public, the first postulate is, of course, that the use of nuclear energy be regulated by adequate licensing and control mechanisms so as to prevent any accidents. To the extent, however, that nuclear damage cannot be prevented, there must be liability on the part of the enterprise which caused the damage and, where damage exceeds its liability or its financial resources there should be some assurance of compensation by the State. This should be so not only within the borders of one State, but especially also on an international basis. Security should be required for the possible liability of the enterprises connected with a nuclear incident. Litigation with respect to liability should be concentrated in the most convenient tribunal and be governed by a single clearly defined law. The methods of distribution should meet general standards of equity and be as expeditious as possible. Emergency measures, especially evacuation, first aid and decontamination, should be organized and financed without delay. At the same time, the liability of an enterprise should not exceed its reasonable financial capabilities. This means that a ceiling should be imposed upon the amount of third party liability to which an enterprise could be held. And the liability should generally be such as can be covered by adequate financial security. Uniformity in the treatment of victims of nuclear incidents in all these fields is a desirable goal. Yet, if a rule adopted on an international level or suggested by uniform legislation were to be viable, it should adapt itself to the social, economic and legal order already existing in individual States. This may mean that in certain fields it

  17. The law concerning liability for nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinouchi, Kazuo

    1978-01-01

    This treatise outlines the Law on Compensation for Nuclear Damage (Law No. 147, June 17, 1961) and the Law on Indemnity Agreement for Compensation of Nuclear Damage (Law, No. 148, June 17, 1961) which are both came into effect in March, 1962, and describes how these laws will be executed if an accident occurs actually in nuclear facilities. The first law which prescribes various provisions for compensation of nuclear damage is characterised as having the principle of no-fault liability and hence making a nuclear enterpriser responsible for securing adequate financial resources to indemnify general public for their damages from nuclear accidents. Thus, in compliance with the law a nuclear enterpriser should effect both the contract of the indemnity responsible insurance and the indemnity agreement for compensation of nuclear damage. The second law deals with the indemnity agreement which is concluded by a nuclear enterpriser with the government and constitutes a full measure for compensation of nuclear damage supplementing the indemnity responsible insurance. The indemnity agreement is to insure compensation liabilities for nuclear damages which the indemnity responsible insurance can not cover-that is, damages caused by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, and also damages from normal operations of nuclear facilities and those occurs after 10 years of an accident. Then, the author describes in detail how these laws apply in a nuclear accident to damages to third parties and those to facilities of related nuclear enterpriser himself and to his employees. Finally, the author refers to the legal systems for compensation of nuclear damage in the United States, Britain, France and West Germany. (Matsushima, A.)

  18. Civil liability for nuclear and radiological damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, D.

    2001-10-01

    The present work gives details of the nuclear damage, the accidents of Chernobil, three Mile Inland and Tokaimura with their respective legal consequences, the nature of the responsibility and bases for their establishment, conventions about civil responsibility for nuclear damages to regional and world level as well as other condition of conventions of the Ibero-American countries with regard to the approval of the conventions it has more than enough civil responsibility for nuclear and radiological accident damages

  19. Civil liability for nuclear damage law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    This Law has as its main objective to regulate civic responsability on damages or injuries that may be brought about by the usage of nuclear reactors and the use of nuclear substances or fuels and their consecuent wastes. The text of this law is consituted by 5 chapters that deal with the following subjects: CHAPTER ONE.- Objective and Definitions. CHAPTER TWO.-On Civic Responsability on Nuclear Damages or Injuries. CHAPTER THREE.- On the Limits of Responsability. CHAPTER FOUR.- On Prescription. CHAPTER FIVE.- General Regulations Concepts such as the following are defined concretely and precisely: Nuclear Accident, Nuclear Damage or Injury, Atomic Energy, Operator of a Nuclear Facility, Nuclear Facility, Radioactive Product or Waste Material, Nuclear Reactor, Nuclear Substances Remittance and Hazardous Nuclear Substance

  20. The law concerning indemnification of nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This Law aims at determining the basic system concerning indemnification for nuclear damage caused by the operation of reactors, fabrication, reprocessing and use of nuclear fuel materials as well as the transportation, storing or disposal of such materials or those contaminated by such materials (including fission products) accompanying these operations in view of protecting the sufferers and contributing to the wholesome development of atomic energy enterprises. The ''nuclear damage'' referred to in this Law is the damages caused by the action during the process of fission of nuclear fuel materials or the action of radiation or the poisonous action of said nuclear fuel materials or matters contaminated by said materials (those causing poisoning or deuteropathy in human bodies by taking in or inhaling such materials). Upon giving nuclear damage by the operation of reactors and others, the atomic energy entrepreneurs concerned are responsible for indemnifying the damage. Atomic energy entrepreneurs should not operate reactors without first taking the measures for indemnifying nuclear damages. Said measures are conclusion of nuclear damage indemnification responsibility insurance contract and nuclear damage indemnification contract or deposit, by which 6,000 million yen may be earmarked for such indemnification per factory, place of business or nuclear ship

  1. Convention on supplementary compensation for nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinese Nuclear Society, Beijing; U.S. Nuclear Energy Institute

    2000-01-01

    The Contracting parties recognize the importance of the measures provided in the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage and the Paris Convention on Third party liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy as well as in national legislation on compensation for nuclear damage consistent with the principles of these conventions. The Contracting parties desire to establish a worldwide liability regime to supplement and enhance these measures with a view to increasing the amount of compensation for nuclear damage and encourage regional and global co-operation to promote a higher level of nuclear safety in accordance with the principle of international partnership and solidarity

  2. Vienna convention on civil liability for nuclear damage and optional protocol concerning the compulsory settlement of disputes. Status lists as of 12 September 2000. Signature, ratification, accession, or succession. Declarations/reservations made upon expressing consent to be bound and objections thereto. Declarations/reservations made upon signature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document provides the status list to the Protocol to Amend the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage and optional protocol concerning the compulsory settlement of disputes as of 12 September 2000

  3. Nuclear power status 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document gives general statistical information (by country) about electricity produced by nuclear power plants in the world in 1998, and in a table the number of nuclear reactors in operation, under construction, nuclear electricity supplied in 1998, and total operating experience as of 31 December 1998

  4. Protocols to Amend the Paris, Vienna and Brussels Supplementary Conventions and the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage: Status of their Implementation into National Legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade, a number of very significant developments have taken place in modernising the existing international nuclear liability regimes. The first major advancement was the adoption, in September 1997, of the Protocol to amend the 1963 Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage (VC Protocol) and of a new Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC). This was followed, in February 2004, by the adoption of Protocols to amend both the 1960 Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy (PC Protocol) and the 1963 Brussels Convention Supplementary to the Paris Convention (BSC Protocol). The principle goal of all these new instruments is to provide a greater amount of compensation to a larger number of victims in respect of a broader scope of nuclear damage suffered as a result of a nuclear accident. The second, but still very important objective is the maintenance of compatibility between the revised Paris and Vienna Conventions to ensure the smooth functioning of the 1988 Joint Protocol Relating to the Application of the Vienna Convention (VC) and the Paris Convention (PC). In addition, the PC States wish to ensure that their newly revised Convention will not prevent a Contracting Party from joining the more global regime established by the CSC. However, it remains to be seen to what extent these new instruments will attract a sufficient number of adherents to make them truly effective. While the VC Protocol is already in force, it has not drawn wide support from the 1963 VC States or from countries with important nuclear generating capacity which have not yet joined that latter any Convention. In addition, notwithstanding its adoption almost 10 years ago, the CSC has not yet entered into force and it remains questionable whether it will ever attract the necessary number of adherents for that purpose, especially in light of its strict requirements in this regard. As for the PC and BSC Protocols to

  5. World status - nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, A.

    1984-01-01

    The problems of nuclear power are not so much anti-nuclear public opinion, but more the decrease of electricity consumption growth rate and the high cost of building reactors. Because of these factors, forecasts of world nuclear capacity have had to be reduced considerably over the last three years. The performance of reactors is considered. The CANDU reactor remains the world's best performer and overall tends to out-perform larger reactors. The nuclear plant due to come on line in 1984 are listed by country; this shows that nuclear capacity will increase substantially over a short period. At a time of stagnant demand this will make nuclear energy an important factor in the world energy balance. Nuclear power stations in operation and under construction in 1983 are listed and major developments in commercial nuclear power in 1983 are taken country by country. In most, the report is the same; national reactor ordering cut back because the expected increase in energy demand has not happened. Also the cost-benefit of nuclear over other forms of energy is no longer as favourable. The export opportunities have also declined as many of the less developed countries are unable to afford reactors. (U.K.)

  6. Iran's Nuclear Program: Status

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kerr, Paul K

    2008-01-01

    .... Indeed, the UN Security Council has responded to Iran's refusal to suspend work on its uranium enrichment and heavy-water nuclear reactor programs by adopting several resolutions, most recently...

  7. Iran's Nuclear Program: Status

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kerr, Paul K

    2008-01-01

    .... Indeed, the UN Security Council has responded to Iran's refusal to suspend work on its uranium enrichment and heavy-water nuclear reactor programs by adopting several resolutions which imposed sanctions on Tehran...

  8. The law concerning indemnification of nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The law defines the basic system of indemnification of nuclear damage by the operation of reactors to protect sufferers and help the sound development of atomic energy business. The operation of reactors means hereunder the operation of reactors, processing, reprocessing and the uses of nuclear fuel materials as well as transport, storage and disposal of nuclear fuel materials or things contaminated by them, which accompany with those procedures. The nuclear damage signifies injuries due to functions of fission of nuclear fuel materials or radiation or poisonous functions of things contaminated by them. When nuclear damage happens by the operation of reactors, the atomic energy enterpriser concerned shall indemnify the damage. Atomic energy undertakers shall not operate reactors without taking measures for compensation. The measures shall be the conclusion of nuclear damage compensation insurance contracts and indemnification contracts or the deposit. The amount of less than yen 10 milliards specified by the order and acknowledged by the Director General of Science and Technology Agency shall be allotted to the compensation by these measures for each works, enterprise or nuclear ship. The government shall assist atomic energy enterprisers to indemnify, when such compensation surpasses the amount assigned and the support is considered necessary. (Okada, K.)

  9. Convention on supplementary compensation for nuclear damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-22

    The document reproduces the text of the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage which was adopted on 12 September 1997 by a Diplomatic Conference held between 8-12 September 1997 in Vienna

  10. Convention on supplementary compensation for nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage which was adopted on 12 September 1997 by a Diplomatic Conference held between 8-12 September 1997 in Vienna

  11. Liability for nuclear damage and compensation therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prochazkova, D.

    1996-01-01

    The basic principles are outlined of the Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy, the Brussels Convention Supplementary to the Paris Convention, the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage, and the Joint Protocol Relating to the Application of the Paris Convention and the Vienna Convention. (P.A.)

  12. Conceptions of nuclear threshold status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quester, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews some alternative definitions of nuclear threshold status. Each of them is important, and major analytical confusions would result if one sense of the term is mistaken for another. The motives for nations entering into such threshold status are a blend of civilian and military gains, and of national interests versus parochial or bureaucratic interests. A portion of the rationale for threshold status emerges inevitably from the pursuit of economic goals, and another portion is made more attraction by the derives of the domestic political process. Yet the impact on international security cannot be dismissed, especially where conflicts among the states remain real. Among the military or national security motives are basic deterrence, psychological warfare, war-fighting and, more generally, national prestige. In the end, as the threshold phenomenon is assayed for lessons concerning the role of nuclear weapons more generally in international relations and security, one might conclude that threshold status and outright proliferation coverage to a degree in the motives for all of the states involved and in the advantages attained. As this paper has illustrated, nuclear threshold status is more subtle and more ambiguous than outright proliferation, and it takes considerable time to sort out the complexities. Yet the world has now had a substantial amount of time to deal with this ambiguous status, and this may tempt more states to exploit it

  13. Nuclear energy - status and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogner, Hans-Holger; MacDonald, Alan

    2007-07-01

    Rising expectations best characterize the current prospects of nuclear power in a world that is confronted with a burgeoning demand for energy, higher energy prices, energy supply security concerns and growing environmental pressures. It appears that the inherent economic and environmental benefits of the technology and its excellent performance record over the last twenty years are beginning to tilt the balance of political opinion and public acceptance in favour of nuclear power. Nuclear power is a cost-effective supply-side technology for mitigating climate change and can make a substantial contribution to climate protection. This paper reviews the current status of nuclear power and its fuel cycle and provides an outlook on where nuclear power may be headed in the short-to-medium run (20 to 40 years from now). (auth)

  14. Genetic damage following nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oftedal, P.

    1984-01-01

    Genetic damage may be caused by ionizing radiation from the exploding bomb itself, or from radioactive nuclides released or formed in the explosion. Long-wave radiation in the heat flash and physical force do not contribute. Thus only a small fraction of the energy of the explosion - fission or fusion- can cause genetic damage. Neutron irradiation is generally found to be 5-20 times more efficient than gamma irradiation for the same absorbed dose. Fetuses and children are generally more radiosensitive than adults. Exposure of gonads during the proliferative stage of gonad growth may conceivably lead to a ''fluctuation test'' effect, so that a gonad may contain a sector of cells carrying identical mutations. A corresponding development may take place if the gonad stem cell population has been severely depleted by an acute exposure and recovers

  15. Current status of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnke, W.B.

    1984-01-01

    The decision to devote the 1984 conference to nuclear power is timely and appropriate. Illinois has a long, and distinguished history in the development of civilian nuclear power. The concept was born at the University of Chicago, developed at Argonne National Laboratory and demonstrated on the Commonwealth Edison system at our pioneer Dresden Nuclear Station. Today, Illinois ranks number one in the nation in nuclear generation. With over a quarter century of commercial operating experience, nuclear power has proven its worth and become a significant and growing component of electric power supply domestically and throughout the world. Despite its initial acceptance, however, the nuclear power industry in the U.S. is now in the midst of a difficult period of readjustment stemming largely from the economic and regulatory problems of the past decade. As a result, the costs of plants under construction have increased dramatically, causing serious financial difficulties for several projects and their owners. At the same time, the U.S. is facing hard choices concerning its future energy supplies. Conferences such as this have an important role in clarifying the issues and helping to find solutions to today's pressing energy problems. This paper summarizes the status of nuclear power both here and abroad, discussing the implications of current events in the context of national energy policy and economic development here in Illinois

  16. Radiation damage studies of nuclear structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, P.

    2012-01-01

    Maximum utilization of fuel in nuclear reactors is one of the important aspects for operating them economically. The main hindrance to achieve this higher burnups of nuclear fuel for the nuclear reactors is the possibility of the failure of the metallic core components during their operation. Thus, the study of the cause of the possibility of failure of these metallic structural materials of nuclear reactors during full power operation due to radiation damage, suffered inside the reactor core, is an important field of studies bearing the basic to industrial scientific views.The variation of the microstructure of the metallic core components of the nuclear reactors due to radiation damage causes enormous variation in the structure and mechanical properties. A firm understanding of this variation of the mechanical properties with the variation of microstructure will serve as a guide for creating new, more radiation-tolerant materials. In our centre we have irradiated structural materials of Indian nuclear reactors by charged particles from accelerator to generate radiation damage and studied the some aspects of the variation of microstructure by X-ray diffraction studies. Results achieved in this regards, will be presented. (author)

  17. Liability for nuclear damage. An international perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopuski, J.

    1993-01-01

    The book deals with some of the complex issues of liability and compensation for nuclear damage which have been considered in the course of the work of the IAEA concerning the revision of the Vienna Convention on nuclear liability. It presents, in an orderly way, personal reflections of its author based on this experience gathered in years 1989-1992 when participating in this work. Necessarily it contains in some of its parts references to documents of the IAEA Standing Committee on Nuclear Liability; these documents because of their length could not be reproduced. Consequently these parts may be fully intelligible for those who have not participated in or closely followed in Committee's work. The IAEA work on liability for nuclear damage was initiated in the wake of the impact made on the world's public opinion by the Chernobyl incident and its transboundary effects; issues of international state liability and full compensation have been raised. But humanitarian ideas have quickly been confronted with cold calculations of the cost of financial protection for victims and an open unwillingness of some nuclear states the engage their liability; conflict of interests between nuclear and non-nuclear states has been manifested. After three years of discussion no wide consensus could be reached on some basic issues, such as: relationship between international state and civil liability regimes, structures of international legislation, concept of nuclear damage, limits of compensation, role of public funds or jurisdiction. The author presents his approach to these controversial issues, trying to provide at the same time a theoretical outline for the future international legislation on nuclear liability. (author)

  18. 1982 annual status report. Nuclear measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Nuclear Measurement programme is briefly presented in this status report, it is divided in two main projects, Nuclear Data on the one hand (neutron data, non neutron nuclear data) and Nuclear Reference Materials and Techniques on the other (nuclear reference materials, samples and targets for nuclear measurements, development of reference techniques, study for the production of enriched actinide isotopes)

  19. Liability and damages in Japanese nuclear law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, E.

    1981-01-01

    The Japanese legislation relating to nuclear liability is based on two laws which date back to 1961, i.e. the law concerning compensation for nuclear damage and the law concerning financial damage compensation indemnification. In Japan, the legal channelling of liability is in force, a contractual recourse is not possible unless there is intent. The financial security act in Japan consists of a (third-party) liability insurance contract concluded with a private insurer and the cover contract concluded with the state. According to the agreement on financial security concluded between government and operator, the operator has to pay the state a certain sum per year. Basically, the amount covered is DM 50 million per site. This sum will be increased to DM 90 million. The operator is fully liable. The state is not bound by law to fully cover damages but will be - de facto - prepared to do so anyway. For potential damage to personnel, the social insurance law is applicable as it is in the Federal Republic of Germany. However, this damage is intended to be subject to nuclear liability, to be effected by an amendmend. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Liability for on-site nuclear property damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neems, H.J.

    2000-01-01

    Typically, liability for on-site property addressed in contracts between operator and its suppliers. Nuclear power plant operators ordinarily protect themselves against risk of nuclear damage to on-site property by insurance. Nuclear liability laws do not specifically address liability for nuclear damage to on-site property. Nuclear plant owners should address risk of damage to on-site property when developing risk management program

  1. Status of nuclear energy in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomek, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this work author presents the status of nuclear energy in Slovakia. There are the electricity production; NPP operating results in 2007; ENEL-SE vision, mission and strategy, Continuous improvement programs as well as public acceptance of nuclear presented.

  2. Experimental nuclear physics in Vietnam - recent status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Thanh Minh

    1995-01-01

    Status of research works on experimental nuclear physics in Vietnam is reviewed. Vietnam institutions and main instruments for nuclear research are listed. The results on physics and technology of nuclear reactor, neutron physics, nuclear reactions, radiological safety are mentioned. (N.H.A). 6 tabs, 4 figs

  3. Present status and needs of research on severe core damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    The needs for research on severe core damage accident have been emphasized recently, in particular, since TMI-2 accident. The Severe Core Damage Research Task Force was established by the Divisions of Reactor Safety and Reactor Safety Evaluation to evaluate individual phenomenon, to survey the present status of research and to provide the recommended research subjects on severe accidents. This report describes the accident phenomena involving some analytical results, status of research and recommended research subjects on severe core damage accidents, divided into accident sequence, fuel damage, and molten material behavior, fission product behavior, hydrogen generation and combustion, steam explosion and containment integrity. (author)

  4. Radiation damage in nuclear waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jencic, I.

    2000-01-01

    Final disposal of high-level radioactive nuclear waste is usually envisioned in some sort of ceramic material. The physical and chemical properties of host materials for nuclear waste can be altered by internal radiation and consequently their structural integrity can be jeopardized. Assessment of long-term performance of these ceramic materials is therefore vital for a safe and successful disposal. This paper presents an overview of studies on several possible candidate materials for immobilization of fission products and actinides, such as spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ), perovskite (CaTiO 3 ), zircon (ZrSiO 4 ), and pyrochlore (Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 and Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 ). The basic microscopic picture of radiation damage in ceramics consists of atomic displacements and ionization. In many cases these processes result in amorphization (metaminctization) of irradiated material. The evolution of microscopic structure during irradiation leads to various macroscopic radiation effects. The connection between microscopic and macroscopic picture is in most cases at least qualitatively known and studies of radiation induced microscopic changes are therefore an essential step in the design of a reliable nuclear waste host material. The relevance of these technologically important results on our general understanding of radiation damage processes and on current research efforts in Slovenia is also addressed. (author)

  5. International Co-operation in providing insurance cover for nuclear damage to third parties and for damage to nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deprimoz, Jacques

    1983-01-01

    This article in three parts analyses cover for damage to third parties by fixed nuclear installations, cover for damage to third parties during transport of nuclear substances and finally, cover for damage to nuclear installations. Part I reviews the principles of nuclear third party liability and describes nuclear insurance pools, the coverage and contracts provided. Part II describes inter alia the role of pools in transport operations as well as the type of contracts available, while Part III discusses material damage, the pools' capacities and the vast sums involved in indemnifying such damage. (NEA) [fr

  6. Status of neutron dosimetry and damage analysis for the fusion materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, L.R.

    1979-01-01

    The status of neutron flux and spectral measurements is described for fusion material irradiations at reactor, T(d,n), Be(d,n), and spallation neutron sources. Such measurements are required for the characterization of an irradiation in terms of displacement damage, gas and transmutant production. Emphasis is placed on nuclear data deficiencies with specific recommendations for cross section measurements and calculations

  7. The Status of Radiation Damage Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Richard L.; Legore, Virginia L.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments have been on-going for about two years to determine the effects that radiation damage have on the physical and chemical properties of candidate titanate ceramics for the immobilization of plutonium. We summarize the results of these experiments in this document

  8. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report: 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavin, Christopher; Lenssen, Nicholas; Froggatt, Antony; Willis, John; Kondakji, Assad; Schneider, Mycle

    1992-05-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. This first WNISR Report was issued in 1992 in a joint publication with WISE-Paris, Greenpeace International and the World Watch Institute, Washington

  9. Present Status of Nuclear Energy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wagner, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, SI (2013), s. 89-94 ISSN 0375-8842. [European Nuclear Forum. Praha, 12.05.2013-13.05.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : nuclear energy * nuclear reactors * electricity production Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  10. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hosokawa, Komei; Thomas, Steve; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Hazemann, Julie; Bradford, Peter A.

    2013-07-01

    Two years after the Fukushima disaster started unfolding on 11 March 2011, its impact on the global nuclear industry has become increasingly visible. Global electricity generation from nuclear plants dropped by a historic 7 percent in 2012, adding to the record drop of 4 percent in 2011. This World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2013 (WNISR) provides a global overview of the history, the current status and the trends of nuclear power programs worldwide. It looks at nuclear reactor units in operation and under construction. Annex 1 provides 40 pages of detailed country-by-country information. A specific chapter assesses the situation in potential newcomer countries. For the second time, the report looks at the credit-rating performance of some of the major nuclear companies and utilities. A more detailed chapter on the development patterns of renewable energies versus nuclear power is also included. Annex 6 provides an overview table with key data on the world nuclear industry by country. The 2013 edition of the World Nuclear Industry Status Report also includes an update on nuclear economics as well as an overview of the status, on-site and off-site, of the challenges triggered by the Fukushima disaster. However, this report's emphasis on recent post-Fukushima developments should not obscure an important fact: as previous editions (see www.WorldNuclearReport.org) detail, the world nuclear industry already faced daunting challenges long before Fukushima, just as the U.S. nuclear power industry had largely collapsed before the 1979 Three Mile Island accident. The nuclear promoters' invention that a global nuclear renaissance was flourishing until 3/11 is equally false: Fukushima only added to already grave problems, starting with poor economics. The performance of the nuclear industry over the year from July 2012 to July 2013 is summed up in this report

  11. International nuclear power status 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    2002-04-01

    This report is the eighth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2001, the report contains: 1) General trends in the development of nuclear power; 2) Nuclear terrorism; 3) Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 2000); 4) An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2001; 5) The development in West Europe; 6) The development in East Europe; 7) The development in the rest of the world; 8) Development of reactor types; 9) The nuclear fuel cycle; 10) International nuclear organisations. (au)

  12. International nuclear power status 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    2003-03-01

    This report is the ninth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2002, the report contains: 1) General trends in the development of nuclear power; 2) Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory: 3) Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 2001); 4) An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2002; 5) The development in West Europe; 6) The development in East Europe; 7) The development in the rest of the world; 8) Development of reactor types; 9) The nuclear fuel cycle; 10) International nuclear organisations. (au)

  13. Compensation for damages in case of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leger, M.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the system of compensation for damages in case of a nuclear accident. This system of civil liability for nuclear damage, as a specific regime, departs on several points from the common rules of civil liability, in order to provide an adequate and equitable compensation for the damages suffered by the victims of nuclear accidents. The French system of civil liability for nuclear damage results from two International Conventions integrated in French law (Paris convention 1960 and Brussels convention 1963) and the French law of 1968, October 30 on civil liability in the area of nuclear energy. These texts define the conditions under which a nuclear operator could be held liable in case of a nuclear accident. The protocols to amend the Paris and Brussels Conventions of 2004, not yet come into force, are also presented. They ensure that increased resources are available to compensate a greater number of victims of a nuclear accident. (author)

  14. Nuclear cardiology - its current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, C.M.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has been an exciting new field of nuclear medicine. Few examples of the dynamism and excitement of nuclear medicine demonstrate this field's vitality in the way that nuclear cardiology does. Recent new developments in radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation have established this field as an extremely useful clinical tool and provide a new dimension to the evaluation of a cardiac patient, more so being nonivasive in nature. An attempt has been made to focus the attention on some of the recent advances in nuclear cardiology with a special reference to its clinical application in the field of cardiology. Nuclear cardiology is the most important field of nuclear medicine which has shown most promising results and has opened a new horizon in the field of diagnostic noninvasive cardiac technique. Now it has come of age in concept, instrument development and clinical application. It is very rapidly growing into a subspeciality. (author)

  15. Report of the working group for nuclear damage compensation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Working Group for Nuclear Damage Compensation System was established within the Atomic Energy Commision of Japan on August 2, 1988. The Group has held five meetings to make a study on the revision of the reserve for nuclear damage compensation. The nuclear damage compensation system in Japan has been established under the Law Concerning Compensation for Nuclear Damages and the Law Concerning Contract for Compensation for Nuclear Damages. The former law requires the nuclear power plant operators to set up a reserve for damage compensation to ensure positive and quick payment of compensation in the event of an accident. The reserve is currently rely on liability insurance and a government compensation contract. The Working Group has concluded that the total reserve should be increased from the current yen10 bill. to yen30 bill. The amount of the reserve specified in the enforcement law for the Law Concerning Compensation for Nuclear Damages should also be increased accordingly. The Law Concerning compensation for Nuclear damage will also be applied to damage which occurs overseas as a result of an accident in Japan. (N.K.)

  16. Turkey's status in nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aykol, F.; Oezkan, R.; Atila, B.; Hanguel, G.; Aksu, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Turkey is a country with dynamic economic development and rapid population growth and nuclear energy is an integral part of these dynamics. Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA) is in charge of regulation and control of all activities related to nuclear field, including safety inspections and licensing. The TAEA is also responsible for the sensitive task of improving public awareness of nuclear technology which includes the use of nuclear power. Turkey's experience with nuclear power dates back to the 1960's, as the first nuclear research reactor started to operate in Istanbul in 1962. There were various plans for the introduction of nuclear power to the country. However the plans for the construction of the first nuclear power in the country were postponed for an indefinite period in 2000. In the wake of this decision TAEA initiated the activities to establish a nuclear policy in the country which includes creating the technical know-how and establishing new generation nuclear power plants in Turkey. The Authority is also responsible for the safe use of nuclear energy in medicine, agriculture, animal health, industry, food irradiation and in all kinds of research activities. The authority has carried or is currently continuing 12 National Technical Cooperation, 30 Research Contract, 21 Regional Europe ongoing IAEA projects and 31 State Planning Organization projects. There were 7571 radiological, 208 radiotherapy, 3792 industrial and 214 instruments licensed and registered by the Radiation Health and Safety Department of the Authority. We are in the opinion that developing a nuclear technology substructure in both Turkey and Turkish Countries will be of great benefit for the Euro-Asia region. We must emphasize that Turkey is the partner of all nonproliferation treaties and has no intention of using nuclear power for non peaceful purposes whatsoever

  17. International nuclear power status 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    2001-03-01

    This report is the seventh in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2000, the report contains: 1. General trends in the development of nuclear power. 2. Deposition of low-level radioactive waste. 3. Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 1999). 4. An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2000. 5. The development in Sweden. 6. The development in Eastern Europe. 7. The development in the rest of the world. 8. Trends in the development of reactor types. 9. Trends in the development of the nuclear fuel cycle. (au)

  18. Nuclear power: status and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogner, H.H.; Langlois, L.M.; McDonald, A.

    2002-01-01

    Current state of the world nuclear energetics is reviewed; data on operating and nuclear power blocks under construction in different countries, data on electric power output, practice of operation are presented. New plans of energetic reactors, capitalized costs for their construction, operating cost and period of construction are treated. Problems of nuclear safety, spent fuel and radioactive waste management, non-proliferation policy are discussed. Outlook for the development of the nuclear energetics is directed and importance of the Bonn agreement in connection with economic reasons for NPP operation is noted [ru

  19. Nuclear Data Section status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, D.; Pronyaev, V.G.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarises the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) related activity of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) for the period October 1998 to September 2000. It covers both online NSDD user service either Telnet or Web services, and offline NSDD service. The NSDD development programs and projects are related to NDS contribution to the IAEA Analytical Quality Control Services program, Coordinated Research Project on nuclear model parameter testing for nuclear data evaluation, Coordinated Research Project on updating of x-ray and gamma-ray decay data standards for detector calibration, and Coordinated Research Project on development of database for prompt gamma-neutron activation analysis

  20. Ukrainian Nuclear Data Centre status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gritzay, O.O.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is the status report of the Ukrainian Nuclear Data Center, Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv. It describes the collection and compilation of new experimental data, the collaboration with other institutes, customer services and experimental neutron data measurements. (a.n.)

  1. China Nuclear Data Center (CNDC) status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Youxiang

    2002-01-01

    This paper is the status report of the China Nuclear Data Center, Beijing. It describes the nuclear data evaluation, the validation of CENDL-3.0, the CINDA and EXFOR compilation and gives a list of meetings in this subject area. (a.n.)

  2. Status and prospects of nuclear desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupitz, J.; Konishi, T.

    2000-01-01

    While availability of potable water is an important prerequisite for socio-economic development, about 1/3 of the world's population is suffering from inadequate potable water supplies. Seawater desalination with nuclear energy could help to cope with the fresh water shortages and several countries are investigating nuclear desalination. Status and future prospects of nuclear desalination and the role of the IAEA in this area are discussed in this paper. (author)

  3. Present status of nuclear containments in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jihong; Hong, Jaekeun; Lee, Byunghoon; Son, Youngho

    2007-01-01

    Since the first nuclear power plant in Korea, Kori unit no.1, was started in commercial service in 1978, 20 units including Kori unit no.1 have been operated and maintained until now in Korea. Recently several units were started to be constructed and also, additionally more than 4 units were planned to be constructed in the near future. The importance of nuclear containments has been always one of the hottest issues for the safety and protection of nuclear power plants until now. At the beginning of nuclear power plants construction in Korea, several typed nuclear containment systems were adopted. For those reasons, various codes, standards, and inspection technologies are applied to nuclear containment systems differently. In this study, the status of inservice inspection performed for the safety and maintenance of nuclear containments in Korea was researched. Overall nuclear containment systems and inspections performed up to recently in Korea including trends, inspection items, periods, and regulations were described briefly. (author)

  4. Status: nuclear and radiochemistry discipline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakumar, K.L.

    2013-01-01

    There is no universally accepted definition for the term 'nuclear chemistry'. We may regard nuclear chemistry as an interdisciplinary subject with roots in physics, biology, and chemistry. The basic aspects include among others (i) nuclear reactions and energy levels, (ii) the types and energetics of radioactive decay, (iii) the formation and properties of radioactive elements, (iv) the effect of individual isotopes on chemical and physical properties, and (v) the effects of nuclear radiation on matter. Research in (i) and (ii) is often indistinguishable in purpose and practice from that in nuclear physics, although for nuclear chemists, chemical techniques may play a significant role. (iii) and (iv) can be classified as radiochemistry and isotope chemistry, while (v) falls in the classification of radiation chemistry. There is an urgent need in India also to have similar mechanism. Different universities, research organizations and the education administrators should join hands to address this issue in a focused manner. This is all the more needed urgently as the nuclear power programme and other applications are expected to increase many fold in coming years

  5. The status of nuclear development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.J.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to report on topics discussed at the Congress which are relevant to developments in the more applied areas of nuclear technology. These include subjects related to the short- and long-term potentials of nuclear power (fission and fusion) in the perspective of future energy requirements, the industrial uses of atomic radiation and the effects of ionising radiation on man. (R.L.)

  6. International nuclear power status 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoejerup, C.F.; Majborn, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    1995-02-01

    This report is the first in a planned series of annual reports covering the international development in the field of nuclear power. The report deals with: statistical information on the electricity produced by nuclear power plants; major safety-related incidents in 1994; the development in Sweden, Eastern Europe, and the rest of the world; the trends of development of a number of reactor types; the trends of development in the fuel cycle. (au)

  7. The 1968 Brussels convention and liability for nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sands, Ph.; Galizzi, P.

    2000-01-01

    The legal regime governing civil liability for transboundary nuclear damage is expressly addressed by two instruments adopted in the 1960's: the 1960 Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy and the 1963 Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage These establish particular rules governing the jurisdiction of national courts and other matters, including channelling of liability to nuclear operators, definitions of nuclear damage, the applicable standard of care, and limitations on liability. Another instrument - the 1968 Brussels Convention on Jurisdiction and the Enforcement of Judgements in Civil and Commercial Matters (hereinafter referred to as 'the Brussels Convention') - which is not often mentioned in the nuclear context will nevertheless also be applicable in certain cases. It is premised upon different rules as to forum and applicable law, and presents an alternate vision of the appropriate arrangements governing civil liability for nuclear damage. In this paper we consider the relative merits and demerits of the Brussels Convention from the perspective of non-nuclear states which might suffer damage as a result of a nuclear accident in another state. We conclude that in the context of the applicability of the Brussels Convention the dedicated nuclear liability conventions present few attractions to non-nuclear states in Europe. We focus in particular on issues relating to jurisdiction and applicable law, and do so by reference to a hypothetical accident in the United Kingdom which has transboundary effects in Ireland. (author)

  8. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony

    2004-12-01

    Fifty years ago, in September 1954, the head of the US Atomic Energy Commission stated that nuclear energy would become 'too cheap to meter': The cost to produce energy by nuclear power plants would be so low that the investment into electricity meters would not be justified. By coincidence the US prophecy came within three months of the announcement of the world's first nuclear power plant being connected to the grid in.. the then Soviet Union. In June 2004, the international nuclear industry celebrated the anniversary of the grid connection at the site of the world's first power reactor in Obninsk, Russia, under the original slogan '50 Years of Nuclear Power - The Next 50 Years'. This report aims to provide a solid basis for analysis into the prospects for the nuclear power industry. Twelve years ago, the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, WISE-Paris and Greenpeace International published the World Nuclear Industry Status Report 1992. In the current international atmosphere of revival of the nuclear revival debate - it has been a periodically recurring phenomenon for the past twenty years - two of the authors of the 1992 report, now independent consultants, have carried out an updated review of the status of the world nuclear industry. The performance of the nuclear industry over the past year is summed up in this report

  9. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie

    2012-07-01

    Twenty years after its first edition, World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2012 portrays an industry suffering from the cumulative impacts of the world economic crisis, the Fukushima disaster, ferocious competitors and its own planning and management difficulties. The report provides a global overview of the history, the current status and trends of nuclear power programs in the world. It looks at units in operation and under construction. Annex 1 also provides detailed country-by-country information. A specific chapter assesses the situation in potential newcomer countries. For the first time, the report looks at the credit-rating performance of some of the major nuclear companies and utilities. A more detailed chapter on the development patterns of renewable energies versus nuclear power is also included. The performance of the nuclear industry over the 18 months since the beginning of 2011 is summed up in this report

  10. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Ayukawa, Yurika; Burnie, Shaun; Piria, Raffaele; Thomas, Steve; Hazemann, Julie; Suzuki, Tatsujiro

    2014-07-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2014 provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. A 20-page chapter on nuclear economics looks at the rapidly changing market conditions for nuclear power plants, whether operating, under construction, or in the planning stage. Reactor vendor strategies and the 'Hinkley Point C Deal' are analyzed in particular. The performance on financial markets of major utilities is documented. The WNISR2013 featured for the first time a Fukushima Status Report that triggered widespread media and analyst attention. The 2014 edition entirely updates that Fukushima chapter. The Nuclear Power vs. Renewable Energy chapter that provides comparative data on investment, capacity, and generation has been greatly extended by a section on system issues. How does nuclear power perform in systems with high renewable energy share? Is this the end of traditional baseload/ peak-load concepts? Finally, the 45-page Annex 1 provides a country-by-country overview of all 31 countries operating nuclear power plants, with extended Focus sections on China, Japan, and the United States

  11. Status of nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittel, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses what nuclear waste is and where it comes from, what the technical strategies are for disposing of this waste, compares the toxicity of nuclear waste to other materials that are more familiar to us, and finally, comments on why it is taking so long to get on with the job of isolating nuclear waste permanently. The author believes that the technical solutions for the management and disposal of high-level and low-level nuclear waste are adequately in hand. The issues that are delaying the implementation of this technology are almost entirely related to sociological and political considerations. High-level nuclear waste can be safely stored and isolated through a multiple barrier approach. Although it is a hazardous material and must be handled properly, its toxicity diminishes rapidly. It then becomes less hazardous than other materials that we deal with everyday in routine industrial or household operations. The disposal of low-level waste has not attracted as much public attention as high-level waste management. Nevertheless, it is just as important to the public. For example, the use of radioactive isotopes in medicine, and the many lives that are saved as a result, would be very greatly reduced if medical institutions had no place to dispose of their radioactive waste. The management of uranium mill tailings is similar in many technical aspects to low-level waste management. Institutional issues, however, have not become as important in the case of mill tailings disposal

  12. Nuclear power internationally, status and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The recent events have stimulated the discussion concerning the human factor in nuclear engineering. Without a guarantee of the reliability and responsibility of everybody concerned, both directly and indirectly, the future of nuclear power will look bleak in an increasing number of countries. The present status and probable future development of nuclear power are outlined, and general trends are discussed. The future use of nuclear power will be concentrated in countries of high political stability which can assure safety, availability and economic efficiency. (orig.) [de

  13. Nuclear power: status and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogner, H.H.; Langlois, L.M.; McDonald, A.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power plants worldwide make important contributions to energy production. A total of 439 plants are in operation; with nearly 10 000 years of operating history, they reliably provide some 16 percent of the world's electricity production. The growth rates of nuclear power expansion in the seventies and eighties are no longer achievable now. Growing operating experience and further optimization of plant operation have caused the electricity generation in existing plants to grow overproportionally, corresponding to a calculated equivalent of 28 000 MW of capacity increment in the nineties. The short-term perspectives of nuclear power generation until 2020 as outlined by the International Energy Agency (IEA) indicate a slight decrease of electricity production with a variety of different regional developments. Over the same period of time, there will mainly be further improvements in reliable operation, resulting in higher availability and added safety, as well as measures extending plant life. Studies going beyond the time frame of the IEA Study forecast a major increase in nuclear generating capacity for the period after 2020 up to 2050. The foreseeable long-term developments on the world energy markets, with their limited fossil energy resources, are seen as a reason why nuclear power and renewable energies jointly will be important components in meeting energy requirements and, simultaneously, fulfilling the needs of climate protection. Specific problems of nuclear power, which can be solved, are seen to be the development of innovative plants, a stable cost situation, and the reduction of economic risks because of the long periods of payback of the capital invested. (orig.) [de

  14. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie; Katsuta, Tadahiro; Ramana, M.V.; Rodriguez, Juan C.; Ruedinger, Andreas; Stienne, Agnes

    2017-09-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2017 (WNISR2017) provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. The WNISR2017 edition includes a new assessment from an equity analyst view of the financial crisis of the nuclear sector and some of its biggest industrial players. The Fukushima Status Report provides not only an update on onsite and offsite issues six years after the beginning of the catastrophe, but also the latest official and new independent cost evaluations of the disaster. Focus chapters provide in-depth analysis of France, Japan, South Korea, the United Kingdom and the United States. The Nuclear Power vs. Renewable Energy chapter provides global comparative data on investment, capacity, and generation from nuclear, wind and solar energy. Finally, Annex 1 presents a country-by-country overview of all other countries operating nuclear power plants

  15. DNA damage-induced inflammation and nuclear architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratigi, Kalliopi; Chatzidoukaki, Ourania; Garinis, George A

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear architecture and the chromatin state affect most-if not all- DNA-dependent transactions, including the ability of cells to sense DNA lesions and restore damaged DNA back to its native form. Recent evidence points to functional links between DNA damage sensors, DNA repair mechanisms and the innate immune responses. The latter raises the question of how such seemingly disparate processes operate within the intrinsically complex nuclear landscape and the chromatin environment. Here, we discuss how DNA damage-induced immune responses operate within chromatin and the distinct sub-nuclear compartments highlighting their relevance to chronic inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nuclear Reaction Data and Uncertainties for Radiation Damage. Summary Report of the Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, P.J.; Sjöstrand, H.; Simakov, S.P.

    2016-08-01

    This Meeting was organized to implement the recommendation of the second Research Coordinated Meeting (RCM) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) “Primary Radiation Damage Cross Sections” to analyse the accuracy and consistency of the radiation damage-relevant nuclear data in the major nuclear data evaluations with the eventual goal of identifying the most reliable data and providing quantitative uncertainty estimates. Participants have considered the status of the primary nuclear data, such as reaction recoils spectra in the latest releases of ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, FENDL, ROSFOND and TENDL nuclear data libraries, and the ways of deriving the damage quantities KERMA, NRT- or arc-dpa and gas production cross sections as well as the recipes for an assessment of their uncertainties. This report contains the contemporary view of the Meeting participants on these issues in the form of a consolidated set of statements, recommendations and individual summaries. (author)

  17. Nuclear power in Russia: status, problems, prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoy, N.

    1992-01-01

    To solve the problem of atomic bomb, a powerful nuclear industrial complex has been established in the Soviet Union. This complex has developed a high scientific and engineering potential and enlisted the best science and engineering experts. Strict administration, rigid discipline in execution and operation, to secrecy limiting both internal and external interactions were typical of the complex which presented a state within the state with the inside divide by rigid barriers and protected from the outside by iron curtain. When the atomic bomb was designed and tested the search for a field of application for the nuclear potential available was started: nuclear power plants, nuclear power facilities for submarines and ships, nuclear aircraft and rocket engines, space nuclear facilities. Such were the conditions of forming the nuclear power in USSR. But this nuclear military complex has failed to prevent the Chelyabinsk accident which involved considerable radiological effects. The national industry could not adopt quickly the work style established in a nuclear complex and relative high technologies because of low educational and technical level and poor technological discipline. The results are known: the Chernobyl accident coincided in time with the beginning of the reconstruction of the System, the result of which was this accident. This paper describes the current status of the nuclear park, shows the problems of safety, maintenance, retrofitting, reconstruction or decommissioning. Statistical data on nuclear power in the power production program are also given

  18. Status of nuclear transmutation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizuka, Takakazu

    1999-01-01

    JAERI is carrying out R and Ds on partitioning and transmutation under the OMEGA Program. The R and Ds include the design study of accelerator-driven transmutation systems and the development of transmutation experimental facilities. Accelerator-driven systems have received much interests due to their potential role as dedicated transmuters in the nuclear fuel cycle for minimizing long-lived waste. Principles of accelerator-driven system, its history, JAERI proposed system concepts, and the experimental program are overviewed. (author)

  19. Compensation for nuclear damage in the OECD member countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The study aims to describe briefly the main features of the system for compensation of nuclear damage in OECD Member Countries, emphasising the practical arrangements for compensating such damage, with illustrations drawn from various national legal provisions applicable to such cases. The study indicates and compares legislative provisions which are specifically nuclear, without going into the substantive and procedural rules of the general law, reference to which frequently occurs in enactments relating to nuclear third party liability. The references to national nuclear legislation illustrate the manner in which effect has been given to international Conventions. (Auth.) [fr

  20. Through the looking glass: placing India's new civil liability regime for nuclear damage in context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruendel, Robert J.; Kini, Els Reynaers

    2012-01-01

    Until India adopted the Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage Act, 2010 (Liability Act) and the Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage Rules, 2011 (Liability Rules or Rules), no specific legislation was in place to govern nuclear liability or to compensate victims for damages due to a nuclear incident in India. Before delving into a more legal-technical analysis of the Liability Act and Rules (Part B), it is worth first briefly touching upon India's general energy situation, which necessarily influences India's policies, laws and negotiating strategies while also driving the significant business opportunities in the nuclear energy sector (Part A). Taking a look at India's energy sector today also underscores the sheer size of India's plans to build new nuclear power plants, which stands in dramatic contrast to the goals of many other countries. In this article, we will address the relationship of the Liability Act with the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) (Part C), while also touching upon the current status of an Indian nuclear insurance pool (Part D) and discussing some recent domestic developments, including the filing of public interest litigations and amendments to the Liability Rules (Part E), before presenting some concluding thoughts (Part F)

  1. National Nuclear Data Center status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This paper is the status report of the US National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven. It describes the new NDS approach to customer services, which is based on users initiating wish lists on topics of interest with the possibility to receive reports in hardcopy or electronically forms. After completion within the next two years of the multi platform software for management and data retrievals from shared databases, users will have the opportunity to install directly their own local nuclear data center for desktop applications. The paper describes the computer facilities, the nuclear reaction data structure, the database migration and the customer services. (a.n.)

  2. Nuclear Liability and Insurance for Nuclear Damage in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thofelt, H.

    1998-01-01

    This paper contains some facts about the Swedish nuclear energy production system and about the nuclear operators liability with the important issues. The nuclear insurance of Sweden is also explained in short terms. (author)

  3. US nuclear engineering education: Status and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This study, conducted under the auspices of the Energy Engineering Board of the National Research Council, examines the status of and outlook for nuclear engineering education in the United States. The study resulted from a widely felt concern about the downward trends in student enrollments in nuclear engineering, in both graduate and undergraduate programs. Concerns have also been expressed about the declining number of US university nuclear engineering departments and programs, the aging of their faculties, the appropriateness of their curricula and research funding for industry and government needs, the availability of scholarships and research funding, and the increasing ratio of foreign to US graduate students. A fundamental issue is whether the supply of nuclear engineering graduates will be adequate for the future. Although such issues are more general, pertaining to all areas of US science and engineering education, they are especially acute for nuclear engineering education. 30 refs., 12 figs., 20 tabs.

  4. US Nuclear Engineering Education: Status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This study, conducted under the auspices of the Energy Engineering Board of the National Research Council, examines the status of and outlook for nuclear engineering education in the United States. The study, as described in this report resulted from a widely felt concern about the downward trends in student enrollments in nuclear engineering, in both graduate and undergraduate programs. Concerns have also been expressed about the declining number of US university nuclear engineering departments and programs, the ageing of their faculties, the appropriateness of their curricula and research funding for industry and government needs, the availability of scholarships and research funding, and the increasing ratio of foreign to US graduate students. A fundamental issue is whether the supply of nuclear engineering graduates will be adequate for the future. Although such issues are more general, pertaining to all areas of US science and engineering education, they are especially acute for nuclear engineering education. 30 refs., 24 figs., 49 tabs

  5. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie; Katsuta, Tadahiro; Ramana, M.V.; Thomas, Steve; Porritt, Jonathon

    2015-07-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2015 provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. Japan without nuclear power for a full calendar year for the first time since the first commercial nuclear power plant started up in the country 50 years ago. Nuclear plant construction starts plunge from fifteen in 2010 to three in 2014. 62 reactors under construction - five fewer than a year ago - of which at least three-quarters delayed. In 10 of the 14 building countries all projects are delayed, often by years. Five units have been listed as 'under construction' for over 30 years. Share of nuclear power in global electricity mix stable at less than 11% for a third year in a row. AREVA, technically bankrupt, downgraded to 'junk' by Standard and Poor's, sees its share value plunge to a new historic low on 9 July 2015-a value loss of 90 percent since 2007 China, Germany, Japan-three of the world's four largest economies-plus Brazil, India, Mexico, the Netherlands, and Spain, now all generate more electricity from non-hydro renewables than from nuclear power. These eight countries represent more than three billion people or 45 percent of the world's population. In the UK, electricity output from renewable sources, including hydropower, overtook the output from nuclear. Compared to 1997, when the Kyoto Protocol on climate change was signed, in 2014 there was an additional 694 TWh per year of wind power and 185 TWh of solar photovoltaics- each exceeding nuclear's additional 147 TWh

  6. Present status of space nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1996-01-01

    USA and former USSR led space development, and had the experience of launching nuclear reactor satellites. In USA, the research and development of space nuclear reactor were advanced mainly by NASA, and in 1965, the nuclear reactor for power source ''SNAP-10A'' was launched and put on the orbit around the earth. Thereafter, the reactor was started up, and the verifying test at 500 We was successfully carried out. Also for developing the reactor for thermal propulsion, NERVA/ROVER project was done till 1973, and the technological basis was established. The space Exploration Initiative for sending mankind to other solar system planets than the earth is the essential point of the future projects. In former USSR, the ground experiment of the reactor for 800 We power source ''Romashka'', the development of the reactor for 10 kWe power source ''Topaz-1 and 2'', the flight of the artificial satellites, Cosmos 954 and Cosmos 1900, on which nuclear reactors were mounted, and the operation of 33 ocean-monitoring satellites ''RORSAT'' using small fast reactors were carried out. The mission of space development and the nuclear reactors as power source, the engineering of space nuclear reactors, the present status and the trend of space nuclear reactor development, and the investigation by the UN working group on the safety problem of space nuclear reactors are described. (K.I.)

