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Sample records for nuclear criticality safety

  1. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators

  2. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

  3. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Seong Ki; Shin, Hee Seong; Park, Seong Won; Shin, Young Joon.

    1997-06-01

    Nuclear criticality safety guide was described for handling, transportation and storage of nuclear fissile materials in this report. The major part of the report was excerpted frp, TID-7016(revision 2) and nuclear criticality safety written by Knief. (author). 16 tabs., 44 figs., 5 refs

  4. Nuclear criticality safety in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shultz, K.R.

    1980-04-01

    The approach taken to nuclear criticality safety in Canada has been influenced by the historical development of participants. The roles played by governmental agencies and private industry since the Atomic Energy Control Act was passed into Canadian Law in 1946 are outlined to set the scene for the current situation and directions that may be taken in the future. Nuclear criticality safety puts emphasis on the control of materials called special fissionable material in Canada. A brief account is given of the historical development and philosophy underlying the existing regulations governing special fissionable material. Subsequent events have led to a change in emphasis in the regulatory process that has not yet been fully integrated into Canadian legislation and regulations. Current efforts towards further development of regulations governing the practice of nuclear criticality safety are described. (auth)

  5. Autoclave nuclear criticality safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Aquila, D.M. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Tayloe, R.W. Jr. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Steam-heated autoclaves are used in gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants to heat large cylinders of UF{sub 6}. Nuclear criticality safety for these autoclaves is evaluated. To enhance criticality safety, systems are incorporated into the design of autoclaves to limit the amount of water present. These safety systems also increase the likelihood that any UF{sub 6} inadvertently released from a cylinder into an autoclave is not released to the environment. Up to 140 pounds of water can be held up in large autoclaves. This mass of water is sufficient to support a nuclear criticality when optimally combined with 125 pounds of UF{sub 6} enriched to 5 percent U{sup 235}. However, water in autoclaves is widely dispersed as condensed droplets and vapor, and is extremely unlikely to form a critical configuration with released UF{sub 6}.

  6. Nuclear data for criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westfall, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    A brief overview is presented on emerging requirements for new criticality safety analyses arising from applications involving nuclear waste management, facility remediation, and the storage of nuclear weapons components. A derivation of criticality analyses from the specifications of national consensus standards is given. These analyses, both static and dynamic, define the needs for nuclear data. Integral data, used primarily for analytical validation, and differential data, used in performing the analyses, are listed, along with desirable margins of uncertainty. Examples are given of needs for additional data to address systems having intermediate neutron energy spectra and/or containing nuclides of intermediate mass number

  7. Realism in nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, T. P.

    2009-01-01

    Commercial nuclear power plant operation and regulation have made remarkable progress since the Three Mile Island Accident. This is attributed largely to a heavy dose of introspection and self-regulation by the industry and to a significant infusion of risk-informed and performance-based regulation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This truly represents reality in action both by the plant operators and the regulators. On the other hand, the implementation of nuclear criticality safety in ex-reactor operations involving significant quantities of fissile material has not progressed, but, tragically, it has regressed. Not only is the practice of the discipline in excess of a factor of ten more expensive than decades ago; the trend continues. This unfortunate reality is attributed to a lack of coordination within the industry (as contrasted to what occurred in the reactor operations sector), and to a lack of implementation of risk-informed and performance-based regulation by the NRC While the criticality safety discipline is orders of magnitude smaller than the reactor safety discipline, both operators and regulators must learn from the progress made in reactor safety and apply it to the former to reduce the waste, inefficiency and potentially increased accident risks associated with current practices. Only when these changes are made will there be progress made toward putting realism back into nuclear criticality safety. (authors)

  8. Nuclear Criticality Safety Data Book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollenbach, D. F. [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-11-14

    The objective of this document is to support the revision of criticality safety process studies (CSPSs) for the Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). This design analysis and calculation (DAC) document contains development and justification for generic inputs typically used in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) DACs to model both normal and abnormal conditions of processes at UPF to support CSPSs. This will provide consistency between NCS DACs and efficiency in preparation and review of DACs, as frequently used data are provided in one reference source.

  9. Nuclear Criticality Safety Data Book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenbach, D. F.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this document is to support the revision of criticality safety process studies (CSPSs) for the Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). This design analysis and calculation (DAC) document contains development and justification for generic inputs typically used in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) DACs to model both normal and abnormal conditions of processes at UPF to support CSPSs. This will provide consistency between NCS DACs and efficiency in preparation and review of DACs, as frequently used data are provided in one reference source.

  10. Nuclear criticality safety: 2-day training course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlesser, J.A. [ed.] [comp.

    1997-02-01

    This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used as Los Alamos; be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; have participated in conducting two critical experiments; be asked to complete a critique of the nuclear criticality safety training course.

  11. Nuclear criticality safety: 2-day training course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used as Los Alamos; be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; have participated in conducting two critical experiments; be asked to complete a critique of the nuclear criticality safety training course

  12. Nuclear criticality safety: 2-day training course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1992-11-01

    This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: (1) be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; (2) be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; (3) be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; (4) be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used at Los Alamos; (5) be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; (6) have participated in conducting two critical experiments

  13. Elements of a nuclear criticality safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopper, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear criticality safety programs throughout the United States are quite successful, as compared with other safety disciplines, at protecting life and property, especially when regarded as a developing safety function with no historical perspective for the cause and effect of process nuclear criticality accidents before 1943. The programs evolved through self-imposed and regulatory-imposed incentives. They are the products of conscientious individuals, supportive corporations, obliged regulators, and intervenors (political, public, and private). The maturing of nuclear criticality safety programs throughout the United States has been spasmodic, with stability provided by the volunteer standards efforts within the American Nuclear Society. This presentation provides the status, relative to current needs, for nuclear criticality safety program elements that address organization of and assignments for nuclear criticality safety program responsibilities; personnel qualifications; and analytical capabilities for the technical definition of critical, subcritical, safety and operating limits, and program quality assurance

  14. Minimum qualifications for nuclear criticality safety professionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketzlach, N.

    1990-01-01

    A Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Training Committee has been established within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Safety and Technology Project to review and, if necessary, develop standards for the training of personnel involved in nuclear criticality safety (NCS). The committee is exploring the need for developing a standard or other mechanism for establishing minimum qualifications for NCS professionals. The development of standards and regulatory guides for nuclear power plant personnel may serve as a guide in developing the minimum qualifications for NCS professionals

  15. Engineering design guidelines for nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltz, W.R.

    1988-08-01

    This document provides general engineering design guidelines specific to nuclear criticality safety for a facility where the potential for a criticality accident exists. The guide is applicable to the design of new SRP/SRL facilities and to major modifications Of existing facilities. The document is intended an: A guide for persons actively engaged in the design process. A resource document for persons charged with design review for adequacy relative to criticality safety. A resource document for facility operating personnel. The guide defines six basic criticality safety design objectives and provides information to assist in accomplishing each objective. The guide in intended to supplement the design requirements relating to criticality safety contained in applicable Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The scope of the guide is limited to engineering design guidelines associated with criticality safety and does not include other areas of the design process, such as: criticality safety analytical methods and modeling, nor requirements for control of the design process

  16. Nuclear Criticality Safety Department Qualification Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Department (NCSD) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of highly qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document defines the Qualification Program to address the NCSD technical and managerial qualification as required by the Y-1 2 Training Implementation Matrix (TIM). This Qualification Program is in compliance with DOE Order 5480.20A and applicable Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) and Y-1 2 Plant procedures. It is implemented through a combination of WES plant-wide training courses and professional nuclear criticality safety training provided within the department. This document supersedes Y/DD-694, Revision 2, 2/27/96, Qualification Program, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department There are no backfit requirements associated with revisions to this document

  17. Nuclear criticality safety department training implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Department (NCSD) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The NCSD Qualification Program is described in Y/DD-694, Qualification Program, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department This document provides a listing of the roles and responsibilities of NCSD personnel with respect to training and details of the Training Management System (TMS) programs, Mentoring Checklists and Checksheets, as well as other documentation utilized to implement the program. This document supersedes Y/DD-696, Revision 2, dated 3/27/96, Training Implementation, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department. There are no backfit requirements associated with revisions to this document

  18. Nuclear criticality safety handbook. Version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook, Version 2 essentially includes the description of the Supplement Report to the Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook, released in 1995, into the first version of Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook, published in 1988. The following two points are new: (1) exemplifying safety margins related to modelled dissolution and extraction processes, (2) describing evaluation methods and alarm system for criticality accidents. Revision is made based on previous studies for the chapter that treats modelling the fuel system: e.g., the fuel grain size that the system can be regarded as homogeneous, non-uniformity effect of fuel solution, and burnup credit. This revision solves the inconsistencies found in the first version between the evaluation of errors found in JACS code system and criticality condition data that were calculated based on the evaluation. (author)

  19. Researches on nuclear criticality safety evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Suyama, Kenya; Nomura, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-10-01

    For criticality safety evaluation of burnup fuel, the general-purpose burnup calculation code, SWAT, was revised, and its precision was confirmed through comparison with other results from OECD/NEA's burnup credit benchmarks. Effect by replacing the evaluated nuclear data from JENDL-3.2 to ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2.2 was also studied. Correction factors were derived for conservative evaluation of nuclide concentrations obtained with the simplified burnup code ORIGEN2.1. The critical masses of curium were calculated and evaluated for nuclear criticality safety management of minor actinides. (author)

  20. Researches on nuclear criticality safety evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Suyama, Kenya; Nomura, Yasushi

    2003-01-01

    For criticality safety evaluation of burnup fuel, the general-purpose burnup calculation code, SWAT, was revised, and its precision was confirmed through comparison with other results from OECD/NEA's burnup credit benchmarks. Effect by replacing the evaluated nuclear data from JENDL-3.2 to ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2.2 was also studied. Correction factors were derived for conservative evaluation of nuclide concentrations obtained with the simplified burnup code ORIGEN2.1. The critical masses of curium were calculated and evaluated for nuclear criticality safety management of minor actinides. (author)

  1. Nuclear criticality safety: 300 Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Standard applies to the receipt, processing, storage, and shipment of fissionable material in the 300 Area and in any other facility under the control of the Reactor Materials Project Management Team (PMT). The objective is to establish practices and process conditions for the storage and handling of fissionable material that prevent the accidental assembly of a critical mass and that comply with DOE Orders as well as accepted industry practice

  2. Neutron nuclear data measurements for criticality safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guber Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To support the US Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program, neutron-induced cross section experiments were performed at the Geel Electron Linear Accelerator of the Joint Research Center Site Geel, European Union. Neutron capture and transmission measurements were carried out using metallic natural cerium and vanadium samples. Together with existing data, the measured data will be used for a new evaluation and will be submitted with covariances to the ENDF/B nuclear data library.

  3. USAEC Controls for Nuclear Criticality Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCluggage, W. C. [Division of Operational Safety, United States Atomic Energy Commission Washington, DC (United States)

    1966-05-15

    This is a paper written to provide a broad general view of the United States Atomic Energy Commission's controls for nuclear criticality safety within its own facilities. Included also is a brief' discussion of the USAEC's methods of obtaining assurance that the controls are being applied. The body of the document contains three sections. The first two describe the functions of the USAEC; the third deals with the contractors. The provisions of the Atomic Energy Act applicable to health and safety are discussed in relation to nuclear criticality safety. The use of United States Atomic Energy Commission manual chapters and Federal regulations is described. The functions of the USAEC Headquarters' offices and the operations offices are briefly outlined. Comments regarding the USAEC's inspection, auditing and appraisal programmes are included. Also briefly mentioned are the basic qualifications which must be met to become a contractor to possess and process or use fissionable materials. On the plant, factory or facility level the duties and responsibilities of industrial management are briefly outlined. The fundamental standards and their origin, together with the principal documents and guides are mentioned. The chief methods of control used by contractors operating large USAEC facilities and plants are described and compared. These include diagrams of how a typical nuclear criticality safety problem is handled from inception, design, construction and finally plant operation. Also included is a brief discussion of the contractors' methods of assuring strict employee compliance with the operating rules and limits. (author)

  4. Applications of PRA in nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, T.P.

    1992-01-01

    Traditionally, criticality accident prevention at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been based on a thorough review and understanding of proposed operations or changes to operations involving both process supervision and criticality safety staff. The outcome of this communication was usually an agreement, based on professional judgment, that certain accident sequences were credible and had to be precluded by design; others were incredible and thus did not warrant expenditures to further reduce their likelihood. The extent of documentation was generally in proportion to the complexity of the operation but never as detailed as that associated with quantified risk assessments. During the last 3 yr, nuclear criticality safety-related probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) have been performed on operations in two LANL facilities. Both of these were conducted in order to better understand the cost/benefit aspects of PRAs as they apply to largely hands-on operations with fissile material

  5. Computational methods for nuclear criticality safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maragni, M.G.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear criticality safety analyses require the utilization of methods which have been tested and verified against benchmarks results. In this work, criticality calculations based on the KENO-IV and MCNP codes are studied aiming the qualification of these methods at the IPEN-CNEN/SP and COPESP. The utilization of variance reduction techniques is important to reduce the computer execution time, and several of them are analysed. As practical example of the above methods, a criticality safety analysis for the storage tubes for irradiated fuel elements from the IEA-R1 research has been carried out. This analysis showed that the MCNP code is more adequate for problems with complex geometries, and the KENO-IV code shows conservative results when it is not used the generalized geometry option. (author)

  6. Applications of PRA in nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, T.P.

    1992-01-01

    Traditionally, criticality accident prevention at Los Alamos has been based on a thorough review and understanding of proposed operations of changes to operations, involving both process supervision and criticality safety staff. The outcome of this communication was usually an agreement, based on professional judgement, that certain accident sequences were credible and had to be reduced in likelihood either by administrative controls or by equipment design and others were not credible, and thus did not warrant expenditures to further reduce their likelihood. The extent of analysis and documentation was generally in proportion to the complexity of the operation but did not include quantified risk assessments. During the last three years nuclear criticality safety related Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) have been preformed on operations in two Los Alamos facilities. Both of these were conducted in order to better understand the cost/benefit aspects of PRA's as they apply to largely ''hands-on'' operations with fissile material for which human errors or equipment failures significant to criticality safety are both rare and unique. Based on these two applications and an appreciation of the historical criticality accident record (frequency and consequences) it is apparent that quantified risk assessments should be performed very selectively

  7. Evolvement of nuclear criticality safety programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketzlach, N.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear criticality safety (NCS) has developed from a discipline requiring the services of personnel with only a background in reactor physics to that involving reactor physics, process engineering, and design as well as administration of the program to ensure all its requirements are implemented. When Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was designed and constructed, the physicists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) were performing the criticality analyses. A physicist who had no chemical process or engineering experience was brought in from LANL to determine whether the facility would be safe. It was only because of his understanding of the reactor physics principles, scientific intuition, and some luck that the design and construction of the facility led to a safe plant. It took a number of years of experience with facility operations and the dedication of personnel for NCS to reach its present status as a recognized discipline

  8. Regulatory considerations for computational requirements for nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidinger, G.H.

    1995-01-01

    As part of its safety mission, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approves the use of computational methods as part of the demonstration of nuclear criticality safety. While each NRC office has different criteria for accepting computational methods for nuclear criticality safety results, the Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards (NMSS) approves the use of specific computational methods and methodologies for nuclear criticality safety analyses by specific companies (licensees or consultants). By contrast, the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation approves codes for general use. Historically, computational methods progressed from empirical methods to one-dimensional diffusion and discrete ordinates transport calculations and then to three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport calculations. With the advent of faster computational ability, three-dimensional diffusion and discrete ordinates transport calculations are gaining favor. With the proper user controls, NMSS has accepted any and all of these methods for demonstrations of nuclear criticality safety

  9. Proceedings of the first annual Nuclear Criticality Safety Technology Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    This document represents the published proceedings of the first annual Nuclear Criticality Safety Technology Project (NCSTP) Workshop, which took place May 12--14, 1992, in Gaithersburg, Md. The conference consisted of four sessions, each dealing with a specific aspect of nuclear criticality safety issues. The session titles were ''Criticality Code Development, Usage, and Validation,'' ''Experimental Needs, Facilities, and Measurements,'' ''Regulation, Compliance, and Their Effects on Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety,'' and ''The Nuclear Criticality Community Response to the USDOE Regulations and Compliance Directives.'' The conference also sponsored a Working Group session, a report of the NCSTP Working Group is also presented. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  10. Nuclear criticality safety: 3-day training course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1993-06-01

    The open-quotes 3-Day Training Courseclose quotes is an intensive course in criticality safety consisting of lectures and laboratory sessions, including active student participation in actual critical experiments, a visit to a plutonium processing facility, and in-depth discussions on safety philosophy. The program is directed toward personnel who currently have criticality safety responsibilities in the capacity of supervisory staff and/or line management. This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. It represents the contributions of many people, particularly Tom McLaughlin, the course's primary instructor. It should be noted that when chapters were extracted, an attempt was made to maintain footnotes and references as originally written. Photographs and illustrations are numbered sequentially

  11. Experience with performance based training of nuclear criticality safety engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.

    1993-01-01

    For non-reactor nuclear facilities, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) does not require that nuclear criticality safety engineers demonstrate qualification for their job. It is likely, however, that more formalism will be required in the future. Current DOE requirements for those positions which do have to demonstrate qualification indicate that qualification should be achieved by using a systematic approach such as performance based training (PBT). Assuming that PBT would be an acceptable mechanism for nuclear criticality safety engineer training in a more formal environment, a site-specific analysis of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job was performed. Based on this analysis, classes are being developed and delivered to a target audience of newer nuclear criticality safety engineers. Because current interest is in developing training for selected aspects of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job, the analysis is incompletely developed in some areas

  12. New Improved Nuclear Data for Nuclear Criticality and Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guber, Klaus H.; Leal, Luiz C.; Lampoudis, C.; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Emiliani, F.; Wynants, R.; Siegler, P.

    2011-01-01

    The Geel Electron Linear Accelerator (GELINA) was used to measure neutron total and capture cross sections of 182,183,184,186 W and 63,65 Cu in the energy range from 100 eV to ∼200 keV using the time-of-flight method. GELINA is the only high-power white neutron source with excellent timing resolution and ideally suited for these experiments. Concerns about the use of existing cross-section data in nuclear criticality calculations using Monte Carlo codes and benchmarks were a prime motivator for the new cross-section measurements. To support the Nuclear Criticality Safety Program, neutron cross-section measurements were initiated using GELINA at the EC-JRC-IRMM. Concerns about data deficiencies in some existing cross-section evaluations from libraries such as ENDF/B, JEFF, or JENDL for nuclear criticality calculations were the prime motivator for new cross-section measurements. Over the past years many troubles with existing nuclear data have emerged, such as problems related to proper normalization, neutron sensitivity backgrounds, poorly characterized samples, and use of improper pulse-height weighting functions. These deficiencies may occur in the resolved- and unresolved-resonance region and may lead to erroneous nuclear criticality calculations. An example is the use of the evaluated neutron cross-section data for tungsten in nuclear criticality safety calculations, which exhibit discrepancies in benchmark calculations and show the need for reliable covariance data. We measured the neutron total and capture cross sections of 182,183,184,186 W and 63,65 Cu in the neutron energy range from 100 eV to several hundred keV. This will help to improve the representation of the cross sections since most of the available evaluated data rely only on old measurements. Usually these measurements were done with poor experimental resolution or only over a very limited energy range, which is insufficient for the current application.

  13. The Department of Energy nuclear criticality safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felty, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper broadly covers key events and activities from which the Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) evolved. The NCSP maintains fundamental infrastructure that supports operational criticality safety programs. This infrastructure includes continued development and maintenance of key calculational tools, differential and integral data measurements, benchmark compilation, development of training resources, hands-on training, and web-based systems to enhance information preservation and dissemination. The NCSP was initiated in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety, and evolved from a predecessor program, the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program, that was initiated in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-2, The Need for Critical Experiment Capability. This paper also discusses the role Dr. Sol Pearlstein played in helping the Department of Energy lay the foundation for a robust and enduring criticality safety infrastructure.

  14. Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Briggs, J. Blair; Nigg, David W.

    2009-01-01

    One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

  15. Program of nuclear criticality safety experiment at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Iwao; Tachimori, Shoichi; Takeshita, Isao; Suzaki, Takenori; Ohnishi, Nobuaki

    1983-11-01

    JAERI is promoting the nuclear criticality safety research program, in which a new facility for criticality safety experiments (Criticality Safety Experimental Facility : CSEF) is to be built for the experiments with solution fuel. One of the experimental researches is to measure, collect and evaluate the experimental data needed for evaluation of criticality safety of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Another research area is a study of the phenomena themselves which are incidental to postulated critical accidents. Investigation of the scale and characteristics of the influences caused by the accident is also included in this research. The result of the conceptual design of CSEF is summarized in this report. (author)

  16. Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook, Version 2. English translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-08-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook, Version 2 essentially includes the description of the Supplement Report to the Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook, released in 1995, into the first version of the Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook, published in 1988. The following two points are new: (1) exemplifying safety margins related to modeled dissolution and extraction processes, (2) describing evaluation methods and alarm system for criticality accidents. Revision has been made based on previous studies for the chapter that treats modeling the fuel system: e.g., the fuel grain size that the system can be regarded as homogeneous, non-uniformity effect of fuel solution, an burnup credit. This revision has solved the inconsistencies found in the first version between the evaluation of errors found in JACS code system and the criticality condition data that were calculated based on the evaluation. This report is an English translation of the Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook, Version 2, originally published in Japanese as JAERI 1340 in 1999. (author)

  17. Martin Marietta Energy Systems Nuclear Criticality Safety Improvement Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speas, I.G.

    1987-01-01

    This report addresses questions raised by criticality safety violation at several DOE plants. Two charts are included that define the severity and reporting requirements for the six levels of accidents. A summary is given of all reported criticality incident at the DOE plants involved. The report concludes with Martin Marietta's Nuclear Criticality Safety Policy Statement

  18. Request from nuclear fuel cycle and criticality safety design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamasaki, Manabu; Sakashita, Kiichiro; Natsume, Toshihiro

    2005-01-01

    The quality and reliability of criticality safety design of nuclear fuel cycle systems such as fuel fabrication facilities, fuel reprocessing facilities, storage systems of various forms of nuclear materials or transportation casks have been largely dependent on the quality of criticality safety analyses using qualified criticality calculation code systems and reliable nuclear data sets. In this report, we summarize the characteristics of the nuclear fuel cycle systems and the perspective of the requirements for the nuclear data, with brief comments on the recent issue about spent fuel disposal. (author)

  19. Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project parameter study database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toffer, H.; Erickson, D.G.; Samuel, T.J.; Pearson, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    A computerized, knowledge-screened, comprehensive database of the nuclear criticality safety documentation has been assembled as part of the Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety (NCTS) Project. The database is focused on nuclear criticality parameter studies. The database has been computerized using dBASE III Plus and can be used on a personal computer or a workstation. More than 1300 documents have been reviewed by nuclear criticality specialists over the last 5 years to produce over 800 database entries. Nuclear criticality specialists will be able to access the database and retrieve information about topical parameter studies, authors, and chronology. The database places the accumulated knowledge in the nuclear criticality area over the last 50 years at the fingertips of a criticality analyst

  20. Criticality safety research on nuclear fuel cycle facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyoshi, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2004-07-01

    This paper present d s current status and future program of the criticality safety research on nuclear fuel cycle made by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Experimental research on solution fuel treated in reprocessing plant has been performed using two critical facilities, STACY and TRACY. Fundamental data of static and transient characteristics are accumulated for validation of criticality safety codes. Subcritical measurements are also made for developing a monitoring system for criticality safety. Criticality safety codes system for solution and power system, and evaluation method related to burnup credit are developed. (author)

  1. A Web-Based Nuclear Criticality Safety Bibliographic Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B L; Huang, S

    2007-01-01

    A bibliographic criticality safety database of over 13,000 records is available on the Internet as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) website. This database is easy to access via the Internet and gets substantial daily usage. This database and other criticality safety resources are available at ncsp.llnl.gov. The web database has evolved from more than thirty years of effort at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), beginning with compilations of critical experiment reports and American Nuclear Society Transactions

  2. USNRC licensing process as related to nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketzlach, N.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Code of Federal Regulations establishes procedures and criteria for the issuance of licenses to receive title to, own, acquire, deliver, receive, possess, use, and initially transfer special nuclear material; and establishes and provides for the terms and conditions upon which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) will issue such licenses. Section 70.22 of the regulations, ''Contents of Applications'', requires that applications for licenses contain proposed procedures to avoid accidental conditions of criticality. These procedures are elements of a nuclear criticality safety program for operations with fissionable materials at fuels and materials facilities (i.e., fuel cycle facilities other than nuclear reactors) in which there exists a potential for criticality accidents. To assist the applicant in providing specific information needed for a nuclear criticality safety program in a license application, the NRC has issued regulatory guides. The NRC requirements for nuclear criticality safety include organizational, administrative, and technical requirements. For purely technical matters on nuclear criticality safety these guides endorse national standards. Others provide guidance on the standard format and content of license applications, guidance on evaluating radiological consequences of criticality accidents, or guidance for dealing with other radiation safety issues. (author)

  3. Proceedings of the Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rene G. Sanchez

    1998-04-01

    This document contains summaries of most of the papers presented at the 1995 Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project (NCTSP) meeting, which was held May 16 and 17 at San Diego, Ca. The meeting was broken up into seven sessions, which covered the following topics: (1) Criticality Safety of Project Sapphire; (2) Relevant Experiments For Criticality Safety; (3) Interactions with the Former Soviet Union; (4) Misapplications and Limitations of Monte Carlo Methods Directed Toward Criticality Safety Analyses; (5) Monte Carlo Vulnerabilities of Execution and Interpretation; (6) Monte Carlo Vulnerabilities of Representation; and (7) Benchmark Comparisons.

  4. Critical enrichment and critical density of infinite systems for nuclear criticality safety evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka; Koyama, Takashi; Komuro, Yuichi

    1986-03-01

    Critical enrichment and critical density of homogenous infinite systems, such as U-H 2 O, UO 2 -H 2 O, UO 2 F 2 aqueous solution, UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 aqueous solution, Pu-H 2 O, PuO 2 -H 2 O, Pu(NO 3 ) 4 aqueous solution and PuO 2 ·UO 2 -H 2 O, were calculated with the criticality safety evaluation computer code system JACS for nuclear criticality safety evaluation on fuel facilities. The computed results were compared with the data described in European and American criticality handbooks and showed good agreement with each other. (author)

  5. Experience with performance based training of nuclear criticality safety engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.

    1993-01-01

    Historically, new entrants to the practice of nuclear criticality safety have learned their job primarily by on-the-job training (OJT) often by association with an experienced nuclear criticality safety engineer who probably also learned their job by OJT. Typically, the new entrant learned what he/she needed to know to solve a particular problem and accumulated experience as more problems were solved. It is likely that more formalism will be required in the future. Current US Department of Energy requirements for those positions which have to demonstrate qualification indicate that it should be achieved by using a systematic approach such as performance based training (PBT). Assuming that PBT would be an acceptable mechanism for nuclear criticality safety engineer training in a more formal environment, a site-specific analysis of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job was performed. Based on this analysis, classes are being developed and delivered to a target audience of newer nuclear criticality safety engineers. Because current interest is in developing training for selected aspects of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job, the analysis i's incompletely developed in some areas. Details of this analysis are provided in this report

  6. Nuclear criticality safety program at the Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lell, R.M.; Fujita, E.K.; Tracy, D.B.; Klann, R.T.; Imel, G.R.; Benedict, R.W.; Rigg, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    The Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) is designed to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel commercial-scale remote pyrometallurgical process for metallic fuels from liquid metal-cooled reactors and to show closure of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Requirements for nuclear criticality safety impose the most restrictive of the various constraints on the operation of FCF. The upper limits on batch sizes and other important process parameters are determined principally by criticality safety considerations. To maintain an efficient operation within appropriate safety limits, it is necessary to formulate a nuclear criticality safety program that integrates equipment design, process development, process modeling, conduct of operations, a measurement program, adequate material control procedures, and nuclear criticality analysis. The nuclear criticality safety program for FCF reflects this integration, ensuring that the facility can be operated efficiently without compromising safety. The experience gained from the conduct of this program in the Fuel cycle Facility will be used to design and safely operate IFR facilities on a commercial scale. The key features of the nuclear criticality safety program are described. The relationship of these features to normal facility operation is also described

  7. Tank waste remediation system nuclear criticality safety program management review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRADY RAAP, M.C.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the results of an internal management review of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) criticality safety program, performed in advance of the DOE/RL assessment for closure of the TWRS Nuclear Criticality Safety Issue, March 1994. Resolution of the safety issue was identified as Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-40-12, due September 1999

  8. Supplement report to the Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Komuro, Yuichi; Nakajima, Ken

    1995-10-01

    Supplementing works to 'The Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook' of Japan have been continued since 1988, the year the handbook edited by the Science and Technology Agency first appeared. This report publishes the fruits obtained in the supplementing works. Substantial improvements are made in the chapters of 'Modelling the evaluation object' and 'Methodology for analytical safety assessment', and newly added are chapters of 'Criticality safety of chemical processes', 'Criticality accidents and their evaluation methods' and 'Basic principles on design and installation of criticality alarm system'. (author)

  9. Proceedings of the Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, R.G. [comp.

    1994-01-01

    This report is the proceedings of the annual Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCTSP) Workshop held in Monterey, California, on April 16--28, 1993. The NCTSP was sponsored by the Department of Energy and organized by the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The report is divided into six sections reflecting the sessions outlined on the workshop agenda.

  10. Proceedings of the Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    This report is the proceedings of the annual Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCTSP) Workshop held in Monterey, California, on April 16--28, 1993. The NCTSP was sponsored by the Department of Energy and organized by the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The report is divided into six sections reflecting the sessions outlined on the workshop agenda

  11. Nuclear criticality safety. Chapter 0530 of AEC manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The programme objectives of this chapter of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission manual on nuclear criticality safety are to protect the health and safety of the public and of the government and contractor personnel working in plants that handle fissionable material and to protect public and private property from the consequences of a criticality accident occurring in AEC-owned plants and other AEC-contracted activities involving fissionable materials

  12. Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization qualification program. Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization (NCSO) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of highly qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document defines the Qualification Program to address the NCSO technical and managerial qualification as required by the Y-12 Training Implementation Matrix (TIM). It is implemented through a combination of LMES plant-wide training courses and professional nuclear criticality safety training provided within the organization. This Qualification Program is applicable to technical and managerial NCSO personnel, including temporary personnel, sub-contractors and/or LMES employees on loan to the NCSO, who perform the NCS tasks or serve NCS-related positions as defined in sections 5 and 6 of this program

  13. Validation of calculational methods for nuclear criticality safety - approved 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The American National Standard for Nuclear Criticality Safety in Operations with Fissionable Materials Outside Reactors, N16.1-1975, states in 4.2.5: In the absence of directly applicable experimental measurements, the limits may be derived from calculations made by a method shown to be valid by comparison with experimental data, provided sufficient allowances are made for uncertainties in the data and in the calculations. There are many methods of calculation which vary widely in basis and form. Each has its place in the broad spectrum of problems encountered in the nuclear criticality safety field; however, the general procedure to be followed in establishing validity is common to all. The standard states the requirements for establishing the validity and area(s) of applicability of any calculational method used in assessing nuclear criticality safety

  14. Nuclear criticality safety specialist training and qualification programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopper, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Nuclear Criticality Safety Division of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) in 1967, the nuclear criticality safety (NCS) community has sought to provide an exchange of information at a national level to facilitate the education and development of NCS specialists. In addition, individual criticality safety organizations within government contractor and licensed commercial nonreactor facilities have developed training and qualification programs for their NCS specialists. However, there has been substantial variability in the content and quality of these program requirements and personnel qualifications, at least as measured within the government contractor community. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief, general history of staff training and to describe the current direction and focus of US DOE guidance for the content of training and qualification programs designed to develop NCS specialists

  15. Research on neutron source multiplication method in nuclear critical safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Qingfu; Shi Yongqian; Hu Dingsheng

    2005-01-01

    The paper concerns in the neutron source multiplication method research in nuclear critical safety. Based on the neutron diffusion equation with external neutron source the effective sub-critical multiplication factor k s is deduced, and k s is different to the effective neutron multiplication factor k eff in the case of sub-critical system with external neutron source. The verification experiment on the sub-critical system indicates that the parameter measured with neutron source multiplication method is k s , and k s is related to the external neutron source position in sub-critical system and external neutron source spectrum. The relation between k s and k eff and the effect of them on nuclear critical safety is discussed. (author)

  16. Proceedings of the nuclear criticality technology safety project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, R.G. [comp.

    1997-06-01

    This document contains summaries of the most of the papers presented at the 1994 Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project (NCTSP) meeting, which was held May 10 and 11 at Williamsburg, Va. The meeting was broken up into seven sessions, which covered the following topics: (1) Validation and Application of Calculations; (2) Relevant Experiments for Criticality Safety; (3) Experimental Facilities and Capabilities; (4) Rad-Waste and Weapons Disassembly; (5) Criticality Safety Software and Development; (6) Criticality Safety Studies at Universities; and (7) Training. The minutes and list of participants of the Critical Experiment Needs Identification Workgroup meeting, which was held on May 9 at the same venue, has been included as an appendix. A second appendix contains the names and addresses of all NCTSP meeting participants. Separate abstracts have been indexed to the database for contributions to this proceedings.

  17. Proceedings of the nuclear criticality technology safety project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, R.G.

    1997-06-01

    This document contains summaries of the most of the papers presented at the 1994 Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project (NCTSP) meeting, which was held May 10 and 11 at Williamsburg, Va. The meeting was broken up into seven sessions, which covered the following topics: (1) Validation and Application of Calculations; (2) Relevant Experiments for Criticality Safety; (3) Experimental Facilities and Capabilities; (4) Rad-Waste and Weapons Disassembly; (5) Criticality Safety Software and Development; (6) Criticality Safety Studies at Universities; and (7) Training. The minutes and list of participants of the Critical Experiment Needs Identification Workgroup meeting, which was held on May 9 at the same venue, has been included as an appendix. A second appendix contains the names and addresses of all NCTSP meeting participants. Separate abstracts have been indexed to the database for contributions to this proceedings

  18. Nuclear criticality safety parameter evaluation for uranium metallic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Andrea; Abe, Alfredo, E-mail: andreasdpz@hotmail.com, E-mail: abye@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Energia Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear criticality safety during fuel fabrication process, transport and storage of fissile and fissionable materials requires criticality safety analysis. Normally the analysis involves computer calculations and safety parameters determination. There are many different Criticality Safety Handbooks where such safety parameters for several different fissile mixtures are presented. The handbooks have been published to provide data and safety principles for the design, safety evaluation and licensing of operations, transport and storage of fissile and fissionable materials. The data often comprise not only critical values, but also subcritical limits and safe parameters obtained for specific conditions using criticality safety calculation codes such as SCALE system. Although many data are available for different fissile and fissionable materials, compounds, mixtures, different enrichment level, there are a lack of information regarding a uranium metal alloy, specifically UMo and UNbZr. Nowadays uranium metal alloy as fuel have been investigated under RERTR program as possible candidate to became a new fuel for research reactor due to high density. This work aim to evaluate a set of criticality safety parameters for uranium metal alloy using SCALE system and MCNP Monte Carlo code. (author)

  19. Applications of probabilistic risk analysis in nuclear criticality safety design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    Many documents have been prepared that try to define the scope of the criticality analysis and that suggest adding probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) to the deterministic safety analysis. The report of the US Department of Energy (DOE) AL 5481.1B suggested that an accident is credible if the occurrence probability is >1 x 10 -6 /yr. The draft DOE 5480 safety analysis report suggested that safety analyses should include the application of methods such as deterministic safety analysis, risk assessment, reliability engineering, common-cause failure analysis, human reliability analysis, and human factor safety analysis techniques. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report NRC SG830.110 suggested that major safety analysis methods should include but not be limited to risk assessment, reliability engineering, and human factor safety analysis. All of these suggestions have recommended including PRA in the traditional criticality analysis

  20. Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization training implementation. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1997-05-19

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization (NCSO) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document provides a listing of the roles and responsibilities of NCSO personnel with respect to training and details of the Training Management System (TMS) programs, Mentoring Checklists and Checksheets, as well as other documentation utilized to implement the program. This Training Implementation document is applicable to all technical and managerial NCSO personnel, including temporary personnel, sub-contractors and/or LMES employees on loan to the NCSO, who are in a qualification program.

  1. Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization training implementation. Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization (NCSO) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document provides a listing of the roles and responsibilities of NCSO personnel with respect to training and details of the Training Management System (TMS) programs, Mentoring Checklists and Checksheets, as well as other documentation utilized to implement the program. This Training Implementation document is applicable to all technical and managerial NCSO personnel, including temporary personnel, sub-contractors and/or LMES employees on loan to the NCSO, who are in a qualification program

  2. Preparation for the second edition of nuclear criticality safety handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Nomura, Yasushi

    1997-01-01

    The making of the second edition of Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook entered the final stage of investigation by the working group. In the second edition, the newest results of the researches in Japan were taken. In this report, among the subjects which were examined continuously from the first edition published in 1988, the size of fuel particles which can be regarded as homogeneous even in a heterogeneous system, the reactivity effect when fuel concentration distribution became not uniform in a homogeneous fuel system, the method of evaluating criticality safety in which submersion is not assumed, and the criticality data when fuel burning is considered are explained. Further, about the matters related to the criticality in chemical processes and the matters related to criticality accident, the outlines are introduced. Finally, the state of preparation for aiming at the third edition is mentioned. Criticality safety control is important for overall nuclear fuel cycle including the transportation and storage of fuel. The course of the publication of this Handbook is outlined. The matters which have been successively examined from the first edition, the results of criticality safety analysis for the dissolving tanks of fuel reprocessing, and the analysis code and the simplified evaluation method for criticality accident are reported. (K.I.)

  3. Design aspects of safety critical instrumentation of nuclear installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan, P. [Electronics Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)]. E-mail: swamy@igcar.ernet.in

    2005-07-01

    Safety critical instrumentation systems ensure safe shutdown/configuration of the nuclear installation when process status exceeds the safety threshold limits. Design requirements for safety critical instrumentation such as functional and electrical independence, fail-safe design, and architecture to ensure the specified unsafe failure rate and safe failure rate, human machine interface (HMI), etc., are explained with examples. Different fault tolerant architectures like 1/2, 2/2, 2/3 hot stand-by are compared for safety critical instrumentation. For embedded systems, software quality assurance is detailed both during design phase and O and M phase. Different software development models such as waterfall model and spiral model are explained with examples. The error distribution in embedded system is detailed. The usage of formal method is outlined to reduce the specification error. The guidelines for coding of application software are outlined. The interface problems of safety critical instrumentation with sensors, actuators, other computer systems, etc., are detailed with examples. Testability and maintainability shall be taken into account during design phase. Online diagnostics for safety critical instrumentation is detailed with examples. Salient details of design guides from Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, International Atomic Energy Agency and standards from IEEE, BIS are given towards the design of safety critical instrumentation systems. (author)

  4. Design aspects of safety critical instrumentation of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaminathan, P.

    2005-01-01

    Safety critical instrumentation systems ensure safe shutdown/configuration of the nuclear installation when process status exceeds the safety threshold limits. Design requirements for safety critical instrumentation such as functional and electrical independence, fail-safe design, and architecture to ensure the specified unsafe failure rate and safe failure rate, human machine interface (HMI), etc., are explained with examples. Different fault tolerant architectures like 1/2, 2/2, 2/3 hot stand-by are compared for safety critical instrumentation. For embedded systems, software quality assurance is detailed both during design phase and O and M phase. Different software development models such as waterfall model and spiral model are explained with examples. The error distribution in embedded system is detailed. The usage of formal method is outlined to reduce the specification error. The guidelines for coding of application software are outlined. The interface problems of safety critical instrumentation with sensors, actuators, other computer systems, etc., are detailed with examples. Testability and maintainability shall be taken into account during design phase. Online diagnostics for safety critical instrumentation is detailed with examples. Salient details of design guides from Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, International Atomic Energy Agency and standards from IEEE, BIS are given towards the design of safety critical instrumentation systems. (author)

  5. Nuclear criticality safety training: guidelines for DOE contractors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowell, M.R.

    1983-09-01

    The DOE Order 5480.1A, Chapter V, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, establishes safety procedures and requirements for DOE nuclear facilities. This guide has been developed as an aid to implementing the Chapter V requirements pertaining to nuclear criticality safety training. The guide outlines relevant conceptual knowledge and demonstrated good practices in job performance. It addresses training program operations requirements in the areas of employee evaluations, employee training records, training program evaluations, and training program records. It also suggests appropriate feedback mechanisms for criticality safety training program improvement. The emphasis is on academic rather than hands-on training. This allows a decoupling of these guidelines from specific facilities. It would be unrealistic to dictate a universal program of training because of the wide variation of operations, levels of experience, and work environments among DOE contractors and facilities. Hence, these guidelines do not address the actual implementation of a nuclear criticality safety training program, but rather they outline the general characteristics that should be included

  6. Nuclear Criticality Safety Assessment for Tank 38H Salt Dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    This assessment report of sample results of the accumulating insoluble solids from Tank 38H demonstrates that an inherent subcritical condition for nuclear criticality safety exists during saltcake dissolution. This report also defines criteria for future sampling of Tank 38H for continued verification of the inherent subcritical condition as saltcake dissolution proceeds

  7. Analysis of the criticality safety of a nuclear fuel deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landeyro, P.A.; Mincarini, M.

    1987-01-01

    In the present work a safety analysis from criticality accidents of nuclear fuel deposits is performed. The analysis is performed utilizing two methods derived from different physical principes: 1) superficial density method, obtained from experimental research; 2) solid angle method, derived from transport theory

  8. Merger of Nuclear Data with Criticality Safety Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrien, H.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.

    1999-09-20

    In this paper we report on current activities related to the merger of differential/integral data (especially in the resolved-resonance region) with nuclear criticality safety computations. Techniques are outlined for closer coupling of many processes � measurement, data reduction, differential-data analysis, integral-data analysis, generating multigroup cross sections, data-testing, criticality computations � which in the past have been treated independently.

  9. Merger of Nuclear Data with Criticality Safety Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrien, H.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we report on current activities related to the merger of differential/integral data (especially in the resolved-resonance region) with nuclear criticality safety computations. Techniques are outlined for closer coupling of many processes measurement, data reduction, differential-data analysis, integral-data analysis, generating multigroup cross sections, data-testing, criticality computations which in the past have been treated independently

  10. SRTC criticality safety technical review: Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation 93-04 enriched uranium receipt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathbun, R.

    1993-01-01

    Review of NMP-NCS-930087, open-quotes Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation 93-04 Enriched Uranium Receipt (U), July 30, 1993, close quotes was requested of SRTC (Savannah River Technology Center) Applied Physics Group. The NCSE is a criticality assessment to determine the mass limit for Engineered Low Level Trench (ELLT) waste uranium burial. The intent is to bury uranium in pits that would be separated by a specified amount of undisturbed soil. The scope of the technical review, documented in this report, consisted of (1) an independent check of the methods and models employed, (2) independent HRXN/KENO-V.a calculations of alternate configurations, (3) application of ANSI/ANS 8.1, and (4) verification of WSRC Nuclear Criticality Safety Manual procedures. The NCSE under review concludes that a 500 gram limit per burial position is acceptable to ensure the burial site remains in a critically safe configuration for all normal and single credible abnormal conditions. This reviewer agrees with that conclusion

  11. Nuclear data needs within the U. S. Nuclear Criticality Safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, R.D.; Dunn, M.E.; Little, R.C.; Felty, J.R.; McKamy, J.N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper will present the nuclear data needs currently identified within the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). It will identify the priority data needs; it will describe the process of prioritizing those needs; and it will provide brief examples of recent data advances which have successfully addressed some of the priority criticality safety data needs.

  12. Role of criticality models in ANSI standards for nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    Two methods used in nuclear criticality safety evaluations in the area of neutron interaction among subcritical components of fissile materials are the solid angle and surface density techniques. The accuracy and use of these models are briefly discussed

  13. Cluster monte carlo method for nuclear criticality safety calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei Lucheng

    1984-01-01

    One of the most important applications of the Monte Carlo method is the calculation of the nuclear criticality safety. The fair source game problem was presented at almost the same time as the Monte Carlo method was applied to calculating the nuclear criticality safety. The source iteration cost may be reduced as much as possible or no need for any source iteration. This kind of problems all belongs to the fair source game prolems, among which, the optimal source game is without any source iteration. Although the single neutron Monte Carlo method solved the problem without the source iteration, there is still quite an apparent shortcoming in it, that is, it solves the problem without the source iteration only in the asymptotic sense. In this work, a new Monte Carlo method called the cluster Monte Carlo method is given to solve the problem further

  14. Evaluation for nuclear safety-critical software reliability of DCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ying

    2015-01-01

    With the development of control and information technology at NPPs, software reliability is important because software failure is usually considered as one form of common cause failures in Digital I and C Systems (DCS). The reliability analysis of DCS, particularly qualitative and quantitative evaluation on the nuclear safety-critical software reliability belongs to a great challenge. To solve this problem, not only comprehensive evaluation model and stage evaluation models are built in this paper, but also prediction and sensibility analysis are given to the models. It can make besement for evaluating the reliability and safety of DCS. (author)

  15. Nuclear criticality safety basics for personnel working with nuclear fissionable materials. Phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vausher, A.L.

    1984-10-01

    DOE order 5480.1A, Chapter V, ''Safety of Nuclear Facilities,'' establishes safety procedures and requirements for DOE nuclear facilities. The ''Nuclear Criticality Safety Basic Program - Phase I'' is documented in this report. The revised program has been developed to clearly illustrate the concept of nuclear safety and to help the individual employee incorporate safe behavior in his daily work performance. Because of this, the subject of safety has been approached through its three fundamentals: scientific basis, engineering criteria, and administrative controls. Only basics of these three elements were presented. 5 refs

  16. Criticality safety calculations for the nuclear waste disposal canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anttila, M.

    1996-12-01

    The criticality safety of the copper/iron canisters developed for the final disposal of the Finnish spent fuel has been studied with the MCNP4A code based on the Monte Carlo technique and with the fuel assembly burnup programs CASMO-HEX and CASMO-4. Two rather similar types of spent fuel disposal canisters have been studied. One canister type has been designed for hexagonal VVER-440 fuel assemblies used at the Loviisa nuclear power plant (IVO canister) and the other one for square BWR fuel bundles used at the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant (TVO canister). (10 refs.)

  17. ICNC2003: Proceedings of the seventh international conference on nuclear criticality safety. Challenges in the pursuit of global nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    This proceedings contain (technical, oral and poster papers) presented papers at the Seventh International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety ICNC2003 held on 20-24 October 2003, in Tokai, Ibaraki, Japan, following ICNC'99 in Versailles, France. The theme of this conference is 'Challenges in the Pursuit of Global Nuclear Criticality Safety'. This proceedings represent the current status of nuclear criticality safety research throughout the world. The 81 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  18. ICNC2003: Proceedings of the seventh international conference on nuclear criticality safety. Challenges in the pursuit of global nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    This proceedings contain (technical, oral and poster papers) presented papers at the Seventh International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety ICNC2003 held on 20-24 October 2003, in Tokai, Ibaraki, Japan, following ICNC'99 in Versailles, France. The theme of this conference is 'Challenges in the Pursuit of Global Nuclear Criticality Safety'. This proceedings represent the current status of nuclear criticality safety research throughout the world. The 79 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  19. Nuclear Data Activities in Support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westfall, R.M.; McKnight, R.D.

    2005-01-01

    The DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) provides the technical infrastructure maintenance for those technologies applied in the evaluation and performance of safe fissionable-material operations in the DOE complex. These technologies include an Analytical Methods element for neutron transport as well as the development of sensitivity/uncertainty methods, the performance of Critical Experiments, evaluation and qualification of experiments as Benchmarks, and a comprehensive Nuclear Data program coordinated by the NCSP Nuclear Data Advisory Group (NDAG).The NDAG gathers and evaluates differential and integral nuclear data, identifies deficiencies, and recommends priorities on meeting DOE criticality safety needs to the NCSP Criticality Safety Support Group (CSSG). Then the NDAG identifies the required resources and unique capabilities for meeting these needs, not only for performing measurements but also for data evaluation with nuclear model codes as well as for data processing for criticality safety applications. The NDAG coordinates effort with the leadership of the National Nuclear Data Center, the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), and the Working Party on International Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee. The overall objective is to expedite the issuance of new data and methods to the DOE criticality safety user. This paper describes these activities in detail, with examples based upon special studies being performed in support of criticality safety for a variety of DOE operations

  20. The Health and Safety Executive's regulatory framework for control of nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.; Simister, D.N.

