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Sample records for nuclear bodies behave

  1. Nuclear bodies: Built to boost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Iain A.

    2016-01-01

    The classic archetypal function of nuclear bodies is to accelerate specific reactions within their crowded space. In this issue, Tatomer et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201504043) provide the first direct evidence that the histone locus body acts to concentrate key factors required for the proper processing of histone pre-mRNAs. PMID:27241912

  2. Brain nuclear receptors and body weight regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural pathways, especially those in the hypothalamus, integrate multiple nutritional, hormonal, and neural signals, resulting in the coordinated control of body weight balance and glucose homeostasis. Nuclear receptors (NRs) sense changing levels of nutrients and hormones, and therefore play essent...

  3. Super obese behave different from simple and morbid obese patients in the changes of body composition after tailored one anastomosis gastric bypass (BAGUA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Garciacaballero

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Super obese patients behave different from simple and morbid obese patients when they reach final changes of body composition (BC after bariatric surgery. This has led us to tailor One Anastomosis Gastric Bypass (BAGUA to achieve better results in this group of patients. Patients and Methods: We studied 83 (37 diabetic and 46 nondiabetic BMI 30 and up patients who completed all evaluation appointment (preoperative, 10 days, 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after tailored BAGUA for diabesity. We used the Tanita body composition analyzer BC-420 MA by the method of single frequency impedance to analyze the evolution of BC in patients classified by BMI 30 - 34,9, 35 - 50, and >50. Results: While preoperative excess weight presented dramatic decreases after tailored BAGUA in all the groups, super obese have different final BC. Diabetics retained more fat mass and visceral fat, where super obese have double (14 kg that simple obese patients (6 kg, they lost more muscle mass, and have higher basal metabolism. The final BC is altered in all parameters if diabetes is added. Conclusions: The reduction of the preoperative excess weight is motivated largely by the tailored effect of BAGUA. Patients BMI 30-50 behaved homogeneous in BC after surgery while patients BMI >50 behave different. Super obese lose less weight, retained more fat mass, visceral fat, bone mass, and total water. This effect should be treated by more aggressive surgery by measuring the entire small intestine to make a proper exclusion (tailored to achieve homogeneous effects.

  4. The Role of Nuclear Bodies in Gene Expression and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Marie; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression. The compartmentalization of cellular processes, such as ribosome biogenesis, RNA processing, cellular response to stress, transcription, modification and assembly of spliceosomal snRNPs, histone gene synthesis and nuclear RNA retention, has significant implications for gene regulation. These functional nuclear domains include the nucleolus, nuclear speckle, nuclear stress body, transcription factory, Cajal body, Gemini of Cajal body, histone locus body and paraspeckle. We herein review the roles of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression and their relation to human health and disease. PMID:24040563

  5. The Role of Nuclear Bodies in Gene Expression and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Morimoto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression. The compartmentalization of cellular processes, such as ribosome biogenesis, RNA processing, cellular response to stress, transcription, modification and assembly of spliceosomal snRNPs, histone gene synthesis and nuclear RNA retention, has significant implications for gene regulation. These functional nuclear domains include the nucleolus, nuclear speckle, nuclear stress body, transcription factory, Cajal body, Gemini of Cajal body, histone locus body and paraspeckle. We herein review the roles of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression and their relation to human health and disease.

  6. Few-body models for nuclear astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Descouvemont

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We present applications of microscopic models to nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest, and we essentially focus on few-body systems. The calculation of radiative-capture and transfer cross sections is outlined, and we discuss the corresponding reaction rates. Microscopic theories are briefly presented, and we emphasize on the matrix elements of four-body systems. The microscopic extension of the R-matrix theory to nuclear reactions is described. Applications to the 2H(d, γ4He, 2H(d, p3H and 2H(d, n3He reactions are presented. We show the importance of the tensor force to reproduce the low-energy behaviour of the cross sections.

  7. Few-body models for nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descouvemont, P., E-mail: pdesc@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucléaire Théorique et Physique Mathématique, C.P. 229, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Baye, D., E-mail: dbaye@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucléaire Théorique et Physique Mathématique, C.P. 229, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Physique Quantique, C.P. 165/82, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Suzuki, Y., E-mail: suzuki@nt.sc.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Aoyama, S., E-mail: aoyama@cc.niigata-u.ac.jp [Center for Academic Information Service, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Arai, K., E-mail: arai@nagaoka-ct.ac.jp [Division of General Education, Nagaoka National College of Technology, 888 Nishikatakai, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-8532 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    We present applications of microscopic models to nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest, and we essentially focus on few-body systems. The calculation of radiative-capture and transfer cross sections is outlined, and we discuss the corresponding reaction rates. Microscopic theories are briefly presented, and we emphasize on the matrix elements of four-body systems. The microscopic extension of the R-matrix theory to nuclear reactions is described. Applications to the {sup 2}H(d, γ){sup 4}He, {sup 2}H(d, p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d, n){sup 3}He reactions are presented. We show the importance of the tensor force to reproduce the low-energy behaviour of the cross sections.

  8. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section...

  9. Nuclear, particle and many body physics

    CERN Document Server

    Morse, Philip M; Feshbach, Herman

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear, Particle and Many Body Physics, Volume II, is the second of two volumes dedicated to the memory of physicist Amos de-Shalit. The contributions in this volume are a testament to the respect he earned as a physicist and of the warm and rich affection he commanded as a personal friend. The book contains 41 chapters and begins with a study on the renormalization of rational Lagrangians. Separate chapters cover the scattering of high energy protons by light nuclei; approximation of the dynamics of proton-neutron systems; the scattering amplitude for the Gaussian potential; Coulomb excitati

  10. Regulation of neuronal differentiation by proteins associated with nuclear bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Förthmann

    Full Text Available Nuclear bodies are large sub-nuclear structures composed of RNA and protein molecules. The Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN protein localizes to Cajal bodies (CBs and nuclear gems. Diminished cellular concentration of SMN is associated with the neurodegenerative disease Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA. How nuclear body architecture and its structural components influence neuronal differentiation remains elusive. In this study, we analyzed the effects of SMN and two of its interaction partners in cellular models of neuronal differentiation. The nuclear 23 kDa isoform of Fibroblast Growth Factor - 2 (FGF-2(23 is one of these interacting proteins - and was previously observed to influence nuclear bodies by destabilizing nuclear gems and mobilizing SMN from Cajal bodies (CBs. Here we demonstrate that FGF-2(23 blocks SMN-promoted neurite outgrowth, and also show that SMN disrupts FGF-2(23-dependent transcription. Our results indicate that FGF-2(23 and SMN form an inactive complex that interferes with neuronal differentiation by mutually antagonizing nuclear functions. Coilin is another nuclear SMN binding partner and a marker protein for Cajal bodies (CBs. In addition, coilin is essential for CB function in maturation of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs. The role of coilin outside of Cajal bodies and its putative impacts in tissue differentiation are poorly defined. The present study shows that protein levels of nucleoplasmic coilin outside of CBs decrease during neuronal differentiation. Overexpression of coilin has an inhibitory effect on neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, we find that nucleoplasmic coilin inhibits neurite outgrowth independent of SMN binding revealing a new function for coilin in neuronal differentiation.

  11. Computational Nuclear Quantum Many-Body Problem: The UNEDF Project

    CERN Document Server

    Bogner, Scott; Carlson, Joseph A; Engel, Jonathan; Fann, George; Furnstahl, Richard J; Gandolfi, Stefano; Hagen, Gaute; Horoi, Mihai; Johnson, Calvin W; Kortelainen, Markus; Lusk, Ewing; Maris, Pieter; Nam, Hai Ah; Navratil, Petr; Nazarewicz, Witold; Ng, Esmond G; Nobre, Gustavo P A; Ormand, Erich; Papenbrock, Thomas; Pei, Junchen; Pieper, Steven C; Quaglioni, Sofia; Roche, Kenneth J; Sarich, Jason; Schunck, Nicolas; Sosonkina, Masha; Terasaki, Jun; Thompson, Ian J; Vary, James P; Wild, Stefan M

    2013-01-01

    The UNEDF project was a large-scale collaborative effort that applied high-performance computing to the nuclear quantum many-body problem. UNEDF demonstrated that close associations among nuclear physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists can lead to novel physics outcomes built on algorithmic innovations and computational developments. This review showcases a wide range of UNEDF science results to illustrate this interplay.

  12. Whole body counting at nuclear facilities in North America (Supplement)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saban, C.L.; Coleman, R.L.; Haskins, A.W.

    1985-10-01

    A survey was conducted on whole body counting at nuclear facilities. The survey was a supplement to an initial study done by the Tennessee Valley Authority in 1980. Data obtained from this study were used to compare current trends in whole body counting to those observed in the 1980 survey. The current status of this method of personnel monitoring is described, including a description of whole body counting systems in use, spectral analysis software, quality assurance programs, protocol for performing whole body counts, and the technical bases for whole body counting programs. 1 ref., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Nuclear bodies domain changes with microspore reprogramming to embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM Seguí-Simarro

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We analysed the presence of nuclear bodies and particularly Cajal bodies during representative stages of gametophytic and haploid embryogenic development in isolated microspore and anther cultures of a model system (Brassica napus cv. Topas and a recalcitrant species (Capsicum annuum L. var. Yolo Wonder B. The nuclear bodies domain is involved on several important roles on nuclear metabolism, and Cajal bodies are specifically involved on the storage and maturation of both snRNPs and snoRNPs, as well as other splicing factors, necessary for mRNA and pre-rRNA processing, but not directly on the transcription. In this study, immunofluorescence and immunogold labelling with anti-trimethylguanosine antibodies against the specific cap of snRNAs, ultrastructural and cytochemical analysis were performed on cryoprocessed samples at confocal and electron microscopy respectively. Results showed that Cajal bodies increase during the early stages of microspore embryogenic development (young pro-embryos, compared to microspore and pollen development. Our results suggest that Cajal bodies may have a role in the transcriptionally active, proliferative stages that characterise early microspore embryogenic development.

  14. Few-Body Problems in Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, H.O.U.

    2013-01-01

    The 3α-reaction is one of the key reactions in nuclear astrophysics. Since it is a three-body reaction direct measurement is impossible, and therefore the reaction rate must be estimated theoretically. In this contribution I will discuss uncertainties in this reaction rate both at very low...

  15. How are we behaving?

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    It’s almost two years since CERN introduced a Code of Conduct. The results may not be immediately measurable, but I’d like to think it’s made the lab a better place to be. The Code of Conduct is based on values that most of us immediately identify with, and so implementing it comes as second nature. Nevertheless, in an organisation of over 10,000 people, it’s useful to have a set of guidelines and there have been occasions on which it’s been necessary to remind people of them.   I use the figure of 10,000 advisedly since the Code of Conduct applies to us all, those on the CERN payroll as well as users of the lab’s facilities and people working for CERN contractors, as long as they are acting on CERN’s behalf. The Code also applies to us whether we are on the CERN site or anywhere else. CERN is a major presence in the region. The way we behave can have a significant influence on how our neighbours perceive us, and how the la...

  16. Thermodynamic properties of nuclear matter with three-body forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somà, V.; Bożek, P.

    2009-08-01

    We calculate thermodynamic quantities in symmetric nuclear matter within the self-consistent Green's functions method including three-body forces. The thermodynamic potential is computed directly from a diagrammatic expansion, implemented with the CD-Bonn and Nijmegen nucleon-nucleon potentials and the Urbana three-body forces. We present results for entropy and pressure up to temperatures of 20 MeV and densities of 0.32fm-3. While the pressure is sensitive to the inclusion of three-body forces, the entropy is not. The unstable spinodal region is identified and the critical temperature associated to the liquid-gas phase transition is determined. When three-body forces are added we find a strong reduction of the critical temperature, obtaining Tc≃12MeV.

  17. Thermodynamic properties of nuclear matter with three-body forces

    CERN Document Server

    Soma, V

    2009-01-01

    We calculate thermodynamic quantities in symmetric nuclear matter within the self-consistent Green's functions method including three-body forces. The thermodynamic potential is computed directly from a diagrammatic expansion, implemented with the CD-Bonn and Nijmegen nucleon-nucleon potentials and the Urbana three-body forces. We present results for entropy and pressure up to temperatures of 20 MeV and densities of 0.32 fm^-3. While the pressure is sensitive to the inclusion of three-body forces, the entropy is not. The unstable spinodal region is identified and the critical temperature associated to the liquid-gas phase transition is determined. When three-body forces are added we find a strong reduction of the critical temperature, obtaining T_c ~ 12 MeV.

  18. Whole body counting at nuclear facilities in North America-1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saban, C.L.; Coleman, R.L.; Haskins, A.W. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, AL (US))

    1984-04-01

    In 1984, the Tennessee Valley Authority conducted a survey of whole body counting (WBC) programs at 75 nuclear facilities in North America. The survey was a supplement to an initial survey performed in 1980. Data obtained from the study were used to compare current trends in whole body counting to those observed in the 1980 survey. This article presents the results of the 1984 survey in five areas: types of WBC systems, WBC spectral analysis software, protocol for performing WBCs, quality assurance programs, and technical bases for WBC programs.

  19. Multiple scattering and N-body approaches to nuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picklesimer, A.; Tandy, P.C.; Thaler, R.M.

    1983-02-01

    The relationship between conventional multiple scattering approaches and the recently developed N-body approaches to nuclear reactions is considered with a view towards elastic scattering applications. Connectivity expansions in the N-body approach and multiple scattering expansions in the Watson approach are developed by a common technique so that a comparison of the physical content of each can be made. In the N-body case this leads to a new derivation of the equations of Bencze, Redish, and Sloan in both particle-labelled and partition-labelled form and this yields new insight into minimal dimensionality of these equations and into the role of channel coupling schemes within this formulation. The relative simplicity and generality with which these results are obtained is designed to be easily understood by those unfamiliar with N-body formalisms. The two approaches are contrasted first for the three-particle problem and subsequently for the many-body problem. We argue that a strict adherence to the connected-kernel property which is advantageous for the three-particle problem may not be so advantageous for the many-body elastic scattering problem. Undesirable physical characteristics of the connectivity expansion for elastic scattering are identified and their rectification is discussed. The off-shell transformation associated with the N-body approach is examined critically. The origin of the multiplicity of N-body coupling schemes is elucidated. It is shown that a modified concept of connectivity, called inclusive connectivity, can be introduced to guide expansions which can be truncated in a physically meaningful way. The inclusive connectivity expansion is seen to be identical to the spectator expansion for an elementary projectile but differs in the case of a composite projectile.

  20. Many-Body Theory of the Electroweak Nuclear Response

    CERN Document Server

    Benhar, Omar

    2008-01-01

    After a brief review of the theoretical description of nuclei based on nonrelativistic many-body theory and realistic hamiltonians, these lectures focus on its application to the analysis of the electroweak response. Special emphasis is given to electron-nucleus scattering, whose experimental study has provided a wealth of information on nuclear structure and dynamics, exposing the limitations of the shell model. The extension of the formalism to the case of neutrino-nucleus interactions, whose quantitative understanding is required to reduce the systematic uncertainty of neutrino oscillation experiments, is also discussed.