  7. Nuclear power: Status report and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnitz, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the current status and future prospects of commercial nuclear electric power, with emphasis on issues of safety, physical security, proliferation, and economics. Discussions of these issues are presented separately for the current operating fleet, for new reactor designs similar in size to the current fleet, and for prospective new reactors of substantially smaller size. This article also discusses the issue of expansion of commercial nuclear power into new countries. The article concludes with recommendations, related both to technical issues and policy considerations. The major implications for policy are that although the level of safety and security achieved in today's operating reactor fleet worldwide is considered broadly acceptable, some advanced designs now under development potentially offer demonstrably safer performance, and may offer improved financial performance also. Management and safety culture are vital attributes for achieving adequate safety and security, as are a strong political culture that includes an absence of corruption, an independent regulatory authority, and a separation of nuclear operation from day-to-day politics. In some countries that are now considering a nuclear-power program for the first time, careful attention to these attributes will be essential for success. - Highlights: •Current status of nuclear reactor safety and security is judged to be adequate. •Strong management and safety culture are vital to achieve adequate nuclear safety. •Advanced reactor designs offer important safety advantages. •Maintaining and strengthening international nuclear institutions is important. •Achieving nuclear safety in “newcomer” countries requires a strong political culture.

  8. Nuclear Liability and Insurance for nuclear Damage in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, S. M. S.

    1998-01-01

    With nuclear power generating 43% of its total electricity production, Switzerland is amongst the states, employing the highest percentage of nuclear electricity. Although, the country has not ratified any of the international Nuclear Liability Conventions, its Nuclear Third Party Liability Act reflects all the principles, underlying those Conventions. The statutory liability of the operator of a Swiss nuclear installation itself being unlimited, the total insurance limit of CHF 770 m. provides the highest private insurance protection worldwide. With the support of its foreign Reinsurance Pools, the capacity for this insurance guarantee has, over more than 40 years, been built up by the Swiss Nuclear Insurance Pool. Apart from Third Party Liability cover, the Pool also provides Property insurance to Swiss nuclear installation operators and reinsurance cover to other nuclear insurers worldwide. (author)

  9. Status Report Kuwait Nuclear Data Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhan, A. [Kuwait Nuclear Data Center, Kuwait University, Kuwait (Kuwait)

    2013-08-15

    This report covers the Kuwaiti group's activities for the period April 2011 - January 2013. The Kuwait Group will continue its collaboration in order to fulfill its commitments. The Kuwait Nuclear Data Project has permanent responsibility for evaluating and updating ENSDF for A = 74 -80. The status of the mass chains is: - A = 74 (2006), - A = 75 (1999) {radical}, - A = 76 (1995) {radical}, - A = 77 (2012), - A = 78 (2009), - A = 79 (2002), - A = 80 (2005)

  10. The law on indemnity agreement for compensation of nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Basic terms are defined, such as: operation of reactors; nuclear damage; nuclear enterpriser; nuclear ship; measure for compensation; amount of compensation and liability insurance contract. The government may conclude with nuclear enterprisers indemnity agreements, in which in the case of reparation responsibilities of the enterprisers coming into being, the government agrees to make for losses of the enterprisers not possible to be compensated by liability insurance contracts, etc., and the enterprisers comply to pay indemnity charges. Losses indemnified by the government with the said agreements (indemnity agreement) shall be losses of the enterprisers (indemnity loss) which occur from reparation of nuclear damages due to earthquakes or eruptions, or regular operation of reactors or damages to be compensated by the insurance contracts, which are not demanded by the sufferers for 10 years from the day of events, and others. The term of indemnity agreements is from the time of the conclusion to the date of suspension of the operation of reactors. Indemnity charges, amount of indemnity, limit of conclusion of indemnity agreements, notice, prescription and others are prescribed respectively. The government may dissolute indemnity agreements in specified particular cases, including violation of the provisions of the law concerning indemnification of nuclear damage by the enterprisers, etc. (Okada, K.)

  11. Romanian nuclear power program - status and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, T.; Condu, M.; Bilegan, I.C.; Glodeanu, F.; Popescu, D.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents the status and the forecast for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program, as a component of the national strategy of power sector in Romania. The successful commissioning and operation of Cernavoda NPP - Unit 1 consolidated the opinion to go further for completion of Unit 2 to 5 on Cernavoda site. The focus is now on Unit 2, planned to be commissioned in 2001, and on the related projects for radioactive waste treatment and disposal. The Romanian national infrastructure supporting this program is also presented, including the research and development facilities. Romanian nuclear industry represents today one of the most advanced sector in engineering and technology and has the ability to meet the requirements of international codes and standards, proving also excellent quality assurance skills. Romanian nuclear industry has also the capability to compete on third market, for nuclear projects, together with the traditional suppliers. The conclusion of the paper is that for Romania, the nuclear energy is the best solution for future development of power sector, is safe, economic, and ethical. Nuclear sector created in Romania new jobs and activities contributing to the progress of Romanian society. (authors)

  12. Romanian nuclear power program - status and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, T.; Condu, M.; Stiopol, M.; Bilegan, I. C.; Glodeanu, F.; Popescu, D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the status and the forecast for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program, as a component of the national strategy of power sector in Romania. The successful commissioning and operation of Cernavoda NPP - Unit 1 consolidated the opinion to go further for completion of Unit 2 to 5 on Cernavoda site. The focus is now on Unit 2, planed to be commissioned in 2001, and on the related projects for radioactive waste treatment and disposal. The Romanian national infrastructure supporting this program is also presented, including the research and development facilities. Romanian nuclear industry represent today one of the most advanced sector in engineering and technology and has the ability to meet the requirements of international codes and standards, proving also excellent quality assurance skills. Romanian nuclear industry has also the capability to compete on third markets, for nuclear projects, together with the traditional suppliers. The conclusion of the paper is that for Romania the nuclear energy is the best solution for future development of power sector, is safe, economic and ethical. Nuclear sector created in Romania new jobs and activities, contributing to the progress of Romanian society. (author). 5 refs

  13. Compensation of damage caused by diverted nuclear substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deprimoz, J.

    1981-10-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive analysis of the insurance system for nuclear liability. As a rule, if nuclear fuel, radioactive products or waste are governed by nuclear energy law providing for strict and channelled liability, their legal holder will pay for damage arising from them anywhere within 20 years after theft or diversion and 10 years after the nuclear incident. In most countries, atomic liability insurers will implicitly grant their cover through policies underwritten by legal holders. If diverted substances have a low specific radioactivity, their legal holder remains liable according to common law and insurance policies cover this conventional liability. (NEA) [fr

  14. Act of 19 June 1974 on Compensation for Nuclear Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    This Act which came into force on 18 September 1974 replaces the nuclear third party liability provisions of the 1962 Act on nuclear installations. Its adoption enabled the Danish Government to ratify the 1960 Paris Convention and the 1963 Brussels Supplementary Convention. In accordance with the principles prescribed by these Conventions, the Act establishes an absolute and limited third party liability system (75 million Danish Krone) and compulsory insurance for the operator of a nuclear installation situated in Denmark. In certain conditions, the State may have to intervene to ensure compensation of nuclear damage exceeding the financial security provided by the operator liable. (NEA) [fr

  15. Third party liability cover for nuclear damage and related problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbone, Ferdinando; Gambardella, Elio.

    1974-06-01

    This paper analyses the financial security and cover for third party liability for nuclear damage as provided for by Act No. 1860 of 31 December 1962 on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The relevant Sections of the Act are quoted and explained, as are the nuclear operator's obligation to furnish financial security for his liability. Different possible types of security and cover are described, also with reference to other national legislation. Finally, the author mentions the Paris Convention which provides the basis for Italian nuclear third party liability legislation. (NEA) [fr

  16. Nuclear education in Russia : Status, peculiarities, perspectives and international cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kryuchkov, Eduard F.

    2008-01-01

    The paper is devoted to analysis of Russian nuclear education system: its current status, specific features, difficulties and prospects. Russian higher education system in nuclear engineering has been created simultaneously with development of nuclear industry, and the system completely satisfied

  17. Economic damage caused by a nuclear reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goemans, T.; Schwarz, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    This study is directed towards the estimation of the economic damage which arises from a severe possible accident with a newly built 1000 MWE nuclear power plant in the Netherlands. A number of cases have been considered which are specified by the weather conditions during and the severity of the accident and the location of the nuclear power plant. For each accident case the economic damage has been estimated for the following impact categories: loss of the power plant, public health, evacuation and relocation of population, export of agricultural products, working and living in contaminated regions, decontamination, costs of transportation and incoming foreign tourism. The consequences for drinking water could not be quantified adequately. The total economic damage could reach 30 billion guilders. Besides the power plant itself, loss of export and decreasing incoming foreign tourism determine an important part of the total damage. 12 figs.; 52 tabs

  18. Survey of Codes Employing Nuclear Damage Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-10-01

    surveyed codes were com- DO 73Mu 1473 ETN OF 1NOVSSSOLETE UNCLASSIFIED 1 SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS f AGE (Wh*11 Date Efntered)S<>-~C. I UNCLASSIFIED...level and above) TALLEY/TOTEM not nuclear TARTARUS too highly aggregated (battalion level and above) UNICORN highly aggregated force allocation code...vulnerability data can bq input by the user as he receives them, and there is the abil ’ity to replay any situation using hindsight. The age of target

  19. Nuclear power worldwide: Status and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    environmental constraints such as entry-into-force of the Kyoto Protocol and the European carbon trading scheme mean there is now a real financial benefit to avoiding greenhouse gas emissions, adding to the appeal of low-carbon electricity generation, including nuclear power and renewables. The complete nuclear power chain - including uranium mining, reactor construction and waste disposal - emits only 3 - 24 grams of carbon dioxide per kilowatt-hour, about the same as wind and hydro power, and well below coal, oil and natural gas, Mr. Rogner added. The IAEA provides energy planning assistance to its 145 member states. When a state considers launching a nuclear energy programme for the first time, the IAEA has established a set of milestones for it to follow. Audio Q and A with IAEA, is available here. For further information, please contact: IAEA Division of Public Information, Media and Outreach Section, tel. [43-1] 2600-21273. For further details on the current status of the nuclear industry, go to the IAEA's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS). Related Resources: Nuclear's Great Expectations; Energy, Electricity and Nuclear Power Estimates for the Period up to 2030, Report; Nuclear Power in Focus. (IAEA)

  20. Radiation damage in nuclear waste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, R.P.; Roberts, F.P.; Rusin, J.M.; Wald, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The text contains a number of specific observations about the radiation-induced changes in glass, glass-ceramic, and supercalcine nuclear waste forms. Other, more general conclusions can be summarized: Radiation-induced property changes follow an exponential ingrowth curve to saturation. Actinide host phases in both crystalline waste forms become X-ray amorphous. The magnitudes of the waste-form density changes observed could not be directly related to observed changes in the primary actinide phases. Although large crystal-structure changes occur in the materials studied, obvious physical degradation was not observed

  1. Damage caused to houses and equipment by underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delort, F.; Guerrini, C.

    1969-01-01

    A description is given of the damaged caused to various structures, buildings, houses, mechanical equipment and electrical equipment by underground nuclear explosions in granite. For each type of equipment or building are given the limiting distances for a given degree of damage. These distances have been related to a parameter characterizing the movement of the medium; it is thus possible to generalize the results obtained in granite, for different media. The problem of estimating the damage caused at a greater distance from the explosion is considered. (authors) [fr

  2. Status of nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    In the context of the world-wide energy situation and the key position energy plays and will play for the economic and social development of any country, the energy demand situation up to the year 2000 is analysed. As a result, the world-wide energy demand will continue to increase, however, mainly in the developing world. Nuclear power is one of the important component in the energy mix of today and in the future. Status of nuclear power application in developing countries up to the end of the century. Any further growth of the peaceful use of nuclear power in developing countries is closely linked with the following requirements: - qualified manpower, - industrial infrastructure, - energy demand and supply assessments, - high investments, - assurance of supply of nuclear fuel and fuel cycle services, - availability of small and medium power reactors. The possible role of the IAEA in developing countries and international measures to remove some of the limitations for the peaceful use of nuclear energy in developing countries are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Current Status of Yongbyon Nuclear Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Yong Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Non-proliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The DPRK has developed Yongbyon Nuclear Complex in Figure 1 since 1960's. Currently it is composed of the reactor facility, fuel fabrication facility including the enrichment center, and the radiochemistry center. Even though many facilities are not modern and economic in the western standards, Yongbyon Nuclear Complex is fully equipped with the entire life cycle of the nuclear installation. The key facilities have been added step by step. For example, the DPRK's nuclear reactor fleet started with the 2 MW IRT-2000 reactor in the middle of 80's. It started with a small scale radioactive isotope separation center nearby. But nowadays the DPRK is constructing a much more larger isotope separation center in the vicinity of its enrichment center along with a potential new UF6 conversion center. The general description over Yongbyon Nuclear Complex is given in this paper. More detailed context of the current status of the center will be discussed in the main symposium purely based on the open source information study.

  4. Indemnification of damage in the event of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Workshop on the Indemnification of Damage in the Event of a Nuclear Accident, organised by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency in close co-operation with the French authorities, was held in Paris from 26 to 28 November 2001. This event was an integral part of the International Nuclear Emergency Exercise INEX 2000. It attracted wide participation from national nuclear authorities, regulators, operators of nuclear installations, nuclear insurers and international organisations. The objective was to test the capacity of the existing nuclear liability and compensation mechanisms in the 29 countries represented at the workshop to manage the consequences of a nuclear emergency. This workshop was based upon the scenario used for the INEX 2000 Exercise, i.e. an accident simulated at the Gravelines nuclear power plant in the north of France in May 2001. These proceedings contain a comparative analysis of legislative and regulatory provisions governing emergency response and nuclear third party liability, based upon country replies to a questionnaire. This publication also includes the full responses provided to that questionnaire, as well as the texts of presentations made by special guests from Germany and Japan describing the manner in which the public authorities in their respective countries responded to two nuclear accidents of a very different nature and scale. (authors)

  5. Fundamental Technology Development for Radiation Damage in Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Sang Chul; Kwon, J. H.; Kim, E. S. and others

    2005-04-01

    This project was performed to achieve technologies for the evaluation of radiation effects at materials irradiated at HANARO and nuclear power plants, to establish measurement equipment and software for the analysis of radiation defects and to set up facilities for the measurements of radiation damage with non-destructive methods. Major targets were 1) establishment of hot laboratories and remote handling facilities/ technologies for the radioactive material tests, 2) irradiation test for the simulation of nuclear power plant environment and measurement/calculation of physical radiation damage, 3) evaluation and analysis of nano-scale radiation damage, 4) evaluation of radiation embrittlement with ultrasonic resonance spectrum measurement and electromagnetic measurement and 5) basic research of radiation embrittlement and radiation damage mechanism. Through the performance of 3 years, preliminary basics were established for the application research to evaluation of irradiated materials of present nuclear power plants and GEN-IV systems. Particularly the results of SANS, PAS and TEM analyses were the first output in Korea. And computer simulations of radiation damage were tried for the first time in Korea. The technologies will be developed for the design of GEN-IV material

  6. Nuclear data for radiation damage assessment and related safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocherov, N.P.

    1989-12-01

    The IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on Nuclear Data for Radiation Damage Assessment and Related Safety Aspects was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, 19-22 September 1989. This report contains the conclusions and recommendations of this meeting. The papers which the participants prepared for and presented at the meeting will be published as an IAEA Technical Document. (author)

  7. Vienna convention on civil liability for nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage was adopted on 21 May 1963 and was opened for signature on the same day. It entered into force on 12 November 1977, i.e. three months after the date of deposit with the Director General of the fifth instrument of ratification, in accordance with Article 23

  8. Vienna convention on civil liability for nuclear damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-20

    The Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage was adopted on 21 May 1963 and was opened for signature on the same day. It entered into force on 12 November 1977, i.e. three months after the date of deposit with the Director General of the fifth instrument of ratification, in accordance with Article 23.

  9. Status of automated nuclear scanning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C.; McNeece, J.P.; Ruddy, F.H.

    1983-07-01

    Present day minicomputers and microprocessors enable a range of automation, from partial to total, of tasks once thought beyond approach. The status of three computer controlled systems for quantitative track measurements is reviewed. Two systems, the Hanford optical track scanner (HOTS) and an automated scanning electron microscope (ASEM) are used for scanning solid state track recorders (SSTR). The third systems, the emulsion scanning processor (ESP), is an interactive system used to measure the length of proton tracks in nuclear research emulsions (NRE). Current limitations of these systems for quantitative track scanning are presented. Experimental uncertainties attained with these computer controlled systems are described using results obtained from reactor neutron dosimetry

  10. The law on indemnity agreement for compensation of nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The Government can conclude the contract with atomic energy entrepreneurs promising that it would indemnify the loss caused by the payment of indemnity by the latter for the nuclear damage which cannot be covered with responsibility insurance contract and other measures for indemnifying the damages upon the occurrence of responsibility of said entrepreneurs, who promises to pay the rate for indeminty. The loss to be indemnified by the Government with said contract should be limited to the loss caused by the payment of indemnity by said entrepreneurs for the damage caused by earthquakes or volcanic activities, normal operation of reactors (to be specified by the cabinet order) or the damage which can be covered with the responsibility insurance contract so long as the fact becoming its cause is concerned and the indemnification for which was not demanded by the sufferer in 10 years elapsed since the outbreak of such fact, and the damage caused by the entry of nuclear ships in foreign territorial waters, which cannot be covered with the measures for indemnifying the damage. The sum of the rate for indemnity is specified

  11. Current status and improvement of the nuclear physics experiment course for speciality of nuclear physics and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Guopu; Guo Lanying

    1999-01-01

    The author reviews the current status of the nuclear physics experiment course for speciality of nuclear physics and nuclear technology in higher education and expresses author's views on the future improvement of the nuclear physics experiment course

  12. Ubiquitination of HTLV-I Tax in response to DNA damage regulates nuclear complex formation and nuclear export

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marriott Susan J

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HTLV-I oncoprotein, Tax, is a pleiotropic protein whose activity is partially regulated by its ability to interact with, and perturb the functions of, numerous cellular proteins. Tax is predominantly a nuclear protein that localizes to nuclear foci known as Tax Speckled Structures (TSS. We recently reported that the localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins are altered in response to various forms of genotoxic and cellular stress. The level of cytoplasmic Tax increases in response to stress and this relocalization depends upon the interaction of Tax with CRM1. Cellular pathways and signals that regulate the subcellular localization of Tax remain to be determined. However, post-translational modifications including sumoylation and ubiquitination are known to influence the subcellular localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins. The sumoylated form of Tax exists predominantly in the nucleus while ubiquitinated Tax exists predominantly in the cytoplasm. Therefore, we hypothesized that post-translational modifications of Tax that occur in response to DNA damage regulate the localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins. Results We found a significant increase in mono-ubiquitination of Tax in response to UV irradiation. Mutation of specific lysine residues (K280 and K284 within Tax inhibited DNA damage-induced ubiquitination. In contrast to wild-type Tax, which undergoes transient nucleocytoplasmic shuttling in response to DNA damage, the K280 and K284 mutants were retained in nuclear foci following UV irradiation and remained co-localized with the cellular TSS protein, sc35. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the localization of Tax, and its interactions with cellular proteins, are dynamic following DNA damage and depend on the post-translational modification status of Tax. Specifically, DNA damage induces the ubiquitination of Tax at K280 and K284

  13. A nuclear power plant status monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, B.B.; Conradi, L.L.; Weinzimmer, F.

    1986-01-01

    Power plant operation requires decisions that can affect both the availability of the plant and its compliance with operating guidelines. Taking equipment out of service may affect the ability of the plant to produce power at a certain power level and may also affect the status of the plant with regard to technical specifications. Keeping the plant at a high as possible production level and remaining in compliance with the limiting conditions for operation (LCOs) can dictate a variety of plant operation and maintenance actions and responses. Required actions and responses depend on the actual operational status of a nuclear plant and its attendant systems, trains, and components which is a dynamic situation. This paper discusses an Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Research Project, RP 2508, the objective of which is to combine the key features of plant information management systems with systems reliability analysis techniques in order to assist nuclear power plant personnel to perform their functions more efficiently and effectively. An overview of the EPRI Research Project is provided along with a detailed discussion of the design and operation of the PSM portion of the project

  14. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie; Katsuta, Tadahiro; Ramana, M.V.; Fairlie, Ian; Maltini, Fulcieri; Thomas, Steve; Kaaberger, Tomas

    2016-07-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2015 provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. Nuclear power generation in the world increased by 1.3%, entirely due to a 31% increase in China. Ten reactors started up in 2015-more than in any other year since 1990-of which eight were in China. Construction on all of them started prior to the Fukushima disaster. Eight construction starts in the world in 2015-to which China contributed six-down from 15 in 2010 of which 10 were in China. No construction starts in the world in the first half of 2016. The number of units under construction is declining for the third year in a row, from 67 reactors at the end of 2013 to 58 by mid-2016, of which 21 are in China. China spent over US$100 billion on renewables in 2015, while investment decisions for six nuclear reactors amounted to US$18 billion. Eight early closure decisions taken in Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan and the U.S. Nuclear phase-out announcements in the U.S. (California) and Taiwan. In nine of the 14 building countries all projects are delayed, mostly by several years. Six projects have been listed for over a decade, of which three for over 30 years. China is no exception here, at least 10 of 21 units under construction are delayed. With the exception of United Arab Emirates and Belarus, all potential newcomer countries delayed construction decisions. Chile suspended and Indonesia abandoned nuclear plans. AREVA has accumulated US$11 billion in losses over the past five years. French government decides euro 5.6 billion bailout and breaks up the company. Share value 95 percent below 2007 peak value. State utility EDF struggles with US$ 41.5 billion debt, downgraded by S and P. Chinese utility CGN, EDF partner for Hinkley Point C, loses 60% of its share value

  15. The world nuclear industry status report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.; Froggatt, A

    2007-11-15

    The status and perspectives of the nuclear industry in the world have been subject to a large number of publications and considerable media attention over the last few years. The present report attempts to provide solid elements of key information for intelligent analysis and informed decision-making. As of 1 November 2007 there are 439 nuclear reactors operating in the world. That is five less than five years ago. There are 32 units listed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as 'under construction'. That is about 20 less than in the late 1990's. In 1989 a total of 177 nuclear reactors had been operated in what are now the 27 EU Member States. That number shrank to 146 units as of 1 November 2007. In 1992 the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, WISE-Paris and Greenpeace International published the first World Nuclear Industry Status Report. As a first updated review in 2004 showed the 1992 analyses proved correct. In reality, the combined installed nuclear capacity of the 436 units operating in the world in the year 2000 was less than 352,000 megawatts - to be compared with the forecast of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from the 1970's of up to 4,450,000 megawatts. Today the 439 worldwide operating reactors total 371,000 megawatts. Nuclear power plants provide 16% of the electricity, 6% of the commercial primary energy and 2-3% of the final energy in the world - the tendency is downwards - less than hydropower alone. Twenty-one of the 31 countries operating nuclear power plants decreased their share of nuclear power within the electricity mix if compared with 2003. The average age of the operating power plants is 23 years. Some nuclear utilities envisage reactor lifetimes of 40 years or more. Considering the fact that the average age of all 117 units that have already been closed is equally about 22 years, the doubling of the operational lifetime seems already rather optimistic. However, we have assumed an average

  16. The world nuclear industry status report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.; Froggatt, A.

    2007-11-01

    The status and perspectives of the nuclear industry in the world have been subject to a large number of publications and considerable media attention over the last few years. The present report attempts to provide solid elements of key information for intelligent analysis and informed decision-making. As of 1 November 2007 there are 439 nuclear reactors operating in the world. That is five less than five years ago. There are 32 units listed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as 'under construction'. That is about 20 less than in the late 1990's. In 1989 a total of 177 nuclear reactors had been operated in what are now the 27 EU Member States. That number shrank to 146 units as of 1 November 2007. In 1992 the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, WISE-Paris and Greenpeace International published the first World Nuclear Industry Status Report. As a first updated review in 2004 showed the 1992 analyses proved correct. In reality, the combined installed nuclear capacity of the 436 units operating in the world in the year 2000 was less than 352,000 megawatts - to be compared with the forecast of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from the 1970's of up to 4,450,000 megawatts. Today the 439 worldwide operating reactors total 371,000 megawatts. Nuclear power plants provide 16% of the electricity, 6% of the commercial primary energy and 2-3% of the final energy in the world - the tendency is downwards - less than hydropower alone. Twenty-one of the 31 countries operating nuclear power plants decreased their share of nuclear power within the electricity mix if compared with 2003. The average age of the operating power plants is 23 years. Some nuclear utilities envisage reactor lifetimes of 40 years or more. Considering the fact that the average age of all 117 units that have already been closed is equally about 22 years, the doubling of the operational lifetime seems already rather optimistic. However, we have assumed an average lifetime of 40 years

  17. Status of the JEFF nuclear data library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.; Bauge, E.; Dean, C.J.; Dupont, E.; Nordborg, C.; Rugama, Y.; Fischer, U.; Forrest, R.A.; Kellett, M.A.; Jacqmin, R.; Leeb, H.; Mills, R.W.; Pescarini, M.; Rullhusen, P.

    2011-01-01

    The status of the Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion file (JEFF) is described. Recently, the JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data library was released and shortly after adopted by the French nuclear power industry for inclusion in their production and analysis codes. Recent updates include actinide evaluations, materials evaluations that have emerged from various European nuclear data projects, the activation library, the decay data and fission yield sub-libraries, and fusion-related data files from the European F4E project. The revisions were motivated by the availability of new measurements, modelling capabilities and trends from integral experiments. Validations have been performed, mainly for criticality, reactivity temperature coefficients, fuel inventory, decay heat and shielding of thermal and fast systems. The next release of the library, JEFF-3.2, will be discussed. This will contain among others a significant increase of covariance data evaluations, modern evaluations for various structural materials, a larger emphasis on minor actinides and addition of high-quality gamma production data for many fission products. (authors)

  18. Indemnification of Damage in the Event of a Nuclear Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Second International Workshop on the Indemnification of Nuclear Damage was held in Bratislava, Slovak Republic, from 18 to 20 May 2005. The workshop was co-organised by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic. It attracted wide participation from national nuclear authorities, regulators, operators of nuclear installations, nuclear insurers and international organisations. The purpose of the workshop was to assess the third party liability and compensation mechanisms that would be implemented by participating countries in the event of a nuclear accident taking place within or near their borders. To accommodate this objective, two fictitious accident scenarios were developed: one involving a fire in a nuclear installation located in the Slovak Republic and resulting in the release of significant amounts of radioactive materials off-site, and the other a fire on board a ship transporting enriched uranium hexafluoride along the Danube River. The first scenario was designed to involve the greatest possible number of countries, with the second being restricted to countries with a geographical proximity to the Danube. These proceedings contain the papers presented at the workshop, as well as reports on the discussion sessions held. (author)

  19. Assessment of the current status of basic nuclear data compilations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Topics discussed include: the status of mass-chain evaluations, remote terminal access, other US Nuclear Data Network publications, formats and procedures subcommittee report, keyword follow-up (Phys. Rev. C), and atomic data and nuclear data tables

  20. Costs for insurance of civil responsibility for nuclear damage during transportation of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amelina, M.E.; Arsent'ev, S.V.; Molchanov, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    The article considers the method of calculation of rates for insurance of civil responsibility for nuclear damage during transportation of nuclear materials, which can minimize the insurer's costs for this type of insurance in situation when there is no statistics available and it is not possible to calculate the insurance rate by the traditional means using the probability theory

  1. Status of the JEFF Nuclear Data Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.; Bersillon, O.; Forrest, R. A.; Jacqmin, R.; Kellett, M.A.; Nouri, A.; Rullhusen, P.

    2005-01-01

    The status of the Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion file (JEFF) is described. The next version of the library, JEFF-3.1, comprises a significant update of actinide evaluations, evaluations emerging from European nuclear data projects, the activation library JEFF-3/A, the decay data and fission yield library, and fusion-related data files from the EFF project. The revisions were motivated by the availability of new measurements, modelling capabilities, or trends from integral experiments. Various pre-release validation efforts are underway, mainly for criticality and shielding of thermal and fast systems. This JEFF-3.1 library is expected to provide improved performances with respect to previous releases for a variety of scientific and industrial applications

  2. Status of the JEFF nuclear data library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.; Duijvestijn, M.C.; Bersillon, O.; Forrest, R.A.; Jacqmin, R.; Kellett, M.A.; Nouri, A.; Rullhusen, P.

    2005-03-01

    The status of the Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion file (JEFF) is described. The next version of the library, JEFF-3.1, comprises a significant update of actinide evaluations, evaluations emerging from European nuclear data projects, the activation library JEFF-3/A, the decay data and fission yield library, and fusion-related data files from the EFF project. The revisions were motivated by the availability of new measurements, modelling capabilities, or trends from integral experiments. Various pre-release validation efforts are underway, mainly for criticality and shielding of thermal and fast systems. This JEFF-3.1 library is expected to provide improved performances with respect to previous releases for a variety of scientific and industrial applications

  3. Study on radiation damage of electron and γ-rays and mechanism of nuclear hardening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Tao

    2001-01-01

    Radiation damage effects of electrons and γ-rays are presented. The damage defects are studied by experimental methods. On the basis of these studies the damage mechanism and nuclear hardening techniques are studied

  4. Advanced nuclear data for radiation-damage calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, R.E.; Foster, D.G. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Accurate calculations of atomic displacement damage in materials exposed to neutrons require detailed spectra for primary recoil nuclei. Such data are not available from direct experimental measurements. Moreover, they cannot always be computed accurately starting from evaluated nuclear data libraries such as ENDF/B-V that were developed primarily for neutron transport applications, because these libraries lack detailed energy-and-angle distributions for outgoing charged particles. Fortunately, a new generation of nuclear model codes is now available that can be used to fill in the missing spectra. One example is the preequilibrium statistical-model code GNASH. For heating and damage applications, a supplementary code called RECOIL has been developed. RECOIL uses detailed reaction data from GNASH, together with angular distributions based on Kalbach-Mann systematics to compute the energy and angle distributions of recoil nuclei. The energy-angle distributions for recoil nuclei and outgoing particles are written out in the new ENDF/B File 6 format. The result is a complete set of nuclear data that can be used to calculate displacement-energy production, heat production, gas production, transmutation, and activation. Sample results for iron are given and compared to the results of conventional damage models such as those used in NJOY

  5. Damage assessment of nuclear containment against aircraft crash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Mohd Ashraf, E-mail: iqbal_ashraf@rediffmail.com; Sadique, Md. Rehan, E-mail: rehan.sadique@gmail.com; Bhargava, Pradeep, E-mail: bhpdpfce@iitr.ac.in; Bhandari, N.M., E-mail: nmbcefce@iitr.ac.in

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Damage assessment of nuclear containment is studied against aircraft crash. • Four impact locations have been identified at the outer containment shell. • The mid of the total height has been found to be most vulnerable location. • The crown of dome has been found to be the strongest location. • Phantom F4 caused more localized and severe damage compared to other aircrafts. - Abstract: The behavior of nuclear containment structure has been studied against aircraft crash with an emphasis on the influence of strike location. The impact locations identified on the BWR Mark III type nuclear containment structure are mid-height, junction of dome and cylinder, crown of dome and arc of dome. The containment at each of the above locations has been impacted normally by Phantom F-4, Boeing 707-320 and Airbus A320 aircrafts. The loading of the aircraft has been assigned through the corresponding reaction-time response curve. ABAQUS/Explicit finite element code has been used to carry out the three-dimensional numerical simulations. The concrete damaged plasticity model was used to simulate the behavior of concrete while the behavior of steel reinforcement was incorporated using the Johnson–Cook elasto-viscoplastic material model. The mid-height of containment has been found to experience most severe deformation against each aircraft. Phantom F4 has been found to be most disastrous at each location. The results have been compared with those of the available studies with respect to the containment deformation.

  6. Current status of nuclear physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, Carlos A.; Hussein, Mahir S.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the current status of research in nuclear physics which is being carried out in different centers in the world. For this purpose, we supply a short account of the development in the area which evolved over the last nine decades, since the discovery of the neutron. The evolution of the physics of the atomic nucleus went through many stages as more data became available. We briefly discuss models introduced to discern the physics behind the experimental discoveries, such as the shell model, the collective model, the statistical model, the interacting boson model, etc., some of these models may be seemingly in conflict with each other, but this was shown to be only apparent. The richness of the ideas and abundance of theoretical models attests to the important fact that the nucleus is a really singular system in the sense that it evolves from two-body bound states such as the deuteron, to few-body bound states, such as 4 He, 7 Li, 9 Be, etc. and up the ladder to heavier bound nuclei containing up to more than 200 nucleons. Clearly, statistical mechanics, usually employed in systems with very large number of particles, would seemingly not work for such finite systems as the nuclei, neither do other theories which are applicable to condensed matter. The richness of nuclear physics stems from these restrictions. New theories and models are presently being developed. Theories of the structure and reactions of neutron-rich and proton-rich nuclei, called exotic nuclei, halo nuclei, or Borromean nuclei, deal with the wealth of experimental data that became available in the last 35 years. Furthermore, nuclear astrophysics and stellar and Big Bang nucleosynthesis have become a more mature subject. Due to limited space, this review only covers a few selected topics, mainly those with which the authors have worked on. Our aimed potential readers of this review are nuclear physicists and physicists in other areas, as well as graduate students interested

  7. Current status of nuclear physics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertulani, Carlos A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University-Commerce (United States); Hussein, Mahir S., E-mail: hussein@if.usp.br [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2015-12-15

    In this review, we discuss the current status of research in nuclear physics which is being carried out in different centers in the world. For this purpose, we supply a short account of the development in the area which evolved over the last nine decades, since the discovery of the neutron. The evolution of the physics of the atomic nucleus went through many stages as more data became available. We briefly discuss models introduced to discern the physics behind the experimental discoveries, such as the shell model, the collective model, the statistical model, the interacting boson model, etc., some of these models may be seemingly in conflict with each other, but this was shown to be only apparent. The richness of the ideas and abundance of theoretical models attests to the important fact that the nucleus is a really singular system in the sense that it evolves from two-body bound states such as the deuteron, to few-body bound states, such as {sup 4}He, {sup 7}Li, {sup 9}Be, etc. and up the ladder to heavier bound nuclei containing up to more than 200 nucleons. Clearly, statistical mechanics, usually employed in systems with very large number of particles, would seemingly not work for such finite systems as the nuclei, neither do other theories which are applicable to condensed matter. The richness of nuclear physics stems from these restrictions. New theories and models are presently being developed. Theories of the structure and reactions of neutron-rich and proton-rich nuclei, called exotic nuclei, halo nuclei, or Borromean nuclei, deal with the wealth of experimental data that became available in the last 35 years. Furthermore, nuclear astrophysics and stellar and Big Bang nucleosynthesis have become a more mature subject. Due to limited space, this review only covers a few selected topics, mainly those with which the authors have worked on. Our aimed potential readers of this review are nuclear physicists and physicists in other areas, as well as graduate

  8. Station blackout core damage frequency in an advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Luiz Sergio de

    2004-01-01

    Even though nuclear reactors are provided with protection systems so that they can be automatically shut down in the event of a station blackout, the consequences of this event can be severe. This is because many safety systems that are needed for removing residual heat from the core and for maintaining containment integrity, in the majority of the nuclear power plants, are AC dependent. In order to minimize core damage frequency, advanced reactor concepts are being developed with safety systems that use natural forces. This work shows an improvement in the safety of a small nuclear power reactor provided by a passive core residual heat removal system. Station blackout core melt frequencies, with and without this system, are both calculated. The results are also compared with available data in the literature. (author)

  9. The Brussels I Regulation and Liability for Nuclear Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handrlica, J.

    2010-01-01

    Prior to 2004, the map of the European Union seemed to be basically identical to the map of the contracting parties to the Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy of 1960 ('the Paris Convention'). The 2004 and 2007 enlargements were mainly composed of the contracting parties to the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage of 1963 ('the Vienna Convention'). In various discussions, the term 'nuclear liability patchwork' is used to describe this existing situation. One of the problems arising from this 'patchwork' is that, while a uniform legal framework was established for matters of jurisdiction and the enforcement of decisions under the authority given to the European Union ('EU') by the Council Regulation on jurisdiction and the recognition and enforcement of judgements in civil and commercial matters ('Brussels Regulation'), this overall framework does not apply to particular matters governed by the special conventions to which member states may be contracting parties, see Article 71 of the Brussels Regulation. This paper aims to outline the 'patchwork' of these rules that are applicable to nuclear third party liability cases in the EU and to point out the main consequences arising from this legal framework difficult to comprehend.5 Its scope, however, is limited to the legal issues arising from a nuclear incident occurring in a nuclear installation situated within the territory of the European Union

  10. Terrorism cover in France for property damage including nuclear risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanislas, A.

    2004-01-01

    The obligation to include terrorism cover in all Property Damage policies issued on the French Market is ruled by an Act of 1986 and introduced under Section R 126-2 of the French Code of Insurance. This section stipulates that Property Damage policies must provide cover for damage resulting from acts of terrorism, with the same deductible and the same limit than that of the other damage covered in the policy. Soon after the dramatic events of September 11, 2001 in the United States and although reinsurers worldwide restricted their offer of capacities, French insurers recognized that they had to maintain this global cover for the benefit of their insurers. After difficult discussions between insurers, reinsurers, brokers, risk managers and representatives of the State, the creation of a new Pool, backed with a State guarantee, was decided in less than three months. Effective January 1, 2002 and called Gestion d'Assurance et de Reassurance des Risques Attentats et Actes de Terrorisme (GAREAT), the Pool offers a multiple layers stop-loss cover for Property Damage only, i.e. excluding TPL policies. Considering that nuclear risks should be treated in the same way as other industrial risks, it was decided that they would be covered by GAREAT as well. In the meantime, by a Decree of December 28, 2001 modifying Section R 126-2, a special provision, aiming at reducing the limit and thus the price of this cover, was introduced in the Code. The purpose of this paper is to expose the present situation applying through GAREAT and, after two years of operation to discuss future developments, including other sources of capacity for the coverage of acts of terrorism in nuclear risks insurance.(author)

  11. New nuclear build programs status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tankosic, D.; Sabinov, S.

    2010-01-01

    Presentation topics: Reactor technology update OECD OEMs development; Nuclear power sector development projections - global nuclear capacity projections to 2050 (NEA low , high and phase-out scenarios); new nuclear constructions Worley Parsons support to new nuclear Programs around the world; Drivers towards increased nuclear capacity - increased demand of generating capacities; climate change concerns; Security of supply; Economics; Robust to fuel price increases

  12. Investigation on Current Status of World Nuclear Education and Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, J. Y.; Min, M. J.; Noh, B. C.

    2010-04-01

    All over the world, the interest of nuclear energy is increasing and the expectations of it are getting more as one of the most practical alternative energy resources. However, since 1990s, as a lot of nuclear specialists are being retired, now the problem of manpower shortage is taken into consideration for all of us and will be continued until 2011. In this point of view, the good quality of the professional nuclear training and education systems and the nuclear education centers are requested in order to breed and supply the next generation nuclear scientists and engineers. Thus, the objective of this study is to explore the current status of world nuclear education for both of nuclear power countries and potential nuclear power utilization countries in the near future. This report introduces the importance of nuclear energy, the current status of world nuclear power plants operation and the contribution of nuclear energy. Besides, it also includes the nuclear energy development plan of potential nuclear developing countries in the near future. In addition, this study also explores the nuclear training and education systems of the nuclear development countries and the current status of nuclear education in various fields such as government, industries, nuclear power plants ect. Especially, as considering the status of nuclear education classified such as Asia, the Americas, East and West Europe, the Middle East and Africa, it shows the different characteristics of nuclear education systems in each regions aimed to identify the good practices on the nuclear education systems. Finally, through observation of international cooperation and networks of the various nuclear organizations, this will be contributed to the development of nuclear education for member states and be suggested the various of the direction of development for nuclear education in Korea. The report presents in the basis of the recent status data of the world nuclear education systems collected

  13. Status of nuclear data activities in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Ouk; Chang, Jonghwa [Nuclear Data Evaluation Lab., Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Yusung, Taejon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-01

    Although nuclear data activities in Korea are still in the early stage, considerable demands for more accurate and wide-range nuclear data from nuclear R and D fields activated a new nuclear data project titled as `Development of Nuclear Data System`. It was launched this year as one of nation-wide long-term nuclear R and D programs in Korea for the next decade. Its main goals are (1) to establish nuclear data system, (2) to build up the infra-structure for utilization of nuclear data and (3) to develop highly reliable nuclear data system. To achieve these goals, international cooperation and cultivation of human resource as well as construction of measurement facilities will be indispensable. This report briefly describes the demands of nuclear data from the nuclear R and D programs, current nuclear data activities and future plan with its strategy. (author)

  14. Status of nuclear data activities in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young-Ouk; Chang, Jonghwa

    1998-01-01

    Although nuclear data activities in Korea are still in the early stage, considerable demands for more accurate and wide-range nuclear data from nuclear R and D fields activated a new nuclear data project titled as 'Development of Nuclear Data System'. It was launched this year as one of nation-wide long-term nuclear R and D programs in Korea for the next decade. Its main goals are 1) to establish nuclear data system, 2) to build up the infra-structure for utilization of nuclear data and 3) to develop highly reliable nuclear data system. To achieve these goals, international cooperation and cultivation of human resource as well as construction of measurement facilities will be indispensable. This report briefly describes the demands of nuclear data from the nuclear R and D programs, current nuclear data activities and future plan with its strategy. (author)

  15. Operational status of nuclear facilities in Japan. 2012 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This document is a compilation which provides an outline of the administration of nuclear facility safety regulations as well as various data including operational status, the status of periodical and safety inspections, the status of issues, and radiation management on nuclear power reactor facilities, reactor facilities in the research and development stage, and fabrication, reprocessing, disposal, and storage facilities in fiscal year 2011 (from April 2011 to March 2012). (J.P.N.)

  16. A present status for dry storage of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, K. S.; Lee, J. C.; Park, H. Y.; Seo, K. S

    2003-04-01

    National policy for management of a spent nuclear fuel does not establish in Korea yet. A storage capacity of a storage pool that is to store the spent nuclear fuel will be exceeded an amount of accumulation from the first Woljin nuclear power plant in 2007. Therefore it is necessary that dry storage facility is secured to store safely the spent nuclear fuel on site of the nuclear power plant until national policy for a back-end spent nuclear fuel cycle is established. In order to store safely spent nuclear fuel, it is important that the present status and technology on dry storage of spent nuclear fuel is looked over. Therefore, the present status on dry storage of spent nuclear fuel was analyzed so as to develop dry storage system and choose a proper dry storage method domestic.

  17. Nuclear safety in Slovak Republic. Status of safety improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, A.

    1999-01-01

    Status of the safety improvements at Bohunice V-1 units concerning WWER-440/V-230 design upgrading were as follows: supplementing of steam generator super-emergency feed water system; higher capacity of emergency core cooling system; supplementing of automatic links between primary and secondary circuit systems; higher level of secondary system automation. The goal of the modernization program for Bohunice V-1 units WWER-440/V-230 was to increase nuclear safety to the level of the proposals and IAEA recommendations and to reach probability goals of the reactor concerning active zone damage, leak of radioactive materials, failures of safety systems and damage shields. Upgrading program for Mochovce NPP - WWER-440/V-213 is concerned with improving the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel, steam generators 'leak before break' methods applied for the NPP, instrumentation and control of safety systems, diagnostic systems, replacement of in-core monitoring system, emergency analyses, pressurizers safety relief valves, hydrogen removal system, seismic evaluations, non-destructive testing, fire protection. Implementation of quality assurance has a special role in improvement of operational safety activities as well as safety management and safety culture, radiation protection, decommissioning and waste management and training. The Year 2000 problem is mentioned as well

  18. Indemnification for nuclear damages - recent developments in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapar, H.K.

    1981-10-01

    Public liability for nuclear damages in the United States is dealt with by a Federal statutory system. The Price-Anderson Act provides a system of compensation for such damages with an overall limit of $560 million. This fund is composed of private insurance, a utility assessment pool, and Federal government indemnity. The 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear station resulted in a less-than-full-scale test of the system. For the most part, the system has performed as intended although certain problems have been brought to light. Legislative proposal since the accident have focused on increasing the $560 million limitation on liability, but so far none of these proposals has been acted upon by the U.S. Congress. In the next several years, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and possibly Congress will consider application of the Price-Anderson system to high-level waste facilities. The Commission must file with the Congress within two years a comprehensive report on the Price-Anderson Act, including recommendations for its continuation and amendment. (NEA) [fr

  19. Transmutation of radioactive nuclear waste – present status and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transmutation of long-lived actinides and fission products becomes an important issue of the overall nuclear fuel cycle assessment, both for existing and future reactor systems. Reliable nuclear data are required for analysis of associated neutronics. The present paper gives a review of the status of nuclear data analysis ...

  20. Summary Report of the Technical Meeting on Primary Radiation Damage: From Nuclear Reaction to Point Defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, R. E.; Nordlund, K.; Simakov, S.P.

    2012-11-01

    The Meeting was convened to bring together the experts from both the nuclear data and materials research communities because of their common objective of accurately characterizing irradiation environments and resulting material damage. The meeting demonstrated that significant uncertainties remain regarding both the status of nuclear data and the use of these data by the materials modeling community to determine the primary damage state obtained in irradiated materials. At the conclusion of the meeting, the participants agreed that there is clear motivation to initiate a CRP that engages participants from the nuclear data and materials research communities. The overall objective of this CRP would be to determine the best possible parameter (or a few parameters) for correlating damage from irradiation facilities with very different particle types and energy spectra, including fission and fusion reactors, charged particle accelerators, and spallation irradiation facilities. Regarding progress achieved during the last decade in the atomistic simulation of primary defects in crystalline materials, one of the essential and quantitative outcomes from the CRP is expected to be cross sections for point defects left after recoil cascade quenching. (author)

  1. Transportation of failed or damaged foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, Charles E.; Mustin, Tracy P.; Massey, Charles D.

    1999-01-01

    Since initiating the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR SNF) Acceptance Program in 1996, the Program has had to deal with difficult issues associated with the transportation of failed or damaged spent fuel. In several instances, problems with failed or damaged fuel have prevented the acceptance of the fuel at considerable cost to both the Department of Energy and research reactor operators. In response to the problems faced by the Acceptance Program, DOE has undertaken significant steps to better define the spent fuel acceptance criteria. DOE has worked closely with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to address failed or damaged research reactor spent fuel causing a degradation of the fuel assembly exposing fuel meat and to identify cask certificate issues which must be resolved by cask owners and foreign regulatory authorities. The specific issues and implementation challenges associated with the transport of MTR type FRR SNF will be discussed. The information presented will include U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory issues, cask certificate issues, technical constraints, implementation status, and lessons learned. Specific information will also be provided on the latest efforts to revise DOE's Appendix B, Transport Package (Cask) Acceptance Criteria. The information presented in this paper will be of interest to foreign research reactor operators, shippers, and cask vendors in evaluating the condition of their fuel to ensure it can be transported in accordance with appropriate cask certificate requirements. (author)

  2. Prevention of damage and 'residual risk' in nuclear power laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greipl, C.

    1992-01-01

    The concept of prevention of damage within the framework of nuclear power laws includes averting danger for the protection of third parties and preventing risks for the partial protection of third parties with the proviso that still a desire to use the concept 'residual risk' in addition, it should be limited, on the grounds of what can be reasonably expected, to those risks which cannot be reduced any further by the government, i.e. to risks which the public in general and third parties ('actually') must accept. In the future, questions regarding safety systems should be taken into account exclusively withing the context of 'what is necessary for protection against damage in keeping with the latest developments in science and technology' and not at the discretion of the law in denying permission according to Article 7 Paragraph 2 Atomic Energy Law. (orig.) [de

  3. Protocol to amend the Vienna convention on civil liability for nuclear damage. Convention on supplementary compensation for nuclear damage. Final act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the Final Act of the Diplomatic Conference held in Vienna between 8-12 September 1997 which adopted the Protocol to Amend the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage, and the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage

  4. Protocol to amend the Vienna convention on civil liability for nuclear damage. Convention on supplementary compensation for nuclear damage. Final act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-23

    The document reproduces the Final Act of the Diplomatic Conference held in Vienna between 8-12 September 1997 which adopted the Protocol to Amend the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage, and the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage

  5. Nuclear status report for Western Europe 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decock, J.P.; Rogghe, L.; Selleslagh, E.; Fynbo, P.B.; Tuura, L.; Gaussens, J.; Cuzzaniti, M.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Monroy, C.R.; Wikdahl, C.E.; Juillerat, T.; Starr, G.; Afgan, N.; Riznic, J.

    1988-01-01

    Information about nuclear electricity production and main events in the nuclear sector in 1987 is given for following countries: Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, F.R. Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom and Yugoslavia

  6. Status of Nuclear Safety evaluation in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jiashu

    1999-01-01

    Chinese nuclear safety management and control follows international practice, the regulations are mainly from IAEA with the Chinese condition. The regulatory body is National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA). The nuclear safety management, surveillance, safety review and evaluation are guided by NNSA with technical support by several units. Beijing Review Center of Nuclear Safety is one of these units, which was founded in 1987 within Beijing Institute of nuclear Engineering (BINE), co-directed by NNSA and BINE, it is the first technical support team to NNSA. Most of the safety reviews and evaluations of Chinese nuclear installations has been finished by this unit. It is described briefly in this paper that the NNSA's main function and organization, regulations on the nuclear safety, procedure of application and issuing of license, the main activities performed by Beijing Review Center of Nuclear Safety, the situation of severe accident analyses in China, etc. (author)

  7. Status of the civilian nuclear industry in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heim, Alexandre; Laconde, Thibault

    2011-01-01

    The main nuclear actors in Asia are China, South Korea, India and Japan. The authors indicate the share of nuclear energy in their energy mix, the number of operating reactors, the total installed power, and the number of projects. Then, for each of these four countries, and for Pakistan and Taiwan, they propose a brief history of the nuclear program and briefly present its current status. They also evoke the official reactions after the Fukushima accident. Finally, they briefly discuss some issues for the development of civilian nuclear industry in Asia: uranium supplies, nuclear waste processing, development of a national nuclear sector

  8. Nuclear education in Russia: Status, peculiarities, problems and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onykiy, B.N.; Kryuchkov, E.F.