    1991-01-01

    In the United Kingdom the Health and Safety at Work Act, 1974 is the main legal instrument under which risks to people from work activities are controlled. Certain sections of the Nuclear Installations Act, 1965 which deal with the licensing of nuclear sites and the regulatory control of risks arising from them, including the risk from accidental criticality, are relevant statutory provisions of the Health and Safety at Work Act. The responsibility for safety rests with the operator who has to make and implement arrangements to prevent accidental criticality. The adequacy of these arrangements must be demonstrated in a safety case to the regulatory authorities. Operators are encouraged to treat each plant on its own merits and develop the safety case accordingly. The Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII), for its part, assesses the adequacy of the operator's safety case against the industry's own standards and criteria, but more particularly against the NII's safety assessment principles and guides, and international standards. Risks should be made as low as reasonably practicable. Generally, the NII seeks improvements in safety using an enforcement policy which operates at a number of levels, ranging from persuasion through discussion to the ultimate deterrent of withdrawal of a site licence. This paper describes the role of the NII, which includes a specialist criticality expertise, within the Health and Safety Executive, in regulating the nuclear sites from the criticality safety viewpoint. (Author)

  1. University of New Mexico short course in nuclear criticality safety: Training for new NCS [nuclear criticality safety] specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    Since 1973, the University of New Mexico (UNM) has given ten short courses in nuclear criticality safety (NCS). Generally, thee have been given every other year, although in 1989 it was decided to offer the course on an annual basis. This decision was primarily based on the large demand for NCS specialists and a large turnover rate in the industry. The purpose of the course is to provide a 1-week overview of NCS. The typical student has been involved in NCS for <1 yr, although it many cases they have been associated with the nuclear industry in other capacities for many years. The short course is conducted at several levels. Carefully prepared lectures provide the information framework for selected topics. The following topics are covered in the course: basic reactor theory, criticality accidents and consequences, hand calculations, administration of a criticality safety program, regulators and their processes, computer methods and applications, experimental methods and correlations, overview of some process operations, and transportation and storage issues in NCS

  2. Administrative practices for nuclear criticality safety, ANSI/ANS-8.19-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    American National Standard, open-quotes Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety,close quotes American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society (ANSI/ANS)-8.19-1996, addresses the responsibilities of management, supervision, and the criticality safety staff in the administration of an effective criticality safety program. Characteristics of operating procedures, process evaluations, material control procedures, and emergency plans are discussed

  3. Critical Reflections on Conservatism in Nuclear Safety Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Sung; Choi, Kwang Sik

    2007-01-01

    A recent report published by the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) says that a fundamental principle for safety regulators is the practice of conservative decision making. Nuclear regulators frequently face challenging issues surrounded by uncertainties or lack of data and information. No matter what efforts will be made to collect the available information and to assess the issues, nobody can clear all the uncertainties and make absolutely certain decision. More often than not, the regulators have to make a decision in light of continuing uncertainties and limited information. It is at this point that the principle of conservatism should play a role. However the principle comes in many diverse forms such as default conservatism, precautionary principle, defense in depth and realistic conservatism. These different forms of conservatism have different roles and meanings that will take a decision maker to drastically different results. This paper reviews different forms of conservatism in critical way, presents analytical framework for decision making under uncertainty and suggests future research works needed

  4. Training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    A training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff personnel has been developed and implemented. The program is compliant with requirements and provides evidence that a systematic approach has been taken to indoctrinate new technical staff. Development involved task analysis to determine activities where training was necessary and the standard which must be attained to qualify. Structured mentoring is used where experienced personnel interact with candidates using checksheets to guide candidates through various steps and to provide evidence that steps have been accomplished. Credit can be taken for the previous experience of personnel by means of evaluation boards which can credit or modify checksheet steps. Considering just the wealth of business practice and site specific information a new person at a facility needs to assimilate, the program has been effective in indoctrinating new technical staff personnel and integrating them into a productive role. The program includes continuing training

  5. Qualification of safety-critical software for digital reactor safety system in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kee-Choon; Park, Gee-Yong; Kim, Jang-Yeol; Lee, Jang-Soo

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the software qualification activities for the safety-critical software of the digital reactor safety system in nuclear power plants. The main activities of the software qualification processes are the preparation of software planning documentations, verification and validation (V and V) of the software requirements specifications (SRS), software design specifications (SDS) and codes, and the testing of the integrated software and integrated system. Moreover, the software safety analysis and software configuration management are involved in the software qualification processes. The V and V procedure for SRS and SDS contains a technical evaluation, licensing suitability evaluation, inspection and traceability analysis, formal verification, software safety analysis, and an evaluation of the software configuration management. The V and V processes for the code are a traceability analysis, source code inspection, test case and test procedure generation. Testing is the major V and V activity of the software integration and system integration phases. The software safety analysis employs a hazard operability method and software fault tree analysis. The software configuration management in each software life cycle is performed by the use of a nuclear software configuration management tool. Through these activities, we can achieve the functionality, performance, reliability, and safety that are the major V and V objectives of the safety-critical software in nuclear power plants. (author)

  6. Nuclear criticality safety program for environmental restoration projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marble, R.C.; Brown, T.D.

    1994-05-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), formerly known as the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC), is located on a 1050 acre site approximately twenty miles northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. The production area of the site covers approximately 136 acres in the central portion of the site. Surrounding the core production area is a buffer consisting of leased grazing land, reforested land, and unused areas. The uranium processing facility was designed and constructed in the early 1950s. During the period from 1952 to 1989 the site produced uranium feed material and uranium products used in the United States weapons complex. Production at the site ended in 1989, when the site was shut down for what was expected to be a short period of time. However, the FUTC was permanently shut down in 1991, and the site's mission was changed from production to environmental restoration. The objective of this paper is to give an update on activities at the Fernald Site and to describe the Nuclear Criticality Safety issues that are currently being addressed

  7. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of Spray Booth Operations in X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report evaluates nuclear criticality safety for Spray Booth Operations in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A general description of current procedures and related hardware/equipment is presented. Control parameters relevant to nuclear criticality safety are explained, and a consolidated listing of administrative controls and safety systems is developed. Based on compliance with DOE Orders and MMES practices, the overall operation is evaluated, and recommendations for enhanced safety are suggested

  8. Nuclear criticality safety calculational analysis for small-diameter containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeTellier, M.S.; Smallwood, D.J.; Henkel, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents calculations performed to establish a technical basis for the nuclear criticality safety of favorable geometry containers, sometimes referred to as 5-inch containers, in use at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A list of containers currently used in the plant is shown in Table 1.0-1. These containers are currently used throughout the plant with no mass limits. The use of containers with geometries or material types other than those addressed in this evaluation must be bounded by this analysis or have an additional analysis performed. The following five basic container geometries were modeled and bound all container geometries in Table 1.0-1: (1) 4.32-inch-diameter by 50-inch-high polyethylene bottle; (2) 5.0-inch-diameter by 24-inch-high polyethylene bottle; (3) 5.25-inch-diameter by 24-inch-high steel can (open-quotes F-canclose quotes); (4) 5.25-inch-diameter by 15-inch-high steel can (open-quotes Z-canclose quotes); and (5) 5.0-inch-diameter by 9-inch-high polybottle (open-quotes CO-4close quotes). Each container type is evaluated using five basic reflection and interaction models that include single containers and multiple containers in normal and in credible abnormal conditions. The uranium materials evaluated are UO 2 F 2 +H 2 O and UF 4 +oil materials at 100% and 10% enrichments and U 3 O 8 , and H 2 O at 100% enrichment. The design basis safe criticality limit for the Portsmouth facility is k eff + 2σ < 0.95. The KENO study results may be used as the basis for evaluating general use of these containers in the plant

  9. Critical evaluation of nuclear safety reports Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egely, Gy.

    1987-01-01

    Licensing procedures of siting, commissioning and operation of nuclear power plants in the USA, FRG, France and Japan are compared. The standard format and content of nuclear safety analysis reports including the general description of the plant, the presentation of the characteristics of siting, building structures, components, facilities, the reactors, the cooling system, the safety system, the measuring and control system, the power supply system, the auxilliary system, the energy transformation system, etc. are discussed in detail by the example of the US procedure. (V.N.)

  10. SRTC criticality safety technical review: Nuclear criticality safety evaluation 94-02, uranium solidification facility pencil tank module spacing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathbun, R.

    1994-01-01

    Review of NMP-NCS-94-0087, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation 94-02: Uranium Solidification Facility Pencil Tank Module Spacing (U), April 18, 1994,'' was requested of the SRTC Applied Physics Group. The NCSE is a criticality assessment to show that the USF process module spacing, as given in Non-Conformance Report SHM-0045, remains safe for operation. The NCSE under review concludes that the module spacing as given in Non-Conformance Report SHM-0045 remains in a critically safe configuration for all normal and single credible abnormal conditions. After a thorough review of the NCSE, this reviewer agrees with that conclusion

  11. Developing guidance in the nuclear criticality safety assessment for fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galet, C.; Evo, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this poster IRSN (Institute for radiation protection and nuclear safety) presents its safety guides whose purpose is to transmit the safety assessment know-how to any 'junior' staff or even to give a view of the safety approach on the overall risks to any staff member. IRSN has written a first version of such a safety guide for fuel cycle facilities and laboratories. It is organized into several chapters: some refer to types of assessments, others concern the types of risks. Currently, this guide contains 13 chapters and each chapter consists of three parts. In parallel to the development of criticality chapter of this guide, the IRSN criticality department has developed a nuclear criticality safety guide. It follows the structure of the three parts fore-mentioned, but it presents a more detailed first part and integrates, in the third part, the experience feedback collected on nuclear facilities. The nuclear criticality safety guide is online on the IRSN's web site

  12. Criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, G.

    1983-01-01

    When a sufficient quantity of fissile material is brought together a self-sustaining neutron chain reaction will be started in it and will continue until some change occurs in the fissile material to stop the chain reaction. The quantity of fissile material required is the 'Critical Mass'. This is not a fixed quantity even for a given type of fissile material but varies between quite wide limits depending on a number of factors. In a nuclear reactor the critical mass of fissile material is assembled under well-defined condition to produce a controllable chain reaction. The same materials have to be handled outside the reactor in all stages of fuel element manufacture, storage, transport and irradiated fuel reprocessing. At any stage it is possible (at least in principle) to assemble a critical mass and thus initiate an accidental and uncontrollable chain reaction. Avoiding this is what criticality safety is all about. A system is just critical when the rate of production of neutrons balances the rate of loss either by escape or by absorption. The factors affecting criticality are, therefore, those which effect neutron production and loss. The principal ones are:- type of nuclide and enrichment (or isotopic composition), moderation, reflection, concentration (density), shape and interaction. Each factor is considered in detail. (author)

  13. DOE spent nuclear fuel -- Nuclear criticality safety challenges and safeguards initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopper, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    The field of nuclear criticality safety is confronted with growing technical challenges and the need for forward-thinking initiatives to address and resolve issues surrounding economic, safe and secure packaging, transport, interim storage, and long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel. These challenges are reflected in multiparameter problems involving optimization of packaging designs for maximizing the density of material per package while ensuring subcriticality and safety under variable normal and hypothetical transport and storage conditions and for minimizing costs. Historic and recently revealed uncertainties in basic data used for performing nuclear subcriticality evaluations and safety analyses highlight the need to be vigilant in assessing the validity and range of applicability of calculational evaluations that represent extrapolations from ''benchmark'' data. Examples of these uncertainties are provided. Additionally, uncertainties resulting from the safeguarding of various forms of fissionable materials in transit and storage are discussed

  14. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    This document contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE non-reactor nuclear facilities. Adherence to these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in criticality safety evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.24

  15. Overview of the activities of the OECD/NEA/NSC working party on nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouri, A.; Blomquist, R.; Bradyraap, M.; Briggs, B.; Cousinou, P.; Nomura, Y.; Weber, W.

    2003-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) started dealing with criticality-safety related subjects back in the seventies. In the mid-nineties, several activities related to criticality-safety were grouped together into the Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety. This working party has since been operating and reporting to the Nuclear Science Committee. Six expert groups co-ordinate various activities ranging from experimental evaluations to code and data inter-comparisons for the study of static and transient criticality behaviours. The paper describes current activities performed in this framework and the achievements of the various expert groups. (author)

  16. Consensus standards utilized and implemented for nuclear criticality safety in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Yasushi; Okuno, Hiroshi; Naito, Yoshitaka

    1996-01-01

    The fundamental framework for the criticality safety of nuclear fuel facilities regulations is, in many advanced countries, generally formulated so that technical standards or handbook data are utilized to support the licensing safety review and to implement its guidelines. In Japan also, adequacy of the safety design of nuclear fuel facilities is checked and reviewed on the basis of licensing safety review guides. These guides are, first, open-quotes The Basic Guides for Licensing Safety Review of Nuclear Fuel Facilities,close quotes and as its subsidiaries, open-quotes The Uranium Fuel Fabrication Facility Licensing Safety Review Guidesclose quotes and open-quotes The Reprocessing Facility Licensing Safety Review Guides.close quotes The open-quotes Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook close-quote of Japan and the Technical Data Collection are published and utilized to supply related data and information for the licensing safety review, such as for the Rokkasho reprocessing plant. The well-established technical standards and data abroad such as those by the American Nuclear Society and the American National Standards Institute are also utilized to complement the standards in Japan. The basic principles of criticality safety control for nuclear fuel facilities in Japan are duly stipulated in the aforementioned basic guides as follows: 1. Guide 10: Criticality control for a single unit; 2. Guide 11: Criticality control for multiple units; 3. Guide 12: Consideration for a criticality accident

  17. Some problems of neutron source multiplication method for site measurement technology in nuclear critical safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Yongqian; Zhu Qingfu; Hu Dingsheng; He Tao; Yao Shigui; Lin Shenghuo

    2004-01-01

    The paper gives experiment theory and experiment method of neutron source multiplication method for site measurement technology in the nuclear critical safety. The measured parameter by source multiplication method actually is a sub-critical with source neutron effective multiplication factor k s , but not the neutron effective multiplication factor k eff . The experiment research has been done on the uranium solution nuclear critical safety experiment assembly. The k s of different sub-criticality is measured by neutron source multiplication experiment method, and k eff of different sub-criticality, the reactivity coefficient of unit solution level, is first measured by period method, and then multiplied by difference of critical solution level and sub-critical solution level and obtained the reactivity of sub-critical solution level. The k eff finally can be extracted from reactivity formula. The effect on the nuclear critical safety and different between k eff and k s are discussed

  18. American National Standard administrative practices for nuclear criticality safety, ANSI/ANS-8.19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.R.; Carson, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    American National Standard Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety, ANSI/ANS-8.19, provides guidance for the administration of an effective program to control the risk of nuclear criticality in operations with fissile material outside reactors. The several sections of the standard address the responsibilities of management, supervisory personnel, and the criticality safety staff, as well as requirements and suggestions for the content of operating procedures, process evaluations, material control procedures, and emergency procedures

  19. American National Standards and the DOE - A cooperative effort to promote nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothleder, B.M.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) new criticality safety order, DOE Order 420.1 (open-quotes Facility Safety,close quotes October 13, 1995), Sec. 4.3 (open-quotes Nuclear Criticality Safetyclose quotes), invokes, as an integral part, 12 appropriate American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society (ANSI/ANS) Series-8 standards for nuclear criticality safety, but with modifications. (The order that 420.1/4.3 replaced also invoked some ANSI/ANS Series-8 standards.) These modifications include DOE operation-specific exceptions to the standards and elaborations on some of the wording in the standards

  20. Training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    A training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff personnel has been developed and implemented. All personnel who are to perform nuclear criticality safety technical work are required to participate in the program. The program includes both general nuclear criticality safety and plant specific knowledge components. Advantage can be taken of previous experience for that knowledge which is portable such as performance of computer calculations. Candidates step through a structured process which exposes them to basic background information, general plant information, and plant specific information which they need to safely and competently perform their jobs. Extensive documentation is generated to demonstrate that candidates have met the standards established for qualification

  1. A study on methodologies for assessing safety critical network's risk impact on Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, T. J.; Lee, H. J.; Park, S. K.; Seo, S. J.

    2006-08-01

    The objectives of this project is to investigate and study existing reliability analysis techniques for communication networks in order to develop reliability analysis models for Nuclear Power Plant's safety-critical networks. It is necessary to make a comprehensive survey of current methodologies for communication network reliability. Major outputs of the first year study are design characteristics of safety-critical communication networks, efficient algorithms for quantifying reliability of communication networks, and preliminary models for assessing reliability of safety-critical communication networks

  2. Evaluating safety-critical organizations - emphasis on the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, Teemu; Oedewald, Pia (VTT, Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland))

    2009-04-15

    - it is understood that safety is a complex phenomenon. Safety is understood as a property of an entire system and not just absence of incidents - people feel personally responsible for the safety of the entire system, they feel they can have an effect on safety - the organizations aims for understanding the hazards and anticipating the risks in their activities - the organization is alert to the possibility of an unanticipated event - good prerequisites for carrying out the daily work exist. An organizational evaluation should aim at reasoning the: - sources of effectiveness in the organizational dimensions - sources of ineffectiveness in the organization dimensions - social processes in the organization - psychological outcomes of the current organization on a personnel level, e.g. motivation, understanding of hazards and sense of control. When drawing inferences from the organizational evaluations and defining development initiatives, it is important to consider actions that will promote and maintain the strengths of the organization as well as actions that will address and develop the weak areas. Issues associated with data collection and choice of methods has been a topic of much discussion in the field of evaluation of safety-critical organizations. We argue that the problem of collecting data is not the most important problem in terms of facilitating valid evaluations. A more important problem concerns the criteria that are used, as well as the operationalization of criteria into something measurable. Too much effort has been spent on methods and too little on contemplating the question of valid evaluation criteria and a valid means of deducing from the data whether the criteria are fulfilled. In order to accomplish this, a valid evaluation framework is needed, which incorporates the idea of organization as a complex sociotechnical system. This report has been an attempt to illustrate the premises and key issues to consider in organizational evaluations. No

  3. Evaluating safety-critical organizations - emphasis on the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, Teemu; Oedewald, Pia

    2009-04-01

    understood that safety is a complex phenomenon. Safety is understood as a property of an entire system and not just absence of incidents - people feel personally responsible for the safety of the entire system, they feel they can have an effect on safety - the organizations aims for understanding the hazards and anticipating the risks in their activities - the organization is alert to the possibility of an unanticipated event - good prerequisites for carrying out the daily work exist. An organizational evaluation should aim at reasoning the: - sources of effectiveness in the organizational dimensions - sources of ineffectiveness in the organization dimensions - social processes in the organization - psychological outcomes of the current organization on a personnel level, e.g. motivation, understanding of hazards and sense of control. When drawing inferences from the organizational evaluations and defining development initiatives, it is important to consider actions that will promote and maintain the strengths of the organization as well as actions that will address and develop the weak areas. Issues associated with data collection and choice of methods has been a topic of much discussion in the field of evaluation of safety-critical organizations. We argue that the problem of collecting data is not the most important problem in terms of facilitating valid evaluations. A more important problem concerns the criteria that are used, as well as the operationalization of criteria into something measurable. Too much effort has been spent on methods and too little on contemplating the question of valid evaluation criteria and a valid means of deducing from the data whether the criteria are fulfilled. In order to accomplish this, a valid evaluation framework is needed, which incorporates the idea of organization as a complex sociotechnical system. This report has been an attempt to illustrate the premises and key issues to consider in organizational evaluations. No method can

  4. Nuclear critical safety analysis for UX-30 transport of freight package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan Yanhui; Zhou Qi; Yin Shenggui

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear critical safety analysis and evaluation for UX-30 transport freight package in the natural condition and accident condition were carried out with MONK-9A code and MCNP code. Firstly, the critical benchmark experiment data of public in international were selected, and the deflection and subcritical limiting value with MONK-9A code and MCNP code in calculating same material form were validated and confirmed. Secondly, the neutron efficiency multiplication factors in the natural condition and accident condition were calculated and analyzed, and the safety in transport process was evaluated by taking conservative suppose of nuclear critical safety. The calculation results show that the max value of k eff for UX-30 transport freight package is less than the subcritical limiting value, and the UX-30 transport freight package is in the state of subcritical safety. Moreover, the critical safety index (CSI) for UX-30 package can define zero based on the definition of critical safety index. (authors)

  5. Recommendations relating to safety-critical real-time software in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety (ACNS) has reviewed safety issues associated with the software for the digital computers in the safety shutdown systems for the Darlington NGS. From this review the ACNS has developed four recommendations for safety-critical real-time software in nuclear power plants. These recommendations cover: the completion of the present efforts to develop an overall standard and sub-tier standards for safety-critical real-time software; the preparation of schedules and lists of responsibilities for this development; the concentration of AECB efforts on ensuring the scrutability of safety-critical real-time software; and, the collection of data on reliability and causes of failure (error) of safety-critical real-time software systems and on the probability and causes of common-mode failures (errors). (9 refs.)

  6. Nuclear criticality safety staff training and qualifications at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monahan, S.P.; McLaughlin, T.P.

    1997-01-01

    Operations involving significant quantities of fissile material have been conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory continuously since 1943. Until the advent of the Laboratory's Nuclear Criticality Safety Committee (NCSC) in 1957, line management had sole responsibility for controlling criticality risks. From 1957 until 1961, the NCSC was the Laboratory body which promulgated policy guidance as well as some technical guidance for specific operations. In 1961 the Laboratory created the position of Nuclear Criticality Safety Office (in addition to the NCSC). In 1980, Laboratory management moved the Criticality Safety Officer (and one other LACEF staff member who, by that time, was also working nearly full-time on criticality safety issues) into the Health Division office. Later that same year the Criticality Safety Group, H-6 (at that time) was created within H-Division, and staffed by these two individuals. The training and education of these individuals in the art of criticality safety was almost entirely self-regulated, depending heavily on technical interactions between each other, as well as NCSC, LACEF, operations, other facility, and broader criticality safety community personnel. Although the Los Alamos criticality safety group has grown both in size and formality of operations since 1980, the basic philosophy that a criticality specialist must be developed through mentoring and self motivation remains the same. Formally, this philosophy has been captured in an internal policy, document ''Conduct of Business in the Nuclear Criticality Safety Group.'' There are no short cuts or substitutes in the development of a criticality safety specialist. A person must have a self-motivated personality, excellent communications skills, a thorough understanding of the principals of neutron physics, a safety-conscious and helpful attitude, a good perspective of real risk, as well as a detailed understanding of process operations and credible upsets

  7. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) is approved for use by all components of DOE. It contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities. Adherence with these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with DOE Order 5480.24 requirements as they pertain to CSEs.

  8. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) is approved for use by all components of DOE. It contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities. Adherence with these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with DOE Order 5480.24 requirements as they pertain to CSEs

  9. Handbook on criticality. Vol. 1. Criticality and nuclear safety; Handbuch zur Kritikalitaet. Bd. 1. Kritikalitaet und nukleare Sicherheit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-04-15

    This handbook was prepared primarily with the aim to provide information to experts in industry, authorities or research facilities engaged in criticality-safety-related problems that will allow an adequate and rapid assessment of criticality safety issues already in the planning and preparation of nuclear facilities. However, it is not the intention of the authors of the handbook to offer ready solutions to complex problems of nuclear safety. Such questions have to remain subject to an in-depth analysis and assessment to be carried out by dedicated criticality safety experts. Compared with the previous edition dated December 1998, this handbook has been further revised and supplemented. The proven basic structure of the handbook remains unchanged. The handbook follows in some ways similar criticality handbooks or instructions published in the USA, UK, France, Japan and the former Soviet Union. The expedient use of the information given in this handbook requires a fundamental understanding of criticality and the terminology of nuclear safety. In Vol. 1, ''Criticality and Nuclear Safety'', therefore, first the most important terms and fundamentals are introduced and explained. Subsequently, experimental techniques and calculation methods for evaluating criticality problems are presented. The following chapters of Vol. 1 deal i. a. with the effect of neutron reflectors and absorbers, neutron interaction, measuring methods for criticality, and organisational safety measures and provide an overview of criticality-relevant operational experience and of criticality accidents and their potential hazardous impact. Vol. 2 parts 1 and 2 finally compile criticality parameters in graphical and tabular form. The individual graph sheets are provided with an initially explained set of identifiers, to allow the quick finding of the information of current interest. Part 1 includes criticality parameters for systems with {sup 235}U as fissile material, while part

  10. NMC and A and nuclear criticality safety systems integration: A prospective way for enhancement of the nuclear industry facilities safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazanov, Boris G.; Sviridov, Victor I.; Frolov, Vladimir V.; Shvedov, Maxim O.; Mclaughlin, Thomas P.; Pruvost, Norman L.

    2003-01-01

    A considerable body of data has now been acquired about the principles, parameters and consequences of nuclear (criticality) accidents at facilities of the atomic industry in Russia, the United States, Great Britain and Japan. The total number of such accidents stands at 22. Russian and US specialists have prepared a rather extensive survey and analysis of these accidents. The final and important section of this survey is the lessons implied by the results of analysis of these 22 accidents. Among these lessons is the necessity of unconditional enforcement of control over the movement and transformations of special nuclear materials (SNM), and in particular fissile materials, (those SNMs with criticality accident concerns) during production and processing. Inadequacies in such control have been among the causes of most of the accidents that have occurred. Nuclear materials control and accounting (MC and A) for the purpose of ensuring storage reliability and nonproliferation safeguards is a major task of nuclear facilities in any nation. MC and A systems use the latest techniques and hardware for periodic control of SNM in specifically organized material balance areas. Immediate checking, periodic inventory of SNM, and measurements of the parameters of SNM at key points are the main sources of data for these systems. Data about the presence and sites of location of SNM in material balance areas that are acquired in inventories can be used for objective assessment of the status of nuclear safety. On the other hand, the inventory itself involves performance of operations that are unlike routine process engineering, and require special consideration of nuclear safety. Use of the techniques and hardware of MC and A systems not only for purposes of storage reliability, but also to ensure nuclear safety, will reduce the risk of nuclear accidents. This paper gives a concise overview of nuclear accidents that have occurred due to inadequacies in MC and A, and demonstrates

  11. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of large cylinder cleaning operations in X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.; Lutz, H.F.

    1995-06-01

    This report evaluates nuclear criticality safety for large cylinder cleaning operations in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A general description of current cleaning procedures and required hardware/equipment is presented, and documentation for large cylinder cleaning operations is identified and described. Control parameters, design features, administrative controls, and safety systems relevant to nuclear criticality are discussed individually, followed by an overall assessment based on the Double Contingency Principle. Recommendations for enhanced safety are suggested, and issues for increased efficiency are presented

  12. Nuclear criticality safety experiments, calculations, and analyses: 1958 to 1982. Volume 1. Lookup tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1982-01-01

    This compilation contains 688 complete summaries of papers on nuclear criticality safety as presented at meetings of the American Nuclear Society (ANS). The selected papers contain criticality parameters for fissile materials derived from experiments and calculations, as well as criticality safety analyses for fissile material processing, transport, and storage. The compilation was developed as a component of the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) now under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The compilation is presented in two volumes: Volume 1 contains a directory to the ANS Transaction volume and page number where each summary was originally published, the author concordance, and the subject concordance derived from the keyphrases in titles. Volume 2 contains - in chronological order - the full-text summaries, reproduced here by permission of the American Nuclear Society from their Transactions, volumes 1-41

  13. Nuclear criticality safety aspects of gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in the diffusion cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffer, J.E. [Parallax, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This paper determines the nuclear safety of gaseous UF{sub 6} in the current Gaseous Diffusion Cascade and auxiliary systems. The actual plant safety system settings for pressure trip points are used to determine the maximum amount of HF moderation in the process gas, as well as the corresponding atomic number densities. These inputs are used in KENO V.a criticality safety models which are sized to the actual plant equipment. The ENO V.a calculation results confirm nuclear safety of gaseous UF{sub 6} in plant operations..

  14. Nuclear criticality safety aspects of gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF6) in the diffusion cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, J.E.

    1997-04-01

    This paper determines the nuclear safety of gaseous UF 6 in the current Gaseous Diffusion Cascade and auxiliary systems. The actual plant safety system settings for pressure trip points are used to determine the maximum amount of HF moderation in the process gas, as well as the corresponding atomic number densities. These inputs are used in KENO V.a criticality safety models which are sized to the actual plant equipment. The ENO V.a calculation results confirm nuclear safety of gaseous UF 6 in plant operations

  15. Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization guidance for the development of continuing technical training. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization (NCSO) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of highly qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in nuclear criticality safety at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and throughout the DOE complex. Continuing technical training is training outside of the initial qualification program to address identified organization-wide needs. Typically, this training is used to improve organization performance in the conduct of business. This document provides guidelines for the development of the technical portions of the Continuing Training Program. It is not a step-by-step procedure, but a collection of considerations to be used during the development process

  16. Activity of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan for compiling the consensus standard on nuclear criticality safety control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Tadakuni

    2003-01-01

    Activity of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan for compiling the consensus standard on nuclear criticality safety control is presented. The standard recommends an enhancement of nuclear criticality safety throughout a life cycle of facility in terms of a concept of 'barriers against criticality'. (author)

  17. Single parameter controls for nuclear criticality safety at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, J.S.; Peek, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    At the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, there are numerous situations in which nuclear criticality safety must be assured and subcriticality demonstrated by some method other than the straightforward use of the double contingency principle. Some cases are cited, and the criticality safety evaluation of contaminated combustible waste collectors is considered in detail. The criticality safety evaluation for combustible collectors is based on applying one very good control to the one controllable parameter. Safety can only be defended when the contingency of excess density is limited to a credible value based on process knowledge. No reasonable single failure is found that will result in a criticality accident. The historically accepted viewpoint is that this meets double contingency, even though there are not two independent controls on the single parameter of interest

  18. Nuclear criticality safety analysis summary report: The S-area defense waste processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    The S-Area Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) can process all of the high level radioactive wastes currently stored at the Savannah River Site with negligible risk of nuclear criticality. The characteristics which make the DWPF critically safe are: (1) abundance of neutron absorbers in the waste feeds; (2) and low concentration of fissionable material. This report documents the criticality safety arguments for the S-Area DWPF process as required by DOE orders to characterize and to justify the low potential for criticality. It documents that the nature of the waste feeds and the nature of the DWPF process chemistry preclude criticality

  19. First start-up of nuclear criticality safety experiment facility for uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Qingfu; Shi Yongqian; Shen Leisheng; Hu Dingsheng; Zhao Shouzhi; He Tao; Sun Zheng; Lin Shenghuo; Yao Shigui

    2005-01-01

    The uranyl nitrate solution experiment facility for the research on nuclear criticality safety is described. The nuclear fuel loading steps in the first start-up for water-reflected core are presented. During the experiments, the critical volume of uranyl nitrate solution was determined as 20479.62 mL with count rate inverse extrapolation method, reactivity interpolation method, and steady power method. By calculation, critical mass of 235 U was derived as 1579.184 g from experimental data. The worth of control rods was also calibrated in the first start-up of the facility. (authors)

  20. Sensitivity analysis of parameters important to nuclear criticality safety of Castor X/28F spent nuclear fuel cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leotlela, Mosebetsi J. [Witwatersrand Univ., Johannesburg (South Africa). School of Physics; Koeberg Operating Unit, Johannesburg (South Africa). Regulations and Licensing; Malgas, Isaac [Koeberg Nuclear Power Station, Duinefontein (South Africa). Nuclear Engineering Analysis; Taviv, Eugene [ASARA consultants (PTY) LTD, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    In nuclear criticality safety analysis it is essential to ascertain how various components of the nuclear system will perform under certain conditions they may be subjected to, particularly if the components of the system are likely to be affected by environmental factors such as temperature, radiation or material composition. It is therefore prudent that a sensitivity analysis is performed to determine and quantify the response of the output to variation in any of the input parameters. In a fissile system, the output parameter of importance is the k{sub eff}. Therefore, in attempting to prevent reactivity-induced accidents, it is important for the criticality safety analyst to have a quantified degree of response for the neutron multiplication factor to perturbation in a given input parameter. This article will present the results of the perturbation of the parameters that are important to nuclear criticality safety analysis and their respective correlation equations for deriving the sensitivity coefficients.

  1. Sensitivity-Uncertainty Techniques for Nuclear Criticality Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rising, Michael Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Alwin, Jennifer Louise [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-07

    The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis course will introduce students to keff sensitivity data, cross-section uncertainty data, how keff sensitivity data and keff uncertainty data are generated and how they can be used. Discussion will include how sensitivity/uncertainty data can be used to select applicable critical experiments, to quantify a defensible margin to cover validation gaps and weaknesses, and in development of upper subcritical limits.

  2. Preparation of data for criticality safety evaluation of nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Suyama, Kenya; Yoshiyama, Hiroshi; Tonoike, Kotaro; Miyoshi, Yoshinori

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook/Data Collection, Version 2 was submitted to the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan as a contract report. In this presentation paper, its outline and related recent works are presented. After an introduction in Chapter 1, useful information to obtain the atomic number densities was collected in Chapter 2. The nuclear characteristic parameters for 11 nuclear fuels were provided in Chapter 3, and subcriticality judgment graphs were given in Chapter 4. The estimated critical and estimated lower-limit critical values were supplied for the 11 nuclear fuels as results of calculations by using the Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library, JENDL-3.2, and the continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code MVP in Chapter 5. The results of benchmark calculations based on the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook were summarized into six fuel categories in Chapter 6. As for recent works, subcriticality judgment graphs for U-SiO 2 and Pu-SiO 2 were obtained. Benchmark calculations were made with the combination of the latest version of the library JENDL-3.3 and MVP code for a series of STACY experiments and the estimated critical and estimated lower-limit critical values of 10 wt%-enriched uranium nitrate solutions were calculated. (author)

  3. Nuclear criticality safety program at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.; Brewer, R.; Dunn, M.; Haught, C.; Plaster, M.; Wilkinson, A.; Dodds, H.; Elliott, E.; Waddell, W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the nuclear criticality safety (NCS) educational program at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. The program is an academic specialization for nuclear engineering graduate students pursuing either the MS or PhD degree and includes special NCS courses and NCS research projects. Both the courses and the research projects serve as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree being pursued

  4. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This book reviews the accomplishments, operations, and problems faced by the defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. Specifically, it discusses the recommendations that the Safety Board made to improve safety and health conditions at the Department of Energy's defense nuclear facilities, problems the Safety Board has encountered in hiring technical staff, and management problems that could affect the Safety Board's independence and credibility

  5. Module Testing Techniques for Nuclear Safety Critical Software Using LDRA Testing Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Kwon-Ki; Kim, Do-Yeon; Chang, Hoon-Seon; Chang, Young-Woo; Yun, Jae-Hee; Park, Jee-Duck; Kim, Jae-Hack

    2006-01-01

    The safety critical software in the I and C systems of nuclear power plants requires high functional integrity and reliability. To achieve those requirement goals, the safety critical software should be verified and tested according to related codes and standards through verification and validation (V and V) activities. The safety critical software testing is performed at various stages during the development of the software, and is generally classified as three major activities: module testing, system integration testing, and system validation testing. Module testing involves the evaluation of module level functions of hardware and software. System integration testing investigates the characteristics of a collection of modules and aims at establishing their correct interactions. System validation testing demonstrates that the complete system satisfies its functional requirements. In order to generate reliable software and reduce high maintenance cost, it is important that software testing is carried out at module level. Module testing for the nuclear safety critical software has rarely been performed by formal and proven testing tools because of its various constraints. LDRA testing tool is a widely used and proven tool set that provides powerful source code testing and analysis facilities for the V and V of general purpose software and safety critical software. Use of the tool set is indispensable where software is required to be reliable and as error-free as possible, and its use brings in substantial time and cost savings, and efficiency

  6. General principles of the nuclear criticality safety for handling, processing and transportation fissile materials in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vnukov, V.S.; Rjazanov, B.G.; Sviridov, V.I.; Frolov, V.V.; Zubkov, Y.N.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the general principles of nuclear criticality safety for handling, processing, transportation and fissile materials storing. Measures to limit the consequences of critical accidents are discussed for the fuel processing plants and fissile materials storage. The system of scientific and technical measures on nuclear criticality safety as well as the system of control and state supervision based on the rules, limits and requirements are described. The criticality safety aspects for various stages of handling nuclear materials are considered. The paper gives descriptions of the methods and approaches for critical risk assessments for the processing facilities, plants and storages. (Author)

  7. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarride, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    The author proposes an overview of methods and concepts used in the nuclear industry, at the design level as well as at the exploitation level, to ensure an acceptable safety level, notably in the case of nuclear reactors. He first addresses the general objectives of nuclear safety and the notion of acceptable risk: definition and organisation of nuclear safety (relationships between safety authorities and operators), notion of acceptable risk, deterministic safety approach and main safety principles (safety functions and confinement barriers, concept of defence in depth). Then, the author addresses the safety approach at the design level: studies of operational situations, studies of internal and external aggressions, safety report, design principles for important-for-safety systems (failure criterion, redundancy, failure prevention, safety classification). The next part addresses safety during exploitation and general exploitation rules: definition of the operation domain and of its limits, periodic controls and tests, management in case of incidents, accidents or aggressions

  8. Educating Next Generation Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineers at the Idaho National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, J.D.; Briggs, J.B.; Garcia, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    One of the challenges in educating our next generation of nuclear safety engineers is the limitation of opportunities to receive significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Such training is generally restricted to on-the-job-training before this new engineering workforce can adequately provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) can provide students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills. The ICSBEP and IRPhEP publish annual handbooks that contain evaluations of experiments along with summarized experimental data and peer-reviewed benchmark specifications to support the validation of neutronics codes, nuclear cross-section data, and the validation of reactor designs. Participation in the benchmark process not only benefits those who use these Handbooks within the international community, but provides the individual with opportunities for professional development, networking with an international community of experts, and valuable experience to be used in future employment. Traditionally students have participated in benchmarking activities via internships at national laboratories, universities, or companies involved with the ICSBEP and IRPhEP programs. Additional programs have been developed to facilitate the nuclear education of students while participating in the benchmark projects. These programs include coordination with the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) Next Degree Program, the Collaboration with the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office to train nuclear and criticality safety engineers, and student evaluations as the basis for their Master's thesis in nuclear engineering.

  9. Educating Next Generation Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineers at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Bess; J. B. Briggs; A. S. Garcia

    2011-09-01

    One of the challenges in educating our next generation of nuclear safety engineers is the limitation of opportunities to receive significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Such training is generally restricted to on-the-job-training before this new engineering workforce can adequately provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) can provide students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills. The ICSBEP and IRPhEP publish annual handbooks that contain evaluations of experiments along with summarized experimental data and peer-reviewed benchmark specifications to support the validation of neutronics codes, nuclear cross-section data, and the validation of reactor designs. Participation in the benchmark process not only benefits those who use these Handbooks within the international community, but provides the individual with opportunities for professional development, networking with an international community of experts, and valuable experience to be used in future employment. Traditionally students have participated in benchmarking activities via internships at national laboratories, universities, or companies involved with the ICSBEP and IRPhEP programs. Additional programs have been developed to facilitate the nuclear education of students while participating in the benchmark projects. These programs include coordination with the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) Next Degree Program, the Collaboration with the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office to train nuclear and criticality safety engineers, and student evaluations as the basis for their Master's thesis in nuclear engineering.

  10. The Development, Content, Design, and Conduct of the 2011 Piloted US DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Criticality Safety Engineering Training and Education Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopper, Calvin Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    In May 1973 the University of New Mexico conducted the first nationwide criticality safety training and education week-long short course for nuclear criticality safety engineers. Subsequent to that course, the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) developed very successful 'hands-on' subcritical and critical training programs for operators, supervisors, and engineering staff. Since the inception of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCT and SP) in 1983, the DOE has stimulated contractor facilities and laboratories to collaborate in the furthering of nuclear criticality as a discipline. That effort included the education and training of nuclear criticality safety engineers (NCSEs). In 1985 a textbook was written that established a path toward formalizing education and training for NCSEs. Though the NCT and SP went through a brief hiatus from 1990 to 1992, other DOE-supported programs were evolving to the benefit of NCSE training and education. In 1993 the DOE established a Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) and undertook a comprehensive development effort to expand the extant LACEF 'hands-on' course specifically for the education and training of NCSEs. That successful education and training was interrupted in 2006 for the closing of the LACEF and the accompanying movement of materials and critical experiment machines to the Nevada Test Site. Prior to that closing, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was commissioned by the US DOE NCSP to establish an independent hands-on NCSE subcritical education and training course. The course provided an interim transition for the establishment of a reinvigorated and expanded two-week NCSE education and training program in 2011. The 2011 piloted two-week course was coordinated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and jointly conducted by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) classroom education and facility training, the Sandia National

  11. Nuclear law - Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontier, Jean-Marie; Roux, Emmanuel; Leger, Marc; Deguergue, Maryse; Vallar, Christian; Pissaloux, Jean-Luc; Bernie-Boissard, Catherine; Thireau, Veronique; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Spencer, Mary; Zhang, Li; Park, Kyun Sung; Artus, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    This book contains the contributions presented during a one-day seminar. The authors propose a framework for a legal approach to nuclear safety, a discussion of the 2009/71/EURATOM directive which establishes a European framework for nuclear safety in nuclear installations, a comment on nuclear safety and environmental governance, a discussion of the relationship between citizenship and nuclear, some thoughts about the Nuclear Safety Authority, an overview of the situation regarding the safety in nuclear waste burying, a comment on the Nome law with respect to electricity price and nuclear safety, a comment on the legal consequences of the Fukushima accident on nuclear safety in the Japanese law, a presentation of the USA nuclear regulation, an overview of nuclear safety in China, and a discussion of nuclear safety in the medical sector

  12. Migration of nuclear criticality safety software from a mainframe to a workstation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowie, L.J.; Robinson, R.C.; Cain, V.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Department (NCSD), Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has undergone the transition of executing the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Nuclear Criticality Safety Software (NCSS) on IBM mainframes to a Hewlett-Packard (HP) 9000/730 workstation (NCSSHP). NCSSHP contains the following configuration controlled modules and cross-section libraries: BONAMI, CSAS, GEOMCHY, ICE, KENO IV, KENO Va, MODIIFY, NITAWL SCALE, SLTBLIB, XSDRN, UNIXLIB, albedos library, weights library, 16-Group HANSEN-ROACH master library, 27-Group ENDF/B-IV master library, and standard composition library. This paper will discuss the method used to choose the workstation, the hardware setup of the chosen workstation, an overview of Y-12 software quality assurance and configuration control methodology, code validation, difficulties encountered in migrating the codes, and advantages to migrating to a workstation environment

  13. Introduction to the nuclear criticality safety evaluation of facility X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report is the first in a series of documents that will evaluate nuclear criticality safety in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. It provides an overview of the facility, categorizes its functions for future analysis, reviews existing NCS documentation, and explains the follow-on effort planned for X-705. A detailed breakdown of systems, subsystems, and operational areas is presented and cross-referenced to existing NCS documentation

  14. Review of Nuclear Criticality Safety Requirements Implementation for Hanford Tank Farms Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DEFIGH PRICE, C.

    2000-01-01

    In November 1999, the Deputy Secretary of the Department of Energy directed a series of actions to strengthen the Department's ongoing nuclear criticality safety programs. A Review Plan describing lines of inquiry for assessing contractor programs was included. The Office of River Protection completed their assessment of the Tank Farm Contractor program in May 2000. This document supports that assessment by providing a compliance statement for each line of inquiry

  15. KAERI software safety guideline for developing safety-critical software in digital instrumentation and control system of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jang Soo; Kim, Jang Yeol; Eum, Heung Seop.

    1997-07-01

    Recently, the safety planning for safety-critical software systems is being recognized as the most important phase in the software life cycle, and being developed new regulatory positions and standards by the regulatory and the standardization organization. The requirements for software important to safety of nuclear reactor are described in such positions and standards. Most of them are describing mandatory requirements, what shall be done, for the safety-critical software. The developers of such a software. However, there have been a lot of controversial factors on whether the work practices satisfy the regulatory requirements, and to justify the safety of such a system developed by the work practices, between the licenser and the licensee. We believe it is caused by the reason that there is a gap between the mandatory requirements (What) and the work practices (How). We have developed a guidance to fill such gap, which can be useful for both licenser and licensee to conduct a justification of the safety in the planning phase of developing the software for nuclear reactor protection systems. (author). 67 refs., 13 tabs., 2 figs

  16. KAERI software safety guideline for developing safety-critical software in digital instrumentation and control system of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jang Soo; Kim, Jang Yeol; Eum, Heung Seop

    1997-07-01

    Recently, the safety planning for safety-critical software systems is being recognized as the most important phase in the software life cycle, and being developed new regulatory positions and standards by the regulatory and the standardization organization. The requirements for software important to safety of nuclear reactor are described in such positions and standards. Most of them are describing mandatory requirements, what shall be done, for the safety-critical software. The developers of such a software. However, there have been a lot of controversial factors on whether the work practices satisfy the regulatory requirements, and to justify the safety of such a system developed by the work practices, between the licenser and the licensee. We believe it is caused by the reason that there is a gap between the mandatory requirements (What) and the work practices (How). We have developed a guidance to fill such gap, which can be useful for both licenser and licensee to conduct a justification of the safety in the planning phase of developing the software for nuclear reactor protection systems. (author). 67 refs., 13 tabs., 2 figs.

  17. Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    In this short paper it has only been possible to deal in a rather general way with the standards of safety used in the UK nuclear industry. The record of the industry extending over at least twenty years is impressive and, indeed, unique. No other industry has been so painstaking in protection of its workers and in its avoidance of damage to the environment. Headings are: introduction; how a nuclear power station works; radiation and its effects (including reference to ICRP, the UK National Radiological Protection Board, and safety standards); typical radiation doses (natural radiation, therapy, nuclear power programme and other sources); safety of nuclear reactors - design; key questions (matters of concern which arise in the public mind); safety of operators; safety of people in the vicinity of a nuclear power station; safety of the general public; safety bodies. (U.K.)

  18. Real-time software use in nuclear materials handling criticality safety control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, S.; Lappa, D.; Chiao, T.; Parrish, C.; Carlson, R.; Lewis, J.; Shikany, D.; Woo, H.

    1997-01-01

    This paper addresses the use of real-time software to assist handlers of fissionable nuclear material. We focus specifically on the issue of workstation mass limits, and the need for handlers to be aware of, and check against, those mass limits during material transfers. Here ''mass limits'' generally refer to criticality safety mass limits; however, in some instances, workstation mass limits for some materials may be governed by considerations other than criticality, e.g., fire or release consequence limitation. As a case study, we provide a simplified reliability comparison of the use of a manual two handler system with a software-assisted two handler system. We identify the interface points between software and handlers that are relevant to criticality safety

  19. Validation of Nuclear Criticality Safety Software and 27 energy group ENDF/B-IV cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.L. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    The validation documented in this report is based on calculations that were executed during June through August 1992, and was completed in June 1993. The statistical analyses in Appendix C and Appendix D were completed in October 1993. This validation gives Portsmouth NCS personnel a basis for performing computerized KENO V.a calculations using the Martin Marietta Nuclear Criticality Safety Software. The first portion of the document outlines basic information in regard to validation of NCSS using ENDF/B-IV 27-group cross sections on the IBM 3090 at ORNL. A basic discussion of the NCSS system is provided, some discussion on the validation database and validation in general. Then follows a detailed description of the statistical analysis which was applied. The results of this validation indicate that the NCSS software may be used with confidence for criticality calculations at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. When the validation results are treated as a single group, there is 95% confidence that 99.9% of future calculations of similar critical systems will have a calculated K eff > 0.9616. Based on this result the Portsmouth Nuclear Criticality Safety Department has adopted the calculational acceptance criteria that a k eff + 2σ ≤ 0.95 is safety subcritical. The validation of NCSS on the IBM 3090 at ORNL was extended to include NCSS on the IBM 3090 at K-25

  20. Recommended nuclear criticality safety experiments in support of the safe transportation of fissile material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tollefson, D.A.; Elliott, E.P.; Dyer, H.R.; Thompson, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Validation of computer codes and nuclear data (cross-section) libraries using benchmark quality critical (or certain subcritical) experiments is an essential part of a nuclear criticality safety evaluation. The validation results establish the credibility of the calculational tools for use in evaluating a particular application. Validation of the calculational tools is addressed in several American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society (ANSI/ANS) standards, with ANSI/ANS-8.1 being the most relevant. Documentation of the validation is a required part of all safety analyses involving significant quantities of fissile materials. In the case of transportation of fissile materials, the safety analysis report for packaging (SARP) must contain a thorough discussion of benchmark experiments, detailing how the experiments relate to the significant packaging and contents materials (fissile, moderating, neutron absorbing) within the package. The experiments recommended in this paper are needed to address certain areas related to transportation of unirradiated fissile materials in drum-type containers (packagings) for which current data are inadequate or are lacking

  1. Nuclear energy - Fissile materials - Principles of criticality safety in storing, handling and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This International Standard specifies the basic principles and limitations which govern operations with fissile materials. It discusses general criticality safety criteria for equipment design and for the development of operating controls, while providing guidance for the assessment of procedures, equipment, and operations. It does not cover quality assurance requirements or details of equipment or operational procedures, nor does it cover the effects of radiation on man or materials, or sources of such radiation, either natural or as the result of nuclear chain reactions. Transport of fissile materials outside the boundaries of nuclear establishments is not within the scope of this International Standard and should be governed by appropriate national and international standards and regulations. These criteria apply to operations with fissile materials outside nuclear reactors but within the boundaries of nuclear establishments. They are concerned with the limitations which must be imposed on operations because of the unique properties of these materials which permit them to support nuclear chain reactions. These principles apply to quantities of fissile materials in which nuclear criticality can be established

  2. SRTC criticality technical review: Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation 93-18 Uranium Solidification Facility's Waste Handling Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathbun, R.

    1993-01-01

    Separate review of NMP-NCS-930058, open-quotes Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation 93-18 Uranium Solidification Facility's Waste Handling Facility (U), August 17, 1993,close quotes was requested of SRTC Applied Physics Group. The NCSE is a criticality assessment to determine waste container uranium limits in the Uranium Solidification Facility's Waste Handling Facility. The NCSE under review concludes that the NDA room remains in a critically safe configuration for all normal and single credible abnormal conditions. The ability to make this conclusion is highly dependent on array limitation and inclusion of physical barriers between 2x2x1 arrays of boxes containing materials contaminated with uranium. After a thorough review of the NCSE and independent calculations, this reviewer agrees with that conclusion

  3. Nuclear Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, E G [ed.

    1989-01-01

    This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  4. Impact of Fuel Failure on Criticality Safety of Used Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, William J.; Wagner, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Commercial used nuclear fuel (UNF) in the United States is expected to remain in storage for considerably longer periods than originally intended (e.g., 45 GWd/t) may increase the potential for fuel failure during normal and accident conditions involving storage and transportation. Fuel failure, depending on the severity, can result in changes to the geometric configuration of the fuel, which has safety and regulatory implications. The likelihood and extent of fuel reconfiguration and its impact on the safety of the UNF is not well understood. The objective of this work is to assess and quantify the impact of fuel reconfiguration due to fuel failure on criticality safety of UNF in storage and transportation casks. This effort is primarily motivated by concerns related to the potential for fuel degradation during ES periods and transportation following ES. The criticality analyses consider representative UNF designs and cask systems and a range of fuel enrichments, burnups, and cooling times. The various failed-fuel configurations considered are designed to bound the anticipated effects of individual rod and general cladding failure, fuel rod deformation, loss of neutron absorber materials, degradation of canister internals, and gross assembly failure. The results quantify the potential impact on criticality safety associated with fuel reconfiguration and may be used to guide future research, design, and regulatory activities. Although it can be concluded that the criticality safety impacts of fuel reconfiguration during transportation subsequent to ES are manageable, the results indicate that certain configurations can result in a large increase in the effective neutron multiplication factor, k eff . Future work to inform decision making relative to which configurations are credible, and therefore need to be considered in a safety evaluation, is recommended.