  1. Nuclear structure with unitarily transformed two-body plus phenomenological three-body interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Anneke

    2011-02-02

    The importance of three-nucleon forces for a variety of nuclear structure phenomena is apparent in various investigations. This thesis provides a first step towards the inclusion of realistic three-nucleon forces by studying simple phenomenological threebody interactions. The Unitary Correlation Operator Method (UCOM) and the Similarity Renormalization Group (SRG) provide two different approaches to derive soft phase-shift equivalent nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions via unitary transformations. Although their motivations are quite different the NN interactions obtained with the two methods exhibit some similarities. The application of the UCOM- or SRG-transformed Argonne V18 potential in the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation and including the second-order energy corrections emerging from many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) reveals that the systematics of experimental ground-state energies can be reproduced by some of the interactions considering a series of closed-shell nuclei across the whole nuclear chart. However, charge radii are systematically underestimated, especially for intermediate and heavy nuclei. This discrepancy to experimental data is expected to result from neglected three-nucleon interactions. As first ansatz for a three-nucleon force, we consider a finite-range three-body interaction of Gaussian shape. Its influence on ground-state energies and charge radii is discussed in detail on the basis of HF plus MBPT calculations and shows a significant improvement in the description of experimental data. As the handling of the Gaussian three-body interaction is time-extensive, we show that it can be replaced by a regularized three-body contact interaction exhibiting a very similar behavior. An extensive study characterizes its properties in detail and confirms the improvements with respect to nuclear properties. To take into account information of an exact numerical solution of the nuclear eigenvalue problem, the No-Core Shell Model is applied to

  2. Applying Twisted Boundary Conditions for Few-body Nuclear Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Körber, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We describe and implement twisted boundary conditions for the deuteron and triton systems within finite-volumes using the nuclear lattice EFT formalism. We investigate the finite-volume dependence of these systems with different twists angles. We demonstrate how various finite-volume information can be used to improve calculations of binding energies in such a framework. Our results suggests that with appropriate twisting of boundaries, infinite-volume binding energies can be reliably extracted from calculations using modest volume sizes with cubic length $L\\approx8-14$ fm. Of particular importance is our derivation and numerical verification of three-body analogue of `i-periodic' twist angles that eliminate the leading order finite-volume effects to the three-body binding energy.

  3. Spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles repeatedly cycle through Cajal bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, David; Pridalová-Hnilicová, Jarmila; Novotný, Ivan; Huranová, Martina; Blazíková, Michaela; Wen, Xin; Sapra, Aparna K; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2008-06-01

    The Cajal body (CB) is a nuclear structure closely associated with import and biogenesis of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs). Here, we tested whether CBs also contain mature snRNPs and whether CB integrity depends on the ongoing snRNP splicing cycle. Sm proteins tagged with photoactivatable and color-maturing variants of fluorescent proteins were used to monitor snRNP behavior in living cells over time; mature snRNPs accumulated in CBs, traveled from one CB to another, and they were not preferentially replaced by newly imported snRNPs. To test whether CB integrity depends on the snRNP splicing cycle, two human orthologues of yeast proteins involved in distinct steps in spliceosome disassembly after splicing, hPrp22 and hNtr1, were depleted by small interfering RNA treatment. Surprisingly, depletion of either protein led to the accumulation of U4/U6 snRNPs in CBs, suggesting that reassembly of the U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP was delayed. Accordingly, a relative decrease in U5 snRNPs compared with U4/U6 snRNPs was observed in CBs, as well as in nuclear extracts of treated cells. Together, the data show that particular phases of the spliceosome cycle are compartmentalized in living cells, with reassembly of the tri-snRNP occurring in CBs.

  4. Recommendations on legislative and regulatory framework and regulatory body of nuclear security in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PU Jilong; LI Xiaoyan

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the definition of nuclear security that has been changing from the cold war age to the post-911 period, and clarifies the close relationship and yet a clear distinction between nuclear security, nuclear safety and nuclear safeguard. Based on analyses of the current state of nuclear security activities in China as well as the requirements and the law infrastructure, a legislative and regulatory framework of nuclear security and the mandate of a regulatory body in China are recommended.

  5. Visualized kinematics code for two-body nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E. J.; Chae, K. Y.

    2016-05-01

    The one or few nucleon transfer reaction has been a great tool for investigating the single-particle properties of a nucleus. Both stable and exotic beams are utilized to study transfer reactions in normal and inverse kinematics, respectively. Because many energy levels of the heavy recoil from the two-body nuclear reaction can be populated by using a single beam energy, identifying each populated state, which is not often trivial owing to high level-density of the nucleus, is essential. For identification of the energy levels, a visualized kinematics code called VISKIN has been developed by utilizing the Java programming language. The development procedure, usage, and application of the VISKIN is reported.

  6. Statistical theory of the many-body nuclear system

    CERN Document Server

    De Pace, A

    2002-01-01

    A recently proposed statistical theory of the mean fields associated with the ground and excited collective states of a generic many-body system is extended by increasing the dimensions of the P-space. In applying the new framework to nuclear matter, in addition to the mean field energies we obtain their fluctuations as well, together with the ones of the wavefunctions, in first order of the expansion in the complexity of the Q-space states. The physics described by the latter is assumed to be random. To extract numerical predictions out of our scheme we develop a schematic version of the approach, which, while much simplified, yields results of significance on the size of the error affecting the mean fields, on the magnitude of the residual effective interaction, on the ground state spectroscopic factor and on the mixing occurring between the vectors spanning the P-space.

  7. Are Girls Behaving like Boys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, Rosie

    2008-01-01

    This article explores some of the issues that have given rise to the perception of an increase in aggressive behaviour by females. It asserts that merely comparing girls' behaviour with that of boys, especially the claim that "girls are behaving like boys", trivialises the very real issues associated with females and aggression. This paper will…

  8. Localization of interchromatin granule cluster and Cajal body components in oocyte nuclear bodies of the hemipterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogolyubov, D S; Batalova, F M; Ogorzałek, A

    2007-10-01

    An oocyte nucleus contains different extrachromosomal nuclear domains collectively called nuclear bodies (NBs). In the present work we revealed, using immunogold labeling electron microscopy, some marker components of interchromatin granule clusters (IGCs) and Cajal bodies (CBs) in morphologically heterogeneous oocyte NBs studied in three hemipteran species: Notostira elongata, Capsodes gothicus (Miridae) and Velia caprai (Veliidae). Both IGC and CB counterparts were revealed in oocyte nuclei of the studied species but morphological and biochemical criteria were found to be not sufficient to determine carefully the define type of oocyte NBs. We found that the molecular markers of the CBs (coilin and non-phosphorylated RNA polymerase II) and IGCs (SC35 protein) may be localized in the same NB. Anti-SC35 antibody may decorate not only a granular material representing "true" interchromatin granules but also masks some fibrillar parts of complex NBs. Our first observations on the hemipteran oocyte NBs confirm the high complexity and heterogeneity of insect oocyte IGCs and CBs in comparison with those in mammalian somatic cells and amphibian oocytes.

  9. Projection techniques to approach the nuclear many-body problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of angular-momentum-projection goes beyond quantum-number restoration for symmetry-violated states. The angular-momentum-projection method can be viewed as an efficient way of truncating the shell-model space which is otherwise too large to handle. It defines a transformation from the intrinsic system, where dominant excitation modes in the low-energy region are identified with the concept of spontaneous symmetry breaking, to the laboratory frame with well-organized configuration states according to excitations. An energy-dictated, physically-guided shell-model truncation can then be carried out within the projected space and the Hamiltonian is thereby diagonalized in a compact basis. The present article reviews the theory of angular-momentum-projection applied in the nuclear many-body problem. Angular momentum projection emerges naturally if a deformed state is treated quantum-mechanically. To demonstrate how different physical problems in heavy, deformed nuclei can be efficiently described with different truncation schemes, we introduce the projected shell model and show examples of calculation in a basis with axial symmetry, a basis with triaxiality, and a basis with both quasiparticle and phonon excitations. Technical details of how to calculate the projected matrix elements and how to build a workable model with the projection techniques are given in the appendix.

  10. Nuclear electric dipole moment of three-body systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young-Ho; Lazauskas, Rimantas; Gudkov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Background: The existence of the electric dipole moment (EDM) of stable nuclei would be a direct evidence of the time reversal invariance violation (TRIV). Therefore, its measurement could be considered as a complement to the search for neutron and atomic EDMs.Purpose: To clarify theoretical issues related to calculations of EDMs in many-body systems we calculated the EDMs of the simplest nuclei.Method: For calculations of three-nucleon systems EDMs we used TRIV potentials based on the meson exchange theory, as well as the ones derived by using effective field theories (EFT) with and without explicit pions. Nuclear wave functions were obtained by solving Faddeev equations in configuration space for the complete Hamiltonians comprising both TRIV and realistic strong interactions.Results: The expressions for EDMs of 3He and 3H are given in terms of meson exchange couplings and low energy constants of EFT potentials.Conclusions: The obtained results are compared with the previous calculations of 3He EDM and with time reversal invariance violating effects in neutron-deuteron scattering. The model dependence on strong interactions is discussed.

  11. Effects of Microscopic Three-body Forces in Asymmetric Nuclear Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The efiects of microscopic three-body forces on the equatioil of state(EOS)and the single particle properties of isospin asymmetric nuclear matter have been studied within Brueckner-Hartree-Fock framework~[1]The microscopic three-body force model constructed from meson exchange current approach in Ref.~[2] has been extended to isospin asymmetric nuclear matter

  12. Structural components of the nuclear body in nuclei of Allium cepa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear bodies have long been noted in interphase nuclei of plant cells,but their structural component,origin and function are still unclear by now.The present work showed in onion cells the nuclear bodies appeared as a spherical structure about 0.3 to 0.8 μm in diameter.They possibly were formed in nucleolus and subsequently released,and entered into nucleoplasm.Observation through cytochemical staining method at the ultrastructural level confirmed that nuclear bodies consisted of ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) and silver-stainable proteins.Immunocytochemical results revealed that nuclear bodies contained no DNA and ribosomal gene transcription factor (UBF).Based on these data,we suggested that nuclear bodies are not related to the ribosome or other gene transcription activities,instead they may act as subnuclear structures for RNPs transport from nucleolus to cytoplasm,and may also be involved in splicing of pre-mRNAs.

  13. Detecting body cavity bombs with nuclear quadrupole resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael London

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a technology with great potential for detecting hidden explosives. Past NQR research has studied the detection of land mines and bombs concealed within luggage and packages. This thesis focuses on an NQR application that has received less attention and little or no publicly available research: detecting body cavity bombs (BCBs). BCBs include explosives that have been ingested, inserted into orifices, or surgically implanted. BCBs present a threat to aviation and secure facilities. They are extremely difficult to detect with the technology currently employed at security checkpoints. To evaluate whether or not NQR can be used to detect BCBs, a computational model is developed to assess how the dielectric properties of biological tissue affect the radio frequency magnetic field employed in NQR (0.5-5MHz). The relative permittivity of some biological tissue is very high (over 1,000 at 1MHz), making it conceivable that there is a significant effect on the electromagnetic field. To study this effect, the low-frequency approximation known as the Darwin model is employed. First, the electromagnetic field of a coil is calculated in free space. Second, a dielectric object or set of objects is introduced, and the free-space electric field is modified to accommodate the dielectric object ensuring that the relevant boundary conditions are obeyed. Finally, the magnetic field associated with the corrected electric field is calculated. This corrected magnetic field is evaluated with an NQR simulation to estimate the impact of dielectric tissue on NQR measurements. The effect of dielectric tissue is shown to be small, thus obviating a potential barrier to BCB detection. The NQR model presented may assist those designing excitation and detection coils for NQR. Some general coil design considerations and strategies are discussed.

  14. Cell cycle-dependent alteration in NAC1 nuclear body dynamics and morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei-Hsun; Hung, Shen-Hsiu; Ren, Tina; Shih, Ie-Ming; Tseng, Yiider

    2011-02-01

    NAC1, a BTB/POZ family member, has been suggested to participate in maintaining the stemness of embryonic stem cells and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancer. In ovarian cancer, NAC1 upregulation is associated with disease aggressiveness and with the development of chemoresistance. Like other BTB/POZ proteins, NAC1 forms discrete nuclear bodies in non-dividing cells. To investigate the biological role of NAC1 nuclear bodies, we characterized the expression dynamics of NAC1 nuclear bodies during different phases of the cell cycle. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assays revealed that NAC1 was rapidly exchanged between the nucleoplasm and NAC1 nuclear bodies in interphase cells. The number of NAC1 bodies significantly increased and their size decreased in the S phase as compared to the G0/G1 and G2 phases. NAC1 nuclear bodies disappeared and NAC1 became diffuse during mitosis. NAC1 nuclear bodies reappeared immediately after completion of mitosis. These results indicate that a cell cycle-dependent regulatory mechanism controls NAC1 body formation in the nucleus and suggest that NAC1 body dynamics are associated with mitosis or cytokinesis.

  15. Effect of three-body interaction on hot asymmetric nuclear matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zeng-Hua; Zuo Wei; Lu Guang-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    The properties of hot asymmetric nuclear matter are studied in the framework of the finite temperature BruecknerHartree-Fock theory that is extended to include the contribution of microscopic three-body forces. We give the variation of the critical temperature with the asymmetry parameter and show the effect brought by this three-body repulsive potential on the value of the critical asymmetry of the phase transition for asymmetric nuclear matter. Owing to the additional repulsion provided by three-body forces, this value decreases. In addition, the domain of mechanical instability for hot nuclear matter is also indicated, which gradually shrinks with increasing asymmetry and temperature.

  16. Towards many-body based nuclear reaction modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilaire, Stéphane; Goriely, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    The increasing need for cross sections far from the valley of stability poses a challenge for nuclear reaction models. So far, predictions of cross sections have relied on more or less phenomenological approaches, depending on parameters adjusted to available experimental data or deduced from systematic expressions. While such predictions are expected to be reliable for nuclei not too far from the experimentally known regions, it is clearly preferable to use more fundamental approaches, based on sound physical principles, when dealing with very exotic nuclei. Thanks to the high computer power available today, all the ingredients required to model a nuclear reaction can now be (and have been) microscopically (or semi-microscopically) determined starting from the information provided by a nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. This concerns nuclear masses, optical model potential, nuclear level densities, photon strength functions, as well as fission barriers. All these nuclear model ingredients, traditionally given by phenomenological expressions, now have a microscopic counterpart implemented in the TALYS nuclear reaction code. We are thus now able to perform fully microscopic cross section calculations. The quality of these ingredients and the impact of using them instead of the usually adopted phenomenological parameters will be discussed. Perspectives for the coming years will be drawn on the improvements one can expect.

  17. 40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear... Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. The microbial pest control agent inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear...

  18. SUMOylation regulates the nuclear mobility of CREB binding protein and its association with nuclear bodies in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Colm M.; Kindle, Karin B.; Collins, Hilary M. [Gene Regulation Group, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Heery, David M., E-mail: david.heery@nottingham.ac.uk [Gene Regulation Group, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-01

    The lysine acetyltransferase CREB binding protein (CBP) is required for chromatin modification and transcription at many gene promoters. In fixed cells, a large proportion of CBP colocalises to PML or nuclear bodies. Using live cell imaging, we show here that YFP-tagged CBP expressed in HEK293 cells undergoes gradual accumulation in nuclear bodies, some of which are mobile and migrate towards the nuclear envelope. Deletion of a short lysine-rich domain that contains the major SUMO acceptor sites of CBP abrogated its ability to be SUMO modified, and prevented its association with endogenous SUMO-1/PML speckles in vivo. This SUMO-defective CBP showed enhanced ability to co-activate AML1-mediated transcription. Deletion mapping revealed that the SUMO-modified region was not sufficient for targeting CBP to PML bodies, as C-terminally truncated mutants containing this domain showed a strong reduction in accumulation at PML bodies. Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) experiments revealed that YFP-CBP{Delta}998-1087 had a retarded recovery time in the nucleus, as compared to YFP-CBP. These results indicate that SUMOylation regulates CBP function by influencing its shuttling between nuclear bodies and chromatin microenvironments.