    2005-01-01

    The paper is devoted to analysis of Russian nuclear education system: its current status, specific features, difficulties and prospects. Russian higher education system in nuclear engineering has been created simultaneously with the development of nuclear industry, and the system completely satisfied all industrial demands for the specialists of different qualification levels. For the past several decades, nuclear education has lost its attractiveness to young people. The paper discusses the actions to be undertaken for reversing the situation. The paper underlines particularly the special role of international collaboration and all-European integration of nuclear educational programmes for further development of nuclear education all over the world. (author)

  9. Status of nuclear power industry in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadenko, I.M.; Vlasenko, M.I.

    2007-01-01

    There are five nuclear power plants and sites (NPPs) with 15 units in operation, 3 units under decommissioning and 1 drastically known as the 'Shelter' object in Ukraine. Ukraine has ambitions plans to develop nuclear industry based on own mineral, human financial resources as well as world wide international cooperation with nuclear countries

  10. Current status of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear power is not a viable energy source for Sri Lanka at present because of a number of reasons, the main reason being the non-availability of small and economically viable nuclear power plants. However several suppliers of nuclear power plants are in the process of developing small and medium power plants (SMPRs) which could be economically competitive with coal. The paper deals with past and future trends of nuclear power plants, their economics and safety. It also deals with environmental effects and public acceptance of nuclear power plants

  11. 1981 Annual status report. Nuclear measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The Nuclear Measurements programme is divided into two main projects, Nuclear Data on the one hand and Nuclear Reference Materials and Techniques on the other. In the former the JRC actions form part of world-wide sets of actions to establish reliable, and in many cases very precise, figures for important nuclear parameters - e.g. neutron interaction cross-sections, radio-nuclide half lives. In this work the Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements (CBNM) pays particular attention to the specific needs of the Community and to complement similar actions undertaken in the laboratories belonging to the Member States. Concerning Nuclear Reference Materials and Techniques the actions are to provide materials to which analytical and other measurements carried out in the nuclear industry or by the nuclear community can be referred. The basic aim of the Nuclear measurement programme is therefore to develop nuclear metrology with special orientation towards satisfying the demands for basic nuclear data and for materials and methods or reference

  12. 75 FR 64717 - Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost... Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (``CSC'') including its obligation to contribute to an international supplementary fund in the event of certain nuclear incidents. The NOI provided a September 27...

  13. IAEA advisory group meeting on nuclear data for radiation damage assessment and related safety aspects, Vienna, 12-16 October 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocherov, N.

    1982-01-01

    This Advisory Group Meeting on Nuclear Data for Radiation Damage Assessment and Related Safety Aspects was convened by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, from 12-16 October 1981. The meeting was attended by 34 participants from 15 countries and 2 international organizations. The main objective of the meeting was to review the requirements for and the status of nuclear data needed for radiation damage estimates in reactor structural materials and related reactor safety aspects, and to develop recommendations to the Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA for its future activities in this field. (author)

  14. Status of Iran's nuclear program and negotiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, David

    2014-01-01

    Iran's nuclear program poses immense challenges to international security. Its gas centrifuge program has grown dramatically in the last several years, bringing Iran close to a point where it could produce highly enriched uranium in secret or declared gas centrifuge plants before its breakout would be discovered and stopped. To reduce the risk posed by Iran's nuclear program, the P5+1 have negotiated with Iran short term limits on the most dangerous aspects of its nuclear programs and is negotiating long-term arrangements that can provide assurance that Iran will not build nuclear weapons. These long-term arrangements need to include a far more limited and transparent Iranian nuclear program. In advance of arriving at a long-term arrangement, the IAEA will need to resolve its concerns about the alleged past and possibly on-going military dimensions of Iran's nuclear program

  15. Nuclear status report for western Europe 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejsa, P.; Laurent, L.; Lauridsen, K.

    1985-01-01

    The status report embraces the following countries: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Federal Republic of Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, Yugoslavia

  16. Legislative Study on China’s Compensation for Nuclear Damage Liability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiu Liu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The civil nuclear industry plays an important role in improving environmental quality and safeguarding energy security in China. Nevertheless, the industry is facing a huge risk of nuclear accident damage. The legal system of nuclear damage compensation is of vital importance for the industry to address potential risks. The Nuclear Safety Law, which has recently been published in China, stipulates two articles about nuclear damage compensation in principle. However, in general, the current nuclear damage compensation legal system in China has not yet been made systematic and there are still problems, such as a lack of maneuverability and details. This paper adopts qualitative and quantitative methodologies to summarize and analyze the current legislation and regulation pertaining to civil nuclear damage compensation liability in China and analyzes the shortages and deficiencies of these rules in detail by using legal analysis methods. Suggestions to establish and perfect China’s legal system of nuclear damage compensation are proposed to safeguard the healthy development of the civil nuclear industry and remedy damages brought about by nuclear accidents. Such a legal system should contain the elements of clear legislative goals and objectives, a specific definition and scope of nuclear damage, strict and sole responsibility principles for operators, an appropriate liability amount, a stable financial guarantee for operators, and national supplementary liability.

  17. Status of nuclear safety research - 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobajima, Makoto; Sasajima, Hideo; Umemoto, Michitaka; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Tadao; Togashi, Yoshihiro; Nakata, Masahito

    2000-11-01

    The nuclear safety research at JAERI is performed in accordance with the long term plan on nuclear research, development and use and the safety research yearly plan determined by the government and under close relationship to the related departments in and around the Nuclear Safety Research Center. The criticality accident having occurred in Tokai-mura in 1999 has been the highest level nuclear accident in Japan and ensuring safety in whole nuclear cycle is severely questioned. The causes of such an accident have to be clarified not only technical points but also organizational points, and it is extremely important to make efforts in preventing recurrence, to fulfill emergency plan and to improve the safety of whole nuclear fuel cycle for restoring the reliability by the people to nuclear energy system. The fields of conducting safety research are engineering safety research on reactor facilities and nuclear fuel cycle facilities including research on radioactive waste processing and disposal and research and development on future technology for safety improvement. Also, multinational cooperation and bilateral cooperation are promoted in international research organizations in the center to internationally share the recognition of world-common issues of nuclear safety and to attain efficient promotion of research and effective utilization of research resources. (author)

  18. Nuclear oxidative damage correlates with poor survival in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheridan, J

    2012-02-01

    Oxidative DNA damage results from DNA adducts such as 8-oxo-7, 8 dihydro-2\\'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG), which is a pro-mutagenic lesion. No known association between 8-oxo-dG, disease progression and survival exists in colorectal cancer (CRC). We examined levels of 8-oxo-dG in sporadic CRC to determine its relationship with pathological stage and outcome. A total of 143 CRC patients and 105 non-cancer patients were studied. Nuclear and cytoplasmic 8-oxo-dG was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Double immunofluorescence using 8-oxo-dG and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) antibodies localised cytoplasmic 8-oxo-dG. Apoptosis was detected using TUNEL. Nuclear staining levels were similar in tumour tissue and matched normal mucosa in both epithelial (P=0.22) and stromal (P=0.85) cells. Epithelial cytoplasmic staining was greater in tumour tissue (P<0.001). Double immunofluorescence localised cytoplasmic 8-oxo-dG to mitochondria. Epithelial and stromal nuclear 8-oxo-dG decreased with local disease spread, but highest levels were found in distant disease (P<0.01). Survival was related to epithelial nuclear and stromal staining in normal mucosa (P<0.001) and tumour (P<0.01) but was unrelated to cytoplasmic staining. Normal control cells in tissue from cancer patients with high levels of 8-oxo-dG failed to undergo cell death. 8-oxo-dG may be an important biomarker of disease risk, progression and survival for CRC patients.

  19. Research on spatial Model and analysis algorithm for nuclear weapons' damage effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaohong; Meng Tao; Du Maohua; Wang Weili; Ji Wanfeng

    2011-01-01

    In order to realize the three dimension visualization of nuclear weapons' damage effects. Aiming at the characteristics of the damage effects data, a new model-MRPCT model is proposed, and this model can carry out the modeling of the three dimension spatial data of the nuclear weapons' damage effects. For the sake of saving on the memory, linear coding method is used to store the MRPCT model. On the basis of Morton code, spatial analysis of the damage effects is completed. (authors)

  20. Ukraine. Law on civil liability for nuclear damage and its financial security (13 december 2001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this law is to regulate civil liability for the compensation of damage resulting from activities involving the utilisation of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. It governs relations in respect of civil liability for nuclear damage, establishes the rules and procedures for compensation for damage caused by a nuclear incident, defines the methods of ensuring financial security of civil liability and establishes its limits. (N.C.)

  1. The amendment of the law on compensation for nuclear damage in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanikawa, H.

    2000-01-01

    The legal regime relating to the compensation for nuclear damage in Japan is governed by 'the Law on Compensation for Nuclear Damage' and the 'Law on indemnity Agreement for Compensation of Nuclear Damage'. The basic liability scheme on compensation for nuclear damage in the Compensation law is constituted on the basis of strict and unlimited liability, and such liability is channeled to a nuclear undertaker who is engaged on the operation of the reactor, etc.Furthermore, in order to operate a reactor a nuclear undertaker has to have provided financial security for compensation of nuclear damage by means of contracts, for liability insurance in respect of potential nuclear damage and an indemnity agreement for compensation of nuclear damage or the deposit. In addition to this financial security, in the event that nuclear damage occurs, and if necessary, the Government shall give to a nuclear undertaker such aid as required for him to compensate the nuclear damage. The financial security amount specified in the compensation Law has been increased to JPY (Japan yen) 60 billion. The necessity for special requirements in relation to financial security and/or the level of its amount in case of decommissioning of reactors, storage of nuclear spent fuel outside the power plant, radioisotopes other than nuclear fuel materials, or high level waste of nuclear fuel material, or the operation of experimental reactors for nuclear fusion, etc. shall be examined in the near future according to developments made in this field and the corresponding necessity for financial security for each case. (N.C.)

  2. Nuclear education in Russia. Status, peculiarities, perspectives and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryuchkov, Eduard F.

    2008-01-01

    The paper is devoted to analysis of Russian nuclear education system: its current status, specific features, difficulties and prospects. Russian higher education system in nuclear engineering has been created simultaneously with development of nuclear industry, and the system completely satisfied all industrial demands for the specialists of different qualification level. The specific features of PhD level (doctoral program) of education in Russia are discussed. The paper underlines particularly a special role of international collaboration in the field of nuclear education for further development of nuclear education all over the world. Some examples of international cooperation in the frames of new educational programs development are considered. (author)

  3. The status of ISI in the UK nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bann, T.; Rogerson, A. [AEA Technology, Risley (United Kingdom). Nuclear NDE Services

    1999-08-01

    This paper reviews the status of in-service inspection (ISI) in UK nuclear power generation industry through the experience of its nuclear utilities. The paper is intended to be a summary of some of the most recent and relevant ISI issues facing the utilities and the solutions devised to address those issues. (orig.)

  4. Status and future plan of nuclear data activities in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang Youxiang; Tang Hongqing [Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of Atomic Energy

    1997-03-01

    The present status and future plan of nuclear data measurement and evaluation in China are presented, including the supplement, improvement on CENDL-2.1 and benchmark test of CENDL-2.1, the progress on nuclear data measurement and CENDL-3. (author)

  5. Current status of nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palladino, N.J.

    1975-01-01

    The 65 colleges and universities offering undergraduate degrees in nuclear engineering and the 15 schools offering strong nuclear engineering options are, in general, doing a good job to meet the current spectrum of job opportunities. But, nuclear engineering programs are not producing enough graduates to meet growing demands. They currently receive little aid and support from their customers --industry and government--in the form of scholarships, grants, faculty research support, student thesis and project support, or student summer jobs. There is not enough interaction between industry and universities. Most nuclear engineering programs are geared too closely to the technology of the present family of reactors and too little to the future breeder reactors and controlled thermonuclear reactors. In addition, nuclear engineering programs attract too few women and members of minority ethnic groups. Further study of the reasons for this fact is needed so that effective corrective action can be taken. Faculty in nuclear engineering programs should assume greater initiative to provide attractive and objective nuclear energy electives for technical and nontechnical students in other disciplines to improve their technical understanding of the safety and environmental issues involved. More aggressive and persistent efforts must be made by nuclear engineering schools to obtain industry support and involvement in their programs

  6. Status Report of JAEA Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukahori, T.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Data Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is working on the nuclear data evaluation for Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library JENDL. The evaluation and related works are performed in the cooperation with Universities, Research Organizations and Companies in Japan through Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. The number of Nuclear Data Center staff members is 7 including one technical assistant as of April 1, 2011. The manpower is not enough for the evaluation and related work. The budget is obtained from MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology), but is annually decreasing after establishment of JAEA. Especially the budget must be much shorter than usual in 2011FY, since many of it will be spent for recovering after the earthquake. We are seeking another fund to compensate the decreasing budget.

  7. Status Report of JAEA Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukahori, T.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Data Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is working on the nuclear data evaluation for Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library JENDL. The evaluation and related works are performed in the cooperation with Universities, Research Organizations and Companies in Japan through Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. The number of Nuclear Data Center staff members is 7 including one technical assistant as of April 1, 2012. The manpower is not enough for the evaluation and related work. The budget is obtained from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), but is annually decreasing after establishment of JAEA. Especially the budget must be much shorter than usual in 2012FY, since many of it will be spent for recovering after the earthquake and Fukushima accident. We are seeking another fund to compensate the decreasing budget.

  8. Experimental nuclear physics in Vietnam - recent status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Thanh Minh

    1995-01-01

    It is really difficult to determine the exact date for the starting of nuclear physics research in Vietnam. Serious research on experimental nuclear physics began only since 1972 with the installation of such nuclear instrument like microtron accelerator, neutron generator, etc. During the past 20 years, hundred of research works have been published in local and foreign scientific journals. In the 5th national conference in Physics held in Hanoi in October 1993, at the Nuclear Physics section, 62 reports were presented reflecting the situation of nuclear physics research in the recent years, especially in the past five years. This review introduces its main results and formulates some perspectives of development in the late nineties in Vietnam. (K.A.). 27 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  9. Status of Nuclear-Pumped Laser research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelas, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    The field of Nuclear-Pumped lasers (NPLs) has progressed in many directions since the discovery of the first NPL in 1974. This paper discusses developments in the area of coupling nuclear energy to a laser media, kinetics, and the integration of nuclear reactors to a laser (or other types of energy conversion medium). Many questions about the process of nuclear-pumping have been examined since the discovery of the first NPL in 1974. During a period of time between 1974 and 1981, several types of lasers have been driven by nuclear reactions (ie rare gas lasers, impurity type lasers, molecular lasers, and an ion laser). Three of the lasers discovered, had demonstrated efficiencies of >1%. In addition, volume scaling of NPLs was demonstrated

  10. Present status and prospects of nuclear power development in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Renkai

    1994-01-01

    The current status and the guiding principles of nuclear power in China are discussed. With the expansion of China's reform and opening to outside world policy, the national economy growth was increased very rapidly. For continuous, stable and fast development of national economy, the safe, clean and economic nuclear energy will play an even more important role. It is envisaged that by 2020 nuclear power will account for about 20%. 1 ref., 4 tabs

  11. Nuclear car wash status report, August 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prussin, S; Slaughter, D; Pruet, J; Descalle, M; Bernstein, A; Hall, J; Accatino, M; Alford, O; Asztalos, S; Church, J; Loshak, A; Madden, N; Manatt, D; Moore, T; Norman, E; Petersen, D

    2005-01-01

    A large majority of US imports arrive at seaports in maritime cargo containers. The number of containers arriving is nearly 10 million per year, each with a cargo of up to 30 tons of various materials. This provides a vulnerable entry point for the importation of a nuclear weapon or its components by a terrorist group. Passive radiation sensors are being deployed at portals to detect radioactive material and portable instruments are carried by port personnel to augment detection. Those instruments can detect the neutrons and g-rays produced by 240 Pu that is normally present in weapons grade plutonium in cases where cargo overburden is not too great. However, 235 U produces almost no neutron output in its normal radioactive decay and its principal γ-radiation is at 186 keV and is readily attenuated by small amounts of wood or packing materials. Impurities such as 232 U, often present in reactor irradiated material at the 100-200 ppt level, can provide a detectable signal through significant cargo overburden but the wide variations among samples of HEU make this an unreliable means of detecting SNM. High quality radiography may be useful in determining that the majority of containers are clearly free of SNM. However, some containers will lead to ambiguous results from radiography and passive radiation sensing. For these reasons active neutron interrogation is proposed as a means to produce fission and thus greatly amplify the radiation output of fissionable material to facilitate its reliable detection even when well shielded by large cargo overburden. Historically, the fission signature utilized as the unique identifying feature of fissionable materials is the detection of delayed neutrons. However, these neutrons have very low yield ∼ 0.017 per fission in 235 U, and their low energy results in very poor penetration of hydrogenous materials such as fuels, water, wood, or agricultural products. That signature alone does not provide reliable detection in thick

  12. Maintaining non-nuclear weapon status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, H.

    1991-01-01

    Among the some 170 sovereign states in the world, five are legally recognized as nuclear weapon states (NWS) under the terms of the 1968 Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). Six countries (Argentina, Brazil, India, Israel, Pakistan, and South Africa) are counted as threshold states: they possess sizeable unsafeguarded nuclear facilities or have passed the brink of a nuclear test or of clandestine weapon production. Six other countries (Iran, Iraq, Libya, Taiwan, and North and South Korea) have been suspected periodically of either considering the nuclear weapon option or of working secretly on the development of weapons. Thus, about 150 non-nuclear weapon states (NNWS) remain which neither possess nuclear weapons nor strive to acquire them. These states are distributed throughout the globe and encompass highly industrialized as well as underdeveloped countries, liberal democracies, socialist states, sheikdoms and dictatorships. Some NNWS face acute military threats; other are far removed from the quarrels of the world, as in the case of some remote fortunate islands. Furthermore, NNWS may be members of nuclear-umbrella alliances or may have opted for a policy of neutrality or non-alignment

  13. Nuclear property insurance: status and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    The report addresses the problem of the unavailability of adequate levels of property insurance for commercial power reactors to pay for decontamination and cleanup costs arising from accidents. The report is designed to answer six questions, as follows: (1) What has been the development of each principal source of nuclear property insurance used as of early 1982 by nuclear utilities in the United States; (2) What are some of the distinguishing features of nuclear property insurance as offered by the principal sources; (3) How much nuclear property insurance was offered by each of these sources as of January 1, 1982; (4) Assuming that present plans came to fruition, how much nuclear property insurance is likely to be offered by each of these sources as of January 1, 1983; (5) What, if any, principal sources of nuclear property insurance are likely to emerge in the private sector by January 1, 1983; (6) What problems serious enough to warrant action of the NRC exist with respect to nuclear property insurance and what action should NRC take in response to each problem

  14. Present status and perspectives of nuclear power in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes the present status of nuclear power in Latin America, giving an analysis of Argentina, Brazil, Cuba and Mexico - the countries that have committed themselves to nuclear power undertakings. The historical development of the energy sector is studied and analysed, comparing Latin America with developed countries and groups of countries. Projected data are also studied and analysed, defining the present status of nuclear power in Latin American and its future possibilities. The region's future needs are analyzed on the basis of various indicators and the most important conclusions are highlighted. (author). 10 refs, 9 figs, 21 tabs

  15. Status of nuclear power in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.R.

    1976-01-01

    The article traces the history of Indian atomic energy programme and deals with the various nuclear power reactors operating commercially and under construction. Development of atomic energy in India is firmly committed to the installation of PHWR's as the mainstay of the country's immediate nuclear power programme. Indian nuclear power programme upto 1982 and major efforts at indigenisation, as reflected by the diminishing foreign exchange component in capital cost of different projects are discussed. Operational highlights of Tarapur atomic power station and Rajasthan atomic power station are reported. (S.K.K.)

  16. Status of nuclear data for actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzhovskii, B.Y.; Gorelov, V.P.; Grebennikov, A.N. [Russia Federal Nuclear Centre, Arzamas (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Nuclear data required for transmutation problem include many actinide nuclei. In present paper the analysis of neutron fission, capture, (n,2n) and (n,3n) reaction cross sections at energy region from thermal point to 14 MeV was carried out for Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm isotops using modern evaluated nuclear data libraries and handbooks of recommended nuclear data. Comparison of these data indicates on substantial discrepancies in different versions of files, that connect with quality and completeness of original experimental data.

  17. Radiation damage status of the ATLAS silicon strip detectors (SCT)

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, Takahiko; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Silicon microstrip detector system (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment at LHC has been working well for about 7 years since 2010. The innermost layer has already received a few times of 10**13 1-MeV neutron-equivalent fluences/cm2. The evolutions of the radiation damage effects on strip sensors such as leakage current and full depletion voltages will be presented.

  18. Status of hydrogen production by nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jong Wa; Yoo, Kun Joong; Park, Chang Kue

    2001-07-01

    Hydrogen production methods, such as electrolysis, thermochemical method, biological method, and photochemical method, are introduced in this report. Also reviewed are current status of the development of High Temperatrue Gas Coooled Reactor, and it application for hydrogen production

  19. Status of nuclear forensic support in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtar, Mohammedelmoez Eltayeb Abderahman

    2015-08-01

    The central problem investigated in this thesis is nuclear forensic support in Sudan, the thesis comprises five chapters, began with an introduction containing the art of forensic science, stated the importance of the it in criminal investigations. The forensic science was defined, and stated the principle of which it underlying, including: principle of individuality and principle of exchange, the divisions of this science has been clarified, then it discussed the crime scene and the collecting of evidence, where starting the forensic science at the crime scene, with clarifying the principle of crime scene investigation. Nuclear and other radioactive material was discussed: defining a radioactivity with the material source. It placed into 3 general categories: special nuclear materials, reactor fuel, and commercial radioactive sources, and mention each category and it characteristics. Radiation is part of our environment was clarified, and discussed what the effect on organisms and populations are. Nuclear forensics was presented,and how problem of the safeguarding of the nuclear material beginning. The emerging nature of the problem was discussed, the radiological crime scene management was explained, importance of securing the scene with an examples of equipment and instruments for on-scene radiation safety assessment and how the collection of evidence, storage forensic laboratory analysis was discussed and how set the designated nuclear forensic laboratory, also nuclear forensic interpretation, and the chain of custody was mentioned. The role of Regulating Authority in Nuclear forensic support was discussed, specifically in Sudan, International Cooperation have also been reminded, as well as memorandum of understanding was mentioned between SNRRA and the administration of forensic evidence, and one of it results is the radiological surveys unit in forensic administration, how the unit is configured, the role of the unit, finally conclusion of research was

  20. The status of nuclear power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calori, F.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is presented of the present state of development concerning nuclear power technology, and the prospects of a modified future development of nuclear energy in the world are dealt with, modification being necessary on account of altered conditions in the development of the energy economy. Projections are made for the development of the fuel market taking into account the quantities and costs for the various steps of the fuel cycle. (UA) [de

  1. Current status of Chinese nuclear power industry and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Min; Kim, Min; Jeong, Hee Jong; Hwang, Jeong Ki; Cho, Chung Hee

    1996-10-01

    China has been carrying out active international cooperation aiming to be a country where is to be an economical super power and an advanced country in nuclear power technology by the year early 2000, and China also has begun to be recognized as the largest potential market for the construction of nuclear power plants(NPPs) expecting to construct more than thirty nuclear power units by the year 2020. China has advanced technology in the basic nuclear science including liquid metal breeder reactor technology, nuclear material, medium and small size power plants, and isotope production technology, and also China has complete nuclear fuel cycle technology. However, China still has low NPP technology. Therefore, it is expected that China may have complementary cooperative relationship with China, it is expected that Korea may have an access to the advanced Chinese nuclear science technology, and may have a good opportunity to explore the Chinese market actively exporting excellent Korean NPP technology, and further may have a good position to the neighboring Asian countries' NPP markets. From this perspective, general Chinese social status, major nuclear R and D activity status, and correct NPP and technology status have been analyzed in this report, and this report is expected to be a useful resource for cooperating with China in future. 10 tabs., 6 figs., 16 refs. (Author)

  2. The Fundamentals and Status of Nuclear Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzie, Regis A.

    2011-11-01

    Nuclear power has enormous potential to provide clean, safe base-load electricity to the world's growing population. Harnessing this potential in an economic and responsible manner is not without challenges. Safety remains the principal tenet of our operating fleet, which currently provides ˜20% of U.S. electricity generated. The performance of this fleet from economic and safety standpoints has improved dramatically over the past several decades. This nuclear generation also represents greater than 70% of the emission free electricity with hydroelectric power providing the majority of the remainder. There have been many lessons learned from the more than 50 years of experience with nuclear power and these have been factored into the new designs now being constructed worldwide. These new designs, which have enhanced safety compared to the operating fleet, have been simplified by employing passive safety systems and modular construction. There are applications for licenses of more than 20 new reactors under review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; the first of these licenses will be completed in early 2012, and the first new U.S. reactor will start operating in 2016. Yet there are still more improvements that can be made and these are being pursued to achieve an even greater deployment of nuclear power technology.

  3. Nuclear medicine in South Africa : current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vangu, M.D.T.H.W.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear medicine in South Africa has been a full specialty on its own since 1987. It is practiced in almost all teaching hospitals and within the private sector in larger cities. Most of the routine radiopharmaceuticals are domestically manufactured and the main isotope can be obtained from locally produced technetium generators. All the radionuclide imaging devices used in the country are imported. The main vendors are GE, Siemens and Phillips. The majority of radionuclide imaging comprises work from nuclear cardiology and nuclear oncology. Almost all the routine clinical nuclear medicine procedures are performed and some in vitro work is also done, however. Principal therapeutic agents used in the country include radioactive iodine, radioactive iodine MIBG and yttrium. The country still lacks experience in receptors imaging and radioimmunology work and no PET scanner has been purchased yet. The academic institutions are active with participation in national and international congresses and also with publications. Although much remains to be done, the future of nuclear medicine in South Africa does not appear gloomy. (author)

  4. Current status of nuclear safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Efforts at nuclear safety research have expanded year by year in Japan, in term of money and technical achievement. The Atomic Energy Commission set last year the five year nuclear safety research program, a guideline by which various research institutes will be able to develop their own efforts in a concerted manner. From the results of the nuclear safety research which cover very wide areas ranging from reactor engineering safety, safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, prevention of radiation hazards to the adequate treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes, AIJ hereafter focuses of LWR engineering safety and prevents two articles, one introducing the current results of the NSSR program developed by JAERI and the other reporting the LWR reliability demonstration testing projects being promoted by MITI. The outline of these demonstration tests was reported in this report. The tests consist of earthquake resistance reliability test of nuclear power plants, steam generator reliability tests, valve integrity tests, fuel assembly reliability tests, reliability tests of heat affected zones and reliability tests of pumps. (Kobatake, H.)

  5. Status and Trends of Nuclear Power World-wide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueorguiev, B.; Spiegelberg-Planer, R.

    1996-01-01

    The reliable and adequate supply of energy, especially electricity, is necessary not only for economic development but to enhance the quality of life. Nuclear power is a proven technology which already supplies about 17% of the world''s electricity generation. In 1995, seven countries produce more than 40% of their electricity from nuclear power plants: Lithuanian, France, Belgium, Sweden, Bulgaria, Slovak and Hungary. It is quite clear that many countries are heavily reliant on nuclear power and are well beyond the point where nuclear power could be replaced by some other source, so, nuclear power remains one of the few technologically proven, economically promising and environmentally benign energy sources. An important factor in the continued development of nuclear power is the extent to which nuclear generated electricity remains economically competitive. Factors such as plant availability, standardisation of systems, components and equipment, as well as the cost of equipment to meet safety and environmental regulations play also an important role in determining the relative competitiveness of nuclear power plants. Many operating organizations have already impressive results in the reduction of plant unavailability. The number of nuclear power plants currently operating with annual availability factor exceeding 85% is increasing. Good performance of some operators should establish performance targets for operators everywhere. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the only international and almost complete information system, the Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) with nuclear power plant status and performance data. This paper presents the current status of nuclear power plants, according to information contained in the IAEA. It discusses the plant performance indicators available in PRIS and the improvement trend in the performance of nuclear power plants based on these indicators. It also presents the future trends of nuclear power focusing

  6. International status and prospects of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-12-01

    Nuclear power plants are primarily used for electricity production. Currently, 439 reactors are operating in 30 countries and are contributing approximately 14% to global electricity generation. The share of nuclear in global electricity generation has declined slightly in recent years. However, the total amount of nuclear electricity generation is increasing as plant availability, power uprating, and new plants offset the loss from older plants that are being shut down. Due to the economic benefits of continuing operation of a plant after the capital cost has been repaid, and with careful plant life management assessments, a number of reactors have had their operating licences extended for an additional 20 years. Light water reactors (LWRs) are by far the most prevalent reactors in use today, followed by pressurized heavy water reactors, gas cooled reactors and, currently, two fast reactors. The safety and reliability of nuclear facilities have been steadily improving. Strong networks among countries with operating nuclear power plants have enabled operators to learn from each other and to address common issues. Ongoing efforts have continuously strengthened safety culture and regulatory oversight. The current available supply of uranium meets the demand. Current enrichment and fuel fabrication capacities are adequate to meet the expected demand for the next decade. There is also substantial experience in the storage and reprocessing of spent fuel and the treatment of high level waste. Existing reprocessing capacity is adequate to meet present demand. Most spent fuel continues, however, to be stored awaiting a decision on future policy, i.e. whether to reprocess and recycle it or to dispose of it as waste. To date, no ultimate disposal facilities are available. Only a few countries currently use civil nuclear energy for purposes other than electricity production - mainly for seawater desalination and district heating - and even then only to a limited extent

  7. Status report on nuclear electric propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Progress in nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems for a multipayload multimission vehicle needed in both deep-space missions and a variety of geocentric missions is reviewed. The space system power level is a function of the initial launch vehicle mass, but developments in out-of-core nuclear thermionic direct conversion have broadened design options. Cost, design, and performance parameters are compared for reusable chemical space tugs and NEP reusable space tugs. Improvements in heat pipes, ion engines, and magnetoplasmadynamic arc jet thrust subsystems are discussed.

  8. Legal analysis at the Law for Civil liabilities by nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez G, A.

    2000-01-01

    The present work has the objective to analyse in specific terms the legal regime of the Civil liability by nuclear damage. It has been the intention of that this compilation is the initiation of a large way which awake the interests of jurists and specialists dedicated to study the aspects as the liability by nuclear damage, compensation guarantee, risk and nuclear damage among others. The peaceful applications of the nuclear energy require the necessity of a legal ordinance that it is updated according to the nuclear technology development that the regulations of the common law do not cover. This work is initiated mentioning some antecedents of the nuclear energy law in Mexico. Also is realized the study of the elemental concepts and definitions about the subject as the evolution of the legal figure in the National law frame where the jurist must do an incursion in the nuclear field and make use of scientific and technical terminology. It was analysed and it was made the reflection of the legal figure of liability, its exoneration cases, about the concepts of risk and nuclear damage overcoming the conceptual error among them. It is talked about the study of nuclear damage and its repairing as financial guarantee to compensate to the people injured by a nuclear accident. Finally, it was treated about the legal analysis and proposals of additions and reforms for updating the Nuclear damage liability Law, concluding with general contributions to the Law resulting products of this work. (Author)

  9. Fatigue damage of nuclear facilities; Endommagement par fatigue des installations nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The conference on the fatigue damage of nuclear facilities, organized by the SFEN (french society of nuclear energy), took place at Paris the 23. of november 2000. Eleven papers were presented, showing the state of the art and the research programs in the domain of the sizing rules, safety, installations damage, examination and maintenance. (A.L.B.)

  10. Sevoflurane Induces DNA Damage Whereas Isoflurane Leads to Higher Antioxidative Status in Anesthetized Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalita L. A. Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account that there are controversial antioxidative effects of inhalational anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane and absence of comparison of genotoxicity of both anesthetics in animal model, the aim of this study was to compare DNA damage and antioxidant status in Wistar rats exposed to a single time to isoflurane or sevoflurane. The alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay was performed in order to evaluate DNA damage in whole blood cells of control animals (unexposed; n = 6 and those exposed to 2% isoflurane (n = 6 or 4% sevoflurane (n = 6 for 120 min. Plasma antioxidant status was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. There was no statistically significant difference between isoflurane and sevoflurane groups regarding hemodynamic and temperature variables (P > 0.05. Sevoflurane significantly increased DNA damage compared to unexposed animals (P = 0.02. In addition, Wistar rats anesthetized with isoflurane showed higher antioxidative status (MTT than control group (P = 0.019. There were no significant differences in DNA damage or antioxidant status between isoflurane and sevoflurane groups (P > 0.05. In conclusion, our findings suggest that, in contrast to sevoflurane exposure, isoflurane increases systemic antioxidative status, protecting cells from DNA damage in rats.

  11. Belene Nuclear Power Plant project status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolov

    2008-01-01

    The status of the Belene project with the following main features is described: Reactor type - PWR, Russian Design Plant supplier - ASE, AREVA NP/Siemens Reactor thermal power - 2 x 3012 MW Electric output -2 x 1060 MW Net efficiency - 35 % Capacity factor - 90 % Design Life Time - 60 years

  12. Status of nuclear data activities at Karlsruhe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Toshihiko [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This is a brief introduction to nuclear data activity at Karlsruhe Research Center. Some URLs concerned are given. Topics mentioned here are, the FENDL and JEF/EFF project at INR, and measurements of neutron capture cross sections at IK III. (author)

  13. Controlled Nuclear Fusion: Status and Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, David J.

    1971-01-01

    Presents the history, current concerns and potential developments of nuclear fusion as a major energy source. Controlled fusion research is summarized, technological feasibility is discussed and environmental factors are examined. Relationships of alternative energy sources as well as energy utilization are considered. (JM)

  14. Status of nuclear technology education in Mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davaa, S.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.

    2007-01-01

    The National University of Mongolia (NUM) is the country's oldest, the only comprehensive university, and a leading center of science, education and culture. The NUM has twelve schools and faculties in the capital city Ulaanbaatar and three branches in provinces. The University offers the widest range of undergraduate and graduate programs in natural and social sciences and humanities. After sixty years of dynamic growth, the University has become a place of sustained innovation, a blend of scholarship and practical realism. The last ten years have been a period of reforms in the structure, financing and governance of Mongolian educational institutions. The NUM has been continuously adjusting its operations and curriculum to deal with new economic conditions, changing labour market demands and altered social aspirations. Committed to human peace, development and welfare in the increasingly globalized world, the NUM promotes equal and mutually beneficial international cooperation. It is a member of the International Association of Universities (IAU), University Mobility in Asia and the Pacific (UMAP), and Euro-Asian University Network (EAUN) and has direct co-operation agreements with more than sixty international academic and research centers in Europe, the USA and the Asia-Pacific Rim. On the threshold of the 21st century, the NUM remains a major center for fundamental and applied research as well as a university that is distinguished by the quality of its teaching. Following its values and traditions, the University strives to be an innovative and dynamic learning community. Requirements for Program Majored in Nuclear Technology: Profession major purpose: The objective is to provide knowledge and skills to use nuclear physics' methodology and nuclear radiation for education, science, health protection, agriculture, geology, mining, nature protection, energy and etc industries. The graduates of this major will become engineer technology staff and researchers in

  15. National Nuclear Data Center status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    In September the NNDC hosted a workshop for international collaborators to discuss issues related to database migration and use of the relational database concept. It is expected that full migration will take four to five years. The preliminary design of the Nuclear Reaction Database has been completed by the Reaction Database Design Team. The nuclear structure team at NNDC has begun investigating options for the nuclear structure databases. A preliminary ENSDF database using Access is being tested. The NNDC continues to compile neutron and charged-particle reaction data produced in the US and Canada. In the period from June 2000 through May 2001, 6 neutron data transmission tapes (TRANS 1289-1294) and 13 charged-particle transmission tapes (C041-C049, P003, T006-T008) were sent containing new and corrected entries. The contract with Oak Ridge to compile neutron total cross section data has been completed. All recoverable data has been received by NNDC and are being processed or have already been added to the CSISRS database. NNDC continues to coordinate the work of the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group. ENDF/B-VI, Release 7, was distributed in June 2000. Version 6.12 of the ENDF Utility codes was also distributed in April 2001. The ENDF-102 Data Formats and Procedures Manual has been updated and is available on the NNDC Web site. Cooperation with KAERI continued on fission product evaluations, focusing on the fast neutron energy range. Thirteen preliminary evaluations have been completed. Cooperation with LANL and IAEA NDS on the development of a modular code for nuclear reaction data evaluations was initiated. The pre-equilibrium Monte Carlo code HMS was extended to account for angular momentum conservation, of importance for modeling isomer and discrete gamma-ray production. The modular code Empire was extended by adding a module based on the exciton model code DEGAS, motivated by the need to handle direct/semi-direct capture in the fast neutron energy

  16. Just and reasonable distribution of funds for limited damages in the event of nuclear disasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schattke, H.

    1985-01-01

    A suggestion is made to make legal dispositions for the distribution of funds before a nuclear event. The concept incorporates the following material-legal elements: Proportionate reduction of damages compensation claims in case the funds for liability and coverage are insufficient; creation of reserve funds for late damage; legal preference of personal damage and only subsequent satisfaction of demand for compensation of nuclear industries. (orig.) [de

  17. Status and future prospects of extensive damage mitigation guidelines in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Han; Kim, Han Chul; Kim, Tae Hyeong; Seul, Kwang Won

    2012-01-01

    Previous severe accidents such as TMI 2 and Chernobyl accidents occurred due to combinations of equipment failures and human errors. However, the Fukushima accident is the first severe accident caused by extreme natural hazards. The Fukushima accident indicated need for integration of accident management such as emergency operating procedures (EOPs), severe accident management guidelines (SAMGs), and extensive damage mitigation guidelines (EDMGs). Therefore, in order to mitigate the effect of simultaneous accidents at multiple units of a site due to extreme natural hazards such as earthquake, tsunami, flooding, the EDMGs in Korea are being evaluated in terms of its effectiveness in prevention and mitigation of a severe accident after the Fukushima accident. In the first step, the Generic EDMG will be developed by KHNP for Wolsong, Kori, Yonggwang, Ulchin, Shin Kori, Shin Wolsong sites by 2013 and then the Specific EDMG will be developed for six nuclear power plants that represent each type of reactors by 2015. The aim of this paper is to describe the EDMGs and also introduce the activities to improve effectiveness of EDMGs through efforts for reflecting lessons-learned from the Fukushima accident. Also, this paper provides the status of developing EDMGs in Korea

  18. Status of nuclear waste management in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issler, H.

    1991-01-01

    The Swiss idea of the final storage of radioactive waste includes two types of waste disposal sites: a waste disposal site for low- and medium-level radioactive waste and a further site for vitrified high-level radioactive waste and long-life medium-level radioactive waste. A report is provided on the status of the two types of storage sites as well as on international cooperation in this area

  19. Status of technology for nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    In the area of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes the successful development and application of specific management technologies have been demonstrated over the years. The major area in which technology remains to be effectively implemented is in the management of high-level wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle. Research and development specifically directed at the management of high-level radioactive wastes in the USA and other countries is briefly reviewed in the article introduced

  20. Nuclear power plant performance. Status and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glorian, D.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of nuclear power plants can be assessed in several different fields: operating costs, safety, reliability of electricity generation, impact on the environment and personnel protection (industrial safety, radiation protection, etc.). Comparing national and international performance levels involves the use of performance indicators, together with a terminology, precise definitions and computerized data collection and processing facilities. The paper gives a brief review of the different actions undertaken during the last ten years to achieve international harmonization in the use of indicators. The main international indicators in use today by virtually all nuclear operators around the world are examined. Figures are given for each of these main indicators. In particularly, the levels of 'excellence' achieved throughout the world are discussed, together with the difficulties encountered in trying to match them or indeed maintain them. Future prospects regarding both the efforts made towards achieving international harmonization and the optimum use of this system of international performance indicators are examined, in order to achieve mutual enhancement through this approach to feedback of experience. Considering the overall performance indicators in use, it must be clearly recognized that, over the last ten years, the nuclear industry has made a tremendous effort to improve performance; the challenge for the future is to maintain a very high level of quality in the area of safety by keeping the operating costs (and investment costs for future plants) within a reasonable range

  1. Nuclear energy: liability for damage to the environment according to the National Environmental Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiras, Sergio Alves; Couto, Roberto Toscano

    1995-01-01

    Liability for damage of the environment is the kind of subject which arouses heated debates in the nuclear energy field among the jurists. Brazil lacks a specific environmental law upon which settlement on questions of nuclear damage could be based. In spite of such lackness, considerable progress has been achieved with the obligatory elaboration of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), the constitutional rules establishing competence and responsibilities on this matter, and some scattered laws. The objective of this work is to focus the responsibility of the Union that exercised the monopoly of nuclear activities, its agents and the team of experts which elaborate the EIA as well as the damage to the environment from a nuclear accident. This study is based on the legal definitions of nuclear reactor, radioactive waste and product, radioisotope, among others. It also focuses some proposed amendments of the law regulating both the civil and criminal liabilities for nuclear damage. (author). 7 refs

  2. Nuclear waste: Status of DOE's nuclear waste site characterization activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Three potential nuclear waste repository sites have been selected to carry out characterization activities-the detailed geological testing to determine the suitability of each site as a repository. The sites are Hanford in south-central Washington State, Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada, and Deaf Smith in the Texas Panhandle. Two key issues affecting the total program are the estimations of the site characterization completion data and costs and DOE's relationship with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission which has been limited and its relations with affected states and Indian tribes which continue to be difficult

  3. Nuclear liability legislation in Russia - current status and expected developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, A. E.; Borisov, D. G.

    2000-01-01

    Present report is provided by the experts of the Russian insurance business, a company member of the Russian Nuclear Pool, and not the experts of the Ministry of Atomic Energy of Russian Federation (RF Minatom). Considering the above, the following document will outline the current status of nuclear liability legislation and insurance in Russia from a viewpoint of the insurance companies and not RF Minatom. (author)

  4. Safety technical investigation activities for shipment of damaged spent fuels from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization(JNES) carries out the investigation for damaged fuel transportation from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station(1F) under safety condition to support Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA). In 2012 fiscal year, JNES carried out the investigation of spent fuel condition in unit 4 of 1F and actual result of leak fuel transport in domestic /other countries. From this result, Package containing damaged fuel from unit 4 in 1F were considered. (author)

  5. New tendencies in the legal mark give the civil liability for nuclear damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil Portela, Rosario; Alonso Gonzalez, Ivonne

    1998-01-01

    The development gives an indispensable legal mark for the execution a nuclear program it includes relative special dispositions to the civil liability for nuclear damages. The existence gives an international regime in this matter and its current improvement, give the one that Cuba is State it leaves, it conditions the inclusion additional requirements in the national legislative system on civil liability relatives to the possible damages that it could cause to the personal one and environment in general a nuclear accident

  6. Status and developing of nuclear emergency response techniques in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiangang, Zhang; Bing, Zhao; Rongyao, Tang; Xiaoxiao, Xu

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear Emergency preparedness and response in China is consistent with international basic principle of nuclear safety and emergency response. Nuclear emergency response techniques in China developed with nuclear power from 1980s. The status of nuclear emergency techniques in China are: 1) China have plentiful experiences and abilities in the fields of nuclear facility emergency planning and preparedness, nuclear accident consequence assessment, emergency monitoring, and emergency advisory; 2) Emergency assistance ability in China has a foundation, however it cannot satisfy national requirement; 3) Emergency planning and preparedness is not based on hazard assessment; 4) Remote monitoring and robot techniques in not adaptable to the requirements of nuclear emergency response; 5) A consistent emergency assessment system is lack in China. In this paper, it is analyzed what is the developing focal points of nuclear emergency response techniques in China, and it is proposed that the main points are: a) To develop the research of emergency preparedness on the base of hazard analysis; b) To improve remote monitoring and robot ability during nuclear emergency; c) To develop the response technique research with anti-terrorism. (author)

  7. Global Status of Nuclear Power: Prospects and Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayobeka, B. M.

    2010-01-01

    Global energy requirements and the share of electricity in total energy consumption are increasing rapidly, and the contribution of nuclear power is projected to increase significantly. Out of the 29 countries currently using nuclear power for electricity generation, 22 intend to allow new plants to be built, and, of those, the majority are actively supporting the increased use of nuclear power, some by providing incentives. Most of these countries are expected to build reactors with a generating capacity of over 1000 MW(e). Only three countries continue to have a policy to phase out the use of nuclear energy in the future by not replacing existing operating nuclear power plants and with no consideration of the option of new nuclear plants.In addition, a growing number of countries are expressing interest in introducing nuclear power. Of the more than 60 countries that have expressed such an interest in recent years, over 20 are actively considering nuclear power programmes to meet their energy needs and the others have expressed interest in understanding the issues associated with the introduction of nuclear power.The drivers for rising expectations for nuclear power include: growing energy demand, concern over national energy supply security, the increasingly volatile price of fossil fuels and global environmental concerns. The drivers appear to be the same for countries expanding existing nuclear programmes and those seeking to introduce programmes. The projections made by different international organizations indicate a significant growth in the use of nuclear power. The IAEA projections indicate a world total for nuclear electrical generating capacity of between 445 and 543 GW(e) by 2020 and between 511 and 807 GW(e) by 2030. This paper takes a detailed look into the global status of nuclear power, highlighting challenges and prospects of the technology going into the next century.(author).

  8. Nuclear data for fission reactor core design and safety analysis: Requirements and status of accuracy of nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    The types of nuclear data required for fission reactor design and safety analysis, and the ways in which the data are represented and approximated for use in reactor calculations, are summarised first. The relative importance of different items of nuclear data in the prediction of reactor parameters is described and ways of investigating the accuracy of these data by evaluating related integral measurements are discussed. The use of sensitivity analysis, together with estimates of the uncertainties in nuclear data and relevant integral measurements, in assessing the accuracy of prediction of reactor parameters is described. The inverse procedure for deciding nuclear data requirements from the target accuracies for prediction of reactor parameters follows on from this. The need for assessments of the uncertainties in nuclear data evaluations and the form of the uncertainty information is discussed. The status of the accuracies of predictions and nuclear data requirements are then summarised. The reactor parameters considered include: (a) Criticality conditions, conversion and burn-up effects. (b) Energy production and deposition, decay heating, irradiation damage, dosimetry and induced radioactivity. (c) Kinetics characteristics and control, including temperature, power and coolant density coefficients, delayed neutrons and control absorbers. (author)

  9. Status of nuclear desalination in IAEA member states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Some of the IAEA Member States have active nuclear desalination programmes and, during the last few years, substantial overall progress has been made in this field. As part of the ongoing activities within the IAEA's nuclear power programme, it was thus decided to prepare a status report, which would briefly describe the recent nuclear seawater desalination related developments and relevant IAEA activities. This status report briefly covers salient aspects of the new generation reactors and a few innovative reactors being considered for desalination and other non-electrical applications, the recent advances in the commonly employed desalination processes and their coupling to nuclear reactors. A summary of techno-economic feasibility studies carried out in interested Member States has been presented and the potable water cost reduction strategies from nuclear desalination plants have been discussed. The socio-economic and environmental benefits of nuclear power driven desalination plants have been elaborated. It is expected that the concise information provided in this report would be useful to the decision makers in the Member States and would incite them to consider or to accelerate the deployment of nuclear desalination projects in their respective countries

  10. Russian nuclear criticality experiments. Status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagarinski, A.Yu.

    2003-01-01

    After the nuclear criticality had been reached on a uranium-graphite assembly for the first time in the Soviet Union on December 25, 1946, by I.V. Kurchatov and his team (1), the critical conditions in a great variety of multiplying media have been realized only in the Kurchatov Institute for at least several thousand times. Even the first Russian critical experiments carried out by Igor Kurchatov confirmed the unique merits of zero-power reactors: the most practically convenient range of parameters of kinetic response for variation of critical conditions, as well as invariability, over a wide range of the most important functions of neutron flux to reactor power. Neutron physics experiments have become a necessary stage in creation and improvement of nuclear reactors. Most critical experiments were performed mainly as a necessary stage of reactor design in the 60ies and 70ies, which has been the reactor 'golden age', when most of the total of over thousand nuclear reactors of various type and destination have been created worldwide. Though the ways of conducting critical measurements were very diversified, there are two main types of experiments. The first is so-called mock-up or prototype experiments when an exact (to the extent possible) simulation of the core is constructed to minimize the error in forecasting the operating reactor characteristics. Such experiments, which often represent the quality control of the core manufacturing and adjustment of core parameters to the design requirements, were carried out in Russia on critical assemblies of several plants, in design institutions (OKBM, Nizhni Novgorod; Electrostal and others), as well as in research centers (RRC 'Kurchatov Institute', etc.). Their results, which prevail today in the criticality database, even taking into account the capabilities provided by present-day calculation codes, are not well suited for new applications. It is hard to expect that the error resulting from inevitable idealization of

  11. Nuclear power in Canada: status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, S.R.

    1978-05-01

    The CANDU-PHW reactor is proven as a reliable and economic reactor for large-scale nuclear generating stations. Specialized Canadian manufacturing capability is well established for the design, manufacture, construction and operation of this pressure-tube reactor with its once-through fuel cycle. Retrievable storage of irradiated natural uranium fuel is safe, reliable and economic; a major research and development program is underway on the technology for immobilizing and disposing of either irradiated fuel or separated radioactive waste with emphasis on emplacement deep in stable geologic strata. The high neutron efficiency of CANDU keeps open options for more efficient fuel cycles, such as the thorium cycle; the existing CANDU concept could be used as a near breeder without the need for a major reactor development program. (author)

  12. Nuclear regulations: current status and proposed initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domondon, D.B.; Valdezco, E.M.; Mateo, A.J.; Parami, V.K.