  5. Criticality safety analysis of TK-13 cask in Bushehr nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Ashgar; Omidvari, Nima [Iran Radioactive Waste Management Company, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hassanzadeh, Mostafa [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-12-15

    Spent fuel production is one of the main problems of nuclear power plants that should be managed properly considering the strategy of each country. Today, in most of nuclear power owner countries, the interim storage has been selected as the temporary solution of spent fuel management because of absence of deep geological repositories and no tendency for reprocessing. On the other side, considering the merits of storage in dual purpose casks based on dry storage, this method was chosen for interim storage. By taking into account that the only operating reactor of Iran is of Water-Water Energetic Reactor (WWER)-1000 type, proposed TK-13 cask by Russia which is the manufacturer of these types of reactors has been considered. In this study, the calculation of basket holding spent fuel assembly criticality of this cask has been analyzed for two modes of fresh and spent fuel by ORIGEN2.1 and MCNPX2.6 nuclear codes. The criterion of the nuclear criticality safety for effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) should be 0.95 and 0.98 for many ordinary and accident conditions, respectively. Therefore, the results show that a cylindrical basket with 66 cm diameter and 28 cm pitch with internal holding basket made of borated steel with 0.1% borate and steel free from borate would meet the criticality of cask, respectively.

  6. Criticality safety analysis of TK-13 cask in Bushehr nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Ashgar; Omidvari, Nima; Hassanzadeh, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    Spent fuel production is one of the main problems of nuclear power plants that should be managed properly considering the strategy of each country. Today, in most of nuclear power owner countries, the interim storage has been selected as the temporary solution of spent fuel management because of absence of deep geological repositories and no tendency for reprocessing. On the other side, considering the merits of storage in dual purpose casks based on dry storage, this method was chosen for interim storage. By taking into account that the only operating reactor of Iran is of Water-Water Energetic Reactor (WWER)-1000 type, proposed TK-13 cask by Russia which is the manufacturer of these types of reactors has been considered. In this study, the calculation of basket holding spent fuel assembly criticality of this cask has been analyzed for two modes of fresh and spent fuel by ORIGEN2.1 and MCNPX2.6 nuclear codes. The criterion of the nuclear criticality safety for effective multiplication factor (k eff ) should be 0.95 and 0.98 for many ordinary and accident conditions, respectively. Therefore, the results show that a cylindrical basket with 66 cm diameter and 28 cm pitch with internal holding basket made of borated steel with 0.1% borate and steel free from borate would meet the criticality of cask, respectively.

  7. BFS, a Legacy to the International Reactor Physics, Criticality Safety, and Nuclear Data Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J. Blair; Tsibulya, Anatoly; Rozhikhin, Yevgeniy

    2012-01-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. Two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) activities, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), initiated in 1992, and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP), initiated in 2003, have been identifying existing integral experiment data, evaluating those data, and providing integral benchmark specifications for methods and data validation for nearly two decades. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. Data provided by these two projects will be of use to the international reactor physics, criticality safety, and nuclear data communities for future decades The Russian Federation has been a major contributor to both projects with the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) as the major contributor from the Russian Federation. Included in the benchmark specifications from the BFS facilities are 34 critical configurations from BFS-49, 61, 62, 73, 79, 81, 97, 99, and 101; spectral characteristics measurements from BFS-31, 42, 57, 59, 61, 62, 73, 97, 99, and 101; reactivity effects measurements from BFS-62-3A; reactivity coefficients and kinetics measurements from BFS-73; and reaction rate measurements from BFS-42, 61, 62, 73, 97, 99, and 101.

  8. Nuclear criticality safety calculations for a K-25 site vacuum cleaner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shor, J.T.; Haire, M.J.

    1997-02-01

    A modified Nilfisk model GSJ dry vacuum cleaner is used throughout the K-25 Site to collect dry forms of highly enriched uranium (HEU). When vacuuming, solids are collected in a cyclone-type separator vacuum cleaner body. Calculations were done with the SCALE (KENO V.a) computer code to establish conditions at which a nuclear criticality event might occur if the vacuum cleaner was filled with fissile solution. Conditions evaluated included full (12-in. water) reflection and nominal (1-in. water) reflection, and full (100%) and 20% 235 U enrichment. Validation analyses of SCALE/KENO and the SCALE 27-group cross sections for nuclear criticality safety applications indicate that a calculated k eff + 2σ eff + 2σ ≥ 0.9605 is considered unsafe and may be critical. Critical conditions were calculated to be 70 g U/L for 100% 235 U and full 12-in. water reflection. This corresponds to a minimum critical mass of approximately 1,400 g 235 U for the approximate 20.0-L volume of the vacuum cleaner. The actual volume of the vacuum cleaner is smaller than the modeled volume because some internal materials of construction were assumed to be fissile solution. The model was an overestimate, for conservatism, of fissile solution occupancy. At nominal reflection conditions, the critical concentration in a vacuum cleaner full of UO 2 F 2 solution was calculated to be 100 g 235 U/L, or 2,000 g mass of 100% 235 U. At 20% 235 U for the 20.0-L volume of the vacuum cleaner. At 15% 235 U enrichment and full reflection, critical conditions were not reached at any possible concentration of uranium as a uranyl fluoride solution. At 17.5% 235 U enrichment, criticality was reached at approximately 1,300 g U/L which is beyond saturation at 25 C

  9. Nuclear criticality predictability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of lots of efforts, a large portion of the tedious and redundant research and processing of critical experiment data has been eliminated. The necessary step in criticality safety analyses of validating computer codes with benchmark critical data is greatly streamlined, and valuable criticality safety experimental data is preserved. Criticality safety personnel in 31 different countries are now using the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments'. Much has been accomplished by the work of the ICSBEP. However, evaluation and documentation represents only one element of a successful Nuclear Criticality Safety Predictability Program and this element only exists as a separate entity, because this work was not completed in conjunction with the experimentation process. I believe; however, that the work of the ICSBEP has also served to unify the other elements of nuclear criticality predictability. All elements are interrelated, but for a time it seemed that communications between these elements was not adequate. The ICSBEP has highlighted gaps in data, has retrieved lost data, has helped to identify errors in cross section processing codes, and has helped bring the international criticality safety community together in a common cause as true friends and colleagues. It has been a privilege to associate with those who work so diligently to make the project a success. (J.P.N.)

  10. Consequences of Fuel Failure on Criticality Safety of Used Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, William J.; Wagner, John C.

    2012-09-01

    This report documents work performed for the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOENE) Fuel Cycle Technologies Used Fuel Disposition Campaign to assess the impact of fuel reconfiguration due to fuel failure on the criticality safety of used nuclear fuel (UNF) in storage and transportation casks. This work was motivated by concerns related to the potential for fuel degradation during extended storage (ES) periods and transportation following ES, but has relevance to other potential causes of fuel reconfiguration. Commercial UNF in the United States is expected to remain in storage for longer periods than originally intended. Extended storage time and irradiation of nuclear fuel to high-burnup values (>45 GWd/t) may increase the potential for fuel failure during normal and accident conditions involving storage and transportation. Fuel failure, depending on the severity, can result in changes to the geometric configuration of the fuel, which has safety and regulatory implications for virtually all aspects of a UNF storage and transport system's performance. The potential impact of fuel reconfiguration on the safety of UNF in storage and transportation is dependent on the likelihood and extent of the fuel reconfiguration, which is not well understood and is currently an active area of research. The objective of this work is to assess and quantify the impact of postulated failed fuel configurations on the criticality safety of UNF in storage and transportation casks. Although this work is motivated by the potential for fuel degradation during ES periods and transportation following ES, it has relevance to fuel reconfiguration due to the effects of high burnup. Regardless of the ultimate disposition path, UNF will need to be transported at some point in the future. To investigate and quantify the impact of fuel reconfiguration on criticality safety limits, which are given in terms of the effective neutron multiplication factor, a set of failed fuel

  11. Model checking of safety-critical software in the nuclear engineering domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahtinen, J.; Valkonen, J.; Björkman, K.; Frits, J.; Niemelä, I.; Heljanko, K.

    2012-01-01

    Instrumentation and control (I and C) systems play a vital role in the operation of safety-critical processes. Digital programmable logic controllers (PLC) enable sophisticated control tasks which sets high requirements for system validation and verification methods. Testing and simulation have an important role in the overall verification of a system but are not suitable for comprehensive evaluation because only a limited number of system behaviors can be analyzed due to time limitations. Testing is also performed too late in the development lifecycle and thus the correction of design errors is expensive. This paper discusses the role of formal methods in software development in the area of nuclear engineering. It puts forward model checking, a computer-aided formal method for verifying the correctness of a system design model, as a promising approach to system verification. The main contribution of the paper is the development of systematic methodology for modeling safety critical systems in the nuclear domain. Two case studies are reviewed, in which we have found errors that were previously not detected. We also discuss the actions that should be taken in order to increase confidence in the model checking process.

  12. Licensing of safety critical software for nuclear reactors. Common position of seven European nuclear regulators and authorised technical support organisations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    policies and in revisions of guidelines; - as a reference in safety cases and demonstrations of safety of software based systems; - as guidance for system design specifications by manufacturers and major I and C suppliers on the international market. From the outset, attention focused on computer based systems used in nuclear power plants for the implementation of safety functions (i.e. the functions of the highest safety criticality level); namely, those systems classified by the International Atomic Energy Agency as 'safety systems'. The recommendations of this report therefore mainly address 'safety systems'; 'safety related systems' are addressed in certain common positions and recommendations only where explicitly mentioned. The common positions are intended to convey the unanimous views of the Task Force members on the guidance that the licensees need to follow as part of an adequate safety demonstration. Throughout the document these common positions are expressed with the auxiliary verb 'shall'. The use of this verb for common positions is intended to convey the unanimous desire felt by the Task Force members for the licensees to satisfy the requirements expressed in the clause. The common positions are a common set of requirements and practices considered necessary by the member states represented in the task force. There was no systematic attempt, however, at guaranteeing that for each issue area these sets are complete or sufficient. It is also recognised that - in certain cases - other possible practices cannot be excluded, but the members felt that such alternatives will be difficult to justify. Recommended practices are supported by most, but may not be systematically implemented by all of the members states represented in the task force. Recommended practices are expressed with the auxiliary verb 'should'. In order to avoid the guidance being merely reduced to a lowest common denominator of safety (inferior

  13. Licensing of safety critical software for nuclear reactors. Common position of seven European nuclear regulators and authorised technical support organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    of guidelines; - as a reference in safety cases and demonstrations of safety of software based systems; - as guidance for system design specifications by manufacturers and major I and C suppliers on the international market. From the outset, attention focused on computer based systems used in nuclear power plants for the implementation of safety functions (i.e. the functions of the highest safety criticality level); namely, those systems classified by the International Atomic Energy Agency as 'safety systems'. The recommendations of this report therefore mainly address 'safety systems'; 'safety related systems' are addressed in certain common positions and recommendations only where explicitly mentioned. The common positions are intended to convey the unanimous views of the Task Force members on the guidance that the licensees need to follow as part of an adequate safety demonstration. Throughout the document these common positions are expressed with the auxiliary verb 'shall'. The use of this verb for common positions is intended to convey the unanimous desire felt by the Task Force members for the licensees to satisfy the requirements expressed in the clause. The common positions are a common set of requirements and practices considered necessary by the member states represented in the task force. There was no systematic attempt, however, at guaranteeing that for each issue area these sets are complete or sufficient. It is also recognised that - in certain cases - other possible practices cannot be excluded, but the members felt that such alternatives will be difficult to justify. Recommended practices are supported by most, but may not be systematically implemented by all of the members states represented in the task force. Recommended practices are expressed with the auxiliary verb 'should'. In order to avoid the guidance being merely reduced to a lowest common denominator of safety (inferior levelling), the task force - in addition to commonly accepted practices

  14. Criticality accident in uranium fuel processing plant. Questionnaires from Research Committee of Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Isao; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    The Research Committee of Nuclear Safety carried out a research on criticality accident at the JCO plant according to statement of president of the Japan Atomic Energy Society on October 8, 1999, of which results are planned to be summarized by the constitutions shown as follows, for a report on the 'Questionnaires of criticality accident in the Uranium Fuel Processing Plant of the JCO, Inc.': general criticality safety, fuel cycle and the JCO, Inc.; elucidation on progress and fact of accident; cause analysis and problem picking-up; proposals on improvement; and duty of the Society. Among them, on last two items, because of a conclusion to be required for members of the Society at discussions of the Committee, some questionnaires were send to more than 1800 of them on April 5, 2000 with name of chairman of the Committee. As results of the questionnaires contained proposals and opinions on a great numbers of fields, some key-words like words were found on a shape of repeating in most questionnaires. As they were thought to be very important nuclei in these two items, they were further largely classified to use for summarizing proposals and opinions on the questionnaires. This questionnaire had a big characteristic on the duty of the Society in comparison with those in the other organizations. (G.K.)

  15. The SCALE Web site: Resources for the worldwide nuclear criticality safety community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    The Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluations (SCALE) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. SCALE includes the well-known KENO V.a and KENO VI three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer codes. For several years, the SCALE staff at ORNL has maintained a Web site to provide information and support to sponsors and users in the worldwide criticality safety community. The SCALE WEB site is located at www.cped.ornl.gov/scale and provides information in the following areas: 1. important notices to users; 2. SCALE Users Electronic Notebook; 3. current and past issues of the SCALE Newsletter; 4. verification and validation (V and V) and benchmark reports; 5. download updates, utilities, and V and V input files; 6. SCALE training course information; 7. SCALE Manual on-line; 8. overview of SCALE system; 9. how to install and run SCALE; 10. SCALE quality assurance documents; and 11. nuclear resources on the Internet

  16. Nuclear safety in France after Fukushima - Critical analysis of complementary safety assessments (CSA) carried out on French nuclear installations after Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhijani, Arjun; Marignac, Yves

    2012-02-01

    This report proposes a critical analysis of the approach carried out on the basis of the CSA (complementary safety assessment), from their specifications to the IRSN conclusions. It is notably based on the analysis performed by EDF on three nuclear sites (Gravelines, Civaux and Flamanville) which encompass the different levels of the nuclear power plants in France and the EPR project under construction, and on the analysis performed by Areva for La Hague reprocessing plants. Due to the short delay, only some sites and some problems have been considered. The CSA methodology is described. The EDF approach is discussed as well as the IRSN analysis of reports made by EDF, and then the different case studies. Beyond the conclusions of these reports, the authors highlight several major possible accidents which must be taken into account. They also outline that this CSA approach is a good starting point for the strengthening of nuclear safety

  17. Nuclear safety. Seguranca nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aveline, A [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1981-01-01

    What is nuclear safety Is there any technical way to reduce risks Is it possible to put them at reasonable levels Are there competitiveness and economic reliability to employ the nuclear energy by means of safety technics Looking for answers to these questions the author describes the sources of potential risks to nuclear reactors and tries to apply the answers to the Brazilian Nuclear Programme. (author).

  18. The official website of the U.S. department of energy's nuclear criticality safety program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koponen, B.; Heinrichs, D.; Lee, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States); Scott, L. [SAIC, Solana Beach, CA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) mission is to provide sustainable expert leadership, direction, and the technical infrastructure necessary to develop, maintain, and disseminate the essential technical tools, training, and data to support safe, efficient fissionable material operations within the DOE. The NCSP Website site makes a variety of information available to the criticality safety practitioner, including reference materials, training modules and links to related sites. It assists criticality safety personnel to keep abreast of NCSP activities or current developments in criticality safety via a 'What's New' section within the Website. Convenient access to the many useful features of the Website is available via drop-down menus. The Website is also available to non-DOE and international professionals tasked with ensuring safe operations involving fissionable nuclear materials. (author)

  19. Nuclear criticality safety practices in digestion systems of the large scale production facility of the Department of Energy at Fernald

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear criticality safety practices used at the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, Ohio in conjunction with its metal dissolving and nonmetal, e.g., ash and ore concentrates, digesting operations are reviewed. Operating procedures with several different types of dissolver or digestor systems, i.e., metal dissolver, continuous, drum and safe geometry, are discussed. Calculations performed to verify the criticality safety of the operations are described

  20. Verification of MCNP6.2 for Nuclear Criticality Safety Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rising, Michael Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Alwin, Jennifer Louise [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-10

    Several suites of verification/validation benchmark problems were run in early 2017 to verify that the new production release of MCNP6.2 performs correctly for nuclear criticality safety applications (NCS). MCNP6.2 results for several NCS validation suites were compared to the results from MCNP6.1 [1] and MCNP6.1.1 [2]. MCNP6.1 is the production version of MCNP® released in 2013, and MCNP6.1.1 is the update released in 2014. MCNP6.2 includes all of the standard features for NCS calculations that have been available for the past 15 years, along with new features for sensitivity-uncertainty based methods for NCS validation [3]. Results from the benchmark suites were compared with results from previous verification testing [4-8]. Criticality safety analysts should consider testing MCNP6.2 on their particular problems and validation suites. No further development of MCNP5 is planned. MCNP6.1 is now 4 years old, and MCNP6.1.1 is now 3 years old. In general, released versions of MCNP are supported only for about 5 years, due to resource limitations. All future MCNP improvements, bug fixes, user support, and new capabilities are targeted only to MCNP6.2 and beyond.

  1. Nuclear criticality safety: general. 3. Tokaimura Criticality Accident: Point Model Stochastic Neutronic Interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechitoua, Boukhmes

    2001-01-01

    This paper shows what can be the stochastic neutronic contribution for the interpretation of criticality accidents. Stochastic neutronic comprehensive texts may be found in refs.1 through 4. We limit our study to the use of initiation probability, which is an important stochastic neutronic tally. Initiation probability P may be defined as the probability for one neutron to initiate an infinite neutron fission chain. The complement probability of P is the extinction probability Q. The probability that the neutron fission chain produced by one neutron will quench is equal to the multiplication of the probability of production of i neutrons g i by the probability of extinction of these i neutrons. We can estimate P by a Newton or by a dichotomic method. We suppose that P S (t) is the probability that an infinite neutron fission chain has been initiated before time t by a neutron produced by the source S(t). P S (t + dt) is the sum of two probabilities: 1. the probability that an infinite neutron fission chain has been initiated before time t by a neutron produced by the source S(t): P S (t); 2. The second probability is a multiplication of two probabilities: the probability that there was no initiation before t that is 1-P S (t), and the probability that a neutron emitted by the source with the probability S dt initiates an infinite neutron fission chain with the probability P(t). This last relation gives the link between P and the source density. The aim of this paper is to show how one can apply the foregoing derivations. We have simplified the Tokaimura criticality accident for this application. We have mono-energetic neutrons with infinite and homogeneous media; we have two reactions: capture and fission. In this section, we show how one can estimate the initiation probability with a source density as a function of time. This estimation makes use of three steps: 1. Reactivity insertion: Estimation of the multiplication coefficient as a function of time K(t). This

  2. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Program on Nuclear Safety comprehends Radioprotection, Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Material Control. These activities are developed at the Nuclear Safety Directory. The Radioactive Waste Management Department (GRR) was formally created in 1983, to promote research and development, teaching and service activities in the field of radioactive waste. Its mission is to develop and employ technologies to manage safely the radioactive wastes generated at IPEN and at its customer’s facilities all over the country, in order to protect the health and the environment of today's and future generations. The Radioprotection Service (GRP) aims primarily to establish requirements for the protection of people, as workers, contractors, students, members of the general public and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, it also aims to establish the primary criteria for the safety of radiation sources at IPEN and planning and preparing for response to nuclear and radiological emergencies. The procedures about the management and the control of exposures to ionizing radiation are in compliance with national standards and international recommendations. Research related to the main activities is also performed. The Nuclear Material Control has been performed by the Safeguard Service team, which manages the accountability and the control of nuclear material at IPEN facilities and provides information related to these activities to ABACC and IAEA. (author)

  3. Nuclear safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Program on Nuclear Safety comprehends Radioprotection, Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Material Control. These activities are developed at the Nuclear Safety Directory. The Radioactive Waste Management Department (GRR) was formally created in 1983, to promote research and development, teaching and service activities in the field of radioactive waste. Its mission is to develop and employ technologies to manage safely the radioactive wastes generated at IPEN and at its customer’s facilities all over the country, in order to protect the health and the environment of today's and future generations. The Radioprotection Service (GRP) aims primarily to establish requirements for the protection of people, as workers, contractors, students, members of the general public and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, it also aims to establish the primary criteria for the safety of radiation sources at IPEN and planning and preparing for response to nuclear and radiological emergencies. The procedures about the management and the control of exposures to ionizing radiation are in compliance with national standards and international recommendations. Research related to the main activities is also performed. The Nuclear Material Control has been performed by the Safeguard Service team, which manages the accountability and the control of nuclear material at IPEN facilities and provides information related to these activities to ABACC and IAEA. (author)

  4. Quantitative safety goals for nuclear power plants: critical review and reformulation within a unified theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munera, H.A.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1987-01-01

    Most suggestions for the establishment of probabilistic safety goals in the regulatory process of nuclear power plants contain some measure of total risk to the individual and to society, and/or a limit line. There is still some confusion, both on formal and informal aspects of the basic ideas. The first part of the chapter critically reviews some of the adopted and/or proposed probabilistic safety goals and criteria in several countries. Some of the difficulties identified are: Lack of an adequate delimitation of the scope of the non-deterministic choice problem. Consequently, the main components of the problem -probabilities and consequences - are not clearly defined. As a further consequence there is a conspicuous absence of a unified treatment, including notation and terminology, for concepts like risk, probability, frequency, utility, risk-aversion, limit-line, etc. The theoretical justifications and limitations of limit lines are not always fully understood, nor are the theoretical limitations realized. In the second part theoretical methods of comparing probability distributions which exist in other disciplines are mentioned and unified methodology to formulate probabilistic safety criteria is described. (author)

  5. Studies of safety and critical work situations in nuclear power plants: A human factors perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsson Kecklund, L.

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to develop and apply different approaches for analyzing safety in critical work situations in real work settings in nuclear power plants, and also to identify safety enhancing measures by using the framework of interaction between human, organizational and technical subsystems. A Cognitive Psychology as well as a Stress Psychology framework was used. All studies were related to the annual outage operational state where the need for coping with many infrequent tasks, often carried out under high time pressure, puts great strain on the staff and organisation of the plant. In three studies the natural variations in the plant state, normal operation and annual outage operation, were used to explore human performance, work-related factors as well as coping and the operators' own resources and the relationship between them. In the annual outage condition high work demands, decreased sleepiness at night shift, more errors and less satisfaction with work performance quality was reported by maintenance as well as by control room operators. A relationship between high work demands and more organizational problems and reports of more frequent human errors and lower satisfactions with work performance quality was also identified in the annual outage condition. Moreover, a relationship between increased sleepiness during night shift, more frequent use of coping strategies and a higher frequency of human errors was reported. In two studies the Event and Barrier Function Model was applied to analyze the safety of barrier function systems inserted into work process sequences to protect the systems from the negative consequences of failures and errors. The model was also used to assess safety in relation to a technical and organizational change. The last study addressed changes in work performance and work-related factors in relation to a technical and organizational change of a safety significant work process involving increased automation and new

  6. Tank waste remediation system nuclear criticality safety inspection and assessment plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAIL, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    This plan provides a management approved procedure for inspections and assessments of sufficient depth to validate that the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) facility complies with the requirements of the Project Hanford criticality safety program, NHF-PRO-334, ''Criticality Safety General, Requirements''

  7. Radiation shielding and criticality safety assessment for KN-12 spent nuclear fuel transport cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Kyung; Shin, Chang Ho; Kim, Gi Hwan [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-08-15

    Because SNFs involve TRU (Transuranium), fission products, and fissile materials, they are highly radioactive and also have a possibility to be critical. Therefore, radiation shielding and criticality safety for transport casks containing the SNFs should be guaranteed through reliable valuation procedure. IAEA safety standard series No ST-1 recommends regulation for safe transportation of the SNFs by transport casks, and United States is carrying out it according to the regulation guide, 10 CFR parts 71 and 72. Present research objective is to evaluate the KN-12 spent nuclear fuel transport cask that is designed for transportation of up to 12 assemblies and is standby status for being licensed in accordance with Korea Atomic Energy Act. Both radiation shielding and criticality analysis using the accurate Monte Carlo transport code, MCNP-4B are carried out for the KN-12 SNF cask as a benchmark calculation. Source terms for radiation shielding calculation are obtained using ORIGEN-S computer code. In this work, for normal transport conditions, the results from MCNP-4B shows the maximum dose rate of 0.557 mSv/hr at the side surface. And the maximum dose rate of 0.0871 mSv/hr was resulted at the 2 m distance from the cask. The level of calculated dose rate is 27.9% of the limit at the cask surface, 87.1% at 2 m from the cask surface for normal transport condition. For hypothetical accident conditions, the maximum rate of 2.5144 mSv/hr was resulted at the 1 m distance from the cask and this level is 25.1% of the limit for hypothetical accident conditions. In criticality calculations using MCNP-4B, the k{sub eff} values yielded for 5.0 w/o U-235 enriched fresh fuel are 0.92098 {+-} 0.00065. This result confirms subcritical condition of the KN-12 SNF cask and gives 96.95% of recommendations for criticality safety evaluation by US NRC these results will be useful as a basis for approval for the KN-12 SNF cask.

  8. Assessing Risk-Based Performance Indicators in Safety-Critical Systems for Nuclear Power Plants

    OpenAIRE

    TONT Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    The paper proposes framework for a multidisciplinary nuclear risk and safety assessment by modeling uncertainty and combining diverse evidence provided in such a way that it could be used to represent an entire argument about a system's dependability. The identified safety issues are being treated by means of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The behavior simulation of power plant in thepresence of risk factors is analyzed from the vulnerability, risk and functional safety viewpoints, hi...

  9. Reliability modeling of safety-critical network communication in a digitalized nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hun; Kim, Hee Eun; Son, Kwang Seop; Shin, Sung Min; Lee, Seung Jun; Kang, Hyun Gook

    2015-01-01

    The Engineered Safety Feature-Component Control System (ESF-CCS), which uses a network communication system for the transmission of safety-critical information from group controllers (GCs) to loop controllers (LCs), was recently developed. However, the ESF-CCS has not been applied to nuclear power plants (NPPs) because the network communication failure risk in the ESF-CCS has yet to be fully quantified. Therefore, this study was performed to identify the potential hazardous states for network communication between GCs and LCs and to develop quantification schemes for various network failure causes. To estimate the risk effects of network communication failures in the ESF-CCS, a fault-tree model of an ESF-CCS signal failure in the containment spray actuation signal condition was developed for the case study. Based on a specified range of periodic inspection periods for network modules and the baseline probability of software failure, a sensitivity study was conducted to analyze the risk effect of network failure between GCs and LCs on ESF-CCS signal failure. This study is expected to provide insight into the development of a fault-tree model for network failures in digital I&C systems and the quantification of the risk effects of network failures for safety-critical information transmission in NPPs. - Highlights: • Network reliability modeling framework for digital I&C system in NPP is proposed. • Hazardous states of network protocol between GC and LC in ESF-CCS are identified. • Fault-tree model of ESF-CCS signal failure in ESF actuation condition is developed. • Risk effect of network failure on ESF-CCS signal failure is analyzed.

  10. The ORSphere Benchmark Evaluation and Its Potential Impact on Nuclear Criticality Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall; J. Blair Briggs

    2013-10-01

    In the early 1970’s, critical experiments using an unreflected metal sphere of highly enriched uranium (HEU) were performed with the focus to provide a “very accurate description…as an ideal benchmark for calculational methods and cross-section data files.” Two near-critical configurations of the Oak Ridge Sphere (ORSphere) were evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook). The results from those benchmark experiments were then compared with additional unmoderated and unreflected HEU metal benchmark experiment configurations currently found in the ICSBEP Handbook. For basic geometries (spheres, cylinders, and slabs) the eigenvalues calculated using MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 were within 3 of their respective benchmark values. There appears to be generally a good agreement between calculated and benchmark values for spherical and slab geometry systems. Cylindrical geometry configurations tended to calculate low, including more complex bare HEU metal systems containing cylinders. The ORSphere experiments do not calculate within their 1s uncertainty and there is a possibility that the effect of the measured uncertainties for the GODIVA I benchmark may need reevaluated. There is significant scatter in the calculations for the highly-correlated ORCEF cylinder experiments, which are constructed from close-fitting HEU discs and annuli. Selection of a nuclear data library can have a larger impact on calculated eigenvalue results than the variation found within calculations of a given experimental series, such as the ORCEF cylinders, using a single nuclear data set.

  11. Nuclear safety culture and nuclear safety supervision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Jianshe

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the author reviews systematically and summarizes up the development process and stage characteristics of nuclear safety culture, analysis the connotation and characteristics of nuclear safety culture, sums up the achievements of our country's nuclear safety supervision, dissects the challenges and problems of nuclear safety supervision. This thesis focused on the relationship between nuclear safety culture and nuclear safety supervision, they are essential differences, but there is a close relationship. Nuclear safety supervision needs to introduce some concepts of nuclear safety culture, lays emphasis on humanistic care and improves its level and efficiency. Nuclear safety supervision authorities must strengthen nuclear safety culture training, conduct the development of nuclear safety culture, make sure that nuclear safety culture can play significant roles. (author)

  12. An outcome of nuclear safety research in JAERI. Case study for LOCA, FP, criticality and reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Ito, Keishiro; Kawashima, Kei; Katsuki, Chisato; Shirabe, Masashi

    2009-09-01

    An outcome of nuclear safety research done by JAERI was case studied by the bibliometric method. (1) For LOCA (loss-of-coolant accident) a domestic share of JAERI in monoclinic research paper was 63% at the past (20) 1978-1982 but was decreased to 40% at the present 1998-2002. For co-authored papers a domestic share between JAERI and PS (public sectors) is almost zero at past (20) but increased to 4% at the present. Research cooperation is active between Tokyo University and JAERI or between JAERI and Nagoya University. (2) Project-type research is to have a large monopolization in papers and that of basic-type research is to have a large development of research networking (DRN). (3) For FP, a share of co-authored paper is high due to an enhanced cooperation among JAERI-PO (Public Organization)-PS. For criticality, research activity was enhanced after JCO accident, especially at NUCEF. (4) For reprocessing, PS had a monopolistic position with a domestic share of 71% and a share of JAERI was about 20%. (5) LOCA and RIA outputs born by NSR-JAERI coincided partly to those of the Safety Licensing Guidelines but a share of contribution done by JAERI was ambiguous due to the lack of necessary information. (author)

  13. Fault-Tree Modeling of Safety-Critical Network Communication in a Digitalized Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hun; Kang, Hyun Gook [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To achieve technical self-reliance for nuclear I and C systems in Korea, the Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR-1400) man-machine interface system (MMIS) architecture was developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). As one of the systems in the developed MMIS architecture, the Engineered Safety Feature-Component Control System (ESF-CCS) employs a network communication system for the transmission of safety-critical information from group controllers (GCs) to loop controllers (LCs) to effectively accommodate the vast number of field controllers. The developed fault-tree model was then applied to several case studies. As an example of the development of a fault-tree model for ESF-CCS signal failure, the fault-tree model of ESF-CCS signal failure for CS pump PP01A in the CSAS condition was designed by considering the identified hazardous states of network failure that would result in a failure to provide input signals to the corresponding LC. The quantitative results for four case studies demonstrated that the probability of overall network communication failure, which was calculated as the sum of the failure probability associated with each failure cause, contributes up to 1.88% of the probability of ESF-CCS signal failure for the CS pump considered in the case studies.

  14. Nuclear criticality safety and time reactivity enhancement aspects of energy amplifier system devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siciliano, F [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, Rotondelle, Matera (Italy). Direzione INFO

    1995-12-01

    As far as the Rubbia`s and colleagues proposal of innovating Energy Amplifier system (E.A.s.) device driven by a particle beam accelerator is concerned, four basic topics are comprised in the present paper: (1) A short outline of the nuclear aspects of Th-U and U-Pu fuel cycles regarding their general breeding and efficiency features. (2) The needed nuclear criticality control requirements have been studied in terms of safety regulating parameters on the basis of the ThO2 mixed oxides selected as fuel kind for the E.A.s. device technology development. Particular attention is devoted to time evolution of neutron multiplication factor since delayed development of the 233U buildup and so system reactivity are expected in the Th-U cycle. (3) Code E.A.s. device irradiation and post-irradiation modelling for determining higher actinides buildup, fission products formation and fuel consumption trends as function of time, system enrichment degree and flux level parameters. (4) The confirmation, on the basis of the same specific power irradiation, of expected actinides waste obtainment cleaner than the one deriving from the U-Pu cycle utilization. For this end, a model comparison of equivalent enriched fissile nuclides in both cycles has been devised as having, within the range of 0-700 days, ten irradiation periods of about 53 MW/ton specific power and equivalent cooling time post-irradiation periods.

  15. French safety and criticality testing programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbry, F.; Leclerc, J.; Manaranche, J.C.; Maubert, L.

    1982-01-01

    This article underlines the need to include experimental safety-criticality programmes in the French nuclear effort. The means and methods used at the Section of Experimental Nuclear Safety and Criticality Research, attached to the CEA Valduc Centre, are described. Three experimental programmes are presented: safety-criticality of the PWR fuel cycle, neutron poisoning of plutonium solutions by gadolinium and safety-criticality of slightly enriched and slightly moderated uranium oxide. Criticality accidents studies in solution are then described [fr

  16. Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation of the 9965, 9968, 9972, 9973, 9974, and 9975 Shipping Casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    A Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation (NCSE) has been performed for the 9965, 9968, 9972, 9973, 9974, and 9975 SRS-designed shipping casks. This was done in support of the recertification effort for the 9965 and 9968, and the certification of the newly designed 9972-9975 series. The analysis supports the use of these packages as Fissile Class I for shipment of fissionable material from the SRS FB-Line, HB-Line, and from Lawrence Livermore national Laboratory. six different types of material were analyzed with varying Isotopic composition, of both oxide and metallic form. The mass limits required to support the fissile Class I rating for each of the envelopes are given in the Table below. These mass limits apply if DOE approves an exception as described in 10 CFR 71.55(c), such that water leakage into the primary containment vessel does not need to be considered in the criticality analysis. If this exception is not granted, the mass limits are lower than those shown below. this issue is discussed in detail in sections 5 and 6 of the report.One finding from this work is important enough to highlight in the abstract. The fire tests performed for this family of shipping casks indicates only minimal charring of the Celotex thermal insulation. Analysis of the casks with no Celotex insulation (assuming it has all burned away), results in values of k-eff that exceed 1.0. Therefore, the Celotex insulation must remain intact in order to guarantee sub criticality of the 9972-9975 family of shipping casks

  17. Nuclear criticality safety experiments, calculations, and analyses - 1958 to 1982. Volume 2. Summaries. Complilation of papers from the Transactions of the American Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1982-01-01

    This compilation contains 688 complete summaries of papers on nuclear criticality safety as presented at meetings of the American Nuclear Society (ANS). The selected papers contain criticality parameters for fissile materials derived from experiments and calculations, as well as criticality safety analyses for fissile material processing, transport, and storage. The compilation was developed as a component of the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) now under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The compilation is presented in two volumes: Volume 1 contains a directory to the ANS Transaction volume and page number where each summary was originally published, the author concordance, and the subject concordance derived from the keyphrases in titles. Volume 2 contains-in chronological order-the full-text summaries, reproduced here by permission of the American Nuclear Society from their Transactions, volumes 1-41

  18. Nuclear criticality safety experiments, calculations, and analyses - 1958 to 1982. Volume 2. Summaries. Complilation of papers from the Transactions of the American Nuclear Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1982-10-21

    This compilation contains 688 complete summaries of papers on nuclear criticality safety as presented at meetings of the American Nuclear Society (ANS). The selected papers contain criticality parameters for fissile materials derived from experiments and calculations, as well as criticality safety analyses for fissile material processing, transport, and storage. The compilation was developed as a component of the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) now under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The compilation is presented in two volumes: Volume 1 contains a directory to the ANS Transaction volume and page number where each summary was originally published, the author concordance, and the subject concordance derived from the keyphrases in titles. Volume 2 contains-in chronological order-the full-text summaries, reproduced here by permission of the American Nuclear Society from their Transactions, volumes 1-41.

  19. NARCISS critical stand experiments for studying the nuclear safety in accident water immersion of highly enriched uranium dioxide fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Glushkov, E.S.; Bubelev, V.G.

    2005-01-01

    A brief description of the Topaz-2 SNPS designed under scientific supervision of RRC KI in Russia, and of the NARCISS critical facility, is given. At the NARCISS critical facility, neutronic peculiarities and nuclear safety issues of the Topaz-2 system reactor were studied experimentally. This work is devoted to a detailed description of experiments on investigation of criticality safety in accident water immersion og highly enriched uranium dioxide fuel elements, performed at the NARCISS facility. The experiments were carried out at water-moderated critical assemblies with varying height, number, and spacing of fuel elements. The results obtained in the critical experiments, computational models of the investigated critical configurations, and comparison of the computational and experimental results are given [ru

  20. Nuclear criticality safety controls for uranium deposits during D and D at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C.; Jollay, L.J. III; Dahl, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Deputy Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environmental Management has issued a challenge to complete DOE environmental cleanup within a decade. The response for Oak Ridge facilities is in accordance with the DOE ten-year plan which calls for completion of > 95% of environmental management work by the year 2006. This will result in a 99% risk reduction and in a significant savings in base line costs in waste management (legacy waste); remedial action (groundwater, soil, etc.); and decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). It is assumed that there will be long-term institutional control of cascade equipment, i.e., there will be no walk away from sites, and that there will be firm radioactivity release limits by 1999 for recycle metals. An integral part of these plants is the removal of uranium deposits which pose nuclear criticality safety concerns in the shut down of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. DOE has initiated the Nuclear Criticality Stabilization Program to improve nuclear criticality safety by removing the larger uranium deposits from unfavorable geometry equipment. Nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements have identified the location of these deposits. The objective of the K-25 Site Nuclear Criticality Stabilization Program is to remove and place uranium deposits into safe geometry storage containers to meet the double contingency principle. Each step of the removal process results in safer conditions where multiple controls are present. Upon completion of the Program, nuclear criticality risks will be greatly reduced

  1. Nuclear power safety economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legasov, V.A.; Demin, V.F.; Shevelev, Ya.V.

    1984-01-01

    The existing conceptual and methodical basis for the decision-making process insuring safety of the nuclear power and other (industrial and non-industrial) human activities is critically analyzed. Necessity of development a generalized economic safety analysis method (GESAM) is shown. Its purpose is justifying safety measures. Problems of GESAM development are considered including the problem of costing human risk. A number of suggestions on solving them are given. Using the discounting procedure in the assessment of risk or detriment caused by harmful impact on human health is substantiated. Examples of analyzing some safety systems in the nuclear power and other spheres of human activity are given

  2. User-oriented information access by information need recontextualisation and articulation. Application in nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medini, Lionel

    2001-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the design methodology of a system of access to information which is based on an access to relevant information with respect to user needs. In a first part, the author addresses the various issues related to access to information and to information understanding. The next part addresses the involved methods and tools and presents the operational approach adopted for this research regarding access to information. Different disciplines are addressed (knowledge management, ergonomics and information science) and different technologies are used (W3 and XML, DVP, ActiveX, pdf format and the Adobe suite). In the core chapter, the author reports the design of a LMCE (a multi-user book of electronic knowledge) which allows both hypermedia navigation in knowledge diagrams and a construction of a document query. This design is based on a knowledge-management modelling to define diagrams, on ergonomics modelling for user profile identification, and on information science for a specific indexing of the information system. The prototype can be visualized with a web browser such as Internet Explorer 5. The author reports a first assessment and discusses the contribution of his approach to the problematic of access to information which is to be applied to nuclear criticality safety [fr

  3. Nuclear criticality information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear criticality safety program at LLNL began in the 1950's with a critical measurements program which produced benchmark data until the late 1960's. This same time period saw the rapid development of computer technology useful for both computer modeling of fissile systems and for computer-aided management and display of the computational benchmark data. Database management grew in importance as the amount of information increased and as experimental programs were terminated. Within the criticality safety program at LLNL we began at that time to develop a computer library of benchmark data for validation of computer codes and cross sections. As part of this effort, we prepared a computer-based bibliography of criticality measurements on relatively simple systems. However, it is only now that some of these computer-based resources can be made available to the nuclear criticality safety community at large. This technology transfer is being accomplished by the DOE Technology Information System (TIS), a dedicated, advanced information system. The NCIS database is described

  4. Nuclear criticality safety aspects of emergency response at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    Emergency response at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is handled through a graded approach depending on the specific emergency situation . LANL maintains a comprehensive capability to respond to events ranging from minor facility events (alerts) through major community events (general emergencies), including criticality accidents . Criticality safety and emergency response apply to all activities involving significant quantities of fissile material at LANL, primarily at Technical Area 18 (TA-18, the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility) and Technical Area 55 (TA-55, the Plutonium Facility). This discussion focuses on response to a criticality accident at TA-55; the approach at TA-18 is comparable .

  5. Survey of bayesian belif nets for quantitative reliability assessment of safety critical software used in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, H.S.; Sung, T.Y.; Jeong, H.S.; Park, J.H.; Kang, H.G.; Lee, K

    2001-03-01

    As part of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment of safety grade digital systems used in Nuclear Power plants research, measures and methodologies applicable to quantitative reliability assessment of safety critical software were surveyed. Among the techniques proposed in the literature we selected those which are in use widely and investigated their limitations in quantitative software reliability assessment. One promising methodology from the survey is Bayesian Belief Nets (BBN) which has a formalism and can combine various disparate evidences relevant to reliability into final decision under uncertainty. Thus we analyzed BBN and its application cases in digital systems assessment area and finally studied the possibility of its application to the quantitative reliability assessment of safety critical software.

  6. Survey of bayesian belif nets for quantitative reliability assessment of safety critical software used in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, H. S.; Sung, T. Y.; Jeong, H. S.; Park, J. H.; Kang, H. G.; Lee, K.

    2001-03-01

    As part of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment of safety grade digital systems used in Nuclear Power plants research, measures and methodologies applicable to quantitative reliability assessment of safety critical software were surveyed. Among the techniques proposed in the literature we selected those which are in use widely and investigated their limitations in quantitative software reliability assessment. One promising methodology from the survey is Bayesian Belief Nets (BBN) which has a formalism and can combine various disparate evidences relevant to reliability into final decision under uncertainty. Thus we analyzed BBN and its application cases in digital systems assessment area and finally studied the possibility of its application to the quantitative reliability assessment of safety critical software

  7. The critical issue of nuclear power plant safety in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1977-01-01

    A little more than a decade from now, large commercial nuclear power facilities will be in operation in almost 40 countries, of which approximately one-half are presently considered industrially less developed. Ambitious nuclear programmes coupled with minimal and frequently under-staffed regulatory and utility organizations are only one aspect of the difficulties related to the safety of nuclear plants that face these developing countries. Inherent problems of meeting current safety standards and requirements for the significantly non-standard nuclear power plant exports can be compounded by financial considerations that may lead to purchases of reactors of various types, from more than one supplier country and with different safety standards and requirements. An examination of these issues points to the necessity and opportunity for effective action which could include provision for adequate funding for safety considerations in the purchase contract, and for sufficient regulatory assistance and training from the developed countries. The article will introduce the topic, discuss specific examples, and offer some suggestions. (author)

  8. Nuclear criticality safety assessment of the Consolidated Edison Uranium-Solidification Program Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear criticality assessment of the Consolidated Edison Uranium-Solidification Program facility confirms that all operations involved in the process may be conducted with an acceptable margin of subcriticality. Normal operation presents no concern since subcriticality is maintained by design. Several recommendations are presented to prevent, or mitigate the consequences of, any abnormal events that might occur in the various portions of the process. These measures would also serve to reduce to a minimum the administrative controls required to prevent criticality

  9. Framework of nuclear safety and safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    Since enormous energy is released by nuclear chain reaction mainly as a form of radiation, a great potential risk accompanies utilization of nuclear energy. Safety has been continuously a critical issue therefore from the very beginning of its development. Though the framework of nuclear safety that has been established at an early developmental stage of nuclear engineering is still valid, more comprehensive approaches are required having experienced several events such as Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and JCO. This article gives a brief view of the most basic principles how nuclear safety is achieved, which were introduced and sophisticated in nuclear engineering but applicable also to other engineering domains in general. (author)

  10. A critical overview of safety-related and technological criteria for nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahodova, M.; Valach, M.

    2000-10-01

    A detailed overview of the safety criteria, methods of analysis and computer codes used in OECD countries is presented. A critical analysis of the validity of criteria in the high burnup domain was performed, and recommendations for testing their validity based on available experimental data are put forth. (author)

  11. OECD/NEA working party on nuclear criticality safety: Challenge of new realities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Y.; Brady, M.C.; Briggs, J.B.; Sartori, E.

    1998-01-01

    New issues in criticality safety continue to emerge as spent fuel storage facilities reach the saturation point, fuel enrichments and burn-ups increase and new types of plutonium-carrying fuels are being developed. The new challenges related to the manipulation, transportation and storage of fuel demand further work to improve models predicting behavior through new experiments, especially where there is a lack of data in the present databases. This article summarizes the activities of the OECD/NEA working groups that coordinate and carry out work in the domain of criticality safety. Particular attention is devoted to establishing sound databases required in this area and to addressing issues of high relevance such as burn-up credit. This is aimed toward improving safety and identifying economic solutions to issues concerning the back end of the fuel cycle

  12. OECD/NEA working party on nuclear criticality safety: challenge of new realities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Y.; Brady, M.C.; Briggs, J.B.; Sartori, E.

    1998-01-01

    New issues in critically safety continue to emerge as spent fuel storage facilities reach the saturation point, fuel enrichments and burn-ups increase and new types of plutonium-carrying fuels are being developed. The new challenges related to the manipulation, transportation and storage of fuel demand further work to improve models predicting behaviour through new experiments, especially where there is a lack of data the present databases. This article summarizes the activities of the OECD/NEA working groups that co-ordinate and carry out work in the domain of criticality safety. Particular attention is devoted to establishing sound databases required in this area and to addressing issues of high relevance such as burn-up credit. This is aimed toward improving safety and identifying economic solutions to issues concerning the back end of the fuel cycle. (authors)

  13. Scenario Analysis for the Safety Assessment of Nuclear Waste Repositories: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosoni, Edoardo; Salo, Ahti; Zio, Enrico

    2018-04-01

    A major challenge in scenario analysis for the safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories pertains to the comprehensiveness of the set of scenarios selected for assessing the safety of the repository. Motivated by this challenge, we discuss the aspects of scenario analysis relevant to comprehensiveness. Specifically, we note that (1) it is necessary to make it clear why scenarios usually focus on a restricted set of features, events, and processes; (2) there is not yet consensus on the interpretation of comprehensiveness for guiding the generation of scenarios; and (3) there is a need for sound approaches to the treatment of epistemic uncertainties. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  14. Proposed American National Standard ANS 8.22: Nuclear criticality safety based on limiting and controlling moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullington, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    This proposed standard features guidance for dealing with the combination of fissile material and moderators in moderator control areas. The main points include nuclear criticality safety practices, encompassing administrative practices and process evaluations, and engineering practices, encompassing moderator control area barriers, equipment and containers, penetrations, fire prevention and suppression, and active engineered controls. Four appendixes follow the standard; the subject of these appendixes are typical moderating materials, potential sources of moderators, moderator control measurements, and engineered barriers to control moderators

  15. Requirement analysis of the safety-critical software implementation for the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hoon Seon; Jung, Jae Cheon; Kim, Jae Hack; Nam, Sang Ku; Kim, Hang Bae

    2005-01-01

    The safety critical software shall be implemented under the strict regulation and standards along with hardware qualification. In general, the safety critical software has been implemented using functional block language (FBL) and structured language like C in the real project. Software design shall comply with such characteristics as; modularity, simplicity, minimizing the use of sub-routine, and excluding the interrupt logic. To meet these prerequisites, we used the computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tool to substantiate the requirements traceability matrix that were manually developed using Word processors or Spreadsheets. And the coding standard and manual have been developed to confirm the quality of software development process, such as; readability, consistency, and maintainability in compliance with NUREG/CR-6463. System level preliminary hazard analysis (PHA) is performed by analyzing preliminary safety analysis report (PSAR) and FMEA document. The modularity concept is effectively implemented for the overall module configurations and functions using RTP software development tool. The response time imposed on the basis of the deterministic structure of the safety-critical software was measured

  16. Validation of nuclear criticality safety software and 27 energy group ENDF/B-IV cross sections. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.L. Jr.; D'Aquila, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    The original validation report, POEF-T-3636, was documented in August 1994. The document was based on calculations that were executed during June through August 1992. The statistical analyses in Appendix C and Appendix D were completed in October 1993. This revision is written to clarify the margin of safety being used at Portsmouth for nuclear criticality safety calculations. This validation gives Portsmouth NCS personnel a basis for performing computerized KENO V.a calculations using the Lockheed Martin Nuclear Criticality Safety Software. The first portion of the document outlines basic information in regard to validation of NCSS using ENDF/B-IV 27-group cross sections on the IBM3090 at ORNL. A basic discussion of the NCSS system is provided, some discussion on the validation database and validation in general. Then follows a detailed description of the statistical analysis which was applied. The results of this validation indicate that the NCSS software may be used with confidence for criticality calculations at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. For calculations of Portsmouth systems using the specified codes and systems covered by this validation, a maximum k eff including 2σ of 0.9605 or lower shall be considered as subcritical to ensure a calculational margin of safety of 0.02. The validation of NCSS on the IBM 3090 at ORNL was extended to include NCSS on the IBM 3090 at K-25

  17. Safety demonstration analyses on criticality for severe accident during overland transport of fresh nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Okuno, Hiroshi; Yamada, Kenji; Watanabe, Kouji; Nomura, Yasushi; Miyoshi, Yoshinori

    2005-01-01

    Criticality safety analysis was performed for transport packages of uranium dioxide powder or of fresh PWR fuel involved in a severe accident during overland transportation, and as a result, sub-criticality was confirmed against impact accident conditions such as loaded by a drop from high position to a concrete or asphalt surface, and fire accident conditions such as caused by collisions with an oil tank trailer carrying lots of inflammable material in open air, or with a commonly used two-ton-truck inside an unventilated tunnel. (author)

  18. NCIS - a Nuclear Criticality Information System (overview)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1983-07-01

    A Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) is being established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in order to serve personnel responsible for safe storage, transport, and handling of fissile materials and those concerned with the evaluation and analysis of nuclear, critical experiments. Public concern for nuclear safety provides the incentive for improved access to nuclear safety information

  19. A comparative study of formal methods for safety critical software in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Se Do; Seong Poong Hyun

    2000-01-01

    The requirement of ultra high reliability of the safety critical software can not be demonstrated by testing alone. The specification based on formal method is recommended for safety system software. But there exist various kinds of formal methods, and this variety of formal method is recognized as an obstacle to the wide use of formal method. In this paper six different formal method have been applied to the same part of the functional requirements that is calculation algorithm intensive. The specification results were compared against the criteria that is derived from the characteristics that good software requirements specifications should have and regulatory body recommends to have. The application experience shows that the critical characteristics should be defined first, then appropriate method has to e selected. In our case, the Software Cost Reduction method was recommended for internal condition or calculation algorithm checking, and state chart method is recommended for the external behavioral description. (author)

  20. Nuclear criticality safety assessment of ORR, NBS, and HFBR fuel element shipping package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.T.