  19. The proteins of intra-nuclear bodies: a data-driven analysis of sequence, interaction and expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodén Mikael

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cajal bodies, nucleoli, PML nuclear bodies, and nuclear speckles are morpohologically distinct intra-nuclear structures that dynamically respond to cellular cues. Such nuclear bodies are hypothesized to play important regulatory roles, e.g. by sequestering and releasing transcription factors in a timely manner. While the nucleolus and nuclear speckles have received more attention experimentally, the PML nuclear body and the Cajal body are still incompletely characterized in terms of their roles and protein complement. Results By collating recent experimentally verified data, we find that almost 1000 proteins in the mouse nuclear proteome are known to associate with one or more of the nuclear bodies. Their gene ontology terms highlight their regulatory roles: splicing is confirmed to be a core activity of speckles and PML nuclear bodies house a range of proteins involved in DNA repair. We train support-vector machines to show that nuclear proteins contain discriminative sequence features that can be used to identify their intra-nuclear body associations. Prediction accuracy is highest for nucleoli and nuclear speckles. The trained models are also used to estimate the full protein complement of each nuclear body. Protein interactions are found primarily to link proteins in the nuclear speckles with proteins from other compartments. Cell cycle expression data provide support for increased activity in nucleoli, nuclear speckles and PML nuclear bodies especially during S and G2 phases. Conclusions The large-scale analysis of the mouse nuclear proteome sheds light on the functional organization of physically embodied intra-nuclear compartments. We observe partial support for the hypothesis that the physical organization of the nucleus mirrors functional modularity. However, we are unable to unambiguously identify proteins' intra-nuclear destination, suggesting that critical drivers behind of intra-nuclear translocation are yet to

  20. Involvement of PML nuclear bodies in CBP degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Germain, Jonathan R; Chen, Jihong; Li, Qiao

    2008-11-01

    Transcriptional coactivator CBP is involved in the regulation of an array of biological processes including cellular differentiation, proliferation and survival. The function of CBP is critical for proper embryonic development and is relevant in cancer biology. Although much is known about the functional roles of CBP in these cellular processes, fewer studies have assessed what in turn regulates CBP activity per se. It has been reported that CBP colocalizes with PML bodies which are nuclear structures disrupted in acute promyelocytic leukemia. However, the biological relevance of CBP localization to PML nuclear bodies is still unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that histone deacetylase inhibitors such as valproic acid, a therapeutically relevant compound used for the treatment of epilepsy, modulates CBP activity. Valproic acid reduces the steady-state level of CBP by inducing CBP degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, while increasing the colocalization of CBP with ubiquitin nuclear speckles and with PML nuclear bodies. Our results suggest that PML nuclear bodies are nuclear sites involved in the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of CBP, providing novel insights in the regulation of CBP function and highlighting the relevance of its localization to PML nuclear bodies.

  1. Simulation of general three-body interactions in a nuclear magnetic resonance ensemble quantum computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Three-body interaction plays an important role in many-body physics,and quantum computer is efficient in simulating many-body interactions. We have experimentally demonstrated the general three-body interactions in a three-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance ensemble quantum computer. Using a nuclear magnetic resonance computer we implemented general forms of three-body interactions including σ 1x σ z2 σ x3 and σ 1x σ z2 σ y3 . The results show good agreement between theory and experiment. We have also given a concise and practical formula for a general n-body interaction in terms of one-and two-body interactions.

  2. Cluster variational method for nuclear matter with the three-body force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, M.; Togashi, H.; Yamamuro, S.; Nakazato, K.; Suzuki, H. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 Japan and Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Yamazaki 2641, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2012-11-12

    We report the current status of our project to construct a new nuclear equation of state (EOS), which may be used for supernova numerical simulations, based on the cluster variational method starting from the realistic nuclear Hamiltonian. We also take into account a higher-order correction to the energy of the nuclear three-body force (TBF). The nuclear EOSs with and without the higher-order TBF correction at zero temperature are very close to each other, when parameters are readjusted so as to reproduce the empirical saturation data.

  3. Many-body theory of nuclear and neutron star matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandharipande, V.R.; Akmal, A.; Ravenhall, D.G. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1998-06-01

    We present results obtained for nuclei, nuclear and neutron star matter, and neutron star structure obtained with the recent Argonne v{sub 18} two- nucleon and Urbana IX three-nucleon interactions including relativistic boost corrections. These interactions predict that matter will undergo a transition to a spin layered phase with neutral pion condensation. We also consider the possibility of a transition to quark matter. (orig.)

  4. Simulation of the four-body interaction in a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU WenZhang; ZHANG JingFu; LONG GuiLu

    2009-01-01

    The four-body interaction plays an important role in many-body systems,and it can exhibit interesting phase transition behaviors.In this letter,we report the experimental demonstration of a four-body interaction in a four-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processor.The strongly modulating pulse is used to implement spin selective excitation.The results show a good agreement between theory and experiment.

  5. Periodic expression of Sm proteins parallels formation of nuclear Cajal bodies and cytoplasmic snRNP-rich bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoliński, Dariusz J; Wróbel, Bogdan; Noble, Anna; Zienkiewicz, Agnieszka; Górska-Brylass, Alicja

    2011-11-01

    Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) play a fundamental role in pre-mRNA processing in the nucleus. The biogenesis of snRNPs involves a sequence of events that occurs in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Despite the wealth of biochemical information about the cytoplasmic assembly of snRNPs, little is known about the spatial organization of snRNPs in the cytoplasm. In the cytoplasm of larch microsporocytes, a cyclic appearance of bodies containing small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and Sm proteins was observed during anther meiosis. We observed a correlation between the occurrence of cytoplasmic snRNP bodies, the levels of Sm proteins, and the dynamic formation of Cajal bodies. Larch microsporocytes were used for these studies. This model is characterized by natural fluctuations in the level of RNA metabolism, in which periods of high transcriptional activity are separated from periods of low transcriptional activity. In designing experiments, the authors considered the differences between the nuclear and cytoplasmic phases of snRNP maturation and generated a hypothesis about the direct participation of Sm proteins in a molecular switch triggering the formation of Cajal bodies.

  6. Reducible chiral four-body interactions in nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, N

    2015-01-01

    The method of unitary transformations generates five classes of leading-order reducible chiral four-nucleon interactions which involve pion-exchanges and a spin-spin contact-term. Their first-order contributions to the energy per particle of isospin-symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter are evaluated in detail. For most of the closed four-loop diagrams the occurring integrals over four Fermi-spheres can be reduced to easily manageable one- or two-parameter integrals. One observes substantial cancelations among the different contributions arising from 2-ring and 1-ring diagrams. Altogether, the net attraction generated by the chiral four-nucleon interaction does not exceed values of $-1.3$\\,MeV for densities $\\rho<2\\rho_0$.

  7. Reducible chiral four-body interactions in nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, N.; Milkus, R. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department T39, Garching (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The method of unitary transformations generates five classes of leading-order reducible chiral four-nucleon interactions which involve pion exchanges and a spin-spin contact term. Their first-order contributions to the energy per particle of isospin-symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter are evaluated in detail. For most of the closed four-loop diagrams the occurring integrals over four Fermi spheres can be reduced to easily manageable one- or two-parameter integrals. One finds substantial compensations among the different contributions arising from 2-ring and 1-ring diagrams. Altogether, the net attraction generated by the chiral four-nucleon interaction does not exceed values of -1.3 MeV for densities ρ < 2ρ{sub 0}. (orig.)

  8. Formation of Few-Body Clusters in Nuclear Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Beyer, M

    2000-01-01

    Starting from a suitably modified three-body equation to include dominant medium effects such as self energy corrections and Pauli blocking I present results on several observables relevant for the formation of light clusters in a heavy ion collision at moderate energies. Properly taking into account the medium leads to the Mott effect, larger reaction rates, in turn, faster time scales for the deuteron life time and chemical relaxation time. Within a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck approach to simulate the heavy ion reactions, also the total number of deuterons and the energy spectrum are significantly changed due to medium effects in the elementary cross sections entering into the collision integrals.

  9. Weak response of cold symmetric nuclear matter at three-body cluster level

    CERN Document Server

    Lovato, Alessandro; Benhar, Omar

    2012-01-01

    We studied the Fermi and Gamow-Teller responses of cold symmetric nuclear matter within a unified dynamical model, suitable to account for both short- and long-range correlation effects. The formalism of correlated basis functions has been used to construct two-body effective interactions and one-body effective weak operators. The inclusion of the three-body cluster term allowed for incorporating in the effective interaction a realistic model of three- nucleon forces, namely the UIX potential. Moreover, the sizable unphysical dependence of the effective weak operator is removed once the three-body cluster term is taken into account.

  10. Low nuclear body formation and tax SUMOylation do not prevent NF-kappaB promoter activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnet Amandine

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Tax protein encoded by Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a powerful activator of the NF-κB pathway, a property critical for HTLV-1-induced immortalization of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Tax permanently stimulates this pathway at a cytoplasmic level by activating the IκB kinase (IKK complex and at a nuclear level by enhancing the binding of the NF-κB factor RelA to its cognate promoters and by forming nuclear bodies, believed to represent transcriptionally active structures. In previous studies, we reported that Tax ubiquitination and SUMOylation play a critical role in Tax localization and NF-κB activation. Indeed, analysis of lysine Tax mutants fused or not to ubiquitin or SUMO led us to propose a two-step model in which Tax ubiquitination first intervenes to activate IKK while Tax SUMOylation is subsequently required for promoter activation within Tax nuclear bodies. However, recent studies showing that ubiquitin or SUMO can modulate Tax activities in either the nucleus or the cytoplasm and that SUMOylated Tax can serve as substrate for ubiquitination suggested that Tax ubiquitination and SUMOylation may mediate redundant rather than successive functions. Results In this study, we analyzed the properties of a new Tax mutant that is properly ubiquitinated, but defective for both nuclear body formation and SUMOylation. We report that reducing Tax SUMOylation and nuclear body formation do not alter the ability of Tax to activate IKK, induce RelA nuclear translocation, and trigger gene expression from a NF-κB promoter. Importantly, potent NF-κB promoter activation by Tax despite low SUMOylation and nuclear body formation is also observed in T cells, including CD4+ primary T lymphocytes. Moreover, we show that Tax nuclear bodies are hardly observed in HTLV-1-infected T cells. Finally, we provide direct evidence that the degree of NF-κB activation by Tax correlates with the level of Tax ubiquitination, but not

  11. Nuclear actin is partially associated with Cajal bodies in human cells in culture and relocates to the nuclear periphery after infection of cells by adenovirus 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedge, L J E; Morrison, E E; Blair, G E; Walker, J H

    2005-02-15

    Cajal bodies are intra-nuclear structures enriched in proteins involved in transcription and mRNA processing. In this study, immunofluorescence microscopy experiments using a highly specific antibody to actin revealed nuclear actin spots that colocalized in part with p80 coilin-positive Cajal bodies. Actin remained associated with Cajal bodies in cells extracted to reveal the nuclear matrix. Adenovirus infection, which is known to disassemble Cajal bodies, resulted in loss of actin from these structures late in infection. In infected cells, nuclear actin was observed to relocate to structures at the periphery of the nucleus, inside the nuclear envelope. Based on these findings, it is suggested that actin may play an important role in the organization or function of the Cajal body.

  12. Few-body calculations of η-nuclear quasibound states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Barnea

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on precise hyperspherical-basis calculations of ηNN and ηNNN quasibound states, using energy dependent ηN interaction potentials derived from coupled-channel models of the S11 N⁎(1535 nucleon resonance. The ηN attraction generated in these models is too weak to generate a two-body bound state. No ηNN bound-state solution was found in our calculations in models where ReaηN≲1 fm, with aηN the ηN scattering length, covering thereby the majority of N⁎(1535 resonance models. A near-threshold ηNNN bound-state solution, with η separation energy of less than 1 MeV and width of about 15 MeV, was obtained in the 2005 Green–Wycech model where Re aηN≈1 fm. The role of handling self consistently the subthreshold ηN interaction is carefully studied.

  13. Few-body calculations of $\\eta$-nuclear quasibound states

    CERN Document Server

    Barnea, N; Gal, A

    2015-01-01

    We report on precise hyperspherical-basis calculations of $\\eta NN$ and $\\eta NNN$ quasibound states, using energy dependent $\\eta N$ interaction potentials derived from coupled-channel models of the $S_{11}$ $N^{\\ast}(1535)$ nucleon resonance. The $\\eta N$ attraction generated in these models is too weak to generate a two-body bound state. No $\\eta NN$ bound-state solution was found in our calculations in models where Re $a_{\\eta N}\\lesssim 1$ fm, with $a_{\\eta N}$ the $\\eta N$ scattering length, covering thereby the majority of $N^{\\ast}(1535)$ resonance models. A near-threshold $\\eta NNN$ bound-state solution, with $\\eta$ separation energy of less than 1 MeV and width of about 15 MeV, was obtained in the 2005 Green-Wycech model where Re $a_{\\eta N}\\approx 1$ fm. The role of handling self consistently the subthreshold $\\eta N$ interaction is carefully studied.

  14. Few-body calculations of η-nuclear quasibound states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnea, N.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2015-07-01

    We report on precise hyperspherical-basis calculations of ηNN and ηNNN quasibound states, using energy dependent ηN interaction potentials derived from coupled-channel models of the S11N* (1535) nucleon resonance. The ηN attraction generated in these models is too weak to generate a two-body bound state. No ηNN bound-state solution was found in our calculations in models where ReaηN ≲ 1 fm, with aηN the ηN scattering length, covering thereby the majority of N* (1535) resonance models. A near-threshold ηNNN bound-state solution, with η separation energy of less than 1 MeV and width of about 15 MeV, was obtained in the 2005 Green-Wycech model where Re aηN ≈ 1 fm. The role of handling self consistently the subthreshold ηN interaction is carefully studied.

  15. Body-fixed relativistic molecular Hamiltonian and its application to nuclear spin-rotation tensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Liu, Wenjian

    2013-04-07

    A relativistic molecular Hamiltonian that describes electrons fully relativistically and nuclei quasi-relativistically is proposed and transformed from the laboratory to the body-fixed frame of reference. As a first application of the resulting body-fixed relativistic molecular Hamiltonian, the long anticipated relativistic theory of nuclear spin-rotation (NSR) tensor is formulated rigorously. A "relativistic mapping" between experimental NSR and NMR is further proposed, which is of great value in establishing high-precision absolute NMR shielding scales.

  16. Do you BEHAVE? - Application of the BehavePlus fire modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pat Andrews

    2010-01-01

    The BehavePlus fire modeling system is the successor to BEHAVE, which was first used in the field in 1984. It is public domain software, available for free use on personal computers. Information on user communities and fire management applications can be useful in designing next generation systems. Several sources of information about BehavePlus are summarized to...