    1996-01-01

    The science Act of 1958 created the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission, presently known as the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI), under the Department of Science and Technology (DOST). The PNRI is tasked with the dual role of promotion and control of the peaceful applications of atomic energy. To carry its mandate of regulation and control on the use of raioisotopes in various fields, the PNRI had promulgated and issued specific regulations known as the Code of PNRI regulations. This paper summarizes the activities undertaken by PNRI in the continuing process of review and subsequent revisions of the Code of PNRI regulations and related guidance documents. It highlights proposed modifications in the present regulations in an attempt to adopt the new international basic safety standards, the practical problems and related issues attendant to the implementation of these new standards, among others. In line with the overall objective of PNRI to ensure the safe application of nuclear energy and radiation technology in various fields, the institute conducted a series of regulatory information conferences to provide an opportunity for members of the regulatory staff of the PNRI and licenses to discuss safety initiatives and regulatory issues. This paper will also provide an in-depth assessment of the lessons learned from these conferences which were conducted by sector or by specific applications for a more focused approach, e.g. radiopharmaceuticals, industrial radiography, research, among others. Licensees' feedback on the PNRI regulatory process are presented as part of the overall objective of enhancing the operational experiences of the licensing, review and evaluation group as well as that of inspection, enforcement and compliance. Several proposed initiatives for consideration of the PNRI to further strengthen its regulatory functions are also briefly outlined. (author)

  13. Integration of nuclear power in the Portuguese network. Present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videira, F.M.

    1977-01-01

    The main characteristics of the Portuguese electric energy production system and their evolution in the past and near future are presented. Taking into consideration the Portuguese energy resources the alternatives to meet the additional long range electric energy needs are evaluated. Finally some comments are made about the present status of the nuclear option. (Auth.)

  14. Radiation damage studies related to nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, W.J.; Wald, J.W.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1981-12-01

    Much of the previously reported work on alpha radiation effects on crystalline phases of importance to nuclear waste forms has been derived from radiation effects studies of composite waste forms. In the present work, two single-phase crystalline materials, Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 (pyrochlore) and CaZrTi 2 O 7 (zirconolite), of relative importance to current waste forms were studied independently by doping with 244 Cm at the 3 wt % level. Changes in the crystalline structure measured by x-ray diffraction as a function of dose show that damage ingrowth follows an expected exponential relationship of the form ΔV/V 0 = A[1-exp(-BD)]. In both cases, the materials became x-ray amorphous before the estimated saturation value was reached. The predicted magnitudes of the unit cell volume changes at saturation are 5.4% and 3.5%, respectively, for Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 and CaZrTi 2 O 7 . The later material exhibited anisotropic behavior in which the expansion of the monoclinic cell in the c 0 direction was over five times that of the a 0 direction. The effects of transmutations on the properties of high-level waste solids have not been studied until now because of the long half-lives of the important fission products. This problem was circumvented in the present study by preparing materials containing natural cesium and then irradiating them with neutrons to produce 134 Cs, which has only a 2y half-life. The properties monitored at about one year intervals following irradiation have been density, leach rate and microstructure. A small amount of x-ray diffraction work has also been done. Small changes in density and leach rate have been observed for some of the materials, but they were not large enough to be of any consequence for the final disposal of high level wastes

  15. Nuclear power for sustainable development. Current status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamantiades, A.; Kessides, I.

    2009-01-01

    Interest in nuclear power has been revived as a result of volatile fossil fuel prices, concerns about the security of energy supplies, and global climate change. This paper describes the current status and future plans for expansion of nuclear power, the advances in nuclear reactor technology, and their impacts on the associated risks and performance of nuclear power. Advanced nuclear reactors have been designed to be simpler and safer, and to have lower costs than currently operating reactors. By addressing many of the public health and safety risks that plagued the industry since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, these reactors may help break the current deadlock over nuclear power. In that case, nuclear power could make a significant contribution towards reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, significant issues persist, fueling reservations among the public and many decision makers. Nuclear safety, disposal of radioactive wastes, and proliferation of nuclear explosives need to be addressed in an effective and credible way if the necessary public support is to be obtained. (author)

  16. Status of Chinese NPP Industry and Nuclear Fuel Cycle Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, R. X. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ko, W. I.; Kim, S. K. [Univ. of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    China still extended their experiences to both domestic and overseas so far. Chinese State Council approved its 'Medium and Long-term Nuclear Power Development Plan' in November 2007, indicating further definition for nuclear energy as indispensable energy option and future self-reliance development of nuclear industry. China intends to become self-sufficient not only in NPPs capacity, but also in the fuel production for all those plants. There are currently 17 NPPs in operation, and 28 NPPs under construction. However, domestic uranium mining supplying is currently less than a quarter of nuclear fuel demands. This paper investigated and summarized the updated status of NPP industry in China and Nuclear Fuel Cycle(NFC) policy. There still remain a number of technical innovation and comprehensive challenges for this nuclear developing country in the long-term, but its large ambitions and dramatic improvements toward future should not be ignored. As shown in this paper, the most suitable approach for China to achieve both environmentally-friendly power supplying and increasing energy demands meeting simultaneously must be considered. Nuclear energy now was recognized as the most potential and optimal way of energy supply system. In addition, to accommodate such a high-speed NPP construction in China, it should also focus on when and how spent nuclear fuel should be reprocessed. Finally, the nuclear back-end fuel cycle policy should be established, taking into accounts of all costs, uranium resource security, spent fuel management, proliferation resistance and environmental impact.

  17. Nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle and waste management: Status and trends, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This report was jointly prepared by the Division of Nuclear Power and the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management as part of an annual overview of both global nuclear industry activities and related IAEA programmes. This year's report focuses on activities during 1992 and the status at the end of that year. The trends in the industry are projected to 2010. Special events and highlights of IAEA activities over the past year are also presented. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. The new definition of nuclear damage in the 1997 protocol to amend the 1963 vienna convention on civil liability for nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soljan, V.

    2000-01-01

    This communication analyzes the content and the impact of the new definition of nuclear damage contented in the amendment protocol of the Vienna Convention relative to the civil liability in the 1963 Convention. Having in mind the experience of the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents, it is demonstrated that the costs of preventive measures, damage to the environment and economic loss may constitute substantial portions of the total damage following a nuclear accident. Then, the new definition is studied in detail, on insisting on the notion of economic loss. A development is devoted to the question of damage to the environment. The preventive measures are studied and their conditions of the compensation receivability evoked with the criteria of reasonable measures. (N.C.)

  19. Nuclear Techniques in Agriculture: Status and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurdali, F.

    2007-01-01

    This paper is focused on the role of nuclear techniques and their applications in agriculture science for plant and animal production, and to study the relationships among soil, plant, air, water, nutrients and agricultural pests. For example, carbon isotope discrimination 12 C/ 13 C can be used to select appropriate plant genotypes which are tolerant to drought and salinity stress. Using 15 N to study, symbiotic N 2 fixation, inorganic N dynamics in the soil, plant system, mineralization of organic N in soils, efficient use of chemical and organic N fertilizers and microbial protein production in ruminants. Neutron gauges are used for soil moisture measurements to assess crop water use efficiencies, crops water requirements, and irrigation scheduling for conventional and new methods of irrigation. The use of environmental isotopes ( 18 O, 2 H, 3 H and 14 C) in hydrology; and 137 Cs to study soil erosion. Using 32 P to study the fate of applied P fertilizers (chemical fractionation and availability), their use efficiency and phosphorus metabolism in animals. Ionizing radiation is used to improve the quality and productivity of major crops, to induce mutations, to improve the metabolisable and digestible energy of unconventional feeds and the nutritive value of agricultural residues, and to protect crops against agricultural pests and in food conservation. Radioimmunoassay is used in studies to improve the production and reproductive performance of indigenous small ruminants. (author)

  20. Aging and oxidatively damaged nuclear DNA in animal organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Løhr, Mille; Folkmann, Janne K

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to contribute to aging and is associated with the generation of oxidatively damaged DNA, including 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine. We have identified 69 studies that have measured the level of oxidatively damaged DNA in organs of animals at various ages. In general, organs...... with limited cell proliferation, i.e., liver, kidney, brain, heart, pancreas, and muscle, tended to show accumulation of DNA damage with age, whereas organs with highly proliferating cells, such as intestine, spleen, and testis, showed more equivocal or no effect of age. A restricted analysis of studies...... evidence for aging-associated accumulation of oxidatively damaged DNA in organs with limited cell proliferation....

  1. The Present Status of Nuclear Medicine in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mun Ho

    1968-01-01

    It is my privilege to give you a brief history on the status of nuclear medicine in Korea. There is nothing much to mention, as the history of the peaceful use of atomic energy is rather short and the RI facilities are limited in the number. It is my sincere hope, however, that you may understand what steps nuclear medicine in the developing countries did take and how it has been developed, seeing the present status of nuclear medicine in Korea, as one of the models. In our country, the peaceful use of atomic energy was actualized since the Law of Atomic Energy had been enacted in March 1959, and the Office of Atomic Energy and the Atomic Energy Research Institute had been established. The Korea Society of Nuclear Medicine was organized in 1961, which i think is one of the older in the Far East area. The Society now held about 170 members and the annual meetings in addition to the quarterly meeting have been held. The 6th general scientific meeting for 1967 is scheduled to be held in 25 November. The society publishes the Korean Journal of Nuclear Medicine twice a year, and the second issue appeared Oct. 1967. The instruments used in nuclear medicine are mostly expensive, therefore, the hospitals equipped with such instruments are inevitably limited in number and the after-service or repair of such instruments are technically not easy. Some of these difficulties, i hope, shall be overcome in the near future.

  2. Socioeconomic status and organ damage in Mexican systemic lupus erythematosus women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Pinto, C; Méndez-Martínez, S; Soto-Santillán, P; Galindo Herrera, J; Pérez-Contreras, I; Macías-Díaz, S; Taboada-Cole, A; García-Carrasco, M

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine relationships between socioeconomic status and organ damage in Mexican systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Demographic and clinical variables were assessed. Socioeconomic status was evaluated using the Graffar method and monthly household income. Lupus activity and organ damage were measured using the SLE disease activity scale, validated for the Mexican population (Mex-SLEDAI), and the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR) scale. The 143 Mexican female SLE patients included (mean age 40.1 ± 8.9 years, mean disease duration 8.9 ± 6.3 years) had a mean monthly household income of $ 407.2 ± 326.5. According to the Graffar index, 18.9%, 52.5%, and 28.7% had high/medium-high, medium, and medium-low/low socioeconomic status, respectively. Organ damage was observed in 61 patients (42.7%). Patients with organ damage had lower monthly household incomes ($241.4 ± 152.4 vs. $354.8 ± 288.3) and were more frequently unemployed (57.3% vs. 35.3%; p = 0.01) than those without. Low monthly income was not associated with lupus activity or self-reported health status. In the adjusted multivariate analysis, low monthly income ( < $300) was associated with organ damage. In conclusion, low income may be associated with organ damage in Mexican SLE patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Nuclear damage under the 1997 protocol: conventional thinking?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, G.

    2000-01-01

    This communication expresses the critical point of view of nuclear insurers about the international civil liability system and tackles questions about the current revision of this system. After having examined the nuclear risk nature in the insurance point of view and remind the objective of nuclear conventions in this context, the author expresses the opinion that compensation means, planned by these conventions, can be suitable to limited nuclear accident but would be insufficient to face the consequences of a serious nuclear accident. (N.C.)

  4. Current status and future prospects on nuclear industry in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joongjae

    2006-01-01

    It is ny great pleasure to have this chance of speaking at twenty-first KAIF/KNS Annual Conference, with the subject of the current status and future prospects of nuclear industry in Korea. As you all know, since the start of operation in Obninsk, the former Soviet Union, on June 26th, 1954, nuclear generation in the world has expanded continuously for the past 50 years. In 1973, when the first oil crisis hit the world, there were 147 nuclear power plants in operation, supplying only 0.8% of the world energy demand. About 30 years later, by the end of last year, 443 plants were in operation in 32 countries, supplying about 16% of the world power demand. Nuclear power generation is greatly contributing to the energy security of many countries and preservation of global environments. Recently, countries all over the world are becoming aware of the values and importance of nuclear energy which can help respond to energy crises caused by a sharp rise in oil prices and protect the earth from global warming. Due to its high energy density and ability to secure fuel supply at a lower cost, in addition to its cleanliness resulting from almost no emission of greenhouse gases, nuclear power generation is the practical alternative for energy security and the prevention of global warming. However, in the rapidly changing 21st century, the nuclear industries of the world, as well as Korea, are facing more challenges than ever before. The political and social disputes on nuclear generation are continuing while we all are facing urgent challenges, including the concerns about the safety of nuclear generation, procuring site to build nuclear power plants, and the improvement of competitiveness. Please allow me to remind you that it is very important for the world's nuclear societies to cooperate together in order to overcome diverse difficulties along our path and to contribute to the development of mankind and preservation of natural environments with nuclear power as a

  5. Nuclear power plant status diagnostics using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, E.B.; Uhrig, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    In this work, the nuclear power plant operating status recognition issue is investigated using artificial neural networks (ANNs). The objective is to train an ANN to classify nuclear power plant accident conditions and to assess the potential of future work in the area of plant diagnostics with ANNS. To this end, an ANN was trained to recognize normal operating conditions as well as potentially unsafe conditions based on nuclear power plant training simulator generated accident scenarios. These scenarios include; hot and cold leg loss of coolant, control rod ejection, loss of offsite power, main steam line break, main feedwater line break and steam generator tube leak accidents. Findings show that ANNs can be used to diagnose and classify nuclear power plant conditions with good results

  6. Current Status of QA For Nuclear Power Plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagoshi, Hitohiko

    1986-01-01

    It is the current status of QA and our QA experiences with nuclear power plants against the background of the Japanese social and business environment. Accordingly, in 1972, 'The Guidance for Quality Assurance in Construction of Nuclear Power Plants' based on U. S. 10CEF50 Appendix B, was published by the Japan Electric Association. 'Jug-4101 The Guide for Quality Assurance of Nuclear Power Plants' has been prepared by referring to the IAEA QA code. The Guide has been accepted by the Japanese nuclear industry and applied to the QA programs of every organization concerned therewith. The Japanese approach to higher quality will naturally be different from that of other countries because of Japan's cultural, social, and economic conditions. Even higher quality is being aimed at through the LWR Improvement and Standardization Program and coordinated quality assurance efforts

  7. Damage by the Great East Japan Earthquake and current status of the Sendai cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakui, Takashi; Itoh, Masatoshi; Shimada, Kenzi; Yoshida, Hidetomo; Shinozuka, Tsutomu; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake has inflicted damages on the accelerator facility of the Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University. The K=110 MeV cyclotron was slanted due to the damage of props supporting the cyclotron. The cyclotron building has also been slightly inclined. This situation requires the re-alignment of all the beam transport line and the cyclotron. Some of the shield doors at experimental rooms were broken and blocked the entrance. The earthquake caused also a lot of damages to some components of the cyclotron as well as the beam transport lines, such as beam ducts, magnets, vacuum pumps and power supplies. Fortunately, no one was injured at CYRIC. The restoration work was started on July 2011 and will be completed by July 2012. This report describes the situation of damages and the current status of the restoration work. (author)

  8. Ecological impacts and damage - comparison of selected components for nuclear and conventional power plants (example of Mochovce nuclear power plant)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucek, M.

    1984-01-01

    A comparison is given of ecological damage for the nuclear power plant in Mochovce and a conventional power plant with the same power. Ecological effects and damage are divided into three groups: comparable damage, ecological damage caused only by conventional power plants and ecological damage caused only by nuclear power plants. In the first group the factors compared are land requisition, consumption of utility water and air consumption. In the second group are enumerated losses of crops (cereals, sugar beet, potatoes, oleaginous plants) and losses caused by increased disease rate owing to polluted environment by conventional power plants. In the third group health hazards are assessed linked with ionizing radiation. Also considered are vent stack escapes. (E.S.)

  9. Nur77 forms novel nuclear structures upon DNA damage that cause transcriptional arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leseleuc, Louis de; Denis, Francois

    2006-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 has been implicated in both growth and apoptosis, and its function and activity can be modulated by cellular redistribution. Green fluorescent protein-tagged Nur77 was used to evaluate the role of Nur77 intracellular redistribution in response to genotoxic stress. Selected DNA damaging agents and transcription inhibition lead to rapid redistribution of Nur77 into nuclear structures distinct from conventional nuclear bodies. These nuclear bodies formed transiently were tightly bound to the nuclear matrix and conditions that lead to their appearance were associated with Nur77 transcriptional inhibition. The formation of Nur77 nuclear bodies might be involved in programmed cell death modulation upon exposure to DNA damaging agents that inhibit transcription by sequestrating this proapoptotic factor in dense nuclear structures

  10. The status report on the nuclear data project in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, G.N.; Baek, W.Y.; Kang, H.S.; Choi, J.Y.; Cho, M.H.; Ko, I.S.; Namkung, W. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Chang, J.H.

    1999-03-01

    The nuclear data project as one of the nation-wide nuclear R and D programs was launched by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) in 1996. Its main goals are to establish a nuclear data system, to construct the infrastructure for the nuclear data productions and evaluations, and to develop a highly reliable nuclear data system. In order to build the infrastructure for the nuclear data production, KAERI wants to build an intense pulsed neutron source by utilizing accelerator facilities, technologies, and manpower at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL). The PAL proposed the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF), which consists of a 100-MeV electron linac, a water-cooled Ta target, and at least three different time-of-flight (TOF) paths. The 100-MeV electron linac was designed and constructed based on experiences obtained from construction and operation of the 2-GeV linac at PAL. We report a status report on the nuclear data production and evaluation in Korea. (author)

  11. The present status of artificial intelligence for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, Kazunori; Yonekawa, Tuyoshi; Yoshikawa, Shinji; Hasegawa, Makoto

    1999-03-01

    JNC researches the development of distributed intelligence systems at autonomous plants and intelligent support system at nuclear power plant. This report describes the present status of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies for this research. The following are represented in this report: present research study for AI, Implementation of AI system and application of AI technologies in the field of industries, requirement for AI by industries, problems of social acceptance for AI. A development of AI systems has to be motivated both by current status of AI and requirement for AI. Furthermore a problem of social acceptance for AI technologies has to be solved for using AI systems in society. (author)

  12. Status of nuclear safety R ampersand D in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    The status of nuclear safety research and development in the US is presented with particular emphasis on work performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory. The nuclear safety program in the US encompasses safety of the current generation of operating commercial reactors, safety-related design of the next generation of advanced reactors, and safety activities for the reactors owned by the US Department of Energy. The broad topical areas of safety research include (but are not limited to) severe accidents, reliability/risk assessment, human performance, thermal-hydraulics, plant aging, seismic, and structural studies

  13. History and current status of nuclear fuel reprocessing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funasaka, Hideyuki; Nagai, Toshihisa; Washiya, Tadahiro

    2008-01-01

    History and present state of fast breeder reactor was reviewed in series. As a history and current status of nuclear fuel reprocessing technology, this ninth lecture presented the progress of the FBR fuel reprocessing technology and advanced reprocessing processes. FBR fuel reprocessing technology had been developed to construct the reprocessing equipment test facilities (RETF) based on PUREX process technologies. With economics, reduction of environmental burdens and proliferation resistance taken into consideration, advanced aqueous method for nuclear fuel cycle activities has been promoted as the government's basic policy. Innovative technologies on mechanical disassembly, continuous rotary dissolver, crystallizer, solvent extraction and actinides recovery have been mainly studied. (T. Tanaka)

  14. Current status of the nuclear medicine in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torizuka, K.

    1974-01-01

    A brief survey of the current status of Japan nuclear medicine is given. The following data are described (from the material of the 11th Japan Conference of Radioisotopes): 1. the increase of the number of nuclear instruments between 1971 and 1973; 2. the total amount of the cobalt radiation apparatur (inclusive of the cesium apparatus) in the hospitals in 1971- and 1972; 3. the radioactive medicines and nuclids used in Japan; 4. the radioactive isotopes used generally in the therapeutics in 1971 and 1972; 5. the question of labour. (K.A.)

  15. Present status of nuclear education and training in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyose, R.; Sumita, K.; Moriya, F.

    1994-01-01

    In Japan, where about 30% of electricity is supplied by nuclear actives require a good number of able and ambitious young scientists and engineers especially in the future. On the other hand, almost all Japanese electric power companies, which operate nuclear power plants, are striving to keep expertise of reactor operators as high as possible. Present status in Japan of education at universities, research and training reactors, training courses at governmental institutions and nonprofit organizations, and operator training centers of electric power companies, are reviewed. 3 tabs

  16. Evaluation of the status of national nuclear infrastructure development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    An appropriate infrastructure is essential for the safe, reliable and peaceful use of nuclear power. The IAEA was encouraged to assess ways to meet infrastructure needs and to provide guidance to Member States considering the introduction of nuclear power. All of these countries face the challenge of building the necessary nuclear infrastructure for the first nuclear power plant. The IAEA is responding to this demand through increased technical assistance, missions and workshops, and with new and updated technical publications. A holistic view of the infrastructure for nuclear power was published in Considerations to Launch a Nuclear Power Programme (GOV/INF/2007), targeted mainly at policy makers. Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power, an IAEA Nuclear Energy Series publication (No. NG-G-3.1) issued in 2007, provided more detailed guidance on the three phases of development outlined in Considerations to Launch a Nuclear Power Programme. It describes the sequential development through the three phases for each of 19 infrastructure issues, ranging from a government's national position on nuclear power to the procurement of items and services for the first nuclear power plant. Member States requested additional guidance on determining how to assess the progress of their infrastructure development for nuclear power programmes. This report was prepared in response to their request. It provides an evaluation approach for the status of national nuclear infrastructure development based upon the guidance presented in the Milestones publication mentioned above. The evaluation approach provides a comprehensive means to determine the status of the infrastructure conditions covering all of the 19 issues identified in the Milestones publication. This approach can be used by any interested Member State for self-evaluation in order to establish what additional work needs to be completed to develop the appropriate national infrastructure. In

  17. Legal responsibility for damage caused by nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brink, J.J. van den.

    1986-04-01

    In this essay a treatment is given of the legal third-party risks of licencees of nuclear power plants. It is regarded to what extent the actual responsibility arrangements provide an adequate protection to the citizen against potential risks of a nuclear power plant. (Auth.)

  18. New national legislation on compensation of nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra Machado de Faria, N.

    1981-10-01

    This paper describes the nuclear third party liability system within the Brazilian legal framework. Following some considerations regarding the development of nuclear energy it then focuses on the relationship between accident prevention and third party liability and on the political administrative framework related to the nuclar industry in Brazil. (NEA) [fr

  19. EVMS for nuclear power plant construction: status and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, M. S.; Kwak, J. K.; Park, S. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The Earned Value Management System (EVMS) method integrates three critical elements of project management scope, cost and time management. It requires the periodic monitoring of actual expenditures and physical scope accomplishments and allows calculation of cost and schedule variances along with performance indices. It allows for casting of project cost and schedule at completion and highlights the possible need for corrective action. It is anticipated that there will be intense competition in the nuclear industry as the cost and time for nuclear power plant construction. In order to attain competitive advantages, utilizing advanced project control systems by integrating cost and time management is of great concern for practitioners. This paper is to review the status of EVMS and its effective implementation to nuclear power plant construction

  20. Nuclear reactor development in Korea: It's history and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, J.; Kim, I.; Kim, D. S.

    2007-01-01

    Currently in Korea, 20 nuclear plants are in operation, generating some 18,000 MWe of electricity which is about 30% of the national electricity supply. Further 8 reactors, including innovative light water reactors developed with 30 years' experience in construction and operation with continuous technology development, are either under construction or being planned. Executing an energetic program of nuclear development, Korea is now the world's sixth-ranked nuclear nation. In this paper, at first, history of the nuclear reactor development in Korea will be discussed including technology self-reliance efforts of the nuclear industry, and future plan and prospects will also be presented. Secondly, the OPR1000 which is a Korean standard plant will be introduced in detail including its characteristics, design approach and features. Six OPR1000's are being operated with outstanding performance and 4 more units are under construction. The APR1400, an upgraded reactor of the OPR1000 in capacity and design, has been developed as a next generation reactor, and the contracts were signed for the first 2 units' construction in August 2006. Its development process and design features will be described. Finally, Korea's efforts for future nuclear power generation will be introduced. For future reliable energy supply, Korea has been actively participating in international cooperation such as Gen IV International Forum. In summary, this paper will introduce the history and status of the Korean nuclear reactor development with its past, present and future, which might be helpful to understand the Korean nuclear industry and find a way for international cooperation especially with European countries

  1. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same...... mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation...... and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity...

  2. Concrete alkali-silica reaction and nuclear radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Tsuneki

    2008-01-01

    The deterioration of concrete by alkali-silica reaction of aggregates (ASR) and the effect of nuclear radiations on the ASR have been reviewed based on our studies on the mechanism of ASR and the effect of nuclear radiations on the resistivity of minerals to alkaline solution. It has been found that the ASR is initiated by the attack of alkaline solution in concrete to silicious aggregates to convert them into hydrated alkali silicate. The consumption of alkali hydroxide by the aggregates induces the dissolution of Ca 2+ ions into the solution. The alkali silicate surrounding the aggregates then reacts with Ca 2+ ions to convert to insoluble tight and rigid reaction rims. The reaction rim allows the penetration of alkaline solution but prevents the leakage of viscous alkali silicate, so that alkali silicate generated afterward is accumulated in the aggregate to give an expansive pressure enough for cracking the aggregate and the surrounding concrete. The effect of nuclear radiation on the reactivity of quartz and plagioclase, a part of major minerals composing volcanic rocks as popular aggregates, to alkaline solution has been examined for clarifying whether nuclear radiations accelerates the ASR. It has been found that the irradiation of these minerals converts them into alkali-reactive amorphous ones. The radiation dose for plagioclase is as low as 10 8 Gy, which suggests that the ASR of concrete surrounding nuclear reactors is possible to be accelerated by nuclear radiation. (author)

  3. Tornado damage at the Grand Gulf, Mississippi nuclear power plant site: aerial and ground surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, T.T.; McDonald, J.R.

    1978-05-01

    A tornado struck the Grand Gulf nuclear power generating station, Port Gibson, Mississippi, about 11:30 p.m. on April 17, 1978. Storm damage investigators from the University of Chicago and Texas Tech University were dispatched to survey the damage. The meteorological situation that spawned the Grand Gulf tornado and seven others in the area is discussed. Aerial surveys of the entire damage path and detailed surveys of the plant site are presented. An engineering evaluation of the damage is also presented based primarily on information gained from detailed ground surveys

  4. The Indian civil liability for nuclear damage act, 2010. Legislation with flaws?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelzer, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    1. India has had no special legislation so far about liability under civil law for nuclear damage. Instead, the general law about damages outside of contractual provisions applied. 2. The ambitious Indian civil nuclear program requires intensified international cooperation. The potential partners in that cooperation demand that liability regulations be adopted on the basis of the principles of the international nuclear liability conventions so as to grant legal assurance to their export industries. 3. In May 2010, draft liability legislation was introduced into the Indian parliament. Final deliberations were held on August 30, 2010. On September 21, 2010, the President confirmed the draft legislation, thereby making it law. The draft legislation had been a matter of dispute in India from the outset. 4. The law applies to nuclear facilities owned or controlled by the Indian central government. Only the government or government institutions or state-owned companies can be owners of a nuclear facility. The owner is liable without fault having to be proven. The details of liability follow the provisions of the liability conventions. 5. The law provides for legal channelling of liability to the owner of a nuclear facility. 6. Regular courts of law have no competence to rule about claims for damages under the law. Instead, a 'Claims Commissioner' appointed ad hoc by the government, or a 'Nuclear Claims Commission,' are competent. 7. The 2010 Indian nuclear liability law is a piece of legislation with deficiencies. Key elements are incompatible with the principles of international nuclear liability regimes. (orig.)

  5. The order for enforcing the law on indemnity agreement for compensation of nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The states to be specified by the cabinet order stipulated in Item 2, Article 3 to the Law on Indemmity Agreement for Compensation of Nuclear Damage (hereinafter referred to as the Law) are the states meeting the following requirements. There are no violation of the stipulations according to the specified articles of the Law for the Regulation of Nuclear Source Materials, Nuclear Fuel Materials and Reactors, no damage of the facilities provided for the operation of reactors and others, and no natural calamity or no action of third parties which become the causes for the occurrence of nuclear damage. The nuclear damage to be specified according to the cabinet order stipulated in No. 5, Article 3 of the Law is the one caused by tidal waves. The indemnification rate stipulated in Article 6 of the Law to be decided by the cabinet order is 5/10000 (and 2.5/10000 regarding the indemnification contract with universities or colleges). Atomic energy entrepreneurs should notify the specified items to the Government with reference to the indemnification contracts concerning the operation of reactors, fabrication, reprocessing, use and transportation of nuclear fuel materials or matters contaminated by nuclear fuel materials

  6. Deliberations on Compensation and Remediation of Nuclear Damage to the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelzer, N.

    2010-01-01

    At its meeting held on 17 and 18 November 2009, the OECD NEA's Nuclear Law Committee (NLC) discussed the issue of obtaining financial security to cover liability for environmental damage. The experts from the insurance industry observed that the liability for environmental damage under the '2004 Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy' (2004 Paris Convention)2 may differ from the liability established under the 'Directive 2004/35/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 April 2004 on environmental liability with regard to the prevention and remedying of environmental damage' (referred to as 'directive'). This discussion put into focus the question whether the term 'liability' of the operator under the 2004 Paris Convention and under the directive covers identical concepts of 'compensation'. It is true that the directive, according to its Article 4, excludes nuclear risks or environmental damage or the imminent threat of such damage originating from defined nuclear activities from its scope of application. However, it reserves the right to amend that exclusion by 2014 [Article 18(2) and (3)]. Irrespective of this legal situation, there exists an understandable interest of the insurance industry and of other stakeholders as well to get clarification on which type of obligation the operator has to meet under both instruments, or in other words: which liability and coverage consequences does damage to the environment entail for the operator?

  7. Status of nuclear data for use in neutron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.M.

    1992-03-01

    Optimization of neutron therapy requires nuclear cross section data for: (1) the selection of source reaction for neutron production, (2) the design of collimators and shields, (3) the calculation of absorbed dose in the irradiation tissues, including heterogeneity corrections, (4) microdosimetry, and (5) studies of the influence of radiation quality on biological effects. Under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a Coordinated Research Program (CRP) has been underway since 1987 to assess the status of these nuclear data, to coordinate research efforts, to report recent progress, and to recommend acceptance of appropriate data and further research where necessary. In this paper, we outline the results of the CRP's final report to be published and evaluate the status of the most critical nuclear data needs for therapy, i.e., kerma calculations and measurements, from low neutron energies to 70 MeV. Recommended values for (n,p) kerma and the carbon-to-oxygen neutron kerma factor ratios up to 70 MeV are given with estimates of their current uncertainties

  8. Possible genetic damage in the Czech nuclear powe plant werkers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šrám, Radim; Rössner st., Pavel; Rubeš, J.; Beskid, Olena; Dušek, Zdík; Chvátalová, Irena; Schmuczerová, J.; Milcová, Alena; Solanský, I.; Bavorová, H.; Očadlíková, D.; Kopečná, O.; Musilová, P.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 593, 1-2 (2006), s. 50-63 ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SL/5/160/05 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : nuclear power plant * chromosomal aberrations * occupational risk Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 4.111, year: 2006

  9. Status of Korean nuclear industry and Romania-Korea cooperation in nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myung-Key, Lee

    2005-01-01

    Current status of electric power in Korea is characterized by the end of August 2004 by a total installed capacity of about 62,000 MW while the total electricity generation is about 342,000 GWh. The installed capacity of nuclear power is 17,716 MW, sharing 29% of total installed capacity and presenting 38% of total electricity generation in Korea. In accordance with the provisions of the Long Term Energy Plan during the past 40 years, the installed capacity in Korea has been drastically increased. In the 1960's, major sources of electricity generation were locally-mined anthracite coal and hydro, but in the 1970's it was the imported oil. However, through diversification policy the dependence of the imported oil has been rapidly reduced and the share of coal , gas and nuclear generation has been steadily increased. According to the long-term power development plan updated last year, which is extended to 2017, the installed capacity in the year 2017 will be about 88,000 MW. At that time nuclear power will become the largest, sharing 30% and the shares of coal and gas fired power will be steadily decreased. Concerning the Nuclear Power Projects, there are four different nuclear power sites along the coast of Korean peninsula, Yonggwang, Kori, Wolsong and Ulchin. In addition to the currently operating 20 nuclear power plants, there are 6 more nuclear power plants under construction at Shin-Wolsong and Shin-Kori sites. Our efforts to enhance the technology, economy and safety of the nuclear power plants will be continuously pursued. Wolsong unclear power units 1, 2, 3 and 4 are CANDU type reactors which are same type as Romanian Cernavoda nuclear power plants. Operational performance, in terms of capacity factor of NPPs, has remained well above the world average and recorded 91.4% last year. Also, last year, the frequency of unplanned trip was 0.6 time per reactor. In 2004, ten NPPs achieved OCTF, which stands for One Cycle Trouble Free in 2004. Wolsong unit 1

  10. Nuclear data for neutron therapy: Status and future needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    This report discusses the status and success of neutron therapy and some of the problems in clinical neutron dosimetry. Existing neutron interaction data, in particular results of kerma factor measurements and data evaluations, are reviewed. Nuclear data relevant for neutron source reactions, collimation, and shielding are also discussed. Finally, physical aspects of the variation of biological effectiveness of neutrons with neutron energy (radiation quality) are set out. Exchange of information between neutron therapy centers is essential, since only clinical experience can determine the optimal absorbed dose, fractionation, target volume, and clinical indications/contra-indications for neutron therapy

  11. Nuclear data for neutron therapy: Status and future needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This report discusses the status and success of neutron therapy and some of the problems in clinical neutron dosimetry. Existing neutron interaction data, in particular results of kerma factor measurements and data evaluations, are reviewed. Nuclear data relevant for neutron source reactions, collimation, and shielding are also discussed. Finally, physical aspects of the variation of biological effectiveness of neutrons with neutron energy (radiation quality) are set out. Exchange of information between neutron therapy centers is essential, since only clinical experience can determine the optimal absorbed dose, fractionation, target volume, and clinical indications/contra-indications for neutron therapy. Refs, 44 figs, 19 tabs.

  12. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén, E-mail: madeleine.lyckesvard@oncology.gu.se [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Lindegren, Sture [Department of Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Jensen, Holger [The PET and Cyclotron Unit Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet (Denmark); Bäck, Tom [Department of Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Swanpalmer, John [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Elmroth, Kecke [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • We study DNA damage response to low-LET photons and high-LET alpha particles. • Cycling primary thyrocytes are more sensitive to radiation than stationary cells. • Influence of radiation quality varies due to cell cycle status of normal cells. • High-LET radiation gives rise to a sustained DNA damage response. - Abstract: Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ({sup 211}At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as {sup 131}I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ({sup 60}Co) and alpha particles from {sup 211}At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24 h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to {sup 211}At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1 Gy {sup 211}At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative

  13. The current status and prospect of nuclear power in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, S. [State Nuclear Power Technology Corp., Beijing (China)

    2014-07-01

    'Full text:' China's nuclear power development has attracted world attention. This paper presented the current status of the nuclear power plant in China. By June 30, 2014, China has 20 operational units of 18.05GWe installed capacity, taking up 1.44% of the country's total. All the units have been operating well without any events above INES Level 1 in 2013. China also has 28 units of 30.5GWe installed capacity under construction, which accounts for around 40% of that in the world. The paper presented the progress of AP1000 in China. China made a national plan for 2011 to 2020 with the target to reach 58GWe operational nuclear power and 30GWe under construction by 2020. The Chinese President Xi Jinping urged recently to speed up the approval for new builds. This paper also presented the work of 'Go Global' by Chinese nuclear companies, i.e., their development of international market. (author)

  14. Status of helium-cooled nuclear power systems. [Development potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melese-d' Hospital, G.; Simnad, M

    1977-09-01

    Helium-cooled nuclear power systems offer a great potential for electricity generation when their long-term economic, environmental, conservation and energy self-sufficiency features are examined. The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) has the unique capability of providing high-temperature steam for electric power and process heat uses and/or high-temperature heat for endothermic chemical reactions. A variation of the standard steam cycle HTGR is one in which the helium coolant flows directly from the core to one or more closed cycle gas turbines. The effective use of nuclear fuel resources for electric power and nuclear process heat will be greatly enhanced by the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) currently being developed. A GCFR using thorium in the radial blanket could generate sufficient U-233 to supply the fuel for three HTGRs, or enough plutonium from a depleted uranium blanket to fuel a breeder economy expanding at about 10% per year. The feasibility of utilizing helium to cool a fusion reactor is also discussed. The status of helium-cooled nuclear energy systems is summarized as a basis for assessing their prospects. 50 references.

  15. The current status and prospect of nuclear power in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, S.

    2014-01-01

    'Full text:' China's nuclear power development has attracted world attention. This paper presented the current status of the nuclear power plant in China. By June 30, 2014, China has 20 operational units of 18.05GWe installed capacity, taking up 1.44% of the country's total. All the units have been operating well without any events above INES Level 1 in 2013. China also has 28 units of 30.5GWe installed capacity under construction, which accounts for around 40% of that in the world. The paper presented the progress of AP1000 in China. China made a national plan for 2011 to 2020 with the target to reach 58GWe operational nuclear power and 30GWe under construction by 2020. The Chinese President Xi Jinping urged recently to speed up the approval for new builds. This paper also presented the work of 'Go Global' by Chinese nuclear companies, i.e., their development of international market. (author)

  16. Risks and benefits of the interventions aimed at minimizing nuclear damage in the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossiello, L.A.; Failla, L.

    1997-01-01

    The damages that the absorption of ionizing radiation (i.r.) can cause to humans may be classified as 1) nonstochastic (somatic or deterministic) or 2) stochastic (probabilistic) , which result, for example, from high doses of i.r. absorbed after a serious nuclear accident. Though the Chernobyl case involved both kinds of damage, this paper deals only with stochastic damage risk, and confine our considerations to individuals who were directly Affected and received high i.r. doses. The purpose of this paper is to provide elements on which to base future decisions on the evacuation and return of populations affected by serious nuclear accidents. Unlike the abundant literature on the subject, and as a necessary complement thereto within the bounds of a strict synthesis, to identify the most significant parameters applicable to single individuals rather than to the population at large, and referring solely to risks of stochastic damage

  17. Assessment of seismic damages in nuclear power plant buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corsanego, A.; DelGrosso, A.; Ferro, G.

    1987-01-01

    Performance of nuclear power plant sites, buildings and components is in today's practice continuously evaluated by means of monitoring systems composed by a variety of instruments, allowing records of the most significant behavioral parameters to be gathered by electronic data acquisition equipment. A great emphasis has been devoted in recent years to the development of ''intelligent'' monitoring systems able to perform interpretation of the response of structures and components automatically, only requiring human intervention and sophisticated data processing techniques when degradation of the safety margins is likely to have been produced. Such computerized procedures can be formulated through logic or algorithmic processes and normally are consistently based upon simplified, heuristic behavioral models and probabilistic reasoning schemes. This paper is devoted to discuss the development of an algorithmic procedure intended for automatic, real-time interpretation of the recorded response of nuclear power plant buildings and foundations during seismic events

  18. International conventions on civil liability for nuclear damage. Revised 1976 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This revised edition contains the texts of the following multilateral conventions and instruments concerning civil liability for nuclear damage: The Vienna Convention of 21 May 1963 on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage; The Paris Convention of 29 July 1960 on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy (incorporating the provisions of the Additional Protocol of 28 January 1964); The Brussels Convention of 31 January 1963; Supplementary to the Paris Convention of 29 July 1960 (and incorporating the provisions of the Additional Protocol signed in Paris on 28 January 1964); and the Brussels Convention of 25 May 1962 on the Liability of Operators of Nuclear Ships. Final Act and Resolutions of the International Conference on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage, held in Vienna from 29 April to 19 May 1963; Final Act of the International Legal Conference on Maritime Carriage of Nuclear Substances, held in Brussels from 29 November to 2 December 1971; and Convention Relating to Civil Liability in the Field of Maritime Carriage of Nuclear Material, adopted at Brussels on 17 December 1971

  19. Liability for nuclear damage: an international perspective. Reflections on the revision of the Vienna Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopuski, J.

    1993-01-01

    This book deals with deals of the complex issues of liability and compensation for nuclear damage which have been considered in the course of the work of the IAEA concerning the revision of the Vienna Convention on nuclear liability. It presents, in an orderly way, personal reflections of its author based on his experience gathered in years 1989-1992 when participating in this work. Necessarily it contains in some of its parts references to documents of the IAEA Standing Committee on Nuclear Liability; these documents because of their length could not be reproduced. Consequently these parts may not be fully intelligible for those who have not participated in or closely followed the Committee's work. The IAEA work on liability for nuclear damage was initiated in the wake of the impact made on the world's public opinion by the Chernobyl incident and its transboundary effects; issues of international state liability and full compensation have been raised. But humanitarian ideas have quickly been confronted with cold calculations of the cost of financial protection for victims and an open unwillingness of some nuclear states has been manifested. After three years of discussions no wide consensus could be reached on some basic issues, such as: relationship between international state and civil liability regimes, structure of international legislation, concept of nuclear damage, limits of compensation, role of public funds or jurisdiction. The author presents his approach to these controversial issue, trying to provide at the same time a theoretical outline for the future international legislation on nuclear liability. (author)

  20. Management of severely damaged nuclear fuel and related waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report is concerned primarily with severe fuel damage accidents in large electric power producing reactors such as those in the TMI and Chernobyl plants. It does include, as appropriate, knowledge gained from accidents in other power, research and military reactors. It is believed that the conclusions and recommendations apply to a large extent to severe fuel damage accidents in all types of reactors. The period considered in this publication begins after the initial crisis of an accident has been brought under control. (This initial crisis could be from one day to several weeks after the event, depending on the specific conditions). Accordingly, it is assumed that the plant is shut down, the reactor is under control and decay heat removal is in progress in a stable manner so that attention must be given to cleanup. This report addresses the principles involved in planning, engineering, construction, operation and other activities to characterize, clean up and dispose of the fuel and related waste. The end of the period under consideration is when the fuel and abnormal wastes are packaged either for interim storage or final disposal and activities are started either to restore the plant to service or to establish a safe state from which decommissioning planning can start. 36 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs.

  1. Data analysis on reducing damage on equipment's available in Malaysian Nuclear Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasif Mohamad; Saipo Bahari Abdul Ratan; Ahmad Firdaus Che Hassan; Mazlipah Mohamed Ramlan; Mohd Hazri Mohd Salleh; Ghazali Bachok

    2010-01-01

    Technical Support Division (BST) in the underlying unit of Instrumentation and Automation Center (PIA), has been entrusted to carry out repair work on the equipment's available at Nuclear Malaysia as well as help rehabilitate and provide advisory services to foreign companies in need of our services. These data taken to determine the cause of damage to seek a solution to reduce damage in future. Tools do get involved are autoclave, Water Distiller, Barometer, Vaccum Pump and Chiller and Freezer. (author)

  2. Current status of international cooperation on nuclear safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuragi, Satoru

    1984-01-01

    JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute), as a representative organization in Japan, has been participating in many international cooperations on nuclear safety research. This report reviews the recent achievement and evolution of the international cooperative safety studies. Twelve projects that are based on the agreements between JAERI and foreign organizations are reviewed. As the fuel irradiation studies, the recent achievement of the OECD Halden Reactor Project and the agreement between Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Battelle Memorial Institute, and JAERI are explained. As for the study of reactivity accident, the cooperation of the NSRR (Nuclear Safety Research Reactor) project in Japan with PBF, PNS and PHEBUS projects in the U.S., West Germany and France, respectively, are now in progress. The fuel performance in abnormal transient and the experiment and analysis of severe fuel damage are the new areas of international interest. The OECD/LOFT project and ROSA-4 projects are also explained in connection with the FP source term problem and the analysis codes such as RELAP-5 and TRAC. As the safety studies associated with the downstream of the nuclear fuel cycle, the BEFAST project of IAEA and the ISIRS project of OECD/NEA are shortly reviewed. (Aoki, K.)

  3. Status of Simulations for the Cyclotron Laboratory at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asova, G.; Goutev, N.; Tonev, D.; Artinyan, A.

    2018-05-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy is preparing to operate a high-power cyclotron for production of radioisotopes for nuclear medicine, research in radiochemistry, radiobiology, nuclear physics, solid state physics. The cyclotron is a TR24 produced by ASCI, Canada, capable to deliver proton beams in the energy range of 15 to 24 MeV with current as high as 400 µA. Multiple extraction lines can be fed. The primary goal of the project is the production of PET and SPECT isotopes as 18F, 67,68Ga, 99mTc, etc. This contribution reports the status of the project. Design considerations for the cyclotron vault will be discussed for some of the target radioisotopes.

  4. Draft Federal Act of the Russian Federation 'The Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage and its Financial Security'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedeva, Yulia

    2014-01-01

    The use of nuclear power by states in the modern world requires supplements to international law through the development of national legislation on civil liability for nuclear damage and compensation. The situation in the Russian Federation is no exception. Russian law on civil liability for nuclear damage has not fully evolved, and currently, there is no specific law covering liability for nuclear damage, nor is there a law regarding the financial and insurance mechanisms for compensation. Instead, the current laws establish a state system of benefits and compensation for damage to health and property of citizens. Since 1996, Russia has been actively working to develop a draft federal act to cover liability for nuclear damage. A bill was first introduced in the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on 16 July 1996, and was originally called 'The Compensation for Nuclear Damage and Nuclear Insurance'. In 1997, the official representative of the Government of the Russian Federation, Head of Russian Federal Inspectorate for Nuclear and Radiation Safety, Yuri Vishnevsky, was appointed to present this bill for discussion in the chambers of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation. In September 1998, the State Duma rejected the draft federal act and instead adopted in the first reading a different draft federal act: No. 96700118-2, 'The Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage and its Financial Security' ('the bill'). In this case, the State Duma Committee on Ecology was charged with incorporating the incoming amendments into a final bill and submitting it to the State Duma for a second reading. In 2005, Russia ratified the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage. This ratification required significant amendments to 'The Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage and its Financial Security' bill. But, even though the Russian Federation had not yet ratified the Vienna Convention, the drafters were still careful to take into account the

  5. Nuclear education in Russia: Status, peculiarities, problems and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onykii, B.N.; Kryuchkov, E.F.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: For longer than 50-year period of nuclear industry development in the USSR, the specialists training system has been created to meet completely the industrial branch's demands for the specialists of all possible qualifications for research, engineering and production activities. This educational system does exist in Russia till now. In the presentation the following items will be addressed: Nuclear Engineering education in Russia: status and peculiarities; Demands of nuclear enterprises for the alumni. Role of the Universities in these problems solution; Nuclear engineering education problems in Russia; Master of science education in nuclear aria; Perspectives of nuclear education in Russia; Integration of nuclear education in Europe: perspectives and problems. The educational system in nuclear engineering, like an educational system in any other knowledge area in Russia, includes the training activities limited by Russian legislation only: academic training of the specialists with award of the State certificates (higher education, re-training, qualification upgrade); qualification upgrade of the specialists without award of the State certificates. The system of education represents a multi-level structure oriented at any possible needs of industrial branches. At present, more than 20 Russian higher education institutions train the specialists in nuclear engineering. The specialists training in nuclear engineering is being conducted in all these universities in full accordance with common educational curricula and standards which define some peculiarities of the specialists training in this area: 1) Combination of fundamental knowledge in physics and mathematics with profound engineering skills; 2) Large share of laboratory works; 3) Participation at the research work starting from the 4th year student; 4) Long education time (5-6 years) and period for thesis preparation (1/2 year - pre-diploma internship and 1/2 year of thesis preparation); 5) High

  6. Economic damage caused by a nuclear reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baan, P.J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The impacts of a nuclear reactor accident have been estimated for: the public water supply; the use of surface water for sprinkling in agriculture, for industry water supply, recreation, etc.; and fisheries. Contamination of water sources may affect the public water supply severely. In such a situation demand of water cannot always be met. Agriculture faces production losses, if demand for uncontaminated surface water cannot be met. The impacts on recreation can also be significant. The losses to other water users are less substantial. Fisheries may lose (export) markets, as people become reluctant to buy fish and fish products. 33 refs.; 3 figs.; 35 tabs

  7. Fatigue damage in nuclear power plants: cases study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goltrant, O.; Thebault, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Some fatigue cracks have been detected on nuclear power plants components. Generally they appears under local solicitations not correctly predicted. Two cases are presented in this paper to illustrate the problem: the pitting during mechanical fatigue where the stresses are induced by the pumps vibrations or by fluid flow; the mixing zones of RRA circuit (N4 bearing) where the stresses are induced by the flow of different temperature fluids. The examination allowed the identification of the cracking origin and the development of corrective solutions. (A.L.B.)