    1979-01-01

    A fuel element shipping package employing a borated-phenolic foam as a thermal insulating material is designed to transport as many as seven fuel elements for use in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, the Brookhaven Fast Beam Reactor, or the National Bureau of Standards Reactor. This report presents the criticality safety evaluation and demonstrates that the requirements for a Fissile Class I package are satisfied by the design

  1. A critical review of published groundwater flow models for safety of nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine, E.

    1997-04-01

    Flow models have been simulated for the potential nuclear waste sites in Precambrian bedrock of Finland in the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). The work had been commissioned by Teollisuuden Voima Oy. In the present study, the published flow models are critically reviewed. The work concentrates on qualitative evaluation of the applied equivalent continuum approach applied to crystalline bedrock. Special attention is paid to the use of the geological information in connection with flow modelling. (35 refs., 6 figs.)

  2. Evaluation of Model Driven Development of Safety Critical Software in the Nuclear Power Plant I and C system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jae Cheon; Chang, Hoon Seon; Chang, Young Woo; Kim, Jae Hack; Sohn, Se Do

    2005-01-01

    The major issues of the safety critical software are formalism and V and V. Implementing these two characteristics in the safety critical software will greatly enhance the quality of software product. The structure based development requires lots of output documents from the requirements phase to the testing phase. The requirements analysis phase is open omitted. According to the Standish group report in 2001, 49% of software project is cancelled before completion or never implemented. In addition, 23% is completed and become operational, but over-budget, over the time estimation, and with fewer features and functions than initially specified. They identified ten success factors. Among them, firm basic requirements and formal methods are technically achievable factors while the remaining eight are management related. Misunderstanding of requirements due to lack of communication between the design engineer and verification engineer causes unexpected result such as functionality error of system. Safety critical software shall comply with such characteristics as; modularity, simplicity, minimizing the sub-routine, and excluding the interrupt routine. In addition, the crosslink fault and erroneous function shall be eliminated. The easiness of repairing work after the installation shall be achieved as well. In consideration of the above issues, we evaluate the model driven development (MDD) methods for nuclear I and C systems software. For qualitative analysis, the unified modeling language (UML), functional block language (FBL) and the safety critical application environment (SCADE) are tested for the above characteristics

  3. Nuclear safety and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hho Jung

    2000-03-01

    This book contains 12 chapters, which are atom and radiation, nuclear reactor and kinds of nuclear power plant, safeguard actuation system and stability evaluation for rock foundation of nuclear power plant, nuclear safety and principle, safety analysis and classification of incident, probabilistic safety assessment and major incident, nuclear safety regulation, system of nuclear safety regulation, main function and subject of safety regulation in nuclear facilities, regulation of fuel cycle and a nuclear dump site, protection of radiation and, safety supervision and, safety supervision and measurement of environmental radioactivity.

  4. A comparative study between transport and criticality safety indexes for fissile uranium nuclearly pure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes da Silva, T. de; Sordi, G.M.A.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN (Brazil)]. e-mail: tmsilva@ipen.br

    2006-07-01

    The international and national standards determine that during the transport of radioactive materials the package to be sent should be identified by labels of risks specifying content, activity and the transport index. The result of the monitoring of the package to 1 meter identifies the transport index, TI, which represents the dose rate to 1 meter of this. The transport index is, by definition, a number that represents a gamma radiation that crosses the superficial layer the radioactive material of the package to 1 meter of distance. For the fissile radioactive material that is the one in which a neutron causes the division of the atom, the international standards specify criticality safety index CSI, which is related with the safe mass of the fissile element. In this work it was determined the respective safe mass for each considered enrichment for the compounds of uranium oxides UO{sub 2}, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. In the study of CSI it was observed that the value 50 of the expression 50/N being N the number of packages be transported in subcriticality conditions it represents a fifth part of the safe mass of the element uranium or 9% of the smallest mass critical for a transport not under exclusive use. As conclusion of the accomplished study was observed that the transport index starting from 7% of enrichment doesn't present contribution and that criticality safety index is always greater than the transport index. Therefore what the standards demand to specify, the largest value between both indexes, was clearly identified in this study as being the criticality safety index. (Author)

  5. HSE's safety assessment principles for criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simister, D N; Finnerty, M D; Warburton, S J; Thomas, E A; Macphail, M R

    2008-01-01

    The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) published its revised Safety Assessment Principles for Nuclear Facilities (SAPs) in December 2006. The SAPs are primarily intended for use by HSE's inspectors when judging the adequacy of safety cases for nuclear facilities. The revised SAPs relate to all aspects of safety in nuclear facilities including the technical discipline of criticality safety. The purpose of this paper is to set out for the benefit of a wider audience some of the thinking behind the final published words and to provide an insight into the development of UK regulatory guidance. The paper notes that it is HSE's intention that the Safety Assessment Principles should be viewed as a reflection of good practice in the context of interpreting primary legislation such as the requirements under site licence conditions for arrangements for producing an adequate safety case and for producing a suitable and sufficient risk assessment under the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999 (SI1999/3232 www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si1999/uksi_19993232_en.pdf). (memorandum)

  6. Nuclear criticality safety bounding analysis for the in-tank-precipitation (ITP) process, impacted by fissile isotopic weight fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, C.E.

    1994-04-22

    The In-Tank Precipitation process (ITP) receives High Level Waste (HLW) supernatant liquid containing radionuclides in waste processing tank 48H. Sodium tetraphenylborate, NaTPB, and monosodium titanate (MST), NaTi{sub 2}O{sub 5}H, are added for removal of radioactive Cs and Sr, respectively. In addition to removal of radio-strontium, MST will also remove plutonium and uranium. The majority of the feed solutions to ITP will come from the dissolution of supernate that had been concentrated by evaporation to a crystallized salt form, commonly referred to as saltcake. The concern for criticality safety arises from the adsorption of U and Pt onto MST. If sufficient mass and optimum conditions are achieved then criticality is credible. The concentration of u and Pt from solution into the smaller volume of precipitate represents a concern for criticality. This report supplements WSRC-TR-93-171, Nuclear Criticality Safety Bounding Analysis For The In-Tank-Precipitation (ITP) Process. Criticality safety in ITP can be analyzed by two bounding conditions: (1) the minimum safe ratio of MST to fissionable material and (2) the maximum fissionable material adsorption capacity of the MST. Calculations have provided the first bounding condition and experimental analysis has established the second. This report combines these conditions with canyon facility data to evaluate the potential for criticality in the ITP process due to the adsorption of the fissionable material from solution. In addition, this report analyzes the potential impact of increased U loading onto MST. Results of this analysis demonstrate a greater safety margin for ITP operations than the previous analysis. This report further demonstrates that the potential for criticality in the ITP process due to adsorption of fissionable material by MST is not credible.

  7. Nuclear criticality safety 2005 and 2006. Monitoring, follow-up and communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mennerdahl, Dennis

    2007-03-01

    A number of selected issues have dominated during 2005 and 2006. This include development of models for realism based on physics (not only statistics and praxis), criteria for criticality safety, regulations and standards, burnup credit, determination of source convergence in calculations, substantial improvements in calculation methods, validation of those methods, etc. In spite of some criticism against certain parts of the NRC FCSS/ISG-10, it is an important document. It should support both authorities and utilities to determine adequate safety margins. To a large extent, the principles that have been applied in Sweden since the 1970's are supported. The extra safety margin (MMS or Δk m ) that protects against unknown uncertainties in k eff should be related to the known uncertainty. In Sweden this has been achieved by limitation of the total, statistically determined standard deviation to 0.01. In addition, FCSS/ISG-10 supports the principle of using different values of Δk m for normal situations than for design basis incidents (must have very low probabilities). In Sweden, Δk m have been included in the design limits that have been 0.95 for normal scenarios and 0.98 for incident scenarios. The corresponding values of Δk m are 0.05 and 0.02. They are exactly the same values as are mentioned in FCSS/ISG-10. The recently issued SCALE 5.1 is very important for burnup credit. Similar capabilities have been available in Sweden, in the form of CASMO, PHOENIX and their predecessor BUXY, for more than 30 years. SCALE 5.1 makes reactor calculations available in a procedure that is easily accessible to specialists on criticality safety. The physics simulation of the irradiation (Monte Carlo through KENO in 3-D or deterministic through NEWT in 2-D) becomes much more realistic with SCALE 5.1 than with earlier versions. A very important project is the OECD/NEA study on reference values for criticality safety. The final report has now been distributed. Among other issues

  8. Insight from a Critical Review on the Safety Analysis of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facility for Domestic Regulatory System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Soon Joon; Chung, Young Wook; Jeong, Seung Young

    2010-01-01

    Korea has 20 nuclear power plants in operation, and 10,761 ton of spent fuel deposited in plant sites. The capacity of reservoir for spent fuel in plant sites is to begin to be full in 2016. The light water reactors of 16 units generate around 320 ton/year and the heavy water reactors of 4 units around 380 ton/year in Korea. And the electricity generated by nuclear power plants is planned to increase up to 59% share by 2030. Spent fuel classified as high level radioactive waste in law is characterized by high level radiation, high heat generation, and high radiological toxicity. In the contrary, it is also a very useful domestic energy source. Thus, the safe management of spent fuel is very important confronting job in nuclear industry. Advanced fuel cycle (AFC) using pyro-process is an innovative technology, by which environmental load is drastically relieved because the extracted long-lived fission products are burn in fast breeder reactors. Domestic nuclear industry also has a perspective road map for the construction of AFC facilities. However, there is not a sufficiently detailed licensing regulatory system yet. Moreover, there is no systematic frame for the safety evaluation. This paper reviews the safety analysis system of foreign fuel cycle facilities. Critical review leads to the insight for setting-up safety analysis system of domestic AFC facilities

  9. Safety critical software design approach developed for Canadian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiyen, M.M.; Joannou, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    Recently two methodologies were developed that comply with a high safety critical standard: the Rational Design Process, which can be characterized as a methodology based on state machines where the required behaviour of the software is defined using mathematical functions written in a notation which has a well defined syntax and semantics, and the Integrated Approach, which uses a graphical functional notation to specify the functional software requirements. The first implementations based on the two methodologies are discussed. Results from all phases of testing show a remarkably low number of errors, demonstrating that the new methodologies have indeed led to a higher demonstrable level of software reliability. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Criticality safety considerations in the geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gore, B.F.; McNair, G.W.; Heaberlin, S.W.

    1980-05-01

    Features of geologic disposal which hamper the demonstration that criticality cannot occur therein include possible changes of shape and form, intrusion of water as a neutron moderator, and selective leaching of spent fuel constituents. If the criticality safety of spent fuel disposal depends on burnup, independent measurements verifying the burnup should be performed prior to disposal. The status of nondestructive analysis method which might provide such verification is discussed. Calculations were performed to assess the potential for increasing the allowed size of a spent fuel disposal canister if potential water intrusion were limited by close-packing the enclosed rods. Several factors were identified which severely limited the potential of this application. The theoretical limit of hexagonal close-packing cannot be achieved due to fuel rod bowing. It is concluded that disposal canisters should be sized on the basis of assumed optimum moderation. Several topics for additional research were identified during this limited study

  11. Status of criticality safety research at NUCEF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Ken [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Two critical facilities, named STACY (Static Experiment Critical Facility) and TRACY (Transient Experiment Critical Facility), at the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility (NUCEF) started their hot operations in 1995. Since then, basic experimental data for criticality safety research have been accumulated using STACY, and supercritical experiments for the study of criticality accident in a reprocessing plant have been performed using TRACY. In this paper, the outline of those critical facilities and the main results of TRACY experiments are presented. (author)

  12. Tank farm nuclear criticality review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The technical basis for the nuclear criticality safety of stored wastes at the Hanford Site Tank Farm Complex was reviewed by a team of senior technical personnel whose expertise covered all appropriate aspects of fissile materials chemistry and physics. The team concluded that the detailed and documented nucleonics-related studies underlying the waste tanks criticality safety basis were sound. The team concluded that, under current plutonium inventories and operating conditions, a nuclear criticality accident is incredible in any of the Hanford single-shell tanks (SST), double-shell tanks (DST), or double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTS) on the Hanford Site

  13. Licensing of safety critical software for nuclear reactors. Common position of seven European nuclear regulators and authorised technical support organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The major result of the work is the identification of consensus and common technical positions on a set of important licensing issues raised by the design and operation of computer-based systems used in Nuclear Power Plants for safety functions. The purpose is to introduce greater consistency and more mutual acceptance into current practices. To achieve these common positions, detailed consideration was paid to the licensing approaches followed in the different countries represented by the experts of the task force. The report is intended to be useful: - to coordinate regulators' and safety experts' technical viewpoints in the design of regulators' national policies and in revisions of guidelines; - as a reference in safety cases and demonstrations of safety of software based systems; - as guidance for system design specifications by manufacturers and major I and C suppliers on the international market. The task force decided at an early stage to focus attention on computer based systems used in Nuclear Power Plants for the implementation of safety functions; namely, those systems classified by the IAEA as 'Safety Systems'. Therefore, recommendations of this report - except those of chapter 1.11 - primarily address 'safety systems' and not 'safety related systems'. It was felt that the most difficult aspects of the licensing of digital programmable systems are rooted in the specific properties of the technology. The objective was therefore to delineate practical and technical licensing guidance, rather than discussing or proposing basic principles or requirements. The design requirements and the basic principles of nuclear safety in force in each member state are assumed to remain applicable. This report represents the consensus view achieved by the experts who contributed to the task force. It is the result of what was at the time of its initiation a first attempt at the international level to achieve consensus among nuclear regulators on practical methods for

  14. The automatic programming for safety-critical software in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jang Yeol; Eom, Heung Seop; Choi, You Rark

    1998-06-01

    We defined the Korean unique safety-critical software development methodology by modifying Dr. Harel`s statechart-based on formal methods in order to digitalized the reactor protection system. It is suggested software requirement specification guideline to specify design specification which is basis for requirement specification and automatic programming by the caused by shutdown parameter logic of the steam generator water level for Wolsung 2/3/4 unit SDS no.1 and simulated it by binding the Graphic User Interface (GUI). We generated the K and R C code automatically by utilizing the Statemate MAGNUM Sharpshooter/C code generator. Auto-generated K and R C code is machine independent code and has high productivity, quality and provability. The following are the summaries of major research and development. - Set up the Korean unique safety-critical software development methodology - Developed software requirement specification guidelines - Developed software design specification guidelines - Reactor trip modeling for steam generator waster level Wolsung 2/3/4 SDS no. 1 shutdown parameter logic - Graphic panel binding with GUI. (author). 20 refs., 12 tabs., 15 figs

  15. Nuclear criticality safety analysis for the traveller PWR fuel shipping package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vescovi, P.J.; Kent, N.A.; Casado, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    The Traveller PWR fresh fuel shipping package represents a radical departure from conventional PWR fuel package designs. Two immediately noticeable features of the Traveller are that it carries a single fuel assembly instead of two as do other package designs, and that it has built-in moderator, which forms part of the flux-trap system. The criticality safety case shows that the Traveller satisfies both U.S. and IAEA licensing requirements, and demonstrates that the package remains acceptably subcritical under normal conditions and hypothetical accident conditions of transport. This paper looks at the modeling techniques that were used to analyze the several accident scenarios that were considered, including: Lattice pitch expansion; Lattice pitch expansion along the fuel assembly length; Preferential flooding (selective flooding of different cavities); Differential flooding (varying water levels inside different cavities); Partial flooding (varying water density); Axial rod displacement; o Sensitivity studies of variable foam densities and boron content in packaging; Analysis for carrying loose rods in a rodbox; The criticality safety case for the Traveller proved to be a successful cooperative effort between ENUSA and Westinghouse

  16. Nuclear criticality safety analysis for the traveller PWR fuel shipping package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vescovi, P.J.; Kent, N.A.; Casado, C.A. [Westinghouse Electric Co., LLC, Columbia, SC (United States)]|[ENUSA Industrias Avanzadas SA, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The Traveller PWR fresh fuel shipping package represents a radical departure from conventional PWR fuel package designs. Two immediately noticeable features of the Traveller are that it carries a single fuel assembly instead of two as do other package designs, and that it has built-in moderator, which forms part of the flux-trap system. The criticality safety case shows that the Traveller satisfies both U.S. and IAEA licensing requirements, and demonstrates that the package remains acceptably subcritical under normal conditions and hypothetical accident conditions of transport. This paper looks at the modeling techniques that were used to analyze the several accident scenarios that were considered, including: Lattice pitch expansion; Lattice pitch expansion along the fuel assembly length; Preferential flooding (selective flooding of different cavities); Differential flooding (varying water levels inside different cavities); Partial flooding (varying water density); Axial rod displacement; o Sensitivity studies of variable foam densities and boron content in packaging; Analysis for carrying loose rods in a rodbox; The criticality safety case for the Traveller proved to be a successful cooperative effort between ENUSA and Westinghouse.

  17. The automatic programming for safety-critical software in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jang Yeol; Eom, Heung Seop; Choi, You Rark

    1998-06-01

    We defined the Korean unique safety-critical software development methodology by modifying Dr. Harel's statechart-based on formal methods in order to digitalized the reactor protection system. It is suggested software requirement specification guideline to specify design specification which is basis for requirement specification and automatic programming by the caused by shutdown parameter logic of the steam generator water level for Wolsung 2/3/4 unit SDS no.1 and simulated it by binding the Graphic User Interface (GUI). We generated the K and R C code automatically by utilizing the Statemate MAGNUM Sharpshooter/C code generator. Auto-generated K and R C code is machine independent code and has high productivity, quality and provability. The following are the summaries of major research and development. - Set up the Korean unique safety-critical software development methodology - Developed software requirement specification guidelines - Developed software design specification guidelines - Reactor trip modeling for steam generator waster level Wolsung 2/3/4 SDS no. 1 shutdown parameter logic - Graphic panel binding with GUI. (author). 20 refs., 12 tabs., 15 figs

  18. Development of Safety-Critical Software for Nuclear Power Plant using a CASE Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Ho; Oh, Do Young; Kim, Koh Eun; Choi, Woong Seock; Sohn, Se Do; Kim, Jae Hack; Kim, Hang Bae [KEPCO E and C, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    The Integrated SOftware Development Environment (ISODE) is developed to provide the major S/W life cycle processes that are composed of development process, V/V process, requirements traceability process, and automated document generation process and target importing process to Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) platform. This provides critical safety software developers with a certified, domain optimized, model-based development environment, and the associated services to reduce time and efforts to develop software such as debugging, simulation, code generation and document generation. This also provides critical safety software verifiers with integrated V/V features of each phase of the software life cycle using appropriate tools such as model test coverage, formal verification, and automated report generation. In addition to development and verification, the ISODE gives a complete traceability solution from the SW design phase to the testing phase. Using this information, the coverage and impact analysis can be done easily whenever software modification is necessary. The final source codes of ISODE are imported into the newly developed PLC environment, as a module based after automatically converted into the format required by PLC. Additional tests for module and unit level are performed on the target platform.

  19. Development of Safety-Critical Software for Nuclear Power Plant using a CASE Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Ho; Oh, Do Young; Kim, Koh Eun; Choi, Woong Seock; Sohn, Se Do; Kim, Jae Hack; Kim, Hang Bae

    2011-01-01

    The Integrated SOftware Development Environment (ISODE) is developed to provide the major S/W life cycle processes that are composed of development process, V/V process, requirements traceability process, and automated document generation process and target importing process to Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) platform. This provides critical safety software developers with a certified, domain optimized, model-based development environment, and the associated services to reduce time and efforts to develop software such as debugging, simulation, code generation and document generation. This also provides critical safety software verifiers with integrated V/V features of each phase of the software life cycle using appropriate tools such as model test coverage, formal verification, and automated report generation. In addition to development and verification, the ISODE gives a complete traceability solution from the SW design phase to the testing phase. Using this information, the coverage and impact analysis can be done easily whenever software modification is necessary. The final source codes of ISODE are imported into the newly developed PLC environment, as a module based after automatically converted into the format required by PLC. Additional tests for module and unit level are performed on the target platform

  20. Nuclear criticality safety analysis of a spent fuel waste package in a tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weren, B.H.; Capo, M.A.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1983-12-01

    An assessment has been performed of the criticality potential associated with the disposal of spent fuel in a tuff geology above the water table. Eleven potential configurations were defined which cover a vast range of geometries and conditions from the nominal configuration at emplacement to a hypothetical configuration thousands of years after emplacement in which the structure is gone, the fuel pellets disintegrated and the borehole flooded. Of these eleven configurations, four have been evaluated at this time. The results of this evaluation indicate that even with very conservative assumptions (4.5 w/o fresh fuel), criticality is not a problem for the nominal configuration either dry or fully flooded. In the cases where the condition of the waste package is assumed to have severely deteriorated, over long times, calculations were performed with less conservative assumptions (depleted fuel). An assessment of these calculations indicates that criticality safety could be demonstrated if the depletion of the fissile inventory during fuel irradiation is taken into account. A detailed discussion of the calculations performed is presented in this report. Also included are a description of the configurations which were considered, the analytical methods and models used, and a discussion of additional related work which should be performed. 15 references, 11 figures, 8 tables

  1. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, D.

    1981-01-01

    Dr Arnott, scientific consultant to PANDORA, emphasises our lack of knowledge of the behaviour of highly active radioactive wastes, particularly effluents, and their characteristics. He proposes that they should be stored, preferably in a solidified state, until our knowledge allows their safe disposal. Political aspects and government policies are discussed and human fallibility is stressed. The nuclear establishment and nuclear power programme are severely criticised. (U.K.)

  2. Quantitative safety goals for nuclear power plants: critical review and reformulation within a unified theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munera, H.A.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1988-01-01

    The first part of the paper critically reviews some of the adopted and/or proposed probabilistic safety goals and criteria in several countries. Some of the difficulties identified are:- Lack of an adequate delimitation of the scope of the non-deterministic choice problem. Consequently, the main components of the problem-probabilities and consequences-are not clearly defined. As a further consequence there is no unified treatment, including notation and terminology, for concepts like risk, probability, frequency, utility, risk-aversion, limit-line, etc. - The theoretical justifications and/or implications of limit-lines are not always fully understood. As a result three very different classes of limit-lines have emerged. The theoretical limitations of limit-lines are not always fully realized, leading to an over-emphasis in that approach and thus preventing the development of alternative methodologies. In the second part of the paper theoretical methods are indicated to compare probability distributions already existing in other disciplines, and a unified methodology to formulate probabilistic safety criteria is briefly described. The proposed theory gives due consideration to the whole probability distribution, and contains both limit-line concepts and global risk indices. The latter can easily incorporate regulatory and/or societal value-judgements, for instance risk-aversion. (author)

  3. Tank farms criticality safety manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FORT, L.A.

    2003-01-01

    This document defines the Tank Farms Contractor (TFC) criticality safety program, as required by Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR-), Subpart 830.204(b)(6), ''Documented Safety Analysis'' (10 CFR- 830.204 (b)(6)), and US Department of Energy (DOE) 0 420.1A, Facility Safety, Section 4.3, ''Criticality Safety.'' In addition, this document contains certain best management practices, adopted by TFC management based on successful Hanford Site facility practices. Requirements in this manual are based on the contractor requirements document (CRD) found in Attachment 2 of DOE 0 420.1A, Section 4.3, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety,'' and the cited revisions of applicable standards published jointly by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the American Nuclear Society (ANS) as listed in Appendix A. As an informational device, requirements directly imposed by the CRD or ANSI/ANS Standards are shown in boldface. Requirements developed as best management practices through experience and maintained consistent with Hanford Site practice are shown in italics. Recommendations and explanatory material are provided in plain type

  4. Convention on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Convention on Nuclear Safety was adopted on 17 June 1994 by Diplomatic Conference convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency at its Headquarters from 14 to 17 June 1994. The Convention will enter into force on the ninetieth day after the date of deposit with the Depository (the Agency's Director General) of the twenty-second instrument of ratification, acceptance or approval, including the instruments of seventeen States, having each at leas one nuclear installation which has achieved criticality in a reactor core. The text of the Convention as adopted is reproduced in the Annex hereto for the information of all Member States

  5. Nuclear safety infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffitt, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of nuclear power in any country requires the early establishment of a long term nuclear safety infrastructure. This is necessary to ensure that the siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation and dismantling of the nuclear power plant and any other related installations, as well as the long term management of radioactive waste and spent fuel, are conducted in a safe and secure manner. The decision to undertake a nuclear power program is a major commitment requiring strict attention to nuclear safety. This commitment is a responsibility to not only the citizens of the country developing such a program, but also a responsibility to the international community. Nobody can take on this responsibility or make the critical decisions except the host country. It is important to make sure that the decision making process and the development activities are done in as open a manner as possible allowing interested stakeholders the opportunity to review and comment on the actions and plans. It cannot be overemphasized that everyone involved in a program to develop nuclear power carries a responsibility for ensuring safety. While it is clear that the key decisions and activities are the responsibility of the host country, it is also very important to recognize that help is available. The IAEA, OECD-NEA, WANO and other international organizations along with countries with established nuclear power programs are available to provide information and assistance. In particular, the IAEA and OECD-NEA have published several documents regarding the development of a nuclear power program and they have been and continue to support many meetings and seminars regarding the development of nuclear power programs

  6. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented

  7. Present status of Japanese Criticality Safety Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    A draft of the second edition of Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook has been finalized, and it is under examination by reviewing committee for JAERI Report. Working Group designated for revising the Japanese Criticality Safety Handbook, which is chaired by Prof. Yamane, is now preparing for 'Guide on Burnup Credit for Storage and Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel' and second edition of 'Data Collection' part of Handbook. Activities related to revising the Handbook might give a hint for a future experiment at STACY. (author)

  8. Criticality safety basics, a study guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. L. Putman

    1999-09-01

    This document is a self-study and classroom guide, for criticality safety of activities with fissile materials outside nuclear reactors. This guide provides a basic overview of criticality safety and criticality accident prevention methods divided into three parts: theory, application, and history. Except for topic emphasis, theory and history information is general, while application information is specific to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Information presented here should be useful to personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. However, the guide's primary target audience is fissile material handler candidates.

  9. Criticality safety basics, a study guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putman, V.L.

    1999-01-01

    This document is a self-study and classroom guide, for criticality safety of activities with fissile materials outside nuclear reactors. This guide provides a basic overview of criticality safety and criticality accident prevention methods divided into three parts: theory, application, and history. Except for topic emphasis, theory and history information is general, while application information is specific to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Information presented here should be useful to personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. However, the guide's primary target audience is fissile material handler candidates

  10. Global nuclear safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    As stated in the Nuclear Safety Review 1996, three components characterize the global nuclear safety culture infrastructure: (i) legally binding international agreements; (ii) non-binding common safety standards; and (iii) the application of safety standards. The IAEA has continued to foster the global nuclear safety culture by supporting intergovernmental collaborative efforts; it has facilitated extensive information exchange, promoted the drafting of international legal agreements and the development of common safety standards, and provided for the application of safety standards by organizing a wide variety of expert services

  11. Licensing safety critical software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archinoff, G.H.; Brown, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Licensing difficulties with the shutdown system software at the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station contributed to delays in starting up the station. Even though the station has now been given approval by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) to operate, the software issue has not disappeared - Ontario Hydro has been instructed by the AECB to redesign the software. This article attempts to explain why software based shutdown systems were chosen for Darlington, why there was so much difficulty licensing them, and what the implications are for other safety related software based applications

  12. Nuclear safety in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servant, J.

    1979-12-01

    The main areas of nuclear safety are considered in this paper, recalling the laws and resolutions in force and also the appropriate authority in each case. The following topics are reviewed: radiological protection, protection of workers, measures to be taken in case of an accident, radioactive effluents, impact on the environment of non-nuclear pollution, nuclear plant safety, protection against malicious acts, control and safeguard of nuclear materials, radioisotopes, transport of radioactive substances, naval propulsion, waste management, nuclear plant decommissioning and export of nuclear equipment and materials. Finally, the author describes the role of the general Secretariat of the Interdepartmental Committee on Nuclear Safety

  13. Nuclear safety in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queniart, D.

    1989-12-01

    This paper outlines the organizational and technical aspects of nuclear safety in France. From the organization point of view, the roles of the operator, of the safety authority and of the Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety are developed. From the technical viewpoint, the evolution of safety since the beginning of the French nuclear programme, the roles of deterministic and probabilistic methods and the severe accident policy (prevention and mitigation, venting containment) in France are explained

  14. Assessment of criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, R.C.; Heaberlin, S.W.; Clayton, E.D.; Carter, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of 100 violations of criticality safety specifications reported over a 10-y period in the operations of fuel reprocessing plants. The seriousness of each rule violation was evaluated by assigning it a severity index value. The underlying causes or reasons, for the violations were identified. A criticality event tree was constructed using the parameters, causes, and reasons found in the analysis of the infractions. The event tree provides a means for visualizing the paths to an accidental criticality. Some 65% of the violations were caused by misinterpretation on the part of the operator, being attributed to a lack of clarity in the specification and insufficient training; 33% were attributed to lack of care, whereas only 2% were caused by mechanical failure. A fault tree was constructed by assembling the events that could contribute to an accident. With suitable data on the probabilities of contributing events, the probability of the accident's occurrence can be forecast. Estimated probabilities for criticality were made, based on the limited data available, that in this case indicate a minimum time span of 244 y of plant operation per accident ranging up to approx. 3000 y subject to the various underlying assumptions made. Some general suggestions for improvement are formulated based on the cases studied. Although conclusions for other plants may differ in detail, the general method of analysis and the fault tree logic should prove applicable. 4 figures, 8 tables

  15. Nuclear safety regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Departmental Rules and The Safety Guides were issued by the NNSA in 1998. The NNSA performed the activities of propagation and implementation of nuclear safety regulations at QTNPP in order to improve the nuclear safety culture of operating organization and construct and contract organizations

  16. Nuclear health and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    Numerous environmental, safety, and health problems found at other Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities precipitated a review of these conditions at DOE's contractor-operated Pantex Plant, where our nation's nuclear weapons are assembled. This book focuses the review on examining key safety and health problems at Pantex and determining the need for external safety oversight of the plant

  17. Nuclear Safety Review 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-15

    The Nuclear Safety Review 2013 focuses on the dominant nuclear safety trends, issues and challenges in 2012. The Executive Overview provides crosscutting and worldwide nuclear safety information along with a summary of the major sections covered in this report. Sections A-E of this report cover improving radiation, transport and waste safety; strengthening safety in nuclear installations; improving regulatory infrastructure and effectiveness; enhancing emergency preparedness and response (EPR); and civil liability for nuclear damage. The Appendix provides details on the activities of the Commission on Safety Standards (CSS), and activities relevant to the IAEA Safety Standards. The world nuclear community has made noteworthy progress in strengthening nuclear safety in 2012, as promoted by the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (hereinafter referred to as ''the Action Plan''). For example, an overwhelming majority of Member States with operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) have undertaken and essentially completed comprehensive safety reassessments ('stress tests') with the aim of evaluating the design and safety aspects of plant robustness to protect against extreme events, including: defence in depth, safety margins, cliff edge effects, multiple failures, and the prolonged loss of support systems. As a result, many have introduced additional safety measures including mitigation of station blackout. Moreover, the IAEA's peer review services and safety standards have been reviewed and strengthened where needed. Capacity building programmes have been built or improved, and EPR programmes have also been reviewed and improved. Furthermore, in 2012, the IAEA continued to share lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident with the nuclear community including through three international experts' meetings (IEMs) on reactor and spent fuel safety, communication in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency, and protection against extreme earthquakes and tsunamis.

  18. Nuclear Safety Review 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    The Nuclear Safety Review 2013 focuses on the dominant nuclear safety trends, issues and challenges in 2012. The Executive Overview provides crosscutting and worldwide nuclear safety information along with a summary of the major sections covered in this report. Sections A-E of this report cover improving radiation, transport and waste safety; strengthening safety in nuclear installations; improving regulatory infrastructure and effectiveness; enhancing emergency preparedness and response (EPR); and civil liability for nuclear damage. The Appendix provides details on the activities of the Commission on Safety Standards (CSS), and activities relevant to the IAEA Safety Standards. The world nuclear community has made noteworthy progress in strengthening nuclear safety in 2012, as promoted by the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (hereinafter referred to as ''the Action Plan''). For example, an overwhelming majority of Member States with operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) have undertaken and essentially completed comprehensive safety reassessments ('stress tests') with the aim of evaluating the design and safety aspects of plant robustness to protect against extreme events, including: defence in depth, safety margins, cliff edge effects, multiple failures, and the prolonged loss of support systems. As a result, many have introduced additional safety measures including mitigation of station blackout. Moreover, the IAEA's peer review services and safety standards have been reviewed and strengthened where needed. Capacity building programmes have been built or improved, and EPR programmes have also been reviewed and improved. Furthermore, in 2012, the IAEA continued to share lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident with the nuclear community including through three international experts' meetings (IEMs) on reactor and spent fuel safety, communication in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency, and protection against extreme earthquakes and tsunamis

  19. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of the passage of decontaminated salt solution from the ITP filters into tank 50H for interim storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, D.T.; Davis, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    This report assesses the nuclear criticality safety associated with the decontaminated salt solution after passing through the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) filters, through the stripper columns and into Tank 50H for interim storage until transfer to the Saltstone facility. The criticality safety basis for the ITP process is documented. Criticality safety in the ITP filtrate has been analyzed under normal and process upset conditions. This report evaluates the potential for criticality due to the precipitation or crystallization of fissionable material from solution and an ITP process filter failure in which insoluble material carryover from salt dissolution is present. It is concluded that no single inadvertent error will cause criticality and that the process will remain subcritical under normal and credible abnormal conditions

  20. Enhancing operational nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengoku, Katsuhisa

    2008-01-01

    Since Chernobyl, the dictum A n accident anywhere is an accident everywhere i s a globally shared perception. The paper presents challenges to the international nuclear community: globalization, sustainable and dynamic development, secure, safe and clean energy supply, nuclear r enaissance , public concern for nuclear safety, nuclear security, and technology and management. Strong national safety infrastructures and international cooperation are required to maintain a high level of nuclear safety and security worldwide. There is an increasing number of countries thinking of going nuclear: Morocco, Indonesia, Iran, Poland, Turkey, Bangladesh, Egypt, Vietnam, Chile, Nigeria, Malaysia, Thailand, Uruguay, Tunisia, Algeria. Another serious incident will jeopardize the prospect of nuclear renaissance. Safety and security are preconditions for countries newly introducing NPP as well as for those with mature nuclear programmes. The Global Nuclear Safety Regime (GNSR) is referred to as the institutional, legal and technical framework to achieve worldwide implementation of the safety of nuclear installations. At the top of the framework is the Convention on Nuclear Safety which covers the nuclear power plants. The convention has 56 contracting parties which meet triennially where national reports are presented and subject to the review of peers. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) undertakes a programme to foster the GNSR through the establishment of IAEA safety standards and related publications. The programme provides for the application of standards for the (1) safety of nuclear installations, (2) safety of radioactive sources, (3) safe transport of radioactive material and (4) management of radioactive waste. It also provides for the security of nuclear installations, nuclear material and radioactive material. The safety standards hierarchy is as follows: safety fundamental, safety requirements and safety guides. The safety fundamentals are the bases for IAEA

  1. Nuclear criticality safety studies applicable to spent fuel shipping cask designs and spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, J.S.

    1980-11-01

    Criticality analyses of water-moderated and reflected arrays of LWR fresh and spent fuel assemblies were carried out in this study. The calculated results indicate that using the assumption of fresh fuel loading in spent fuel shipping cask design leads to assembly spacings which are about twice the spacings of spent fuel loadings. Some shipping cask walls of composite lead and water are more effective neutron reflectors than water of 30.48 cm

  2. Nuclear Safety Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosel, N.; Prah, M.

    2008-01-01

    Beside new Ordinance on the control of nuclear material and special equipment ('Official Gazette' No. 15/08), from 2006 State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) adopted Ordinance on performing nuclear activities ('Official Gazette' No. 74/06) and Ordinance on special requirements which expert organizations must fulfil in order to perform certain activities in the field of nuclear safety ('Official Gazette' No. 74/06), based on Nuclear Safety Act ('Official Gazette' No. 173/03). The Ordinance on performing nuclear activities regulates the procedure of notification of the intent to perform nuclear activities, submitting the application for the issue of a licence to perform nuclear activities, and the procedure for issuing decisions on granting a licence to perform a nuclear activity. The Ordinance also regulates the content of the forms for notification of the intent to perform nuclear activities, as well as of the application for the issue of a licence to perform the nuclear activity and the method of keeping the register of nuclear activities. According to the Nuclear Safety Act, nuclear activities are the production, processing, use, storage, disposal, transport, import, export, possession or other handling of nuclear material or specified equipment. The Ordinance on special requirements which expert organizations must fulfil in order to perform certain activities in the field of nuclear safety regulates these mentioned conditions, whereas compliance is established by a decision passed by the SONS. Special requirements which expert organizations must fulfil in order to perform certain activities in the field of nuclear safety are organizational, technical, technological conditions and established system of quality assurance. In 2007, State Office for Nuclear Safety finalized the text of new Ordinance on conditions for nuclear safety and protection with regard to the siting, design, construction, use and decommissioning of a facility in which a nuclear activity is

  3. Nuclear safety - Topical issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The following topical issues related to nuclear safety are discussed: steam generators; maintenance strategies; control rod drive nozzle cracks; core shrouds cracks; sump strainer blockage; fire protection; computer software important for safety; safety during shutdown; operational safety experience; external hazards and other site related issues. 5 figs, 5 tabs

  4. ALARP considerations in criticality safety assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowden, Russell L.; Barnes, Andrew; Thorne, Peter R.; Venner, Jack

    2003-01-01

    Demonstrating that the risk to the public and workers is As Low As Reasonably Practicable (ALARP) is a fundamental requirement of safety cases for nuclear facilities in the United Kingdom. This is embodied in the Safety Assessment Principles (SAPs) published by the Regulator, the essence of which is incorporated within the safety assessment processes of the various nuclear site licensees. The concept of ALARP within criticality safety assessments has taken some time to establish in the United Kingdom. In principle, the licensee is obliged to search for a deterministic criticality safety solution, such as safe geometry vessels and passive control features, rather than placing reliance on active measurement devices and plant administrative controls. This paper presents a consideration of some ALARP issues in relation to the development of criticality safety cases. The paper utilises some idealised examples covering a range of issues facing the criticality safety assessor, including new plant design, operational plant and decommissioning activities. These examples are used to outline the elements of the criticality safety cases and present a discussion of ALARP in the context of criticality safety assessments. (author)

  5. NCIS: a nuclear criticality information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1984-01-01

    The NCIS is one of the developments carried out to meet the requirements in the field of criticality safety information. Its primary goal is to enhance nuclear criticality safety by dissemination of data, standards, and training material. This paper presents the ''NCIS'' progess since 1950: computer-searching, database management, nuclear critical experiments bibliography. American Nuclear Society transactions criticality safety publications compilation, edition of a personnel directory representing over 140 organizations located in 16 countries and showing a wide range of specialists involved in the field of nuclear criticality safety. The NCIS uses the information management and communication resources of TIS (Technology Information System): automated access procedures; creation of program-dependent information systems; communications. The NCIS is still in a growing, formative stage; it has concentrated first on collecting and organizing the nuclear criticality literature; nuclear critical data, calculational tools, standards, and training materials will follow. Finally the planned and contemplated resources are dealt with: expansion of bibliographic compilations; news database; fundamental criticality safety reference; criticality benchmarck database; user community; training resources; related resources; criticality accident database; dynamic databook; dynamic textbook; expert knowledge system; and, extraction of intelligence

  6. Outline of criticality safety research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Iwao; Tachimori, Shoichi; Suzaki, Takenori; Takeshita, Isao; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Nakajima, Ken; Sakurai, Satoshi; Yanagisawa, Hiroshi

    1987-01-01

    As the power generation capacity of LWRs in Japan increased, the establishment and development of nuclear fuel cycle have become the important subject. Conforming to the safety research project of the nation, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has advanced the project of constructing a new research facility, that is, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Research Facility (NUCEF). In this facility, it is planned to carry out the research on criticality safety, upgraded reprocessing techniques, and the treatment and disposal of transuranium element wastes. In this paper, the subjects of criticality safety research and the research carried out with a criticality safety experiment facility which is expected to be installed in the NUCEF are briefly reported. The experimental data obtained from the criticality safety handbooks and published literatures in foreign countries are short of the data on the mixture of low enriched uranium and plutonium which is treated in the reprocessing of spent fuel from LWRs. The acquisition of the criticality data for various forms of fuel, the elucidation of the scenario of criticality accidents, and the soundness of the confinement system for gaseous fission products and plutonium are the main subjects. The Static Criticality Safety Facility, Transient Criticality Safety Facility and pulse column system are the main facilities. (Kako, I.)

  7. Criticality safety and facility design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltz, W.R.

    1991-06-01

    Operations with fissile material introduce the risk of a criticality accident that may be lethal to nearby personnel. In addition, concerns over criticality safety can result in substantial delays and shutdown of facility operations. For these reasons, it is clear that the prevention of a nuclear criticality accident should play a major role in the design of a nuclear facility. The emphasis of this report will be placed on engineering design considerations in the prevention of criticality. The discussion will not include other important aspects, such as the physics of calculating limits nor criticality alarm systems

  8. Nuclear power safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency, the organization concerned with worldwide nuclear safety has produced two international conventions to provide (1) prompt notification of nuclear accidents and (2) procedures to facilitate mutual assistance during an emergency. IAEA has also expanded operational safety review team missions, enhanced information exchange on operational safety events at nuclear power plants, and planned a review of its nuclear safety standards to ensure that they include the lessons learned from the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident. However, there appears to be a nearly unanimous belief among IAEA members that may attempt to impose international safety standards verified by an international inspection program would infringe on national sovereignty. Although several Western European countries have proposed establishing binding safety standards and inspections, no specific plant have been made; IAEA's member states are unlikely to adopt such standards and an inspection program

  9. Nuclear Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Ethics is caring about people and Safety is caring that no physical harm comes to people.Therefore Safety is a type of Ethical Behavior. Culture: is The Way We Do Things Here.Safety Culture is mixture of organization traditions, values, attitudes and behaviors modeled by Its leaders and internalized by its members that serve to make nuclear safety the overriding priority. Safety Culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in Organisations and individuals which established that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance

  10. SpinlineTM, Benefits of a nuclear specific safety-critical digital I/C platform - 15102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duthou, A.; Mouly, P.; Jegou, H.

    2015-01-01

    Spinline TM is Rolls-Royce modular and digital solution dedicated to developing and/or upgrading safety I/C used in nuclear reactors. From the start, Spinline TM was specifically designed for Nuclear applications. Therefore, its architecture and components satisfy, from design, the most stringent safety standards required by the local Safety authorities, while they can be adapted to various types of reactors. This is a significant advantage over suppliers who tried to adapt industrial systems to the Nuclear constraints and faced unexpected delays and costs to meet Safety authorities requirements. Spinline TM was specifically designed to implement any Class 1E and category A IEC-61226 safety I/C functions. It is qualified according to European and French nuclear standard and more recently by the US NRC, notably thanks to its Fail-safe features, deterministic behavior and Physical and Functional Separation. In 2011 EDF chose Spinline TM as its safety I/C systems technology for the modernization of 20 units of its 1300 MW PWR fleet

  11. Final Technical Report on Quantifying Dependability Attributes of Software Based Safety Critical Instrumentation and Control Systems in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smidts, Carol; Huang, Fuqun; Li, Boyuan; Li, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    With the current transition from analog to digital instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants, the number and variety of software-based systems have significantly increased. The sophisticated nature and increasing complexity of software raises trust in these systems as a significant challenge. The trust placed in a software system is typically termed software dependability. Software dependability analysis faces uncommon challenges since software systems' characteristics differ from those of hardware systems. The lack of systematic science-based methods for quantifying the dependability attributes in software-based instrumentation as well as control systems in safety critical applications has proved itself to be a significant inhibitor to the expanded use of modern digital technology in the nuclear industry. Dependability refers to the ability of a system to deliver a service that can be trusted. Dependability is commonly considered as a general concept that encompasses different attributes, e.g., reliability, safety, security, availability and maintainability. Dependability research has progressed significantly over the last few decades. For example, various assessment models and/or design approaches have been proposed for software reliability, software availability and software maintainability. Advances have also been made to integrate multiple dependability attributes, e.g., integrating security with other dependability attributes, measuring availability and maintainability, modeling reliability and availability, quantifying reliability and security, exploring the dependencies between security and safety and developing integrated analysis models. However, there is still a lack of understanding of the dependencies between various dependability attributes as a whole and of how such dependencies are formed. To address the need for quantification and give a more objective basis to the review process -- therefore reducing regulatory uncertainty

  12. Final Technical Report on Quantifying Dependability Attributes of Software Based Safety Critical Instrumentation and Control Systems in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smidts, Carol [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Huang, Funqun [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Li, Boyuan [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Li, Xiang [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-03-25

    With the current transition from analog to digital instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants, the number and variety of software-based systems have significantly increased. The sophisticated nature and increasing complexity of software raises trust in these systems as a significant challenge. The trust placed in a software system is typically termed software dependability. Software dependability analysis faces uncommon challenges since software systems’ characteristics differ from those of hardware systems. The lack of systematic science-based methods for quantifying the dependability attributes in software-based instrumentation as well as control systems in safety critical applications has proved itself to be a significant inhibitor to the expanded use of modern digital technology in the nuclear industry. Dependability refers to the ability of a system to deliver a service that can be trusted. Dependability is commonly considered as a general concept that encompasses different attributes, e.g., reliability, safety, security, availability and maintainability. Dependability research has progressed significantly over the last few decades. For example, various assessment models and/or design approaches have been proposed for software reliability, software availability and software maintainability. Advances have also been made to integrate multiple dependability attributes, e.g., integrating security with other dependability attributes, measuring availability and maintainability, modeling reliability and availability, quantifying reliability and security, exploring the dependencies between security and safety and developing integrated analysis models. However, there is still a lack of understanding of the dependencies between various dependability attributes as a whole and of how such dependencies are formed. To address the need for quantification and give a more objective basis to the review process -- therefore reducing regulatory uncertainty

  13. Nuclear multifragmentation critical exponents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W.; Friedman, W.A.; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    1995-01-01

    In a recent Letter, cited in a reference, the EoS collaboration presented data of fragmentation of 1 A GeV gold nuclei incident on carbon. By analyzing moments of the fragment charge distribution, the authors claim to determine the values of the critical exponents γ, β, and τ for finite nuclei. These data represent a crucial step forward in the understanding of the physics of nuclear fragmentation. However, as shown in this paper, the analysis presented in the cited reference is not sufficient to support the claim that the critical exponents for nuclear fragmentation have been unambiguously determined

  14. 2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrea Hoffman

    2011-12-01

    The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The

  15. Nuclear safety in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of the main safety aspects of the French nuclear energy programme and of the general safety organization is followed by a discussion on the current thinking in CEA on some important safety issues. As far as methodology is concerned, the use of probabilistic analysis in the licensing procedure is being extensively developed. Reactor safety research is aimed at a better knowledge of the safety margins involved in the present designs of both PWRs and LMFBRs. A greater emphasis should be put during the next years in the safety of the nuclear fuel cycle installations, including waste disposals. Finally, it is suggested that further international cooperation in the field of nuclear safety should be developed in order to insure for all countries the very high safety level which has been achieved up till now. (author)

  16. Nuclear safety in perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, K.; Sjöberg, B.M.D.; Lauridsen, Kurt

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the NKS/SOS-1 project has been to enhance common understanding about requirements for nuclear safety by finding improved means of communicat-ing on the subject in society. The project, which has been built around a number of seminars, wassupported by limited research in three sub......-projects: Risk assessment Safety analysis Strategies for safety management The report describes an industry in change due to societal factors. The concepts of risk and safety, safety management and systems forregulatory oversight are de-scribed in the nuclear area and also, to widen the perspective, for other...