  17. Role of estrogen receptor binding and transcriptional activity in the stimulation of hyperestrogenism and nuclear bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J H; Hardin, J W; Padykula, H A; Cardasis, C A

    1978-06-01

    The effects of estradiol and nafoxidine on nuclear estrogen receptor binding, RNA polymerase activities, and uterine ultrastructure were studied. Animals were either injected with estradiol, implanted with estradiol/paraffin pellets, or injected with nafoxidine. Animals treated with nafoxidine or estradiol implants showed sustained long-term nuclear retention of estrogen receptor and increased nuclear RNA polymerase activities for up to 72 hr. A single injection of estradiol caused initial increases in these variables which returned to control levels by 24 hr after hormone treatment. Uterine tissue was examined by light and electron microscopy 72 hr after hormone treatments. Uteri from eith estradiol-implanted or nafoxidine-treated animals showed markedly increased hypertrophy of the luminal epithelial cells. Nuclei in sections of the uteri of these hyperestrogenized animals displayed a large number and wide array of nuclear bodies composed of a filamentous capsule and granular cores. We conclude that hyperestrogenization, a condition that eventually results in abnormal cell growth, is correlated with increased and sustained nuclear binding of the estrogen receptor, increased and sustained RNA polymerase activity, and the appearance of nuclear bodies.

  18. Nuclear three-body problem in the complex energy plane: Complex-Scaling-Slater method

    CERN Document Server

    Kruppa, A T; Nazarewicz, W; Michel, N

    2013-01-01

    The physics of open quantum systems is an interdisciplinary area of research. The nuclear "openness" manifests itself through the presence of the many-body continuum representing various decay, scattering, and reaction channels. As the radioactive nuclear beam experimentation extends the known nuclear landscape towards the particle drip lines, the coupling to the continuum space becomes exceedingly more important. Of particular interest are weakly bound and unbound nuclear states appearing around particle thresholds. Theories of such nuclei must take into account their open quantum nature. To describe open quantum systems, we introduce a Complex Scaling (CS) approach in the Slater basis. We benchmark it with the complex-energy Gamow Shell Model (GSM) by studying energies and wave functions of the bound and unbound states of the two-neutron halo nucleus 6He viewed as an $\\alpha$+ n + n cluster system. In the CS approach, we use the Slater basis, which exhibits the correct asymptotic behavior at large distances...

  19. Nuclear symmetry energy and the role of three-body forces

    CERN Document Server

    Goudarzi, S; Haensel, P

    2016-01-01

    Density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy as well as its partial wave decomposition is studied within the framework of lowest-order constrained variational (LOCV) method using AV18 two-body interaction supplemented by UIX three-body force. The main focus of the present work is to introduce a revised version of three-body force which is based on an isospin-dependent parametrization of coefficients in the UIX force, in order to overcome the inability to produce correct saturation-point parameters} in the framework of LOCV method. We find that employing the new model of {\\ph three-body force} in the LOCV formalism leads to successfully reproducing the semi-empirical parameters of cold nuclear matter, including} $E_{sym}(\\rho_0)$, $L$, and $K_{sym}$. All our models of three-body force combined with AV18 two-body force give maximum neutron star mass higher than $2\\;M_\\odot$. The fraction of protons in the nucleon cores of neutron stars strongly depends on the three-body force parametrization.

  20. Dynamic regulation of ARGONAUTE4 within multiple nuclear bodies in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey F Li

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation directed by 24-nucleotide small RNAs involves the small RNA-binding protein ARGONAUTE4 (AGO4, and it was previously shown that AGO4 localizes to nucleolus-adjacent Cajal bodies, sites of snRNP complex maturation. Here we demonstrate that AGO4 also localizes to a second class of nuclear bodies, called AB-bodies, which are found immediately adjacent to condensed 45S ribosomal DNA (rDNA sequences. AB-bodies also contain other proteins involved in RNA-directed DNA methylation including NRPD1b (a subunit of the RNA Polymerase IV complex, RNA PolIV, NRPD2 (a second subunit of this complex, and the DNA methyltransferase DRM2. These two classes of AGO4 bodies are structurally independent--disruption of one class does not affect the other--suggesting a dynamic regulation of AGO4 within two distinct nuclear compartments in Arabidopsis. Abolishing Cajal body formation in a coilin mutant reduced overall AGO4 protein levels, and coilin dicer-like3 double mutants showed a small decrease in DNA methylation beyond that seen in dicer-like3 single mutants, suggesting that Cajal bodies are required for a fully functioning DNA methylation system in Arabidopsis.

  1. Human Homolog of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI) is a marker of cellular proliferation associated with nuclear bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmehdawi, Fatima; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Adams, Matthew [BioScreening Technology Group, Biomedical Health Research Center, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); High, Alec S. [Department of Histopathology, Bexley Wing, St. James' s University Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Johnson, Colin A., E-mail: c.johnson@leeds.ac.uk [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Robinson, Philip A. [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-01

    HHARI (also known as ARIH1) is an ubiquitin-protein ligase and is the cognate of the E2, UbcH7 (UBE2L3). To establish a functional role for HHARI in cellular proliferation processes, we performed a reverse genetics screen that identified n=86/522 (16.5%) ubiquitin conjugation components that have a statistically significant effect on cell proliferation, which included HHARI as a strong hit. We then produced and validated a panel of specific antibodies that establish HHARI as both a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein that is expressed in all cell types studied. HHARI was expressed at higher levels in nuclei, and co-localized with nuclear bodies including Cajal bodies (p80 coilin, NOPP140), PML and SC35 bodies. We confirmed reduced cellular proliferation after ARIH1 knockdown with individual siRNA duplexes, in addition to significantly increased levels of apoptosis, an increased proportion of cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle, and significant reductions in total cellular RNA levels. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, there are higher levels of HHARI expression associated with increased levels of proliferation, compared to healthy control tissues. We demonstrate that HHARI is associated with cellular proliferation, which may be mediated through its interaction with UbcH7 and modification of proteins in nuclear bodies. -- Highlights: ► We produce and validate new antibody reagents for the ubiquitin-protein ligase HHARI. ► HHARI colocalizes with nuclear bodies including Cajal, PML and SC35 bodies. ► We establish new functions in cell proliferation regulation for HHARI. ► Increased HHARI expression associates with squamous cell carcinoma and proliferation.

  2. Direct visualization of the co-transcriptional assembly of a nuclear body by noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yuntao S; Sunwoo, Hongjae; Zhang, Bin; Spector, David L

    2011-01-01

    The cell nucleus is a highly compartmentalized organelle harbouring a variety of dynamic membraneless nuclear bodies. How these subnuclear domains are established and maintained is not well understood. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanism of how one nuclear body, the paraspeckle, is assembled and organized. Paraspeckles are discrete ribonucleoprotein bodies found in mammalian cells and implicated in nuclear retention of hyperedited mRNAs. We developed a live-cell imaging system that allows for the inducible transcription of Men ɛ/β (also known as Neat1; ref. 12) noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) and the direct visualization of the recruitment of paraspeckle proteins. Using this system, we demonstrate that Men ɛ/β ncRNAs are essential to initiate the de novo assembly of paraspeckles. These newly formed structures effectively harbour nuclear-retained mRNAs confirming that they are bona fide functional paraspeckles. By three independent approaches, we show that it is the act of Men ɛ/β transcription, but not ncRNAs alone, that regulates paraspeckle maintenance. Finally, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analyses supported a critical structural role for Men ɛ/β ncRNAs in paraspeckle organization. This study establishes a model in which Men ɛ/β ncRNAs serve as a platform to recruit proteins to assemble paraspeckles.

  3. Applications of nuclear techniques for in vivo body composition studies at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, S.H.; Ellis, K.J.; Vartsky, D.; Vaswani, A.N.; Wielopolski, L.

    1981-01-01

    A series of technical developments and their clinical applications in various nuclear technologies at Brookhaven National Laboratory is described. These include the development of a portable neutron activation facility for measuring cadmium in vivo in kidney and liver, a technique for the measurement of body iron utilizing nuclear resonant scattering of gamma rays, a non-invasive measure of the skeletal levels of lead by an x-ray fluorescence technique, and the development of a pulsed Van de Graaff generator as a source of pulsed neutrons for the measurement of lung silicon. (ACR)

  4. Stress-induced Nuclear Bodies Are Sites of Accumulation of Pre-mRNA Processing Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denegri, Marco; Chiodi, Ilaria; Corioni, Margherita; Cobianchi, Fabio; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) HAP (hnRNP A1 interacting protein) is a multifunctional protein with roles in RNA metabolism, transcription, and nuclear structure. After stress treatments, HAP is recruited to a small number of nuclear bodies, usually adjacent to the nucleoli, which consist of clusters of perichromatin granules and are depots of transcripts synthesized before stress. In this article we show that HAP bodies are sites of accumulation for a subset of RNA processing factors and are related to Sam68 nuclear bodies (SNBs) detectable in unstressed cells. Indeed, HAP and Sam68 are both present in SNBs and in HAP bodies, that we rename “stress-induced SNBs.” The determinants required for the redistribution of HAP lie between residue 580 and 788. Different portions of this region direct the recruitment of the green fluorescent protein to stress-induced SNBs, suggesting an interaction of HAP with different components of the bodies. With the use of the 580–725 region as bait in a two-hybrid screening, we have selected SRp30c and 9G8, two members of the SR family of splicing factors. Splicing factors are differentially affected by heat shock: SRp30c and SF2/ASF are efficiently recruited to stress-induced SNBs, whereas the distribution of SC35 is not perturbed. We propose that the differential sequestration of splicing factors could affect processing of specific transcripts. Accordingly, the formation of stress-induced SNBs is accompanied by a change in the splicing pattern of the adenovirus E1A transcripts. PMID:11694584

  5. Microscopic Three-Body Force Effect on Nucleon-Nucleon Cross Sections in Symmetric Nuclear Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-Fei; ZUO Wei; Lombardo Umberto; LI Zeng-Hua; LI Jun-Qing

    2008-01-01

    We provide a microscopic calculation of neutron-proton and proton-proton cross sections in symmetric nuclear matter at various densities, using the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation scheme with the Argonne V14 potential including the contribution of microscopic three-body force. We investigate separately the effects of three-body force on the effective mass and on the scattering amplitude. In the present calculation, the rearrangement contribution of three-body force is considered, which will reduce the neutron and proton effective mass, and depress the amplitude of cross section. The effect of three body force is shown to be repulsive, especially in high densities and large momenta, which will suppress the cross section markedly.

  6. Three-body Effect on Equation of State of Spin-polarized Nuclear Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZuoWei

    2003-01-01

    The equation of state (EOS) of spin-polarized nuclear matter has been investigated within the spin-dependent; Brueckner-Hartree-Fock framework by adopting the realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction supplemented with a microscopic three-body force. The three-body force effects have been studied and stressed with a special attention. The calculated results are given in Fig.1. It is seen that; in the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock framework the predicted energy per particle of spin-polarized nuclear matter versus the neutron and proton spin-polarization parameters fulfills a quadratic law in the whole range of spin-polarization. The related physical quantities such as spin the Landau parameters Go in spin channel and G′0 in spin-isospin channel, have been also calculated.

  7. Role of ND10 nuclear bodies in the chromatin repression of HSV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Haidong; Zheng, Yi

    2016-04-05

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a neurotropic virus that establishes lifelong latent infection in human ganglion sensory neurons. This unique life cycle necessitates an intimate relation between the host defenses and virus counteractions over the long course of infection. Two important aspects of host anti-viral defense, nuclear substructure restriction and epigenetic chromatin regulation, have been intensively studied in the recent years. Upon viral DNA entering the nucleus, components of discrete nuclear bodies termed nuclear domain 10 (ND10), converge at viral DNA and place restrictions on viral gene expression. Meanwhile the infected cell mobilizes its histones and histone-associated repressors to force the viral DNA into nucleosome-like structures and also represses viral transcription. Both anti-viral strategies are negated by various HSV countermeasures. One HSV gene transactivator, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), is a key player in antagonizing both the ND10 restriction and chromatin repression. On one hand, ICP0 uses its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity to target major ND10 components for proteasome-dependent degradation and thereafter disrupts the ND10 nuclear bodies. On the other hand, ICP0 participates in de-repressing the HSV chromatin by changing histone composition or modification and therefore activates viral transcription. Involvement of a single viral protein in two seemingly different pathways suggests that there is coordination in host anti-viral defense mechanisms and also cooperation in viral counteraction strategies. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the role of chromatin regulation and ND10 dynamics in both lytic and latent HSV infection. We focus on the new observations showing that ND10 nuclear bodies play a critical role in cellular chromatin regulation. We intend to find the connections between the two major anti-viral defense pathways, chromatin remodeling and ND10 structure, in order to achieve a better

  8. Lattice methods and the nuclear few- and many-body problem

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dean

    2016-01-01

    We begin with a brief overview of lattice calculations using chiral effective field theory and some recent applications. We then describe several methods for computing scattering on the lattice. After that we focus on the main goal, explaining the theory and algorithms relevant to lattice simulations of nuclear few- and many-body systems. We discuss the exact equivalence of four different lattice formalisms, the Grassmann path integral, transfer matrix operator, Grassmann path integral with a...

  9. Quantum many-body theory for electron spin decoherence in nanoscale nuclear spin baths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen; Ma, Wen-Long; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2017-01-01

    Decoherence of electron spins in nanoscale systems is important to quantum technologies such as quantum information processing and magnetometry. It is also an ideal model problem for studying the crossover between quantum and classical phenomena. At low temperatures or in light-element materials where the spin-orbit coupling is weak, the phonon scattering in nanostructures is less important and the fluctuations of nuclear spins become the dominant decoherence mechanism for electron spins. Since the 1950s, semi-classical noise theories have been developed for understanding electron spin decoherence. In spin-based solid-state quantum technologies, the relevant systems are in the nanometer scale and nuclear spin baths are quantum objects which require a quantum description. Recently, quantum pictures have been established to understand the decoherence and quantum many-body theories have been developed to quantitatively describe this phenomenon. Anomalous quantum effects have been predicted and some have been experimentally confirmed. A systematically truncated cluster-correlation expansion theory has been developed to account for the many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths that are built up during electron spin decoherence. The theory has successfully predicted and explained a number of experimental results in a wide range of physical systems. In this review, we will cover this recent progress. The limitations of the present quantum many-body theories and possible directions for future development will also be discussed.

  10. Quantum many-body theory for electron spin decoherence in nanoscale nuclear spin baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen; Ma, Wen-Long; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2017-01-01

    Decoherence of electron spins in nanoscale systems is important to quantum technologies such as quantum information processing and magnetometry. It is also an ideal model problem for studying the crossover between quantum and classical phenomena. At low temperatures or in light-element materials where the spin-orbit coupling is weak, the phonon scattering in nanostructures is less important and the fluctuations of nuclear spins become the dominant decoherence mechanism for electron spins. Since the 1950s, semi-classical noise theories have been developed for understanding electron spin decoherence. In spin-based solid-state quantum technologies, the relevant systems are in the nanometer scale and nuclear spin baths are quantum objects which require a quantum description. Recently, quantum pictures have been established to understand the decoherence and quantum many-body theories have been developed to quantitatively describe this phenomenon. Anomalous quantum effects have been predicted and some have been experimentally confirmed. A systematically truncated cluster-correlation expansion theory has been developed to account for the many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths that are built up during electron spin decoherence. The theory has successfully predicted and explained a number of experimental results in a wide range of physical systems. In this review, we will cover this recent progress. The limitations of the present quantum many-body theories and possible directions for future development will also be discussed.