  8. Yugoslavia-Act on Liability for Nuclear Damage of 19 April 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    This Act, which came into force eight days after its publication, is based to a great extent on the provisions of the 1963 Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage, ratified by Yugoslavia on 12 August 1977. Under the Act, a nuclear operator is held absolutely liable for any nuclear damage caused by a nuclear indicent occurring in his installation. This liability is limited to 450 million dinars (approximately 22 million US$). To cover his liability, an operator must take out insurance or other financial security, whose amount will be determinated by the competent authority according to the characteristics of the installation involved but in no event should it be below 150 million dinars. Within the meaning of the Act, the operator may be an organisation of associated labour which has obtained site approval, licences for test runs and entry into operation of the installation, or any person recognised as such by the State. (NEA) [fr

  9. Vibration analysis and vibration damage assessment in nuclear and process equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettigrew, M.J.; Taylor, C.E.; Fisher, N.J.; Yetisir, M.; Smith, B.A.W.

    1997-01-01

    Component failures due to excessive flow-induced vibration are still affecting the performance and reliability of process and nuclear components. The purpose of this paper is to discuss flow-induced vibration analysis and vibration damage prediction. Vibration excitation mechanisms are described with particular emphasis on fluid elastic instability. The dynamic characteristics of process and power equipment are explained. The statistical nature of some parameters, in particular support conditions, is discussed. The prediction of fretting-wear damage is approached from several points-of-view. An energy approach to formulate fretting-wear damage is proposed. (author)

  10. Investigation of potential fire-related damage to safety-related equipment in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanless, J.

    1985-11-01

    Based on a review of vendor information, fire damage reports, equipment qualification and hydrogen burn test results, and material properties, thirty-three types of equipment found in nuclear power plants were ranked in terms of their potential sensitivity to fire environments. The ranking considered both the functional requirements and damage proneness of each component. A further review of the seven top-ranked components was performed, considering the relative prevalence and potential safety significance of each. From this, relays and hand switches dominate as first choices for fire damage testing with logic equipment, power supplies, transmitters, and motor control centers as future candidates

  11. Insights on the National Status of Nuclear Crisis Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Ju; Hah, Yeon Hee; Oh, Kju Myeng

    2010-01-01

    . By comprehensively searching the national status, we can have a way to establish nuclear risk communication framework for supporting enhancing social acceptance, and clarifying a difference regarding public cognition and information

  12. The application of the assessment of nuclear accident status in emergency decision-making during nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ling

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear accident assessment is one of the bases for emergency decision-making in the situation of nuclear accident in NPP. Usually, the assessment includes accident status and consequence assessment. It is accident status assessment, and its application in emergency decision-making is introduced here. (author)

  13. Liability for damage resulting from acts of the nuclear and radiological terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handrlica, J.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear terrorism is defined as an attack on a nuclear installation serving peaceful uses (such as a nuclear power plant) or non-peaceful uses. Radiological terrorism, which may be more likely, is defined as an action which doesn't trigger a nuclear reaction but gives rise to the release of radioactivity. The aim of this paper is to analyze the existing legal framework covering such situations. The relevant provisions of the Vienna and Paris Conventions on civil liability for nuclear damage, which represent a legal framework for nuclear liability at the international level, are discussed. The focus is on the identification of the the liable subject, including definition of the scope and nature of its liability. (author)

  14. Entry into force of the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage: Opening the umbrella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McRae, Ben

    2015-01-01

    There are 431 commercial nuclear power plants around the world. On 14 April 2015, 193 of these power plants were covered by a nuclear liability instrument (118 power plants by the Paris Convention and 75 by the Vienna Convention). With the entry into force of the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC)4 on 15 April 2015, the number of power plants covered by a nuclear liability instrument increased to 340. Thus, the entry into force of the CSC marked a major milestone towards the establishment of a global nuclear liability regime. This article discusses several events that have promoted progress towards a global nuclear liability regime and then addresses several questions that may arise as countries consider actions necessary to achieve such a regime. (author)

  15. U.S. commercial nuclear power: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleark, R.G.; Reynolds, A.W.

    1977-09-01

    The current and forecasted status of the domestic nuclear power program is discussed in the context of the proposed National Energy Plan. Nuclear power is expected to increase its contribution to the Nation's electricity generation from 9.4 percent in 1976 to 13 percent in 1980 and 18 percent in 1985. Indigenous uranium reserves and resources appear adequate to allow a continued expansion of the national reactor system, but the annual production capacity of the domestic uranium industry must be significantly expanded to support this generating forecast. U.S. uranium enrichment capacity will also be adequate if ongoing expansion programs and the planned Portsmouth centrifuge addition are realized. However, domestic uranium demand and price, and the Administration's desire to accept new orders for enrichment services, are sensitive to Energy Research and Development Administration's enrichment contract stipulations and plant operating modes. Current U.S. policy has resulted in the deferral of the plutonium and uranium recycle option for the intermediate future, and a shift in post-reactor attention from reprocessing-recycle to unresolved programs for spent fuel storage and radioactive waste management. The comparative economics of nuclear-fueled and coal-fired generating systems vary among geographical regions, but generally, costs are so similar that modest changes in fuel or operating parameters could reverse the relative advantage of one option over the other

  16. The inadequate liability and compensation regime for damage caused by nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyke, Jon M. Van

    2010-09-01

    The specific obligation to provide restitution and compensation when nuclear activities cause injuries has been recognized repeatedly and is now certainly part of customary international law. But problems remain regarding how to measure damages, how to implement the duty to repair the injuries, and what specific obligations exist to protect neighboring states from transboundary pollution. Although some treaties exist governing liability for harm resulting from nuclear accidents, they are not adequate to protect victims and have not been widely ratified. The failure to require nuclear operators to prepare for damage that may result from accidents constitutes a subsidy to the nuclear industry and makes it difficult to compare the real costs of nuclear energy with the costs of other energy sources. This survey of settled norms and unresolved issues demonstrates that further work is needed to develop a comprehensive and authoritative regime to govern harm from nuclear activities. Although it is clear that both the operators of nuclear facilities and the states that have jurisdiction over them would be responsible to provide restitution and compensation for such harm under a strict liability regime, the types of injuries that must be compensated and the range of damages that must be covered remain subjects of controversy. Although the underlying customary international law principles (the no-harm principle and the polluter-pays principle) are clear, the actual treaties that have been drafted are inadequate and they have not been widely ratified. Victims of damage from nuclear activities would have difficulty finding a neutral tribunal in which to bring their claims and would face procedural obstacles including caps on liabilities and inappropriately short statutes of limitations as well as difficulties regarding proof of damages. The failure to develop a proper regime that would ensure full restitution and compensation for harm resulting from nuclear facilities

  17. The convention on supplementary compensation for nuclear damage (CSC). A cornerstone of a global nuclear liability regime?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelzer, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    International discussions on compensation of nuclear damage seem to be governed by the magic word ''global nuclear liability regime''. It is said that only such regime promises to guarantee full and timely compensation at conditions acceptable and favourable for both the victims and the operator liable and at the same time promotes nuclear industry. Surely, nuclear incidents may have worldwide implications, and a globally unified legal framework appears to be desirable or is even necessitated. But until today we have not yet achieved a global regime. There are international nuclear liability conventions some of which may be qualified to form such regime. But which of them is best qualified and which one could be accepted by all States? Mainly the USA opt for, and strongly support, the 1997 ''Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage'' (CSC) to be the only international instrument which is apt to form a global regime. This paper will deal with the question whether this assertion is convincing. It will also be asked whether we need a global regime.

  18. The convention on supplementary compensation for nuclear damage (CSC). A cornerstone of a global nuclear liability regime?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelzer, Norbert

    2015-06-15

    International discussions on compensation of nuclear damage seem to be governed by the magic word ''global nuclear liability regime''. It is said that only such regime promises to guarantee full and timely compensation at conditions acceptable and favourable for both the victims and the operator liable and at the same time promotes nuclear industry. Surely, nuclear incidents may have worldwide implications, and a globally unified legal framework appears to be desirable or is even necessitated. But until today we have not yet achieved a global regime. There are international nuclear liability conventions some of which may be qualified to form such regime. But which of them is best qualified and which one could be accepted by all States? Mainly the USA opt for, and strongly support, the 1997 ''Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage'' (CSC) to be the only international instrument which is apt to form a global regime. This paper will deal with the question whether this assertion is convincing. It will also be asked whether we need a global regime.

  19. Third party nuclear liability regime in the Romanian legislation - current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, T.; Chiripus, V.

    2004-01-01

    The regime of civil liability for nuclear damages in the Romanian legislation is defined by Law no. 703/2001 on civil liability for nuclear damages, as well as Government Decision no. 894/2003 for the approval of the Norms for the enforcement of Law no. 703/2001. These two documents constitute the legal framework that regulates the third party civil liability for nuclear damages. The paper aims at presenting to the audience the main elements of the relatively recent legal framework, namely: the scope of Law no. 703/2001, as well as the subjects to whom such law applies, the regime of civil liability for nuclear damages in Romania (with special emphasis on the relevant responsibilities of nuclear operators), the Romanian nuclear damages compensation system, statute of limitation for claims, types of insurance and financial guarantees covering against civil liability for nuclear damages, limits of nuclear operators' liability, specific requirements regarding the insurance, responsibilities of control and supervision bodies, assessment of nuclear damage.(author)

  20. Nuclear data for analysis of radiation damage processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aruga, Takeo

    1999-01-01

    Parameters needed to analyze radiation damages for neutron irradiations are presented, taking iron samples irradiated with JMTR neutrons for an example. Special interests have been put on a comparison between results obtained by irradiations for one case with a full neutron spectrum and the other with a Cd-shielded neutron spectrum. A possibility is described that although atomic displacement rates for the two case differ only less than 2%, production rates of freely migrating defects can differ appreciably, due to recoiled atoms by (n, γ) reactions. More over, it is also suggested that although the median energy of PKA, defined as a PKA energy above (or below) which one half of the total atomic displacements are to be produced, may differ only slightly between the two cases, final radiation effects can be significantly different. The effects of charged particles emitted with high energies due to nucleon irradiations are stressed in relation to the significance of defects produced by PKAs with lower energies than several keV, especially for the case of irradiations with highly energetic nucleons as anticipated in GeV proton irradiations. (author)

  1. Nuclear data for analysis of radiation damage processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aruga, Takeo [Department of Materials Science Research, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    Parameters needed to analyze radiation damages for neutron irradiations are presented, taking iron samples irradiated with JMTR neutrons for an example. Special interests have been put on a comparison between results obtained by irradiations for one case with a full neutron spectrum and the other with a Cd-shielded neutron spectrum. A possibility is described that although atomic displacement rates for the two case differ only less than 2%, production rates of freely migrating defects can differ appreciably, due to recoiled atoms by (n, {gamma}) reactions. More over, it is also suggested that although the median energy of PKA, defined as a PKA energy above (or below) which one half of the total atomic displacements are to be produced, may differ only slightly between the two cases, final radiation effects can be significantly different. The effects of charged particles emitted with high energies due to nucleon irradiations are stressed in relation to the significance of defects produced by PKAs with lower energies than several keV, especially for the case of irradiations with highly energetic nucleons as anticipated in GeV proton irradiations. (author)

  2. Construction status report: nuclear power plants, data for decisions. Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The document is the 28th edition summarizing the results of a management information system established by the Executive Director for Operations on the construction/fuel load activities of nuclear power plants. The report uses data collected from applicants sponsoring these projects, Office of Inspection and Enforcement, and the Office of Standards Development; and analyzed by the Office of Management Information and Program Control in the implementation of Management Information Systems. The status of 87 plants authorized to engage in construction in Region I through V is summarized in this document. This total includes (4) plants with construction exemptions, and (14) plants with an LWA

  3. Aspects of the Brazilian law on civil liability for nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, L.M.G. da

    1980-06-01

    The civil liability for nuclear damage in the Brazilian law is analysed. The innovations introduced by the 6.453 act of October 17 th, 1977 are emphasized. The influence of international conventions on the Brazilian law are also mentioned. (A.L.) [pt

  4. Compensation for nuclear damage: a comparison among the international regime, Japan and China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, J.; Faure, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Following the Fukushima disaster in Japan in 2011, how the compensation system for nuclear damage should be improved has obtained broad attention. The compensation system, including liability rules, insurance and government involvement, does not only concern to what extent the victims can be

  5. Protocol to amend the Vienna convention on civil liability for nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Protocol to Amend the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage which was adopted by a Diplomatic Conference, 8-12 September 1997, and the consolidated text of the 1963 Vienna Convention as amended by the Protocol

  6. Protocol to amend the Vienna convention on civil liability for nuclear damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-22

    The document reproduces the text of the Protocol to Amend the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage which was adopted by a Diplomatic Conference, 8-12 September 1997, and the consolidated text of the 1963 Vienna Convention as amended by the Protocol

  7. Development of seismic damage assessment system for nuclear power plant structures in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Chang-Hun; Lee, Sung-Kyu; Choi, Kang-Ryoung; Koh, Hyun-Moo; Cho, HoHyun

    2003-01-01

    A seismic damage assessment system that analyses in real-time the actual seismic resistance capacity and the damage level of power plant structures has been developed. The system consists of three parts: a 3-D inelastic seismic analysis, a damage assessment using a damage index based on the previous 3-D analysis, and a 3-D graphic representation. PSC containment structures are modelled by finite shell elements using layered method and analysis is performed by means of time history inelastic seismic analysis method, which takes into account material nonlinearities. HHT-α, one kind of direct integration method, is adopted for the seismic analysis. Two damage indices at finite element and structural levels are applied for the seismic damage assessment. 3-D graphical representation of dynamic responses and damage index expedites procedure for evaluating the damage level. The developed system is now being installed at the Earthquake Monitoring Center of KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) to support site inspections after an earthquake occurrence, and decisions about effective emergency measures, repair and operations of the plant. (author)

  8. Influence of Heavy Metal Stress on Antioxidant Status and DNA Damage in Urtica dioica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darinka Gjorgieva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals have the potential to interact and induce several stress responses in the plants; thus, effects of heavy metal stress on DNA damages and total antioxidants level in Urtica dioica leaves and stems were investigated. The samples are sampled from areas with different metal exposition. Metal content was analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES, for total antioxidants level assessment the Ferric-Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP assay was used, and genomic DNA isolation from frozen plant samples was performed to obtain DNA fingerprints of investigated plant. It was found that heavy metal contents in stems generally changed synchronously with those in leaves of the plant, and extraneous metals led to imbalance of mineral nutrient elements. DNA damages were investigated by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD technique, and the results demonstrated that the samples exposed to metals yielded a large number of new fragments (total 12 in comparison with the control sample. This study showed that DNA stability is highly affected by metal pollution which was identified by RAPD markers. Results suggested that heavy metal stress influences antioxidant status and also induces DNA damages in U. dioica which may help to understand the mechanisms of metals genotoxicity.

  9. Influence of heavy metal stress on antioxidant status and DNA damage in Urtica dioica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjorgieva, Darinka; Kadifkova Panovska, Tatjana; Ruskovska, Tatjana; Bačeva, Katerina; Stafilov, Trajče

    2013-01-01

    Heavy metals have the potential to interact and induce several stress responses in the plants; thus, effects of heavy metal stress on DNA damages and total antioxidants level in Urtica dioica leaves and stems were investigated. The samples are sampled from areas with different metal exposition. Metal content was analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES), for total antioxidants level assessment the Ferric-Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP) assay was used, and genomic DNA isolation from frozen plant samples was performed to obtain DNA fingerprints of investigated plant. It was found that heavy metal contents in stems generally changed synchronously with those in leaves of the plant, and extraneous metals led to imbalance of mineral nutrient elements. DNA damages were investigated by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique, and the results demonstrated that the samples exposed to metals yielded a large number of new fragments (total 12) in comparison with the control sample. This study showed that DNA stability is highly affected by metal pollution which was identified by RAPD markers. Results suggested that heavy metal stress influences antioxidant status and also induces DNA damages in U. dioica which may help to understand the mechanisms of metals genotoxicity.

  10. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1995 A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    Ten operational events that affected 10 commercial light-water reactors during 1995 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10 -6 . These events were identified by first computer-screening the 1995 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to identify those events that could potentially be precursors. Candidate precursors were selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1994 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events

  11. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1996. A status report. Volume 25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Muhlheim, M.D.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W.

    1997-12-01

    This report describes the 14 operational events in 1996 that affected 13 commercial light-water reactors and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage accidents. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10 -6 . These events were identified by first computer-screening the 1996 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to identify those events that could potentially be precursors. Candidate precursors were selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1995 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events

  12. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 22: Appendix I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W.

    1995-12-01

    Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10 -6 . These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1

  13. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1995 A status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Ten operational events that affected 10 commercial light-water reactors during 1995 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer-screening the 1995 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to identify those events that could potentially be precursors. Candidate precursors were selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1994 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  14. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 22: Appendix I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

  15. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1997 - A status report. Volume 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Muhlheim, M.D.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W.

    1998-11-01

    This report describes the five operational events in 1997 that affected five commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage accidents. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10 -6 . These events were identified by first computer-screening the 1997 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those events that could be precursors. Candidate precursors were selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1996 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events

  16. Current status and future planning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station after Great East Japan earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inouer, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) clean-up and decommissioning activities require a lot of R and D and careful project management due to its severity of damage. Inability of access inside the reactor and turbine buildings due to harsh environment results in large uncertainties which make the project planning difficult R and R activities will be conducted in parallel with on-site clean-up and maintenance activities. In order to cope with this unprecedented challenge, the government, laboratories, academicians, vendors, manufacturers, and other partners have joined together to support tokyo electric Power Company, Inc (TEPCO). This paper will summarize the current status and mid-and long-term plan for the clean-up and decommissioning of Units 1 to 4 of Fukushima Daiichi NPS as of March, 2012. (Author) 15 refs.

  17. Legal analysis at the Law for Civil liabilities by nuclear damage; Analisis juridico a la Ley de responsabilidad civil por danos nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez G, A

    2000-07-01

    The present work has the objective to analyse in specific terms the legal regime of the Civil liability by nuclear damage. It has been the intention of that this compilation is the initiation of a large way which awake the interests of jurists and specialists dedicated to study the aspects as the liability by nuclear damage, compensation guarantee, risk and nuclear damage among others. The peaceful applications of the nuclear energy require the necessity of a legal ordinance that it is updated according to the nuclear technology development that the regulations of the common law do not cover. This work is initiated mentioning some antecedents of the nuclear energy law in Mexico. Also is realized the study of the elemental concepts and definitions about the subject as the evolution of the legal figure in the National law frame where the jurist must do an incursion in the nuclear field and make use of scientific and technical terminology. It was analysed and it was made the reflection of the legal figure of liability, its exoneration cases, about the concepts of risk and nuclear damage overcoming the conceptual error among them. It is talked about the study of nuclear damage and its repairing as financial guarantee to compensate to the people injured by a nuclear accident. Finally, it was treated about the legal analysis and proposals of additions and reforms for updating the Nuclear damage liability Law, concluding with general contributions to the Law resulting products of this work. (Author)

  18. Organizing irresponsibility? The (inter)national management of a nuclear accident damages as discursive regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topcu, Sezin

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the historical process related to the international organization of responsibilities and the management of the damages in case of a nuclear disaster. The author shows that the political and legal settings on which the discourse of an 'international regime of civil responsibility' (that emerged in the 1960's) relies, have globally aimed at maintaining a 'historical and spectacular gap' between the damages the nuclear operators are taking responsibility for, and the real and extensive damages engendered by a major accident. She argues that the existence of such a 'gap' is inherent to the nuclear sector, that it is a form of government (both of economic affairs and of the public space) which was historically constructed, and that the existence of such a gap is crucial for the survival of the nuclear industry itself. Thus the notion of 'responsibility' in the nuclear sector appears to serve mainly as a discursive regime, as a means to organize not only responsibilities but also irresponsibilities, whatever the geographic scale (national or international) at which they should be managed

  19. Efficient prevention and compensation of catastrophic risks. The example of damage by nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanden Borre, T.

    2001-01-01

    This book deals with the liability for damage due to catastrophic risks. The nuclear liability law serves as an example of such a catastrophic risk. The question that we tried to answer is what an efficient compensation scheme for catastrophic risks should look like. This question is dealt with both from a law and an economic point of view and from a comparative point of view. The main element in comparing the laws in different countries is the comparison between Belgian and Dutch civil (nuclear) liability law. But also American nuclear liability law is part of the analysis (the Price-Anderson Act). The book consists of four parts: (nuclear) civil liability law, legal and economic approach, analysis of other compensation systems and conclusions. The big themes in this book are therefore civil (nuclear) liability law, insurance law and environmental liability law [nl

  20. Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Damage and Repair in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Blasiak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging and oxidative stress seem to be the most important factors in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD, a condition affecting many elderly people in the developed world. However, aging is associated with the accumulation of oxidative damage in many biomolecules, including DNA. Furthermore, mitochondria may be especially important in this process because the reactive oxygen species produced in their electron transport chain can damage cellular components. Therefore, the cellular response to DNA damage, expressed mainly through DNA repair, may play an important role in AMD etiology. In several studies the increase in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA damage and mutations, and the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair have been correlated with the occurrence and the stage of AMD. It has also been shown that mitochondrial DNA accumulates more DNA lesions than nuclear DNA in AMD. However, the DNA damage response in mitochondria is executed by nucleus-encoded proteins, and thus mutagenesis in nuclear DNA (nDNA may affect the ability to respond to mutagenesis in its mitochondrial counterpart. We reported that lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher amount of total endogenous basal and oxidative DNA damage, exhibited a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation, and repaired the lesions induced by these factors less effectively than did cells from control individuals. We postulate that poor efficacy of DNA repair (i.e., is impaired above average for a particular age when combined with the enhanced sensitivity of retinal pigment epithelium cells to environmental stress factors, contributes to the pathogenesis of AMD. Collectively, these data suggest that the cellular response to both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage may play an important role in AMD pathogenesis.

  1. Workshop summary of 'nuclear knowledge management: Present status and perspective'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Minoru

    2007-03-01

    The workshop on 'Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM): Present Status and Perspective' was held at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (supported by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency), Tokyo, Japan on the 14th and 15th of December 2006. The purpose of the workshop is to introduce NKM activities inside and outside Japan so that concerned parties/professionals could share related information and enhance awareness of the issues on NKM. Participants from various sectors, such as authorities, industry, universities/research institutes, etc, made presentations. Issues on NKM are recognized and discussed. The workshop consisted of 18 oral lectures and a panel discussion. The 55 participants attended the workshop. Under permission of the Tokyo Institute of Technology which is the sponsor of the workshop, this report compiles these lecture's presentation materials which got permission of a lecturer and synopses which were submitted after the workshop. (author)

  2. Status Of Nuclear Heat And Hydrogen Systems Concept Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Jae; Choi, Yoon Ho; Han, Jae Mun; Ham, Jin Ki; Choi, Su Jin; Lee, Sang Il; Park, Je Ho; Koo, Jae Sak

    2014-01-01

    A three-year national research and development project, “Nuclear Heat and Hydrogen (NuH_2) Systems Concept Study” was launched in 2012 as a pre-project in preparation of a demonstration plant construction and subsequent commercialization. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) leads the project, and domestic industry partners, POSCO, HDEC, HHI, HEC and STX, as potential vendors and users share the costs and works. The main tasks are to develop the functional and design requirements, to optimize the system concepts and layouts, and to develop the demonstration plan and business model of the NuH_2 systems. This paper addresses the current status of the project and outcomes. (author)

  3. The protection against nuclear risks under the international nuclear liability law: the geographical and technical scope of the international conventions on third party liability for nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kissich, S.J.

    2001-10-01

    This Ph.D.-research deals with the International Conventions on Third Party Liability for Nuclear Damage. In 1960, the Paris Convention was established with the aim of providing a special uniform nuclear third party liability regime for Western Europe. This Convention was supplemented in 1963 by the Brussels Supplementary Convention. Also in 1963, the Vienna Convention, which aimed to establish a world-wide system based on the same principles as the Paris Convention, was adopted. A further Convention was adopted in 1971 to ensure that nuclear third party liability law and not maritime law would apply to carriage of nuclear materials by sea. In 1988, the Paris and Vienna Conventions have been linked by the adoption of a Joint Protocol. In 1997, the process of amending the 1963 Vienna Convention was successfully concluded and a Convention on Supplementary Compensation was adopted. This Ph.D.-research consists of seven chapters: following an introduction, the second chapter gives a general view of the existing international legal sources. The third chapter describes the international civil nuclear liability law concept and its leading principles. The main element of this work is the question of the technical and geographical scope of the international nuclear liability conventions (chapter IV and V). The conventions are only applicable to nuclear incidents, which occur in a nuclear installation or incidental to the carriage or storage of nuclear material. The nuclear damage must arise out of the radioactive properties of nuclear substances which are also defined by legal terms. In addition, the scope of the conventions is limited by the nature of the installations. The geographical scope of application is established by the provisions on geographical coverage. Only the 1963 Vienna Convention does not contain any specific provision dealing with the territorial scope of its application. The geographical scope determines where the nuclear incident or the nuclear damage

  4. Preliminary study on psychosomatic status of nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi Jinling; Liu Yulong; Li Yuan; Bian Huahui; Sun Yiling; Qiu Mengyue; Liu Chunfeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To understand the operators' psychosomatic health status in nuclear power plant; and provide the scientific basis of measures for preventing and reducing mental disorders in operators. Methods: The Psychosomatic Health Battery (PSHB) was used to assess the psychosomatic health status in 109 operators who were random selected from Qinshan nuclear power plant, etc. They were tested from lie, emotional stability, liveliness, tension, apprehension, mental health, such as psychopathic deviatesuch 7 personality traits. Results: Lie < 8, all inspected groups were normal. Psychopathic deviate: 98.2% for normal group 0.9% for both of groups occurred possible mental health problems and confirmed mental health problems; Mental health: 80.7% (88/109) for fine mental health ones, 29.4% (32/109) for those with excellent mental health, 51.4% (56/109) for good mental health ones, 13.8% (15/109) for general mental health ones, 5.5% (6/109) for poor mental health ones. Age factor could influence the mean values of the factors of apprehension, tension, mental health and psychopathic deviate. Correlation analysis showed that there was a correlation between tension and psychopathic deviate (r=0.664, P<0.01), and the other correlation coefficient was between apprehension and mental health (r=-0.789, P<0.01). Conclusions: There is an excellent condition of psychosomatic health in most of the operators, however, there are still a very small percentage of psychosomatic disorders among these operators, to improve the quality of their psychosomatic health, psychological counseling should be particularly strengthened to those with problems of psychosomatic health. (authors)

  5. Issues and decisions for nuclear power plant management after fuel damage events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    Experience has shown that the on-site activities following an incident that results in severely damaged fuel at a nuclear power plant required extraordinary effort. Even in cases that are not extreme but in which fuel damage is greater than mentioned in the specifications for operation, the recovery will require extensive work. This publication includes information from several projects at the IAEA since 1989 that have resulted in a Technical Report, a TECDOC and a Workshop. While the initial purpose of the projects was focused on providing technical information transfer to the experts engaged in recovery work at the damaged unit of Chernobyl NPP, the results have led to a general approach to managing events in which there is substantial fuel damage. This TECDOC summarizes the work to focus on management issues that may be encountered in any such event whether small or large. 11 refs, 2 figs, 5 tabs

  6. 2010/11 Status Report of China Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Zhigang

    2011-01-01

    China Nuclear Data Center (CNDC) was established in 1975 and joined the nuclear data activities of IAEA as the national nuclear data center of China since 1984. The main task of CNDC: The nuclear data evaluations, libraries and relevant technique researches. The exchange of nuclear data activities with IAEA, foreign nuclear data centers and agencies. The management of domestic nuclear data activities. The services for domestic and foreign nuclear data users.

  7. Mobile robots for the nuclear industry - A 1990 status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meieran, H.B.

    1990-01-01

    Mobile robots with and without manipulating arms have been available for use in radioactive environments for almost 30 yr. Their use commenced in the early 1960s with a family of mobile robots manufactured by the PAR Corporation (now the PAR division of CIMCORP). It was a tethered, two-tracked teleoperator-controlled vehicle that supported one master-slave manipulating arm. The durability of this device is continuing to be demonstrated by HERMAN, which is currently on standby availability at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to respond to emergency situations by supporting mitigating actions at scenes of incidents that involve the release of radioactive material. Mobile robots are being employed in a spectrum of locations in many reactors and other nuclear installations. This paper presents the current status of the use of mobile robots in the nuclear industry and describes currently contemplated missions, with examples, that are being or will be conducted on terrestrial surfaces, underwater, in pipeline locations, and through the air

  8. Thorium-based nuclear fuel: current status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    Until the present time considerable efforts have already been made in the area of fabrication, utilization and reprocessing of Th-based fuels for different types of reactors, namely: by FRG and USA - for HTRs; FRG and Brazil, Italy - for LWRs; India - for HWRs and FBRs. Basic research of thorium fuels and thorium fuel cycles are also being undertaken by Australia, Canada, China, France, FRG, Romania, USSR and other countries. Main emphasis has been given to the utilization of thorium fuels in once-through nuclear fuel cycles, but in some projects closed thorium-uranium or thorium-plutonium fuel cycles are also considered. The purpose of the Technical Committee on the Utilization of Thorium-Based Nuclear Fuel: Current Status and Perspective was to review the world thorium resources, incentives for further exploration, obtained experience in the utilization of Th-based fuels in different types of reactors, basic research, fabrication and reprocessing of Th-based fuels. As a result of the panel discussion the recommendations on future Agency activities and list of major worldwide activities in the area of Th-based fuel were developed. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 9 papers in this proceedings series

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics for prediction of gastric damage induced by indomethacin in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Um, So Young; Park, Jung Hyun; Chung, Myeon Woo; Kim, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Seon Hwa; Choi, Ki Hwan; Lee, Hwa Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NMR based metabolomics – gastric damage by indomethacin. ► Pattern recognition analysis was performed to biomarkers of gastric damage. ► 2-Oxoglutarate, acetate, taurine and hippurate were selected as putative biomarkers. ► The gastric damage induced by NSAIDs can be screened in the preclinical step of drug. - Abstract: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have side effects including gastric erosions, ulceration and bleeding. In this study, pattern recognition analysis of the 1 H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of urine was performed to develop surrogate biomarkers related to the gastrointestinal (GI) damage induced by indomethacin in rats. Urine was collected for 5 h after oral administration of indomethacin (25 mg kg −1 ) or co-administration with cimetidine (100 mg kg −1 ), which protects against GI damage. The 1 H-NMR urine spectra were divided into spectral bins (0.04 ppm) for global profiling, and 36 endogenous metabolites were assigned for targeted profiling. The level of gastric damage in each animal was also determined. Indomethacin caused severe gastric damage; however, indomethacin administered with cimetidine did not. Simultaneously, the patterns of changes in their endogenous metabolites were different. Multivariate data analyses were carried out to recognize the spectral pattern of endogenous metabolites related to indomethacin using partial least square-discrimination analysis. In targeted profiling, a few endogenous metabolites, 2-oxoglutarate, acetate, taurine and hippurate, were selected as putative biomarkers for the gastric damage induced by indomethacin. These metabolites changed depending on the degree of GI damage, although the same dose of indomethacin (10 mg kg −1 ) was administered to rats. The results of global and targeted profiling suggest that the gastric damage induced by NSAIDs can be screened in the preclinical stage of drug development using a NMR based metabolomics approach.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics for prediction of gastric damage induced by indomethacin in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, So Young [Department of Pharmacology, National Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 643 Yeonje-ri, Gangoe-myeon, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Science and College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, 52 Ewahyeodae-gil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jung Hyun [Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Science and College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, 52 Ewahyeodae-gil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Myeon Woo [Department of Pharmacology, National Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 643 Yeonje-ri, Gangoe-myeon, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyu-Bong [College of Pharmacy, Dankook University, Dandae-ro, Cheonan, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Hwa [Department of Pharmacology, National Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 643 Yeonje-ri, Gangoe-myeon, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Science and College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, 52 Ewahyeodae-gil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy, Dankook University, Dandae-ro, Cheonan, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ki Hwan, E-mail: hyokwa11@korea.kr [Department of Pharmacology, National Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 643 Yeonje-ri, Gangoe-myeon, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hwa Jeong, E-mail: hwalee@ewha.ac.kr [Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Science and College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, 52 Ewahyeodae-gil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR based metabolomics - gastric damage by indomethacin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pattern recognition analysis was performed to biomarkers of gastric damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2-Oxoglutarate, acetate, taurine and hippurate were selected as putative biomarkers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The gastric damage induced by NSAIDs can be screened in the preclinical step of drug. - Abstract: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have side effects including gastric erosions, ulceration and bleeding. In this study, pattern recognition analysis of the {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of urine was performed to develop surrogate biomarkers related to the gastrointestinal (GI) damage induced by indomethacin in rats. Urine was collected for 5 h after oral administration of indomethacin (25 mg kg{sup -1}) or co-administration with cimetidine (100 mg kg{sup -1}), which protects against GI damage. The {sup 1}H-NMR urine spectra were divided into spectral bins (0.04 ppm) for global profiling, and 36 endogenous metabolites were assigned for targeted profiling. The level of gastric damage in each animal was also determined. Indomethacin caused severe gastric damage; however, indomethacin administered with cimetidine did not. Simultaneously, the patterns of changes in their endogenous metabolites were different. Multivariate data analyses were carried out to recognize the spectral pattern of endogenous metabolites related to indomethacin using partial least square-discrimination analysis. In targeted profiling, a few endogenous metabolites, 2-oxoglutarate, acetate, taurine and hippurate, were selected as putative biomarkers for the gastric damage induced by indomethacin. These metabolites changed depending on the degree of GI damage, although the same dose of indomethacin (10 mg kg{sup -1}) was administered to rats. The results of global and targeted profiling suggest that the gastric damage induced by

  11. Main features of the convention on supplementary compensation for nuclear damage - an over view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanenkov, V.

    2000-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident prompted widespread awareness of the need for improved protection of the public from the consequences of nuclear accidents. It was generally recognised that urgent efforts should be undertaken to strengthen the international nuclear liability regime based on two civil law conventions, namely the 1963 Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage and the 1960 Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy. The work initiated by the Agency - it was assigned to the Standing Committee established in 1990 - followed a two-track approach: to improve the existing civil liability regime, including revision of the Vienna Convention for which the IAEA is depositary; and, to develop a comprehensive international liability regime. The issue of compensation additional to that available under the two basic conventions received full attention in the negotiations. In the latter context, this work resulted in the adoption by a diplomatic conference convened by the IAEA in September 1997 of a new instrument, i.e. the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (the CSC). The CSC is a product of many years of multilateral negotiations and represents a balance of various legal, economic and political considerations. While not all concerns may have been fully met, it represents a significant improvement in the protection of the public from the consequences of nuclear accidents. (author)

  12. Liability for nuclear damage: an international perspective. Reflections on the revision of the Vienna Convention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopuski, J

    1994-12-31

    This book deals with deals of the complex issues of liability and compensation for nuclear damage which have been considered in the course of the work of the IAEA concerning the revision of the Vienna Convention on nuclear liability. It presents, in an orderly way, personal reflections of its author based on his experience gathered in years 1989-1992 when participating in this work. Necessarily it contains in some of its parts references to documents of the IAEA Standing Committee on Nuclear Liability; these documents because of their length could not be reproduced. Consequently these parts may not be fully intelligible for those who have not participated in or closely followed the Committee`s work. The IAEA work on liability for nuclear damage was initiated in the wake of the impact made on the world`s public opinion by the Chernobyl incident and its transboundary effects; issues of international state liability and full compensation have been raised. But humanitarian ideas have quickly been confronted with cold calculations of the cost of financial protection for victims and an open unwillingness of some nuclear states has been manifested. After three years of discussions no wide consensus could be reached on some basic issues, such as: relationship between international state and civil liability regimes, structure of international legislation, concept of nuclear damage, limits of compensation, role of public funds or jurisdiction. The author presents his approach to these controversial issue, trying to provide at the same time a theoretical outline for the future international legislation on nuclear liability. (author).

  13. Liability for nuclear damage: an international perspective. Reflections on the revision of the Vienna Convention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopuski, J.

    1993-12-31

    This book deals with deals of the complex issues of liability and compensation for nuclear damage which have been considered in the course of the work of the IAEA concerning the revision of the Vienna Convention on nuclear liability. It presents, in an orderly way, personal reflections of its author based on his experience gathered in years 1989-1992 when participating in this work. Necessarily it contains in some of its parts references to documents of the IAEA Standing Committee on Nuclear Liability; these documents because of their length could not be reproduced. Consequently these parts may not be fully intelligible for those who have not participated in or closely followed the Committee`s work. The IAEA work on liability for nuclear damage was initiated in the wake of the impact made on the world`s public opinion by the Chernobyl incident and its transboundary effects; issues of international state liability and full compensation have been raised. But humanitarian ideas have quickly been confronted with cold calculations of the cost of financial protection for victims and an open unwillingness of some nuclear states has been manifested. After three years of discussions no wide consensus could be reached on some basic issues, such as: relationship between international state and civil liability regimes, structure of international legislation, concept of nuclear damage, limits of compensation, role of public funds or jurisdiction. The author presents his approach to these controversial issue, trying to provide at the same time a theoretical outline for the future international legislation on nuclear liability. (author).

  14. Development of a seismic damage assessment program for nuclear power plant structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Hyun Moo; Cho, Yang Heui; Shin, Hyun Mok [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2001-12-15

    The most part of the nuclear power plants operating currently in Korea are more than 20 years old and obviously we cannot pretend that their original performance is actually maintained. In addition, earthquake occurrences show an increasing trend all over the world, and Korea can no more be considered as a zone safe from earthquake. Therefore, need is to guarantee the safety of these power plant structures against seismic accident, to decide to maintain them operational and to obtain data relative to maintenance/repair. Such objectives can be reached by damage assessment using inelastic seismic analysis considering aging degradation. It appears to be more important particularly for the structure enclosing the nuclear reactor that must absolutely protect against any radioactive leakage. Actually, the tendency of the technical world, led by the OECD/NEA, BNL in the United States, CEA in France and IAEA, is to develop researches or programs to assess the seismic safety considering aging degradation of operating nuclear power plants. Regard to the above-mentioned international technical trend, a technology to establish inelastic seismic analysis considering aging degradation so as to assess damage level and seismic safety margin appears to be necessary. Damage assessment and prediction system to grasp in real-time the actual seismic resistance capacity and damage level by 3-dimensional graphic representations are also required.

  15. Development of a seismic damage assessment program for nuclear power plant structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Hyun Moo; Cho, Ho Hyun; Cho, Yang Hui [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2000-12-15

    Some of nuclear power plants operating currently in Korea have been passed about 20 years after construction. Moreover, in the case of KORI I the service year is over 20 years, so their abilities are different from initial abilities. Also, earthquake outbreak increase, our country is not safe area for earthquake. Therefore, need is to guarantee the safety of these power plant structures against seismic accident, to decide to maintain them operational and to obtain data relative to maintenance/repair. Such objectives can be reached by damage assessment using inelastic seismic analysis considering aging degradation. It appears to be more important particularly for the structure enclosing the nuclear reactor that must absolutely protect against any radioactive leakage. Actually, the tendency of the technical world, led by the OECD/NEA, BNL in the United States, CEA in France and IAEA, is to develop researches or programs to assess the seismic safety considering aging degradation of operating nuclear power plants. Regard to the above-mentioned international technical trend, a technology to establish inelastic seismic analysis considering aging degradation so as to assess damage level and seismic safety margin appears to be necessary. Damage assessment and prediction system to grasp in real-time the actual seismic resistance capacity and damage level by 3-dimensional graphic representations are also required.

  16. A study on the status of nuclear development and utilization in North Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Myung; Oh, Keun Bae; Lee, Kwang Seok; Ham, Cheol Hoon; Lee, Byeong Uk; Lee, Jae Seong; Choi, Yeong Rok; Ko, Han Seong

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project is to propose strategies and tactics for nuclear cooperation between the South and the North in the perspective of the unification of the Korean Peninsula, based on proper and objective understanding of the status of nuclear development and utilization activities in North Korea, especially those for peaceful purposes. This study analyzes the nuclear development and utilization status of North Korea in terms of nuclear development history and policies, nuclear research and development, nuclear power generation, nuclear fuel cycle, production and uses of radiation and isotopes, manufacturing of equipment and components of nuclear power plants, and international nuclear cooperation. Based on the analysis, this study proposes basic directions for nuclear cooperation between South and North Korea. (Author)

  17. The order for enforcing the law on indemnity agreement for compensation of nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The cabinet ordinance is established under the provisions of the law concerning atomic energy damage indemnification contract. The damage indemnifications in this law cover the occasions when there is not the cause for atomic energy damages due to the violation of the specified provisions of the law concerning the regulation of nuclear raw materials, nuclear fuel materials and reactors, the failures of operation facilities for reactors and natural calamity or the deed of a third party. The rate of indemnification fees is stipulated at 5/10,000. An enterpriser of atomic energy business shall inform the following matters to the government concerning the indemnification contracts. The objects of operation of reactors; the types, thermal output and number of reactors; the names and addresses of works or places of business where reactors are set up; the locations, structures and equipments of reactor facilities; beginning dates and expected ending dates of the operation on reactors; the kinds and estimated quantities of use in a year of nuclear fuel materials employed for reactors; the methods of disposal of spent fuels and the matters concerning liability insurance contracts. The matters to be reported to the government are specified respectively for the indemnification contracts for the processing, reprocessing, use, transport and disposal of nuclear fuel materials. The payment of indemnification fees and indemnities, the cancellation of indemnification contracts and the fines for default are particularly defined. (Okada, K.)

  18. Changes in nuclear protein acetylation in u.v.-damaged human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, B.; Smerdon, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    The levels of nuclear protein acetylation in u.v.-irradiated human fibroblasts have been investigated. Initially, we measured the levels of acetylation in total acid-soluble nuclear proteins and observed two distinct differences between the irradiated and unirradiated (control) cells. Immediately after irradiation, there is a 'wave' of protein hyperacetylation that lasts for 2-6 h, followed by a hypoacetylation phase, lasting for many hours, and the total level of acetylation does not return to that of control cells until 24-72 h after u.v. damage. Both the magnitude and duration of each phase is dependent on the dose of u.v. light used. The wave of hyperacetylation is more pronounced at low u.v. doses, while the wave of hypoacetylation is more pronounced at higher u.v. doses. Furthermore, the duration of each phase is prolonged when cells are exposed to 2 mM hydroxyurea, an agent which retards the rate of excision repair at u.v.-damaged sites. Examinations of the acetylation levels of the individual nuclear proteins indicated that acetylation of the core histones follows the same pattern observed for the total acid-soluble protein fractions. Furthermore, these were the only major proteins in the total acid-soluble fraction observed to undergo the early, rapid hyperacetylation immediately following u.v. damage. These results raise the possibility that a causal relationship exists between nuclear protein acetylation and nucleotide excision repair of DNA in human cells. (author)

  19. Nuclear accumulation and activation of p53 in embryonic stem cells after DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolletschek Alexandra

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P53 is a key tumor suppressor protein. In response to DNA damage, p53 accumulates to high levels in differentiated cells and activates target genes that initiate cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Since stem cells provide the proliferative cell pool within organisms, an efficient DNA damage response is crucial. Results In proliferating embryonic stem cells, p53 is localized predominantly in the cytoplasm. DNA damage-induced nuclear accumulation of p53 in embryonic stem cells activates transcription of the target genes mdm2, p21, puma and noxa. We observed bi-phasic kinetics for nuclear accumulation of p53 after ionizing radiation. During the first wave of nuclear accumulation, p53 levels were increased and the p53 target genes mdm2, p21 and puma were transcribed. Transcription of noxa correlated with the second wave of nuclear accumulation. Transcriptional activation of p53 target genes resulted in an increased amount of proteins with the exception of p21. While p21 transcripts were efficiently translated in 3T3 cells, we failed to see an increase in p21 protein levels after IR in embryonal stem cells. Conclusion In embryonic stem cells where (anti-proliferative p53 activity is not necessary, or even unfavorable, p53 is retained in the cytoplasm and prevented from activating its target genes. However, if its activity is beneficial or required, p53 is allowed to accumulate in the nucleus and activates its target genes, even in embryonic stem cells.

  20. Nuclear accumulation and activation of p53 in embryonic stem cells after DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solozobova, Valeriya; Rolletschek, Alexandra; Blattner, Christine

    2009-06-17

    P53 is a key tumor suppressor protein. In response to DNA damage, p53 accumulates to high levels in differentiated cells and activates target genes that initiate cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Since stem cells provide the proliferative cell pool within organisms, an efficient DNA damage response is crucial. In proliferating embryonic stem cells, p53 is localized predominantly in the cytoplasm. DNA damage-induced nuclear accumulation of p53 in embryonic stem cells activates transcription of the target genes mdm2, p21, puma and noxa. We observed bi-phasic kinetics for nuclear accumulation of p53 after ionizing radiation. During the first wave of nuclear accumulation, p53 levels were increased and the p53 target genes mdm2, p21 and puma were transcribed. Transcription of noxa correlated with the second wave of nuclear accumulation. Transcriptional activation of p53 target genes resulted in an increased amount of proteins with the exception of p21. While p21 transcripts were efficiently translated in 3T3 cells, we failed to see an increase in p21 protein levels after IR in embryonal stem cells. In embryonic stem cells where (anti-proliferative) p53 activity is not necessary, or even unfavorable, p53 is retained in the cytoplasm and prevented from activating its target genes. However, if its activity is beneficial or required, p53 is allowed to accumulate in the nucleus and activates its target genes, even in embryonic stem cells.

  1. Nuclear power in the Asia-Pacific region. Current status and future perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Jia; Otsuki, Takashi; Irie, Kazutomo

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the current status and future perspective of nuclear power in the APEC region. We design three scenarios, including Low-nuclear Scenario, Business-as-Usual Scenario (BAU) as well as High-nuclear Scenario, in order to quantitatively evaluate contribution of nuclear power to the low-carbon energy system. Preliminary results from the modeling are presented in the paper, and the drivers and challenges for nuclear power development in the APEC region are discussed. (author)

  2. Oxidative damage in synovial tissue is associated with in vivo hypoxic status in the arthritic joint.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess levels of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2\\'-deoxyguanine; 8-oxo-dG) and lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal; 4-HNE) in serum, synovial fluid and tissue of patients with inflammatory arthritis in relation to in vivo hypoxia levels, disease activity and angiogenic markers. METHODS: Oxygen levels in synovial tissue were assessed using an oxygen\\/temperature probe. Nuclear and cytoplasmic 8-oxo-dG and 4-HNE levels were assessed in synovial tissue from 23 patients by immunohistochemistry. 8-Oxo-dG and 4-HNE levels in serum and synovial fluid were determined using 8-oxo-dG and hexanoyl-Lys (HEL) adduct ELISAs, respectively. Serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin 2 (Ang2) levels were also measured by ELISA. RESULTS: The median oxygen tension in synovial tissue was profoundly hypoxic at 19.35 mm Hg (2.5%). Nuclear 8-oxo-dG levels were significantly higher than nuclear 4-HNE levels in the lining and sublining layers (all p<0.001). In contrast, cytoplasmic 4-HNE levels were higher than cytoplasmic 8-oxo-dG levels in both cell layers (all p<0.001). Reduced in vivo oxygen tension correlated with high lipid peroxidation in synovial fluid (p=0.027; r=0.54) and tissue (p=0.004; r=0.58). Serum VEGF levels were positively correlated with cytoplasmic 4-HNE expression (p=0.05; r=0.43) and intensity (p=0.006; r=0.59) in the lining layer. Serum Ang2 levels were positively correlated with nuclear 4-HNE expression and intensity in both cell layers (all p < or = 0.05). DAS28-C-reactive protein was correlated with nuclear 4-HNE expression in the sublining layer (p=0.02; r=0.48) and DAS28-erythrocyte sedimentation rate was correlated with nuclear 4-HNE expression in both cell layers (p < or = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Lipid peroxidation is associated with low oxygen tension in vivo, disease activity and angiogenic marker expression in inflammatory arthritis.

  3. Japan's compensation system for nuclear damage - As related to the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Toyohiro; Matsuura, Shigekazu; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Takenaka, Chihiro; Hokugo, Taro; Kamada, Toshihiko; Kamai, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Following the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, extraordinary efforts were undertaken in Japan to implement a compensation scheme for the proper and efficient indemnification of the affected victims. This publication provides English translations of key Japanese legislative and administrative texts and other implementing guidance, as well as several commentaries by Japanese experts in the field of third party nuclear liability. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has prepared this publication in co-operation with the government of Japan to share Japan's recent experience in implementing its nuclear liability and compensation regime. The material presented in the publication should provide valuable insights for those wishing to better understand the regime applied to compensate the victims of the accident and for those working on potential improvements in national regimes and the international framework for third party nuclear liability

  4. Nuclear Liability and Insurance of Nuclear Damage in the Czech republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaruba, P.

    1998-01-01

    The paper gives a short introduction to the past and present situation of operation and construction of nuclear power plants in the Czech Republic, including some basic technical data and background information. It then continues in providing up to date information on the Czech nuclear legislation and consideration of various questions and problems in the light of the respective legal clauses (e.g. minimum insurance requirements, treatment of small reactors and small quantities of nuclear material, state guarantees etc.). The paper gives more detailed information about practical application of the insurance clauses of the Atomic Act, including some time related questions. A considerable part of the paper is dedicated to the past history and present functions and activities of the Czech Nuclear Insurance Pool which was officially founded in 1995 and is without doubt one of the most active and successful national nuclear insurance pools of the former East European countries. (author)

  5. U.S. Nuclear Power Reactor Plant Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission — Demographic data on U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors, including: plant name/unit number, docket number, location, licensee, reactor/containment type, nuclear...