  17. New Nuclear Safety Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosel, N.; Prah, M.; Cizmek, A.

    2008-01-01

    Beside new Ordinance on the control of nuclear material and special equipment (Official Gazette No. 15/08), from 2006 State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) adopted Ordinance on performing nuclear activities (Official Gazette No. 74/06) and Ordinance on special conditions for individual activities to be performed by expert organizations which perform activities in the area of nuclear safety (Official Gazette No. 74/06), based on Nuclear Safety Act (Official Gazette No. 173/03). The Ordinance on performing nuclear activities regulates the procedure of announcing the intention to perform nuclear activity, submitting an application for the issue of a license to perform nuclear activity, and the procedure for adoption a decision on issuing a nuclear activity license. The Ordinance also regulates the contents of the application form for the announcement of the intention to perform nuclear activity, as well as of the application for the issue of a nuclear activity license and the method of keeping a nuclear activity register. The Ordinance on special conditions for individual activities to be performed by expert organizations which perform activities in the area of nuclear safety regulates these mentioned conditions, whereas compliance is established by a decision passed by the SONS. Special conditions for individual activities to be performed by expert organizations which perform activities in the area of nuclear safety are organizational, technical, technological conditions and established system of quality assurance. In 2007, SONS finalized the text of new Ordinance on nuclear safety and protection conditions for location, design, construction, operation and decommissioning of facility in which nuclear activity is performed. This Ordinance regulates nuclear safety and protection conditions for location, design, construction, operation and decommissioning of facility in which nuclear activity is performed. This Ordinance defines facilities in which nuclear activity is

  18. Safety of nuclear ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Interest in the utilization of nuclear steam supply systems for merchant ships and icebreakers has recently increased considerably due to the sharp rise in oil prices and the continuing trend towards larger and faster merchant ships. Canada, for example, is considering construction of an icebreaker in the near future. On the other hand, an accident which could result in serious damage to or the sinking of a nuclear ship is potentially far more dangerous to the general public than a similar accident with a conventional ship. Therefore, it was very important to evaluate in an international forum the safety of nuclear ships in the light of our contemporary safety philosophy, taking into account the results of cumulative operating experience with nuclear ships in operation. The philosophy and safety requirement for land-based nuclear installations were outlined because of many common features for both land-based nuclear installations and nuclear ships. Nevertheless, essential specific safety requirements for nuclear ships must always be considered, and the work on safety problems for nuclear ships sponsored by the NEA was regarded as an important step towards developing an international code of practice by IMCO on the safety of nuclear merchant ships. One session was devoted to the quantitative assessment of nuclear ship safety. The probability technique of an accident risk assessment for nuclear power plants is well known and widely used. Its modification, to make it applicable to nuclear propelled merchant ships, was discussed in some papers. Mathematical models for describing various postulated accidents with nuclear ships were developed and reported by several speakers. Several papers discussed a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) with nuclear steam supply systems of nuclear ships and engineering design features to prevent a radioactive effluence after LOCA. Other types of postulated accidents with reactors and systems in static and dynamic conditions were also

  19. Disposal of high active nuclear fuel waste. A critical review of the Nuclear Fuel Safety (KBS) project on final disposal of vitrified high active nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Swedish Energy Commission's working group for Safety and Environment. The main contributions are by profs. Jan Rydberg of Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden and John W Winchester of Florida State University, USA. The aim of the report is to discuss weather the KBS-project fullfills the Swedish ''Stipulations Act'', that a absolutely safe way of disposing of the nuclear waste must have been demonstrated before any new reactors are allowed to be taken inot use. Rydberg and Winchester do not arrive at similar conclusions. (L.E.)

  20. Researches in nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souchet, Y.

    2009-01-01

    This article comprises three parts: 1 - some general considerations aiming at explaining the main motivations of safety researches, and at briefly presenting the important role of some organisations in the international conciliation, and the most common approach used in safety researches (analytical experiments, calculation codes, global experiments); 2 - an overview of some of the main safety problems that are the object of worldwide research programs (natural disasters, industrial disasters, criticality, human and organisational factors, fuel behaviour in accidental situation, serious accidents: core meltdown, corium spreading, failure of the confinement building, radioactive releases). Considering the huge number of research topics, this part cannot be exhaustive and many topics are not approached; 3 - the presentation of two research programs addressing very different problems: the evaluation of accidental releases in the case of a serious accident (behaviour of iodine and B 4 C, air infiltration, fission products release) and the propagation of a fire in a facility (PRISME program). These two programs belong to an international framework involving several partners from countries involved in nuclear energy usage. (J.S.)

  1. China's nuclear safety regulatory body: The national nuclear safety administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shiguan

    1991-04-01

    The establishment of an independent nuclear safety regulatory body is necessary for ensuring the safety of nuclear installations and nuclear fuel. Therefore the National Nuclear Safety Administration was established by the state. The aim, purpose, organization structure and main tasks of the Administration are presented. At the same time the practical examples, such as nuclear safety regulation on the Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, safety review and inspections for the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant during the construction, and nuclear material accounting and management system in the nuclear fuel fabrication plant in China, are given in order to demonstrate the important roles having been played on nuclear safety by the Administration after its founding

  2. Nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, B.F.; Colvin, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-nine papers are included. Six were previously abstracted; separate abstracts were prepared for the remaining 23 papers. The conference covers historical perspectives, analysis, national programs, storage and transport training, and standards

  3. Nuclear power safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports that since the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident in 1986, over 70 of the International Atomic Energy Agency's 112 member states have adopted two conventions to enhance international cooperation by providing timely notification of an accident and emergency assistance. The Agency and other international organizations also developed programs to improve nuclear power plant safety and minimize dangers from radioactive contamination. Despite meaningful improvements, some of the measures have limitations, and serious nuclear safety problems remain in the design and operation of the older, Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. The Agency's ability to select reactors under its operational safety review program is limited. Also, information on the extent and seriousness of safety-related incidents at reactors in foreign countries is not publicly available. No agreements exist among nuclear power countries to make compliance with an nuclear safety standards or principles mandatory. Currently, adherence to international safety standards or principles is voluntary and nonbinding. Some states support the concept of mandatory compliance, but others, including the United States, believe that mandatory compliance infringes on national sovereignty and that the responsibility for nuclear reactor safety remains with each nation

  4. Nuclear power and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, P.; Tasker, A.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power currently provides about a fifth of both Britain's and the world's electricity. It is the largest single source of electricity in Western Europe; in France three quarters of electricity is generated by nuclear power stations. This booklet is about the safety of those plants. It approaches the subject by outlining the basic principles and approaches behind nuclear safety, describing the protective barriers and safety systems that are designed to prevent the escape of radioactive material, and summarising the regulations that govern the construction and operation of nuclear power stations. The aim is to provide a general understanding of the subject by explaining the general principles of the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor and setting out the UKAEA strategy for nuclear safety, the objective being always to minimize risk. (author)

  5. Safety and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, John; Gunning, Angela.

    1988-01-01

    Representatives of the supporters and opponents of civil nuclear power put forward the arguments they feel the public should consider when making up their mind about the nuclear industry. The main argument in favour of nuclear power is about the low risk in comparison with other risks and the amount of radiation received on average by the population in the United Kingdom from different sources. The aim is to show that the nuclear industry is fully committed to the cause of safety and this has resulted in a healthy workforce and a safe environment for the public. The arguments against are that the nuclear industry is deceitful, secretive and politically motivated and thus its arguments about safety, risks, etc, cannot be trusted. The question of safety is considered further - in particular the perceptions, definitions and responsibility. The economic case for nuclear electricity is not accepted. (U.K.)

  6. Nuclear regulation and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrie, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear regulation and safety are discussed from the standpoint of a hypothetical country that is in the process of introducing a nuclear power industry and setting up a regulatory system. The national policy is assumed to be in favor of nuclear power. The regulators will have responsibility for economic, reliable electric production as well as for safety. Reactor safety is divided into three parts: shut it down, keep it covered, take out the afterheat. Emergency plans also have to be provided. Ways of keeping the core covered with water are discussed

  7. Application of Integrated Verification Approach to FPGA-based Safety-Critical I and C System of Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Ibrahim; Heo, Gyunyoung [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jaecheon [KEPCO, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Safety-critical instrumentation and control (I and C) system in nuclear power plant (NPP) implemented on programmable logic controllers (PLCs) plays a vital role in safe operation of the plant. The challenges such as fast obsolescence, the vulnerability to cyber-attack, and other related issues of software systems have currently led to the consideration of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) as an alternative to PLCs because of their advantages and hardware related benefits. Generally in FPGA design verification, the designers make use of verification techniques by writing the test benches which involved various stages of verification activities of register-transfer level (RTL), gate-level, and place and route. Writing the test benches is considerably time consuming and require a lot of efforts to achieve a satisfied desire results. Furthermore, performing the verification at each stage is a major bottleneck and demanded much activities and time. In addition, verification is conceivably, the most difficult and complicated aspect of any design. Therefore, in view of these, this work applied an integrated verification approach to the verification of FPGA-based I and C system in NPP that simultaneously verified the whole design modules using MATLAB/Simulink HDL Co-simulation models. Verification is conceivably, the most difficult and complicated aspect of any design, and an FPGA design is not an exception. Therefore, in this work, we introduced and discussed how an application of integrated verification technique to the verification and testing of FPGA-based I and C system design in NPP can facilitate the verification processes, and verify the entire design modules of the system simultaneously using MATLAB/Simulink HDL co-simulation models. In conclusion, the results showed that, the integrated verification approach through MATLAB/Simulink models, if applied to any design to be verified, could speed up the design verification and reduce the V and V tasks.

  8. Application of Integrated Verification Approach to FPGA-based Safety-Critical I and C System of Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Ibrahim; Heo, Gyunyoung; Jung, Jaecheon

    2016-01-01

    Safety-critical instrumentation and control (I and C) system in nuclear power plant (NPP) implemented on programmable logic controllers (PLCs) plays a vital role in safe operation of the plant. The challenges such as fast obsolescence, the vulnerability to cyber-attack, and other related issues of software systems have currently led to the consideration of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) as an alternative to PLCs because of their advantages and hardware related benefits. Generally in FPGA design verification, the designers make use of verification techniques by writing the test benches which involved various stages of verification activities of register-transfer level (RTL), gate-level, and place and route. Writing the test benches is considerably time consuming and require a lot of efforts to achieve a satisfied desire results. Furthermore, performing the verification at each stage is a major bottleneck and demanded much activities and time. In addition, verification is conceivably, the most difficult and complicated aspect of any design. Therefore, in view of these, this work applied an integrated verification approach to the verification of FPGA-based I and C system in NPP that simultaneously verified the whole design modules using MATLAB/Simulink HDL Co-simulation models. Verification is conceivably, the most difficult and complicated aspect of any design, and an FPGA design is not an exception. Therefore, in this work, we introduced and discussed how an application of integrated verification technique to the verification and testing of FPGA-based I and C system design in NPP can facilitate the verification processes, and verify the entire design modules of the system simultaneously using MATLAB/Simulink HDL co-simulation models. In conclusion, the results showed that, the integrated verification approach through MATLAB/Simulink models, if applied to any design to be verified, could speed up the design verification and reduce the V and V tasks

  9. One safety critical indicators model for regulatory actions on nuclear power plants based on a level 1 PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Jefferson Borges

    2006-03-01

    This study presents a general methodology to the establishment, selection and use of safety indicators for a two loop PWR plant, as Angra 1. The study performed identifies areas considered critical for the plant operational safety. For each of these areas, strategic sub-areas are defined. For each strategic sub-area, specific safety indicators are defined. These proposed Safety Indicators are based on the contribution to risk considering a quantitative risk analysis. For each safety indicator, a goal, a bounded interval and proper bases are developed, to allow for a clear and comprehensive individual behavior evaluation. Additionally, an integrated evaluation of the indicators, using expert systems, was done to obtain an overview of the plant general safety. This methodology can be used for identifying situations where the plant safety is challenged, by giving a general overview of the plant operational condition. Additionally, this study can also identify eventual room for improvements by generating suggestions and recommendations, as a complement for regulatory actions and inspections, focusing resources on eventual existing weaknesses, in order to increase or maintain a high pattern of operational safety. (author)

  10. Nuclear safety: risks and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    Taking a fresh look at nuclear safety regulations, this study finds that the mandate and organization of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) militate against its making sound decisions. The author criticizes failures to make hard decisions on societal risk, to clarify responsibility, and to implement cost-effective safety measures. Among his recommendations are reorganization of the NRC under a single authoritative administrator, separation of technical issues from social ones, and reform of the Price-Anderson Act. The author concludes that the worst eventuality would be to continue the current state of indecision. 161 references, 6 figures, 4 tables

  11. Criticality accident of nuclear fuel facility. Think back on JCO criticality accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Keiji

    2003-09-01

    This book is written in order to understand the fundamental knowledge of criticality safety or criticality accident of nuclear fuel facility by the citizens. It consists of four chapters such as critical conditions and criticality accident of nuclear facility, risk of criticality accident, prevention of criticality accident and a measure at an occurrence of criticality accident. A definition of criticality, control of critical conditions, an aspect of accident, a rate of incident, damage, three sufferers, safety control method of criticality, engineering and administrative control, safety design of criticality, investigation of failure of safety control of JCO criticality accident, safety culture are explained. JCO criticality accident was caused with intention of disregarding regulation. It is important that we recognize the correct risk of criticality accident of nuclear fuel facility and prevent disasters. On the basis of them, we should establish safety culture. (S.Y.)

  12. Nuclear Safety Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    The semiannual progress report 1983/1 is a description of work within the Nuclear Safety Project performed in the first six month of 1983 in the nuclear safety field by KfK institutes and departments and by external institutions on behalf of KfK. The chosen kind of this report is that of short summaries, containing the topics work performed, results obtained and plans for future work. (orig./RW) [de

  13. Nuclear safety project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    The Annual Report 1981 is a detailed description (in German language) of work within the Nuclear Safety Project performed in 1981 in the nuclear safety field by KfK institutes and departments and by external institutes on behalf of KfK. It includes for each individual research activity short summaries in English language on - work completed - results obtained - plans for future work. This report was compiled by the project management. (orig.) [de

  14. Project Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    The semiannual progress report 1981/1 is a description of work within the Nuclear Safety Project performed in the first six month of 1981 in the nuclear safety field by KfK institutes and departments and by external institutions on behalf of KfK. The chosen kind of this report is that of short summaries, containing the topics, work performed, results obtained, plans for future work. This report was compiled by the project management. (orig.) [de

  15. Nuclear safety project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    The semiannual progress report 1984/1 is a description of work within the Nuclear Safety Project performed in the first six month of 1984 in the nuclear safety field by KfK institutes and departements and by external institutions on behalf of KfK. The chosen kind of this report is that of short summaries, containing the topics work performed, results obtained and plans for future work. This report was compiled by the project management. (orig./RW) [de

  16. Nuclear safety project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-11-01

    The 17th semi-annual report 1980/1 is a description of work within the Nuclear Safety Project performed in the first six months of 1980 in the nuclear safety field by KfK institutes and departments and by external institutions on behalf of KfK. The chosen kind of this report is that of short summaries, containing the topics - work performed, results obtained, plans for future work. (orig.) [de

  17. Nuclear Safety Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    The 13th semi-annual report 1/78 is a description of work within the Nuclear Safety Project performed in the first six months of 1978 in the nuclear safety field by KFK institutes and departments and by external institutions on behalf of KfK. It includes for each individual research activity short summaries on - work completed, - essential results, - plans for the near future. (orig./RW) [de

  18. Organization and Nuclear Safety: Safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Marquinez, A.

    1998-01-01

    This book presents the experience in nuclear safety and its influence in the exploitation on nuclear power plants. The safety organization and quality management before and after Chernobylsk and three mile island accidents

  19. Nuclear power and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidambaram, R.

    1992-01-01

    Some aspects of safety of nuclear power with special reference to Indian nuclear power programme are discussed. India must develop technology to protect herself from the adverse economic impact arising out of the restrictive regime which is being created through globalization of safety and environmental issues. Though the studies done and experience gained so far have shown that the PHWR system adopted by India has a number of superior safety features, research work is needed in the field of operation and maintenance of reactors and also in the field of reactor life extension through delaying of ageing effects. Public relations work must be pursued to convince the public at large of the safety of nuclear power programme. The new reactor designs in the second stage of evolution are based on either further improvement of existing well-proven designs or adoptions of more innovative ideas based on physical principles to ensure a higher level of safety. The development of Indian nuclear power programme is characterised by a balanced approach in the matter of assuring safety. Safety enforcement is not just looked upon as a pure administrative matter, but experts with independent minds are also involved in safety related matters. (M.G.B.)

  20. Elements of nuclear safety

    CERN Document Server

    Libmann, Jacques

    1996-01-01

    This basically educational book is intended for all involved in nuclear facility safety. It dissects the principles and experiences conducive to the adoption of attitudes compliant with what is now known as "safety culture". This book is accessible to a wide range of readers.

  1. Nuclear safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The NNSA checked and coordinated in 1999 the research project of the Surveillance Technology on Nuclear Installations under the National 9th-Five-Year Program to promote the organizations that undertake the research work on schedule and lay a foundation of obtaining achievements and effectiveness for the 9th-five-year plan on nuclear safety research

  2. Nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otway, H.J.

    1974-01-01

    Action at the international level will assume greater importance as the number of nuclear power plants increases, especially in the more densely populated parts of the world. Predictions of growth made prior to October 1973 [9] indicated that, by 1980, 14% of the electricity would be supplied by nuclear plants and by the year 2000 this figure would be about 50%. This will make the topic of international co-operation and standards of even greater importance. The IAEA has long been active in providing assistance to Member States in the siting design and operation of nuclear reactors. These activities have been pursued through advisory missions, the publication of codes of practice, guide books, technical reports and in arranging meetings to promote information exchange. During the early development of nuclear power, there was no well-established body of experience which would allow formulation of internationally acceptable safety criteria, except in a few special cases. Hence, nuclear power plant safety and reliability matters often received an ad hoc approach which necessarily entailed a lack of consistency in the criteria used and in the levels of safety required. It is clear that the continuation of an ad hoc approach to safety will prove inadequate in the context of a world-wide nuclear power industry, and the international trade which this implies. As in several other fields, the establishment of internationally acceptable safety standards and appropriate guides for use by regulatory bodies, utilities, designers and constructors, is becoming a necessity. The IAEA is presently planning the development of a comprehensive set of basic requirements for nuclear power plant safety, and the associated reliability requirements, which would be internationally acceptable, and could serve as a standard frame of reference for nuclear plant safety and reliability analyses

  3. Approaches to nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    This article examines the factors which affect the safe operation of a nuclear power plant. Some of these are an organizational and individual dedication to safety and excellence in every aspect of plant functions, international cooperation, and advanced reactor design. These are in addition to excellence in management of nuclear plants and the training of key operations personnel. The author feels all of these are necessary to restore public confidence in nuclear power

  4. INMACS: Operating experience of a mature, computer-assisted control system for nuclear material inventory and criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the operating experience of INMACS, the Integrated Nuclear Material Accounting and Control System used in the Recycle Fuel Fabrication Laboratories at Chalk River. Since commissioning was completed in 1977, INMACS has checked and recorded approximately 3000 inventory-related transactions involved in fabricating thermal-recycle fuels of (U,Pu)0 2 and (Th,Pu)0 2 . No changes have been necessary to INMACS programs that are used by laboratory staff when moving or processing nuclear material. The various utility programs have allowed efficient management and surveillance of the INMACS data base. Hardware failures and the nuisance of system unavailability at the laboratory terminals have been minimized by regular preventative maintenance. The original efforts in the design and rigorous testing of programs have helped INMACS to be accepted enthusiastically by old and new staff of the laboratories. The work required for nuclear material inventory control is done efficiently and in an atmosphere of safety

  5. Nuclear safety chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, M.C.; Eames, G.F.; Mayell, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    An original scheme has been developed for expressing the complex interrelationships associated with the engineered safeguards provided for a nuclear power station. This management tool, based upon network diagrams called Nuclear Safety Chains, looks at the function required of a particular item of safety plant, defines all of the vital supplies and support features necessary for successful operation, and expresses them in visual form, to facilitate analysis and optimisation for operations and maintenance staff. The safety chains are confined to manual schemes at present, although they are designed to be compatible with modern computer techniques. Their usefulness with any routine maintenance planning application on high technology plant is already being appreciated. (author)

  6. Nuclear Safety. 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    A quick review of the nuclear safety at EDF may be summarized as follows: - the nuclear safety at EDF maintains at a rather good standard; - none of the incidents that took place has had any direct impact upon safety; - the availability remained good; - initiation of the floor 4 reactor generation (N4 unit - 1450 MW) ensued without major difficulties (the Civaux 1 NPP has been coupled to the power network at 24 december 1997); - the analysis of the incidents interesting from the safety point of view presents many similarities with earlier ones. Significant progress has been recorded in promoting actively and directly a safe operation by making visible, evident and concrete the exertion of the nuclear operation responsibility and its control by the hierarchy. The report develops the following chapters and subjects: 1. An overview on 1997; 1.1. The technical issues of the nuclear sector; 1.2. General performances in safety; 1.3. The main incidents; 1.4. Wastes and radiation protection; 2. Nuclear safety management; 2.1. Dynamics and results; 2.2. Ameliorations to be consolidated; 3. Other important issues in safety; 3.1. Probabilistic safety studies; 3.2. Approach for safety re-evaluation; 3.3. The network safety; 3.4. Crisis management; 3.5. The Lifetime program; 3.6. PWR; 3.7. Documentation; 3.8. Competence; 4. Safety management in the future; 4.1. An open future; 4.2. The fast neutron NPP at Creys-Malville; 4.3. Stabilization of the PWR reference frame; 4.4. Implementing the EURATOM directive regarding the radiation protection standards; 4.5. Development of biomedical research and epidemiological studies; 4.6. New regulations concerning the liquid and gaseous effluents; 5. Visions of an open future; 5.1. Alternative views upon safety ay EDF; 5.2. Safety authority; 5.3. International considerations; 5.4. What happens abroad; 5.5. References from non-nuclear domain. Four appendices are added referring to policy of safety management, policy of human factors in NPPs

  7. Nuclear safety in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, K.; Sjoeberg, B.M.D.; Lauridsen, K.; Wahlstroem, B.

    2002-06-01

    The aim of the NKS/SOS-1 project has been to enhance common understanding about requirements for nuclear safety by finding improved means of communicating on the subject in society. The project, which has been built around a number of seminars, was supported by limited research in three sub-projects: 1) Risk assessment, 2) Safety analysis, and 3) Strategies for safety management. The report describes an industry in change due to societal factors. The concepts of risk and safety, safety management and systems for regulatory oversight are described in the nuclear area and also, to widen the perspective, for other industrial areas. Transparency and public participation are described as key elements in good risk communication, and case studies are given. Environmental Impact Assessment and Strategic Environmental Assessment are described as important overall processes within which risk communication can take place. Safety culture, safety indicators and quality systems are important concepts in the nuclear safety area are very useful, but also offer important challenges for the future. They have been subject to special attention in the project. (au)

  8. Introduction to 'International Handbook of Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komuro, Yuichi

    1998-01-01

    The Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (CSBEP) was initiated in 1992 by the United States Department of Energy. The project quickly became an international effort as scientists from other interested countries became involved. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) is now an official activity of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development-Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). 'International Handbook of Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments' was prepared and is updated year by year by the working group of the project. This handbook contains criticality safety benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments that were performed at various nuclear critical facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by criticality safety engineers to validate calculation techniques used. The author briefly introduces the informative handbook and would like to encourage Japanese engineers who are in charge of nuclear criticality safety to use the handbook. (author)

  9. Nuclear ships and their safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1961-04-15

    Several aspects of nuclear ship propulsion, with special reference to nuclear safety, were discussed at an international symposium at Taormina, Italy, from 14-18 November 1960. Discussions on specific topics are conducted, grouped under the following headings: Economics and National Activities in Nuclear Ship Propulsion; International Problems and General Aspects of Safety for Nuclear Ships; Nuclear Ship Projects from the Angle of Safety; Ship Reactor Problems; Sea Motion and Hull Problems; Maintenance and Refuelling Problems; and Safety Aspects of Nuclear Ship Operation.

  10. Nuclear Criticality Safety Assessment Using the SCALE Computer Code Package. A demonstration based on an independent review of a real application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mennerdahl, Dennis

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this project was to instruct a young scientist from the Lithuanian Energy Institute (LEI) on how to carry out an independent review of a safety report. In particular, emphasis, was to be put on how to use the personal computer version of the calculation system SCALE 4.3 in this process. Nuclear criticality safety together with radiation shielding from gamma and neutron sources were areas of interest. This report concentrates on nuclear criticality safety aspects while a separate report covers radiation shielding. The application was a proposed storage cask for irradiated fuel assemblies from the Ignalina RBMK reactors in Lithuania. The safety report contained various documents involving many design and safety considerations. A few other documents describing the Ignalina reactors and their operation were available. The time for the project was limited to approximately one month, starting 'clean' with a SCALE 4.3 CD-ROM, a thick safety report and a fast personal computer. The results should be of general interest to Swedish authorities, in particular related to shielding where experience in using advanced computer codes like those available in SCALE is limited. It has been known for many years that criticality safety is very complicated, and that independent reviews are absolutely necessary to reduce the risk from quite common errors in the safety assessments. Several important results were obtained during the project. Concerning use of SCALE 4.3, it was confirmed that a young scientist, without extensive previous experience in the code system, can learn to use essentially all options. During the project, it was obvious that familiarity with personal computers, operating systems (including network system) and office software (word processing, spreadsheet and Internet browser software) saved a lot of time. Some of the Monte Carlo calculations took several hours. Experience is valuable in quickly picking out input or source document errors. Understanding

  11. DRY TRANSFER FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.E. Sanders

    2005-01-01

    This design calculation updates the previous criticality evaluation for the fuel handling, transfer, and staging operations to be performed in the Dry Transfer Facility (DTF) including the remediation area. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that operations performed in the DTF and RF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Dry Transfer Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173737], p. 3-8). A description of the changes is as follows: (1) Update the supporting calculations for the various Category 1 and 2 event sequences as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171429], Section 7). (2) Update the criticality safety calculations for the DTF staging racks and the remediation pool to reflect the current design. This design calculation focuses on commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies, i.e., pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) SNF. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) owned SNF is evaluated in depth in the ''Canister Handling Facility Criticality Safety Calculations'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173284]) and is also applicable to DTF operations. Further, the design and safety analyses of the naval SNF canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. Also, note that the results for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Site specific Cask (MSC) calculations are limited to the

  12. Nuclear safety. Improvement programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In this brochure the improvement programme of nuclear safety of the Mochovce NPP is presented in detail. In 1996, a 'Mochovce NPP Nuclear Safety Improvement Programme' was developed in the frame of unit 1 and 2 completion project. The programme has been compiled as a continuous one, with the aim to reach the highest possible safety level at the time of commissioning and to establish good preconditions for permanent safety improvement in future. Such an approach is in compliance with the world's trends of safety improvement, life-time extension, modernisation and nuclear station power increase. The basic document for development of the 'Programme' is the one titled 'Safety Issues and their Ranking for WWER 440/213 NPP' developed by a group of IAEA experts. The following organisations were selected for solution of the safety measures: EUCOM (Consortium of FRAMATOME, France, and SIEMENS, Germany); SKODA Prague, a.s.; ENERGOPROJEKT Prague, a.s. (EGP); Russian organisations associated in ATOMENERGOEXPORT; VUJE Trnava, a.s

  13. An emergent proposal on the Committee of Uranium Processing Factory Criticality Accident Survey of the Nuclear Safety Commission. A meantime report dated on November 5, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Commission was received a decision on thorough investigations of accident reason on criticality accident at the Tokai-mura uranium processing factory of the JCO Incorporation occurred on September 30, 1999, to establish the Committee of Uranium Processing Factory Criticality Accident Survey to elucidate its reason thoroughly and contribute to set up a sufficient reforming prevention countermeasure. This Committee judged that it was important to propose a countermeasure directly obtainable by grasping some fact relations clarified before now as soon as possible and intended to conduct this meantime report of 'emergent proposal' by arrangement of such fact relations. Here were described on accidental conditions and their effects, response to the accident (on prevention of the accident), its reasons and their relating conditions, and some emergent proposals. In the last items, safety security at accidental site, health countermeasures to residents and others, establishment of safety security for nuclear business workers and others, and reconstruction on safety regulation in national government. (G.K.)

  14. Nuclear Safety Charter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The AREVA 'Values Charter' reaffirmed the priority that must be given to the requirement for a very high level of safety, which applies in particular to the nuclear field. The purpose of this Nuclear Safety Charter is to set forth the group's commitments in the field of nuclear safety and radiation protection so as to ensure that this requirement is met throughout the life cycle of the facilities. It should enable each of us, in carrying out our duties, to commit to this requirement personally, for the company, and for all stakeholders. These commitments are anchored in organizational and action principles and in complete transparency. They build on a safety culture shared by all personnel and maintained by periodic refresher training. They are implemented through Safety, Health, and Environmental management systems. The purpose of these commitments, beyond strict compliance with the laws and regulations in force in countries in which we operate as a group, is to foster a continuous improvement initiative aimed at continually enhancing our overall performance as a group. Content: 1 - Organization: responsibility of the group's executive management and subsidiaries, prime responsibility of the operator, a system of clearly defined responsibilities that draws on skilled support and on independent control of operating personnel, the general inspectorate: a shared expertise and an independent control of the operating organization, an organization that can be adapted for emergency management. 2 - Action principles: nuclear safety applies to every stage in the plant life cycle, lessons learned are analyzed and capitalized through the continuous improvement initiative, analyzing risks in advance is the basis of Areva's safety culture, employees are empowered to improve nuclear Safety, the group is committed to a voluntary radiation protection initiative And a sustained effort in reducing waste and effluent from facility Operations, employees and subcontractors are treated

  15. Nuclear safety endeavour in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sang-hoon lee

    1987-01-01

    Korea's nuclear power plant program is growing. As it grows, nuclear safety becomes an important issue. This article traces the development of Korean nuclear power program, the structure of the nuclear industries, the Nuclear Safety Center and its roles in the regulation and licensing of nuclear power plant, and also identifies some of the activities carried out to enhance the safety of nuclear power plants. (author)

  16. Nuclear reactors safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Francois; Seiler, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    fuels as well as the applied methodologies. The IRSN proceeds in a relevant and independent assessment of the submitted safety reports. To achieve this goal and maintain over time an independent and relevant assessment capability, the IRSN relies on the excellence of its experts and on state of art techniques and knowledge. The IRSN contributes by its work in key area to cutting edge research and development in order to drive nuclear industry towards making the best use of scientific and technological progress for improving safety, environmental protection and health. To maintain at all times the state of the art knowledge and the operational expertise necessary to deal efficiently with major nuclear accident consequences, the IRSN carries out, on the one hand, its own research and development programs to gain accurate knowledge on still unknown phenomena for safety analysis. On the other hand, the IRSN works out its own scientific calculation methodologies involving industrial calculation chain. Concerning more particularly the 'two-phase flows' thematic, The ISRN must correctly simulate the primary fluid behavior in the reactor in normal operation as well as in accidental situations, to estimate if, in such situations, the core reactor state is fully safe and any safety risk is undergone The research and development programs launched at the ISRN on two-phase flows gather work on advanced thermohydraulic configurations encounter in various reactor states (normal operation or accidental situations), in particular: (i)The estimation of the margin to the critical heat flux in normal operation (DNBR), (ii) The pressurized thermal shock, which is due to mechanical important constraints in the reactor vessel resulting from the injection of a cold fluid in case of emergency cooling (PTS), (iii) The reactivity insertion accident (RIA), (iv) The loss of coolant accident (LOCA), (vi) The accidents in spent-fuel pools and (vii) The severe accident, which could lead to core

  17. Critical experiments facility and criticality safety programs at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Iwao; Tachimori, Shoichi; Takeshita, Isao; Suzaki, Takenori; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Nomura, Yasushi

    1985-10-01

    The nuclear criticality safety is becoming a key point in Japan in the safety considerations for nuclear installations outside reactors such as spent fuel reprocessing facilities, plutonium fuel fabrication facilities, large scale hot alboratories, and so on. Especially a large scale spent fuel reprocessing facility is being designed and would be constructed in near future, therefore extensive experimental studies are needed for compilation of our own technical standards and also for verification of safety in a potential criticality accident to obtain public acceptance. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is proceeding a construction program of a new criticality safety experimental facility where criticality data can be obtained for such solution fuels as mainly handled in a reprocessing facility and also chemical process experiments can be performed to investigate abnormal phenomena, e.g. plutonium behavior in solvent extraction process by using pulsed colums. In FY 1985 detail design of the facility will be completed and licensing review by the government would start in FY 1986. Experiments would start in FY 1990. Research subjects and main specifications of the facility are described. (author)

  18. Plant safety review from mass criticality accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susanto, B.G.

    2000-01-01

    The review has been done to understand the resent status of the plant in facing postulated mass criticality accident. From the design concept of the plant all the components in the system including functional groups have been designed based on favorable mass/geometry safety principle. The criticality safety for each component is guaranteed because all the dimensions relevant to criticality of the components are smaller than dimensions of 'favorable mass/geometry'. The procedures covering all aspects affecting quality including the safety related are developed and adhered to at all times. Staff are indoctrinated periodically in short training session to warn the important of the safety in process of production. The plant is fully equipped with 6 (six) criticality detectors in strategic places to alert employees whenever the postulated mass criticality accident occur. In the event of Nuclear Emergency Preparedness, PT BATAN TEKNOLOGI has also proposed the organization structure how promptly to report the crisis to Nuclear Energy Control Board (BAPETEN) Indonesia. (author)

  19. Verification of safety critical software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Ki Chang; Chun, Chong Son; Lee, Byeong Joo; Lee, Soon Sung; Lee, Byung Chai

    1996-01-01

    To assure quality of safety critical software, software should be developed in accordance with software development procedures and rigorous software verification and validation should be performed. Software verification is the formal act of reviewing, testing of checking, and documenting whether software components comply with the specified requirements for a particular stage of the development phase[1]. New software verification methodology was developed and was applied to the Shutdown System No. 1 and 2 (SDS1,2) for Wolsung 2,3 and 4 nuclear power plants by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited(AECL) in order to satisfy new regulation requirements of Atomic Energy Control Boars(AECB). Software verification methodology applied to SDS1 for Wolsung 2,3 and 4 project will be described in this paper. Some errors were found by this methodology during the software development for SDS1 and were corrected by software designer. Outputs from Wolsung 2,3 and 4 project have demonstrated that the use of this methodology results in a high quality, cost-effective product. 15 refs., 6 figs. (author)

  20. A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newvahner, R.L.; Pryor, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2-1/2-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF 6 cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO 2 F 2 ) slab above a UF 6 hemicylinder, and a UO 2 sphere centered within a UF 6 hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a ''safetime,'' for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF 6 , along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  1. A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newvahner, R.L. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2 {1/2}-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF{sub 6} cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) slab above a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder, and a UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} sphere centered within a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a {open_quotes}safetime{close_quotes}, for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF{sub 6}, along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations.

  2. Overview of DOE/ONS criticality safety projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, R.W.; Brown, B.P.; Hopper, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of Federal involvement with nuclear criticality safety has traversed through the 1940's and early 1950's with the Manhattan Engineering District, the 1950's and 1960's with the Atomic Energy Commission, the early 1970's with the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the late 1970's to date with the US Department of Energy. The importance of nuclear criticality safety has been maintained throughout these periods; however, criticality safety has received shifting emphases in research/applications, promulgations of regulations/standards, origins of fiscal support and organization. In June 1981 the Office of Nuclear Safety was established in response to a Department of Energy study of the impact of the March 1979 Three Mile Island accident. The organizational structure of the ONS, its program for establishing and maintaining a progressive nuclear criticality safety program, and associated projects, and current history of ONS's fiscal support of program projects is presented. With the establishment of the ONS came concomitant missions to develop and maintain nuclear safety policy and requirements, to provide independent assurance that nuclear operations are performed safely, to provide resources and management for DOE responses to nuclear accidents, and to provide technical support. In the past four years, ONS has developed and initiated a continuing Department Nuclear Criticality Safety Program in such areas as communications and information, physics of criticality, knowledge of factors affecting criticality, and computational capability

  3. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, B. J.; Dean, V. F.; Pesic, M. P.

    2001-01-01

    In order to properly manage the risk of a nuclear criticality accident, it is important to establish the conditions for which such an accident becomes possible for any activity involving fissile material. Only when this information is known is it possible to establish the likelihood of actually achieving such conditions. It is therefore important that criticality safety analysts have confidence in the accuracy of their calculations. Confidence in analytical results can only be gained through comparison of those results with experimental data. The Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (CSBEP) was initiated in October of 1992 by the US Department of Energy. The project was managed through the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), but involved nationally known criticality safety experts from Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Savannah River Technology Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Y-12 Plant, Hanford, Argonne National Laboratory, and the Rocky Flats Plant. An International Criticality Safety Data Exchange component was added to the project during 1994 and the project became what is currently known as the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP). Representatives from the United Kingdom, France, Japan, the Russian Federation, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Korea, Slovenia, Yugoslavia, Spain, and Israel are now participating on the project In December of 1994, the ICSBEP became an official activity of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development - Nuclear Energy Agency's (OECD-NEA) Nuclear Science Committee. The United States currently remains the lead country, providing most of the administrative support. The purpose of the ICSBEP is to: (1) identify and evaluate a comprehensive set of critical benchmark data; (2) verify the data, to the extent possible, by reviewing original and subsequently revised documentation, and by talking with the

  4. Nuclear safety in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverie, M.

    1981-02-01

    The principles and rules governing the safety of nuclear installations are defined as from three fundamental principles and three practical rules as follows: First principle: the operator is responsible and of the highest order. Second principle: the public authorities exercise their control responsibility with respect to the design, construction and running of the installations. Third principle: nuclear safety, this is to accept that man and his technique are not infallible and that one must be prepared to control the unpredictable. First rule: the installations must include several 'lines of defence' in succession and to the extent where this is possible these must be independent of each other. Second rule: procedures are required and supervised by the Government Departments. Third rule: nuclear safety requires that any incident or anomaly must undergo an analysis in depth and is also based on a standing 'clinical' examination of the installations. The definition is given as to how the public authorities exercise their intervention: terms and conditions of the intervention by the safety authorities, authorization procedures, surveillance of the installations, general technical regulations. Two specific subjects are presented in the addendum, (a) the choice of nuclear power station sites in France and (b) the storage of radioactive wastes [fr

  5. Nuclear safety in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caro, R.

    1988-01-01

    Control and monitoring of all Spanish nuclear facilities was first carried out by the Department of Nuclear Safety of the Junta de Energia Nuclear established by the Nuclear Energy Act in 1964. Later, following the example of other Western countries, it was concluded that regulations and monitoring of nuclear energy on one hand and its promotion and development on the other should not be done by the same national body. Therefore, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN) was created in 1980, as the sole national body responsible for controlling the safety of nuclear installations, and radiological protection. The CSN has five members, one chairman and four comissioners, required to be independent and therefore with politically objective criteria, internationally acknowledged technical capability, and free from other duties and responsibilities. For this purpose the Chairman has been given the status of Minister and the commissioners that of Secretary of State. They serve for six years, after being accepted by Parliament by a majority of at least 3/5 of the votes, and are called upon to report to Parliament at least twice a year on nuclear safety and radiological protection in the country. A complete report on those issues is presented to Parliament, becoming a politic document as from that moment. To prepare that report (basically a summary of CSN activities) and, in general, to fulfill all its tasks, the CSN has a staff of some 300, about 50% being technical. CSN activities cover: 1. Standards; 2. Licences; 3. Research; 4. Environment; 5. Information; and 6. International Relations

  6. Nuclear health and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This paper is a review of environmental and safety programs at facilities in the Naval Reactors Program which shows no basis for allegations that unsafe conditions exist there or that the environment is being harmed by activities conducted there. The prototype reactor design provides safety measures that are consistent with commercial nuclear power plants. Minor incidents affecting safety and the environment have occurred, however, and dents affecting safety and the environment have occurred, however, and as with other nuclear facilities, past activities have caused environmental problems that require ongoing monitoring and vigilance. While the program has historically been exempt from most oversight, some federal and state environmental oversight agencies have recently been permitted access to Naval Reactors facilities for oversight purposes. The program voluntarily cooperates with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regarding reactor modifications, safety improvements, and component reliability. In addition, the program and its contractors have established an extensive internal oversight program that is geared toward reporting the slightest deviations from requirements or procedures. Given the program's classification policies and requirements, it does not appear that the program routinely overclassifies information to prevent its release to the public or to avoid embarrassment. However, GAO did not some instances in which documents were improperly classified

  7. Safety of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    In accordance with the Nuclear Energy Act, a Licence may only be issued if the precautions required by the state of the art have been taken to prevent damage resulting from the construction and operation of the installation. The maximum admissible body doses in the area around the installation which must be observed in planning constructional and other technical protective measures to counter accidents in or at a nuclear power station (accident planning values, are established). According to the Radiological Protection Ordinance the Licensing Authority can consider these precautions to have been taken if, in designing the installation against accidents, the applicant has assumed the accidents which, according to the Safety Criteria and Guidelines for Nuclear Power Stations published in the Federal Register by the Federal Minister of the Interior after hearing the competent senior state authorities, must determine the design of a nuclear power station. On the basis of previous experience from safety analysis, assessment and operation of nuclear power stations, the accident guidelines published here define which accidents are determinative for the safety-related design of PWR power stations and what verification -particularly with regard to compliance with the accident planning values of the Radiological Protection Ordinance -must be provided by the applicant. (author)

  8. Strengthening the Global Nuclear Safety Regime. INSAG-21. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Global Nuclear Safety Regime is the framework for achieving the worldwide implementation of a high level of safety at nuclear installations. Its core is the activities undertaken by each country to ensure the safety and security of the nuclear installations within its jurisdiction. But national efforts are and should be augmented by the activities of a variety of international enterprises that facilitate nuclear safety - intergovernmental organizations, multinational networks among operators, multinational networks among regulators, the international nuclear industry, multinational networks among scientists, international standards setting organizations and other stakeholders such as the public, news media and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) that are engaged in nuclear safety. All of these efforts should be harnessed to enhance the achievement of safety. The existing Global Nuclear Safety Regime is functioning at an effective level today. But its impact on improving safety could be enhanced by pursuing some measured change. This report recommends action in the following areas: - Enhanced use of the review meetings of the Convention on Nuclear Safety as a vehicle for open and critical peer review and a source for learning about the best safety practices of others; - Enhanced utilization of IAEA Safety Standards for the harmonization of national safety regulations, to the extent feasible; - Enhanced exchange of operating experience for improving operating and regulatory practices; and - Multinational cooperation in the safety review of new nuclear power plant designs. These actions, which are described more fully in this report, should serve to enhance the effectiveness of the Global Nuclear Safety Regime

  9. Nuclear criticality safety: general. 4. The CASTOR X/32S Method of Covering mis-loading Concerns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancaster, Dale B.; Rombough, Charles T.; Diersch, Rudolf; Spilker, Harry

    2001-01-01

    In the United States, most cask licenses do not directly consider mis-loading. If the enrichment limit for a shipping cask is high and the reactivity control is inherent in the cask, the reactivity effect of a mis-load is small. However, in large-capacity casks, such as the CASTOR X/32S, the effect can be much larger. The U.S. Department of Energy Topical Report on Actinide- Only Burnup Credit takes the position that a fuel assembly mis-load does need to be analyzed since there are multiple independent checks, and thus, the double-contingency principle is met. Unfortunately, 11 assemblies were mis-loaded at Palisades. This event has caused the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to ask for more detail on prevention of mis-loading. In the summer of 1999, Palisades loaded 11 assemblies, which did not comply with the loading requirements for their VSC-24 cask. The cask requires 5 yr of cooling, and these 11 assemblies had just a little more than 4 yr of cooling. The mis-loading did not result in an unsafe condition but in an un-reviewed condition. This mis-loading was not identified until November 2000 during a review related to an NRC information notice. The loading plan for the cask was incorrect. The engineering review of the loading plan missed the error. The operators had loaded the cask consistent with the loading plan. The cask loading was then confirmed by comparing to the loading plan. The loading plan was in error since the engineer assumed that the entire region of fuel was discharged at the same time. The 11 assemblies of concern were reinserted in the reactor, and the engineer and the reviewer did not check for this. The reactor records for all the assemblies were correct but apparently were not checked by the engineer who created the loading plan. To prevent a mis-load criticality event, the following steps will be required for the CASTOR X/32S storage and transport cask: 1. A loading plan will be prepared for each cask loaded. This plan will be

  10. Nuclear safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The topics 'Large-sized PWR-NPP Safety Techniques Research',and 'The Key Techniques Research on the Safety Supervision and Control for Operation of Nuclear Installations' have been adopted as an apart of 'the National 9th five Year Programs for Tacking the Key Scientific and Technical Topics' which are organized by the State Planning Commission (SPC) and State Science and Technology Commission (SSTC) respectively, and have obtained a financial support from them. To play a better role with the limited fund, the NNSA laid special stress on selecting key sub-topics on nuclear safety, and carefully choosing units which would undertake sub-topics and signing technical contracts with them

  11. Proceedings of KURRI symposium on criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishina, Kojiro; Kanda, Keiji

    1984-01-01

    On August 8, 1984, at the Reactor Application Center of the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, the symposium on criticality safety was held, and 81 participants from various fields of reactor physics, nuclear fuel cycle engineering, reactor chemistry, nuclear chemistry, health physics and so on discussed the problem. The gists of the presentation are collected in this report. The contents are the techniques of evaluating criticality safety in respective fuel facilities, the system of control and its concept, the course and plan of the research on criticality safety in Japan and foreign countries, the techniques of determining multiplication factor and so on, and the review of present status, the pointing-out of problems and the report of new techniques were made. The measures coping with criticality safety have been mostly to meet urgent demand, but its fundamental examination and long term research should be carried out. This symposium was planned as the preparation for such research project, and favorable comment was given by the participants. In the next symposium, it is considered better to limit the themes and to allot more time to respective lectures. (Kako, I.)

  12. Nuclear safety policy working group recommendations on nuclear propulsion safety for the space exploration initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Albert C.; Lee, James H.; Mcculloch, William H.; Sawyer, J. Charles, Jr.; Bari, Robert A.; Cullingford, Hatice S.; Hardy, Alva C.; Niederauer, George F.; Remp, Kerry; Rice, John W.

    1993-01-01

    An interagency Nuclear Safety Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) nuclear propulsion program. These recommendations, which are contained in this report, should facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG has recommended a top-level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the SEI nuclear propulsion safety program. In addition, the NSPWG has reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top-level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. These recommendations should be useful for the development of the program's top-level requirements for safety functions (referred to as Safety Functional Requirements). The safety requirements and guidelines address the following topics: reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, safeguards, risk/reliability, operational safety, ground testing, and other considerations.

  13. An updated nuclear criticality slide rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopper, C.M.; Broadhead, B.L.

    1998-04-01

    This Volume 2 contains the functional version of the updated nuclear criticality slide rule (more accurately, sliding graphs) that is referenced in An Updated Nuclear Criticality Slide Rule: Technical Basis, NUREG/CR-6504, Vol. 1 (ORNL/TM-13322/V1). This functional slide rule provides a readily usable open-quotes in-handclose quotes method for estimating pertinent nuclear criticality accident information from sliding graphs, thereby permitting (1) the rapid estimation of pertinent criticality accident information without laborious or sophisticated calculations in a nuclear criticality emergency situation, (2) the appraisal of potential fission yields and external personnel radiation exposures for facility safety analyses, and (3) a technical basis for emergency preparedness and training programs at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The slide rule permits the estimation of neutron and gamma dose rates and integrated doses based upon estimated fission yields, distance from the fission source, and time-after criticality accidents for five different critical systems. Another sliding graph permits the estimation of critical solution fission yields based upon fissile material concentration, critical vessel geometry, and solution addition rate. Another graph provides neutron and gamma dose-reduction factors for water, steel, and concrete. Graphs from historic documents are provided as references for estimating critical parameters of various fissile material systems. Conversion factors for various English and metric units are provided for quick reference

  14. Status of nuclear safety research - 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobajima, Makoto; Sasajima, Hideo; Umemoto, Michitaka; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Tadao; Togashi, Yoshihiro; Nakata, Masahito

    2000-11-01

    The nuclear safety research at JAERI is performed in accordance with the long term plan on nuclear research, development and use and the safety research yearly plan determined by the government and under close relationship to the related departments in and around the Nuclear Safety Research Center. The criticality accident having occurred in Tokai-mura in 1999 has been the highest level nuclear accident in Japan and ensuring safety in whole nuclear cycle is severely questioned. The causes of such an accident have to be clarified not only technical points but also organizational points, and it is extremely important to make efforts in preventing recurrence, to fulfill emergency plan and to improve the safety of whole nuclear fuel cycle for restoring the reliability by the people to nuclear energy system. The fields of conducting safety research are engineering safety research on reactor facilities and nuclear fuel cycle facilities including research on radioactive waste processing and disposal and research and development on future technology for safety improvement. Also, multinational cooperation and bilateral cooperation are promoted in international research organizations in the center to internationally share the recognition of world-common issues of nuclear safety and to attain efficient promotion of research and effective utilization of research resources. (author)

  15. Criticality safety (prospect of study in NUCEF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, Masafumi

    1996-01-01

    Experimental studies of criticality safety are under way using STACY and TRACY in NUCEF. Collection of fundamental data on criticality in a solution system is undergoing with STACY to confirm that the likelihood of criticality safety in the system constructed on the assumption of apparatuses in a reprocessing plant is enough large. Whereas some experiments simulating criticality accidents in a reprocessing plant using TRACY were designed to investigate the behaviors of fuel solution and radioactive matters in order to clarify whether it is possible to safely shut them in the facility even if a critical accident occurs. Both STACY and TRACY reached the criticality in 1995. Up to now a series of criticality experiments have been done using STACY with a core tank φ60 cm and the first periodical examination is now under way. On the other hand, we have a plan using TRACY to investigate the behaviors of nuclear heat solution at a criticality accident, and the releasing, transfer and deposition of radioactive materials. After reaching the criticality for the first, the performance verification test has been conducted. The full-scale study using TRACY is planned to begin in the second half of 1996. (M.N.)

  16. The Nuclear Criticality Information System: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B.L.

    1991-07-01

    The US Department of Energy's Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) has served the criticality community for the past ten years with publications and with an online information system. NCIS provides a mean for widely distributed nuclear criticality specialists to communicate and work together instantly. Users of the system may receive assistance from all members of the NCIS community, which provides a much broader base of support than is available at any single site. When unified by NCIS, these diverse specialists provide a resource that has proven to be very useful in the safe handling of fissile material. NCIS also is a source of current nuclear criticality safety information; the rapid access of such up-to-date information on the handling of fissile materials outside of nuclear reactors is international in scope, extending beyond political and geographical boundaries

  17. Nuclear installations sites safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, P.; Candes, P.; Duclos, P.; Doumenc, A.; Faure, J.; Hugon, J.; Mohammadioun, B.