  11. Absence of gemin5 from SMN complexes in nuclear Cajal bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burghes Arthur HM

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal muscular atrophy is caused by reduced levels of the survival of motor neurons (SMN protein. SMN is found in large complexes with Sm proteins and at least eight other proteins, including seven "gemins". These complexes are involved in the assembly of snRNPs in the cytoplasm and their transport into the nucleus, but the precise roles of the individual protein components are largely unknown. Results We have investigated the subcellular distribution of gemins using novel antibodies against gemins 3–7, and existing mAbs against SMN, gemin2, unrip, fibrillarin and profilin II. Most gemins were equally distributed between nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions of HeLa cells, but gemin5 and unrip were more abundant in the cytoplasm. In a cytoplasmic extract obtained by mild disruption of HeLa cells, nearly all the SMN and gemins 2–4 were in large complexes, but most of the gemin5 sedimented separately with a lower S value. Most of the unrip sedimented with gemins 6 and 7 near the top of the sucrose density gradients, separate from both SMN and gemin5. Anti-SMN mAbs pulled down gemin5 from cytoplasmic extracts, but not from nuclear extracts, and gemin5 did not co-sediment with large SMN complexes in nuclear extracts. These data suggest that gemin5 is easily detached from SMN-gemin complexes in the nucleus. By immuno-histochemistry, gemin5 was rarely detectable in nuclear gems/Cajal bodies, although it was accessible to antibody and easily detectable when present. This suggests that gemin5 is normally absent from SMN complexes in these nuclear storage sites. Conclusion We conclude that SMN complexes usually exist without gemin5 in nuclear gems/Cajal bodies. Gemin5 is believed to be involved in capturing snRNA into SMN complexes in the cytoplasm for transport into the nucleus. We hypothesize that gemin5, though present in the nucleus, is no longer needed for SMN complex function during the time these complexes are stored in gems

  12. Chromatin remodeling complexes in the assembly of long noncoding RNA-dependent nuclear bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Tetsuya; Hirose, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Paraspeckles are subnuclear structures that assemble on nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 (NEAT1) long noncoding (lnc)RNA. Paraspeckle formation requires appropriate NEAT1 biogenesis and subsequent assembly with multiple prion-like domain (PLD) containing RNA-binding proteins. We found that SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes function as paraspeckle components that interact with paraspeckle proteins (PSPs) and NEAT1. SWI/SNF complexes play an essential role in paraspeckle formation that does not require their ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity. Instead, SWI/SNF complexes facilitate organization of the PSP interaction network required for intact paraspeckle assembly. SWI/SNF complexes may collectively bind multiple PSPs to recruit them onto NEAT1. SWI/SNF complexes are also required for Sat III (Satellite III) lncRNA-dependent formation of nuclear stress bodies under heat shock conditions. Organization of the lncRNA-dependent omega speckle in Drosophila also depends on the chromatin remodeling complex. These findings raise the possibility that a common mechanism controls the formation of lncRNA-dependent nuclear body architecture.

  13. Nuclear Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossión, Rubén

    2010-09-01

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction). Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  14. PML nuclear bodies contribute to the basal expression of the mTOR inhibitor DDIT4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsman, Jayme; Stathakis, Alex; Parker, Ellen; Chung, Dudley; Anthes, Livia E.; Koskowich, Kara L.; Lahsaee, Sara; Gaston, Daniel; Kukurba, Kimberly R.; Smith, Kevin S.; Chute, Ian C.; Léger, Daniel; Frost, Laura D.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Lewis, Stephen M.; Eskiw, Christopher; Dellaire, Graham

    2017-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is an essential component of PML nuclear bodies (PML NBs) frequently lost in cancer. PML NBs coordinate chromosomal regions via modification of nuclear proteins that in turn may regulate genes in the vicinity of these bodies. However, few PML NB-associated genes have been identified. PML and PML NBs can also regulate mTOR and cell fate decisions in response to cellular stresses. We now demonstrate that PML depletion in U2OS cells or TERT-immortalized normal human diploid fibroblasts results in decreased expression of the mTOR inhibitor DDIT4 (REDD1). DNA and RNA immuno-FISH reveal that PML NBs are closely associated with actively transcribed DDIT4 loci, implicating these bodies in regulation of basal DDIT4 expression. Although PML silencing did reduce the sensitivity of U2OS cells to metabolic stress induced by metformin, PML loss did not inhibit the upregulation of DDIT4 in response to metformin, hypoxia-like (CoCl2) or genotoxic stress. Analysis of publicly available cancer data also revealed a significant correlation between PML and DDIT4 expression in several cancer types (e.g. lung, breast, prostate). Thus, these findings uncover a novel mechanism by which PML loss may contribute to mTOR activation and cancer progression via dysregulation of basal DDIT4 gene expression. PMID:28332630

  15. Identification of repressive and active epigenetic marks and nuclear bodies in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Amado, Daniela; Herrera-Solorio, Abril Marcela; Valdés, Jesús; Alemán-Lazarini, Leticia; Almaraz-Barrera, Ma de Jesús; Luna-Rivera, Eva; Vargas, Miguel; Hernández-Rivas, Rosaura

    2016-01-14

    In human hosts, Entamoeba histolytica cysts can develop into trophozoites, suggesting that the life cycle of this parasite are regulated by changes in gene expression. To date, some evidence has suggested that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone modification are involved in the regulation of gene expression in Entamoeba. Some post-translational modifications (PTMs) at the N-terminus of E. histolytica's histones have been reported experimentally, including tri-methylation in the lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4me3) and dimethylation in the lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me2), dimethylation of arginine 3 (H4R3me2) and the indirect acetylation of histone H4 in the N-terminal region. However, it is not known which residues of histone H4 are subject to acetylation and/or methylation or where in the nucleus these epigenetic marks are located. Histones from trophozoites of E. histolytica were obtained and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. WB assays were performed using antibodies against epigenetic marks (acetylated lysines and methylated arginines). Immunofluorescence assays (IFA) were carried out to determine the distribution of PTMs and the localization of DNA methylation as a heterochromatin marker. Nuclear bodies such as the nucleolus were identified by using antibodies against fibrillarin and nucleolin and speckles by using anti-PRP6 antibody. Some new PTMs in histone H4 of E. histolytica, such as the acetylation of lysines 5, 8, 12 and 16 and the monomethylation of arginine 3, were identified by WB. IFA demonstrated that some marks are associated with transcriptional activity (such as acetylation and/or methylation) and that these marks are distributed throughout the E. histolytica nucleus. Staining with antibodies against anti-pan-acetylated lysine H4 histone and 5-methyl cytosine showed that the activation and transcriptional repression marks converge. Additionally, two nuclear bodies, the nucleolus and speckles, were identified in this parasite. This study

  16. Nuclear Pairing from Two-body Microscopic Forces: Analysis of the Cooper Pair Wavefunctions

    CERN Document Server

    Finelli, P; Holt, J W

    2014-01-01

    In a recent paper we studied the behavior of the pairing gaps $\\Delta_F$ as a function of the Fermi momentum $k_F$ for neutron and nuclear matter in all relevant angular momentum channels where superfluidity is believed to naturally emerge. The calculations employed realistic chiral nucleon-nucleon potentials with the inclusion of three-body forces and self-energy effects. In this contribution, after a detailed description of the numerical method we employed in the solution of the BCS equations, we will show a preliminary analysis of the Cooper pair wavefunctions.

  17. Lattice methods and the nuclear few- and many-body problem

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Dean

    2016-01-01

    We begin with a brief overview of lattice calculations using chiral effective field theory and some recent applications. We then describe several methods for computing scattering on the lattice. After that we focus on the main goal, explaining the theory and algorithms relevant to lattice simulations of nuclear few- and many-body systems. We discuss the exact equivalence of four different lattice formalisms, the Grassmann path integral, transfer matrix operator, Grassmann path integral with auxiliary fields, and transfer matrix operator with auxiliary fields. Along with our analysis we include several coding examples and a number of exercises for the calculations of few- and many-body systems at leading order in chiral effective field theory.

  18. Application of stochastic variational method to 3-4 body systems with realistic nuclear force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohbayashi, Yoshihide [Niigata Univ. (Japan); Varga, K.; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki

    1997-05-01

    SVM (stochastic variational method) was applied to simulate triton and alpha with realistic nuclear force such as Reid V8 (RV8), Argonne V6, V8 (AV6 and aV8). 3-4 body systems were solved by about 300-400 dimensions and the results were agreed with the most accurate solution. Convergence of energy of 3-4 body systems was rapid by using AV6 and AV8 potential, but it was slow by RV8 with strong repulsive force core. The energy values using SVM and GFMC were almost same. Number of dimension to convert the energy of triton was decreased by refinement. (S.Y.)

  19. Lattice Methods and the Nuclear Few- and Many-Body Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dean

    This chapter builds upon the review of lattice methods and effective field theory of the previous chapter. We begin with a brief overview of lattice calculations using chiral effective field theory and some recent applications. We then describe several methods for computing scattering on the lattice. After that we focus on the main goal, explaining the theory and algorithms relevant to lattice simulations of nuclear few- and many-body systems. We discuss the exact equivalence of four different lattice formalisms, the Grassmann path integral, transfer matrix operator, Grassmann path integral with auxiliary fields, and transfer matrix operator with auxiliary fields. Along with our analysis we include several coding examples and a number of exercises for the calculations of few- and many-body systems at leading order in chiral effective field theory.

  20. An ARGONAUTE4-containing nuclear processing center colocalized with Cajal bodies in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Carey Fei; Pontes, Olga; El-Shami, Mahmoud; Henderson, Ian R; Bernatavichute, Yana V; Chan, Simon W-L; Lagrange, Thierry; Pikaard, Craig S; Jacobsen, Steven E

    2006-07-14

    ARGONAUTE4 (AGO4) and RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV) are required for DNA methylation guided by 24 nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we show that AGO4 localizes to nucleolus-associated bodies along with the Pol IV subunit NRPD1b; the small nuclear RNA (snRNA) binding protein SmD3; and two markers of Cajal bodies, trimethylguanosine-capped snRNAs and the U2 snRNA binding protein U2B''. AGO4 interacts with the C-terminal domain of NRPD1b, and AGO4 protein stability depends on upstream factors that synthesize siRNAs. AGO4 is also found, along with the DNA methyltransferase DRM2, throughout the nucleus at presumed DNA methylation target sites. Cajal bodies are conserved sites for the maturation of ribonucleoprotein complexes. Our results suggest a function for Cajal bodies as a center for the assembly of an AGO4/NRPD1b/siRNA complex, facilitating its function in RNA-directed gene silencing at target loci.

  1. Ephemeral Protein Binding to DNA Shapes Stable Nuclear Bodies and Chromatin Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackley, Chris A; Liebchen, Benno; Michieletto, Davide; Mouvet, Francois; Cook, Peter R; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2017-03-28

    Fluorescence microscopy reveals that the contents of many (membrane-free) nuclear bodies exchange rapidly with the soluble pool while the underlying structure persists; such observations await a satisfactory biophysical explanation. To shed light on this, we perform large-scale Brownian dynamics simulations of a chromatin fiber interacting with an ensemble of (multivalent) DNA-binding proteins able to switch between an "on" (binding) and an "off" (nonbinding) state. This system provides a model for any DNA-binding protein that can be posttranslationally modified to change its affinity for DNA (e.g., through phosphorylation). Protein switching is a nonequilibrium process, and it leads to the formation of clusters of self-limiting size, where individual proteins in a cluster exchange with the soluble pool with kinetics similar to those seen in photobleaching experiments. This behavior contrasts sharply with that exhibited by nonswitching proteins, which are permanently in the on-state; when these bind to DNA nonspecifically, they form clusters that grow indefinitely in size. To explain these findings, we propose a mean-field theory from which we obtain a scaling relation between the typical cluster size and the protein switching rate. Protein switching also reshapes intrachromatin contacts to give networks resembling those seen in topologically associating domains, as switching markedly favors local (short-range) contacts over distant ones. Our results point to posttranslational modification of chromatin-bridging proteins as a generic mechanism driving the self-assembly of highly dynamic, nonequilibrium, protein clusters with the properties of nuclear bodies.

  2. Influence of nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaniwa, T., E-mail: taku@nirs.go.jp; Kanematsu, N. [Medical Physics Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tsuji, H.; Kamada, T. [Hospital, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning, the planar integrated dose (PID) measured in water is applied to the patient dose calculation with density scaling using the stopping power ratio. Since body tissues are chemically different from water, this dose calculation can be subject to errors, particularly due to differences in inelastic nuclear interactions. In recent studies, the authors proposed and validated a PID correction method for these errors. In the present study, the authors used this correction method to assess the influence of these nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in various clinical cases. Methods: Using 10–20 cases each of prostate, head and neck (HN), bone and soft tissue (BS), lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine neoplasms, the authors first used treatment plans for carbon-ion radiotherapy without nuclear interaction correction to derive uncorrected dose distributions. The authors then compared these distributions with recalculated distributions using the nuclear interaction correction (corrected dose distributions). Results: Median (25%/75% quartiles) differences between the target mean uncorrected doses and corrected doses were 0.2% (0.1%/0.2%), 0.0% (0.0%/0.0%), −0.3% (−0.4%/−0.2%), −0.1% (−0.2%/−0.1%), −0.1% (−0.2%/0.0%), −0.4% (−0.5%/−0.1%), and −0.3% (−0.4%/0.0%) for the prostate, HN, BS, lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine cases, respectively. The largest difference of −1.6% in target mean and −2.5% at maximum were observed in a uterine case. Conclusions: For most clinical cases, dose calculation errors due to the water nonequivalence of the tissues in nuclear interactions would be marginal compared to intrinsic uncertainties in treatment planning, patient setup, beam delivery, and clinical response. In some extreme cases, however, these errors can be substantial. Accordingly, this correction method should be routinely applied to treatment planning in clinical practice.

  3. The multiple scattering and N-body approaches to nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picklesimer, A.; Tandy, P. C.; Thaler, R. M.

    1983-02-01

    The relationship between conventional multiple scattering approaches and the recently developed N-body approaches to nuclear reactions is considered with a view towards elastic scattering applications. Connectivity expansions in the N-body approach and multiple scattering expansions in the Watson approach are developed by a common technique so that a comparison of the physical content of each can be made. In the N-body case this leads to a new derivation of the equations of Bencze, Redish, and Sloan in both particle-labelled and partition-labelled form and this yields new insight into the minimal dimensionality of these equations and into the role of channel coupling schemes within this formulation. The relative simplicity and generality with which these results are obtained is designed to be easily understood by those unfamiliar with N-body formalisms. The two approaches are contrasted first for the three-particle problem and subsequently for the many-body problem. We argue that a strict adherence to the connected-kernel property which is advantageous for the three-particle problem may not be so advantageous for the many-body elastic scattering problem. Undesirable physical characteristics of the connectivity expansion for elastic scattering are identified and their rectification is discussed. The off-shell transformation associated with the N-body approach is examined critically. The origin of the multiplicity of N-body coupling schemes is elucidated. It is shown that a modified concept of connectivity, called inclusive connectivity, can be introduced to guide expansions which can be truncated in a physically meaningful way. The inclusive connectivity expansion is seen to be identical to the spectator expansion for an elementary projectile but differs in the case of a composite projectile. Extant elastic scattering optical potential formulations based on the two concepts of connectivity are compared and contrasted. We show that connected kernel integral equations

  4. Genome-wide screen of three herpesviruses for protein subcellular localization and alteration of PML nuclear bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme Salsman

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses are large, ubiquitous DNA viruses with complex host interactions, yet many of the proteins encoded by these viruses have not been functionally characterized. As a first step in functional characterization, we determined the subcellular localization of 234 epitope-tagged proteins from herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus. Twenty-four of the 93 proteins with nuclear localization formed subnuclear structures. Twelve of these localized to the nucleolus, and five at least partially localized with promyelocytic leukemia (PML bodies, which are known to suppress viral lytic infection. In addition, two proteins disrupted Cajal bodies, and 19 of the nuclear proteins significantly decreased the number of PML bodies per cell, including six that were shown to be SUMO-modified. These results have provided the first functional insights into over 120 previously unstudied proteins and suggest that herpesviruses employ multiple strategies for manipulating nuclear bodies that control key cellular processes.