  6. Psychological health damage as an environmental effect: Metropolitan Edison Co. v. People Against Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    The Supreme court took a narrow view of the term environmental in Metropolitan Edison Co. v. People Against Nuclear Energy when it stated that the purpose of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is to protect the physical environment. Psychological health damage caused by the perception of the risk of a nuclear accident is not an environmental effect cognizable under NEPA unless their is a demonstrable relationship. Litigants seeking the protection of NEPA must carefully examine the origin and nature of alleged psychological harms and frame their complains to establish a close relationship between a change in the physical environment and the alleged psychological harm

  7. Liability according to civil law regarding border-crossing nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, Caroline

    1987-12-01

    The problem of the liability in border-crossing damage caused by a nuclear-reactor accident is divided into two different areas: the liability according to international law of the state, and liability according to civil right of the licensee of a nuclear power plant. In this study attention is paid to the question of the liability according to civil right: is it possible that an aggrieved obtains compensation for damage? This is investigated on the basis of three standard questions of international private law: which judge is qualified, which law is to be applied, and is acknowledgement and execution of foreign sentences possible? First a historical survey is given of international agreements and national legislations regarding third-party liability. (author). 112 refs

  8. Changes in nuclear protein acetylation in u. v. -damaged human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanathan, B.; Smerdon, M.J.

    1986-07-01

    We have investigated the levels of nuclear protein acetylation in u.v.-irradiated human fibroblasts. We measured the levels of acetylation in total acid-soluble nuclear proteins and observed two distinct differences between the irradiated and unirradiated (control) cells. Immediately after irradiation, there is a wave of protein hyperacetylation (i.e. a total acetylation level greater than that of unirradiated cells) that lasts for 2-6 h depending on the experimental conditions. This hyperacetylation phase is then followed by a hypoacetylation phase, lasting for many hours, and the total level of acetylation does not return to that of control cells until 24-72 h after u.v. damage. Both the magnitude and duration of each phase is dependent on the dose of u.v. light used. The wave of hyperacetylation is more pronounced at low u.v. doses (i.e. less than 5 J/m2), while the wave of hypoacetylation is more pronounced at higher u.v. doses (greater than or equal to 8 J/m2). Furthermore, the duration of each phase is prolonged when cells are exposed to 2 mM hydroxyurea. Examination of the acetylation levels of the individual nuclear proteins indicated that acetylation of the core histones follows the same pattern observed for the total acid-soluble protein fractions. Furthermore, these were the only major proteins in the total acid-soluble fraction observed to undergo the early, rapid hyperacetylation immediately following u.v. damage. Acetylation of histone H1 was negligible in both damaged and control cells, while three prominent non-histone proteins were acetylated only after long labeling times (greater than 4 h) in each case, gradually becoming hyperacetylated in the u.v.-damaged cells. These results raise the possibility that a causal relationship exists between nuclear protein acetylation and nucleotide excision repair of DNA in human cells.

  9. Effect of radiation damage on operating safety of steel pressure vessels of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, M.; Havel, S.; Stoces, B.; Brumovsky, M.

    1980-01-01

    The effects are assessed of the environment upon mechanical properties of steel used generally for pressure vessels of light water nuclear reactors. Changes caused by radiation affect the reliability of vessels. Deterioration of steel properties is mainly due to neutron radiation. The article deals with factors bearing upon damage and with methods allowing to evaluate the reliability of vessels and predict their service life. Operating reliability of vessels is very unfavourably affected by planned and accidental reactor transients. (author)

  10. Evaluation of the initial and final radiological status of a nuclear facility in sanitation status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granier, Guy; Aubonnet, Emilie; Courbet, Christele; Desnoyers, Yvon; Dubot, Didier; Fichet, Pascal; Nokhamzon, Jean-Guy; Ollivier Dehaye, Catherine; Pillette-Cousin, Lucien; Mahe, Charly

    2017-02-01

    This technical report is a guideline for radiological assessment of a nuclear facility in remediation stages. From initial state of remediation to final status survey it describes the best suited statistical or geostatistical approach for the characterization of sites contaminated by radionuclides. Prior to any characterization campaign an historical analysis coupled with a function analysis targeted investigations is fundamental to obtain a robust overview. The evaluation of the amount of radioactive material present in a defined area requires a sampling strategy correlated with characterization objective. On the other hand correlation between remediation objectives and characterization objectives also requires knowing acceptable level of risk. This give better inputs to allow available resources and take into account environmental constraints. In particular, radiological characterization of infrastructures is one of the key step to conduct industrial project of decommissioning nuclear facilities in remediation. It needs a reliable initial diagnosis to obtain an efficient waste management with a financial control Optimization of the production of nuclear waste. It is an important part of Setting the Off Final - Dismantling). This approach is compatible with French Regulation (Guide 14 ASN) for the first and second line of defence. Annexes provide feedback of experimentation of this methodology. This report supplements the methodological guide published by the GT10 CETAMA entitled 'Soil Radiological Characterisation Methodology' (CEA-R 6386). The latter is intended for project managers and covers all issues related to the characterization projects for soil. This guideline concern specifically design engineers in charge of implementation program at the different stages of investigation and data processing. Similarly, the proposed methodology can be broken for the characterization of chemical pollution and process equipment. (authors)

  11. Specific defences to the liability of a nuclear operator for damages resulting from a nuclear incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.A.; Cunningham, G.H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews the cases in which the nuclear operator may be partly or totally exonerated from his liability for a nuclear accident (insurrection, civil war, exceptional natural disasters, intentional act of the victim, etc.) under the Paris and Vienna Conventions and national laws. The laws of the countries reviewed are the following: United States, Japan, Canada, United Kingdom, Brazil, Belgium, the Federal Republic of Germany, France (NEA) [fr

  12. Current status of nuclear power generation in Japan and directions in water cooled reactor technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, T.

    1991-01-01

    Electric power demand aspects and current status of nuclear power generation in Japan are outlined. Although the future plan for nuclear power generation has not been determined yet the Japanese nuclear research centers and institutes are investigating and developing some projects on the next generation of light water reactors and other types of reactors. The paper describes these main activities

  13. Nuclear power in the world: Its present status and development trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.L.

    1994-01-01

    Present status of nuclear power development in the world is presented showing data on power reactors in operation and under construction, on growth of nuclear electricity generation since 1970, the distribution of nuclear electricity generation during 1993. Development trends in the field are also outlined. 7 figs, 5 tabs

  14. 9th PEF status colloquium from March 9-11, 1993 at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsch, F.; Filby, W.G.; Fund, N.; Gross, S.; Kaendler, G.; Reinhardt, W.

    1993-04-01

    During the 9-11th of March 1993 the ninth status report of the project ''European Research Centre for Air Pollution Prevention Measures'' (PEF) took place at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe. Progress reports on the following topics were presented: investigation into damage and elucidation of the causes and effects of forest decline (task 1A); research into atmospheric dispersion, conversion and deposition of airborne pollutants (task 2); development and optimization of industrial-technical processes to reduce or avoid emissions (task 3); and providing instruments and making recommendations to the industrial and political sectors (task 4). (orig./BBR) [de

  15. An overview of the international regime governing liability for nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturms, W.; Reye, S.

    1995-01-01

    Since 1986, the IAEA has been seized with considerations of all aspects of international nuclear liability, with a view to establishing a comprehensive international regime that would obtain widest adherence. The practical work is currently being done in the IAEA Standing Committee on Liability for Nuclear Damage. The efforts, which were first concentrated on the improvement of the existing civil liability regime, resulted in adoption, in 1988, of the Joint Protocol to the Vienna Convention and the Paris Convention, combining them into one expanded regime. At present, the work is focused on the following questions: (a) Revision of the Vienna Convention: In this context, specific draft amendments are considered relating to some key issues where need for improvement has been recognized, such as geographical scope, application to military installations, expansion of the definition of damage to cover environmental damage, preventative measures and consequential losses, increase of liability limits, provision of funds by the Installation State, extension of time limits for submission of claims, restriction of exonerations, etc. (b) International State liability and its relationship with the civil liability regime: Emphasis is placed on proposals for Installation State involvement in the provision of public funds in addition to compensation paid by the operator. (c) Elaboration of a supplementary funding system to cover damage exceeding compensation available under the Vienna and Paris Conventions

  16. Evaluation of cytogenetic damage in nuclear medicine personnel occupationally exposed to low-level ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garaj-Vrhovac, V.; Kopjar, N.; Poropat, M.

    2005-01-01

    Despite intensive research over the last few decades, there still remains considerable uncertainty as to the genetic impact of ionising radiation on human populations, particularly at low levels. The aim of this study was to provide data on genetic hazards associated with occupational exposure to low doses of ionising radiation in nuclear medicine departments. The assessment of DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of medical staff was performed using the chromosome aberration (CA) test. Exposed subjects showed significantly higher frequencies of CA than controls. There were significant inter-individual differences in DNA damage within the exposed population, indicating differences in genome sensitivity. Age and gender were not confounding factors, while smoking enhanced the levels of DNA damage only in control subjects. The present study suggests that chronic exposure to low doses of ionising radiation in nuclear medicine departments causes genotoxic damage. Therefore, to avoid potential genotoxic effects, the exposed medical personnel should minimise radiation exposure wherever possible. Our results also point to the significance of biological indicators providing information about the actual risk to the radiation exposed individuals.(author)

  17. Transportation of failed or damaged foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, C.E.; Mustin, T.P.; Massey, C.D.

    1998-01-01

    Since resuming the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR SNF) Acceptance Program in 1996, the Program has had to deal with difficult issues associated with the transportation of failed or damaged spent fuel. In several instances, problems with failed or damaged fuel have prevented the acceptance of the fuel at considerable cost to both the Department of Energy (DOE) and research reactor operators. In response to the problems faced by the Acceptance Program, DOE has undertaken significant steps to better define the spent fuel acceptance criteria. DOE has worked closely with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to address failed or damaged research reactor spent fuel and to identify cask certificate issues which must be resolved by cask owners and foreign regulatory authorities. The specific issues associated with the transport of Materials Testing Reactor (MTR)-type FRR SNF will be discussed. The information presented will include U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory issues, cask certificate issues, technical constraints, and lessons learned. Specific information will also be provided on the latest efforts to revise DOE's Appendix B, Transport Package (Cask) Acceptance Criteria. The information presented in this paper will be important to foreign research reactor operators, shippers, and cask vendors, so that appropriate amendments to the Certificate of Compliance for spent fuel casks can be submitted in a timely manner to facilitate the safe and scheduled transport of FRR SNF

  18. The mast cell stabilizer sodium cromoglycate reduces histamine release and status epilepticus-induced neuronal damage in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Dorado, María Guadalupe; Santana-Gómez, César Emmanuel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra Adela; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-05-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate changes in the histamine release, mast cell number and neuronal damage in hippocampus induced by status epilepticus. We also evaluated if sodium cromoglycate, a stabilizer of mast cells with a possible stabilizing effect on the membrane of neurons, was able to prevent the release of histamine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate during the status epilepticus. During microdialysis experiments, rats were treated with saline (SS-SE) or sodium cromoglycate (CG-SE) and 30 min later received the administration of pilocarpine to induce status epilepticus. Twenty-four hours after the status epilepticus, the brains were used to determine the neuronal damage and the number of mast cells in hippocampus. During the status epilepticus, SS-SE group showed an enhanced release of histamine (138.5%, p = 0.005), GABA (331 ± 91%, p ≤ 0.001) and glutamate (467%, p ≤ 0.001), even after diazepam administration. One day after the status epilepticus, SS-SE group demonstrated increased number of mast cells in Stratum pyramidale of CA1 (88%, p status epilepticus (p = 0.048), absence of wet-dog shakes, reduced histamine (but not GABA and glutamate) release, lower number of mast cells (p = 0.008) and reduced neuronal damage in hippocampus. Our data revealed that histamine, possibly from mast cells, is released in hippocampus during the status epilepticus. This effect may be involved in the subsequent neuronal damage and is diminished with sodium cromoglycate pretreatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Status of radioiodine control for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, L.L.; Scheele, R.D.

    1983-07-01

    This report summarizes the status of radioiodine control in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant with respect to capture, fixation, and disposal. Where possible, we refer the reader to a number of survey documents which have been published in the last four years. We provide updates where necessary. Also discussed are factors which must be considered in developing criteria for iodine control. For capture from gas streams, silver mordenite and a silver nitrate impregnated silica (AC-6120) are considered state-of-the-art and are recommended. Three aqueous scrubbing processes have been demonstrated: Caustic scrubbing is simple but probably will not give an adequate iodine retention by itself. Mercurex (mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrubbing) has a number of disadvantages including the use of toxic mercury. Iodox (hyperazeotropic nitric acid scrubbing) is effective but employs a very corrosive and hazardous material. Other technologies have been tested but require extensive development. The waste forms recommended for long-term storage or disposal are silver iodide, the iodates of barium, strontium, or calcium, and silver loaded sorbents, all fixed in cement. Copper iodide in bitumen (asphalt) is a possibility but requires testing. The selection of a specific form will be influenced by the capture process used

  20. The OECD/NEA workshop on the indemnification of nuclear damage in the event of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagstaff, F.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1993, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) has run the International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (INEX) Program. The program serves to discuss an effective accident management approach on the basis of a simulated nuclear accident situation together with the states involved and their institutions, and also elaborate measures for its further improvement. At the present time, the INEX Program has reached Phase 3 in which, for the first time, also aspects of liability for the consequences of accidents were included. These aspects were made the subject of a workshop held after an emergency exercise. The scenario covered was based on an INES level-4 accident in the French Gravelines Nuclear Power Station situated close to the French-Belgian border. The workshop dealt with these topics, among others: the application of the Paris Convention on Third Party Liability, the Brussels Supplementary Convention, and the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage as well as the Supplementary Compensation Convention of 1997. It was seen that there was a clear need for further discussion, especially to shed more light on the interrelationship of these treaties. (orig.) [de

  1. Research in nuclear chemistry: current status and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, A.V.R.

    2007-01-01

    Research in nuclear chemistry has seen a huge growth over the last few decades. The large umbrella of nuclear chemistry includes several research areas such as nuclear fission, reactions, spectroscopy, nuclear probes and nuclear analytical techniques. Currently, nuclear chemistry research has extended its horizon into various applications like nuclear medicine, isotopes for understanding physico chemical processes, and addressing environmental and biomedical problems. Tremendous efforts are going on for synthesizing new elements (isotopes), isolating physically or chemically wherever possible and investigating their properties. Theses studies are useful to understand nuclear and chemical properties at extreme ends of instability. In addition, nuclear chemists are making substantial contribution to astrophysics and other related areas. During this talk, a few of the contributions made by nuclear chemistry group of BARC will be discussed and possible future areas of research will be enumerated. (author)

  2. Vienna Convention and Its Revision and convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage on September 12, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soljan, V.

    1998-01-01

    After Chernobyl, the perception of common interest in modernization of the international regime that regulate various aspects of nuclear energy, has been evident among states with nuclear power plants as well as those likely to be involved in or affected by a nuclear incident. The adoption of the protocol Amending the Vienna Convention on Civil liability for Nuclear Damage, 1963 and the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for nuclear damage in September 1997, represents important part of the entire result that has been achieved from the 1986. This article gives a brief survey on the background of the process of modernization of the international regime of liability for nuclear damage and examines solutions contained in the provisions of the conventions. (author)

  3. Quantitative PCR analysis of diepoxybutane and epihalohydrin damage to nuclear versus mitochondrial DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaRiviere, Frederick J. [Department of Chemistry, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, VA 24450 (United States); Newman, Adam G.; Watts, Megan L.; Bradley, Sharonda Q.; Juskewitch, Justin E. [Department of Chemistry, Colby College, 5757 Mayflower Hill Drive, Waterville, ME 04901 (United States); Greenwood, Paul G. [Department of Biology, Colby College, Waterville, ME 04901 (United States); Millard, Julie T., E-mail: jtmillar@colby.edu [Department of Chemistry, Colby College, 5757 Mayflower Hill Drive, Waterville, ME 04901 (United States)

    2009-05-12

    The bifunctional alkylating agents diepoxybutane (DEB) and epichlorohydrin (ECH) are linked to the elevated incidence of certain cancers among workers in the synthetic polymer industry. Both compounds form interstrand cross-links within duplex DNA, an activity suggested to contribute to their cytotoxicity. To assess the DNA targeting of these compounds in vivo, we assayed for damage within chicken erythro-progenitor cells at three different sites: one within mitochondrial DNA, one within expressed nuclear DNA, and one within unexpressed nuclear DNA. We determined the degree of damage at each site via a quantitative polymerase chain reaction, which compares amplification of control, untreated DNA to that from cells exposed to the agent in question. We found that ECH and the related compound epibromohydrin preferentially target nuclear DNA relative to mitochondrial DNA, whereas DEB reacts similarly with the two genomes. Decreased reactivity of the mitochondrial genome could contribute to the reduced apoptotic potential of ECH relative to DEB. Additionally, formation of lesions by all agents occurred at comparable levels for unexpressed and expressed nuclear loci, suggesting that alkylation is unaffected by the degree of chromatin condensation.

  4. Quantitative PCR analysis of diepoxybutane and epihalohydrin damage to nuclear versus mitochondrial DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaRiviere, Frederick J.; Newman, Adam G.; Watts, Megan L.; Bradley, Sharonda Q.; Juskewitch, Justin E.; Greenwood, Paul G.; Millard, Julie T.

    2009-01-01

    The bifunctional alkylating agents diepoxybutane (DEB) and epichlorohydrin (ECH) are linked to the elevated incidence of certain cancers among workers in the synthetic polymer industry. Both compounds form interstrand cross-links within duplex DNA, an activity suggested to contribute to their cytotoxicity. To assess the DNA targeting of these compounds in vivo, we assayed for damage within chicken erythro-progenitor cells at three different sites: one within mitochondrial DNA, one within expressed nuclear DNA, and one within unexpressed nuclear DNA. We determined the degree of damage at each site via a quantitative polymerase chain reaction, which compares amplification of control, untreated DNA to that from cells exposed to the agent in question. We found that ECH and the related compound epibromohydrin preferentially target nuclear DNA relative to mitochondrial DNA, whereas DEB reacts similarly with the two genomes. Decreased reactivity of the mitochondrial genome could contribute to the reduced apoptotic potential of ECH relative to DEB. Additionally, formation of lesions by all agents occurred at comparable levels for unexpressed and expressed nuclear loci, suggesting that alkylation is unaffected by the degree of chromatin condensation.

  5. Nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle and waste management: Status and trends 1995. Part C of the IAEA Yearbook 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This report was jointly prepared by the Division of Nuclear Power and the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management as part of an annual overview of both global nuclear industry activities and related IAEA programmes. This year's report focuses on activities during 1994 and the status at the end of that year. The trends in the industry are projected to 2010. Special events and highlights of IAEA activities over the past year are also presented. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. Nuclear Power, nuclear fuel cycle and waste management: Status and trends 1996. Part C of the IAEA yearbook 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This report was jointly prepared by the Division of Nuclear Power and the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management as part of an annual overview of both global nuclear industry activities and related IAEA programmes. This year's report focuses on activities during 1995 and the status at the end of that year. The trends in the industry are projected to the year 2010. Special events and highlights of IAEA activities over the past year are also presented. Refs, figs, tabs

  7. DNA damage in blood cells in relation to chemotherapy and nutritional status in colorectal cancer patients-A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kværner, Ane Sørlie; Minaguchi, Jun; Yamani, Naouale El; Henriksen, Christine; Ræder, Hanna; Paur, Ingvild; Henriksen, Hege Berg; Wiedswang, Gro; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Blomhoff, Rune; Collins, Andrew Richard; Bøhn, Siv Kjølsrud

    2018-03-01

    DNA damage can be considered as a biomarker for toxicity and response to chemotherapy. It is not known whether the chemotherapy-induced genotoxicity is associated with malnutrition. In this pilot study, we assess genotoxicity by means of DNA damage in patients with lymph-node positive colorectal cancer (CRC) and explore associations with chemotherapy treatment and nutritional status. DNA damage was compared between patients receiving chemotherapy (n = 24) and those not receiving chemotherapy (n = 20). DNA damage was measured in frozen whole blood by the comet assay. Associations between DNA damage and various indicators of malnutrition were also explored, including Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA), bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and anthropometric measurements, using multiple linear regression models. Patients on chemotherapy have higher levels of DNA damage in blood cells than patients not receiving chemotherapy (median of 16.9 and 7.9% tail DNA respectively, p = 0.001). The moderately malnourished patients (PG-SGA category B), representing 41% of the patients, have higher levels of cellular DNA damage than patients with good nutritional status (mean difference of 7.5% tail DNA, p = 0.033). In conclusion, adjuvant chemotherapy and malnutrition are both associated with increased levels of DNA damage in blood cells of CRC patients. Carefully controlled longitudinal studies or randomized controlled trials should be performed to determine whether good nutritional status may protect against chemotherapy-induced genotoxicity and enhance compliance to therapy in CRC patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Nuclear Containment Inspection Using AN Array of Guided Wave Sensors for Damage Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, A. C.; Fisher, J. L.

    2010-02-01

    Nuclear power plant containments are typically both the last line of defense against the release of radioactivity to the environment and the first line of defense to protect against intrusion from external objects. As such, it is important to be able to locate any damage that would limit the integrity of the containment itself. Typically, a portion of the containment consists of a metallic pressure boundary that encloses the reactor primary circuit. It is made of thick steel plates welded together, lined with concrete and partially buried, limiting areas that can be visually inspected for corrosion damage. This study presents a strategy using low frequency (<50 kHz) guided waves to find corrosion-like damage several meters from the probe in a mock-up of the containment vessel. A magnetostrictive sensor (MsS) is scanned across the width of the vessel, acquiring waveforms at a fixed interval. A beam forming strategy is used to localize the defects. Experimental results are presented for a variety of damage configurations, demonstrating the efficacy of this technique for detecting damage smaller than the ultrasonic wavelength.

  9. Novel Concepts for Damage-Resistant Alloys in Next Generation Nuclear Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen M. Bruemmer; Peter L. Andersen; Gary Was

    2002-12-27

    The discovery of a damage-resistant alloy based on Hf solute additions to a low-carbon 316SS is the highlight of the Phase II research. This damage resistance is supported by characterization of radiation-induced microstructures and microchemistries along with measurements of environmental cracking. The addition of Hf to a low-carbon 316SS reduced the detrimental impact of radiation by changing the distribution of Hf. Pt additions reduced the impact of radiation on grain boundary segregation but did not alter its effect on microstructural damage development or cracking. Because cracking susceptibility is associated with several material characteristics, separate effect experiments exploring strength effects using non-irradiated stainless steels were conducted. These crack growth tests suggest that irradiation strength by itself can promote environmental cracking. The second concept for developing damage resistant alloys is the use of metastable precipitates to stabilize the microstructure during irradiation. Three alloys have been tailored for evaluation of precipitate stability influences on damage evolution. The first alloy is a Ni-base alloy (alloy 718) that has been characterized at low neutron irradiation doses but has not been characterized at high irradiation doses. The other two alloys are Fe-base alloys (PH 17-7 and PH 17-4) that have similar precipitate structures as alloy 718 but is more practical in nuclear structures because of the lower Ni content and hence lesser transmutation to He.

  10. Damaged Spent Nuclear Fuel at U.S. DOE Facilities Experience and Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brett W. Carlsen; Eric Woolstenhulme; Roger McCormack

    2005-01-01

    From a handling perspective, any spent nuclear fuel (SNF) that has lost its original technical and functional design capabilities with regard to handling and confinement can be considered as damaged. Some SNF was damaged as a result of experimental activities and destructive examinations; incidents during packaging, handling, and transportation; or degradation that has occurred during storage. Some SNF was mechanically destroyed to protect proprietary SNF designs. Examples of damage to the SNF include failed cladding, failed fuel meat, sectioned test specimens, partially reprocessed SNFs, over-heated elements, dismantled assemblies, and assemblies with lifting fixtures removed. In spite of the challenges involved with handling and storage of damaged SNF, the SNF has been safely handled and stored for many years at DOE storage facilities. This report summarizes a variety of challenges encountered at DOE facilities during interim storage and handling operations along with strategies and solutions that are planned or were implemented to ameliorate those challenges. A discussion of proposed paths forward for moving damaged and nondamaged SNF from interim storage to final disposition in the geologic repository is also presented

  11. The order for enforcing the law concerning indemnification of nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The cabinet ordinance is established under the law concerning the indemnification for atomic energy damages. The matters stipulated by the ordinance in the law include the following matters: the operation of reactors; the processing of nuclear fuel materials, such as uranium 235, specified uranium and its compounds, plutonium and its compounds, etc.; reprocessing; the employment of such nuclear fuel materials; the transportation, storage and disposal of such materials, particular spent fuels and the things contaminated by nuclear fuel materials, which occur according to the operation of reactors and other practices above mentioned. The amounts of indemnification are respectively 10 billion yen for the operation of reactors whose thermal outputs are more than 10,000 kilowatts and reprocessing, 2 billion yen for the operation of reactors whose thermal outputs are more than 100 kilowatts and less than 10,000 kilowatts and the transportation of spent fuel accompanying the operation of reactors or reprocessing, 200 million yen for the operation of reactors whose thermal outputs are less than 100 kilowatts, and the processing and employment of nuclear fuel materials, the transportation of nuclear fuel materials accompanying the operation of reactors, and the processing, reprocessing and employment of nuclear fuel materials. The payment of casualty indemnification includes that according to the provisions of the government official casualty indemnification law and that due to official causes under the provisions of the seamen insurance law. (Okada, K.)

  12. ELECNUC. Nuclear power plants in the world - 2012 edition, Status on 2011-12-31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. Data come from the IAEA's PRIS database and from specific I-tese studies. The following aspects are reviewed: 2011 highlights; Main characteristics of reactor types; Map of the French nuclear power plants on 2011/01/01; Worldwide status of nuclear power plants (12/31/2011); Units distributed by countries; Nuclear power plants connected to the Grid- by reactor type groups; Nuclear power plants under construction on 2011; Evolution of nuclear power plants capacities connected to the grid; First electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit in each country; Electrical generation from nuclear powe plants by country at the end 2011; Performance indicator of french PWR units; Evolution of the generation indicators worldwide by type; Nuclear operator ranking according to their installed capacity; Units connected to the grid by countries at 12/31/2011; Status of licence renewal applications in USA; Nuclear power plants under construction at 12/31/2011; Shutdown reactors; Exported nuclear capacity in net MWe; Exported and national nuclear capacity connected to the grid; Exported nuclear power plants under construction; Exported and national nuclear capacity under construction; Nuclear power plants ordered at 12/31/2011; Long term shutdown units at 12/31/2011; COL (Combined Licence) applications in the USA; Recycling of Plutonium in reactors and experiences; Mox licence plants projects; Appendix - historical development; Meaning of the used acronyms; Glossary

  13. Spirulina does not decrease muscle damage nor oxdidative stress in cycling athletes with adequate nutritional status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A.M. Franca

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the effect of Spirulina maxima on oxidative stress and muscle damage in cycling athletes subjected to high volume and intensity of training. Eighteen male athletes were randomly divided into an experimental group (n=11 with age 27.8±3.5 and placebo (n=7 with age 34.3±2.3 in a double-blind fashion. They carried out a protocol of Spirulina dietary supplementation (7.5 g/day of placebo for four weeks and maintained their trainings during this period. A nutritional anamnesis was performed and blood tests were done to determine pre and post levels of creatine kinase (CK, lactic dehydrogenase (LHD, superoxide dismutase (SOD and malondialdehyde (MDA. The supplemented and placebo groups performed the same volume training, has adequate macronutrients and antioxidant vitamins ingestion before study, as well as initial CK, LDH, SOD and MDA levels. Supplementation did not promote a significant alteration in CK levels on supplemented group (158.4±16.3 for 140.0±16.6 U/l, p>0.05, LDH (420±13.2 for 394.9±27.9 UI/l, p>0.05, MDA (2.8±0.2 for 2.9±0.4 nmol/ml, p>0.05, nor an increase in the SOD (7.3±0.6 for 7.0±0.6 U/mg Hb, p>0.05. We conclude that administration of Spirulina does not interfere in the magnitude of muscle damage nor in antioxidant status of cycling athletes that practice intense training.

  14. Study on status of nuclear export/import implementation in KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. J.; Lee, B. D.; Lee, S. H.; Park, H. J.; So, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    As Korea is the member of ZC(Zangger Committee) and NSG(Nuclear Suppliers Group), domestic legislation reflected their guideline of nuclear export. The paper investigate the status of implementation procedures of nuclear export and import in KAERI based on domestic and international law. In addition, the paper analyzes on problem of export/import implementation system and also extract the efficient implementation system of nuclear export and import

  15. International nuclear power status 2002; International kernekraftstatus 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L. (eds.)

    2003-03-01

    This report is the ninth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2002, the report contains: 1) General trends in the development of nuclear power; 2) Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory: 3) Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 2001); 4) An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2002; 5) The development in West Europe; 6) The development in East Europe; 7) The development in the rest of the world; 8) Development of reactor types; 9) The nuclear fuel cycle; 10) International nuclear organisations. (au)

  16. International nuclear power status 2001; International kernekraftstatus 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L. (eds.)

    2002-04-01

    This report is the eighth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2001, the report contains: 1) General trends in the development of nuclear power; 2) Nuclear terrorism; 3) Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 2000); 4) An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2001; 5) The development in West Europe; 6) The development in East Europe; 7) The development in the rest of the world; 8) Development of reactor types; 9) The nuclear fuel cycle; 10) International nuclear organisations. (au)

  17. Research reactor status for future nuclear research in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, Patrick; Bignan, Gilles; Guidez, Joel [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique - CEA (France)

    2010-07-01

    Scandinavia). The nuclear renaissance is effective worldwide, with 33 power plants today under construction in the world and a lot of projects in discussion or in preparation in various countries (England, Italy, South Africa, USA...). In Europe, some countries, who phase-out the development nuclear energy, are also coming back in nuclear perspectives as Sweden, Italy, England, Poland,.. All these facts begin to give more work to the MTR (material testing reactors) for testing new materials and new fuels to improve their capacities and their performances. For the ZPR (Zero Power Reactors) test with new fuels allowing additives to suppress Bore utilisation, or allowing to reduce uranium consumption, will be necessary in the near future. For the safety dedicated reactors, test for compliance to last safety requirements are necessary. In this field the refurbishment of the CABRI reactor for Reactivity Insertion Accident studies, is now almost finished for test that should begin in 2010. For the radio isotope production the world demand is increasing year after year, especially for {sup 99}Mo, used in about 70 millions of medicine procedures each year in the world. Today 95% of this world production is assumed by five reactors: HFR (Netherlands), OSIRIS (France), SAFARI (South Africa), BRII (Belgium), and NRU (Canada). The youngest is OSIRIS (41 years) and should be close in 2015. Due to ageing problems NRU and HFR were shut down in 2009 for necessary repair. These points have conduced to some radio isotopes crisis in 2009. This paper explains some projects in line for the future to avoid this type of problems (FRMII initiative, RJH utilisation and PALLAS project). For training activities, needs are huge with nuclear renaissance, especially for the new countries coming back in nuclear field. It will also give a lot of opportunities to low power reactors and to the universities reactors. This paper also provides information on the status of the new projects such as the JHR ongoing

  18. Research reactor status for future nuclear research in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, Patrick; Bignan, Gilles; Guidez, Joel

    2010-01-01

    renaissance is effective worldwide, with 33 power plants today under construction in the world and a lot of projects in discussion or in preparation in various countries (England, Italy, South Africa, USA...). In Europe, some countries, who phase-out the development nuclear energy, are also coming back in nuclear perspectives as Sweden, Italy, England, Poland,.. All these facts begin to give more work to the MTR (material testing reactors) for testing new materials and new fuels to improve their capacities and their performances. For the ZPR (Zero Power Reactors) test with new fuels allowing additives to suppress Bore utilisation, or allowing to reduce uranium consumption, will be necessary in the near future. For the safety dedicated reactors, test for compliance to last safety requirements are necessary. In this field the refurbishment of the CABRI reactor for Reactivity Insertion Accident studies, is now almost finished for test that should begin in 2010. For the radio isotope production the world demand is increasing year after year, especially for 99 Mo, used in about 70 millions of medicine procedures each year in the world. Today 95% of this world production is assumed by five reactors: HFR (Netherlands), OSIRIS (France), SAFARI (South Africa), BRII (Belgium), and NRU (Canada). The youngest is OSIRIS (41 years) and should be close in 2015. Due to ageing problems NRU and HFR were shut down in 2009 for necessary repair. These points have conduced to some radio isotopes crisis in 2009. This paper explains some projects in line for the future to avoid this type of problems (FRMII initiative, RJH utilisation and PALLAS project). For training activities, needs are huge with nuclear renaissance, especially for the new countries coming back in nuclear field. It will also give a lot of opportunities to low power reactors and to the universities reactors. This paper also provides information on the status of the new projects such as the JHR ongoing construction on the Cadarache

  19. Analysis on the status of the application of satellite remote sensing technology to nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Zhangsheng; Zhao Yingjun

    2008-01-01

    Based on the application status of satellite remote sensing technology to nuclear safeguards, advantage of satellite remote sensing technology is analyzed, main types of satellite image used in nuclear safeguards are elaborated and the main application of satellite images is regarded to detect, verify and monitor nuclear activities; verify additional protocol declaration and design information, support performing complementary access inspections; investigate alleged undeclared activities based on open source or the third party information. Application examples of satellite image in nuclear safeguards to analyze nuclear facilities by other countries, the ability of remote sensing technology in nuclear safeguards is discussed. (authors)

  20. Curcumin protects neuronal cells against status-epilepticus-induced hippocampal damage through induction of autophagy and inhibition of necroptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Liu, Yuan; Li, Xiao-Hui; Zeng, Xiang-Chang; Li, Jian; Zhou, Jun; Xiao, Bo; Hu, Kai

    2017-05-01

    Status epilepticus, the most severe form of epilepsy, is characterized by progressive functional and structural damage in the hippocampus, ultimately leading to the development and clinical appearance of spontaneous, recurrent seizures. Although the pathogenesis underlying epileptogenesis processes remains unclear, a substantial body of evidence has shown that status epilepticus acts as an important initial factor in triggering epileptogenesis. Notably, besides classical cell death mechanisms such as apoptosis and necrosis, 2 novel regulators of cell fate known as necroptosis and autophagy, are demonstrated to be involved in neuronal damage in various neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, whether necroptosis and autophagy play a role in post-status-epilepticus rat hippocampus and other epilepsy mechanisms deserves further research effort. In addition, research is needed to determine whether compounds from traditional Chinese herbs possess antiepileptic effects through the modulation of necroptosis and autophagy. In this study, we found that curcumin, a polyphenolic phytochemical extracted from the Curcuma longa plant, protects neuronal cells against status-epilepticus-induced hippocampal neuronal damage in the lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus rat model through induction of autophagy and inhibition of necroptosis.

  1. Sixty years of nuclear dissuasion: status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This paper recalls first the 4 main turns of the history of the atomic bomb, from its invention to the non-proliferation treaty. Then, it analyzes the reasons of the reinforcement of the 'nuclear taboo' and its conformability with the dissuasion theory. The nuclear strategy and the future of nuclear weapons development is discussed with respect to conventional military strategy and weapons. Finally, some false ideas about the French nuclear dissuasion are clarified. (J.S.)

  2. Operational status of nuclear facilities in Japan. 2008 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This document is a summary of the outline of the safety regulation administration of nuclear facilities as well as various data on the commercial nuclear power reactor facilities, research and development nuclear power reactor facilities, fabrication facilities, reprocessing facilities, and disposal facilities in fiscal year 2007 (from April 2007 to March 2008). I sincerely hope this document is used widely by many people engaged in work related to ensuring nuclear safety. (J.P.N.)

  3. Operational status of nuclear facilities in Japan. 2010 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This document is a summary of the outline of the safety regulation administration of nuclear facilities as well as various data on the commercial nuclear power reactor facilities, research and development nuclear power reactor facilities, fabrication facilities, reprocessing facilities, and disposal facilities in fiscal year 2009 (from April 2009 to March 2010). We sincerely hope this document is used widely by many people engaged in work related to ensuring nuclear safety. (author)

  4. Status and prospects of nuclear arms control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xiangli; Wang Deli

    1995-01-01

    Some main issues and problems involved in nuclear arms control study, such as nuclear policy, NPT regime, verification technologies for a CTBT and disposal of military nuclear materials are introduced, in which both the current state and prospects of these issues are analyzed

  5. The recent status of nuclear technology development in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laoharojanaphand, Sirinart; Cherdchu, Chainarong; Sumitra, Tatchai; Sudprasert, Wanwisa; Chankow, Nares; Tiyapan, Kanokrat; Onjun, Thawatchai; Bhanthumnavin, Duangduen

    2016-01-01

    Thailand has started the peaceful utilization of nuclear program in 1961. The program has developed considerably in various aspects. Laws and regulations were established while applications in medical, agriculture, industry as well as research and education have been accomplished successfully in the country. As for the energy production, Thailand has realized the importance of nuclear power generation several years back. However, the implementation has been delayed. There are four main nuclear organizations namely The Thai Atomic Energy Commission - the country's policy holder, the Office of Atoms for Peace (OAP) - the nuclear regulatory bodies, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT: Public Organization) - the research and services provider in nuclear field and the Nuclear Society of Thailand the non-governmental organization. Major research in nuclear technology is actively carried out at TINT. Filed of research include medical and public health, agricultural, material and industrial, environmental and advanced technology like neutron scattering and nuclear fusion. Nuclear density gauge has been utilized in many industries including petrochemical production and refineries. TINT is also providing services on nuclear radiography to industrial and clients. Additionally, x-ray techniques have been utilized in many manufacturers for quality and process control. Nuclear applications for medical purpose have been utilized in Thailand several years back both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. To ensure safe and peaceful use of nuclear technology and for the safety of the general public in Thailand, OAP has launched laws, regulations and ministerial announcements. Thailand has only one multi-purposes nuclear research reactor and no NPP. Yet we have realized the importance of nuclear power generation several years back. (N.T.)

  6. A quantitative 14-3-3 interaction screen connects the nuclear exosome targeting complex to the DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasius, Melanie; Wagner, Sebastian A; Choudhary, Chuna Ram

    2014-01-01

    RNA metabolism is altered following DNA damage, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Through a 14-3-3 interaction screen for DNA damage-induced protein interactions in human cells, we identified protein complexes connected to RNA biology. These include the nuclear exosome...

  7. Nondestructive Evaluation of Functionally Graded Subsurface Damage on Cylinders in Nuclear Installations Based on Circumferential SH Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Qu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface damage could affect the service life of structures. In nuclear engineering, nondestructive evaluation and detection of the evaluation of the subsurface damage region are of great importance to ensure the safety of nuclear installations. In this paper, we propose the use of circumferential horizontal shear (SH waves to detect mechanical properties of subsurface regions of damage on cylindrical structures. The regions of surface damage are considered to be functionally graded material (FGM and the cylinder is considered to be a layered structure. The Bessel functions and the power series technique are employed to solve the governing equations. By analyzing the SH waves in the 12Cr-ODS ferritic steel cylinder, which is frequently applied in the nuclear installations, we discuss the relationship between the phase velocities of SH waves in the cylinder with subsurface layers of damage and the mechanical properties of the subsurface damaged regions. The results show that the subsurface damage could lead to decrease of the SH waves’ phase velocity. The gradient parameters, which represent the degree of subsurface damage, can be evaluated by the variation of the SH waves’ phase velocity. Research results of this study can provide theoretical guidance in nondestructive evaluation for use in the analysis of the reliability and durability of nuclear installations.

  8. High dose radiation damage in nuclear energy structural materials investigated by heavy ion irradiation simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yongnan; Xu Yongjun; Yuan Daqing

    2014-01-01

    Structural materials in ITER, ADS and fast reactor suffer high dose irradiations of neutrons and/or protons, that leads to severe displacement damage up to lOO dpa per year. Investigation of radiation damage induced by such a high dose irradiation has attracted great attention along with the development of nuclear energy facilities of new generation. However, it is deeply hampered for the lacking of high dose neutron and proton sources. Irradiation simulation of heavy ions produced by accelerators opens up an effective way for laboratory investigation of high dose irradiation induced radiation damage encountered in the ITER, ADS, etc. Radiation damage is caused mainly by atomic displacement in materials. The displacement rate of heavy ions is about lO 3 ∼10 7 orders higher than those of neutrons and protons. High displacement rate of heavy ions significantly reduces the irradiation time. The heavy ion irradiation simulation technique (HIIS) technique has been developed at China Institute of Atomic Energy and a series of the HIIS experiments have been performed to investigate radiation damage in stainless steels, tungsten and tantalum at irradiation temperatures from room temperature to 800 ℃ and in the irradiation dose region up to 100 dpa. The experimental results show that he radiation swelling peak for the modified stainless steel appears in the temperature region around 580 ℃ and the radiation damage is more sensitive to the temperature, the size of the radiation induced vacancy cluster or void increase with the increasing of the irradiation dose, and among the three materials the home-made modified stainless steel has the best radiation resistant property. (authors)

  9. International nuclear power status 1999; International kernekraftstatus 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejerup, C.F.; Oelgaard, P.L. [eds.

    2000-03-01

    This report isthe sixth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 1999, the report contains: General trends in the development of nuclear power; The past and possible future of Barsebaeck Nuclear Power Plant; Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 1998); An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 1999; The development in Sweden; The development in Eastern Europe; The development in the rest of the world; Trends in the development of reactor types; Trends in the development of the nuclear fuel cycle. (au)

  10. Radiation damage studies in nuclear waste storage matrices: a few remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limoge, Y.

    1997-01-01

    For safe management of high level nuclear waste (HLNW) we have to predict the behaviour of the storage matrix that will have to sustain irradiation over a long period of 10 4 to 10 5 years. 2 approaches are possible and in fact complementary. The first approach is an experimental one: the selected material is submitted to an acceleration of the damage by using various forms of external or internal radiations delivering a higher flux than the stored wastes themselves. The second approach is a cognitive one that requires the modelling of the radiation damage. The second approach seems to have been less developed than the first one. The second approach is a multi-step one. The first step is to review and model all possible phenomena occurring in irradiated material. The second step is to review the different kinds of defects produced by irradiation, their possible mutual interaction and their elimination modes that are followed by the material to go back to equilibrium. There have been a lot of detailed studies of defect formation under ionizing conditions in silica and simple silica based glass, mainly for electronic industry purposes. Fewer studies have been done on nuclear glasses. This article makes a point about the necessity and need for reliable simulation of long-term irradiation effects on nuclear glasses

  11. The Current Status and Implications of Nuclear Energy Cultural Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Won

    2006-01-01

    The Korean nuclear energy community paid a high price in terms of the tremendous social costs incurred in the process of securing a site for mid-to-low radioactive waste disposal facility, indicating that interest in the technical danger of nuclear energy has spread to the realm of people's daily lives. Under the circumstances it is important to raise rational public awareness of nuclear science as a foundation of everyday life through nuclear cultural activities. This study examines the various types of public relations activities of the Korea Nuclear Energy Foundation, an organization in charge of promoting nuclear energy, and explores what activities are required to ensure efficient promotion in accordance with development of nuclear culture

  12. Review of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station Probabilistic Risk Assessment: internal events and core damage frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilberg, D.; Shiu, K.; Hanan, N.; Anavim, E.

    1985-11-01

    A review of the Probabilistic Risk Assessment of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station was conducted with the broad objective of evaluating its risks in relation to those identified in the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400). The scope of the review was limited to the ''front end'' part, i.e., to the evaluation of the frequencies of states in which core damage may occur. Furthermore, the review considered only internally generated accidents, consistent with the scope of the PRA. The review included an assessment of the assumptions and methods used in the Shoreham study. It also encompassed a reevaluation of the main results within the scope and general methodological framework of the Shoreham PRA, including both qualitative and quantitative analyses of accident initiators, data bases, and accident sequences which result in initiation of core damage. Specific comparisons are given between the Shoreham study, the results of the present review, and the WASH-1400 BWR, for the core damage frequency. The effect of modeling uncertainties was considered by a limited sensitivity study so as to show how the results would change if other assumptions were made. This review provides an independently assessed point value estimate of core damage frequency and describes the major contributors, by frontline systems and by accident sequences. 17 figs., 81 tabs

  13. Damage-plasticity model of the host rock in a nuclear waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koudelka, Tomáš; Kruis, Jaroslav, E-mail: kruis@fsv.cvut.cz [Department of Mechanics, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Thákurova 7, 166 29 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-08

    The paper describes damage-plasticity model for the modelling of the host rock environment of a nuclear waste repository. Radioactive Waste Repository Authority in Czech Republic assumes the repository to be in a granite rock mass which exhibit anisotropic behaviour where the strength in tension is lower than in compression. In order to describe this phenomenon, the damage-plasticity model is formulated with the help of the Drucker-Prager yield criterion which can be set to capture the compression behaviour while the tensile stress states is described with the help of scalar isotropic damage model. The concept of damage-plasticity model was implemented in the SIFEL finite element code and consequently, the code was used for the simulation of the Äspö Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) which was performed in order to determine yielding strength under various conditions in similar granite rocks as in Czech Republic. The results from the performed analysis are presented and discussed in the paper.

  14. Status of SiO2/TiO2 HR coating damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowermilk, W.H.

    1979-01-01

    The data, observations, and conclusions from a number of experiments on high-reflector (HR) coating damage which were done in FY 1979 are summarized. Damage threshold measurements for the experiments described are presented

  15. The principle of proportionateness in the nuclear law to provide against damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marburger, P.

    1983-01-01

    The author explains the principle of proportionateness as applied in licensing procedures for nuclear installations to provide against damage, as required by section 7, sub-section (2), no. 3 of the Atomic Energy Act. He stated that in his opinion, the appropriateness as an important element of the principle of proportionateness in the law pertaining to technical safety calls for a balanced evaluation so that in principle, additional safety requirements ought to be set only if they undoubtedly bring about additional improvements, improvements that clearly outweigh any disadvantages. This, he said, is also the opinion of the Federal Constitutional Court, as expressed in the indicial declaration of law. Appropriate consideration is also to be given to economic aspects (risk/cost evaluations) when deciding upon appropriate measures to provide against damage. (WB) [de

  16. Nuclear Power Plants. Construction status report, data as of February 28, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    Data on the construction status of nuclear power plants in the US as of February 28, 1978 are presented. The data include licensing activities affecting the construction as well as detailed information on construction activities and schedules

  17. Nuclear power plants. Construction status report, data as of April 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    Data on the construction status of nuclear power plants in the U.S. as of April 30, 1978 are presented. The data include licensing activities affecting the construction as well as detailed information on construction activities and schedules

  18. Status report: conceptual fuel cycle studies for the Hanford Nuclear Energy Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrill, E.T.; Fleischman, R.M.

    1975-07-01

    A summary is presented of the current status of studies to determine the logistics of onsite plutonium recycle and the timing involved in introducing the associated reprocessing and fabrication fuel cycle facilities at the Hanford Nuclear Energy Center

  19. Status of nuclear engineering education in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear engineering education in the United States is reflective of the perceived health of the nuclear electric power industry within the country. Just as new commercial reactor orders have vanished and some power plants have shut down, so too have university enrollments shrunk and research reactors closed. This decline in nuclear trained specialists and the disappearance of the nuclear infrastructure is a trend that must be arrested and reversed if the United States is to have a workforce capable of caring for a nuclear power industry to not only meet future electric demand but to ensure that the over 100 existing plants, their supporting facilities and their legacy in the form of high level waste and facility clean-up are addressed. Additionally, the United States has an obligation to support and maintain its nuclear navy and other defence needs. And, lastly, if the United States is to have a meaningful role in the international use of nuclear power with regard to safety, non-proliferation and the environment, then it is imperative that the country continues to produce world-class nuclear engineers and scientists by supporting nuclear engineering education at its universities. The continued support of the federal government. and industry for university nuclear engineering and nuclear energy research and development is essential to sustain the nuclear infrastructure in the United States. Even with this support, and the continued excellent operation of the existing fleet of nuclear electric power plants, it is conceivable that nuclear engineering as an academic discipline may fall victim to poor communications and a tarnished public image. What is needed is a combination of federal and industrial support along with the creativity of the universities to expand their offerings to include more than power production. The objective is a positive message on careers in nuclear related fields, and recognition of the important role of nuclear energy in meeting the country

  20. The status and prospects of nuclear reactor technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhn, P.E.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power is a proven technology which currently contributes about 16% to the world electricity supply and, to a much lesser extent, to heat supply in some countries. Nuclear Power is economically competitive with fossil fuels for base load electricity generation in many countries, and is one of the commercially proven energy supply options that could be extended in the future to reduce environmental burdens, especially greenhouse gas emissions, from the electricity sector. Over the past five decades, nearly ten thousand reactor-years of operating experience have been accumulated with current nuclear power plants. However, nuclear power is currently at a cross-road. There are no new nuclear power construction projects in most parts of the world, except some countries in East Asia and Eastern Europe. The main issues are economic competitiveness with cheap gas plants and public concerns on nuclear waste disposal and safety. Strong economic growth and the shrinking of existing electricity over-capacities could favour nuclear power. Since nuclear power emits no greenhouse gases to the environment, its development could be further accelerated by a breakthrough in innovative nuclear reactor technology development. Great attention also needs to be paid to the design of new nuclear reactors, which are modularized and faster to construct, thus reducing capital investment and construction period, and thereby improving their overall economics and their compatibility with the infrastructure of, in particular, developing countries, where new energy demands are expected. This paper discusses the future world energy outlook, challenges for and progresses on nuclear power; overview of new nuclear reactor technology development; and the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the development of new innovative nuclear reactors. (author)

  1. The effect of uncertainties in nuclear reactor plant-specific failure data on core damage frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martz, H.F.