    1988-11-01

    This report is divided into ten parts bearing: 1 Safety analysis procedures for Basis Nuclear Installations sites (BNI) in France 2 Site safety for BNI in France 3 Industrial and transport activities risks for BNI in France 4 Demographic characteristics near BNI sites in France 5 Meteorologic characteristics of BNI sites in France 6 Geological aspects near the BNI sites in France 7 Seismic studies for BNI sites in France 8 Hydrogeological aspects near BNI sites in France 9 Hydrological aspects near BNI sites in France 10 Ecological and radioecological studies of BNI sites in France [fr

  18. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.E. Sanders

    2005-04-07

    This design calculation revises and updates the previous criticality evaluation for the canister handling, transfer and staging operations to be performed in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) documented in BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 167614]. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of canisters performed in the CHF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Canister Handling Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], Sections 3.1.1.3.4.13 and 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of updating the Category 1 and 2 event sequence evaluations as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). The CHF is limited in throughput capacity to handling sealed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) canisters, defense high-level radioactive waste (DHLW), naval canisters, multicanister overpacks (MCOs), vertical dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), and multipurpose canisters (MPCs) (if and when they become available) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], p. 1-1). It should be noted that the design and safety analyses of the naval canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for

  19. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.E. Sanders

    2005-01-01

    This design calculation revises and updates the previous criticality evaluation for the canister handling, transfer and staging operations to be performed in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) documented in BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 167614]. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of canisters performed in the CHF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Canister Handling Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], Sections 3.1.1.3.4.13 and 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of updating the Category 1 and 2 event sequence evaluations as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). The CHF is limited in throughput capacity to handling sealed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) canisters, defense high-level radioactive waste (DHLW), naval canisters, multicanister overpacks (MCOs), vertical dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), and multipurpose canisters (MPCs) (if and when they become available) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], p. 1-1). It should be noted that the design and safety analyses of the naval canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the CHF and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility

  20. An international nuclear safety regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1995-01-01

    For all the parties involved with safe use of nuclear energy, the opening for signature of the 'Convention on Nuclear Safety' (signed by 60 countries) and the ongoing work to prepare a 'Convention on Radioactive Waste Safety' are particularly important milestones. 'Convention on Nuclear Safety' is the first legal instrument that directly addresses the safety of nuclear power plants worldwide. The two conventions are only one facet of international cooperation to enhance safety. A review of some cooperative efforts of the past decades, and some key provisions of the new safety conventions, presented in this paper, show how international cooperation is increasing nuclear safety worldwide. The safety philosophy and practices involved with legal framework for the safe use of nuclear power will foster a collective international involvement and commitment. It will be a positive step towards increasing public confidence in nuclear power

  1. Safety critical application of fuzzy control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schildt, G.H.

    1995-01-01

    After an introduction into safety terms a short description of fuzzy logic will be given. Especially, for safety critical applications of fuzzy controllers a possible controller structure will be described. The following items will be discussed: Configuration of fuzzy controllers, design aspects like fuzzfiication, inference strategies, defuzzification and types of membership functions. As an example a typical fuzzy rule set will be presented. Especially, real-time behaviour a fuzzy controllers is mentioned. An example of fuzzy controlling for temperature control purpose within a nuclear reactor together with membership functions and inference strategy of such a fuzzy controller will be presented. (author). 4 refs, 17 figs

  2. Links among available integral benchmarks and differential date evaluations, computational biases and uncertainties, and nuclear criticality safety biases on potential MOX production throughput

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goluoglu, S.; Hopper, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    Through the use of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's recently developed and applied sensitivity and uncertainty computational analysis techniques, this paper presents the relevance and importance of available and needed integral benchmarks and differential data evaluations impacting potential MOX production throughput determinations relative to low-moderated MOX fuel blending operations. The relevance and importance in the availability of or need for critical experiment benchmarks and data evaluations are presented in terms of computational biases as influenced by computational and experimental sensitivities and uncertainties relative to selected MOX production powder blending processes. Recent developments for estimating the safe margins of subcriticality for assuring nuclear criticality safety for process approval are presented. In addition, the impact of the safe margins (due to computational biases and uncertainties) on potential MOX production throughput will also be presented. (author)

  3. Software Quality Assurance for Nuclear Safety Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparkman, D R; Lagdon, R

    2004-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has undertaken an initiative to improve the quality of software used to design and operate their nuclear facilities across the United States. One aspect of this initiative is to revise or create new directives and guides associated with quality practices for the safety software in its nuclear facilities. Safety software includes the safety structures, systems, and components software and firmware, support software and design and analysis software used to ensure the safety of the facility. DOE nuclear facilities are unique when compared to commercial nuclear or other industrial activities in terms of the types and quantities of hazards that must be controlled to protect workers, public and the environment. Because of these differences, DOE must develop an approach to software quality assurance that ensures appropriate risk mitigation by developing a framework of requirements that accomplishes the following goals: (sm b ullet) Ensures the software processes developed to address nuclear safety in design, operation, construction and maintenance of its facilities are safe (sm b ullet) Considers the larger system that uses the software and its impacts (sm b ullet) Ensures that the software failures do not create unsafe conditions Software designers for nuclear systems and processes must reduce risks in software applications by incorporating processes that recognize, detect, and mitigate software failure in safety related systems. It must also ensure that fail safe modes and component testing are incorporated into software design. For nuclear facilities, the consideration of risk is not necessarily sufficient to ensure safety. Systematic evaluation, independent verification and system safety analysis must be considered for software design, implementation, and operation. The software industry primarily uses risk analysis to determine the appropriate level of rigor applied to software practices. This risk-based approach distinguishes safety-critical

  4. Criticality safety analysis for mockup facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Joon; Shin, Hee Sung; Kim, Ik Soo; Oh, Seung Chul; Ro, Seung Gy; Bae, Kang Mok

    2000-03-01

    Benchmark calculations for SCALE4.4 CSAS6 module have been performed for 31 UO 2 fuel, 15MOX fuel and 10 metal material criticality experiments and then calculation biases of the SCALE 4.4 CSAS6 module have been revealed to be 0.00982, 0.00579 and 0.02347, respectively. When CSAS6 is applied to the criticality safety analysis for the mockup facility in which several kinds of nuclear material components are included, the calculation bias of CSAS6 is conservatively taken to be 0.02347. With the aid of this benchmarked code system, criticality safety analyses for the mockup facility at normal and hypothetical accidental conditions have been carried out. It appears that the maximum K eff is 0.28356 well below than the critical limit, K eff =0.95 at normal condition. In a hypothetical accidental condition, the maximum K eff is found to be 0.73527 much lower than the subcritical limit. For another hypothetical accidental condition the nuclear material leaks out of container and spread or lump in the floor, it was assumed that the nuclear material is shaped into a slab and water exists in the empty space of the nuclear material. K eff has been calculated as function of slab thickness and the volume ratio of water to nuclear material. The result shows that the K eff increases as the water volume ratio increases. It is also revealed that the K eff reaches to the maximum value when water if filled in the empty space of nuclear material. The maximum K eff value is 0.93960 lower than the subcritical limit

  5. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Kampmann, D.; Nystrup, P.E.; Thorlaksen, B.

    2010-05-01

    The report is the seventh report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe DTU and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2009 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events, international relations, conflicts and the European safety directive. (LN)

  6. Nuclear criticality safety: general. 6. Application of Fixed Neutron Absorbers in the New Hanford PFP Horizontal Rack Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, J.S.; Miller, E.M.; Toffer, H.; Mo, B.S.

    2001-01-01

    The Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is currently in a waste cleanup and plutonium stabilization mode. Plutonium-bearing materials are processed through thermal treatment, creating forms of oxides suitable for long-term storage. Stabilized materials at PFP are stored in a variety of cans such as the bag-less transfer cans (BTCs), which are ultimately contained in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 3013 can; both cans are larger than previously used plutonium storage containers and hold more plutonium. To compensate for the increased plutonium loadings, added engineered safety features were considered in the storage facilities. The vaults in PFP, subdivided into concrete-walled cubicles, will contain both new and older cans. The DOE 3013 and BTC cans may be loaded with up to 4.4 kg of plutonium as a compound (mostly oxide). New racks that store cans horizontally are being constructed to hold both new and older containers. The loading objective is to accommodate 70 kg of plutonium per cubicle. Two design analysis approaches for the new racks were considered. The first approach incorporated neutron absorption provided by the structural materials of the rack and the cans in determining a safe configuration. A rack loading arrangement was determined as shown in Fig. 1 and specified in Table I. This approach provides compliance with criticality control requirements; however, added administrative controls were needed to accommodate a sufficient number of cans in specific locations to achieve 70 kg of plutonium per cubicle. The 4.4-kg plutonium container can be placed only in predetermined locations. The second approach evaluated the addition of a fixed neutron absorber plate along the back wall of the cubicle (Fig. 1). The location of the special plate facilitates installation of the racks and provides additional criticality safety margin beyond the first approach. Its presence permits loading of racks with up to 4.4-kg plutonium cans in any storage locations

  7. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Kampmann, D.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Nystrup, P.E.

    2007-04-01

    The report is the fourth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2006 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power, and international relations and conflicts. (LN)

  8. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The report is the second report in a new series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2004 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power and international relations and conflicts. (ln)

  9. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Kampman, D.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Nystrup, P.E.

    2006-03-01

    The report is the third report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2005 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power and international relations and conflicts. (ln)

  10. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Kampmann, D.

    2009-06-01

    The report is the fifth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe DTU and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2008 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events of nuclear power, and international relations and conflicts. (LN)

  11. Criticality Safety Evaluation for the TACS at DAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Percher, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Heinrichs, D. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-06-10

    Hands-on experimental training in the physical behavior of multiplying systems is one of ten key areas of training required for practitioners to become qualified in the discipline of criticality safety as identified in DOE-STD-1135-99, Guidance for Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineer Training and Qualification. This document is a criticality safety evaluation of the training activities and operations associated with HS-3201-P, Nuclear Criticality 4-Day Training Course (Practical). This course was designed to also address the training needs of nuclear criticality safety professionals under the auspices of the NNSA Nuclear Criticality Safety Program1. The hands-on, or laboratory, portion of the course will utilize the Training Assembly for Criticality Safety (TACS) and will be conducted in the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS). The training activities will be conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory following the requirements of an Integrated Work Sheet (IWS) and associated Safety Plan. Students will be allowed to handle the fissile material under the supervision of an LLNL Certified Fissile Material Handler.

  12. In-Situ Radiological Surveys to Address Nuclear Criticality Safety Requirements During Remediation Activities at the Shallow Land Disposal Area, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania - 12268

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Phillip; Mihalo, Mark; Eberlin, John; Lambert, Mike [Cabrera Services (United States); Matthews, Brian [Nuclear Safety Associates (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Cabrera Services Inc. (CABRERA) is the remedial contractor for the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) Site in Armstrong County Pennsylvania, a United States (US) Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) contract. The remediation is being completed under the USACE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) which was established to identify, investigate, and clean up or control sites previously used by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED). As part of the management of the FUSRAP, the USACE is overseeing investigation and remediation of radiological contamination at the SLDA Site in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 US Code (USC), Section 9601 et. seq, as amended and, the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Section 300.430(f) (2). The objective of this project is to clean up radioactive waste at SLDA. The radioactive waste contains special nuclear material (SNM), primarily U-235, in 10 burial trenches, Cabrera duties include processing, packaging and transporting the waste to an offsite disposal facility in accordance with the selected remedial alternative as defined in the Final Record of Decision (USACE, 2007). Of particular importance during the remediation is the need to address nuclear criticality safety (NCS) controls for the safe exhumation and management of waste containing fissile materials. The partnership between Cabrera Services, Inc. and Measutronics Corporation led to the development of a valuable survey tool and operating procedure that are essential components of the SLDA Criticality Safety and Material Control and Accountability programs. Using proven existing technologies in the design and manufacture of the Mobile Survey Cart, the continued deployment of the Cart will allow for an efficient and reliable

  13. Fissile materials principles of criticality safety in handling and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This Swedish Standard consists of the English version of the International Standard ISO 1709-1975-Nuclear energy. Fissile materials. Principles of criticality safety in handling and processing. (author)

  14. Spent fuel storage criticality safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, E M; Elmessiry, A M [National center of nuclear safety and radiation control atomic energy authority, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    The safety aspects of the spent fuel storage pool of the Egyptian test and research reactor one (ET-R R-1) has to be assessed as part of a general overall safety evaluation to be included in a safety analysis report (SAR) for this reactor. The present work treats the criticality safety of the spent fuel storage pool. Conservative calculations based on using fresh fuel has been performed, as well as less conservative using burned fuel. The calculations include cross library generation for burned and fresh fuel for the ET-R R-1 fuel type. The WIMS-D 4 code has been used in library generation and burn up calculation the critically calculations are performed using the one dimensional transport code (ANISN) and the two dimensional diffusion code (DIXY2). The possibility of increasing the storage efficiency either by insertion of absorber sheets of soluble boron salts or by reduction of fuel rod separation has been studied. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Spent fuel storage criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, E.M.; Elmessiry, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The safety aspects of the spent fuel storage pool of the Egyptian test and research reactor one (ET-R R-1) has to be assessed as part of a general overall safety evaluation to be included in a safety analysis report (SAR) for this reactor. The present work treats the criticality safety of the spent fuel storage pool. Conservative calculations based on using fresh fuel has been performed, as well as less conservative using burned fuel. The calculations include cross library generation for burned and fresh fuel for the ET-R R-1 fuel type. The WIMS-D 4 code has been used in library generation and burn up calculation the critically calculations are performed using the one dimensional transport code (ANISN) and the two dimensional diffusion code (DIXY2). The possibility of increasing the storage efficiency either by insertion of absorber sheets of soluble boron salts or by reduction of fuel rod separation has been studied. 8 figs., 2 tabs

  16. STACY and TRACY: nuclear criticality experimental facilities under construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, I.; Takeshita, I.; Yanagisawa, H.; Tsujino, T.

    1992-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is constructing a Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility, NUCEF, where the following research themes essential for evaluating safety problems relating to back-end technology in nuclear fuel cycle facilities will be studied: nuclear criticality safety research; research on advanced reprocessing processes and partitioning; and research on transuranic waste treatment and disposal. To perform nuclear criticality safety research related to the reprocessing of light water reactor spent fuels, two criticality experimental facilities, STACY and TRACY, are under construction. STACY (Static Criticality Facility) will be used for the study of criticality conditions of solution fuels, uranium, plutonium and their mixtures. TRACY (Transient Criticality Facility) will be used to investigate criticality accident phenomena with uranium solutions. The construction progress and experimental programmes are described in this Paper. (author)

  17. HSE Nuclear Safety Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagley, M.J. [Health and Safety Executive, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    HSE funds two programmes of nuclear safety research: a programme of {approx} 2.2M of extramural research to support the Nuclear Safety Division`s regulatory activities and a programme of {approx} 11M of generic safety research managed by the Nuclear Safety Research Management Unit (NSRMU) in Sheffield, UK. This paper is concerned only with the latter programme; it describes how it is planned and procured and outlines some of the work on structural integrity problems. It also describes the changes that are taking place in the way nuclear safety research is procured in the UK. (author).

  18. HSE Nuclear Safety Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    HSE funds two programmes of nuclear safety research: a programme of ∼ 2.2M of extramural research to support the Nuclear Safety Division's regulatory activities and a programme of ∼ 11M of generic safety research managed by the Nuclear Safety Research Management Unit (NSRMU) in Sheffield, UK. This paper is concerned only with the latter programme; it describes how it is planned and procured and outlines some of the work on structural integrity problems. It also describes the changes that are taking place in the way nuclear safety research is procured in the UK. (author)

  19. Nuclear safety research in HGF 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tromm, Walter

    2012-01-01

    After the events at the Japanese nuclear power plant of Fukushima Daiichi, the German federal government decided that Germany will give up electricity generation from nuclear power within a decade. The last reactor will be disconnected from the power grid in 2022. Helping to make this opt-out as safe as possible is one of the duties of the Helmholtz Association with its Nuclear Safety Research Program within the Energy Research Area. Also the demolition of nuclear power plants and the repository problem will keep society, and thus also research, busy for a number of decades to come. Giving up electricity production from nuclear power thus must not mean giving up the required nuclear technology competences. In the fields of reactor safety, demolition, final storage, radiation protection, and crisis management, in critical support of international developments, and for competent evaluation of nuclear facilities around Germany, these competences will be in demand far beyond the German opt-out. This is the reason why the final report by the Ethics Committee on 'Safe Energy Supply' emphasizes the importance of nuclear technology research. Close cooperation on national, European and international levels is indispensable in this effort. Also nuclear safety research in the Helmholtz Association is aligned with the challenges posed by the opt-out of the use of nuclear power. It is important that the high competences in the areas of plant safety and demolition, handling of radioactive waste, and safe final storage as well as radiation protection be preserved. The Nuclear Safety Research Program within the Energy Research Area of the Helmholtz Association therefore will continue studying scientific and technical aspects of the safety of nuclear reactors and the safety of nuclear waste management. These research activities are provident research conducted for society and must be preserved for a long period of time. The work is closely harmonized with the activities of the

  20. Nuclear Safety Review for 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    The Nuclear Safety Review 2014 focuses on the dominant nuclear safety trends, issues and challenges in 2013. The Executive Overview provides general nuclear safety information along with a summary of the major issues covered in this report: strengthening safety in nuclear installations; improving radiation, transport and waste safety; enhancing emergency preparedness and response (EPR); improving regulatory infrastructure and effectiveness; and strengthening civil liability for nuclear damage. The Appendix provides details on the activities of the Commission on Safety Standards, and activities relevant to the Agency’s safety standards. The global nuclear community has made steady and continuous progress in strengthening nuclear safety in 2013, as promoted by the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (hereinafter referred to as “the Action Plan”) and reported in Progress in the Implementation of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (document GOV/INF/2013/8-GC(57)/INF/5), and the Supplementary Information to that report and Progress in the Implementation of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (document GOV/INF/2014/2). • Significant progress continues to be made in several key areas, such as assessments of safety vulnerabilities of nuclear power plants (NPPs), strengthening of the Agency’s peer review services, improvements in EPR capabilities, strengthening and maintaining capacity building, and protecting people and the environment from ionizing radiation. The progress that has been made in these and other areas has contributed to the enhancement of the global nuclear safety framework. • Significant progress has also been made in reviewing the Agency’s safety standards, which continue to be widely applied by regulators, operators and the nuclear industry in general, with increased attention and focus on vitally important areas such as design and operation of NPPs, protection of NPPs against severe accidents, and EPR. • The Agency continued to

  1. Automated tools for safety-critical software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapassat, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    The regulatory (DSIN), the utilities (EDF, CEA..) and the CEA-Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety (IPSN) work together at the French nuclear safety. This paper presents a tool, called CLAIRE, for simulation and tests of different nuclear safety system. (TEC)

  2. No nuclear safety without security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2016-01-01

    ead of Health and Safety - Nuclear Safety and Corporate Security at ENGIE Benelux, Pierre Doumont has the delicate job of defining and implementing measures, including cybersecurity, to prevent the risk of malevolent acts against tangible and intangible assets. He gives some hints on the contribution of nuclear security to safety.

  3. Nuclear reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    The invention provides a safety system for a nuclear reactor which uses a parallel combination of computer type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular parameter (from transducers located in the reactor system) and each of which produces the functional counterpart of that particular parameter. The various functional counterparts are then added together to form a control signal for shutting down the reactor. The functional counterparts are developed by analysis of experimental thermal and hydraulic data, which are used to form expressions that define safe conditions

  4. Nuclear reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    A safety system for shutting down a nuclear reactor under overload conditions is described. The system includes a series of parallel-connected computer memory type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular reactor parameter and in each of which a precalculated functional value for that parameter is stored indicative of the percentage of maximum reactor load that the parameter contributes. The various functional values corresponding to the actual measured parameters are added together to provide a control signal used to shut down the reactor under overload conditions. (U.K.)

  5. Nuclear and radiation safety policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikus, T; Strycek, E.

    1998-01-01

    Slovenske elektrarne (SE) is a producer of electricity and heat, including from nuclear fuel source. The board of SE is ultimately responsible for nuclear and radiation safety matters. In this leaflet main principles of maintaining nuclear and radiation safety of the Company SE are explained

  6. Improving Safety, Economic, Substantiality, and Security of Nuclear Energy with Canadian Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Holly; Pencer, Jeremy; Yetisir, Metin; Leung, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor is one of the six design concepts being developed under the Generation IV International Forum. It is the only concept evolving from the water-cooled reactors and taking advantages of the balance-of-plant design and operation experience of the fossil-power plants. Canada is developing the SCR concept from the well-established pressure-tube reactor technology. The Canadian SCWR maintains modular design approach using relative small fuel channels with the separation of coolant and moderator. It is equipped with an advanced fuel channel design that is capable to transfer decay heat from the fuel to the moderator under the long-term cooling stage. Coupled with the advanced passive-moderator cooling system, cooling of fuel and fuel channel is continuous even without external power or operator intervention. The Canadian SCWR is operating at a pressure of 25 MPa with a core outlet temperature of 625 deg. C. This has led to a drastic increase in thermal efficiency to 48% from 34% of the current fleet of reactors (a 40% rise in relative efficiency). With the high core outlet temperature, a direct thermal cycle has been adopted and has led to simplification in plant design attributing to the cost reduction compared to the current reactor designs. The Canadian SCWR adopts the advanced Thorium fuel cycle to enhance the substantiality, economic, and security. than uranium in the world (estimated to be three times more). This provides the long-term fuel supply. Thorium's price is stable compared to uranium and is consistently lower than uranium. This would maintain the predictability and economic of fuel supply. Thorium itself is a non-fissile material and once irradiated requires special handling. This improves proliferative resistance. The objective of this paper is to highlight these improvements in generating nuclear energy with the Canadian SCWR

  7. White paper on nuclear safety in 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    It deals with a general introduction of nuclear safety like general safety, safety regulation and system law and standard. It indicates of nuclear energy facility safety about general safety, safety regulation of operating nuclear power plant safety regulation under constructing nuclear power plant. It deals with radiation facility safety, monitoring of environmental radiation, radiation protection, radiation control, international cooperating on nuclear energy safety and establishment of safety regulation.

  8. Research on consequence analysis method for probabilistic safety assessment of nuclear fuel facilities (5). Evaluation method and trial evaluation of criticality accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Yuichi; Abe, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Ken; Hayashi, Yoshiaki; Arisawa, Jun; Hayami, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    A special committee of 'Research on the analysis methods for accident consequence of nuclear fuel facilities (NFFs)' was organized by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) under the entrustment of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The committee aims to research on the state-of-the-art consequence analysis method for the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of NFFs, such as fuel reprocessing and fuel fabrication facilities. The objectives of this research are to obtain information useful for establishing quantitative performance objectives and to demonstrate risk-informed regulation through qualifying issues needed to be resolved for applying PSA to NFFs. The research activities of the committee were mainly focused on the consequence analysis method for postulated accidents with potentially large consequences in NFFs, e.g., events of criticality, spill of molten glass, hydrogen explosion, boiling of radioactive solution and fire (including the rapid decomposition of TBP complexes), resulting in the release of radioactive materials to the environment. The results of the research were summarized in a series of six reports, which consist of a review report and five technical ones. In this report, the evaluation methods of criticality accident, such as simplified methods, one-point reactor kinetics codes and quasi-static method, were investigated and their features were summarized to provide information useful for the safety evaluation of NFFs. In addition, several trial evaluations were performed for a hypothetical scenario of criticality accident using the investigated methods, and their results were compared. The release fraction of volatile fission products in a criticality accident was also investigated. (author)

  9. The relevance of axial burn-up profiles for the criticality safety analysis of spent nuclear fuel in a final repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilger, R.; Gmal, B.; Moser, E.F.

    2008-01-01

    Due to inhomogeneous neutron flux and moderator density distributions in the reactor core, the burn-up of a nuclear fuel assembly is not homogeneous but shows an axial distribution, typically with lower partial burn-up and thus higher remaining reactivity at the fuel ends in particular at the assembly top end. Beyond a burn-up of about 15 to 20 GWd/tHM, the multiplication factor K of the whole assembly is dominated by this lower-burnt end regions, and is usually higher than for assuming a homogeneous uniform distribution of the averaged burn-up. This behaviour commonly referred to as positive ''end effect'' is well known in burn-up credit considerations for transportation and storage casks and is being investigated also in the context of criticality analyses for final disposition of spent nuclear fuel. Sign and value of the end effect depend on several parameters. Based on a generic model one may not conclude that criticality in a final repository is a likely or expected event, but nevertheless it draws the attention to the fact that criticality is not excluded per se but has to be considered in the analysis and probably has to be encountered by certain appropriate measures, maybe e.g. by limitation of the amount of fissile material inside one single cask, or a rigorous prove for prevention of water ingress. The authors also conclude that the higher partial reactivity of the fuel ends has to be accounted for carefully in more realistic analyses of post-closure scenarios with respect to criticality safety.

  10. Status, plans, and capabilities of the Nuclear Criticality Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B.L.

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS), in preparation since 1981, has substantially evolved and now contains a growing number of resources pertinent to nuclear criticality safety. These resources include bibliographic compilations, experimental data, communications media, and the International Directory of Nuclear Criticality Safety Personnel. These resources are part of the LLNL Technology Information System (TIS) which provides the host computer for NCIS. The TIS provides nationwide access to authorized members of the nuclear criticality community via interactive dial-up from computer terminals that utilize communication facilities such as commercial and federal telephone networks, toll-free WATS lines, TYMNET, and the ARPANET/MILNET computer network

  11. Prospects for nuclear safety research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1995-04-01

    This document is the text of a paper presented by Eric S. Beckjord (Director, Nuclear Regulatory Research/NRC) at the 22nd Water Reactor Safety Meeting in Bethesda, MD in October 1994. The following topics are briefly reviewed: (1) Reactor vessel research, (2) Probabilistic risk assessment, (3) Direct containment heating, (4) Advanced LWR research, (5) Nuclear energy prospects in the US, and (6) Future nuclear safety research. Subtopics within the last category include economics, waste disposal, and health and safety.

  12. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Aage, H.K.; Kampmann, D.; Nystrup, P.E.; Thomsen, J.

    2012-07-01

    The report is the ninth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe DTU and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2011 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events, international relations and conflicts, and the Fukushima accident. (LN)

  13. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Nonboel, E.; Israelson, C.; Kampmann, D.; Nystrup, P.E.; Thomsen, J.

    2013-11-01

    The report is the tenth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is prepared in collaboration between DTU Nutech and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2012 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events, international relations and conflicts, and the results of the EU stress test. (LN)

  14. File: nuclear safety and transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, J.P.; Etchegoyen, A.; Jeandron, C.

    2001-01-01

    Several experiences of nuclear safety and transparency are related in this file. Public information, access to documents, transparency in nuclear regulation are such subjects developed in this debate. (N.C.)

  15. Nuclear-criticality safety analysis of the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant birdcage-type containers for intraplant storage and transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachowiak, R.V.

    1983-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant birdcage-type containers include a family of cubic (20-, 24-, and 30-inch) open-framed containers used for the in-house storage and transfer of unirradiated enriched uranium metal. This paper provides insight into the nuclear criticality safety analysis for birdcage usage. All credible contingencies (abnormal events) were analyzed and proven safe (subcritical) in accordance with the requirements and procedures of nuclear criticality safety standards. Examples of the contingencies considered in the analysis include, but are not limited to, full water reflection of any single uranium mass loading, double batching of a loading, water moderation, and misuse of the birdcage. These and other applicable contingencies determine the maximum uranium mass for the 20- and 24-inch birdcages, which is 20 and 28 kilograms, respectively. The maximum number of birdcages stored at one location and the storage array configuration are also determined by the credible contingencies. Stacking restrictions for birdcage storage are three high for the 20-inch birdcage and two high for the 24-inch birdcage. A maximum size for square-based arrays is ten feet by ten feet. Any number of these arrays may be used provided a twelve-foot separation is maintained between each array. Such a storage arrangement results in a floor utilization of 0.42 birdcages per square foot. Better floor utilization, i.e., more birdcages per square foot, is possible with other array configurations that are not square-based. Physical as well as administrative controls, procedures, training, and audits are used to ensure these basic criteria are observed. 1 table

  16. Traceability of Software Safety Requirements in Legacy Safety Critical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Janice L.

    2007-01-01

    How can traceability of software safety requirements be created for legacy safety critical systems? Requirements in safety standards are imposed most times during contract negotiations. On the other hand, there are instances where safety standards are levied on legacy safety critical systems, some of which may be considered for reuse for new applications. Safety standards often specify that software development documentation include process-oriented and technical safety requirements, and also require that system and software safety analyses are performed supporting technical safety requirements implementation. So what can be done if the requisite documents for establishing and maintaining safety requirements traceability are not available?

  17. Use of a Web Site to Enhance Criticality Safety Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, S T; Morman, J

    2003-01-01

    Currently, a website dedicated to enhancing communication and dissemination of criticality safety information is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). This website was developed as part of the DOE response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 97-2, which reflected the need to make criticality safety information available to a wide audience. The website is the focal point for DOE nuclear criticality safety (NCS) activities, resources and references, including hyperlinks to other sites actively involved in the collection and dissemination of criticality safety information. The website is maintained by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under auspices of the NCSP management. One area of the website contains a series of Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineer Training (NCSET) modules. During the past few years, many users worldwide have accessed the NCSET section of the NCSP website and have downloaded the training modules as an aid for their training programs. This trend was remarkable in that it points out a continuing need of the criticality safety community across the globe. It has long been recognized that training of criticality safety professionals is a continuing process involving both knowledge-based training and experience-based operations floor training. As more of the experienced criticality safety professionals reach retirement age, the opportunities for mentoring programs are reduced. It is essential that some method be provided to assist the training of young criticality safety professionals to replenish this limited human expert resource to support on-going and future nuclear operations. The main objective of this paper is to present the features of the NCSP website, including its mission, contents, and most importantly its use for the dissemination of training modules to the criticality safety community. We will discuss lessons learned and several ideas

  18. Licensing of safety critical software for nuclear reactors - Common position of seven European nuclear regulators and authorised technical support organisations - Revision 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This report is the 5th revision of the report. The task force was formed in 1994 as a group of experts on safety critical software. The members come from regulatory authorities and/or their technical support organization. Bo Liwaang, SSM, has been a member since the work started in 1994. For full information of the historical background, previous revisions of the report and objectives, see the Introduction of the report. The conclusions and viewpoints presented in the report are those of the authors and do not necessarily coincide with those of the SSM. The report, without the SSM cover and this page, will be published by or available at the websites of the other participating organizations. Effect on SSM supervisory and regulatory task: The effect of the report is high as it presents a common view on important issues by experts from seven European regulatory organizations, even though the report is not a regulation or guide

  19. Nuclear safety organisation in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    This report outlines the public authorities responsible for the safety of nuclear installations in France. The composition and responsibilities of the Central Safety Service of Nuclear Installations within the Ministry of Industry, the Institute of Nuclear Protection and Safety within the CEA, the Central Service of Protection Against Ionising Radiation and the Interministerial Committee of Nuclear Safety are given. Other areas covered include the technical safety examination of large nuclear installations, the occurrence of accidents, treatment and control of release of radioactive wastes and decommissioning. The section on regulations covers the authorisation procedure, plant commissioning, release of radioactive effluents, surveillance and protection of workers exposed to ionising radiation. The situation is compared with the USA and the Federal Republic of Germany. A list of commercial nuclear installations in France is given

  20. Nuclear power: safety and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniere, D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the Fukushima accident new countries are willing to use nuclear power and as a nuclear accident somewhere is a nuclear accident everywhere, all countries are concerned with nuclear safety. A big association that would gather all the national Safety Authorities would be an efficient tool to promote and improve safety at the world scale and may be the unique available tool as no country would let a foreign authority to drive its own nuclear industry. An important lesson from Fukushima and Chernobyl accidents is that the signature of a big nuclear accident is not the number of casualties (it will always be limited) but the importance of the radioactive contamination. The question is how to make this long-term and long-range contamination impossible to happen, it is the mission of nuclear safety. (A.C.)

  1. Improving versus maintaining nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The concept of improving nuclear safety versus maintaining it has been discussed at a number of nuclear regulators meetings in recent years. National reports have indicated that there are philosophical differences between NEA member countries about whether their regulatory approaches require licensees to continuously improve nuclear safety or to continuously maintain it. It has been concluded that, while the actual level of safety achieved in all member countries is probably much the same, this is difficult to prove in a quantitative way. In practice, all regulatory approaches require improvements to be made to correct deficiencies and when otherwise warranted. Based on contributions from members of the NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA), this publication provides an overview of current nuclear regulatory philosophies and approaches, as well as insights into a selection of public perception issues. This publication's intended audience is primarily nuclear safety regulators, but government authorities, nuclear power plant operators and the general public may also be interested. (author)

  2. Design verification enhancement of field programmable gate array-based safety-critical I&C system of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Ibrahim [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1732 Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 17104 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jaecheon, E-mail: jcjung@kings.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Power Plant Engineering, KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, 658-91 Haemaji-ro, Seosang-myeon, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 45014 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Gyunyoung [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1732 Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 17104 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • An enhanced, systematic and integrated design verification approach is proposed for V&V of FPGA-based I&C system of NPP. • RPS bistable fixed setpoint trip algorithm is designed, analyzed, verified and discussed using the proposed approaches. • The application of integrated verification approach simultaneously verified the entire design modules. • The applicability of the proposed V&V facilitated the design verification processes. - Abstract: Safety-critical instrumentation and control (I&C) system in nuclear power plant (NPP) implemented on programmable logic controllers (PLCs) plays a vital role in safe operation of the plant. The challenges such as fast obsolescence, the vulnerability to cyber-attack, and other related issues of software systems have currently led to the consideration of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) as an alternative to PLCs because of their advantages and hardware related benefits. However, safety analysis for FPGA-based I&C systems, and verification and validation (V&V) assessments still remain important issues to be resolved, which are now become a global research point of interests. In this work, we proposed a systematic design and verification strategies from start to ready-to-use in form of model-based approaches for FPGA-based reactor protection system (RPS) that can lead to the enhancement of the design verification and validation processes. The proposed methodology stages are requirement analysis, enhanced functional flow block diagram (EFFBD) models, finite state machine with data path (FSMD) models, hardware description language (HDL) code development, and design verifications. The design verification stage includes unit test – Very high speed integrated circuit Hardware Description Language (VHDL) test and modified condition decision coverage (MC/DC) test, module test – MATLAB/Simulink Co-simulation test, and integration test – FPGA hardware test beds. To prove the adequacy of the proposed

  3. Design verification enhancement of field programmable gate array-based safety-critical I&C system of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Ibrahim; Jung, Jaecheon; Heo, Gyunyoung

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An enhanced, systematic and integrated design verification approach is proposed for V&V of FPGA-based I&C system of NPP. • RPS bistable fixed setpoint trip algorithm is designed, analyzed, verified and discussed using the proposed approaches. • The application of integrated verification approach simultaneously verified the entire design modules. • The applicability of the proposed V&V facilitated the design verification processes. - Abstract: Safety-critical instrumentation and control (I&C) system in nuclear power plant (NPP) implemented on programmable logic controllers (PLCs) plays a vital role in safe operation of the plant. The challenges such as fast obsolescence, the vulnerability to cyber-attack, and other related issues of software systems have currently led to the consideration of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) as an alternative to PLCs because of their advantages and hardware related benefits. However, safety analysis for FPGA-based I&C systems, and verification and validation (V&V) assessments still remain important issues to be resolved, which are now become a global research point of interests. In this work, we proposed a systematic design and verification strategies from start to ready-to-use in form of model-based approaches for FPGA-based reactor protection system (RPS) that can lead to the enhancement of the design verification and validation processes. The proposed methodology stages are requirement analysis, enhanced functional flow block diagram (EFFBD) models, finite state machine with data path (FSMD) models, hardware description language (HDL) code development, and design verifications. The design verification stage includes unit test – Very high speed integrated circuit Hardware Description Language (VHDL) test and modified condition decision coverage (MC/DC) test, module test – MATLAB/Simulink Co-simulation test, and integration test – FPGA hardware test beds. To prove the adequacy of the proposed

  4. International Aspects of Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lash, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    Even though not all the world's nations have developed a nuclear power industry, nuclear safety is unquestionably an international issue. Perhaps the most compelling proof is the 1986 accident at Chornobyl nuclear power plant in what is now Ukraine. The U.S. Department of Energy conducts a comprehensive, cooperative effort to reduce risks at Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. In the host countries : Armenia, Ukraine, Russia, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania, Slovakia, and Kazakhstan joint projects are correcting major safety deficiencies and establishing nuclear safety infrastructures that will be self-sustaining.The U.S. effort has six primary goals: 1. Operational Safety - Implement the basic elements of operational safety consistent with internationally accepted practices. 2. Training - Improve operator training to internationally accepted standards. 3. Safety Maintenance - Help establish technically effective maintenance programs that can ensure the reliability of safety-related equipment. 4. Safety Systems - Implement safety system improvements consistent with remaining plant lifetimes. 5. Safety Evaluations - Transfer the capability to conduct in-depth plant safety evaluations using internationally accepted methods. 6. Legal and Regulatory Capabilities - Facilitate host-country implementation of necessary laws and regulatory policies consistent with their international treaty obligations governing the safe use of nuclear power

  5. Review of studies on criticality safety evaluation and criticality experiment methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamane, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 1960s, many studies on criticality safety evaluation have been conducted in Japan. Computer code systems were developed initially by employing finite difference methods, and more recently by using Monte Carlo methods. Criticality experiments have also been carried out in many laboratories in Japan as well as overseas. By effectively using these study results, the Japanese Criticality Safety Handbook was published in 1988, almost the intermediate point of the last 50 years. An increased interest has been shown in criticality safety studies, and a Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety (WPNCS) was set up by the Nuclear Science Committee of Organisation Economic Co-operation and Development in 1997. WPNCS has several task forces in charge of each of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Program (ICSBEP), Subcritical Measurement, Experimental Needs, Burn-up Credit Studies and Minimum Critical Values. Criticality safety studies in Japan have been carried out in cooperation with WPNCS. This paper describes criticality safety study activities in Japan along with the contents of the Japanese Criticality Safety Handbook and the tasks of WPNCS. (author)

  6. Criticality safety evaluation in Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Nobutoshi; Nakajima, Masayoshi; Takaya, Akikazu; Ohnuma, Hideyuki; Shirouzu, Hidetomo; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Yoshikawa, Koji; Suto, Toshiyuki

    2000-04-01

    Criticality limits for equipments in Tokai Reprocessing Plant which handle fissile material solution and are under shape and dimension control were reevaluated based on the guideline No.10 'Criticality safety of single unit' in the regulatory guide for reprocessing plant safety. This report presents criticality safety evaluation of each equipment as single unit. Criticality safety of multiple units in a cell or a room was also evaluated. The evaluated equipments were ones in dissolution, separation, purification, denitration, Pu product storage, and Pu conversion processes. As a result, it was reconfirmed that the equipments were safe enough from a view point of criticality safety of single unit and multiple units. (author)

  7. Use of a web site to enhance criticality safety training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Song T.; Morman, James A.

    2003-01-01

    Establishment of the NCSP (Nuclear Criticality Safety Program) website represents one attempt by the NCS (Nuclear Criticality Safety) community to meet the need to enhance communication and disseminate NCS information to a wider audience. With the aging work force in this important technical field, there is a common recognition of the need to capture the corporate knowledge of these people and provide an easily accessible, web-based training opportunity to those people just entering the field of criticality safety. A multimedia-based site can provide a wide range of possibilities for criticality safety training. Training modules could range from simple text-based material, similar to the NCSET (Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineer Training) modules, to interactive web-based training classes, to video lecture series. For example, the Los Alamos National Laboratory video series of interviews with pioneers of criticality safety could easily be incorporated into training modules. Obviously, the development of such a program depends largely upon the need and participation of experts who share the same vision and enthusiasm of training the next generation of criticality safety engineers. The NCSP website is just one example of the potential benefits that web-based training can offer. You are encouraged to browse the NCSP website at http://ncsp.llnl.gov. We solicit your ideas in the training of future NCS engineers and welcome your participation with us in developing future multimedia training modules. (author)

  8. Nuclear safety review for 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    This publication is based on the fourth Nuclear Safety Review prepared by the IAEA Secretariat for presentation to the Board of Governors. It discusses relevant international activities in 1984 and the current status of nuclear safety and radiation protection, and looks ahead to anticipated developments

  9. Nuclear safety legislation and supervision in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shiguan

    1991-02-01

    The cause for the urgent need of nuclear safety legislation and supervision in China is firstly described, and then a brief introduction to the basic principle and guideline of nuclear safety is presented. Finally the elaboration on the establishment of nuclear safety regulatory system, the enactment of a series of regulations and safety guides, and the implementation of licencing, nuclear safety supervision and research for ensuring the safety of nuclear energy, since the founding of the National Nuclear Safety Administration, are introduced

  10. Japan reforms its nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident deeply questioned the bases of nuclear safety and nuclear safety regulation in Japan. It also resulted in a considerable loss of public confidence in the safety of nuclear power across the world. Although the accident was caused by natural phenomena, institutional and human factors also largely contributed to its devastating consequences, as shown by the Japanese Diet's and Government's investigation reports. 'Both regulators and licensees were held responsible and decided to fully reconsider the existing approaches to nuclear safety. Consequently, the regulatory system underwent extensive reform based on the lessons learned from the accident,' Yoshihiro Nakagome, the President of Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organisation, an ETSON member TSO, explains. (orig.)

  11. The Key-Role of shielding analysis in advanced Candu Fuel bundles nuclear safety improvement for some accidental criticality scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margeanu, C.A.; Rizoiu, A.; Olteanu, G.

    2008-01-01

    The paper aims to present the source term and photon dose rates estimation for advanced Candu fuel bundles in some accidental criticality scenarios. As reference, the Candu standard fuel bundle has been used. The scenarios take into account for a very short-time irradiated or spent fuel bundles for some configurations closed to criticality. In order to estimate irradiated fuel characteristic parameters and radiation doses, the ORNL's SCALE 5 codes Origin-S and Monte Carlo MORSE-SGC have been used. The paper includes the irradiated fuel characteristic parameters comparison for the considered Candu fuel bundles, providing also a comparison between the corresponding radiation doses

  12. Criticality safety validation of MCNP5 using continuous energy libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salome, Jean A.D.; Pereira, Claubia; Assuncao, Jonathan B.A.; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Costa, Antonella L.; Silva, Clarysson A.M. da

    2013-01-01

    The study of subcritical systems is very important in the design, installation and operation of various devices, mainly nuclear reactors and power plants. The information generated by these systems guide the decisions to be taken in the executive project, the economic viability and the safety measures to be employed in a nuclear facility. Simulating some experiments from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments, the code MCNP5 was validated to nuclear criticality analysis. Its continuous libraries were used. The average values and standard deviation (SD) were evaluated. The results obtained with the code are very similar to the values obtained by the benchmark experiments. (author)

  13. Nuclear Safety in Central and Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    Nuclear safety is one of the critical issues with respect to the enlargement of the European Union towards the countries of Central and Eastern Europe. In the context of the enlargement process, the European Commission overall strategy on nuclear safety matters has been to bring the general standard of nuclear safety in the pre-accession countries up to a level that would be comparable to the safety levels in the countries of the European Union. In this context, the primary objective of the project was to develop a common format and general guidance for the evaluation of the current nuclear safety status in countries that operate commercial nuclear power plants. Therefore, one of the project team first undertakings was to develop an approach that would allow for a consistent and comprehensive overview of the nuclear safety status in the CEEC, enabling an equal treatment of the countries to be evaluated. Such an approach, which did not exist, should also ensure identification of the most important safety issues of the individual nuclear power plants. The efforts resulted in the development of the ''Performance Evaluation Guide'', which focuses on important nuclear safety issues such as plant design and operation, the practice of performing safety assessments, and nuclear legislation and regulation, in particular the role of the national regulatory body. Another important aspect of the project was the validation of the Performance Evaluation Guide (PEG) by performing a preliminary evaluation of nuclear safety in the CEEC, namely in Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania, Romania, Slovak Republic, and Slovenia. The nuclear safety evaluation of each country was performed as a desktop exercise, using solely available documents that had been prepared by various Western institutions and the countries themselves. Therefore, the evaluation is only of a preliminary nature. The project did not intend to re-assess nuclear safety, but to focus on a comprehensive summary

  14. Nuclear Safety through International Cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flory, Denis

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident was the worst at a nuclear facility since the Chernobyl accident in 1986. It caused deep public anxiety and damaged confidence in nuclear power. Following this accident, strengthening nuclear safety standards and emergency response has become an imperative at the global level. The IAEA is leading in developing a global approach, and the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety is providing a comprehensive framework and acting as a significant driving force to identify lessons learned and to implement safety improvements. Strengthening nuclear safety is addressed through a number of measures proposed in the Action Plan including 12 main actions focusing on safety assessments in the light of the accident. Significant progress has been made in assessing safety vulnerabilities of nuclear power plants, strengthening the IAEA's peer review services, improvements in emergency preparedness and response capabilities, strengthening and maintaining capacity building, as well as widening the scope and enhancing communication and information sharing with Member States, international organizations and the public. Progress has also been made in reviewing the IAEA's safety standards, which continue to be widely applied by regulators, operators and the nuclear industry in general, with increased attention and focus on accident prevention, in particular severe accidents, and emergency preparedness and response.

  15. Safety Justification and Safety Case for Safety-critical Software in Digital Reactor Protection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kee-Choon; Lee, Jang-Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jee, Eunkyoung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Nuclear safety-critical software is under strict regulatory requirements and these regulatory requirements are essential for ensuring the safety of nuclear power plants. The verification & validation (V and V) and hazard analysis of the safety-critical software are required to follow regulatory requirements through the entire software life cycle. In order to obtain a license from the regulatory body through the development and validation of safety-critical software, it is essential to meet the standards which are required by the regulatory body throughout the software development process. Generally, large amounts of documents, which demonstrate safety justification including standard compliance, V and V, hazard analysis, and vulnerability assessment activities, are submitted to the regulatory body during the licensing process. It is not easy to accurately read and evaluate the whole documentation for the development activities, implementation technology, and validation activities. The safety case methodology has been kwon a promising approach to evaluate the level and depth of the development and validation results. A safety case is a structured argument, supported by a body of evidence that provides a compelling, comprehensible, and valid case that a system is safe for a given application in a given operating environment. It is suggested to evaluate the level and depth of the results of development and validation by applying safety case methodology to achieve software safety demonstration. A lot of documents provided as evidence are connected to claim that corresponds to the topic for safety demonstration. We demonstrated a case study in which more systematic safety demonstration for the target system software is performed via safety case construction than simply listing the documents.

  16. Safety Justification and Safety Case for Safety-critical Software in Digital Reactor Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kee-Choon; Lee, Jang-Soo; Jee, Eunkyoung

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear safety-critical software is under strict regulatory requirements and these regulatory requirements are essential for ensuring the safety of nuclear power plants. The verification & validation (V and V) and hazard analysis of the safety-critical software are required to follow regulatory requirements through the entire software life cycle. In order to obtain a license from the regulatory body through the development and validation of safety-critical software, it is essential to meet the standards which are required by the regulatory body throughout the software development process. Generally, large amounts of documents, which demonstrate safety justification including standard compliance, V and V, hazard analysis, and vulnerability assessment activities, are submitted to the regulatory body during the licensing process. It is not easy to accurately read and evaluate the whole documentation for the development activities, implementation technology, and validation activities. The safety case methodology has been kwon a promising approach to evaluate the level and depth of the development and validation results. A safety case is a structured argument, supported by a body of evidence that provides a compelling, comprehensible, and valid case that a system is safe for a given application in a given operating environment. It is suggested to evaluate the level and depth of the results of development and validation by applying safety case methodology to achieve software safety demonstration. A lot of documents provided as evidence are connected to claim that corresponds to the topic for safety demonstration. We demonstrated a case study in which more systematic safety demonstration for the target system software is performed via safety case construction than simply listing the documents

  17. Nuclear safety guide. TID-7016, Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.T.

    1978-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Guide was first issued in 1956 as classified AEC report LA-2063 and was reprinted the next year, unclassified, as TID-7016. Revision 1, published in 1961, extended the scope and refined the guiding information. The present revision of the Guide differs significantly from its predecessor in that the latter was intentionally conservative in its recommendations. Firmly based on experimental evidence of criticality, the original Guide and the first revision were considered to be of most value to organizations whose activities with fissionable materials were not extensive and, secondarily, that it would serve as a point of departure for members of established nuclear safety teams, experienced in the field. The reader will find a significant change in the character of information presented in this version. Nuclear Criticality Safety has matured in the past twelve years. The advance of calculational capability has permitted validated calculations to extend and substitute for experimental data. The broadened data base has enabled better interpolation, extension, and understanding of available information, especially in areas previously addressed by undefined but adequate factors of safety. The content has been thereby enriched in qualitative guidance. The information inherently contains, and the user can recapture, the quantitative guidance characteristic of the formerGuides by employing appropriate safety factors. In fact, it becomes incumbent on the Criticality Safety Specialist to necessarily impose safety factors consistent with the possible normal and abnormal credible contingencies of an operation as revealed by his evaluation. In its present form the Guide easily becomes a suitable module in any compendium or handbook tailored for internal use by organizations. It is hoped the Guide will continue to serve immediate needs and will encourage continuing and more comprehensive efforts toward organizing nuclear criticality safety information

  18. Nuclear safety guide. TID-7016, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J T [ed.

    1978-05-01

    The Nuclear Safety Guide was first issued in 1956 as classified AEC report LA-2063 and was reprinted the next year, unclassified, as TID-7016. Revision 1, published in 1961, extended the scope and refined the guiding information. The present revision of the Guide differs significantly from its predecessor in that the latter was intentionally conservative in its recommendations. Firmly based on experimental evidence of criticality, the original Guide and the first revision were considered to be of most value to organizations whose activities with fissionable materials were not extensive and, secondarily, that it would serve as a point of departure for members of established nuclear safety teams, experienced in the field. The reader will find a significant change in the character of information presented in this version. Nuclear Criticality Safety has matured in the past twelve years. The advance of calculational capability has permitted validated calculations to extend and substitute for experimental data. The broadened data base has enabled better interpolation, extension, and understanding of available information, especially in areas previously addressed by undefined but adequate factors of safety. The content has been thereby enriched in qualitative guidance. The information inherently contains, and the user can recapture, the quantitative guidance characteristic of the formerGuides by employing appropriate safety factors. In fact, it becomes incumbent on the Criticality Safety Specialist to necessarily impose safety factors consistent with the possible normal and abnormal credible contingencies of an operation as revealed by his evaluation. In its present form the Guide easily becomes a suitable module in any compendium or handbook tailored for internal use by organizations. It is hoped the Guide will continue to serve immediate needs and will encourage continuing and more comprehensive efforts toward organizing nuclear criticality safety information.