  5. Mx1 GTPase accumulates in distinct nuclear domains and inhibits influenza A virus in cells that lack promyelocytic leukaemia protein nuclear bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Othmar G; Sirma, Hüseyin; Pandolfi, Pier-Paolo; Haller, Otto

    2004-08-01

    The interferon-induced murine Mx1 GTPase is a nuclear protein. It specifically inhibits influenza A viruses at the step of primary transcription, a process known to occur in the nucleus of infected cells. However, the exact mechanism of inhibition is still poorly understood. The Mx1 GTPase has previously been shown to accumulate in distinct nuclear dots that are spatially associated with promyelocytic leukaemia protein (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs), but the significance of this association is not known. Here it is reported that, in cells lacking PML and, as a consequence, PML NBs, Mx1 still formed nuclear dots. These dots were indistinguishable from the dots observed in wild-type cells, indicating that intact PML NBs are not required for Mx1 dot formation. Furthermore, Mx1 retained its antiviral activity against influenza A virus in these PML-deficient cells, which were fully permissive for influenza A virus. Nuclear Mx proteins from other species showed a similar subnuclear distribution. This was also the case for the human MxA GTPase when this otherwise cytoplasmic protein was translocated into the nucleus by virtue of a foreign nuclear localization signal. Human MxA and mouse Mx1 do not interact or form heterooligomers. Yet, they co-localized to a large degree when co-expressed in the nucleus. Taken together, these findings suggest that Mx1 dots represent distinct nuclear domains ('Mx nuclear domains') that are frequently associated with, but functionally independent of, PML NBs.

  6. Nuclear Immunolocalization of Hexamerins in the Fat Body of Metamorphosing Honey Bees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Ramos Martins

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hexamerins are storage proteins with primordial functions in insect metamorphosis. They are actively secreted by the larval fat body and stored in the hemolymph. During metamorphosis, they return to the fat body to be processed. For decades, these proteins were thought to exclusively function as an amino acid source for tissue reconstruction during the non-feeding pupal and pharate adult stages and, in some species, for egg production. Recently, new findings have linked the hexamerins to caste polyphenism and gonad development in social insects. To explore the roles of hexamerins during the honey bee metamorphosis, we used specific antibodies in expression analysis by western blot, in situ immunolocalization by confocal laser-scanning microscopy and in vivo injections to lower their endogenous levels. Our expression analysis highlighted the changing expression patterns in the fat body and hemolymph during development, which is consistent with the temporal dynamics of hexamerin secretion, storage and depletion. Confocal microscopy showed hexamerin expression in the cytoplasm of both types of fat body cells, trophocytes and oenocytes. Notably, hexamerin foci were also found in the nuclei of these cells, thus confirming our western blot analysis of fat body nuclear-enriched fractions. We also observed that the decrease in soluble hexamerins in antibody-treated pharate adults led to a precocious adult ecdysis, perhaps in response to the lack (or decrease in hexamerin-derived amino acids. Taken together, these findings indicate that hexamerins have other functions in addition to their well-established role as amino acid sources for development.

  7. Bioassay program: determination of I-131 body burden among radiation workers and nuclear medicine laboratory technicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, E.B.; Napenas, D.; San Jose, V.; Juan, N.

    The body burden of I-131 was determined among the radiation workers of the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) who are directly involved in I-131 processing and nuclear laboratory technicians of University of Santo Tomas and Veterans Hospital, who handle and dispense I-131 to patients. The routine monitoring was done by urine analysis. The untreated urine samples were counted directly for 4000 seconds using Nal(Tl) scintillation detector coupled to an ND66 microcomputer-based multichannel analyzer. Urine samples of radiation workers of PAEC who are not involved in I-131 processing and non-radiation workers were also assayed for comparison. For radiation workers of PAEC who are directly involved in processing I-131, the estimated body burden of I-131 ranged from <0.055 to 8.53 uCi (282 urine samples). These values were higher than those observed for radiation workers not involved in the handling or processing of I-131 with estimated body burden of I-131 ranging from <0.055 to 0.52 uCi (48 urine samples) or than those observed from non-radiation workers (<0.055 uCi). The maximum permissible burden of I-131 is 0.7 uCi.

  8. Dynamic localization of tripartite motif-containing 22 in nuclear and nucleolar bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Gayathri; Sun, Yang; Tan, Si Kee [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Lin, Valerie C.L., E-mail: cllin@ntu.edu.sg [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore)

    2009-05-01

    Tripartite motif-containing 22 (TRIM22) exhibits antiviral and growth inhibitory properties, but there has been no study on the localization and dynamics of the endogenous TRIM22 protein. We report here that TRIM22 is dramatically induced by progesterone in MDA-MB-231-derived ABC28 cells and T47D cells. This induction was associated with an increase in TRIM22 nuclear bodies (NB), and an even more prominent increase in nucleolar TRIM22 bodies. Distinct endogenous TRIM22 NB were also demonstrated in several other cell lines including MCF7 and HeLa cells. These TRIM22 NB resemble Cajal bodies, co-localized with these structures and co-immunoprecipitated with p80-coilin. However, IFN{gamma}-induced TRIM22 in HeLa and MCF7 cells did not form NB, implying the forms and distribution of TRIM22 are regulated by specific cellular signals. This notion is also supported by the observation that TRIM22 NB undergoes dynamic cell-cycle dependent changes in distribution such that TRIM22 NB started to form in early G0/G1 but became dispersed in the S-phase. In light of its potential antiviral and antitumor properties, the findings here provide an interesting gateway to study the relationship between the different forms and functions of TRIM22.

  9. Nuclear Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein is localized to Cajal bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dury, Alain Y; El Fatimy, Rachid; Tremblay, Sandra; Rose, Timothy M; Côté, Jocelyn; De Koninck, Paul; Khandjian, Edouard W

    2013-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by loss of function of a single gene encoding the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). This RNA-binding protein, widely expressed in mammalian tissues, is particularly abundant in neurons and is a component of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes present within the translational apparatus. The absence of FMRP in neurons is believed to cause translation dysregulation and defects in mRNA transport essential for local protein synthesis and for synaptic development and maturation. A prevalent model posits that FMRP is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that transports its mRNA targets from the nucleus to the translation machinery. However, it is not known which of the multiple FMRP isoforms, resulting from the numerous alternatively spliced FMR1 transcripts variants, would be involved in such a process. Using a new generation of anti-FMRP antibodies and recombinant expression, we show here that the most commonly expressed human FMRP isoforms (ISO1 and 7) do not localize to the nucleus. Instead, specific FMRP isoforms 6 and 12 (ISO6 and 12), containing a novel C-terminal domain, were the only isoforms that localized to the nuclei in cultured human cells. These isoforms localized to specific p80-coilin and SMN positive structures that were identified as Cajal bodies. The Cajal body localization signal was confined to a 17 amino acid stretch in the C-terminus of human ISO6 and is lacking in a mouse Iso6 variant. As FMRP is an RNA-binding protein, its presence in Cajal bodies suggests additional functions in nuclear post-transcriptional RNA metabolism. Supporting this hypothesis, a missense mutation (I304N), known to alter the KH2-mediated RNA binding properties of FMRP, abolishes the localization of human FMRP ISO6 to Cajal bodies. These findings open unexplored avenues in search for new insights into the pathophysiology of Fragile X Syndrome.

  10. Nuclear Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein is localized to Cajal bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Y Dury

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome is caused by loss of function of a single gene encoding the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP. This RNA-binding protein, widely expressed in mammalian tissues, is particularly abundant in neurons and is a component of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP complexes present within the translational apparatus. The absence of FMRP in neurons is believed to cause translation dysregulation and defects in mRNA transport essential for local protein synthesis and for synaptic development and maturation. A prevalent model posits that FMRP is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that transports its mRNA targets from the nucleus to the translation machinery. However, it is not known which of the multiple FMRP isoforms, resulting from the numerous alternatively spliced FMR1 transcripts variants, would be involved in such a process. Using a new generation of anti-FMRP antibodies and recombinant expression, we show here that the most commonly expressed human FMRP isoforms (ISO1 and 7 do not localize to the nucleus. Instead, specific FMRP isoforms 6 and 12 (ISO6 and 12, containing a novel C-terminal domain, were the only isoforms that localized to the nuclei in cultured human cells. These isoforms localized to specific p80-coilin and SMN positive structures that were identified as Cajal bodies. The Cajal body localization signal was confined to a 17 amino acid stretch in the C-terminus of human ISO6 and is lacking in a mouse Iso6 variant. As FMRP is an RNA-binding protein, its presence in Cajal bodies suggests additional functions in nuclear post-transcriptional RNA metabolism. Supporting this hypothesis, a missense mutation (I304N, known to alter the KH2-mediated RNA binding properties of FMRP, abolishes the localization of human FMRP ISO6 to Cajal bodies. These findings open unexplored avenues in search for new insights into the pathophysiology of Fragile X Syndrome.

  11. Analytical nuclear gradients for the range-separated many-body dispersion model of noncovalent interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Blood-Forsythe, Martin A; DiStasio, Robert A; Car, Roberto; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-01-01

    Accurate treatment of the long-range electron correlation energy, including van der Waals (vdW) or dispersion interactions, is essential for describing the structure, dynamics, and function of a wide variety of systems. Among the most accurate models for including dispersion into density functional theory (DFT) is the range-separated many-body dispersion (MBD) method [A. Ambrossetti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 18A508 (2014)], in which the correlation energy is modeled at short-range by a semi-local density functional and at long-range by a model system of coupled quantum harmonic oscillators. In this work, we develop analytical gradients of the MBD energy with respect to nuclear coordinates, including all implicit coordinate dependencies arising from the partitioning of the charge density into Hirshfeld effective volumes. To demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of these MBD gradients for geometry optimizations of systems with intermolecular and intramolecular interactions, we optimized conformers of the be...

  12. A multi-body vehicle for moving inside cluttered nuclear environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littmann, F.; Chameaud, H. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. des Procedes et Systemes Avances; Dorn, J. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The paper presents the result of the TALOS (Technologies for Advanced locomotion Systems) programme. The general aim of the TALOS was to prove the feasibility of multi-body articulated vehicles for intervention missions in nuclear plant were high payload volume and mass are required, combined with great geometrical and obstacles constraints. This programme was based on one hand on the TLV (Train Like Vehicle) concept, developed by CEA ( Atomic Energy Commission) and on the other hand on the KfK experience on locomotion. The main difficulties of this programme were to find the mechanical linkage concept and the locomotion concept, and also to build an integrated mockup with linkage and locomotion concepts. (TEC). 4 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Ephemeral protein binding to DNA shapes stable nuclear bodies and chromatin domains

    CERN Document Server

    Brackley, C A; Michieletto, D; Mouvet, F; Cook, P R; Marenduzzo, D

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy reveals that the contents of many (membrane-free) nuclear "bodies" exchange rapidly with the soluble pool whilst the underlying structure persists; such observations await a satisfactory biophysical explanation. To shed light on this, we perform large-scale Brownian dynamics simulations of a chromatin fiber interacting with an ensemble of (multivalent) DNA-binding proteins; these proteins switch between two states -- active (binding) and inactive (non-binding). This system provides a model for any DNA-binding protein that can be modified post-translationally to change its affinity for DNA (e.g., like the phosphorylation of a transcription factor). Due to this out-of-equilibrium process, proteins spontaneously assemble into clusters of self-limiting size, as individual proteins in a cluster exchange with the soluble pool with kinetics like those seen in photo-bleaching experiments. This behavior contrasts sharply with that exhibited by "equilibrium", or non-switching, proteins that exis...

  14. The spindle pole bodies facilitate nuclear envelope division during closed mitosis in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liling; Schwartz, Cindi; Magidson, Valentin; Khodjakov, Alexey; Oliferenko, Snezhana

    2007-07-01

    Many organisms divide chromosomes within the confines of the nuclear envelope (NE) in a process known as closed mitosis. Thus, they must ensure coordination between segregation of the genetic material and division of the NE itself. Although many years of work have led to a reasonably clear understanding of mitotic spindle function in chromosome segregation, the NE division mechanism remains obscure. Here, we show that fission yeast cells overexpressing the transforming acid coiled coil (TACC)-related protein, Mia1p/Alp7p, failed to separate the spindle pole bodies (SPBs) at the onset of mitosis, but could assemble acentrosomal bipolar and antiparallel spindle structures. Most of these cells arrested in anaphase with fully extended spindles and nonsegregated chromosomes. Spindle poles that lacked the SPBs did not lead the division of the NE during spindle elongation, but deformed it, trapping the chromosomes within. When the SPBs were severed by laser microsurgery in wild-type cells, we observed analogous deformations of the NE by elongating spindle remnants, resulting in NE division failure. Analysis of dis1Delta cells that elongate spindles despite unattached kinetochores indicated that the SPBs were required for maintaining nuclear shape at anaphase onset. Strikingly, when the NE was disassembled by utilizing a temperature-sensitive allele of the Ran GEF, Pim1p, the abnormal spindles induced by Mia1p overexpression were capable of segregating sister chromatids to daughter cells, suggesting that the failure to divide the NE prevents chromosome partitioning. Our results imply that the SPBs preclude deformation of the NE during spindle elongation and thus serve as specialized structures enabling nuclear division during closed mitosis in fission yeast.

  15. The spindle pole bodies facilitate nuclear envelope division during closed mitosis in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liling Zheng

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Many organisms divide chromosomes within the confines of the nuclear envelope (NE in a process known as closed mitosis. Thus, they must ensure coordination between segregation of the genetic material and division of the NE itself. Although many years of work have led to a reasonably clear understanding of mitotic spindle function in chromosome segregation, the NE division mechanism remains obscure. Here, we show that fission yeast cells overexpressing the transforming acid coiled coil (TACC-related protein, Mia1p/Alp7p, failed to separate the spindle pole bodies (SPBs at the onset of mitosis, but could assemble acentrosomal bipolar and antiparallel spindle structures. Most of these cells arrested in anaphase with fully extended spindles and nonsegregated chromosomes. Spindle poles that lacked the SPBs did not lead the division of the NE during spindle elongation, but deformed it, trapping the chromosomes within. When the SPBs were severed by laser microsurgery in wild-type cells, we observed analogous deformations of the NE by elongating spindle remnants, resulting in NE division failure. Analysis of dis1Delta cells that elongate spindles despite unattached kinetochores indicated that the SPBs were required for maintaining nuclear shape at anaphase onset. Strikingly, when the NE was disassembled by utilizing a temperature-sensitive allele of the Ran GEF, Pim1p, the abnormal spindles induced by Mia1p overexpression were capable of segregating sister chromatids to daughter cells, suggesting that the failure to divide the NE prevents chromosome partitioning. Our results imply that the SPBs preclude deformation of the NE during spindle elongation and thus serve as specialized structures enabling nuclear division during closed mitosis in fission yeast.