    1995-05-01

    It is sometimes the case in PRA applications that reported plant-specific failure data are, in fact, only estimates which are uncertain. Even for detailed plant-specific data, the reported exposure time or number of demands is often only an estimate of the actual exposure time or number of demands. Likewise the reported number of failure events or incidents is sometimes also uncertain because incident or malfunction reports may be ambiguous. In this report we determine the corresponding uncertainty in core damage frequency which can b attributed to such uncertainties in plant-specific data using a simple but typical nuclear power reactor example

  2. Study of DNA damage with a new system for irradiation of samples in a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: mrgual@instec.c [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, InSTEC, Avenida Salvador Allende y Luaces, Quinta de Los Molinos, Plaza de la Revolucion, Havana, AP 6163 (Cuba); Milian, Felix M. [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, UESC (Brazil); Deppman, Airton [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Sao Paulo, IF-USP, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, no. 187, Ciudade Universitaria, Butanta, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Coelho, Paulo R.P. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN-CNEN/SP (Brazil)

    2011-02-15

    In this paper, we report results of a quantitative analysis of the effects of neutrons on DNA, and, specifically, the production of simple and double breaks of plasmid DNA in aqueous solutions with different concentrations of free-radical scavengers. The radiation damage to DNA was evaluated by electrophoresis through agarose gels. The neutron and gamma doses were measured separately with thermoluminescent detectors. In this work, we have also demonstrated usefulness of a new system for positioning and removing samples in channel BH3 of the IEA-R1 reactor at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (Brazil) without necessity of interrupting the reactor operation.

  3. Equipment for testing a group of nuclear reactor fuel elements for damage to the cans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohm, F.

    1977-01-01

    Equipment is described for use in sodium cooled nuclear reactors, with which the fuel elements consisting of bundles of fuel and fertile rods can be examined for damage to the cans. Fission poducts occurring in the liquid coolant act as indicators. The coolant is sucked via pipelines which penetrate into the elements into a collecting container, and a special pipeline is available for every element of a group, where the highest points of individual pipelines at different hydrostatic heads are taken to the collecting container. This permits the checking of one line at a time due to pressure changes. (UWI) [de

  4. Accident prevention and security measures to prevent intentional harm and damage through nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauschning, D.

    1984-01-01

    The author explains the authorities' duty to provide for protection against intentional damage or physical harm through the use of nuclear energy. It belongs to the competence of the various authorities to define ways and means to afford protection, and to establish an appropriate network of provisions. There are provisions belonging to criminal law, those concerning liability and indemnity, and security regulations incorporated in the law on licensing and supervision. The author presents a detailed account of the law applicable and discusses the conflict of interests between governmental duties and intentions and the civil rights of the individual affected by the provisions. (HSCH) [de

  5. Status of Iran's nuclear program and negotiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, David [President, Institute for Science and International Security (ISIS), 236 Massachusetts Avenue, NE 305, Washington, DC 20002 (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Iran's nuclear program poses immense challenges to international security. Its gas centrifuge program has grown dramatically in the last several years, bringing Iran close to a point where it could produce highly enriched uranium in secret or declared gas centrifuge plants before its breakout would be discovered and stopped. To reduce the risk posed by Iran's nuclear program, the P5+1 have negotiated with Iran short term limits on the most dangerous aspects of its nuclear programs and is negotiating long-term arrangements that can provide assurance that Iran will not build nuclear weapons. These long-term arrangements need to include a far more limited and transparent Iranian nuclear program. In advance of arriving at a long-term arrangement, the IAEA will need to resolve its concerns about the alleged past and possibly on-going military dimensions of Iran's nuclear program.

  6. Nuclear and radiochemistry in China. Present status and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, W.Q.; Zhao, Y.L.; Chai, Z.F.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear and radiochemistry is one of the frontier areas of chemistry with high impact on national security, energy supply, scientific advances, social and economic development. Nuclear and radiochemistry in China is now experiencing a renaissance, which is being strongly motivated by China's huge demand for nuclear energy. With this in review, the progress in nuclear and radiochemistry of China is selectively addressed. Some hot topics have been summarized and the main research results achieved by Chinese scientists in this field are highlighted, with emphasis on the basic nuclear chemistry, actinide and trans-actinide chemistry, chemistry of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, radioanalytical chemistry, environmental radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry, etc. Some measures about how to promote the radiochemical education and research in China are suggested, and future perspectives are briefly outlined as well. (orig.)

  7. Current Status of World Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology (II): Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Ko, Won Il

    2007-06-01

    Japan needs to import around 80% of its energy requirements. In 1966, the first nuclear power plant began operation, nuclear energy has been a national strategic priority since 1973. Currently, 55 reactors provide around 30% of the country's electricity. Japanese energy policy has been conducted by the energy security and minimization of dependence of energy imports. The main factors regarding nuclear power are: - Continue to have nuclear power as a main factor of electricity production. - Recycle uranium and plutonium, and start domestic reprocessing from 2005. - Continue to develop fast breeder reactors to increase uranium utilization. - Promote the nuclear transparency to the public, emphasizing safety and non-proliferation. Also, the prospects of Asia's nuclear energy growth has been reviewed

  8. China's nuclear power policy and the present development status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingfan, L.

    1998-01-01

    Experience acquired in China 's nuclear power development has proven that it is very important to strengthen exchange in nuclear science and technology, and further to share and to introduce techniques, funds, management experience and experts from abroad. China will continue to keep and to extend international cooperation in the nuclear field on basis of equality and mutual benefit to make a great contribution to the world's peace and economic prosperity. (N.C.)

  9. Nuclear engineering education in the United States: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Spinrad, B.I.

    1986-01-01

    The executive summary of the White Paper entitled The Revitalization of Nuclear Energy Education in the United States is the major component of this paper. The White Paper was completed under the auspices of the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO). The presentation highlights events and program changes that have occurred in 1985-1986 following publication of the NEDHO White Paper. Many of these events provide optimism for the revitalization of nuclear engineering education

  10. Present status of nuclear fusion research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discussions are included on the following topics: (1) plasma confinement theoretical research, (2) torus plasma research, (3) plasma measurement research, (4) technical development of equipment, (5) plasma heating, (6) vacuum wall surface phenomena, (7) critical plasma test equipment design, (8) noncircular cross-sectional torus test equipment design, (9) nuclear fusion reactor design, (10) nuclear fusion reactor engineering, (11) summary of nuclear fusion research in foreign countries, and (12) long range plan in Japan

  11. Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Norway: Status and Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Peter; Larsen, Erlend

    2014-01-01

    Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) in Norway has arisen from irradiation of fuel in the JEEP I and JEEP II reactors at Kjeller, and in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) in Halden. In total there are some 16 tonnes of SNF, all of which is currently stored on-site, in either wet or dry storage facilities. The greater part of the SNF, 12 tonnes, consists of aluminium-clad fuel, of which 10 tonnes is metallic uranium fuel and the remainder oxide (UO 2 ). Such fuel presents significant challenges with respect to long-term storage and disposal. Current policy is that existing spent fuel will, as far as possible considering its suitability for later direct disposal, be stored until final disposal is possible. Several committees have advised the Government of Norway on, among others, policy issues, storage methods and localisation of a storage facility. Both experts and stakeholders have participated in these committees. This paper presents an overview of the spent fuel in Norway and a description of current storage arrangements. The prospects for long-term storage are then described, including a summary of recommendations made to government, the reactions of various stakeholders to these recommendations, the current status, and the proposed next steps. A recommended policy is to construct a new storage facility for the fuel to be stored for a period of at least 50 years. In the meantime a national final disposal facility should be constructed and taken into operation. It has been recommended that the aluminium-clad fuel be reprocessed in an overseas commercial facility to produce a stable waste form for storage and disposal. This recommendation is controversial, and a decision has not yet been taken on whether to pursue this option. An analysis of available storage concepts for the more modern fuel types resulted in the recommendation to use dual-purpose casks. In addition, it was recommended to construct a future storage facility in a rock hall instead of a free

  12. Analysis of simulation results of damaged nuclear fuel accidents at NPPs with shell-type nuclear reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor L. Kozlov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lessons from the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP made it necessary to reevaluate and intensificate the work on modeling and analyzing various scenarios of severe accidents with damage to the nuclear fuel in the reactor, containment and spent nuclear fuel storage pool with the expansion of the primary initiating event causes group listing. Further development of computational tools for modeling the explosion prevention criteria as to steam and gas mixtures, considering the specific thermal-hydrodynamic conditions and mechanisms of explosive situations arrival at different stages of a severe accident development, is substantiated. Based on the analysis of the known shell-type nuclear reactors accidents results the explosion safety thermodynamic criteria are presented, the parameters defining the steam and gas explosions conditions are found, the need to perform the further verification and validation of deterministic codes serving to simulate general accident processes behavior as well as phase-to-phase interaction calculated dependencies is established. The main parameters controlling and defining the criteria explosion safety effective regulation areas and their optimization conditions are found.

  13. Notes on third party liability for nuclear damage in connection with the construction of the first nuclear power plant in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoes, A.C.

    1975-01-01

    Responsibilities for the construction and operation of the first nuclear power plant have been transferred from the National Nuclear Energy Commission to Electrobras, a public undertaking set up for this purpose. In view of such transfer of responsibilities and the implementation of further nuclear power projects, liability for nuclear damage has to be regulated in a way consistent with international conventions. A working group associating representatives of national authorities and public utilities was entrusted with the task of drafting rules for co-ordinating their respective activities in relation to the execution of the first nuclear power project; these rules were issued by Ministerial order in 1970. The working group also prepared a draft law on civil liability for nuclear damage, based on the Vienna Convention. This draft law has reached its final stage and, after promulgation, will enable Brazil to ratify the Vienna Convention. (author)

  14. International nuclear power status 2000; International kernekraftstatus 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L. [eds.

    2001-03-01

    This report is the seventh in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2000, the report contains: 1. General trends in the development of nuclear power. 2. Deposition of low-level radioactive waste. 3. Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 1999). 4. An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2000. 5. The development in Sweden. 6. The development in Eastern Europe. 7. The development in the rest of the world. 8. Trends in the development of reactor types. 9. Trends in the development of the nuclear fuel cycle. (au)

  15. Current Status and Future Prospects for Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhn, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    In the past 50 years, nuclear power has grown from a new scientific development to become a major part of the energy mix in over 30 countries. In 1998, 434 power reactors worldwide produced 2294 billion kWh of electricity, slightly up on 1997 output. Sixteen countries relied on nuclear power for 25 percent or more of their electricity. Accumulated operating experience for nuclear power plants reached over 9,000 reactor-years. In 1998, 36 nuclear power plants were under construction: 14 in Eastern Europe, 12 in the Fat East; 7 in the Middle East and South Asia, 2 in Latin America, 1 in stern Europe (France)

  16. Nuclear power in Russia: Status and developments trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grarinski, A. Yu.

    1994-01-01

    27 June 1954 saw the birth of nuclear power in the Soviet Union when a 5 MWe plant went into operation. The second reference point falls on 26 April 1986. Since then the fate of nuclear energy in the Soviet Union has been transformed once again: ft is now clear the Chernobyl did not entirely bury the notion of building nuclear p0wer stations. There are even signs that the leaders of the new states, as well as the general public, are beginning to see some of benefits of continuing with nuclear power programmes

  17. Status, plans, and capabilities of the Nuclear Criticality Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B.L.

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS), in preparation since 1981, has substantially evolved and now contains a growing number of resources pertinent to nuclear criticality safety. These resources include bibliographic compilations, experimental data, communications media, and the International Directory of Nuclear Criticality Safety Personnel. These resources are part of the LLNL Technology Information System (TIS) which provides the host computer for NCIS. The TIS provides nationwide access to authorized members of the nuclear criticality community via interactive dial-up from computer terminals that utilize communication facilities such as commercial and federal telephone networks, toll-free WATS lines, TYMNET, and the ARPANET/MILNET computer network

  18. Nuclear power: status, outlook, guarantees of sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkasov, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The principal advantages of nuclear power - almost unlimited fuel resources, its high energy capacity, ecological compatibility with a possibility of high wastes concentration - determine the large-scale nuclear power development. The signs of large-scale power - a large rate (dozens of percent) in electricity production, diverse areas (electricity, heat supply, technologies, transport) and media of application (land, ocean, space), extension of number of user countries, diversified power systems (centralized, autonomous), obligatory reproduction and reuse of produced fuel - create various requirements to nuclear power installations of the future. Economic efficiency and competitiveness, safety (of reactors and fuel cycle with waste), proper characteristics of nuclear fuel reproduction, guarantees of nuclear arm's non-proliferation and, particularly, public acceptance are the conditions of such nuclear power development. The up-to-date situation is the following: the 441 nuclear power-generation units with total installed power of 377.36 GW el. (in 31 countries) supply by 1/6 part of the world electric-power consumptions. The 32 units are in stage of the construction. To the present mid-century the level of the nuclear power production, as supposed, must be increased 4-5 times at the following scenario of a regional distribution of nuclear electric powers, GW: USA, Europe and developed countries of Eastern Asia - 1000, FSU-countries - 100 and developing countries - 400

  19. Status and future plan of nuclear data activities in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Soo-Youl; Chang, Jonghwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    It was reviewed the nuclear data related activities in Korea, and was explained a 15-year term nation-wide R and D project that had been launched at 1996. The experiences up to now show, as a whole, that the nuclear data field in Korea is in the early stage. Through the long term project, however, it is expected that a firm foundation be established. Then it would be possible to contribute actively to the international nuclear data community as well as to meet domestic requests for nuclear data. Also it was pointed out the necessity of the international collaboration such as consultings and co-works. (author)

  20. Oxidative damage of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA induced by ionizing radiation in human hepatoblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, Albert; Miranda, Merce; Sanchez-Reyes, Alberto; Biete, Alberto; Fernandez-Checa, Jose C.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as mediators of radiation-induced cellular damage, the aim of our studies was to determine the effects of ionizing radiation on the regulation of hepatocellular reduced glutathione (GSH), survival and integrity of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in human hepatoblastoma cells (Hep G2) depleted of GSH prior to radiation. Methods and Materials: GSH, oxidized glutathione (GSSG), and generation of ROS were determined in irradiated (50-500 cGy) Hep G2 cells. Clonogenic survival, nuclear DNA fragmentation, and integrity of mtDNA were assessed in cells depleted of GSH prior to radiation. Results: Radiation of Hep G2 cells (50-400 cGy) resulted in a dose-dependent generation of ROS, an effect accompanied by a decrease of reduced GSH, ranging from a 15% decrease for 50 cGy to a 25% decrease for 400 cGy and decreased GSH/GSSG from a ratio of 17 to a ratio of 7 for controls and from 16 to 6 for diethyl maleate (DEM)-treated cells. Depletion of GSH prior to radiation accentuated the increase of ROS by 40-50%. The depletion of GSH by radiation was apparent in different subcellular sites, being particularly significant in mitochondria. Furthermore, depletion of nuclear GSH to 50-60% of initial values prior to irradiation (400 cGy) resulted in DNA fragmentation and apoptosis. Consequently, the survival of Hep G2 to radiation was reduced from 25% of cells not depleted of GSH to 10% of GSH-depleted cells. Fitting the survival rate of cells as a function of GSH using a theoretical model confirmed cellular GSH as a key factor in determining intrinsic sensitivity of Hep G2 cells to radiation. mtDNA displayed an increased susceptibility to the radiation-induced loss of integrity compared to nuclear DNA, an effect that was potentiated by GSH depletion in mitochondria (10-15% intact mtDNA in GSH-depleted cells vs. 25-30% of repleted cells). Conclusion: GSH plays a critical protective role in maintaining nuclear and mtDNA functional

  1. Status and prospects of nuclear energy development in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Vuong Huu

    2006-01-01

    In Vietnam, nuclear energy has been used in non-power applications for more than 80 years. Health care is a field of the most popular applications of nuclear energy. Every year, hundreds of thousands of people have been diagnosed and treated using nuclear technologies such as radiotherapy, nuclear medicine. In agricultural sector, radiation mutation breeding techniques have been used successfully in creating high quality varieties of rice, soybean, and have made an active contribution in the food security program of the country. The radiation technology has been applied in preservation and pasteurization of some kinds of food, and in production of bio-promoters, hydro gels, etc. The nuclear techniques such as NDT, NCS, and TRACER have been applied in various industries, geology, environment, etc. Recently, the TRACER technique has been used in the management and exploitation of groundwater in Hochiminh City and the Capital of Hanoi. However, effectiveness and scale of non-power applications of nuclear energy is still moderated, does not meet the potential and demand. The studies of nuclear power introduction to Vietnam been carried out for many years and show its necessity and feasibility for the country. Awareness of the advantages of nuclear energy utilization, the Vietnam Government assigned the Ministry of Science and Technology to formulate the long-term strategy for peaceful utilization of nuclear energy in co-operation with other governmental agencies. On 3rd of January 2006, the Prime Minister has approved the long-term strategy for peaceful utilization of nuclear energy. The goal of the strategy is to set up and develop a nuclear technology industry with high contribution to the socio-economic development as well as the enhancement of the science and technology capability of the country. In order to implement the strategy, main solutions have been proposed: Strengthening and perfecting the organizational and management system; Formulation of nuclear legal

  2. Status and prospects of nuclear energy development in Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Vuong Huu [Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2006-04-15

    In Vietnam, nuclear energy has been used in non-power applications for more than 80 years. Health care is a field of the most popular applications of nuclear energy. Every year, hundreds of thousands of people have been diagnosed and treated using nuclear technologies such as radiotherapy, nuclear medicine. In agricultural sector, radiation mutation breeding techniques have been used successfully in creating high quality varieties of rice, soybean, and have made an active contribution in the food security program of the country. The radiation technology has been applied in preservation and pasteurization of some kinds of food, and in production of bio-promoters, hydro gels, etc. The nuclear techniques such as NDT, NCS, and TRACER have been applied in various industries, geology, environment, etc. Recently, the TRACER technique has been used in the management and exploitation of groundwater in Hochiminh City and the Capital of Hanoi. However, effectiveness and scale of non-power applications of nuclear energy is still moderated, does not meet the potential and demand. The studies of nuclear power introduction to Vietnam been carried out for many years and show its necessity and feasibility for the country. Awareness of the advantages of nuclear energy utilization, the Vietnam Government assigned the Ministry of Science and Technology to formulate the long-term strategy for peaceful utilization of nuclear energy in co-operation with other governmental agencies. On 3rd of January 2006, the Prime Minister has approved the long-term strategy for peaceful utilization of nuclear energy. The goal of the strategy is to set up and develop a nuclear technology industry with high contribution to the socio-economic development as well as the enhancement of the science and technology capability of the country. In order to implement the strategy, main solutions have been proposed: Strengthening and perfecting the organizational and management system; Formulation of nuclear legal

  3. Contribution of intestinal barrier damage, microbial translocation and HIV-1 infection status to an inflammaging signature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K Steele

    Full Text Available Systemic inflammation is a characteristic of both HIV-1 infection and aging ("inflammaging". Intestinal epithelial barrier damage (IEBD and microbial translocation (MT contribute to HIV-associated inflammation, but their impact on inflammaging remains unclear.Plasma biomarkers for IEBD (iFABP, MT (LPS, sCD14, T-cell activation (sCD27, and inflammation (hsCRP, IL-6 were measured in 88 HIV-1 uninfected (HIV(neg and 83 treated, HIV-1-infected (HIV(pos adults from 20-100 years old.Age positively correlated with iFABP (r = 0.284, p = 0.008, sCD14 (r = 0.646, p = <0.0001 and LPS (r = 0.421, p = 0.0002 levels in HIV(neg but not HIV(pos subjects. Age also correlated with sCD27, hsCRP, and IL-6 levels regardless of HIV status. Middle-aged HIV(pos subjects had elevated plasma biomarker levels similar to or greater than those of elderly HIV(neg subjects with the exception of sCD14. Clustering analysis described an inflammaging phenotype (IP based on iFABP, sCD14, sCD27, and hsCRP levels in HIV(neg subjects over 60 years of age. The IP in HIV(neg subjects was used to develop a classification model that was applied to HIV(pos subjects to determine whether HIV(pos subjects under 60 years of age were IP+. HIV(pos IP+ subjects were similar in age to IP- subjects but had a greater risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD based on Framingham risk score (p =  0.01.We describe a novel IP that incorporates biomarkers of IEBD, MT, immune activation as well as inflammation. Application of this novel IP in HIV-infected subjects identified a group at higher risk of CVD.

  4. Oxidative stress evoked damages on rat sperm and attenuated antioxidant status on consumption of aspartame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, I; Poornima, P S; Wankhar, D; Ravindran, R; Sheeladevi, R

    2017-07-01

    Although several studies on toxic effect of aspartame metabolite have been studied, controversial reports over the use of aspartame owing to the fact that it releases methanol as one of its metabolite during metabolism exist. This present study is proposed to investigate whether aspartame (40 mg kg -1 b.wt) administration for 90 days could induce oxidative stress and alter antioxidant status of epididymal sperm in Wistar strain male albino rats. To mimic the human methanol metabolism, methotrexate (MTX)-treated rats were included to study the effects of aspartame. Oral intubations of FDA approved 40 mg kg -1 b.wt aspartame were given daily for 90 days to Wistar strain male albino rats and studied along with controls and MTX-treated controls. Sperm count, viability, morphology, morphometry and motility were assessed. A significant decrease in sperm function of aspartame treated animals was observed when compared with the control and MTX control. The free radical generation were observed in epididymal sperm by assessing the scavenging enzymes, enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Result suggest that there was a significant increase glutathione-s-transferase (GST), with a significant decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), glutathione peroxidase levels (GPx), catalase activity (CAT) and glutathione reductase concentration. The increase in free radicals generation could have ultimately caused the lipid peroxidation mediated damages on the testis. Aspartame treated animals also revealed the reduced space in seminiferous tubules, which resulted in reduced Leydig cells when compared with control in histopathology. These findings demonstrate that aspartame metabolites could be a contributing factor for development of oxidative stress in the epididymal sperm.

  5. The regulation for enforcing the law concerning indemnification of nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    These provisions are established on the basis of and to enforce the ''Law concerning the indemnification of nuclear damage''. Atomic energy enterprises who want to get the approval in connection with the Law shall file the applications to the Director General of Science and Technology Agency, in which the name and the address of the applicant, kinds of the operation of nuclear reactors, the name and the address of the factory or the establishment concerning the operation of nuclear reactors, the thermal output of the reactors, the kinds and quantities of nuclear fuel materials or the things contaminated by such materials to be transported, and the time of starting and the expected time of ending the operation of the reactors, etc. To such applications, shall be attached actually surveyed maps indicating the area of the factory or the establishment concerning the operation of the reactors and the documents certifying the conclusion of obligatory insurances and indemnification contracts, etc. The securities which can be deposited and recovering of such securities are prescribed. (Okada, K.)

  6. Application status of on-line nuclear techniques in analysis of coal quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Shaohui

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear techniques are favourable for continuous on-line analysis, because they are fast, non-intrusive. They can be used in the adverse circumstances in coal industry. The paper reviews the application status of on-line nuclear techniques in analysis of coal quality and economic benefits derived from such techniques in developed countries

  7. Nuclear power plant control and instrumentation in the Netherlands: Status and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plas, Y. van der

    1992-01-01

    This article has been prepared for the regular IAEA/IWG-NPPCI-meeting in May 1991. It provides an outline of the status of and prospects for nuclear energy in the Netherlands and a brief description of topics given specific attention by the authorities. It also gives an overview of recent developments and aims related to I and C in nuclear power stations. (author)

  8. The status of nuclear safety of Ukrainian NPPS and evaluations by ASSET methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koltakov, V [State Scientific and Technical Center on Nuclear and Radiational Safety, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-10-01

    The presentation discusses the following issues: nuclear power plants and research reactors; electricity production and operating personnel; status of nuclear safety at NPPs of Ukraine; operation of Ukrainian NPPs; violations of NPPs operation; short review of ASSET missions; experience of feedback process. Figs, tabs.

  9. The status of nuclear safety of Ukrainian NPPS and evaluations by ASSET methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koltakov, V.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation discusses the following issues: nuclear power plants and research reactors; electricity production and operating personnel; status of nuclear safety at NPPs of Ukraine; operation of Ukrainian NPPs; violations of NPPs operation; short review of ASSET missions; experience of feedback process. Figs, tabs

  10. US central station nuclear electric generating units: significant milestones (status as of July 1, 1980)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The status of 189 US nuclear power plants is reported in a table which gives the name, owner, capacity, type, NSSS architect and contractor and data of public announcement, NSSS order, licensing, and initial operation. The plants are also indexed according to state, region, utility, and alphabetical name. The utility nuclear steam supply system orders are also listed

  11. Present status and problems of nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    The nuclear power generation in Japan began in 1963 with the successful power generation in the JPDR of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and since then, more than 20 years have elapsed. The Japan Atomic Power Co. started the operation of an imported Calder Hall type gas-cooled reactor with 166,000 kWe output in Tokai Nuclear Power Station in July, 1966. In 1983, the quantity of nuclear power generation was 113.1 billion kWh, which was equivalent to 21.4 % of the total power generation in Japan. As of April 1, 1984, 25 nuclear power plants with 18.28 million kW output were in operation, 12 plants of 11.8 million kW were under construction, and 7 plants of 6.05 million kW were in preparation phase. Besides, the ATR ''Fugen'' with 165,000 kW output has been in operation, and the FBR ''Monju'' with 280,000 kW output is under construction. The capacity ratio of Japanese nuclear power stations attained 71.5 % in 1983. According to the ''Long term energy demand and supply outlook'' revised in November, 1983, the nuclear power generation in 2000 will be about 62 million kW to cater for about 16 % of primary energy supply. The problems are the improvement of economy, the establishment of independent nuclear fuel cycle, the decommissioning of nuclear reactors and so on. (Kako, I.)

  12. Status of nuclear power in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linhart, Z.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation by the CEZ Executive Director for Nuclear Power concentrates on the following topics: (i) Current situation in the Czech electricity market; (ii) CEZ Group; (iii) Development of the Nuclear Power Division; (iv) Modernisation of the Dukovany and Temelin NPPs; and (v) Efficiency enhancement. The document contains many detailed figures and graphs. (P.A.)

  13. Nuclear power - status and development 1986/87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingjaerde, R.O.

    1987-10-01

    A review og the present global position of nuclear power is given. Topics as nuclear power in developing countries, operation experience for the Super Phenix reactor, and the long-term consequences of the Chernobyl reactor accident are briefly dealt with

  14. Present status and future development of Qinshan nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Yu

    1987-01-01

    Qinshan 300 MWe Nuclear power Project is the first domestically designed and constructed nuclear power plant in China. Here is a brief description of its progress in design work, equipment manufacture and site construction since the first structural concrete in March 1985. In Qinshan area four units of 600 MWe each are planned to be built with collaboration of proper foreign partners. (author)

  15. Nuclear heat applications in Russia: Experience, status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitenkov, F.M.; Kusmartsev, E.V.

    1998-01-01

    The extensive experience gained with nuclear district heating in Russia is described. Most of the WWER reactors in Russia are cogeneration plants. Steam is extracted through LP turbine bleeders and condensed in intermediate heat exchangers to hot water which is then supplied to DH grids. Also some small dedicated nuclear heating plants are operated. (author)

  16. The past and the present status of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, C.S.

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of nuclear medicine in Korea such as a short history, personnels and medical establishments of using radioisotopes, the trend and pattern of radioisotopes usage, amount of medically applying radioisotopes, and the amount of home production of primary radioisotopes and labelled compounds in Korea are summarized as well as an introduction of research activities of the Korean Society of Nuclear Medicine. (Author)

  17. Status of nuclear power programs in South America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitalnik, J.

    2010-10-01

    Analysis of nuclear power plants construction in four South American countries - Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Uruguay - is made based on programs set up by government specialized agencies. In Argentina, in a time-span up to 2023, the nuclear power program considers a five-fold increase of the current installed capacity reaching some 5,000 M We. The Brazilian reference scenario will install additional 4,000 M We, up to 2030, to reach a total installed capacity of about 6,000 M We. Other scenarios could bring this total to some 8,000 - 10,000 M We. Chile and Uruguay have started strategic studies to place the nuclear power option in the future energy matrix of the country. The government of Chile set up, in 2007, a Task Group to determine whether nuclear power could be considered a viable option. This Group concluded that nuclear power is a mature, safe competitive, and low carbon emitter technology that could be considered a viable option. A Nuclear Advisory Group was created who made studies to install a nuclear power plant in the 2016-2021 time-span. In December 2008, the Uruguayan Government created a high level Working Group to establish the feasibility conditions for Nuclear Power Generation in the country. (Author)

  18. Status of higher education in nuclear technology in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.

    2007-01-01

    To harness the benefits of nuclear energy and the applications of radiation and radionuclides in various disciplines, a broad and deeply rooted nuclear education is essential. To cater to its needs, the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has established training institutes/centres of higher education. This paper briefly describes the programmes offered by these institutes/centres. (author)

  19. Act No 6453 of 17th October, 1977 on civil liability for nuclear damage and criminal responsibility for acts relating to nuclear activities, and other provisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This Act was published on 17 October 1977. It is based to a great extent on the provisions of the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nucler Damage of 21 May 1963. Under the Act the operator of a nuclear installation is exclusively liable regardless of fault for compensation of nuclear damage due to a nuclear incident. This exclusive liability is limited to an amount equal to 1,500,000 Treasury Bonds and the operator must take out and maintain insurance or other financial security to cover his liability. The Federative Government will guarantee, up to the prescribed limit, payment of compensation for nuclear damage where it is acknowledged that the operator's liability is involved. As regards apportionment of compensation, persons are granted priority over property. This Act is original in that it contains provisions on criminal liability with penalties ranging from two to ten years imprisonment. (NEA) [fr

  20. Questions raised by the concept of nuclear damage in the ambit of the nuclear Conventions with particular regard to the German viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinkemper, H.

    1985-01-01

    An important consequence of the amendment of the Paris Convention and the Brussels Supplementary Convention by the Protocols of 16 November 1982 is the replacement of the European Monetary Agreement unit of account by the International Monetary Fund's Special Drawing Right. The increase by a factor of 2.5 of the maximum amounts under the Brussels Convention is also an essential aspect of the revision. The question of damage covered by the nuclear third party liability regime was not affected by the 1982 amendments. This is why the author considers it appropriate to examine in further detail a number of important questions in this field. The paper deals with the following aspects: the scope and limits of the concept of nuclear damage; the right to be indemnified for disamenities and costs arising from evacuation and prevention measures; and the problem of the nuclear link of causality for damage likely to be attributed also to non-nuclear causes. (NEA) [fr

  1. Current Status of The Korean Society of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Chang Soon

    1977-01-01

    As the application of nuclear medicine to clinics became generalized and it held an important position, the Korean Society of Nuclear Medicine was founded in 1961, and today it has become known as one of the oldest nuclear medicine societies not only to Asian nations but also to other advanced countries all over the world. Now it has 100 or so regular members composed of students of each medicine filed unlike other medical societies. Only nuclear medicine research workers are eligible for its membership. The Korean Society of Nuclear Medicine holds its regular general meeting and symposium twice per annom respectively in addition to occasional group gatherings and provincial lectures on nuclear medicine. With an eye to exchanging information on symposium, research and know-how, KSNM issued its initial magazine in 1967. Every year two editions are published. Year after year the contents of treatises are getting elevated with researches on each field including the early study on morphology-greatly improved both in quality and quantity. Of late, a minute and fixed quantity of various matters by dynamical research and radioimmunoassay of every kind has become visibly active. In particular, since KSNM, unlike other local societies, keeps close and frequent contact with the nuclear medicine researchers of world-wide fame, monographs by eminent scholars of the world are carried in its magazine now internationally and well received in foreign countries. Now the magazine has been improved to such an extent that foreign authors quote its contents. KSNM invited many a foreign scholar with a view to exchanging the knowledge of nuclear medicine. Sponsored by nuclear energy institute, the nuclear medicine symposium held in Seoul in October of 1966 was a success with Dr. Wagner participating, a great scholar of world wide fame: It was the first international symposium ever held in Korea, and the Korea Japan symposium held in Seoul 1971 was attended by all distinguished nuclear

  2. Nuclear merchant ship propulsion. The present status in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsey, R.P.

    1976-01-01

    The latest report of the Nuclear Ship Stearing Group which deals with three important aspects; economic assessments, international safety and operating procedures for nuclear ships, and the industrial capability of the UK shipbuilding and nuclear industries, is discussed. The integral design concept for a pressurised water reactor for use as a marine reactor is considered. The operational safety aspects of such reactors and of the attendant refuelling facilities are discussed. U.K. capability in the whole nuclear merchant ship propulsion project is considered; reference being made to the design and construction of small PWR reactors, the development, design and supply of the nuclear propulsion unit, financial aspects, and the requirement for cooperation between industrial interests and governmental research units. (U.K.)

  3. Nuclear research centres in Pakistan: Status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, K.M.; Khan, H.A.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear research centres (NRCs) played an important role in the introduction of nuclear techniques in their respective countries. These centres are now faced with changes in public and government attitudes, pressures from anti-nuclear groups, competition from non-nuclear technologies, budget cuts and privatization, etc. These NRCs are still making useful contribution in the field of science and technology but need to change their strategy to operate under these pressures. The Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH) has a record of 34 years of successful operation. Salient features and achievements of this Institute are presented as a model for a research centre in a developing country. The elements that are contributed for the success are described. The IAEA and other cooperative agencies can help to overcome the negative factors posed to these NRCs. (author)

  4. Global status of nuclear power and the needed human resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernido, Corazon C.

    2009-01-01

    According to projections of the OECD/IEA, the world energy demand will expand by 45% from now until 2030, with coal accounting for more than a third of the overall rise. To reduce greenhouse gases and mitigate climate change, many countries are resorting to renewables and nuclear power. Some statistics about nuclear energy in the global energy mix and about nuclear power plants worldwide, as well as the energy situation in the country are presented. According to sources from the Department of Energy on the Philippine Energy Plan, nuclear power is a long-term energy option and will likely enter the energy mix by 2025. Preparation of the infrastructure for nuclear power has to start ten to fifteen years before the first plant comes online. The needed human resources, the education and training required are present. (Author)

  5. Status of CONRAD, a nuclear reaction analysis tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint Jean, C. de; Habert, B.; Litaize, O.; Noguere, G.; Suteau, C.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a software tool (CONRAD) was initiated at CEA/Cadarache to give answers to various problems arising in the data analysis of nuclear reactions. This tool is then characterized by the handling of uncertainties from experimental values to covariance matrices for multi-group cross sections. An object oriented design was chosen allowing an easy interface with graphical tool for input/output data and being a natural framework for innovative nuclear models (Fission). The major achieved developments are a data model for describing channels, nuclear reactions, nuclear models and processes with interface to classical data formats, theoretical calculations for the resolved resonance range (Reich-Moore) and unresolved resonance range (Hauser-Feshbach, Gilbert-Cameron,...) with nuclear model parameters adjustment on experimental data sets and a Monte Carlo method based on conditional probabilities developed to calculate properly covariance matrices. The on-going developments deal with the experimental data description (covariance matrices) and the graphical user interface. (authors)

  6. The status and future development of nuclear power in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoda, A.Y.

    1987-01-01

    As a result of its high dependence on imports in the energy supply sector, Japan has embarked on an extensive nuclear power program, which covers the whole nuclear fuel cycle and the construction of nuclear power plants. In 1985, 32 nuclear generating units with an aggregate power of 24.500 MW were in operation; this amounts to well over a quarter of the total generating capacity installed in Japan. Another ten units with an aggregate approx. 10,000 MW are under construction and six units with 6300 MW are being prepared for construction. After the completion of this phase of the program in 1995, the nuclear generating capacity is to be stepped up year by year by an aggregate 1500 to 2500 MW, for the time being. (orig.) [de

  7. Present status and prospects of nuclear power programme in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan-yong Chon; Byong-whi Lee; Chang-kun Lee

    1987-01-01

    The republic of Korea has made dramatic progress in her economic growth in the last twenty-five years, which had to be supported by annual power increase of typically fifteen (15) percent. The limited domestic energy resources available and also the bitter experience of two oil crises made it necessary that the nation pursue its national nuclear power projects vigourously. Throughout the project execution, however, problems related to nuclear safety have been given the top priority. In the forthcoming KNU Nos. 11 and 12 projects, steadily growing domestic nuclear industries will play major roles in plant design, construction, standardization, and technological self-independence. By the year 2001, the total number of nuclear power plants may reach fourteen, while construction of additional small nuclear power plants for combined cycle district heating may become a reality. Preparation for full-fledged fuel cycle is also underway and necessary amendment to the existing Atomic Energy Act has been enacted. (author)

  8. The nuclear power program in CIS-countries, status and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagarinski, A.Yu.

    1995-01-01

    The status and prospects of nuclear power development in the newly-independent state in the territory of the former Soviet Union are considered. The prerequisites as well as the scientific - technical and industrial basis for the implementation of the national nuclear programs - technical and industrial basis for the implementation of the national nuclear programs are discussed. The tendencies in development of a new generation of advanced reactors are described. (author)

  9. Nuclear electricity in the U.S.A. - A status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenstein, W B [American Nuclear Society, Hinsdale, IL (United States)

    1990-06-01

    The status of nuclear electricity programs in the USA is reviewed. About 20% of the electricity in the USA comes from nuclear generating stations. The potential impact of greenhouse concerns is prominent in plans for the future. Advanced reactor programs for water, liquid metal and gas cooled systems is reviewed. Safety and plant economics feature prominently in future considerations. The increasing average availability of nuclear stations in the USA provides some insights on lessons to be learned for the future. (author)

  10. Nuclear electricity in the U.S.A. - A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenstein, W.B.

    1990-01-01

    The status of nuclear electricity programs in the USA is reviewed. About 20% of the electricity in the USA comes from nuclear generating stations. The potential impact of greenhouse concerns is prominent in plans for the future. Advanced reactor programs for water, liquid metal and gas cooled systems is reviewed. Safety and plant economics feature prominently in future considerations. The increasing average availability of nuclear stations in the USA provides some insights on lessons to be learned for the future. (author)

  11. Economic impacts of electricity liberalization on the status of nuclear power generation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Toru

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the economic impact of electricity liberalization on the status of nuclear power generation in the United States. Nuclear power plants have been treated equally with other types of power plants in the liberalized electricity market. The existing nuclear power plants were thought to be competitive in liberalized wholesale electricity market. Competitive pressure from the market also facilitated efficiency improvement among the existing nuclear power plants. Although it was difficult to build new reactor, the U.S. nuclear power generators expanded capacity through up rates. In recent years, however, nuclear power plants suffer from the decline in wholesale power prices and some of them are forced to retire early. Although there are some market design issues that could be improved to maintain the efficient nuclear power plants in competitive environment, it is now argued that some additional arrangements to mitigate the investment risks of the nuclear power plants are necessary. (author)

  12. Probabilistic analysis of turbine missile damage to nuclear power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twisdale, L.A.; Dunn, W.L.; Frank, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the EPRI project that focused on the development of the overall probabilistic methodology to assess the risks of turbine missile induced damage to nuclear power plant structures and components. The project was structured to use the results of other EPRI projects that provided information on turbine failure and missile generation frequencies, models to predict the characteristics and exit conditions of the missiles, and experimental data for use in updating empirical impact formulas for reinforced concrete barriers. The research effort included: (1) adaptation and implementation of the missile generation probability and turbine casing impact models developed in Ref. [2]; (2) development of a methodology for the prediction of the motion of the postulated missile fragments that perforate the turbine casing; (3) development of a model using the experimental impact data to predict the effects of fragment impact on nuclear power plant barriers and components; (4) construction of a probabilistic damage assessment methodology using Monte Carlo simulation methodology; and (5) implementation of the methodology into an independent computer program (TURMIS), demonstration of its application to an example case study problem, and assessment of prediction sensitivity. (orig./RW)

  13. The status of nuclear cooperation with Kola and Leningrad nuclear power plant; Status for atomsikkerhetssamarbeidet med Kola og Leningrad kjernekraftverk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    Norway has since 1993 participated in joint projects with Russia to improve nuclear safety at the Kola and Leningrad nuclear power plant. The project have been funded under the Government's nuclear action under the leadership of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) has completed most of the projects. NRPA is the authority responsible for assessing the implementation of the projects. (eb)

  14. Present status of maintenance in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueki, Kensuke

    1982-01-01

    For nuclear power stations, the improvement of the rate of facility utilization is indispensable. As its means, the shortening of regular inspection period, the adoption of long term cycle operation, the shortening of plant shutdown period by the improvement of the reliability of installed equipment and so on are conceivable. In this paper, the maintenance techniques in nuclear power stations which constitute the basis of reliability improvement are explained. In nuclear power stations, the use of nuclear fuel, accordingly the existence of radioactivity are the remarkable features. At the time of an accident, the nuclear reaction in a reactor must be stopped, and the excessive heat must be removed. The radioactivity in nuclear fuel must not be released outside. The regular inspection of once a year is provided by the law, and routine tests are performed during normal operation. The check-up by operators also is a part of the safety measures. For the early detection of abnormality, the diagnosis system is developed, and the maintenance techniques during operation are examined for being taken into the safety test and standard. The improvement of reliability is attempted by the redundancy of systems. The activity of quality assurance, the organization for the maintenance of nuclear power stations and maintenance works, and the measures to raise the rate of operation are reported. (Kako, I.)

  15. Present status of nuclear power safety studies in JAERI, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    Securing safety in the development and utilization of nuclear power is the prerequisite, and in order to maintain the safety of nuclear power facilities at level corresponding to the expansion and diversification of nuclear power development and utilization, it is necessary to promote the safety research. The reliable evaluation of environmental effect and the safe disposal of radioactive waste are the indispensable conditions. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has carried out the research on the engineering safety of nuclear reactors and nuclear fuel cycle facilities and the research on the environmental safety related to environmental radiation and the treatment and disposal of radioactive waste. In this book, the researches on the safety of reactor fuel, the reliability of reactor machinery and equipment and structures, the thermo-hydraulic behavior of reactors at the time of accidents, the behavior of reactors at the time of severe accidents, the analytical research on the safety of reactors, the researches on the safety of nuclear fuel cycle, the treatment and disposal of radioactive waste, the assessment and analysis of environmental radiation and radioactivity, and the individual researches related to nuclear power safety are reported. (K.I.)

  16. Seismic reevaluation of nuclear facilities worldwide: Overview and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, R.D.; Hardy, G.S.; Ravindra, M.K.; Johnson, J.J.; Hoy, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Existing nuclear facilities throughout the world are being subjected to severe scrutiny of their safety in tile event of an earthquake. In the United States, there have been several licensing and safety review issues for which industry and regulatory agencies have cooperated to develop rational and economically feasible criteria for resolving the issues. Currently, all operating nuclear power plants in the United States are conducting an Individual Plant Examination of External Events, including earthquakes beyond tile design basis. About two-thirds of tile operating plants are conducting parallel programs for verifying, tile seismic adequacy of equipment for the design basis earthquake. The U.S. Department of Energy is also beginning to perform detailed evaluations of their facilities, many of which had little or no seismic design. Western European countries also have been reevaluating their older nuclear power plants for seismic events often adapting the criteria developed in the United States. With the change in tile political systems in Eastern Europe, there is a strong emphasis from their Western European neighbors to evaluate and Upgrade tile safely of their operating nuclear power plants. Finally, nuclear facilities in Asia are, also, being evaluated for seismic vulnerabilities. This paper focuses oil tile methodologies that have been developed for reevaluation of existing nuclear power plants and presents examples of the application of these methodologies to nuclear facilities worldwide. (author)

  17. Seismic reevaluation of nuclear facilities worldwide: Overview and status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, R D; Hardy, G S; Ravindra, M K [EQE International, Irvine, CA (United States); Johnson, J J [EQE International, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hoy, A J [EQE International Ltd., Birchwood, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    1995-07-01

    Existing nuclear facilities throughout the world are being subjected to severe scrutiny of their safety in tile event of an earthquake. In the United States, there have been several licensing and safety review issues for which industry and regulatory agencies have cooperated to develop rational and economically feasible criteria for resolving the issues. Currently, all operating nuclear power plants in the United States are conducting an Individual Plant Examination of External Events, including earthquakes beyond tile design basis. About two-thirds of tile operating plants are conducting parallel programs for verifying, tile seismic adequacy of equipment for the design basis earthquake. The U.S. Department of Energy is also beginning to perform detailed evaluations of their facilities, many of which had little or no seismic design. Western European countries also have been reevaluating their older nuclear power plants for seismic events often adapting the criteria developed in the United States. With the change in tile political systems in Eastern Europe, there is a strong emphasis from their Western European neighbors to evaluate and Upgrade tile safely of their operating nuclear power plants. Finally, nuclear facilities in Asia are, also, being evaluated for seismic vulnerabilities. This paper focuses oil tile methodologies that have been developed for reevaluation of existing nuclear power plants and presents examples of the application of these methodologies to nuclear facilities worldwide. (author)

  18. The usefulness of the nuclear cardiology in the cellular implant in patients with severe myocardial damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omelas A, M.; Arguero S, R.; Garrido G, M.H.; Rodriguez C, A.; Careaga, G.; Castano G, R.; Nambo, M.J.; Pascual P, J.; Ortega R, A.; Gaxiola A, A.; Magana S, J.A.; Estrada A, H.; Equipo de Tecnicos en Medicina Nuclear

    2005-01-01

    The recent therapeutic advances as the cellular implant as well as those different protocols of image acquisition in the field of the Nuclear Cardiology its have allowed that the patient with severe myocardial damage and without some possibility of revascularization is benefited with these advances. Doubtless the Tl-201 par excellence has an important paper for standardize the more appropriate therapeutic behavior for the heart attack patient; reason by this investigation protocol was developed. The objective of the study was to identify the heart attack regions without viable tissue with SPECT in patient with important myocardial damage without some possibility of traditional revascularization; for the 'Stem cell' cellular implantation therapy. The methodology it was carried out by a study of myocardial perfusion in 10 patients with important myocardial damage previous cellular implants, with PICANUC/ SPECT methodology and using a software (Emory Tool Box) for the image processing validated by the University of Emory Atlanta GA; and using as tracer the Tl - 201 to identify the heart attack regions without presence of viable tissue with an analysis model of 17 segments standardized for the left ventricle; qualifying this way the myocardial perfusion in: 0 (normal), 1 (light), 2 (moderate), 3 (severe), 4 (absent) and x (bad technique). The conclusions were that the SPECT study with PICANUC methodology with Tl-201 is safe and effective for the precise localization for the cellular implantation via direct intra myocardial. (Author)

  19. Displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zujun; Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo; Xiao, Zhigang; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Sheng, Jiangkun

    2014-01-01

    The experiments of displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor are presented. The CMOS APS image sensors are manufactured in the standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The flux of neutron beams was about 1.33 × 10 8 n/cm 2 s. The three samples were exposed by 1 MeV neutron equivalent-fluence of 1 × 10 11 , 5 × 10 11 , and 1 × 10 12 n/cm 2 , respectively. The mean dark signal (K D ), dark signal spike, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), noise (V N ), saturation output signal voltage (V S ), and dynamic range (DR) versus neutron fluence are investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors are analyzed. The mean dark signal increase due to neutron displacement damage appears to be proportional to displacement damage dose. The dark images from CMOS APS image sensors irradiated by neutrons are presented to investigate the generation of dark signal spike

  20. Status of higher education in nuclear technology in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, A.

    2007-01-01

    Pakistan's nuclear power program was formally launched in 1959 with the establishment of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC). The first research reactor, the Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR1), went critical in 1965, while the first nuclear power plant, the Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP), was connected to the grid in 1972. PARR1, a 5 MW highly enriched uranium swimming pool reactor, has been upgraded to 10 MW low enriched reactor and KANUPP is a 137 MWe CANDU reactor. Later during the mid eighties PAEC added another small research reactor, PARR2, a miniature neutron source, and in 2000 a 325 MW PWR at Chashma, the Chashma Nuclear Power Plant (CHASHNUPP). Thus PAEC currently owns and operates two nuclear power plants and two research reactors. KANUPP has completed its design life of 30 years and is now undergoing the re-licensing process. CHASNUPP has just completed its first refuelling outage. Negotiations for the third nuclear power plant, also a 300 MW PWR from China, are continuing. The training and education programs in nuclear technology were initiated in the early 1960's soon after the establishment of PAEC. Initially the cream of fresh graduates in engineering, medicine and natural sciences, who were inducted in PAEC were given short training before they were sent for higher studies abroad. The availability of a nucleus of highly qualified professionals in nuclear power and allied disciplines, the lack of adequate facilities in the local educational institutions in these fields and the realization that many more professionals will be needed than could be trained abroad led to the establishment of coherent indigenous training and education program in the late sixties. Given below is a brief description of the centers set up by the PAEC for providing manpower for its nuclear power program

  1. Current Status and Future Perspective of Nuclear Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, June Key

    2009-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is on the rise over the world. Myocardial perfusion SPECT is a well established technique to detect coronary artery disease and to assess left ventricular function. In addition, it has the unique ability to predict the prognosis of the patients. Moreover, the application of ECG-gated images provided the quantitative data and improved the accuracy. This approach has been proved to be cost-effective and suitable for the emerging economies as well as developed countries. However, the utilization of nuclear cardiology procedures vary widely considering the different countries and region of the world. Korea exits 2-3 times less utilization than Japan, and 20 times than the United States. Recently, with the emerging of new technology, namely cardiac CT, cardiac MR and stress echocardiography, the clinical usefulness of nuclear cardiology has been called in question and its role has been redefined. For the proper promotion of nuclear cardiology, special educations should be conducted since the nuclear cardiology has the contact points between nuclear medicine and cardiology. Several innovations are in horizon which will impact the diagnostic accuracy as well as imaging time and cost savings. Development of new tracers, gamma camera technology and hybrid systems will open the new avenue in cardiac imaging. The future of nuclear cardiology based on molecular imaging is very exciting. The newly defined biologic targets involving atherosclerosis and vascular vulnerability will allow the answers for the key clinical questions. Hybrid techniques including SPECT/CT indicate the direction in which clinical nuclear cardiology may be headed in the immediate future. To what extent nuclear cardiology will be passively absorbed by other modalities, or will actively incorporate other modalities, is up to the present and next generation of nuclear cardiologists

  2. Current Status and Future Perspective of Nuclear Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, June Key [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Coronary artery disease is on the rise over the world. Myocardial perfusion SPECT is a well established technique to detect coronary artery disease and to assess left ventricular function. In addition, it has the unique ability to predict the prognosis of the patients. Moreover, the application of ECG-gated images provided the quantitative data and improved the accuracy. This approach has been proved to be cost-effective and suitable for the emerging economies as well as developed countries. However, the utilization of nuclear cardiology procedures vary widely considering the different countries and region of the world. Korea exits 2-3 times less utilization than Japan, and 20 times than the United States. Recently, with the emerging of new technology, namely cardiac CT, cardiac MR and stress echocardiography, the clinical usefulness of nuclear cardiology has been called in question and its role has been redefined. For the proper promotion of nuclear cardiology, special educations should be conducted since the nuclear cardiology has the contact points between nuclear medicine and cardiology. Several innovations are in horizon which will impact the diagnostic accuracy as well as imaging time and cost savings. Development of new tracers, gamma camera technology and hybrid systems will open the new avenue in cardiac imaging. The future of nuclear cardiology based on molecular imaging is very exciting. The newly defined biologic targets involving atherosclerosis and vascular vulnerability will allow the answers for the key clinical questions. Hybrid techniques including SPECT/CT indicate the direction in which clinical nuclear cardiology may be headed in the immediate future. To what extent nuclear cardiology will be passively absorbed by other modalities, or will actively incorporate other modalities, is up to the present and next generation of nuclear cardiologists.