  19. Nuclear safety guide TID-7016 Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    The present revision of TID-7016 Nuclear Safety Guide is discussed. This Guide differs significantly from its predecessor in that the latter was intentionally conservative in its recommendations. Firmly based on experimental evidence of criticality, the original Guide and the first revision were considered to be of most value to organizations whose activities with fissionable materials were not extensive and, secondarily, that it would serve as a point of departure for members of established nuclear safety teams, experienced in the field. The reader will find a significant change in the character of information presented in this version. Nuclear Criticality Safety has matured in the past twelve years. The advance of calculational capability has permitted validated calculations to extend and substitute for experimental data. The broadened data base has enabled better interpolation, extension, and understanding of available, information, especially in areas previously addressed by undefined but adequate factors of safety. The content has been thereby enriched in qualitative guidance. The information inherently contains, and the user can recapture, the quantitative guidance characteristic of the former Guides by employing appropriate safety factors. In fact, it becomes incumbent on the Criticality Safety Specialist to necessarily impose safety factors consistent with the possible normal and abnormal credible contingencies of an operation as revealed by his evaluation. In its present form the Guide easily becomes a suitable module in any compendium or handbook tailored for internal use by organizations. It is hoped the Guide will continue to serve immediate needs and will encourage continuing and more comprehensive efforts toward organizing nuclear criticality safety information

  20. Nuclear power: Siting and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Openshaw, S.

    1986-01-01

    By 2030, half, or even two-thirds, of all electricity may be generated by nuclear power. Major reactor accidents are still expected to be rare occurrences, but nuclear safety is largely a matter of faith. Terrorist attacks, sabotage, and human error could cause a significant accident. Reactor siting can offer an additional, design-independent margin of safety. Remote geographical sites for new plants would minimize health risks, protect the industry from negative changes in public opinion concerning nuclear energy, and improve long-term public acceptance of nuclear power. U.K. siting practices usually do not consider the contribution to safety that could be obtained from remote sites. This book discusses the present trends of siting policies of nuclear power and their design-independent margin of safety

  1. The role of nuclear law in nuclear safety after Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardozo, Diva E. Puig

    2013-01-01

    The paper contains the following topics: nuclear law, origin and evolution, role of the legal instruments on nuclear safety, nuclear safety the impact of major nuclear accidents: Chernobyl and Fukushima. The response of the nuclear law post Fukushima. Safety and security. International framework for nuclear safety: nuclear convention joint convention on safety on spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. The Fukushima World Conference on Nuclear Safety. Convention on Prompt Notification and Assistance in case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. Plan of Action for Nuclear Safety. IAEA recommendations for the safety transport of radioactive material. International framework for nuclear security. Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials. International Convention for the Suppression of Acts Against Nuclear Terrorism. Resolution No. 1540 of the Security Council of United Nations (2004). Measures to strengthen international safety. Code of conduct on the safety research reactor

  2. Parametric Criticality Safety Calculations for Arrays of TRU Waste Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gough, Sean T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-26

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Division (NCSD) has performed criticality safety calculations for finite and infinite arrays of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. The results of these analyses may be applied in any technical area onsite (e.g., TA-54, TA-55, etc.), as long as the assumptions herein are met. These calculations are designed to update the existing reference calculations for waste arrays documented in Reference 1, in order to meet current guidance on calculational methodology.

  3. Nuclear safety research in HGF 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2013-01-01

    After the events at the Japanese nuclear power plant of Fukushima Daiichi, the German Federal government decided that Germany will give up electricity generation from nuclear power within a decade. The last reactor will be disconnected from the power grid in 2022. Helping to make this opt-out safe is one of the duties of the Helmholtz Association with its Nuclear Safety Research Program within the Energy Research Area. Also the demolition of nuclear power plants and the repository problem will keep society, and thus also research, busy for a number of decades to come. Giving up electricity production from nuclear power thus must not mean giving up the required nuclear technology competences. In the fields of reactor safety, demolition, final storage, radiation protection, and crisis management, in critical support of international developments, and for competent evaluation of nuclear facilities around Germany, these competences will be in demand far beyond the German opt-out. This is the reason why the final report by the Ethics Committee on 'Safe Energy Supply' emphasizes the importance of nuclear technology research. Close cooperation on national, European and international levels is indispensable in this effort. Also nuclear safety research in the Helmholtz Association is aligned with the challenges posed by the opt-out of the use of nuclear power. It is important that the high competences in the areas of plant safety and demolition, handling of radioactive waste, and safe final storage as well as radiation protection be preserved. The Nuclear Safety Research Program within the Energy Research Area of the Helmholtz Association therefore will continue studying scientific and technical aspects of the safety of nuclear reactors and the safety of nuclear waste management. These research activities are provident research conducted for society and must be preserved for a long period of time. The work is closely harmonized with the activities of the partners in the

  4. Nuclear safety and nuclear insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramovitz, A.

    1983-01-01

    To an extent, public opinion is against Koeberg, inspite of the fact that Escom, Koeberg's prospective licensee, are liable for damages caused in the event of an accident, that they carry public liability insurance bought in the market place to the maximum of ten million rand, and if that is not enough the government will take over responsibility for the rest. A question is put that if this kind of protection carries on, won't there always be a minority of the public who will find nuclear power socially, psychologically and politically unacceptable

  5. National nuclear safety report 2005. Convention on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This National Nuclear Safety Report was presented at the 3rd. Review meeting. In general the information contained in the report are: Highlights / Themes; Follow-up from 2nd. Review meeting; Challenges, achievements and good practices; Planned measures to improve safety; Updates to National report to 3rd. Review meeting; Questions from peer review of National Report; and Conclusions

  6. Safety-critical Java for embedded systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeberl, Martin; Dalsgaard, Andreas Engelbredt; Hansen, René Rydhof

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the motivation for and outcomes of an engineering research project on certifiable Javafor embedded systems. The project supports the upcoming standard for safety-critical Java, which defines asubset of Java and libraries aiming for development of high criticality systems....... The outcome of this projectinclude prototype safety-critical Java implementations, a time-predictable Java processor, analysis tools formemory safety, and example applications to explore the usability of safety-critical Java for this applicationarea. The text summarizes developments and key contributions...

  7. Technical safety Organisations (TSO) contribute to European Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repussard, J.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear safety and radiation protection rely on science to achieve high level prevention objectives, through the analysis of safety files proposed by the licensees. The necessary expertise needs to be exercised so as to ensure adequate independence from nuclear operators, appropriate implementation of state of the art knowledge, and a broad spectrum of analysis, adequately ranking the positive and negative points of the safety files. The absence of a Europe-wide nuclear safety regime is extremely costly for an industry which has to cope with a highly competitive and open international environment, but has to comply with fragmented national regulatory systems. Harmonization is therefore critical, but such a goal is difficult to achieve. Only a gradual policy, made up of planned steps in each of the three key dimensions of the problem (energy policy at EU level, regulatory harmonization, consolidation of Europe-wide technical expertise capability) can be successful to achieve the required integration on the basis of the highest safety levels. TSO's contribute to this consolidation, with the support of the EC, in the fields of research (EURATOM-Programmes), of experience feedback analysis (European Clearinghouse), of training and knowledge management (European Training and Tutoring Institute, EUROSAFE). The TSO's network, ETSON, is becoming a formal organisation, able to enter into formal dialogue with EU institutions. However, nuclear safety nevertheless remains a world wide issue, requiring intensive international cooperation, including on TSO issues. (author)

  8. Life Management and Safety of Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbri, S.; Diluch, A.; Vega, G., E-mail: fabbri@cnea.gov.ar [Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-10-15

    The nuclear programme in Argentina includes: nuclear power and related supplies, medical and industrial applications, waste management, research and development and human training. Nuclear facilities require life management programs that allow a safe operation. Safety is the first priority for designers and operators. This can be attained with defence in depth: regular inspections and maintenance procedures to minimize failure risks. CNEA objectives in this area are to possess the necessary capability to give safe and fast technical support. Within this scheme, one of the main activities undertaken by CNEA is to provide technological assistance to the nuclear plants and research reactors. As a consequence of an increasing concern about safety and ageing a Life Management Department for safe operation was created to take care of these subjects. The goal is to elaborate a Safety Evaluation Process for the critical components of nuclear plants and other facilities. The overall objectives of a safety process are to ensure a continuous safe, reliable and effective operation of nuclear facilities and it means the implementation of the defence in deep concept to enhance safety for the protection of the public, the workers and the environment. (author)

  9. Dukovany nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Presentation covers recommended safety issues for the Dukovany NPP which have been solved with satisfactory conclusions. Safety issues concerned include: radiation safety; nuclear safety; security; emergency preparedness; health protection at work; fire protection; environmental protection; chemical safety; technical safety. Quality assurance programs at all stages on NPP life time is described. Report includes description of NPP staff training provision, training simulator, emergency operating procedures, emergency preparedness, Year 2000 problem, inspections and life time management. Description of Dukovany Plant Safety Analysis Projects including integrity of the equipment, modernisation, equipment innovation and safety upgrading program show that this approach corresponds to the actual practice applied in EU countries, and fulfilment of current IAEA requirements for safety enhancement of the WWER 440/213 units in the course of MORAWA Equipment Upgrading program

  10. Software for safety critical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropik, M.; Matejka, K.; Jurickova, M.; Chudy, R.

    2001-01-01

    The contribution gives an overview of the project of the software development for safety critical applications. This project has been carried out since 1997. The principal goal of the project was to establish a research laboratory for the development of the software with the highest requirements for quality and reliability. This laboratory was established at the department, equipped with proper hardware and software to support software development. A research team of predominantly young researchers for software development was created. The activities of the research team started with studying and proposing the software development methodology. In addition, this methodology was applied to the real software development. The verification and validation process followed the software development. The validation system for the integrated hardware and software tests was brought into being and its control software was developed. The quality of the software tools was also observed, and the SOSAT tool was used during these activities. National and international contacts were established and maintained during the project solution.(author)

  11. Nuclear safety research master plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jae Joo; Yang, J. U.; Jun, Y. S. and others

    2001-06-01

    The SRMP (Safety Research Master Plan) is established to cope with the changes of nuclear industry environments. The tech. tree is developed according to the accident progress of the nuclear reactor. The 11 research fields are derived to cover the necessary technologies to ensure the safety of nuclear reactors. Based on the developed tech. tree, the following four main research fields are derived as the main safety research areas: 1. Integrated nuclear safety enhancement, 2. Thermal hydraulic experiment and assessment, 3. Severe accident management and experiment, and 4. The integrity of equipment and structure. The research frame and strategies are also recommended to enhance the efficiency of research activity, and to extend the applicability of research output.

  12. Nuclear waste management in Canada : critical issues, critical perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durant, D.; Fuji Johnson, G.

    2009-01-01

    As oil reserves decline and the environment takes centre stage in public policy discussions, the merits and dangers of nuclear power and nuclear waste management continue to be debated. Canada is intent on building more reactors to increase energy production without destroying the planet, but it and other nuclear energy-producing countries face not only technical problems but also social and ethical issues. This book provides a critical antidote to the favourable position of government and industry. The contributors build their case by exploring key issues and developments. What do frequently used terms such as safety, risk, and acceptability really mean? How and why did the public consultation process in Canada fail to address ethical and social issues? What is the significance and potential of a public consultation process that involves diverse interests, epistemologies, and actors, including Aboriginal peoples? And how do we ensure that our frameworks for discussion are inclusive and ethical? This timely collection defuses the uncertainty, ambiguity, and ignorance that surrounds nuclear energy. It will appeal to academics, students, and stakeholders in public policy or environmental studies who want to think critically and more broadly about how we approach energy generation and waste management.

  13. Comparative analysis of operation and safety of subcritical nuclear systems and innovative critical reactors; Analyse comparative du fonctionnement et de la surete de systemes sous-critiques et de reacteurs critiques innovants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokov, P.M

    2005-05-01

    The main goal of this thesis work is to investigate the role of core subcriticality for safety enhancement of advanced nuclear systems, in particular, molten salt reactors, devoted to both energy production and waste incineration/transmutation. The inherent safety is considered as ultimate goal of this safety improvement. An attempt to apply a systematic approach for the analysis of the subcriticality contribution to inherent properties of hybrid system was performed. The results of this research prove that in many cases the subcriticality may improve radically the safety characteristics of nuclear reactors, and in some configurations it helps to reach the 'absolute' intrinsic safety. In any case, a proper choice of subcriticality level makes all analyzed transients considerably slower and monotonic. It was shown that the weakest point of the independent-source systems with respect to the intrinsic safety is thermohydraulic unprotected transients, while in the case of the coupled-source systems the excess reactivity/current insertion events remain a matter of concern. To overcome these inherent drawbacks a new principle of realization of a coupled sub-critical system (DENNY concept) is proposed. In addition, the ways to remedy some particular safety-related problems with the help of the core sub-criticality are demonstrated. A preliminary safety analysis of the fast-spectrum molten salt reactor (REBUS concept) is also carried out in this thesis work. Finally, the potential of the alternative (to spallation) neutron sources for application in hybrid systems is examined. (author)

  14. Safety goals for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischhoff, B.

    1984-02-01

    The key policy question in managing hazardous technologies is often some variant of How safe is safe enough. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has recently broached this topic by adopting safety goals defining acceptable risk levels for nuclear power plants. These goals are analyzed here with a general theory of standard setting (Fischhoff, 1983) which asks: (1) Are standards an appropriate policy tool in this case. (2) Can the Commission's safety philosophy be defended. (3) Do the operational goals capture that philosophy. The anlaysis shows the safety goals proposal to be sophisticated in some respects, incomplete in others. More generally, it points to difficulties with the concept of acceptable risk and any attempt to build policy instruments around it. Although focused on the NRC's safety goals, the present analysis is a prototype of what can be learned by similarly detailed consideration of other standards, not only for nuclear power but also for other hazardous technologies, as well as for issues unrelated to safety

  15. National Nuclear Safety Report 2001. Convention on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The First National Nuclear Safety Report was presented at the first review meeting of the Nuclear Safety Convention. At that time it was concluded that Argentina met the obligations of the Convention. This second National Nuclear Safety Report is an updated report which includes all safety aspects of the Argentinian nuclear power plants and the measures taken to enhance the safety of the plants. The present report also takes into account the observations and discussions maintained during the first review meeting. The conclusion made in the first review meeting about the compliance by Argentina of the obligations of the Convention are included as Annex 1. In general, the information contained in this Report has been updated since March 31, 1998 to March 31, 2001. Those aspects that remain unchanged were not addressed in this second report with the objective of avoiding repetitions and in order to carry out a detailed analysis considering article by article. As a result of the above mentioned detailed analysis of all the Articles, it can be stated that the country fulfils all the obligations imposed by the Nuclear Safety Convention

  16. National nuclear safety report 2004. Convention on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The second National Nuclear Safety Report was presented at the second review meeting of the Nuclear Safety Convention. At that time it was concluded that Argentina met the obligations of the Convention. This third National Nuclear Safety Report is an updated report which includes all safety aspects of the Argentinian nuclear power plants and the measures taken to enhance the safety of the plants. The present report also takes into account the observations and discussions maintained during the second review meeting. The conclusion made in the first review meeting about the compliance by Argentina of the obligations of the Convention are included as Annex I and those belonging to the second review meeting are included as Annex II. In general, the information contained in this Report has been updated since March 31, 2001 to April 30, 2004. Those aspects that remain unchanged were not addressed in this third report. As a result of the detailed analysis of all the Articles, it can be stated that the country fulfils all the obligations imposed by the Nuclear Safety Convention. The questions and answers originated at the Second Review Meeting are included as Annex III

  17. National nuclear safety report 1998. Convention on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Argentine Republic subscribed the Convention on Nuclear Safety, approved by a Diplomatic Conference in Vienna, Austria, in June 17th, 1994. According to the provisions in Section 5th of the Convention, each Contracting Party shall submit for its examination a National Nuclear Safety Report about the measures adopted to comply with the corresponding obligations. This Report describes the actions that the Argentine Republic is carrying on since the beginning of its nuclear activities, showing that it complies with the obligations derived from the Convention, in accordance with the provisions of its Article 4. The analysis of the compliance with such obligations is based on the legislation in force, the applicable regulatory standards and procedures, the issued licenses, and other regulatory decisions. The corresponding information is described in the analysis of each of the Convention Articles constituting this Report. The present National Report has been performed in order to comply with Article 5 of the Convention on Nuclear Safety, and has been prepared as much as possible following the Guidelines Regarding National Reports under the Convention on Nuclear Safety, approved in the Preparatory Meeting of the Contracting Parties, held in Vienna in April 1997. This means that the Report has been ordered according to the Articles of the Convention on Nuclear Safety and the contents indicated in the guidelines. The information contained in the articles, which are part of the Report shows the compliance of the Argentine Republic, as a contracting party of such Convention, with the obligations assumed

  18. Progress of nuclear safety research. 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anoda, Yoshinari; Sasajima, Hideo; Nishiyama, Yutaka (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-10-01

    JAERI is conducting nuclear safety research primarily at the Nuclear Safety Research Center in close cooperation with the related departments in accordance with the Long Term Plan for Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy or the Safety Research Annual Plan issued by the Japanese government. The safety research at JAERI concerns the engineering safety of nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and radioactive waste management as well as advanced technology for safety improvement or assessment. Also, JAERI has conducted international collaboration to share the information on common global issues of nuclear safety. This report summarizes the nuclear safety research activities of JAERI from April 1999 through March 2001. (author)

  19. Selecting of key safety parameters in reactor nuclear safety supervision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Fan; Yu Hong

    2014-01-01

    The safety parameters indicate the operational states and safety of research reactor are the basis of nuclear safety supervision institution to carry out effective supervision to nuclear facilities. In this paper, the selecting of key safety parameters presented by the research reactor operating unit to National Nuclear Safety Administration that can express the research reactor operational states and safety when operational occurrence or nuclear accident happens, and the interrelationship between them are discussed. Analysis shows that, the key parameters to nuclear safety supervision of research reactor including design limits, operational limits and conditions, safety system settings, safety limits, acceptable limits and emergency action level etc. (authors)

  20. The internationalization of nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear safety is interlinked in many ways with the themes of this conference. In searching for co-operative activities that touch on global energy and environmental problems and on initiatives that relieve international tensions, the ongoing developments in nuclear power safety offer a number of successful examples. Commercial nuclear power has been with us for more than 30 years, and with 26 countries operating plants in addition to 6 more constructing their first, there has been an ongoing global co-operation, coinciding of Chernobyl with Glasnost, along with the increasing awareness of the benefits of common solutions to safety issues, have brought about an internationalization of nuclear safety. Although the main responsibility for safety rests with each operator and its government, a primary driving force expanding international co-operation is the transboundary aspects of nuclear energy, as vividly demonstrated by Chernobyl accident. In this presentation we focus on the mechanisms already in place that foster cooperation in the nuclear safety area

  1. Lecture Notes on Criticality Safety Validation Using MCNP & Whisper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rising, Michael Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Alwin, Jennifer Louise [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-11

    Training classes for nuclear criticality safety, MCNP documentation. The need for, and problems surrounding, validation of computer codes and data area considered first. Then some background for MCNP & Whisper is given--best practices for Monte Carlo criticality calculations, neutron spectra, S(α,β) thermal neutron scattering data, nuclear data sensitivities, covariance data, and correlation coefficients. Whisper is computational software designed to assist the nuclear criticality safety analyst with validation studies with the Monte Carlo radiation transport package MCNP. Whisper's methodology (benchmark selection – Ck's, weights; extreme value theory – bias, bias uncertainty; MOS for nuclear data uncertainty – GLLS) and usage are discussed.

  2. Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, E.D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    This report is revision 6 of the Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality anomalies that are different than expected. An anomaly is defined as something not in keeping with expected notions of fitness and order, a departure from the regular arrangement or general rule. In reviewing the literature and experimental data on nuclear criticality and the conditions under which a fission chain reaction can be achieved, a number of anomalies have come to light. The actinide group is composed of the fourteen elements beginning with thorium, Atomic No. 90, and ending with lawrencium, Atomic No. 103. There are about 220 known actinide isotopes, most of which are believed capable of supporting neutron chain reactions. Although every element in the actinide group has at least one isotope believed capable of supporting a chain reaction, from a practical point of view regarding the time for chemical processing, only those nuclides with half-lives more than several weeks are of obvious concern in criticality safety. Forty-six of the nuclides are known to have half-lives greater than six weeks. The selection of six weeks is somewhat arbitrary. There may well be shorter-lived nuclides of concern in criticality safety. These 46 nuclides are identified in Figure 44. Of the 46 nuclides, 4 are known and 37 are believed to be capable of supporting chain reactions, and 5 are known or believed to not support a chain reaction. Figure 44 was constructed in the format used for the Chart of the Nuclides.(1) Figure 44 also shows the distinction between fissile and fissible nuclides. The actinides derive their name from actinium (Atomic No. 89) because they tend to maintain an actinium-like electron structure as the fourteen inner electrons are added to the 5f electron shell. Actually, electrons do

  3. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J.B.

    2003-01-01

    The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) was initiated in 1992 by the United States Department of Energy. The ICSBEP became an official activity of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) - Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in 1995. Representatives from the United States, United Kingdom, France, Japan, the Russian Federation, Hungary, Republic of Korea, Slovenia, Yugoslavia, Kazakhstan, Israel, Spain, and Brazil are now participating. The purpose of the ICSBEP is to identify, evaluate, verify, and formally document a comprehensive and internationally peer-reviewed set of criticality safety benchmark data. The work of the ICSBEP is published as an OECD handbook entitled 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments.' The 2003 Edition of the Handbook contains benchmark model specifications for 3070 critical or subcritical configurations that are intended for validating computer codes that calculate effective neutron multiplication and for testing basic nuclear data. (author)

  4. Nuclear power reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pon, G.A.

    1976-10-01

    This report is based on the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited submission to the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning on the safety of CANDU reactors. It discusses normal operating conditions, postulated accident conditions, and safety systems. The release of radioactivity under normal and accident conditions is compared to the limits set by the Atomic Energy Control Regulations. (author)

  5. International nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, P.H.W.

    1978-01-01

    The background to the development of internationally agreed safety principles and practices is discussed. The activities of the IAEA and the scope, structure, and organisation of its programme of Reactor Safety Codes and Guides are described. Attention is drawn to certain areas needing further considerations. (UK)

  6. Criticality safety studies for the storage of waste from nuclear fuel service in Intercell Storage Wells 2 and 3 of Building 3019

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primm, R.T. III; Hopper, C.M.; Smolen, G.R.

    1992-11-01

    This report provides computational evaluation results demonstrating that mixed oxide waste can be safely stored in Intercell Storage Wells 2 and 3 of Building 3019 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Existing, verified computational techniques are validated with applicable critical experiments and tolerance limits for safety analyses are derived. Multiplication factors for normal and credible abnormal configurations are calculated and found to be far subcritical when compared to derived safety limits

  7. Nuclear safety - Culture or obsession?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira Villar, Heldio

    2002-01-01

    Although nuclear activities are among the safest, having an enviable record in this respect, public perception is quite different. It is argued here that, regardless of the fact that environmental groups and the media in general look unfavourably towards the nuclear sector, the emphasis the sector places on safety matters is a liability rather than a asset. In short, public acceptance of a risky enterprise increases with the safety concerns shown by an entrepreneur up to a certain point. Beyond this threshold the enterprise is found too risky to be accepted, and it looks like the nuclear establishment has already crossed it. Ideas for further relationship with the public are then shown. (author)

  8. Nuclear safety research in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.

    1976-01-01

    As a consequence of the decision of choosing light water reactors (PWR) for the French nuclear plants of the next ten years, a large safety program has been launched referring to three physical barriers against fission product release: the fuel element cladding, main primary system boundary and the containment. The parallel development of French-designed fast breeder reactors involved safety studies on: sodium boiling, accidental fuel behavior, molten fuel-sodium interaction, core accident and protection, and external containment. The rapid development of nuclear energy resulted in a corresponding development of safety studies relating to nuclear fuel facilities. French regulations also required a special program to be developed for the realistic evaluation of the consequences of external agressions, the French cooperation to multinational safety research being also intensive

  9. The safety of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This Safety Fundamental publication sets out basic objectives, concepts and principles for ensuring safety that can be used both by the IAEA in its international assistance operations and by Member States in their national nuclear programmes. These Safety Fundamentals apply primarily to those nuclear installations in which the stored energy developed in certain situations could potentially results in the release of radioactive material from its designated location with the consequent risk of radiation exposure of people. These principles are applicable to a broad range of nuclear installations, but their detailed application will depend on the particular technology and the risks posed by it. In addition to nuclear power plants, such installations may include: research reactors and facilities, fuel enrichment, manufacturing and reprocessing plants; and certain facilities for radioactive waste treatment and storage

  10. Nuclear safety management at the Wolsong NGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bong-Seob, Han [Korea Electric Power Corp., Wolson NPP no. 1 and 2 (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Nuclear safety management at the Wolsong nuclear power plant is described, including the following issues: site selection; plant history; operational goals; operational guidelines; reactor safety; safety training; plant maintenance; management of plant equipment lifetime; future tasks.

  11. Nuclear safety management at the Wolsong NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Bong-Seob

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear safety management at the Wolsong nuclear power plant is described, including the following issues: site selection; plant history; operational goals; operational guidelines; reactor safety; safety training; plant maintenance; management of plant equipment lifetime; future tasks

  12. Safety of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacPherson, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    Safety is the major public issue to be resolved or accommodated if nuclear power is to have a future. Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) of accidental releases of low-level radiation, the spread and activity of radiation in populated areas, and the impacts on public health from exposure evolved from the earlier Rasmussen Reactor Safety Study. Applications of the PRA technique have identified design peculiarities in specific reactors, thus increasing reactor safety and establishing a quide for evaluating reactor regulations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission and reactor vendors must share with utilities the responsibility for reactor safety in the US and for providing reasonable assurance to the public. This entails persuasive public education and information that with safety a top priority, changes now being made in light water reactor hardware and operations will be adequate. 17 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  13. Nuclear safety risk control in the outage of CANDU unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Mingliang; Zheng Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear fuel remains in the core during the outage of CANDU unit, but there are still nuclear safety risks such as reactor accidental criticality, fuel element failure due to inability to properly remove residual heat. Furthermore, these risks are aggravated by the weakening plant system configuration and multiple cross operations during the outage. This paper analyzes the phases where there are potential nuclear safety risks on the basis of the typical critical path arrangement of the outage of Qinshan NPP 3 and introduces a series of CANDU-specific risk control measures taken during the past plant outages to ensure nuclear safety during the unit outage. (authors)

  14. Nuclear health and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    This report summarizes the responsiveness of DOE and contractors to findings contained in DOE technical safety appraisals and environmental surveys. These appraisals and surveys have been done at DOE facilities and sites to find out the extent of the environmental, safety, and health problems and to prioritize them for corrective action. As of January 1990, DOE computer data showed over 1,700 safety and health problems and almost 1,300 environmental problems. The majority of these problems, however, have not yet been corrected. GAO also looked at the extent to which DOE has developed a computerized tracking system to monitor the status of its environmental, safety, and health problems. GAO found that the computer system lacks important information, such as various field office and independent appraisals. Inclusion of this information would provide a more complete picture of the problems at the site

  15. Safety of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    The safety philosophy of a PWR type reactor distinguishing three levels of safety, is presented. At the first level, the concept of reactivity defining coefficients which measure the reactivity variation is introduced. At the second level, the reactor protection system establishing the design criteria to assure the high reliability, is defined. At the third level, the protection barriers to contain the consequences of accident evolution, are defined. (M.C.K.) [pt

  16. Nuclear plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The four-member New York Power Pool Panel concluded that, for a number of reasons, no nuclear power plant in New York State is prone to the type of accident that occurred at Three Mile Island (TMI). The Panel further concluded that changes in operating practices, both regulatory and voluntary, and heightened sensitivity to reactor-core-cooling requirements will substantially reduce the chances for another such accident anywhere. Panel members found that New York State utilities have taken a responsible attitude with regard to requirements set forth by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as a result of the TMI accident. In a cover letter that accompanied the report to Federal and New York state officials, New York Power Pool Executive Committee Chairman Francis E. Drake, Jr. expressed hope that the report will alleviate public fears of nuclear reactors and promote wider acceptance of nuclear energy as an economic and safe means of power production. 17 references

  17. Technical bases for criticality safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    An American National Standard implies a consensus of those substantially concerned with its scope and provisions. The technical basis, or foundation, on which the consensus rests, must in turn, be firmly established and documented for public review. The technical bases are discussed and reviewed of several standards in different stages of completion and acceptance: ANSI/ANS-8.12, 1978, Nuclear Criticality Control and Safety of Homogeneous Plutonium - Uranium Mixtures Outside Reactors (Approved July 17, 1978); ANS-815, Nuclear Criticality Control of Special Actinide Elements (Draft No. 5 of newly proposed standard); ANS-8.14, Use of Solutions of Neutron Absorbers for Criticality Control (Draft No. 4 of newly proposed standard); ANS-8.5 (Revision of N16.4, 1971), Use of Borosilicate-Glass Raschig Rings as a Neutron Absorber in Solutions of Fissile Material (Draft No. 5 as a result of prescribed five-year review and update of old standard). In each of the preceding, the newly proposed (or revised) limits are based on the extension of experimental data via well established calculations, or by means of independent calculations with adequate margins for uncertainties. The four cases serve to illustrate the insight of the work group members in the establishment of the technical bases for the limits and the level of activity required on their part in the preparation of ANSI Standards. A time span of from four up to seven years has not been uncommon for the preparation, review, and acceptance of an ANSI Standard. 8 figures. 7 tables

  18. On the road to new nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, Zoltan; Novakova, Helena; Spenlinger, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The article describes the issue of nuclear safety of nuclear power plants and major factors affecting nuclear safety, discusses the consequences of the Fukushima-Daiichi accident, and outlines the advanced concept of nuclear safety which extends the current regulatory requirements for plant safety. This new concept should be adopted globally to prevent occurrences having similar consequences worldwide. The tasks of this new nuclear safety concept are discussed. (orig.)

  19. ICSBEP-2007, International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair Briggs, J.

    2007-01-01

    1 - Description: The Critically Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (CSBEP) was initiated in October of 1992 by the United Sates Department of Energy. The project quickly became an international effort as scientist from other interested countries became involved. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) is now an official activity of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development - Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). This handbook contains criticality safety benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments that were performed at various nuclear critical facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by criticality safety engineers to validate calculational techniques used to establish minimum subcritical margins for operations with fissile material. The example calculations presented do not constitute a validation of the codes or cross section data. The work of the ICSBEP is documented as an International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. Currently, the handbook spans over 42,000 pages and contains 464 evaluations representing 4,092 critical, near-critical, or subcritical configurations and 21 criticality alarm placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each and 46 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications. The handbook is intended for use by criticality safety analysts to perform necessary validations of their calculational techniques and is expected to be a valuable tool for decades to come. The ICSBEP Handbook is available on DVD. You may request a DVD by completing the DVD Request Form on the internet. Access to the Handbook on the Internet requires a password. You may request a password by completing the Password Request Form. The Web address is: http://icsbep.inel.gov/handbook.shtml 2 - Method of solution: Experiments that are found

  20. Nuclear safety and public debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.

    1997-01-01

    In this article are evoked the question of nuclear safety and the public opinion, from the beginning of nuclear power plants in 1954 where a peaceful use of nuclear energy is developed in minds. If the aim was to avoid any important accident, the Three Miles Island accident and more recently the Chernobyl accident provoked a shock in public opinion and marked a peak of nuclear controversy. From this point, the policy of transparence and a best information of the public taken as a partner are necessary to maintain the dialogue. (N.C.)

  1. Enhancement of nuclear safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Stanley J.

    1996-01-01

    Throughout the 40-year history of the commercial nuclear power industry, improvements have continually been made in the design of nuclear power plants and the equipment in them. In one sense, we have reached an enviable point -- in most plants, equipment failures have become relatively rare. Yet events continue to occur. Regardless of how much the plants are improved, that equipment is operated by people -- highly motivated, well-trained people -- but people nonetheless. And people occasionally make mistakes. By setting the right climate and by setting high standards, good plant management can reduce the number of mistakes made ? and also reduce their potential consequences. Another way to say this is that the proper safety culture must be established and continually improved upon in our nuclear plants. Safety culture is defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency as 'that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance.' In short, we must make safety our top priority

  2. Criticality safety enhancements for SCALE 6.2 and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rearden, Bradley T.; Bekar, Kursat B.; Celik, Cihangir; Clarno, Kevin T.; Dunn, Michael E.; Hart, Shane W.; Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Langley, Brandon R.; Lefebvre, Jordan P.; Lefebvre, Robert A.; Marshall, William J.; Mertyurek, Ugur; Mueller, Don; Peplow, Douglas E.; Perfetti, Christopher M.; Petrie Jr, Lester M.; Thompson, Adam B.; Wiarda, Dorothea; Wieselquist, William A.; Williams, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    SCALE is a widely used suite of tools for nuclear systems modeling and simulation that provides comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly capabilities for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. Since 1980, regulators, industry, and research institutions around the world have relied on SCALE for nuclear safety analysis and design. SCALE 6.2 provides several new capabilities and significant improvements in many existing features for criticality safety analysis. Enhancements are realized for nuclear data; multigroup resonance self-shielding; continuous-energy Monte Carlo analysis for sensitivity/uncertainty analysis, radiation shielding, and depletion; and graphical user interfaces. An overview of these capabilities is provided in this paper, and additional details are provided in several companion papers.

  3. Nuclear power systems: Their safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, L.C.

    1993-01-01

    Mankind utilizes energy in many forms and from a variety of sources. Canada is one of a growing number of countries which have chosen to embrace nuclear-electric generation as a component of their energy systems. As of August 1992 there were 433 power reactors operating in 35 countries and accounting for more than 15% of the world's production of electricity. In 1992, thirteen countries derived at least 25% of their electricity from nuclear units, with France leading at nearly 70%. In the same year, Canada produced about 16% of its electricity from nuclear units. Some 68 power reactors are under construction in 16 countries, enough to expand present generating capacity by close to 20%. No human endeavour carries the guarantee of perfect safety and the question of whether or not nuclear-electric generation represents an 'acceptable' risk to society has long been vigorously debated. Until the events of late April 1986, nuclear safety had indeed been an issue for discussion, for some concern, but not for alarm. The accident at the Chernobyl reactor in the USSR has irrevocably changed all that. This disaster brought the matter of nuclear safety back into the public mind in a dramatic fashion. This paper discusses the issue of safety in complex energy systems and provides brief accounts of some of the most serious reactor accidents which have occurred to date. (author). 7 refs

  4. International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) - ICSBEP 2015 Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (CSBEP) was initiated in October of 1992 by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The project quickly became an international effort as scientists from other interested countries became involved. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) became an official activity of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in 1995. This handbook contains criticality safety benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments performed at various critical facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by criticality safety engineers to validate calculation techniques used to establish minimum subcritical margins for operations with fissile material and to determine criticality alarm requirements and placement. Many of the specifications are also useful for nuclear data testing. Example calculations are presented; however, these calculations do not constitute a validation of the codes or cross-section data. The evaluated criticality safety benchmark data are given in nine volumes. These volumes span approximately 69000 pages and contain 567 evaluations with benchmark specifications for 4874 critical, near-critical or subcritical configurations, 31 criticality alarm placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 207 configurations that have been categorised as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications. New to the handbook are benchmark specifications for neutron activation foil and thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements performed at the SILENE critical assembly in Valduc, France as part of a joint venture in 2010 between the US DOE and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). A photograph of this experiment is shown on the front cover. Experiments that are found unacceptable for use as criticality safety benchmark experiments are discussed in these

  5. Burn-up Credit Criticality Safety Benchmark Phase III-C. Nuclide Composition and Neutron Multiplication Factor of a Boiling Water Reactor Spent Fuel Assembly for Burn-up Credit and Criticality Control of Damaged Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, K.; Uchida, Y.; Kashima, T.; Ito, T.; Miyaji, T.

    2016-01-01

    Criticality control of damaged nuclear fuel is one of the key issues in the decommissioning operation of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident. The average isotopic composition of spent nuclear fuel as a function of burn-up is required in order to evaluate criticality parameters of the mixture of damaged nuclear fuel with other materials. The NEA Expert Group on Burn-up Credit Criticality (EGBUC) has organised several international benchmarks to assess the accuracy of burn-up calculation methodologies. For BWR fuel, the Phase III-B benchmark, published in 2002, was a remarkable landmark that provided general information on the burn-up properties of BWR spent fuel based on the 8x8 type fuel assembly. Since the publication of the Phase III-B benchmark, all major nuclear data libraries have been revised; in Japan from JENDL-3.2 to JENDL-4, in Europe from JEF-2.2 to JEFF-3.1 and in the US from ENDF/B-VI to ENDF/B-VII.1. Burn-up calculation methodologies have been improved by adopting continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes and modern neutronics calculation methods. Considering the importance of the criticality control of damaged fuel in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident, a new international burn-up calculation benchmark for the 9 x 9 STEP-3 BWR fuel assemblies was organised to carry out the inter-comparison of the averaged isotopic composition in the interest of the burnup credit criticality safety community. Benchmark specifications were proposed and approved at the EGBUC meeting in September 2012 and distributed in October 2012. The deadline for submitting results was set at the end of February 2013. The basic model for the benchmark problem is an infinite two-dimensional array of BWR fuel assemblies consisting of a 9 x 9 fuel rod array with a water channel in the centre. The initial uranium enrichment of fuel rods without gadolinium is 4.9, 4.4, 3.9, 3.4 and 2.1 wt% and 3.4 wt% for the rods using gadolinium. The burn-up conditions are

  6. Performance Testing Methodology for Safety-Critical Programmable Logic Controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Ho; Oh, Do Young; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Sung Ho; Sohn, Se Do

    2009-01-01

    The Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) for use in Nuclear Power Plant safety-related applications is being developed and tested first time in Korea. This safety-related PLC is being developed with requirements of regulatory guideline and industry standards for safety system. To test that the quality of the developed PLC is sufficient to be used in safety critical system, document review and various product testings were performed over the development documents for S/W, H/W, and V/V. This paper provides the performance testing methodology and its effectiveness for PLC platform conducted by KOPEC

  7. Software Safety Risk in Legacy Safety-Critical Computer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Janice L.; Baggs, Rhoda

    2007-01-01

    Safety Standards contain technical and process-oriented safety requirements. Technical requirements are those such as "must work" and "must not work" functions in the system. Process-Oriented requirements are software engineering and safety management process requirements. Address the system perspective and some cover just software in the system > NASA-STD-8719.13B Software Safety Standard is the current standard of interest. NASA programs/projects will have their own set of safety requirements derived from the standard. Safety Cases: a) Documented demonstration that a system complies with the specified safety requirements. b) Evidence is gathered on the integrity of the system and put forward as an argued case. [Gardener (ed.)] c) Problems occur when trying to meet safety standards, and thus make retrospective safety cases, in legacy safety-critical computer systems.

  8. Space nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damon, D.; Temme, M.; Brown, N.

    1990-01-01

    Definition of safety requirements and design features of the SP-100 space reactor power system has been guided by a mission risk analysis. The analysis quantifies risk from accidental radiological consequences for a reference mission. Results show that the radiological risk from a space reactor can be made very low. The total mission risk from radiological consequences for a shuttle-launched, earth orbit SP-100 mission is estimated to be 0.05 Person-REM (expected values) based on a 1 mREM/yr de Minimus dose. Results are given for each mission phase. The safety benefits of specific design features are evaluated through risk sensitivity analyses

  9. Nuclear energy safety - new challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rausch, Julio Cezar; Fonseca, Renato Alves da, E-mail: jrausch@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: rfonseca@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Fukushima accident in March this year, the second most serious nuclear accident in the world, put in evidence a discussion that in recent years with the advent of the 'nuclear renaissance' has been relegated in the background: what factors influence the use safe nuclear energy? Organizational precursor, latent errors, reduction in specific areas of competence and maintenance of nuclear programs is a scenario where the guarantee of a sustainable development of nuclear energy becomes a major challenge for society. A deep discussion of factors that influenced the major accidents despite the nuclear industry use of the so-called 'lessons learned' is needed. Major accidents continue to happen if a radical change is not implemented in the focus of safety culture. (author)

  10. Nuclear energy safety - new challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rausch, Julio Cezar; Fonseca, Renato Alves da

    2011-01-01

    Fukushima accident in March this year, the second most serious nuclear accident in the world, put in evidence a discussion that in recent years with the advent of the 'nuclear renaissance' has been relegated in the background: what factors influence the use safe nuclear energy? Organizational precursor, latent errors, reduction in specific areas of competence and maintenance of nuclear programs is a scenario where the guarantee of a sustainable development of nuclear energy becomes a major challenge for society. A deep discussion of factors that influenced the major accidents despite the nuclear industry use of the so-called 'lessons learned' is needed. Major accidents continue to happen if a radical change is not implemented in the focus of safety culture. (author)

  11. Nuclear energy safety - new challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rausch, Julio Cezar; Fonseca, Renato Alves da, E-mail: jrausch@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: rfonseca@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Fukushima accident in March this year, the second most serious nuclear accident in the world, put in evidence a discussion that in recent years with the advent of the 'nuclear renaissance' has been relegated in the background: what factors influence the use safe nuclear energy? Organizational precursor, latent errors, reduction in specific areas of competence and maintenance of nuclear programs is a scenario where the guarantee of a sustainable development of nuclear energy becomes a major challenge for society. A deep discussion of factors that influenced the major accidents despite the nuclear industry use of the so-called 'lessons learned' is needed. Major accidents continue to happen if a radical change is not implemented in the focus of safety culture. (author)

  12. NRC - regulator of nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was formed in 1975 to regulate the various commercial and institutional uses of nuclear energy, including nuclear power plants. The agency succeeded the Atomic Energy Commission, which previously had responsibility for both developing and regulating nuclear activities. Federal research and development work for all energy sources, as well as nuclear weapons production, is now conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy. Under its responsibility to protect public health and safety, the NRC has three principal regulatory functions: (1) establish standards and regulations, (2) issue licenses for nuclear facilities and users of nuclear materials, and (3) inspect facilities and users of nuclear materials to ensure compliance with the requirements. These regulatory functions relate to both nuclear power plants and to other uses of nuclear materials - like nuclear medicine programs at hospitals, academic activities at educational institutions, research work, and such industrial applications as gauges and testing equipment. The NRC places a high priority on keeping the public informed of its work. The agency recognizes the interest of citizens in what it does through such activities as maintaining public document rooms across the country and holding public hearings, public meetings in local areas, and discussions with individuals and organizations

  13. Reusable libraries for safety-critical Java

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rios Rivas, Juan Ricardo; Schoeberl, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The large collection of Java class libraries is a main factor of the success of Java. However, these libraries assume that a garbage-collected heap is used. Safety-critical Java uses scope-based memory areas instead of a garbage-collected heap. Therefore, the Java class libraries are problematic...... to use in safety-critical Java. We have identified common programming patterns in the Java class libraries that make them unsuitable for safety-critical Java. We propose ways to improve the libraries to avoid the impact of the identified problematic patterns. We illustrate these changes by implementing...

  14. A Profile for Safety Critical Java

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeberl, Martin; Søndergaard, Hans; Thomsen, Bent

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new, minimal specification for real-time Java for safety critical applications. The intention is to provide a profile that supports programming of applications that can be validated against safety critical standards such as DO-178B [15]. The proposed profile is in line with the Java...... specification request JSR-302: Safety Critical Java Technology, which is still under discussion. In contrast to the current direction of the expert group for the JSR-302 we do not subset the rather complex Real-Time Specification for Java (RTSJ). Nevertheless, our profile can be implemented on top of an RTSJ...

  15. Criticality Safety Basics for INL FMHs and CSOs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. L. Putman

    2012-04-01

    Nuclear power is a valuable and efficient energy alternative in our energy-intensive society. However, material that can generate nuclear power has properties that require this material be handled with caution. If improperly handled, a criticality accident could result, which could severely harm workers. This document is a modular self-study guide about Criticality Safety Principles. This guide's purpose it to help you work safely in areas where fissionable nuclear materials may be present, avoiding the severe radiological and programmatic impacts of a criticality accident. It is designed to stress the fundamental physical concepts behind criticality controls and the importance of criticality safety when handling fissionable materials outside nuclear reactors. This study guide was developed for fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates to use with related web-based course 00INL189, BEA Criticality Safety Principles, and to help prepare for the course exams. These individuals must understand basic information presented here. This guide may also be useful to other Idaho National Laboratory personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. This guide also includes additional information that will not be included in 00INL189 tests. The additional information is in appendices and paragraphs with headings that begin with 'Did you know,' or with, 'Been there Done that'. Fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates may review additional information at their own discretion. This guide is revised as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Issued in 2006, Revision 0 established the basic text and integrated various programs from former contractors. Revision 1 incorporates operation and program changes implemented since 2006. It also incorporates suggestions, clarifications

  16. Nuclear materials facility safety initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peddicord, K.L.; Nelson, P.; Roundhill, M.; Jardine, L.J.; Lazarev, L.; Moshkov, M.; Khromov, V.V.; Kruchkov, E.; Bolyatko, V.; Kazanskij, Yu.; Vorobeva, I.; Lash, T.R.; Newton, D.; Harris, B.

    2000-01-01

    Safety in any facility in the nuclear fuel cycle is a fundamental goal. However, it is recognized that, for example, should an accident occur in either the U.S. or Russia, the results could seriously delay joint activities to store and disposition weapons fissile materials in both countries. To address this, plans are underway jointly to develop a nuclear materials facility safety initiative. The focus of the initiative would be to share expertise which would lead in improvements in safety and safe practices in the nuclear fuel cycle.The program has two components. The first is a lab-to-lab initiative. The second involves university-to-university collaboration.The lab-to-lab and university-to-university programs will contribute to increased safety in facilities dealing with nuclear materials and related processes. These programs will support important bilateral initiatives, develop the next generation of scientists and engineers which will deal with these challenges, and foster the development of a safety culture

  17. Safety device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquelin, Roland.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a safety device for a nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid metal (generally sodium) cooled fast reactor. This safety device includes an absorbing element with a support head connected by a disconnectable connector formed by the armature of an electromagnet at the end of an axially mobile vertical control rod. This connection is so designed that in the event of it becoming disconnected, the absorbing element gravity slides in a passage through the reactor core into an open container [fr

  18. Nuclear Safety Review for the Year 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-07-01

    other fields. It is clear that safety continues to be a work in progress. The global nuclear power industry continued to require substantial efforts by designers, manufacturers, operators, regulators and other stakeholders to satisfy diverse quality and safety requirements and licensing processes, along with the recognized need in industry and among regulators to standardize and harmonize these requirements and processes. In some cases, plans for nuclear power programme development moved faster than the establishment of the necessary regulatory and safety infrastructure and capacity. To assist Member States in this effort, the Regulatory Cooperation Forum (RCF) was formed in June 2010. The RCF is a regulator-to-regulator forum that optimizes regulatory support from Member States with advanced nuclear power programmes to newcomer Member States or, on request, to those States that are expanding their nuclear power programmes. The Agency is actively involved in the development of safety goals for a robust and technically consistent framework for nuclear power plants and other nuclear and radiation installations and activities. This requires a holistic consideration of quantitative and qualitative criteria to ensure that no individual bears unacceptable radiation risks, as stated in the Agency's Fundamental Safety Principles (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1). Fuel cycle facilities, covering a diverse range of installations and processes - from mining to enrichment to fabrication to reprocessing to storage or disposal- present varying degrees of hazards and specific challenges to nuclear safety (e.g., criticality control, chemical hazards, fires and explosions). Many rely on operator intervention and administrative controls to ensure nuclear safety. Events reported in 2010 to the Agency's Fuel Incident Notification and Analysis System (FINAS) indicated that the main root causes of these events were related to organizational and human factors. Of the 441 reactors

  19. Towards an International Approach to Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomihiro Taniguchi

    2006-01-01

    This document presents in a series of transparencies the different activities of the IAEA: Introduction of International Atomic Energy Agency, Changing world, Changing Technology, Changing Global Security, Developing Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems, Global Nuclear Safety Regime, IAEA Safety Standards: Hierarchy - Global Reference for Striving for Excellence, IAEA Safety Reviews and Services: Integrated Safety Approach, Global Knowledge Network - Asian Nuclear Safety Network, Safety Issues and Challenges, Synergy between Safety and Security, Recent Developments: Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources, Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (CPPNM), Incident and Emergency Preparedness and Response, Holistic Approach for Safety and Security, Sustainable Development. (J.S.)