  16. Subthreshold pion production: The effects of three body collisions the Fermi momentum, and the nuclear equation of state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molitoris, J.; Bonasera, A.; Adorno, A.

    1993-04-01

    The authors study pion production at subthreshold energies in nucleus-collisions using the extended Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov (BNV) model. The extreme sensitivity of the pion yield to the initial momentum space Fermi distribution is demonstrated. The effect of the three body collision term is also shown to be substantial. However, the nuclear equation of state has no significant effect at these energies. Details and implications of the nuclear kinetic equation simulation are discussed.

  17. Inhibition of Sp1 functions by its sequestration into PML nuclear bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June Li

    Full Text Available Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs are comprised of PML and a striking variety of its associated proteins. Various cellular functions have been attributed to PML NBs, including the regulation of gene expression. We report here that induced expression of PML recruits Sp1 into PML NBs, leading to the reduction of Sp1 transactivation function. Specifically, Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay demonstrated that induced expression of PML significantly diminishes the amount of Sp1 binding to its target gene promoter, immunofluorescence staining showed dramatic increase in the co-localization between PML and Sp1 upon induction of PML expression, moreover, PML and Sp1 co-fractionated in the core nuclear matrix. Our study further showed that PML promotes SUMOylation of Sp1 in a RING-motif-dependent manner, SUMOylation of Sp1 facilitates physical interaction between Sp1 and PML and recruitment of Sp1 into the PML NBs, the SUMO binding motif of PML was also important for its interaction with Sp1. The results of this study demonstrate a novel mechanism by which PML regulates gene expression through sequestration of the transcription factor into PML NBs.

  18. Nuclear inner membrane fusion facilitated by yeast Jem1p is required for spindle pole body fusion but not for the first mitotic nuclear division during yeast mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi; Hirata, Aiko; Endo, Toshiya

    2008-11-01

    During mating of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two haploid nuclei fuse to produce a diploid nucleus. The process of nuclear fusion requires two J proteins, Jem1p in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen and Sec63p, which forms a complex with Sec71p and Sec72p, in the ER membrane. Zygotes of mutants defective in the functions of Jem1p or Sec63p contain two haploid nuclei that were closely apposed but failed to fuse. Here we analyzed the ultrastructure of nuclei in jem1 Delta and sec71 Delta mutant zygotes using electron microscope with the freeze-substituted fixation method. Three-dimensional reconstitution of nuclear structures from electron microscope serial sections revealed that Jem1p facilitates nuclear inner-membrane fusion and spindle pole body (SPB) fusion while Sec71p facilitates nuclear outer-membrane fusion. Two haploid SPBs that failed to fuse could duplicate, and mitotic nuclear division of the unfused haploid nuclei started in jem1 Delta and sec71 Delta mutant zygotes. This observation suggests that nuclear inner-membrane fusion is required for SPB fusion, but not for SPB duplication in the first mitotic cell division.

  19. Improved quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization with local search strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maolong Xi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization, which was motivated by analysis of particle swarm optimization and quantum system, has shown compared performance in finding the optimal solutions for many optimization problems to other evolutionary algorithms. To address the problem of premature, a local search strategy is proposed to improve the performance of quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization. In proposed local search strategy, a super particle is presented which is a collection body of randomly selected particles’ dimension information in the swarm. The selected probability of particles in swarm is different and determined by their fitness values. To minimization problems, the fitness value of one particle is smaller; the selected probability is more and will contribute more information in constructing the super particle. In addition, in order to investigate the influence on algorithm performance with different local search space, four methods of computing the local search radius are applied in local search strategy and propose four variants of local search quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization. Empirical studies on a suite of well-known benchmark functions are undertaken in order to make an overall performance comparison among the proposed methods and other quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization. The simulation results show that the proposed quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization variants have better advantages over the original quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization.

  20. PREFACE: Many-body correlations from dilute to dense nuclear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Takaharu; Urban, Michael; Yamada, Taiichi

    2011-09-01

    The International EFES-IN2P3 conference on "Many body correlations from dilute to dense nuclear systems" was held at the Institut Henri Poincaré (IHP), Paris, France, from 15-18 February 2011, on the occasion of the retirement of our colleague Peter Schuck. Correlations play a decisive role in various many-body systems such as nuclear systems, condensed matter and quantum gases. Important examples include: pairing correlations (Cooper pairs) which give rise to nuclear superfluidity (analogous to superconductivity in condensed matter); particle-hole (RPA) correlations in the description of the ground state beyond mean-field theory; clusters; and α-particle correlations in certain nuclei. Also, the nucleons themselves can be viewed as clusters of three quarks. During the past few years, researchers have started to study how the character of these correlations changes with the variation of the density. For instance, the Cooper pairs in dense matter can transform into a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of true bound states at low density (this is the BCS-BEC crossover studied in ultracold Fermi gases). Similar effects play a role in neutron matter at low density, e.g., in the "neutron skin" of exotic nuclei. The α-cluster correlation becomes particularly important at lower density, such as in the excited states of some nuclei (e.g., the α-condensate-like structure in the Hoyle state of 12C) or in the formation of compact stars. In addition to nuclear physics, topics from astrophysics (neutron stars), condensed matter, and quantum gases were discussed in 48 talks and 19 posters, allowing the almost 90 participants from different communities to exchange their ideas, experiences and methods. The conference dinner took place at the Musée d'Orsay, and all the participants enjoyed the very pleasant atmosphere. One session of the conference was dedicated to the celebration of Peter's retirement. We would like to take this opportunity to wish Peter all the best and we hope

  1. Method of resonating groups in the Faddeev-Hahn equation formalism for three-body nuclear problem

    CERN Document Server

    Nasirov, M Z

    2002-01-01

    The Faddeev-Hahn equation formalism for three-body nuclear problem is considered. For solution of the equations the method of resonant groups have applied. The calculations of tritium binding energy and doublet nd-scattering length have been carried out. The results obtained shows that Faddeev-Hahn equation formalism is very simple and effective. (author)

  2. RNA recognition motif 2 directs the recruitment of SF2/ASF to nuclear stress bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Corioni, Margherita; Giordano, Manuela; Valgardsdottir, Rut; Ghigna, Claudia; Cobianchi, Fabio; Xu, Rui-Ming; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Heat shock induces the transcriptional activation of large heterochromatic regions of the human genome composed of arrays of satellite III DNA repeats. A number of RNA-processing factors, among them splicing factor SF2/ASF, associate with these transcription factors giving rise to nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). Here, we show that the recruitment of SF2/ASF to these structures is mediated by its second RNA recognition motif. Amino acid substitutions in the first α-helix of this domain, but not in the β-strand regions, abrogate the association with nSBs. The same mutations drastically affect the in vivo activity of SF2/ASF in the alternative splicing of adenoviral E1A transcripts. Sequence analysis identifies four putative high-affinity binding sites for SF2/ASF in the transcribed strand of the satellite III DNA. We have verified by gel mobility shift assays that the second RNA-binding domain of SF2/ASF binds at least one of these sites. Our analysis suggests that the recruitment of SF2/ASF to nSBs is mediated by a direct interaction with satellite III transcripts and points to the second RNA-binding domain of the protein as the major determinant of this interaction. PMID:15302913

  3. Transcriptional regulation is affected by subnuclear targeting of reporter plasmids to PML nuclear bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Gregory J; Eskiw, Christopher H; Dellaire, Graham; Bazett-Jones, David P

    2006-12-01

    Whereas the PML protein has been reported to have both transcriptional coactivator and corepressor potential, the contribution of the PML nuclear body (PML NB) itself to transcriptional regulation is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that plasmid DNA artificially tethered to PML or the PML NB-targeting domain of Sp100 is preferentially localized to PML NBs. Using the tethering technique, we targeted a simian virus 40 promoter-driven luciferase reporter plasmid to PML NBs, resulting in the repression of the transgene transcriptional activity. Conversely, the tethering of a cytomegalovirus promoter-containing reporter plasmid resulted in activation. Targeting a minimal eukaryotic promoter did not affect its activity. The expression of targeted promoters could be modulated by altering the cellular concentration of PML NB components, including Sp100 and isoforms of the PML protein. Finally, we demonstrate that ICP0, the promiscuous herpes simplex virus transactivator, increases the level of transcriptional activation of plasmid DNA tethered to the PML NB. We conclude that when PML NB components are artificially tethered to reporter plasmids, the PML NB contributes to the regulation of the tethered DNA in a promoter-dependent manner. Our findings demonstrate that transient transcription assays are sensitive to the subnuclear localization of the transgene plasmid.

  4. 53BP1 nuclear bodies form around DNA lesions generated by mitotic transmission of chromosomes under replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Claudia; Savic, Velibor; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Completion of genome duplication is challenged by structural and topological barriers that impede progression of replication forks. Although this can seriously undermine genome integrity, the fate of DNA with unresolved replication intermediates is not known. Here, we show that mild replication...... bodies shield chromosomal fragile sites sequestered in these compartments against erosion. Together, these data indicate that restoration of DNA or chromatin integrity at loci prone to replication problems requires mitotic transmission to the next cell generations....... increases after genetic ablation of BLM, a DNA helicase associated with dissolution of entangled DNA. Conversely, 53BP1 nuclear bodies are partially suppressed by knocking down SMC2, a condensin subunit required for mechanical stability of mitotic chromosomes. Finally, we provide evidence that 53BP1 nuclear...

  5. The Oncogenic Fusion Proteins SET-Nup214 and Sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1)-Nup214 Form Dynamic Nuclear Bodies and Differentially Affect Nuclear Protein and Poly(A)+ RNA Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Sarah A; Mendes, Adélia; Valkova, Christina; Spillner, Christiane; Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Kaether, Christoph; Kehlenbach, Ralph H

    2016-10-28

    Genetic rearrangements are a hallmark of several forms of leukemia and can lead to oncogenic fusion proteins. One example of an affected chromosomal region is the gene coding for Nup214, a nucleoporin that localizes to the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). We investigated two such fusion proteins, SET-Nup214 and SQSTM1 (sequestosome)-Nup214, both containing C-terminal portions of Nup214. SET-Nup214 nuclear bodies containing the nuclear export receptor CRM1 were observed in the leukemia cell lines LOUCY and MEGAL. Overexpression of SET-Nup214 in HeLa cells leads to the formation of similar nuclear bodies that recruit CRM1, export cargo proteins, and certain nucleoporins and concomitantly affect nuclear protein and poly(A)(+) RNA export. SQSTM1-Nup214, although mostly cytoplasmic, also forms nuclear bodies and inhibits nuclear protein but not poly(A)(+) RNA export. The interaction of the fusion proteins with CRM1 is RanGTP-dependent, as shown in co-immunoprecipitation experiments and binding assays. Further analysis revealed that the Nup214 parts mediate the inhibition of nuclear export, whereas the SET or SQSTM1 part determines the localization of the fusion protein and therefore the extent of the effect. SET-Nup214 nuclear bodies are highly mobile structures, which are in equilibrium with the nucleoplasm in interphase and disassemble during mitosis or upon treatment of cells with the CRM1-inhibitor leptomycin B. Strikingly, we found that nucleoporins can be released from nuclear bodies and reintegrated into existing NPC. Our results point to nuclear bodies as a means of preventing the formation of potentially insoluble and harmful protein aggregates that also may serve as storage compartments for nuclear transport factors.

  6. Continuum-discretized coupled-channels method for four-body nuclear breakup in $^6$He+$^{12}$C scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, T; Ogata, K; Iseri, Y; Kamimura, M; Chiba, S; Yahiro, M

    2004-01-01

    We propose a fully quantum-mechanical method of treating four-body nuclear breakup processes in scattering of a projectile consisting of three constituents, by extending the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method. The three-body continuum states of the projectile are discretized by diagonalizing the internal Hamiltonian of the projectile with the Gaussian basis functions. For $^6$He+$^{12}$C scattering at 18 and 229.8 MeV, the validity of the method is tested by convergence of the elastic and breakup cross sections with respect to increasing the number of the basis functions. Effects of the four-body breakup and the Borromean structure of $^6$He on the elastic and total reaction cross sections are discussed.

  7. GATA transcription factors associate with a novel class of nuclear bodies in erythroblasts and megakaryocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G. Elefanty (Andrew); M. Antoniou (Michael); N. Custodio; M. Carmo-Fonseca; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe nuclear distribution of GATA transcription factors in murine haemopoietic cells was examined by indirect immunofluorescence. Specific bright foci of GATA-1 fluorescence were observed in erythroleukaemia cells and primary murine erythroblasts and megakaryocytes, in addition to diffuse

  8. Belgian class II nuclear facilities such as irradiators and accelerators. Regulatory Body attention points and operating experience feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minne, Etienne; Peters, Christelle; Mommaert, Chantal; Kennes, Christian; Cortenbosch, Geert; Schmitz, Frederic; Haesendonck, Michel van [Bel V, Brussels (Belgium); Carlier, Pascal; Schrayen, Virginie; Wertelaers, An [Federal Agency for Nuclear Control, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this paper is to present the Regulatory Body attention points and the operating experience feedback from Belgian ''class IIA'' facilities such as industrial and research irradiators, bulk radionuclides producers and conditioners. Reinforcement of the nuclear safety and radiation protection has been promoted by the Federal Agency for Nuclear Control (FANC) since 2009. This paper is clearly a continuation of the former paper [1] presenting the evolution in the regulatory framework relative to the creation of Bel V, the subsidiary of the FANC, and to the new ''class IIA'' covering heavy installations such as those mentioned above. Some lessons learnt are extracted from the operating experience feedback based on the events declared to the authorities. Even though a real willingness to meet the new safety requirements is observed among the ''class IIA'' licensees, promoting the safety culture, the nuclear safety and radiation protection remains an endless challenge for the Regulatory Body.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Thermal Pollution of Large Water Bodies from Thermal and Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubimova, Tatyana; Lepikhin, Anatoly; Lyakhin, Yury; Parshakova, Yanina; Tiunov, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    Currently, the major manufacturers of electrical energy are the thermal and nuclear power plants including the cooling ponds in the processing chains. For a wide range of both environmental and technological problems, the evaluation of the temperature fields in the cooling ponds at certain critical values of hydrological and meteorological parameters is important. The present paper deals with the evaluation of the thermal effect of one of the largest thermal power plant in Europe - Perm GRES - to its cooling pond which is the Kama Reservoir. Since the area of the possible impact is rather large and the reservoir itself is characterized by a very complex morphometry, numerical modeling of thermal spot propagation in the Kama River due to the discharge of warm water by Perm GRES for the entire area in the 3D-formulation with the desired detail setting morphometric characteristics of the water body meets very serious difficulties. Because of that, to solve the problem, a combined scheme of calculations based on the combination of hydrodynamic models in 2D and 3D formulations was used. At the first stage of the combined scheme implementation, 2D hydrodynamical model was developed for all possible area, using software SMS v.11.1. The boundary and initial conditions for this model were formulated on the basis of calculations made using 1D hydrodynamical model developed and applied for the entire Kama Reservoir. Application of 2D hydrodynamical model for solving the problem under consideration was needed to obtain the necessary information for setting the boundary conditions for the 3D model. Software package ANSYS Fluent v.6.3 was used for the realization of 3D model. 3D modeling was performed for different wind speeds and directions and quantitative characteristics of the discharge of warm water. To verify the models, the data of the detailed field measurements in the zones of thermal pollution of the Kama reservoir due to impact of the Perm GRES were used. A

  10. Mutations in the gene encoding the PML nuclear body protein Sp110 are associated with immunodeficiency and hepatic veno-occlusive disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Roscioli, Tony; Simon T Cliffe; Bloch, Donald B.; Bell, Christopher G.; Mullan, Glenda; Taylor, Peter J; Sarris, Maria; Wang, Joanne; Donald, Jennifer A.; Kirk, Edwin P; Ziegler, John B.; Salzer, Ulrich; McDonald, George B.; Wong, Melanie; Lindeman, Robert

    2006-01-01

    We describe mutations in the PML nuclear body protein Sp110 in the syndrome veno-occlusive disease with immunodeficiency, an autosomal recessive disorder of severe hypogammaglobulinemia, combined T and B cell immunodeficiency, absent lymph node germinal centers, absent tissue plasma cells and hepatic veno-occlusive disease. This is the first report of the involvement of a nuclear body protein in a human primary immunodeficiency and of high-penetrance genetic mutations in hepatic veno-occlusiv...