  3. Assessment of the current status of basic nuclear data compilations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riemer, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Panel on Basic Nuclear Data Compilations believes that it is important to provide the user with an evaluated nuclear database of the highest quality, dependability, and currency. It is also important that the evaluated nuclear data are easily accessible to the user. In the past the panel concentrated its concern on the cycle time for the publication of A-chain evaluations. However, the panel now recognizes that publication cycle time is no longer the appropriate goal. Sometime in the future, publication of the evaluated A-chains will evolve from the present hard-copy Nuclear Data Sheets on library shelves to purely electronic publication, with the advent of universal access to terminals and the nuclear databases. Therefore, the literature cut-off date in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) is rapidly becoming the only important measure of the currency of an evaluated A-chain. Also, it has become exceedingly important to ensure that access to the databases is as user-friendly as possible and to enable electronic publication of the evaluated data files. Considerable progress has been made in these areas: use of the on-line systems has almost doubled in the past year, and there has been initial development of tools for electronic evaluation, publication, and dissemination. Currently, the nuclear data effort is in transition between the traditional and future methods of dissemination of the evaluated data. Also, many of the factors that adversely affect the publication cycle time simultaneously affect the currency of the evaluated nuclear database. Therefore, the panel continues to examine factors that can influence cycle time: the number of evaluators, the frequency with which an evaluation can be updated, the review of the evaluation, and the production of the evaluation, which currently exists as a hard-copy issue of Nuclear Data Sheets

  4. Management of commercial radioactive nuclear wastes. A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The President's Energy Resources Council (ERC) has the responsibility for coordination of Administration policies and programs relating to energy. Because of the important role envisioned for nuclear power in the next decade and beyond, the ERC established a nuclear sub-committee to coordinate Federal nuclear policy and programs to assure that issues which arise are treated via an integrated Government effort. This paper was prepared by those Federal agencies which are ERC members and have the technical, economic, and environmental expertise to provide a brief review of the nature of radioactive wastes and our ability to dispose of them safely

  5. Nuclear energy and public opinion: the status in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timbal-Duclaux, L.

    1981-01-01

    The author assesses the importance of social and political aspects for the failure or success of nuclear programs. He draws the link between the nuclear opposition and the development of the ecological movement born in USA in the seventies. After underlining his generality in the Western World, he describes the importance of the differences between countries. France has fully succeeded its program, at the other end Holland and Denmark failed. As a conclusion a true energy education and a local and regional approach of the nuclear power plant installation is presented. (author)

  6. Status and potential of nuclear energy in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.M.; Jalal, A.I.

    1991-01-01

    Pakistan is an energy resource deficient country which is heavily dependent on imported energy, while its per capita energy consumption level is still very low. Energy and electricity needs have been growing rapidly and these trends are expected to continue. Pakistan needs to make use of nuclear power on a large scale. This paper discusses the limitations of indigenous energy resources in coping with the future requirements of electricity and compares the cost economics of nuclear power with that of electricity generation based on imported oil and coal. It then describes the efforts being made in the country to make use of nuclear power in a self-reliant manner. (author)

  7. Status of US program for disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.I.

    1991-04-01

    In this paper, a brief history of the United States' program for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and the legislative acts that have guided the program are discussed. The current plans and schedules for beginning acceptance of SNF from the nuclear utilities for disposal are described, and some of the development activities supporting the program are discussed. And finally, the viability of the SNF disposal fee presently paid into the Nuclear Waste Fund by the owners/generators of commercial SNF and high-level waste (HLW) is examined. 12 refs., 9 figs

  8. The nuclear knowledge management, its present status and tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Yonezawa, Minoru; Sawada, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge management can be defined as the integrated, systematic approach to identifying, collecting, maintaining, and sharing knowledge, and enabling the creation of new knowledge in order to achieve the objectives of the organization. Knowledge can be classified into explicit knowledge and tacit knowledge. Due to the aging of nuclear personnel, it is necessary to systematically manage nuclear knowledge within and between the organizations and to smoothly transfer or pass these down to the next generation. World's trend of nuclear knowledge management and its tasks were described referring to topics of its latest international meetings. (T.Tanaka)

  9. Fatigue damage evaluation of stainless steel pipes in nuclear power plants using positron annihilation lineshape analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Yasuhiro [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan); Nakamura, Noriko; Yusa, Satoru [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Since positron annihilation lineshape analysis can evaluate the degree of fatigue damage by detecting defects such as dislocations in metals, we applied this method to evaluate that in a type 316 stainless steel pipe which was used in the primary system of a nuclear power plant. Using {sup 68}Ge as a positron source, an energy spread of annihilation gamma ray peak from the material was measured and expressed as the S-parameter. Actual plant material cut from a surge line pipe of a pressurizer in a pressurized water reactor type nuclear power plant was measured by positron annihilation lineshape analysis and the S-parameter was obtained. Comparing the S-parameter with a relationship between the S-parameter and fatigue life ratio of the type 316 stainless steel, we evaluated the degree of fatigue damage of the actual material. Furthermore, to verify the evaluation, microstructures of the actual material were investigated with TEM (transmission electron microscope) to observe dislocation densities. As a result, a change in the S-parameter of the actual material from standard as-received material (type 316 stainless steel) was in the range from -0.0013 to 0.0014, while variations in the S-parameter of the standard as-received material were about {+-}0.002, and hence the differences between the actual material and the as-received material were negligible. Moreover, the dislocation density of the actual plant material observed with TEM was almost the same as that of the as-received one. In conclusion, we could confirm the applicability of the positron annihilation lineshape analysis to fatigue damage evaluation of stainless steel. (author)

  10. Current status nuclear training and education in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsono

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear technology was officially recognized through the setting up Panitia Negara untuk Penyelidikan Radioaktivitet in 1954, and the founding of Dewan Tenaga Atom Nasional and Lembaga Tenaga Atom (National Atomic Energy Board) in 1958 which then further reorganized and named BATAN (National Atomic Energy Agency) in 1964. Since the construction of the first research reactor in 1965, BATAN has been operating 3 research reactors. The application of nuclear technology in research, which was started in 1960's, was followed by application in non energy sectors such as agriculture and industries, and the utilization of radiation and radioisotopes in medical therapy and diagnostic. In 1997, in order to separate the control function and the promotion function of the application of nuclear energy in Indonesia, the Government set up two nuclear administrative agencies, i.e. the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) and the Nuclear Energy Control Board (BAPETEN). To provide well-educated and well-trained personnel in the fields of research, development, and application of nuclear technology, BATAN implementing its education and training program through the ETC (BATAN Education and Training Center) and STTN (Polytechnic Institute of Nuclear Technology), which were set up in 1981 and 1991, respectively. While STTN, formerly known as PATN, offers formal education at D3-level and D4-level in Technophysics and Techno-chemistry, the ETC is responsible for implementing education and training program, mainly in nuclear science and technology. In conducting education and training, ETC cooperates also with other education and training institutions, domestic as well as overseas institutions. ETC has set up a national network of nuclear education and training which involves some state universities and school, such as University of Indonesia, University of Gadjah Mada, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bogor Agriculture Institute, University of Pajajaran, and School of Medical

  11. Moroccan experience in nuclear sciences and technology: Present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Mediouri, K.

    2001-01-01

    The applications of nuclear technology started in Morocco in the early sixties and were developed particularly in the sectors of Agriculture, Education and Medicine. In the early seventies, these applications were extended to other important sectors such as Industry using gauges and NDT techniques, Mines and Hydrology. But a lack of sufficient and adequate infrastructure has limited the development of these applications. Further more, as Morocco relies totally on foreign imports to meet its energy needs, the option of nuclear power generation started to be considered seriously. This was the initiator of a real national reflection on an integrated program for all peaceful applications of nuclear energy which led to the progressive constitution of an institutional and regulatory frame. In this context, the National Center for Nuclear energy, Sciences and Techniques (CNESTEN), which is a public institution, was created in 1986. Its current programme and future are described in the paper. (author)

  12. Status of physical protection systems of nuclear facilities; survey report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, In Koo; Kwack, Eun Ho; Ahn, Jin Soo; Lee, Hyun Chul; Kim, Jung Soo

    2002-02-01

    This report presents a survey on the physical protection equipment for a nuclear power plant. This survey was conducted by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute as a part of the project, 'Development of Technologies for National Control of and Accountancy for Nuclear Material,' funded by the Ministry of Science and Technology of Korea. A physical protection system of a nuclear plant includes outer and inner fences, intrusion detection sensors, alarm generation system, illumination equipment, central monitoring and control station, entry control and management system, etc. The outermost fence indicates the boundary of the plant area and prevents a simple or unintentional intrusion. The inner fence area of each plant unit associated with intrusion detection sensors, illuminators, monitoring cameras, serves the key role for physical protection function for the nuclear plant

  13. Current status of neutron activation analysis and applied nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, W.S.

    1990-01-01

    A review of recent scientometric studies of citations and publication data shows the present state of NAA and applied nuclear chemistry as compared to other analytical techniques. (author) 9 refs.; 7 tabs

  14. Nuclear power - status and development 1985/1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingjaerde, R.O.

    1986-08-01

    A review of the present global position of nuclear power is given. Topics as power-generating capasity, reactor economy, reactor operation experience, uranium requirement, and reprocessing of spent fuel are briefly dealt with

  15. Status of Nuclear Activities of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, Zakia [Planning and Development, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission - BAEC, Paramanu Bhaban, E 12/A, Agargoan, 01207 Shere Banglanagar, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2008-07-01

    Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) is the national authority for acquisition, development and application of Nuclear Science and Technology and thus is playing the pioneering role for the development of the country's nuclear research programmes and thus helping to achieve the cherished goal of self-reliance through national efforts and international co-operation. Being firmly committed to the peaceful uses of Atomic Energy, programmes have been undertaken in Physical Sciences, Biological Sciences, Engineering and Nuclear Power Sector by Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission and some of the results have been transferred from laboratories to hospitals, agriculture, industries and environment for practical applications. In spite of some major constrains, presently BAEC's activities have increased many folds and keeping in view of the overall power crisis of the country efforts have also been given to establish Nuclear Power Plant in the country. (author)

  16. NRC nuclear-plant-analyzer concept and status at INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, F.; Wagner, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The Office of Research of the US NRC has proposed development of a software-hardware system called the Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA). This paper describes how we of the INEL envision the nuclear-plant analyzer. The paper also describes a pilot RELAP5 plant-analyzer project completed during the past year and current work. A great deal of analysis is underway to determine nuclear-steam-system response. System transient analysis being so complex, there is the need to present analytical results in a way that interconnections among phenomena and all the nuances of the transient are apparent. There is the need for the analyst to dynamically control system calculations to simulate plant operation in order to perform what if studies as well as the need to perform system analysis within hours of a plant emergency to diagnose the state of the stricken plant and formulate recovery actions. The NRC-proposed nuclear-plant analyzer can meet these needs

  17. The EFF Project Status and the NEA Nuclear Data Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksson, H.; Kodeli, I.; Nordborg, C.; Forrest, R.; Batistoni, P.; Fischer, U.

    2006-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank is part of an international network of data centres in charge of the compilation and dissemination of basic nuclear data. Through its activities in the reaction data field, the NEA participates in the production of data and their distribution to its users. The NEA Data Bank administrates the collection and validation as well as the distribution of the Joint Evaluated Fusion and Fission (JEFF) library. The JEFF project has evolved from two separate projects, namely the European Fusion File (EFF) and the Joint Evaluated File (JEF), to JEFF with the latest release of the library, JEFF-3.1, in May 2005. The EFF Project is a collaborative project with work funded by the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA). The tasks within the project comprise new data evaluation and verification of activation and transport data, calculation methods and validation via integral experiments. The EFF project brings together all available expertise in Europe, relating to the nuclear data requirements of existing and future fusion devices. EFF contributed greatly to the successful release of the internationally recognised nuclear data library JEFF-3.1. The NEA Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) is established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations and validation. WPEC provides a framework for co-operative activities between the participating projects, such as the high priority request list that is a collection of experimental data requests of special interest in a certain project, such as JEFF or ITER. The NEA provides also computer program services for nuclear energy and radiation physics applications. Of special interest for fusion applications are the integral experiments, such as SINBAD, with radiation shielding and dosimetry experiments including many fusion neutronics shielding experiments. (author)

  18. Present status and prospects of nuclear power in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibenschutz, J.

    1987-01-01

    Mexico decided to build its first nuclear power plant at the end of 1972. Actual construction in Laguna Verde started in early 1977 and after several changes in the structure of the project, CFE has taken full responsibility for engineering and construction since 1981 of the first- and for the time being the only-nuclear power project.The first unit is in the process of commissioning and operation is planned for 1987. (author)

  19. The recent status of nuclear technology development in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laoharojanaphand, Sirinart; Cherdchu, Chainarong; Sumitra, Tatchai; Sudprasert, Wanwisa; Chankow, Nares; Tiyapan, Kanokrat; Onjun, Thawatchai; Bhanthumnavin, Duangduen

    2016-01-01

    Thailand has started the peaceful utilization of nuclear program in 1961. The program has developed considerably in various aspects. Laws and regulations were established while applications in medical, agriculture, industry as well as research and education have been accomplished successfully in the country. As for the energy production, Thailand has realized the importance of nuclear power generation several years back. However, the implementation has been delayed. (J.P.N.)

  20. International nuclear power status 1994; International kernekraftstatus 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejerup, C.F.; Majborn, B.; Oelgaard, P.L. [eds.

    1995-02-01

    This report is the first in a planned series of annual reports covering the international development in the field of nuclear power. The report deals with: statistical information on the electricity produced by nuclear power plants; major safety-related incidents in 1994; the development in Sweden, Eastern Europe, and the rest of the world; the trends of development of a number of reactor types; the trends of development in the fuel cycle. (au).

  1. Nuclear power in USSR. Present status and future outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemskoff, Pierre.

    1980-05-01

    This study on nuclear electricity in the USSR deals with the main aspects of the development motivations of this form of energy in the country. The various systems developed are recalled, with their complex of power stations in operations or under construction, as well as the various other Soviet achievements: processs heat reactors, prefabricated reactors, etc. The nuclear industry in the USSR, profitability of the base facilities and cooperation with foreign countries are briefly reviewed [fr

  2. Tupperware's Strategy and Current Status of Nuclear Power Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Eng

    1986-01-01

    Taiwan is poorly endowed with indigenous energy resources. At the present time, its domestic energy consumption is depending over 80% on energy imports. The government energy policy is to diversify the sources and the forms of the imported energy emphasizing the reduction of dependence on oil and the promotion of the peaceful uses of atomic energy. Following this policy and guiding principles for the management of the company, Tupperware has formulated and has been implementing its nuclear power development program very diligently and vigorously. Nuclear power generation is seen as a reliable alternative to oil before other new energy sources are commercialized. The generation cost of nuclear power is only one-third of advantage will certainly attract either our country or other countries in the world with similar energy resources situation to make full utilization of nuclear power. In aggressively pursuing the nuclear generation program, Tupperware has made considerable efforts in the following aspects to further assure safety, reliability and also economy of nuclear power operation

  3. Nuclear power development status in Russia and China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Taito

    2016-01-01

    Russia and China have clear policy for the export of nuclear reactors, and both countries conduct negotiations with the initiative of the government. In Russia, Atomenergoprom, which controls civilian nuclear power sector, is in charge, and in China, CNNC, CGN, and SPI are in charge. As for the development of new type reactors, Russian type VVER-1200 is led by NIAEP and Atomproekt, and China type CAP 1400 and Hualong-1 are led by CNNC, CGN, and SPI. The next reactor export is considered to be an improved type of the third generation. Furthermore, both countries are proceeding with the construction and planning of a variety of the fourth generation reactors. As for the power generation and construction costs of domestic nuclear reactors in each country, three countries such as South Korea, China, and Russia hold a dominant position, keeping the costs significantly lower than those in Japan, the United States, and France. In Russia and China, the governments approve government support loans of approximately 5 to 9 billion dollars per reactor for exporting reactors. For developing countries, where financial resources are limited, this system is considered to be a powerful incentive for importing nuclear reactors in combination with BOO contract system that covers from construction to operation. Japan's nuclear reactor exports are planned for the UK, Vietnam, and Turkey. In addition, a nuclear power agreement with India has been agreed in principle, and the order receipt of Japanese power plant manufacturers is expected. (A.O.)

  4. Current status of SMPRs and manpower development for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.P.

    1994-01-01

    The development of SMPRs could make it possible for countries with small electrical grids to use nuclear power. SMPRs are still in the developing stages and none of them have the capability of good plant performance. Most of the SMPRs are in the 300 MWe range and a grid capacity of at least 2000 MWe would be required before such a power plant can be connected to the grid. There is a possibility that SMPRs could generate electricity cheaper coal plants requiring desulphurization. An unexpected increase in coal price and adverse environmental effects could make it necessary to use nuclear power in the future. Qualified manpower is required to plan, build and properly operate a nuclear power plant; and the availability of qualified manpower is a pre-condition for deciding to use nuclear power. There is a possibility that Sri Lanka would be able to use nuclear power in the next 15-20 years and a total dependence upon foreign expertise is neither possible nor desirable. Therefore pre-project activities should be considering such things as teaching nuclear science and engineering in the universities and retraining existing professionals, say from the coal power industry. Adequate emphasis must be given to manpower development and to the need to scheduling this development

  5. Status and development of nuclear power program in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C.T.

    1991-01-01

    The low availability in Korea of indigenous energy resources in the forms of water power and coal, and the oil squeeze in the seventies, have caused nuclear power to be expanded into the country's main primary energy source. Nine nuclear generating units with a cumulated power of 7616 MWe have been commissioned since 1978 and now contribute 36.2% to the power generating capacity of the country. In 1990, the nine nuclear plants converted 52.9 TWh of nuclear power into electricity, thus covering some 50% of the Korean electricity supply, as already in 1989. In the past three years, the electricity requirement rose by an annual 13.7%. In the light of a forecast continued rise by 5% to 8% annually up until 2006, the nuclear generating capacity then installed would have to be 23 229 MWe, which would be some 40% of the total generating capacity required. Under the long term energy plan of the Korean Energy Ministry, nine new nuclear generating units with an aggregate 8100 MWe will be built by 2001, and another nine units by the year 2006. (orig.) [de

  6. The legal status of nuclear power in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, political attitudes in Germany towards the nuclear industry have been characterised less by consistency than by some major policy shifts, and the same can be said for the legislation born of these attitudes. Although a number of these about-turns were predictable, others were less so because of their dependence on external factors. What now looks likely to be the final decision to phase out the civil use of nuclear power in Germany by 31 December 2022 raises a whole host of legal questions. In particular, the procedure followed to implement this phase-out provides ample material for debates on questions of constitutionality. Further matters of jurisprudential interest include the agreements concluded with the nuclear industry before the final phase-out decision was taken and the chronologically close political about-faces themselves. Finally, a degree of legal uncertainty still surrounds not only the as yet still unresolved issue of final repositories but also the resurgent debate over the source of funding for the dismantling of nuclear power plants. After providing an overview of the initial situation and the problems arising in connection with Germany's phasing out of the civil use of nuclear energy, this paper will place these issues in their proper legal context before evaluating them and highlighting the connection between these points of nuclear law and the current upheaval in German energy policy. (author)

  7. Status of evaluations and modifications of diesel generator status annunciator systems at various US nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindell, B.M.; Rumble, R.P.

    1979-10-01

    This report documents the current status of evaluations and modifications to the diesel generator status annunciators in a number of US nuclear power plants. These modifications may be required in order to: ensure that all conditions which might render the diesel generators incapable of automatic starting are annunciated in the control room; ensure that the wording on the control room annunciator clearly indicates to the operator that the diesel generator is unavailable if such is the case; and separate disabling and non-disabling annunciation

  8. Glutathione-deficient Plasmodium berghei parasites exhibit growth delay and nuclear DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padín-Irizarry, Vivian; Colón-Lorenzo, Emilee E; Vega-Rodríguez, Joel; Castro, María Del R; González-Méndez, Ricardo; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; Serrano, Adelfa E

    2016-06-01

    Plasmodium parasites are exposed to endogenous and exogenous oxidative stress during their complex life cycle. To minimize oxidative damage, the parasites use glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx) as primary antioxidants. We previously showed that disruption of the Plasmodium berghei gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (pbggcs-ko) or the glutathione reductase (pbgr-ko) genes resulted in a significant reduction of GSH in intraerythrocytic stages, and a defect in growth in the pbggcs-ko parasites. In this report, time course experiments of parasite intraerythrocytic development and morphological studies showed a growth delay during the ring to schizont progression. Morphological analysis shows a significant reduction in size (diameter) of trophozoites and schizonts with increased number of cytoplasmic vacuoles in the pbggcs-ko parasites in comparison to the wild type (WT). Furthermore, the pbggcs-ko mutants exhibited an impaired response to oxidative stress and increased levels of nuclear DNA (nDNA) damage. Reduced GSH levels did not result in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage or protein carbonylations in neither pbggcs-ko nor pbgr-ko parasites. In addition, the pbggcs-ko mutant parasites showed an increase in mRNA expression of genes involved in oxidative stress detoxification and DNA synthesis, suggesting a potential compensatory mechanism to allow for parasite proliferation. These results reveal that low GSH levels affect parasite development through the impairment of oxidative stress reduction systems and damage to the nDNA. Our studies provide new insights into the role of the GSH antioxidant system in the intraerythrocytic development of Plasmodium parasites, with potential translation into novel pharmacological interventions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Status of the TMI-2 core: a review of damage assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croucher, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    Assessments of the damage within the core of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor, performed by reconstructing the transient thermal-hydraulic sequence of events, estimating the amount of hydrogen generation, and evaluating the amount of fission products released, are reviewed and summarized. Minimum and maximum bounds of damage to the core are identified

  10. MAP kinase-signaling controls nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in response to DNA damage and oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Chakraborti, Shankhamala [Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Glas, Rickard, E-mail: rickard.glas@ki.se [Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of TPPII occurs in response to different DNA damage inducers. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of TPPII is linked to ROS and anti-oxidant enzyme levels. {yields} MAPKs control nuclear accumulation of TPPII. {yields} Inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII decreases DNA damage-induced {gamma}-H2AX expression. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a continuous hazard in eukaroytic cells by their ability to cause damage to biomolecules, in particular to DNA. Previous data indicated that the cytosolic serine peptidase tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) translocates into the nucleus of most tumor cell lines in response to {gamma}-irradiation and ROS production; an event that promoted p53 expression as well as caspase-activation. We here observed that nuclear translocation of TPPII was dependent on signaling by MAP kinases, including p38MAPK. Further, this was caused by several types of DNA-damaging drugs, a DNA cross-linker (cisplatinum), an inhibitor of topoisomerase II (etoposide), and to some extent also by nucleoside-analogues (5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea). In the minority of tumor cell lines where TPPII was not translocated into the nucleus in response to DNA damage we observed reduced intracellular ROS levels, and the expression levels of redox defense systems were increased. Further, treatment with the ROS-inducer {gamma}-hexa-chloro-cyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH, lindane), an inhibitor of GAP junctions, restored nuclear translocation of TPPII in these cell lines upon {gamma}-irradiation. Moreover, blocking nuclear translocation of TPPII in etoposide-treated cells, by using a peptide-derived inhibitor (Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH), attenuated expression of {gamma}-H2AX in {gamma}-irradiated melanoma cells. Our results indicated a role for TPPII in MAPK-dependent DNA damage signaling.

  11. The regulation for enforcing the law concerning indemnification of nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The regulation is set up under the provisions of the law concerning the indemnification for atomic energy damages, to enforce them. An atomic energy business enterpriser who intends to get the approval of indemnification measures specified under the law shall file an application to the General Director of the Science Technology Agency, attaching particular documents and writing the following matters: his name and address; the kinds of operation of reactors; the names and addresses of works or places of business where reactors are operated; the thermal output of reactors; the kinds and quantities of nuclear fuel materials processed or employed; the kinds and quantities of nuclear fuel materials or contaminated materials to be transported; the kinds and quantities of nuclear fuel materials or contaminated materials to be disposed; beginning dates and expected ending dates of the operation of reactors; and other items stipulated concerning liability insurance and indemnification contracts. The negotiable securities qualified to be trusted include government bonds; municipal bonds; bonds issued by particular legal persons; bonds issued by banks, Central Cooperative Bank for Agriculture and Forestry, or Bank for Commerce and Industrial Cooperatives, and secured debentures under the secured debenture trust law. The recovering of trusted securities and identification cards are defined, respectively. (Okada, K.)

  12. Regulation imposed to nuclear facility operators for the elaboration of 'waste studies' and 'waste statuses'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This decision from the French authority of nuclear safety (ASN) aims at validating the new versions of the guidebook for the elaboration of 'waste studies' for nuclear facilities and of the specifications for the elaboration of 'waste statuses' for nuclear facilities. This paper includes two documents. The first one is a guidebook devoted to nuclear facility operators which fixes the rules of production of waste studies according to the articles 20 to 26 of the inter-ministry by-law from December 31, 1999 (waste zoning conditions and ASN's control modalities). The second document concerns the specifications for the establishment of annual waste statuses according to article 27 of the inter-ministry by-law from December 31, 1999 (rational management of nuclear wastes). (J.S.)

  13. Nuclear fuel cycle in Japan : status and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Atsuyuki

    1996-01-01

    Nearly one third of electricity in Japan is being generated by nuclear fission primarily by light-water reactors. The industries to supply uranium fuel for these reactors have been well established including the capability for uranium enrichment. From the onset of nuclear program in Japan, a country with thin energy resources, the emphasis has been placed on maximizing the efficiency of uranium utilization. Thus the national nuclear program set forth by the Japan Atomic Energy Commission has consistently called for the establishment of closed fuel cycle, or for recycling of nuclear fuel. As part of such efforts in private sectors, the first commercial reprocessing plant is now under construction at Rokkasho-mura. The program to develop technologies for recycling nuclear fuel in a fast reactor system is also in progress steadily under the governmental support, while the Monju accident casts a long shadow on the future of fast reactor development in Japan. Even though the price of uranium has been stable at relatively low level in recent years, the uranium market in the longer time range is somewhat unpredictable. In Asian countries, a rapid growth of nuclear power production is foreseen in the 21st century. Under such circumstances, the effort to pursue the recycling option in Japan is important not only for its own energy security but also for stabilization of future uranium market in the world. The recycling option can also offer more flexible, easier and safer ways of radioactive waste management. Since the recycling option means utilization of plutonium in an industrial scale, special attention is inevitably required from the viewpoint of nuclear non-proliferation. It is the Japan's national policy to develop recycling technologies in compliance with the NPT and IAEA safeguard system as well as to maintain the transparency of its developmental program. (author)

  14. Status of the Korean nuclear hydrogen production project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonghwa, Chang; Won-Jae, Lee

    2010-01-01

    The rapid climate changes and the heavy reliance on imported fuel in Korea have motivated interest in the hydrogen economy. The Korean government has set up a long-term vision for transition to the hydrogen economy. To meet the expected demand of hydrogen as a fuel, hydrogen production using nuclear energy was also discussed. Recently the Korean Atomic Energy Committee has approved nuclear hydrogen production development and demonstration which will lead to commercialisation in late 2030's. An extensive research and development programme for the production of hydrogen using nuclear power has been underway since 2004 in Korea. During the first three years, a technological area was identified for the economic and efficient production of hydrogen using a VHTR. A pre-conceptual design of the commercial nuclear hydrogen production plant was also performed. As a result, the key technology area in the core design, the hydrogen production process, the coupling between reactor and chemical side, and the coated fuel were identified. During last three years, research activities have been focused on the key technology areas. A nuclear hydrogen production demonstration plant (NHDD) consisting of a 200 MWth capacity VHTR and five trains of water-splitting plants was proposed for demonstration of the performance and the economics of nuclear hydrogen. The computer tools for the VHTR and the water-splitting process were created and validated to some extent. The TRISO-coated particle fuel was fabricated and qualified. The properties of high temperature materials, including nuclear graphite, were studied. The sulphur-iodine thermochemical process was proved on a 3 litre/ hour scale. A small gas loop with practical pressure and temperature with the secondary sulphur acid loop was successfully built and commissioned. The results of the first phase research increased the confidence in the nuclear hydrogen technology. From 2009, the government decided to support further key technology

  15. Current Status of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Yong Soo; Lee, Jong Hyun

    2009-07-01

    To expand the use of nuclear energy, SNF from nuclear power plants must be managed in a safe and environmental friendly and the problem of decreasing uranium should be solved. To resolve this, a dry processing technology Pyroprocessing is focused on. The government started to develop of Pyroprocessing technology in 1997. According to the decision of government based of Atomic Energy Commission in December 2008, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute will construct PRIDE (Pyroprocess Integrated Inactive DEmonstration Facility) by 2011 to prove a consistent process. If Pyroprocessing technology will be developed in the near future, the size of radioactive waste disposal site can be reduced to 100 times compared to the direct disposal. When this technology will be connected to Fast Reactor. high level nuclear waste management of Hundreds of thousands of years may be reduced to hundreds years. However for the commercialization of Pyroprocessing technology, there are some problems to solve. First, because of none commercial facilities in the world of executive experience, so that the facility design, measurement. management and material flow, the critical need for data accumulation. Second, High-level nuclear waste have been known to generate more than the wet methods, it should continue to reduce technology development. In addition, a careful consideration of the residual uranium generating on process also can maximize the efficiency of reducing. The new concept is being developed in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute Pyroprocessing technology and nuclear waste processing technology to overcome these drawbacks sUQQested a way

  16. Current Status of the Cyber Threat Assessment for Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Doo [KINAC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In December 2014, unknown hackers hacked internal documents sourced from Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) and those electronic documents were posted five times on a Social Network Service (SNS). The data included personal profiles, flow charts, manuals and blueprints for installing pipes in the nuclear power plant. Although the data were not critical to operation or sabotage of the plant, it threatened people and caused social unrest in Korea and neighboring countries. In December 2015, cyber attack on power grid caused a blackout for hundreds of thousands of people in Ukraine. The power outage was caused by a sophisticated attack using destructive malware called 'BlackEnergy'. Cyber attacks are reality in today's world and critical infrastructures are increasingly targeted. Critical infrastructures, such as the nuclear power plant, need to be proactive and protect the nuclear materials, assets and facilities from potential cyber attacks. The threat assessment document and its detailed procedure are confidential for the State. Nevertheless, it is easy to find cooperation on assessing and evaluating the threats of nuclear materials and facilities with other government departments or agencies including the national police. The NSSC and KINAC also cooperated with the National Intelligence Service (NIS) and National Security Research Institute (NSR). However, robust cyber threat assessment system and regular consultative group should be established with domestic and overseas organization including NIS, NSR, the National Police Agency and the military force to protect and ensure to safety of people, public and environment from rapidly changing and upgrading cyber threats.

  17. Current Status of the Cyber Threat Assessment for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Doo

    2016-01-01

    In December 2014, unknown hackers hacked internal documents sourced from Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) and those electronic documents were posted five times on a Social Network Service (SNS). The data included personal profiles, flow charts, manuals and blueprints for installing pipes in the nuclear power plant. Although the data were not critical to operation or sabotage of the plant, it threatened people and caused social unrest in Korea and neighboring countries. In December 2015, cyber attack on power grid caused a blackout for hundreds of thousands of people in Ukraine. The power outage was caused by a sophisticated attack using destructive malware called 'BlackEnergy'. Cyber attacks are reality in today's world and critical infrastructures are increasingly targeted. Critical infrastructures, such as the nuclear power plant, need to be proactive and protect the nuclear materials, assets and facilities from potential cyber attacks. The threat assessment document and its detailed procedure are confidential for the State. Nevertheless, it is easy to find cooperation on assessing and evaluating the threats of nuclear materials and facilities with other government departments or agencies including the national police. The NSSC and KINAC also cooperated with the National Intelligence Service (NIS) and National Security Research Institute (NSR). However, robust cyber threat assessment system and regular consultative group should be established with domestic and overseas organization including NIS, NSR, the National Police Agency and the military force to protect and ensure to safety of people, public and environment from rapidly changing and upgrading cyber threats

  18. Compilation status and research topics in Hokkaido University Nuclear Reaction Data Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aikawa, M.; Furutachi, N.; Katō, K.; Ebata, S.; Ichinkhorloo, D.; Imai, S.; Sarsembayeva, A.; Zhou, B.; Otuka, N.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reaction data are necessary and applicable for many application fields. The nuclear reaction data must be compiled into a database for convenient availability. One such database is the EXFOR database maintained by the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC). As a member of the NRDC, the Hokkaido University Nuclear Reaction Data Centre (JCPRG) compiles charged-particle induced reaction data and contributes about 10 percent of the EXFOR database. In this paper, we show the recent compilation status and related research topics of JCPRG. (author)

  19. Present status of nuclear science education and training in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewamanna, R.

    2007-01-01

    Like others Sri Lankans too have fear of nuclear radiation, probably because of the weak system of proper radiation education. Some National Institutes and few Universities are involved in nuclear science teaching and research. There are two major levels of obtaining radiation or nuclear education and training in Sri Lanka : the University and training courses in nuclear related technology and radiation protection offered by the Atomic Energy Authority of the Ministry of Science and Technology. This paper summarizes the status, some of the activities and problems of radiation education in Sri Lanka. (author)

  20. Ukrainian Nuclear Data Centre. Status report. P8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gritzay, O.O.

    2001-01-01

    Collection and compilation of new experimental data published in Ukrainian printed sources is continuing. As soon as they are ready, they will be sent to NDS IAEA to be included to EXFOR library. Collaboration with Slavutych Laboratory (SLIRT) was continued with the aim of scientific support of Slavutych Nuclear Data Bank and its users. The teaching course 'Nuclear Data for Science and Technology' for graduate students of Kiev University, included the following items: ENDF/B libraries; EXROR system; ENSDF library; The use of PREPRO codes in the work with ENDF libraries; The Network of Nuclear Data Centers and the use of on-line services. The work on Neutron Excitation Function Guide for Reactor Dosimetry was done and it is close to end. The list of included reactions is enclosed

  1. Act No. 225 of 17 March 1979 containing regulations on third party liability for damage caused by nuclear incidents; Nuclear Incidents (Third Party Liability) Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This Act on nuclear third party liability provides that the maximum amount of liability of the operator of a nuclear installation in the Netherlands is set at 100 million guilders in accordance with the Paris Convention; it also implements the Brussels Supplementary Convention's additional compensation mechanism. The new Act further provides that if damage is suffered on the Netherlands' territory as a result of a nuclear incident for which compensation is payable pursuant to the Brussels Convention or to the Act, and that the funds available for this purpose are insufficient to secure compensation of such damage to an amount of one thousand million guilders, the State shall make available the public funds needed to compensate such damage up to that amount. (NEA) [fr

  2. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1992, A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D.F.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Cross-Dial, A.E.; Morris, R.H.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Jansen, J.M.; Minarick, J.W.; Lau, W.; Salyer, W.D.

    1993-12-01

    Twenty-seven operational events with conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage of 1.0 x 10E-06 or higher occurring at commercial light-water reactors during 1992 are considered to be precursors to potential core damage. These are described along with associated significance estimates, categorization, and subsequent analyses. The report discusses (1) the general rationale for this study, (2) the selection and documentation of events as precursors, (3) the estimation and use of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage to rank precursor events, and (4) the plant models used in the analysis process

  3. Status of U.S. nuclear waste disposal programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastering, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Since the days of the Manhattan Project in the early 1940's, the United States has recognized the need for a system of effective nuclear waste management. The evolution of that system has been directed by a series of legislative actions to determine responsibilities and develop procedures. Under these laws, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as the lead agency, is required to plan and implement the programs that will ensure safe and efficient management of nuclear wastes from both civilian and defense activities. This overview paper describes the organization of these programs

  4. Status report on nuclear power - information from STN databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prinz, H.

    1995-01-01

    The worldwide future of nuclear power as seen about 25 years ago is presented based on a literature search in the INIS database. The role of nuclear power today, after TMI and Chernobyl, in energy supplies and in combating the greehouse effect is evaluated by literature searches in STN databases (e.g. INIS, ETDE, COMPENDEX, CA, ULIDAT, INSPEC). An evaluation is given of the different information contents of bibliographic databases such as INIS and pure information databases such as NLDB. (orig./HP)

  5. The current status of nuclear research reactor in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sittichai, C; Kanyukt, R; Pongpat, P [Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand)

    1998-10-01

    Since 1962, the Thai Research Reactor has been serving for various kinds of activities i.e. the production of radioisotopes for medical uses and research and development on nuclear science and technology, for more than three decades. The existing reactor site should be abandoned and relocated to the new suitable site, according to Thai cabinet`s resolution on the 27 December 1989. The decommissioning project for the present reactor as well as the establishment of new nuclear research center were planned. This paper discussed the OAEP concept for the decommissioning programme and the general description of the new research reactor and some related information were also reported. (author)

  6. Nuclear Power – current status and future development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, A.

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions • Nuclear energy is extensively used in the world today as reliable base-load energy • Nuclear energy planning at the low level demand involves building of significant number of new NPPs around the world • Highest rate of new builds is expected in Eastern Asia • New advanced reactor designs known as Gen 3 and 3+ have emerged in recent years • As a result of the Fukushima event in Japan, the advanced reactors will be subjected to additional level of scrutiny and design improvements and changes • As a result of the Fukushima event, the regulatory requirements will become more stringent and demanding

  7. Current Status of Non-Electric Applications of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Joon; Lee, Jun; Lee, Tae Hoon

    2009-05-01

    IAEA Technical Meeting(I3-TM-37394) on 'Non-Electric Applications of Nuclear Energy' has been successfully held from March 3 to 6 in 2009 at KAERI/INTEC. The 24 experts from 12 countries participated in this meeting and provided 17 presentations and their opinions and comments in desalination, hydrogen production, and heat application sessions. All of the participants from 12 countries agreed that nuclear power should be the potential carbon-free energy source to replace crude oil and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the fields of non-electric applications such as desalination, hydrogen production, district heating, and industrial processes applications

  8. Status of the evaluated nuclear structure data file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    The structure, organization, and contents of the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) are discussed in this paper. This file contains a summary of the state of experimental nuclear structure data for all nuclides as determined from consideration of measurements reported worldwide in the literature. Special emphasis is given to the data evaluation procedures, the consistency checks, and the quality control utilized at the input stage and to the retrieval capabilities of the system at the output stage. Recent enhancements of the on-line interaction with the file contents is addressed as well as procedural changes that will improve the currency of the file

  9. Nuclear medicine in Tunisia : current status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammami, Hatem

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is concerned with the utilisation of radioactivity in vivo or in vitro for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. In Tunisia, there are four public departments of nuclear medicine and seven private clinics. 50% of the population is localized in the north, which justifies the existence of 7 public and private departments of nuclear medicine with nine gamma cameras in this region. In the south, there are 30 pour cent of the population that goes to Sfax and 20 pour cent to Sousse where we count two departments with gamma cameras in public services and one in the private sector. The nuclear medicine services in the public sector have 4 SPECT / CT. Siemens is the leading provider of gamma cameras and occupies 73 pour cent of market share, subsequently ranks SMV (13 pour cent) and (GE and GAEDE) have the same proportion of the market share (7 pour cent). For radio-protected rooms, there is a single center with a single chamber from four public services. On the other hand, there are 2/7 private centers that are equipped with five radio-protected electrically rooms. Concerning the human resources, there are 26 doctors and 24 technicians in the public sector. The private sector has 6 doctors and 12 technicians. In 2012, there has been 22000 examinations (diagnostic and therapeutic procedures) in which 14,600 in nuclear medicine departments of public hospitals. Bone scintigraphy ranks first, with a relative frequency of 40-80 pour cent thereafter ranks renal scintigraphy (10-15 pour cent) and then the thyroid scintigraphy (8-12 pour cent). The waiting period is a major problem, especially in the public sector. Taking as an example, for the therapy of thyroid, injection of 100 mCi of I-131 requires a period of waiting more than six months and waiting more than three months for the bone scan. The second problem for patient with cancer is the distance, there are 11 centers concentrated in 3 coastal cities and none in the inner areas of the country, no regional

  10. Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. Status and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultgren, Aa.

    1993-01-01

    The report gives a short review of the status for industrial reprocessing and recycling of Uranium/Plutonium. The following countries are covered: Belgium, France, Germany, Great Britain, India, Japan, Russia, USA. Different fuel cycle strategies are accounted for, and new developments outlined. 116 refs, 27 figs, 12 tabs

  11. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents. A status report, 1982--1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forester, J.A.; Mitchell, D.B.; Whitehead, D.W. [and others

    1997-04-01

    This study is a continuation of earlier work that evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1994 events affecting commercial light-water reactors. One-hundred nine operational events that affected 51 reactors during 1982 and 1983 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer screening the 1982-83 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to select events that could be precursors to core damage. Candidates underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. This report discusses the general rationale for the study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  12. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents. A status report, 1982--1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forester, J.A.; Mitchell, D.B.; Whitehead, D.W.

    1997-04-01

    This study is a continuation of earlier work that evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1994 events affecting commercial light-water reactors. One-hundred nine operational events that affected 51 reactors during 1982 and 1983 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10 -6 . These events were identified by first computer screening the 1982-83 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to select events that could be precursors to core damage. Candidates underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. This report discusses the general rationale for the study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events

  13. Status of ANSI standards on decommissioning of nuclear reprocessing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, H.B.

    1975-01-01

    A definition of decommissioning is given, and the preparation of ANSI Standard, ''General Design Criteria for Nuclear Reprocessing Facilities'' (N101.3) is discussed. A Eurochemic report, entitled ''The Shutdown of Reprocessing Facilities--Results of Preliminary Studies on the Installations Belonging to Eurochemic,'' was used in the preparation of this standard. (U.S.)

  14. Status of nuclear regulatory research and its future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. I.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, M. W.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the regulatory research comprising an examination of the research system, its areas and contents, and the goals and financial resources is undertaken. As a result of this study, the future direction of regulatory research and its implementation strategies are suggested to resolve the current issues emerging from this examination. The major issues identified in the study are; (a) an insufficient investment in nuclear regulatory and safety research, (b) an interfacial discrepancy between similar research areas, and (c) a limitation of utilizing research results. To resolve these issues, several measures are proposed : (1) developing a lead project to establish a comprehensive infrastructure for enhancing research cooperation between nuclear organizations including institutes, industry, and universities, with an aim to improve cooperation between projects and to strengthen overall coordination functions among research projects, (2) introducing a certification system on research outcome to promote the proliferation of both research results themselves and their application with a view to enhancing the research quality, (3) strengthening the cooperative system to promote the international cooperative research, and (4) digitalizing all documents and materials relevant to safety and regulatory research to establish KIMS (knowledge and information based management system). It is expected that the aforementioned measures suggested in this study will enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of both nuclear regulatory and safety research, if they are implemented after deliberating with the government and related nuclear industries in the near future

  15. Governmental regulation of nuclear power in Russia: Status and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.; Vishnevskij, Yu.G.

    1995-01-01

    Gosatomnadzor is responsible for governmental supervision of nuclear and radiation safety. Its sphere of competence covers nuclear power, research reactors and the nuclear fuel cycle complex, among others. The paper discusses the situation regarding the adoption of the draft Law of the Russian Federation on the Use of Atomic Energy and its basic formulations. The draft Law is based on the principle that priority be given to safety and the protection of human health, the environment and property over any economic interests in the area of atomic energy utilization. The most important respect in which the activities of Gosatomnadzor differ from those of its predecessors is that it has been assigned the functions of the regulatory authority for safety in the utilization of atomic energy. The paper discusses the main functions of Gosatomnadzor. An important task is to set up operating organizations, preparing the requirements for these organizations and monitoring compliance with those requirements. Gosatomnadzor has adopted safety analysis reports as the basic form of documentation to demonstrate the safety of facilities involving nuclear and radiation hazards. Independent assessment of safety and preparation of reference documents for its regulatory activities are other tasks of Gosatomnadzor. (author)

  16. Status of the new nuclear energy systems study in CIAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, D.; Luo, Z.; Xu, M.

    2003-01-01

    The nuclear energy civil-application has been started in China. To meet the long-term sustainable primary energy supply it could be envisaged that the nuclear power systems will be developed in large scale. Following three key points must be satisfied by the future nuclear energy systems: - more safer nuclear energy systems than recent those should be developed to decrease the risk of core-melten and unforeseen release of radioactive materials; - long lived minor actinides and long lived fission products must be safely treated to assure a proper environment; - uranium resource should be sufficiently utilized. In order to meet above general requirements, the fast reactor technology development has been launched and the basic researches of Accelerator Driven Subcritical facility (ADS) system has been started in China. The activity of the construction of the China Experimental Fast Reactor and plan for next step, some calculation results on core physics study of ADS, some results on target physics and a proposed verification facility are briefed in the paper. (author)

  17. The status of nuclear data for transmutation calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, W.B.; England, T.R.; MacFarlane, R.E.; Muir, D.W.; Young, P.G.

    1995-01-01

    At this point, the accurate description of transmutation products in a radiation environment is more a nuclear data problem than a code development effort. We have used versions of the CINDER code for over three decades to describe the transmutation of nuclear reactor fuels in radiation environments. The need for the accurate description of reactor neutron-absorption, decay-power, and decay-spectra properties have driven many AEC, ERDA, and DOE supported nuclear data development efforts in this period. The level of cross-section, decay, and fission-yield data has evolved from rudimentary to a comprehensive ENDF/B-VI library permitting great precision in reactor calculations. The precision of the data supporting reactor simulations provides a sturdy foundation for the data base required for the wide range of transmutation problems currently studied. However, such reactor problems are typically limited to neutron energies below 10 MeV or so; reaction and decay data are required for actinides of, say, 90 ≤ Z ≤ 96 neutron-rich fission products of 22 ≤ Z ≤ 72. The expansion into reactor structural materials and fusion systems extends these ranges in energy and Z somewhat. The library of nuclear data, constantly growing in breadth and quality with international cooperation, is now described in the following table

  18. Radiation Damage in Nuclear Fuel for Advanced Burner Reactors: Modeling and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Niels Gronbech; Asta, Mark; Ozolins, Nigel Browning' Vidvuds; de Walle, Axel van; Wolverton, Christopher

    2011-12-29

    The consortium has completed its existence and we are here highlighting work and accomplishments. As outlined in the proposal, the objective of the work was to advance the theoretical understanding of advanced nuclear fuel materials (oxides) toward a comprehensive modeling strategy that incorporates the different relevant scales involved in radiation damage in oxide fuels. Approaching this we set out to investigate and develop a set of directions: 1) Fission fragment and ion trajectory studies through advanced molecular dynamics methods that allow for statistical multi-scale simulations. This work also includes an investigation of appropriate interatomic force fields useful for the energetic multi-scale phenomena of high energy collisions; 2) Studies of defect and gas bubble formation through electronic structure and Monte Carlo simulations; and 3) an experimental component for the characterization of materials such that comparisons can be obtained between theory and experiment.

  19. The regulation for enforcing the law concerning indemnification of nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The atomic energy entrepreneurs wishing to obtain the approval according to Item 1, Article 7 of the Law Concerning Indemnification of Nuclear Damage should file application (one original and one duplicate) describing the following items to the Director of the Science and Technology Agency: (1) in case of taking indemnification measures including the conclusion of responsibility insurance contracts and indemnification contracts, the particulars of the contracts including the sum of money involved, (2) in case of taking indemnification measures including deposit, the particulars of the deposit including the sum of money involved, and (3) in case of taking loss indemnification measures including the conclusion of responsibility insurance contracts and indemnification contracts or other measures than deposit, the particulars of such measures. (Rikitake, Y.)

  20. Detecting Structural Damage of Nuclear Power Plant by Interactive Data Mining Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yufei Shu

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a nonlinear structural damage identification technique, based on an interactive data mining approach, which integrates a human cognitive model in a data mining loop. A mining control agent emulating human analysts is developed, which directly interacts with the data miner, analyzing and verifying the output of the data miner and controlling the data mining process. Additionally, an artificial neural network method, which is adopted as a core component of the proposed interactive data mining method, is evolved by adding a novelty detecting and retraining function for handling complicated nuclear power plant quake-proof data. Plant quake-proof testing data has been applied to the system to show the validation of the proposed method. (author)