  20. Applications of noise analysis to nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar Martinez, Omar

    2000-01-01

    Noise Analysis techniques (analysis of the fluctuation of physical parameters) have been successfully applied to the operational vigilance of the technical equipment that plays a decisive role in the production cycle of a very complex industry. Although fluctuation measurements in nuclear installations started almost at the start of the nuclear era (see works by Feynman and Rossi on the development of neutron methodology), only recently have neutron noise diagnostic applications begun to be a part of the standard procedures for the performance of some modern nuclear installations. Following the relevant technical advances made in information sciences and analogical electronics, measuring the fluctuation of physical parameters has become a very effective tool for detecting, guarding and following up possible defects in a nuclear system. As the processing techniques for the fluctuation of a nuclear reactor's physical-neutron parameters have evolved (temporal and frequency analysis, multi-parameter self -regression analysis, etc.), the applications of the theory of non-lineal dynamics and chaos theory have progressed by focusing on the problem from another perspective. This work reports on those nuclear applications of noise analysis that increase nuclear safety in all types of nuclear facilities and that have been carried out by the author over the last decade, such as: -Void Force Critical Set Applications (Zero Power Reactor Applications, Central Institute of Physical Research, Budapest, Hungary); -Research Reactor Applications (Triga Mark III Reactor, National Institute of Nuclear Research, ININ, Mexico); -Power Reactor Applications in a Nuclear Power Plant (First Circuit of Block II, Paks Nuclear Center, Hungary); -Second Loop applications in a Nuclear Power Plant (Block I Paks Nuclear Center, Hungary; Block II Kalinin Nuclear Center, Russia); -Shield System Applications for the Transport of Radioisotopes (Nuclear Technology Center, Havana, Cuba) New trends in

  1. White paper on nuclear safety in 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    The white paper consists of four parts. The first part described the outline of international discussions on safety culture and activities promoted by utilities and regulatory bodies in Japan. The second part explained the main activities of the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan and nuclear regulatory authorities on nuclear safety regulation. The third part introduced various activities for ensuring overall nuclear safety in Japan, such as safety regulation systems for nuclear facilities, disaster measures at nuclear facilities, progress in nuclear research, nuclear safety regulation by risk-informed utilization, environmental radiation surveys, international cooperation on nuclear safety. The forth part contained various materials and data related to the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan. (J.P.N.)

  2. The nuclear controversy and nuclear safety techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragnarson, P.

    1979-09-01

    Survey interviews with 125 Swedish nuclear safety engineers are summarized and commented upon. A short historical background is given, claiming that the major safety issues of nuclear energy have been debated continously during the 50's and 60's in a way that could well have been watched and interpreted by a political, democratic system involving political parties, government departments, etc. With a few exceptions, these 125 engineers represent 10 - 20 years experience in nuclear research and development. By definition they belong to a professional group of about 800 in Sweden (1978). The main aim of the study is to find out if (how and why) a public debate can bring about changes in an industrially established technology by influencing the attitudes and technical judgements of the individuals and/or organizations involved. Examples are given in which the nuclear specialists themselves admit or claim that direct or indirect impacts from the public debate have been important. A common experience is that the scientists and engineers have been forced to broaden their professional scope through a time-consuming but - on the whole - 'positive' process. A year after the interviews started, a serious reactor accident occured near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The group has been used for a survey of the immediate reactions in order to see if it could cause sudden changes of attitudes among the experts. A minority demonstrated clear changes towards a more cautious attitude regarding nuclear risks. (author)

  3. Selection and verification of safety parameters in safety parameter display system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yuangfang

    1992-02-01

    The method and results for safety parameter selection and its verification in safety parameter display system of nuclear power plants are introduced. According to safety analysis, the overall safety is divided into six critical safety functions, and a certain amount of safety parameters which can represent the integrity degree of each function and the causes of change are strictly selected. The verification of safety parameter selection is carried out from the view of applying the plant emergency procedures and in the accident man oeuvres on a full scale nuclear power plant simulator

  4. Criticality safety evaluations - a open-quotes stalking horseclose quotes for integrated safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Columbia Fuel Fabrication Facility of the Westinghouse Commercial Nuclear Fuel Division manufactures low-enriched uranium fuel and associated components for use in commercial pressurized water power reactors. To support development of a comprehensive integrated safety assessment (ISA) for the facility, as well as to address increasing U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expectations regarding such a facility's criticality safety assessments, a project is under way to complete criticality safety evaluations (CSEs) of all plant systems used in processing nuclear materials. Each CSE is made up of seven sections, prepared by a multidisciplinary team of process engineers, systems engineers, safety engineers, maintenance representatives, and operators. This paper provides a cursory outline of the type of information presented in a CSE

  5. Criticality safety evaluations - a {open_quotes}stalking horse{close_quotes} for integrated safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.A. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Columbia, SC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Columbia Fuel Fabrication Facility of the Westinghouse Commercial Nuclear Fuel Division manufactures low-enriched uranium fuel and associated components for use in commercial pressurized water power reactors. To support development of a comprehensive integrated safety assessment (ISA) for the facility, as well as to address increasing U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expectations regarding such a facility`s criticality safety assessments, a project is under way to complete criticality safety evaluations (CSEs) of all plant systems used in processing nuclear materials. Each CSE is made up of seven sections, prepared by a multidisciplinary team of process engineers, systems engineers, safety engineers, maintenance representatives, and operators. This paper provides a cursory outline of the type of information presented in a CSE.

  6. Safety culture in nuclear power enterprise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Zhengyu; Su Luming

    2008-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) introduced the concept of safety culture when analyzing the Chernobyl accident. Safety culture has now been widely accepted and practiced by nuclear enterprise in the world. As an important safeguard for nuclear safety, safety culture has become the core of nuclear power enterprise and entitled as the soul of nuclear enterprise. This paper analyzes the three levels of safety culture and describes its three developing phases. (authors)

  7. Basic safety principles for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shiguan

    1989-01-01

    To ensure the safety operation of nuclear power plant, one should strictly adhere to the implelmentation of safety codes and the establishment of nuclear safety code system, as well as the applicable basic safety principles of nuclear power plants. This article briefly introduce the importance of nuclear codes and its economic benefits and the implementation of basic safety principles to be accumulated in practice for many years by various countries

  8. Regional cooperation on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, W.Y.; Chen, J.H.; Kim, D.H.; Simmons, R.B.V.; Surguri, S.

    1985-01-01

    A review has been conducted of a number of multi-national and bilateral arrangements between governments and between utility-sponsored organizations which provide the framework for international cooperation in the field of nuclear safety. These arrangements include the routine exchange operational data, experiences, technical reports and regulatory data, provision of special assistance when requested, collaboration in safety research, and the holding of international conferences and seminars. Areas which may be better suited for cooperation on a regional basis are identified. These areas include: exchange of operational data and experience, sharing of emergency planning information, and collaboration in safety research. Mechanisms to initiate regional cooperation in these areas are suggested

  9. Nuclear safety policy statement in korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W.S.; Kim, H.J.; Choi, K.S.; Choi, Y.S.; Park, D.K.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Wide varieties of programs to enhance nuclear safety have been established and implemented by the Korean government in accordance with the Nuclear Safety Policy Statement announced in September 1994. The policy statement was intended to set the long-term policy goals for maintaining and achieving high-level of nuclear safety and also help the public understand the national policy and a strong will of the government toward nuclear safety. It has been recognized as very effective in developing safety culture in nuclear-related organizations and also enhancing nuclear safety in Korea. However, ageing of operating nuclear power plants and increasing of new nuclear facilities have demanded a new comprehensive national safety policy to cover the coming decade, taking the implementation results of the policy statement of 1994 and the changing environment of nuclear industries into consideration. Therefore, the results of safety policy implementation have been reviewed and, considering changing environment and future prospects, a new nuclear safety policy statement as a highest level national policy has been developed. The implementation results of 11 regulatory policy directions such as the use of Probabilistic Safety Assessment, introduction of Periodic Safety Review, strengthening of safety research, introduction of Risk Based Regulation stipulated in the safety policy statement of 1994 were reviewed and measures taken after various symposia on nuclear safety held in Nuclear Safety Days since 1995 were evaluated. The changing international and domestic environment of nuclear industry were analysed and future prospects were explored. Based on the analysis and review results, a draft of new nuclear safety policy statement was developed. The draft was finalized after the review of many prominent experts in Korea. Considering changing environment and future prospects, new policy statement that will show government's persistent will for nuclear safety has been

  10. Software reliability for safety-critical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everett, B.; Musa, J.

    1994-01-01

    In this talk, the authors address the question open-quotes Can Software Reliability Engineering measurement and modeling techniques be applied to safety-critical applications?close quotes Quantitative techniques have long been applied in engineering hardware components of safety-critical applications. The authors have seen a growing acceptance and use of quantitative techniques in engineering software systems but a continuing reluctance in using such techniques in safety-critical applications. The general case posed against using quantitative techniques for software components runs along the following lines: safety-critical applications should be engineered such that catastrophic failures occur less frequently than one in a billion hours of operation; current software measurement/modeling techniques rely on using failure history data collected during testing; one would have to accumulate over a billion operational hours to verify failure rate objectives of about one per billion hours

  11. Nuclear safety in crisis regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ustohalova, Veronika; Englert, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The use of nuclear energy demands extensive institutional and material infrastructure upon a foundation of stable intrastate conditions and interstate relations. Conflicts can result in catastrophic accidents, either deliberately or unintentionally. If there are nuclear facilities located in a crisis region, the risk of a nuclear disaster is markedly heightened. This can be explained not only in terms of the strategic relevance of the energy supply in military conflicts, but also the increased accident risks and hazards arising from collateral damage, as well as the erosion of the safety culture and institutional control in crisis regions with a nuclear infrastructure. Even just the escalation of a political dispute or the persistence of low intensity conflicts can make it generally more difficult and complex to maintain nuclear safety, if intrastate safety mechanisms come under strain or even fail as a result. So far no instance of military escalation, past or present, has led to an accident in a civil nuclear facility. Nevertheless, questions are clearly raised about the vulnerability of nuclear facilities in crisis regions and the risks associated with this vulnerability. Despite the potentially far-reaching consequences, too little attention is currently being paid to the linkage between intra- and interstate conflicts and the safety of nuclear facilities in crisis regions. The aim of the research presented here was to explore this theme and, after laying the groundwork in this manner, to raise awareness among policy-makers and the wider public. In this context the escalation of conflicts in the Ukraine is a particular focus. The first part of the report begins with a systematic look at the link between crisis regions and/or conflicts and nuclear safety. The various impact pathways relating to nuclear facility safety and the associated risks are described in relation to potential hazards induced by crises and wars. A nuclear facility can itself become a theatre

  12. Nuclear safety in crisis regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ustohalova, Veronika; Englert, Matthias

    2017-04-12

    The use of nuclear energy demands extensive institutional and material infrastructure upon a foundation of stable intrastate conditions and interstate relations. Conflicts can result in catastrophic accidents, either deliberately or unintentionally. If there are nuclear facilities located in a crisis region, the risk of a nuclear disaster is markedly heightened. This can be explained not only in terms of the strategic relevance of the energy supply in military conflicts, but also the increased accident risks and hazards arising from collateral damage, as well as the erosion of the safety culture and institutional control in crisis regions with a nuclear infrastructure. Even just the escalation of a political dispute or the persistence of low intensity conflicts can make it generally more difficult and complex to maintain nuclear safety, if intrastate safety mechanisms come under strain or even fail as a result. So far no instance of military escalation, past or present, has led to an accident in a civil nuclear facility. Nevertheless, questions are clearly raised about the vulnerability of nuclear facilities in crisis regions and the risks associated with this vulnerability. Despite the potentially far-reaching consequences, too little attention is currently being paid to the linkage between intra- and interstate conflicts and the safety of nuclear facilities in crisis regions. The aim of the research presented here was to explore this theme and, after laying the groundwork in this manner, to raise awareness among policy-makers and the wider public. In this context the escalation of conflicts in the Ukraine is a particular focus. The first part of the report begins with a systematic look at the link between crisis regions and/or conflicts and nuclear safety. The various impact pathways relating to nuclear facility safety and the associated risks are described in relation to potential hazards induced by crises and wars. A nuclear facility can itself become a theatre

  13. 25 years of nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curien, H.; Duclos, D.; Saint Raymond, Ph.

    1998-01-01

    This philosophical dossier is devoted to the last 25 years of nuclear safety. It is organized around three main subjects: the control, the communication with the public and the international relations. The control affected the builder and the operator, but also an independent authority. This duality is essential. The public relations became a main point in the risks management. The transparency leads to a better public information. The last part is devoted to the international relations. It affects the international regulations but also the opinion exchange. The nuclear industries (and even non nuclear industries) should take inspiration from the foreign management and experiences. (A.L.B.)

  14. Nuclear Safety Review for 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-06-01

    The Nuclear Safety Review 2015 focuses on the dominant nuclear safety trends, issues and challenges in 2014. The Executive Overview provides general nuclear safety information along with a summary of the major issues covered in this report: improving radiation, transport and waste safety; strengthening safety in nuclear installations; enhancing emergency preparedness and response (EPR); and strengthening civil liability for nuclear damage. The Appendix provides details on the activities of the Commission on Safety Standards (CSS), and activities relevant to the Agency’s safety standards. The global nuclear community continued to make steady progress in improving nuclear safety throughout the world in 2014; and, the Agency and its Member States continued to implement the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (hereinafter referred to as “the Action Plan”), which was endorsed by the General Conference in 2011 after the Fukushima Daiichi accident in March 2011. • Significant progress has been made in reviewing and revising various Agency’s safety standards in areas such as management of radioactive waste, design basis hazard levels, protection of nuclear power plants (NPPs) against severe accidents, design margins to avoid cliff edge effects, multiple facilities at one site, and strengthening the prevention of unacceptable radiological consequences to the public and the environment, communications and EPR. In addition, the Guidelines for Drafting IAEA Safety Standards and Nuclear Security Series Publications was issued in July 2014.• The Agency continued to analyse the relevant technical aspects of the Fukushima Daiichi accident and to share and disseminate lessons learned to the wider nuclear community. In 2014, the Agency organized two international experts’ meetings (IEMs), one on radiation protection and one on severe accident management. Reports from previous IEMs were also published in 2014: IAEA Report on Human and Organizational Factors in Nuclear

  15. Test process for the safety-critical embedded software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Ahyoung; Choi, Byoungju; Lee, Jangsoo

    2004-01-01

    Digitalization of nuclear Instrumentation and Control (I and C) system requires high reliability of not only hardware but also software. Verification and Validation (V and V) process is recommended for software reliability. But a more quantitative method is necessary such as software testing. Most of software in the nuclear I and C system is safety-critical embedded software. Safety-critical embedded software is specified, verified and developed according to V and V process. Hence two types of software testing techniques are necessary for the developed code. First, code-based software testing is required to examine the developed code. Second, after code-based software testing, software testing affected by hardware is required to reveal the interaction fault that may cause unexpected results. We call the testing of hardware's influence on software, an interaction testing. In case of safety-critical embedded software, it is also important to consider the interaction between hardware and software. Even if no faults are detected when testing either hardware or software alone, combining these components may lead to unexpected results due to the interaction. In this paper, we propose a software test process that embraces test levels, test techniques, required test tasks and documents for safety-critical embedded software. We apply the proposed test process to safety-critical embedded software as a case study, and show the effectiveness of it. (author)

  16. Criticality safety studies at VTT Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roine, T.; Anttila, M.

    1995-01-01

    At VTT Energy a compact reactor physics calculation system is applied in many kind of problems. Generation of group constants for static and dynamic core calculations, flux and dose rate calculations as well as criticality safety studies are performed basically with the same codes. In the presentation a short overview of the wide variety of criticality safety problems analyzed at VTT Energy is given. The calculation system with some illustrative examples is also described. (12 refs., 1 tab.)

  17. Nordic projects concerning nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, H.C.

    1988-11-01

    The report describes the nature of the work done in the first half of 1988 within the field of nuclear safety (1985-89) under the Nordic program for 1985-89. Five programmes and their documentation, are described and complete lists of addresses and of persons involved is given. (AB)

  18. Nuclear medicine software: safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    A brief editorial discusses the safety aspects of nuclear medicine software. Topics covered include some specific features which should be incorporated into a well-written piece of software, some specific points regarding software testing and legal liability if inappropriate medical treatment was initiated as a result of information derived from a piece of clinical apparatus incorporating a malfunctioning computer program. (U.K.)

  19. Nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhl, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    Dr. Buhl feels that nuclear-energy issues are too complex to be understood as single topics, and can only be understood in relationship to broader issues. In fact, goals and risks associated with all energy options must be seen as interrelated with other broad issues, and it should be understood that there are presently no clearcut criteria to ensure that the best decisions are made. The technical community is responsible for helping the public to understand the basic incompatibility of hard and soft technologies and that there is no risk-free energy source. Four principles are outlined for assessing the risks of various energy technologies: (1) take a holistic view; (2) compare the risk with the unit energy output; (3) compare the risk with those of everyday activities; and (4) identify unusual risks associated with a particular option. Dr. Buhl refers to the study conducted by Dr. Inhaber of Canada who used this approach and concluded that nuclear power and natural gas have the lowest overall risk

  20. Nuclear power: levels of safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidsky, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    The rise and fall of the nuclear power industry in the United States is a well-documented story with enough socio-technological conflict to fill dozens of scholarly, and not so scholarly, books. Whatever the reasons for the situation we are now in, and no matter how we apportion the blame, the ultimate choice of whether to use nuclear power in this country is made by the utilities and by the public. Their choices are, finally, based on some form of risk-benefit analysis. Such analysis is done in well-documented and apparently logical form by the utilities and in a rather more inchoate but not necessarily less accurate form by the public. Nuclear power has failed in the United States because both the real and perceived risks outweigh the potential benefits. The national decision not to rely upon nuclear power in its present form is not an irrational one. A wide ranging public balancing of risk and benefit requires a classification of risk which is clear and believable for the public to be able to assess the risks associated with given technological structures. The qualitative four-level safety ladder provides such a framework. Nuclear reactors have been designed which fit clearly and demonstrably into each of the possible qualitative safety levels. Surprisingly, it appears that safer may also mean cheaper. The intellectual and technical prerequisites are in hand for an important national decision. Deployment of a qualitatively different second generation of nuclear reactors can have important benefits for the United States. Surprisingly, it may well be the nuclear establishment itself, with enormous investments of money and pride in the existing nuclear systems, that rejects second generation reactors. It may be that we will not have a second generation of reactors until the first generation of nuclear engineers and nuclear power advocates has retired

  1. New approach to managing nuclear criticality risk at Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R.; Droke, R.; Paine, D.

    1992-01-01

    The negative aspects of having a nuclear criticality accident at a fuel fabrication facility have substantially increased in recent years. Although ensuring that the facility is designed and operating in a critically safe manner is a high management priority, practices of managing the risk of a criticality accident have not significantly changed. The method of evaluating risk based on quantitative analysis can enable management to adapt to the increased consequences of a nuclear criticality accident. Additional controls may be placed on high-risk areas within a facility to ensure safe operation of the plant. Areas where controls are in place that impede the productivity of the facility and have negligible impact on criticality safety may be removed or replaced. Management can also streamline the safety analysis efforts applied to facility upgrades by demonstrating that proposed design changes do not compromise criticality safety. Future expansion of quantitative analysis techniques will also allow risk-based management decisions on industrial, radiological, and environmental safety

  2. A global nuclear safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses three components characterizing the infrastructure of a global nuclear safety culture, each one satisfying special needs. These are: (a) legally binding international agreements, which were drawn up at an accelerated pace in the 1980s following the Chernobyl accident, with its transboundary implications; (b) non-binding common safety standards, which were developed rapidly during the 1960s and 1970s, a period which saw a desire for harmonized safety approaches as nuclear power and the use of radiation and radioactive materials expanded globally; and (c) review and advisory services, which are provided by international experts, the need for which was underscored by the accident at Chernobyl. 5 refs, 1 fig

  3. Anatomy of safety-critical computing problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swu Yih; Fan Chinfeng; Shirazi, Behrooz

    1995-01-01

    This paper analyzes the obstacles faced by current safety-critical computing applications. The major problem lies in the difficulty to provide complete and convincing safety evidence to prove that the software is safe. We explain this problem from a fundamental perspective by analyzing the essence of safety analysis against that of software developed by current practice. Our basic belief is that in order to perform a successful safety analysis, the state space structure of the analyzed system must have some properties as prerequisites. We propose the concept of safety analyzability, and derive its necessary and sufficient conditions; namely, definability, finiteness, commensurability, and tractability. We then examine software state space structures against these conditions, and affirm that the safety analyzability of safety-critical software developed by current practice is severely restricted by its state space structure and by the problem of exponential growth cost. Thus, except for small and simple systems, the safety evidence may not be complete and convincing. Our concepts and arguments successfully explain the current problematic situation faced by the safety-critical computing domain. The implications are also discussed

  4. Welding faults and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergemann, W.

    1977-01-01

    Recommendations are presented with a view to further improving the nuclear safety and radiological protection in G.D.R. nuclear power plants by altering the requirements set out in the Labour Safety Regulation 880 for the weld quality of components of nuclear power plant systems. In order to fix the requirements to be met in non-destructive testing of welded joints, the individual systems should be classified taking injury to persons and reduction in availability as criteria. As regards the testing for leaks, it is shown that the soap-bubble test can be replaced partially by the system hydrostatic test and, that the halogen test and equivalent methods need not be applied. (author)

  5. Nuclear safety and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England-Joseph, J.A.

    1991-03-01

    The full extent of nonconforming parts usage in the federal government is unknown. However, large and small companies, both foreign and domestic, have sold nonconforming parts-including counterfeit and substandard items-to nuclear power plants, commercial and military aircraft, naval ships, weapons systems, and the space shuttle. Accidents resulting from the failure of nonconforming parts could be devastating, GAO testified. To eliminate this problem, GAO believes that an aggressive, government wide approach is needed, one that would ensure that federal agencies cooperate and share information about nonconforming products. This paper reports that while a centralized information system may not stop the proliferation of nonconforming products, it should help federal agencies make informed decisions about potential suppliers and products. GAO concludes that the Office of Management and Budget is in the best position to develop an effective, appropriate, and cost-beneficial plan to help resolve the problem of nonconforming parts

  6. Safety in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeberlein, K.

    1987-01-01

    In nuclear power plants large amounts of radioactive fission products ensue from the fission of uranium. In order to protect the environment, the radioactive material is confined in multiple 'activity barriers' (crystal matrix of the fuel, fuel cladding, coolant boundary, safety containment, reactor building). These barriers are protected by applying a defense-in-depth concept (high quality requirements, protection systems which recognize and terminate operational incidents, safety systems to cope with accidents). In spite of a favorable safety record of German nuclear power plants it is obvious - and became most evident by the Chernobyl accident - that absolute safety is not achievable. At Chernobyl, however, design disadvantages of that reactor type (like positive reactivity feedback of coolant voiding, missing safety containment) played an important role in accident initiation and progression. Such features of the Russian 'graphite-moderated pressure tube boiling water reactor' are different from those of light water reactors operating in western countries. The essential steps of the waste management of the nuclear fuel cycle ('Entsorgung') are the interim storage, the shipment, and the reprocessing of the spent fuel and the final repository of radioactive waste. Reprocessing means the separation of fossil material (uranium, plutonium) from radioactive waste. Legal requirements for radiological protection of the environment, which are identical for nuclear power plants and reprocessing plant, are complied with by means of comprehensive filter systems. Safety problems of a reprocessing plant are eased considerably by the fact that system pressures, process temperatures and energy densities are low. In order to confine the radioactive waste from the biosphere for a very long period of time, it is to be discarded after appropriate treatment into the deep geological underground of salt domes. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Nuclear safety: an international approach: the convention on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a general presentation of the IAEA Convention on Nuclear Safety which has already be signed by 50 countries and which is the first legal instrument that directly addresses the safety of nuclear power plants worldwide. The paper gives a review of its development and some key provisions for a better understanding of how this agreement will operate in practice. The Convention consists of an introductory preamble and four chapters consisting of 35 articles dealing with: the principal objectives, definitions and scope of application; the various obligations (general provisions, legislation, responsibility and regulation, general safety considerations taking into account: the financial and human resources, the human factors, the quality assurance, the assessment and verification of safety, the radiation protection and the emergency preparedness; the safety of installations: sitting, design and construction, operation); the periodic meetings of the contracting parties to review national reports on the measures taken to implement each of the obligations, and the final clauses and other judicial provisions common to international agreements. (J.S.). 1 append

  8. Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, E. D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.

    2010-02-19

    This report is revision 6 of the Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality anomalies that are different than expected.

  9. SCALE criticality safety verification and validation package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, S.M.; Emmett, M.B.; Jordan, W.C.

    1998-01-01

    Verification and validation (V and V) are essential elements of software quality assurance (QA) for computer codes that are used for performing scientific calculations. V and V provides a means to ensure the reliability and accuracy of such software. As part of the SCALE QA and V and V plans, a general V and V package for the SCALE criticality safety codes has been assembled, tested and documented. The SCALE criticality safety V and V package is being made available to SCALE users through the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) to assist them in performing adequate V and V for their SCALE applications

  10. Risk communication activities toward nuclear safety in Tokai: your safety is our safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, T.

    2007-01-01

    As several decades have passed since the construction of nuclear power plants began, residents have become gradually less interested in nuclear safety. The Tokai criticality accident in 1909, however, had roused residents in Tokai-Mura to realize that they live with nuclear technology risks. To prepare a field of risk communication, the Tokai-Mura C 3 project began as a pilot research project supported by NISA. Alter the project ended, we are continuing risk. communication activities as a non-profit organisation. The most important activity of C 3 project is the citizen's inspection programme for nuclear related facilities. This programme was decided by participants who voluntarily applied to the project. The concept of the citizen's inspection programme is 'not the usual facility tours'. Participants are involved from the planning stage and continue to communicate with workers of the inspected nuclear facility. Since 2003, we have conducted six programmes for five nuclear related organisations. Participants evaluated that radiation protection measures were near good but there were some problems concerning the worker's safety and safety culture, and proposed a mixture of advice based on personal experience. Some advice was accepted and it did improve the facility's safety measures. Other suggestions were not agreed upon by nuclear organisations. The reason lies in the difference of concept between the nuclear expert's 'safety' and the citizen's 'safety'. Residents do not worry about radiation only, but also about the facility's safety as a whole including the worker's safety. They say, 'If the workers are not safe, you also are unable to protect us'. Although the disagreement remained, the participants and the nuclear industry learned much about each other. Participating citizens received a substantial amount of knowledge about the nuclear industry and its safety measures, and feel the credibility and openness of the nuclear industry. On the other hand, the nuclear

  11. Strategies for nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetto, A.M.; Taniguchi, T.

    2006-01-01

    Please Rarely in the history of the IAEA has radiation-based technology provided so much opportunity and presented such great risk. The harsh reality is that broader distribution of radioactive materials and sources makes more sources available to more people, thereby increasing the probability of incidents and accidents. As human beings derive greater benefit from ionizing radiation, they also stand a higher risk of being exposed to its harmful effects. Over the past ten years, the IAEA's technical cooperation programme undertook a massive effort to empower developing nations to realise social and economic goals through the application of radiation-based technologies. The Model Project on Upgrading Radiation Protection Infrastructure (the Model Project) represented a significant shift in priorities in that the aim was not to deliver technology per se, but rather to ensure that Member States acquired the capacity to self-manage all related aspects of radiation protection. Without question, the project keeps achieving a great deal. Virtually all participating countries are making significant progress in establishing a basic safety infrastructure; many also are developing the human resources required to tackle the issues of exposure control and emergency preparedness. This strengthened capacity enables Member States to realise more benefits from radiation-based technology more quickly. Moreover, through the knowledge and experience gained, more countries are reaching a level of maturity where they recognize that they hold responsibility for the radioactive sources and materials found within their borders

  12. Criticality calculations for safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vellozo, S.O.

    1981-01-01

    Criticality studies in uranium nitrate and plutonium nitrate aqueous solutions were done. For uranium compound three basic computer codes are used: GAMTEC-II, DTF-IV, KENO-IV. Water was used as refletor and the results obtained with the different computer codes were analyzed and compared with the 'Handbuck zur Kriticalitat'. The cross sections and the cylindrical geometry were generated by Gamtec-II computer code. In the second compound the thickness of the recipient with plutonium nitrate are used with rectangular geometry and concret reflector. The effective multiplication constant was calculated with the Gamtec-II and Keno-IV library. The results show many differences. (E.G) [pt

  13. Status of Nuclear Safety evaluation in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jiashu

    1999-01-01

    Chinese nuclear safety management and control follows international practice, the regulations are mainly from IAEA with the Chinese condition. The regulatory body is National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA). The nuclear safety management, surveillance, safety review and evaluation are guided by NNSA with technical support by several units. Beijing Review Center of Nuclear Safety is one of these units, which was founded in 1987 within Beijing Institute of nuclear Engineering (BINE), co-directed by NNSA and BINE, it is the first technical support team to NNSA. Most of the safety reviews and evaluations of Chinese nuclear installations has been finished by this unit. It is described briefly in this paper that the NNSA's main function and organization, regulations on the nuclear safety, procedure of application and issuing of license, the main activities performed by Beijing Review Center of Nuclear Safety, the situation of severe accident analyses in China, etc. (author)

  14. Progress of nuclear safety research-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anoda, Yoshinari; Ebine, Noriya; Chuto, Toshinori; Sato, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Jun; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Munakata, Masahiro; Asakura, Toshihide; Yamaguchi, Tetsuji; Kida, Takashi; Matsui, Hiroki; Haneishi, Akihiro; Araya, Fumimasa

    2005-03-01

    JAERI is conducting nuclear safety research primarily at the Nuclear Safety Research Center in close cooperation with the related departments in accordance with the Long Term Plan for Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy and Annual Plan for Safety Research issued by the Japanese government. The fields of conducting safety research at JAERI are the engineering safety of nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and radioactive waste management as well as advanced technology for safety improvement or assessment. Also, JAERI has conducted international collaboration to share the information on common global issues of nuclear safety and to supplement own research. Moreover, when accidents occurred at nuclear facilities, JAERI has taken a responsible role by providing technical experts and investigation for assistance to the government or local public body. This report summarizes the nuclear safety research activities of JAERI from April 2002 through March 2004 and utilized facilities. (author)

  15. Use of modern software - based instrumentation in safety critical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmett, J.; Smith, B.

    2005-01-01

    Many Nuclear Power Plants are now ageing and in need of various degrees of refurbishment. Installed instrumentation usually uses out of date 'analogue' technology and is often no longer available in the market place. New technology instrumentation is generally un-qualified for nuclear use and specifically the new 'smart' technology contains 'firmware', (effectively 'soup' (Software of Uncertain Pedigree)) which must be assessed in accordance with relevant safety standards before it may be used in a safety application. Particular standards are IEC 61508 [1] and the British Energy (BE) PES (Programmable Electronic Systems) guidelines EPD/GEN/REP/0277/97. [2] This paper outlines a new instrument evaluation system, which has been developed in conjunction with the UK Nuclear Industry. The paper concludes with a discussion about on-line monitoring of Smart instrumentation in safety critical applications. (author)

  16. Criticality Safety in the Handling of Fissile Material. Specific Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-05-15

    This Safety Guide provides guidance and recommendations on how to meet the relevant requirements for ensuring subcriticality when dealing with fissile material and for planning the response to criticality accidents. The guidance and recommendations are applicable to both regulatory bodies and operating organizations. The objectives of criticality safety are to prevent a self-sustained nuclear chain reaction and to minimize the consequences of this if it were to occur. The Safety Guide makes recommendations on how to ensure subcriticality in systems involving fissile materials during normal operation, anticipated operational occurrences, and, in the case of accident conditions, within design basis accidents, from initial design through commissioning, operation, and decommissioning and disposal.

  17. Nuclear criticality safety 2005 and 2006. Monitoring, follow-up and communication; Nukleaer kriticitetssaekerhet 2005 och 2006. Bevakning, uppfoeljning och kommunikation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mennerdahl, Dennis (E Mennerdahl Systems, Taeby (SE))

    2007-03-15

    A number of selected issues have dominated during 2005 and 2006. This include development of models for realism based on physics (not only statistics and praxis), criteria for criticality safety, regulations and standards, burnup credit, determination of source convergence in calculations, substantial improvements in calculation methods, validation of those methods, etc. In spite of some criticism against certain parts of the NRC FCSS/ISG-10, it is an important document. It should support both authorities and utilities to determine adequate safety margins. To a large extent, the principles that have been applied in Sweden since the 1970's are supported. The extra safety margin (MMS or DELTAk{sub m}) that protects against unknown uncertainties in k{sub eff} should be related to the known uncertainty. In Sweden this has been achieved by limitation of the total, statistically determined standard deviation to 0.01. In addition, FCSS/ISG-10 supports the principle of using different values of DELTAk{sub m} for normal situations than for design basis incidents (must have very low probabilities). In Sweden, DELTAk{sub m} have been included in the design limits that have been 0.95 for normal scenarios and 0.98 for incident scenarios. The corresponding values of DELTAk{sub m} are 0.05 and 0.02. They are exactly the same values as are mentioned in FCSS/ISG-10. The recently issued SCALE 5.1 is very important for burnup credit. Similar capabilities have been available in Sweden, in the form of CASMO, PHOENIX and their predecessor BUXY, for more than 30 years. SCALE 5.1 makes reactor calculations available in a procedure that is easily accessible to specialists on criticality safety. The physics simulation of the irradiation (Monte Carlo through KENO in 3-D or deterministic through NEWT in 2-D) becomes much more realistic with SCALE 5.1 than with earlier versions. A very important project is the OECD/NEA study on reference values for criticality safety. The final report has

  18. Safety principles for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuorinen, A.

    1993-01-01

    The role and purpose of safety principles for nuclear power plants are discussed. A brief information is presented on safety objectives as given in the INSAG documents. The possible linkage is discussed between the two mentioned elements of nuclear safety and safety culture. Safety culture is a rather new concept and there is more than one interpretation of the definition given by INSAG. The defence in depth is defined by INSAG as a fundamental principle of safety technology of nuclear power. Discussed is the overall strategy for safety measures, and features of nuclear power plants provided by the defence-in-depth concept. (Z.S.) 7 refs

  19. Developing safety in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.L.

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle had its origins in the new technology developed in the 1940s and 50s involving novel physical and chemical processes. At the front end of the cycle, mining, milling and fuel fabrication all underwent development, but in general the focus of process development and safety concerns was the reprocessing stage, with radiation, contamination and criticality the chief hazards. Safety research is not over and there is still work to be done in advancing technical knowledge to new generation nuclear fuels such as Mixed Oxide Fuel and in refining knowledge of margins and of potential upset conditions. Some comments are made on potential areas for work. The NUCEF facility will provide many useful data to aid safety analysis and accident prevention. The routine operations in such plants, basically chemical factories, requires industrial safety and in addition the protection of workers against radiation or contamination. The engineering and management measures for this were novel and the early operation of such plants pioneering. Later commissioning and operating experience has improved routine operating safety, leading to a new generation of factories with highly developed worker protection, engineering safeguards and safety management systems. Ventilation of contamination control zones, remote operation and maintenance, and advanced neutron shielding are engineering examples. In safety management, dose control practices, formally controlled operating procedures and safety cases, and audit processes are comparable with, or lead, best industry practice in other hazardous industries. Nonetheless it is still important that the knowledge and experience from operating plants continue to be gathered together to provide a common basis for improvement. The NEA Working Group on Fuel Cycle Safety provides a forum for much of this interchange. Some activities in the Group are described in particular the FINAS incident reporting system. (J.P.N.)

  20. International handbook of evaluated criticality safety benchmark experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (CSBEP) was initiated in October of 1992 by the United States Department of Energy. The project quickly became an international effort as scientists from other interested countries became involved. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) became an official activity of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development - Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA) in 1995. This handbook contains criticality safety benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments performed at various nuclear critical facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by criticality safety engineers to validate calculational techniques used to establish minimum subcritical margins for operations with fissile material and to determine criticality alarm requirement and placement. Many of the specifications are also useful for nuclear data testing. Example calculations are presented; however, these calculations do not constitute a validation of the codes or cross section data. The evaluated criticality safety benchmark data are given in nine volumes. These volumes span over 55,000 pages and contain 516 evaluations with benchmark specifications for 4,405 critical, near critical, or subcritical configurations, 24 criticality alarm placement / shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 200 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications. Experiments that are found unacceptable for use as criticality safety benchmark experiments are discussed in these evaluations; however, benchmark specifications are not derived for such experiments (in some cases models are provided in an appendix). Approximately 770 experimental configurations are categorized as unacceptable for use as criticality safety benchmark experiments. Additional evaluations are in progress and will be

  1. Alternate approaches to nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crane, A.T.

    1985-01-01

    For the US nuclear power industry to expand, a greatly increased portion of the public must come to share the industry's confidence in reactor safety. Major obstacles to establishing this confidence are frequent incidents with potential safety implications and a lack of incontrovertible proof that the risk of a major accident is very low. The most important step toward overcoming these obstacles would be for each utility to operate, maintain, and evaluate its reactors according to far higher standards. With improvements in reliability and safety margins, existing plants would be a stimulus for building new ones rather than an impediment. If changes to the operation of existing plants and improvements to the design of future ones were inadequate, the only hope for a revival of the nuclear industry would be an alternative reactor so obviously safe that risk would no longer be an issue. Three possible concepts are the modular high-temperature gas reactor, the process inherent ultimate safety reactor, and the liquid-metal fast reactor. All three have inherent safety features that should make a meltdown essentially impossible. They cannot know just how great the advantage of these alternate reactors would be, but the benefits of developing one or more of the concepts appear great

  2. Fuel Receiving and Storage Station. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's safety evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The safety evaluation report covers design of structures, components, equipment, and systems; nuclear criticality safety; radiological safety; accident analysis; conduct of operations; quality assurance; common defense and security; financial qualifications; financial protection and indemnity requirements; and technical specifications

  3. Leadership Actions to Improve Nuclear Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clewett, L.K.

    2016-01-01

    The challenge many leaders face is how to effectively implement and then utilise the results of Safety Culture surveys. Bruce Power has recently successfully implemented changes to the Safety Culture survey process including how corrective actions were identified and implemented. The actions taken in response to the latest survey have proven effective with step change performance noted. Nuclear Safety is a core value for Bruce Power. Nuclear Safety at Bruce Power is based on the following four pillars: reactor safety, industrial safety, radiological safety and environmental safety. Processes and practices are in place to achieve a healthy Nuclear Safety Culture within Bruce Power such that nuclear safety is the overriding priority. This governance is based on industry leading practices which monitor, asses and take action to drive continual improvements in the Nuclear Safety Culture within Bruce Power.

  4. Nuclear industry and radioecological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, V. G.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of XXI century is marked with increasing public concern over impact of man-made activity, including nuclear technologies, on the environment. Currently, the anthropocentric principle is applied in the course of the radioecological safety guaranteeing for the environment, which postulates that human protectability serves as guarantee of the environmental one. However, this principle correctness is called in question recently. The ecocentric principle is proposed as an alternative doctrine, defining balance between human importance and that of any other elements of biota. The system recommended isn't intended for the regulatory standards development yet, because of substantial gaps in scientific knowledge. Nevertheless, renunciation of the anthropocentric principle can result in unwarranted tightened regulatory basis, decreasing of nuclear industry evolution rates, and, consequently, breaching of societal and economical priorities. It is obvious that for the safety guaranteeing, nuclear industry shouldn't stand out against a background of other fields of human activity involved hazard factors. Therefore, new conceptions applying within the regulatory system is to be weighted and exclude formal using of discussion theses. More than semi-centennial experience of the anthropocentric approach applying serves as an evidence of safe protection of ecosystems against radiation exposure that ensures safe ecological development of nuclear power industry and other fields of nuclear technologies application. (author)

  5. International views on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkhofer, A.

    2002-01-01

    Safety has always been an important objective in nuclear technology. Starting with a set of sound physical principles and prudent design approaches, safety concepts have gradually been refined and cover now a wide range of provisions related to design, quality and operation. Research, the evaluation of operating experiences and probabilistic risk assessments constitute an essential basis and international co-operation plays a significant role in that context. Concerning future developments a major objective for new reactor concepts, such as the EPR, is to practically exclude a severe core damage accident with large scale consequences outside the plant. (author)

  6. Safety critical software development qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marron, J. E.

    2006-01-01

    With the increasing use of digital systems in control applications, customers must acquire appropriate expectations for software development and quality assurance procedures. Purchasers and users of digital systems need to understand the benefits to the supplier of effective quality systems. These systems consist not only of procedures but tools that enable automation. Without the use of automation, quality can not be assured. A software and systems quality program starts with the documents you are very familiar with. But these documents must define more than the final system. They must address specific development environment characteristics and testing capabilities. Starting with the RFP, some of the items that should be introduced are Software Configuration Management, regression testing and defect tracking. The digital system customer is in the best position to enforce the use of software and systems quality programs by including them in project requirements as early as the Purchase Order. The customer's understanding of the full scope and implementation of a software quality program is essential to achieving the quality necessary in nuclear projects, and, incidentally, completing those projects on schedule. (authors)

  7. White paper on nuclear safety in 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    This report is composed of three parts and a subjective part Part 1 includes special articles on the measures for the security of nuclear safety and the future problems described from the beginning of the security. Taking consideration that there exists potential risk in the utilization of nuclear energy in addition to the previous accidents in the area of nuclear energy, future measures to take for safety security were discussed as well as the reorganization of government facilities. In addition, the measures for nuclear safety according to the special nuclear disaster countermeasure law and the future problems were described. In Part 2, the trend of nuclear safety in 2000 and the actual effects of 'the basic principle for the countermeasures of the hour' proposed by the nuclear safety commission were outlined. Moreover, the activities of the commission in 2000 were briefly described. In Part 3, various activities for security of nuclear safety, the safety regulation system and the disaster protection system in nuclear facilities, nuclear safety researches in Japan were described in addition to international cooperation as to nuclear safety. Finally, various materials related to the nuclear safety commission, and the materials on the practical activities for nuclear safety were listed in the subjective part. (M.N.)

  8. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project on the Internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J.B.; Brennan, S.A.; Scott, L.

    2000-01-01

    The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) was initiated in October 1992 by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) defense programs and is documented in the Transactions of numerous American Nuclear Society and International Criticality Safety Conferences. The work of the ICSBEP is documented as an Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) handbook, International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. The ICSBEP Internet site was established in 1996 and its address is http://icsbep.inel.gov/icsbep. A copy of the ICSBEP home page is shown in Fig. 1. The ICSBEP Internet site contains the five primary links. Internal sublinks to other relevant sites are also provided within the ICSBEP Internet site. A brief description of each of the five primary ICSBEP Internet site links is given

  9. Character and consequence of nuclear criticality accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xinhua; Liu Hua; Wu Deqiang; Li Bing

    2001-01-01

    The author describes some concepts, the process and magnitude of energy release and the destruction of the nuclear criticality accident and also describes the radiation consequence of criticality accidents from three aspects: prompt radiation, contamination in working place and release of fission products to the environment. It shows that the effects of radioactivity release from criticality accidents in the nuclear fuel processing plants on the environment and the public is minor, the main danger is from the external exposure of prompt rays. The paper make as have a correct understanding of the nuclear criticality accident and it would be helpful to take appropriate emergency response to potential criticality accident

  10. 48 CFR 923.7001 - Nuclear safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nuclear safety. 923.7001... ENVIRONMENT, CONSERVATION, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Environmental, Energy and Water Efficiency, Renewable Energy Technologies, and Occupational Safety Programs 923.7001 Nuclear safety. The DOE...

  11. Nuclear Safety Review for the Year 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-15

    States with advanced nuclear power programmes to newcomer Member States or, on request, to those States that are expanding their nuclear power programmes. The Agency is actively involved in the development of safety goals for a robust and technically consistent framework for nuclear power plants and other nuclear and radiation installations and activities. This requires a holistic consideration of quantitative and qualitative criteria to ensure that no individual bears unacceptable radiation risks, as stated in the Agency's Fundamental Safety Principles (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1). Fuel cycle facilities, covering a diverse range of installations and processes - from mining to enrichment to fabrication to reprocessing to storage or disposal - present varying degrees of hazards and specific challenges to nuclear safety (e.g., criticality control, chemical hazards, fires and explosions). Events reported in 2010 to the Agency's Fuel Incident Notification and Analysis System (FINAS) indicated that the main root causes of these events were related to organizational and human factors. Of the 441 reactors currently operating around the world, many were built in the 1970s and 1980s, with an average lifespan of around 35 years. Their decommissioning peak will occur from 2020 to 2030 which will present a major managerial, technological, safety and environmental challenge to those States engaged in nuclear decommissioning. The need for national and international mechanisms for early planning, adequate funding and long term strategies applies not only to decommissioning, but also to radioactive waste management and spent fuel management, including disposal arrangements and clean-up, as well as the preservation of operational knowledge and experience to ensure the safety of these activities. Many of these issues were discussed in depth at the International Conference on Management of Spent Fuel from Nuclear Power Reactors held at the Agency in May, 2010. The collective

  12. Nuclear power indices and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennet, L.L.; Fizher, D.; Nechaev, A.

    1987-01-01

    Problems discussed at the IAEA International Conference on nuclear power indices and safety held in Vienna from 28 September to 2 October, 1987 are considered. Representatives from 40 countries and 12 international organizations participated in the conference. It is marked that by the end of this century nuclear power plant capacities in developing countries will increase by more than twice. In developed countries increase of installed capacity by 65 % is forecasted. It is stressed that competently constructed and operated NPPs will be successfully competing with coal-fueled power plants in the majority of the world regions. Much attention was paid to reports on measures taken after Chernobyl' accident and its radiation effects on people helth. It is shown that parallel with fundamental theoretical studies on NPP safety as a complex engineering system much attention is paid to some problems of designing and operation of such facilities. Fuel cycle problems, radioactive waste and spent fuel storage and disposal in particular, are considered

  13. Criticality safety engineer training at WSRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, T.G.; Mincey, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    Two programs designed to prepare engineers for certification as criticality safety engineers are offered at Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). One program, Student On Loan Criticality Engineer Training (SOLCET), is an intensive 2-yr course involving lectures, rigorous problem assignments, and mentoring. The other program, In-Field Criticality Engineer Training (IN-FIELD), is a less intensive series of lectures and problem assignments. Both courses are conducted by members of the Applied Physics Group (APG) of the Savannah River Technical Center, the organization at WSRC responsible for the operation and maintenance of criticality codes and for training of code users

  14. Safety culture and subcontractor network governance in a complex safety critical project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oedewald, Pia; Gotcheva, Nadezhda

    2015-01-01

    In safety critical industries many activities are currently carried out by subcontractor networks. Nevertheless, there are few studies where the core dimensions of resilience would have been studied in safety critical network activities. This paper claims that engineering resilience into a system is largely about steering the development of culture of the system towards better ability to anticipate, monitor, respond and learn. Thus, safety culture literature has relevance in resilience engineering field. This paper analyzes practical and theoretical challenges in applying the concept of safety culture in a complex, dynamic network of subcontractors involved in the construction of a new nuclear power plant in Finland, Olkiluoto 3. The concept of safety culture is in focus since it is widely used in nuclear industry and bridges the scientific and practical interests. This paper approaches subcontractor networks as complex systems. However, the management model of the Olkiluoto 3 project is to a large degree a traditional top-down hierarchy, which creates a mismatch between the management approach and the characteristics of the system to be managed. New insights were drawn from network governance studies. - Highlights: • We studied a relevant topical subject safety culture in nuclear new build project. • We integrated safety science challenges and network governance studies. • We produced practicable insights in managing safety of subcontractor networks

  15. Criticality Safety Information Resource Center Web portal: www.csirc.net

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, C.D. II; Jones, T.

    2000-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Group (ESH-6) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is in the process of collecting and archiving historical and technical information related to nuclear criticality safety from LANL and other facilities. In an ongoing effort, this information is being made available via the Criticality Safety Information Resource Center (CSIRC) web site, which is hosted and maintained by ESH-6 staff. Recently, the CSIRC Web site was recreated as a Web portal that provides the criticality safety community with much more than just archived data

  16. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvin, L.J.

    1996-02-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan describes the new nuclear facility regulatory requirements basis for the Spemt Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project and establishes the plan to achieve compliance with this basis at the new SNF Project facilities

  17. Nuclear liability, nuclear safety, and economic efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    This dissertation applies the methods of economic analysis to nuclear liability and Price-Anderson. First the legislative history is reviewed; in that history the economic role of liability in affecting safety and allocating risk was virtually ignored. Succeeding chapters reformulate issues from the policy debate and subject them to economic analysis. A persistent issue is whether nuclear utilities respond to their limited liability by allowing a higher probability of serious accident. Comparative-static analysis shows that limited liability does lead to a higher chance of accidents, though the effect may be small. The analysis also shows that safety is achieved in a more capital-intensive manner than is cost-minimizing and that limited liability causes reactor owners to favor more heavily populated sites for plants. Therefore, the siting decision makes potential loss greater even if there is no change in the probability of an accident. Citizens' preferences on nuclear liability are examined next, starting with the nature of coverage that would be just in the sense of contraction theories such as John Rawls' Theory of Justice. Citizens behind Rawls' veil of ignorance, forced to be fair because of their ignorance of whether they will be harmed, unanimously choose a high level of coverage. The just level of coverage is greater than the existing $560 million. Second, the nature of economically efficient liability coverage is determined and contrasted with coverage that would emerge from a democratic system of public choice. Population and expected damage profiles indicate that majorities could easily be formed among groups of citizens expecting to suffer little of the damage of a nuclear accident. Thus, majority voting on liability arrangements is likely to produce an inefficiently low level of coverage

  18. White paper on nuclear safety in 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-05-01

    The white paper consists of four parts. The first part described the regulation of nuclear facility decommissioning and the clearance level at which the decommissioned waste materials are not necessarily treated as radioactive materials. The second part explained the main operations of the nuclear safety regulation of the Nuclear Safety Commission and the regulatory bodies in 2004 and Mihama unit 3 accident. The third part introduced various activities for the general preservation of nuclear safety in Japan, such as safety regulation systems for nuclear facilities, disaster preparedness of nuclear facilities, progress in nuclear research, environmental radiation surveys and international cooperation on nuclear safety. The forth part contained various materials and data related to the Nuclear Safety Commission. (J.P.N.)

  19. Nuclear safety in France in 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents the milestones of 2001 concerning nuclear safety in France: 1) the new organization of nuclear safety in France, IPSN (institute of protection and nuclear safety) and OPRI (office for protection against ionizing radiation) have merged into an independent organization: IRSN (institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety); 2) a draft bill has been proposed by the government to impose to nuclear operators new obligations concerning the transfer of information to the public; 3) nuclear safety authorities have drafted a new procedure in order to cope with the demand concerning modification of nuclear fuel management particularly the increase of the burn-up; 4) new evolutions concerning the management of a major nuclear crisis as a consequence of the terrorist attack on New-york and the accident at the AZF plant in Toulouse; 5) a point is made concerning the work of the WENRA association about the harmonization of the nuclear safety policies of its different members. (A.C.)