  11. Body-fixed relativistic molecular Hamiltonian and its application to nuclear spin-rotation tensor: linear molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Liu, Wenjian

    2013-07-21

    The relativistic molecular Hamiltonian written in the body-fixed frame of reference is the basis for high-precision calculations of spectroscopic parameters involving nuclear vibrations and/or rotations. Such a Hamiltonian that describes electrons fully relativistically and nuclei quasi-relativistically is just developed for semi-rigid nonlinear molecules [Y. Xiao and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134104 (2013)]. Yet, the formulation should somewhat be revised for linear molecules thanks to some unusual features arising from the redundancy of the rotation around the molecular axis. Nonetheless, the resulting isomorphic Hamiltonian is rather similar to that for nonlinear molecules. Consequently, the relativistic formulation of nuclear spin-rotation (NSR) tensor for linear molecules is very much the same as that for nonlinear molecules. So is the relativistic mapping between experimental NSR and NMR.

  12. THE COMPLEX ORGANIZATION OF EUKARYOTIC CELL NUCLEUS: THE NUCLEAR BODIES (I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Campeanu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Identified short time after the discovery of cells, over 300 years ago, the cell nucleus of eukaryotes continuously focused the interest of scientists, which used increasingly sophisticated research tools to clarify its complex structure and functions. The results of all these studies, especially those carried out in the second half of the past century, proved and confirmed that the eukaryotic cell nucleus is the control center of all cellular activities and also ensures the continuity of genetic information along successive generations of cells. These vital functions are the result of selective expression of genes contained in the nuclear chromatin, which is a high ordered and dynamic structure, in permanent and bilateral relations with other nuclear components. Based on these considerations, the present review aims to synthetize the latest researches and concepts about the cell nuclear territory in three distinctive parts, according to the complexity of the topic

  13. Nuclear Many-Body Theory of Electroweak Interactions with Nuclei at Intermediate Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieves, J. [Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Amaro, J.E. [Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Valverde, M. [Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2005-02-15

    The Quasi-Elastic (QE) contribution of the nuclear inclusive electron model developed in reference [Nucl. Phys. A627 (1997) 543; ibidem Nucl. Phys. A627 (1997) 598] is extended to the study of electroweak Charged Current (CC) induced nuclear reactions at intermediate energies of interest for future neutrino oscillation experiments. Long range nuclear (RPA) correlations, Final State Interaction (FSI) and Coulomb corrections are included within the model. RPA correlations are shown to play a crucial role in the whole range of neutrino energies, up to 500 MeV, studied in this work. Predictions for inclusive muon capture for different nuclei through the Periodic Table and for the reactions C12({nu}{sub {mu}},{mu}{sup -})X and C12({nu}{sub e},e{sup -})X near threshold are also given.

  14. Whole-Body Counter Evaluation of Internal Radioactive Cesium in Dogs and Cats Exposed to the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Seiichi; Ito, Nobuhiko; Watanabe, Masamichi; Kakizaki, Takehiko; Natsuhori, Masahiro; Kawamata, Jun; Urayama, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    As a result of the 2011 nuclear incident that occurred at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant, a large number of abandoned dogs and cats were left within the disaster zone. A small number of these animals were rescued and cared for at shelters. Prior to the dispersal of these animals to their owners or fosterers, we evaluated the degree of internal radiocesium contamination using a specially designed whole-body counter. We conducted 863 non-invasive measurements of gamma rays due to internal radioactive cesium for 68 dogs and 120 cats at one shelter. After plotting graphs of 137Cs density we generated exponential functions of decay from seven dogs and six cats. From the regression formulae, we were able to determine the biological half-lives as 38.2 days for dogs and 30.8 days for cats. We found that in dogs there was a correlation between the biological half-life of radioactive cesium and age. Using our data, we estimated whole-body densities for each cat and dog at the time when they were rescued. We found that there were deviations in the data distributions among the different species, likely due to the timing of rescue, or living habits prior to rescue. A significant correlation was found when extracted feline reproductive organs were analyzed; the coefficients for the estimation of whole-body densities were approximately 7-fold higher than those based on the extracted feline reproductive organs. This may be due to the fact that majority of the radioactive cesium accumulates within muscular tissue with less distribution in other organs. It is possible to plan the appropriate management period in an animal shelter based on the use of the biological half-life of radioactive cesium calculated in this study. We believe that the correlations we uncovered in this work would be of great use for the management of companion animals in the event of a future nuclear accident. PMID:28099476

  15. Whole-Body Counter Evaluation of Internal Radioactive Cesium in Dogs and Cats Exposed to the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Seiichi; Ito, Nobuhiko; Watanabe, Masamichi; Kakizaki, Takehiko; Natsuhori, Masahiro; Kawamata, Jun; Urayama, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    As a result of the 2011 nuclear incident that occurred at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant, a large number of abandoned dogs and cats were left within the disaster zone. A small number of these animals were rescued and cared for at shelters. Prior to the dispersal of these animals to their owners or fosterers, we evaluated the degree of internal radiocesium contamination using a specially designed whole-body counter. We conducted 863 non-invasive measurements of gamma rays due to internal radioactive cesium for 68 dogs and 120 cats at one shelter. After plotting graphs of 137Cs density we generated exponential functions of decay from seven dogs and six cats. From the regression formulae, we were able to determine the biological half-lives as 38.2 days for dogs and 30.8 days for cats. We found that in dogs there was a correlation between the biological half-life of radioactive cesium and age. Using our data, we estimated whole-body densities for each cat and dog at the time when they were rescued. We found that there were deviations in the data distributions among the different species, likely due to the timing of rescue, or living habits prior to rescue. A significant correlation was found when extracted feline reproductive organs were analyzed; the coefficients for the estimation of whole-body densities were approximately 7-fold higher than those based on the extracted feline reproductive organs. This may be due to the fact that majority of the radioactive cesium accumulates within muscular tissue with less distribution in other organs. It is possible to plan the appropriate management period in an animal shelter based on the use of the biological half-life of radioactive cesium calculated in this study. We believe that the correlations we uncovered in this work would be of great use for the management of companion animals in the event of a future nuclear accident.

  16. UNEDF: Advanced Scientific Computing Transforms the Low-Energy Nuclear Many-Body Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Stoitsov, M; Nazarewicz, W; Bulgac, A; Hagen, G; Kortelainen, M; Pei, J C; Roche, K J; Schunck, N; Thompson, I; Vary, J P; Wild, S M

    2011-01-01

    The UNEDF SciDAC collaboration of nuclear theorists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists is developing a comprehensive description of nuclei and their reactions that delivers maximum predictive power with quantified uncertainties. This paper illustrates significant milestones accomplished by UNEDF through integration of the theoretical approaches, advanced numerical algorithms, and leadership class computational resources.

  17. Double decimation and sliding vacua in the nuclear many-body system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.E.; Rho, Mannque

    2004-06-01

    We propose that effective field theories for nuclei and nuclear matter comprise of 'double decimation': (1) the chiral symmetry decimation (CSD) and (2) Fermi liquid decimation (FLD). The Brown-Rho scaling recently identified as the parametric dependence intrinsic in the 'vector manifestation' of hidden local symmetry theory of Harada and Yamawaki results from the first decimation. This scaling governs dynamics down to the scale at which the Fermi surface is formed as a quantum critical phenomenon. The next decimation to the top of the Fermi sea where standard nuclear physics is operative makes up the FLD. Thus, nuclear dynamics are dictated by two fixed points, namely, the vector manifestation fixed point and the Fermi liquid fixed point. It has been a prevalent practice in nuclear physics community to proceed with the second decimation only, assuming density-independent masses, without implementing the first, CSD. We show why most nuclear phenomena can be reproduced by theories using either density-independent, or density-dependent masses, a grand conspiracy of nature that is an aspect that could be tied to the Cheshire Cat phenomenon in hadron physics. We identify what is left out in the FLD that does not incorporate the CSD. Experiments such as the dilepton production in relativistic heavy ion reactions, which are specifically designed to observe effects of dropping masses, could exhibit large effects from the reduced masses. However, they are compounded with effects that are not directly tied to chiral symmetry. We discuss a recent STAR/RHIC observation where BR scaling can be singled out in a pristine environment.

  18. THE IMPROVEMENT OF LOW-WASTE TECHNOLOGIES OF WORKING BODY OF WATER PREPARATION AT THERMAL AND NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. D. Rymasheuskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the main directions of water desalination technologies improving have been analyzed. Possible techniques of high-quality treatment of water that enable the reduction of amounts of environmentally hazardous substances to be discharged into the hydrosphere are indicated. The purpose of the work was to improve the ecological efficiency and the effectiveness of water treatment equipment at heat power plants when designing new and the modernizing existing water treatment schemes. In order to achieve this goal the following problems have been solved: the one of analyzing the main directions of the improvement of technologies of working body of water preparation at thermal and nuclear power plants; of analyzing the main directions of reduction of total volume of highly mineralized power plant wastewaters; of developing the technological scheme of recycling of concentrate of membrane installations and regenerants of ionite filters in acid and alkali; of developing the technological scheme of transformation of the sludge in pre-processing waste into valuable commodity products. The results of research can be applied for the design of new and the modernization of existing water treatment installations of thermal and nuclear power plants. It will enable to reduce considerably the use of natural water and the amount of chemicals added as well as the volume of wastewater and the concentration of dissolved solids in it. As a consequence, the negative impact of thermal and nuclear power plants on the hydrosphere will be reduced. 

  19. Nucleolar disruption and cajal body disassembly are nuclear hallmarks of DNA damage-induced neurodegeneration in purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltanás, Fernando C; Casafont, Iñigo; Weruaga, Eduardo; Alonso, José R; Berciano, María T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2011-07-01

    The Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration (pcd) phenotype results from mutation in nna1 gene and is associated with the degeneration and death of PCs during the postnatal life. Although the pcd mutation is a model of the ataxic mouse, it shares clinical and pathological characteristics of inherited human spinocerebellar ataxias. PC degeneration in pcd mice provides a useful neuronal system to study nuclear mechanisms involved in DNA damage-dependent neurodegeneration, particularly the contribution of nucleoli and Cajal bodies (CBs). Both nuclear structures are engaged in housekeeping functions for neuronal survival, the biogenesis of ribosomes and the maturation of snRNPs and snoRNPs required for pre-mRNA and pre-rRNA processing, respectively. In this study, we use ultrastructural analysis, in situ transcription assay and molecular markers for DNA damage, nucleoli and CB components to demonstrate that PC degeneration involves the progressive accumulation of nuclear DNA damage associated with disruption of nucleoli and CBs, disassembly of polyribosomes into monoribosomes, ribophagy and shut down of nucleolar and extranucleolar transcription. Microarray analysis reveals that four genes encoding repressors of nucleolar rRNA synthesis (p53, Rb, PTEN and SNF2) are upregulated in the cerebellum of pcd mice. Collectively, these data support that nucleolar and CB alterations are hallmarks of DNA damage-induced neurodegeneration.

  20. Magnetic tracking of eye position in freely behaving chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S Schwarz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Research on the visual system of non-primates, such as birds and rodents, is increasing. Evidence that neural responses can differ dramatically between head-immobilized and freely behaving animals underlines the importance of studying visual processing in ethologically relevant contexts. In order to systematically study visual responses in freely behaving animals, an unobtrusive system for monitoring eye-in-orbit position in real time is essential. We describe a novel system for monitoring eye position that utilizes a head-mounted magnetic displacement sensor coupled with an eye-implanted magnet. This system is small, lightweight, and offers high temporal and spatial resolution in real time. We use the system to demonstrate the stability of the eye and the stereotypy of eye position during two different behavioral tasks in chickens. This approach offers a viable alternative to search coil and optical eye tracking techniques for high resolution tracking of eye-in-orbit positions in behaving animals.

  1. Magnetic tracking of eye position in freely behaving chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jason S.; Sridharan, Devarajan; Knudsen, Eric I.

    2013-01-01

    Research on the visual system of non-primates, such as birds and rodents, is increasing. Evidence that neural responses can differ dramatically between head-immobilized and freely behaving animals underlines the importance of studying visual processing in ethologically relevant contexts. In order to systematically study visual responses in freely behaving animals, an unobtrusive system for monitoring eye-in-orbit position in real time is essential. We describe a novel system for monitoring eye position that utilizes a head-mounted magnetic displacement sensor coupled with an eye-implanted magnet. This system is small, lightweight, and offers high temporal and spatial resolution in real time. We use the system to demonstrate the stability of the eye and the stereotypy of eye position during two different behavioral tasks in chickens. This approach offers a viable alternative to search coil and optical eye tracking techniques for high resolution tracking of eye-in-orbit position in behaving animals. PMID:24312023

  2. Fuel model selection for BEHAVE in midwestern oak savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabner, K.W.; Dwyer, J.P.; Cutter, B.E.

    2001-01-01

    BEHAVE, a fire behavior prediction system, can be a useful tool for managing areas with prescribed fire. However, the proper choice of fuel models can be critical in developing management scenarios. BEHAVE predictions were evaluated using four standardized fuel models that partially described oak savanna fuel conditions: Fuel Model 1 (Short Grass), 2 (Timber and Grass), 3 (Tall Grass), and 9 (Hardwood Litter). Although all four models yielded regressions with R2 in excess of 0.8, Fuel Model 2 produced the most reliable fire behavior predictions.

  3. Ab initio nuclear structure and reactions with chiral three-body forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langhammer, Joachim; Roth, Robert; Calci, Angelo [Institut fuer Kernphysik - Theoriezentrum, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Navratil, Petr [TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    One major ambition of ab initio nuclear theory is the description of nuclear-structure and reaction observables on equal footing. This is accomplished by combining the no-core shell model (NCSM) with the resonating-group method (RGM) to a unified ab initio approach to bound and continuum states, which is developed further to the no-core shell model with continuum (NCSMC). We present the formal developments to include three-nucleon interactions in both the NCSM/RGM and NCSMC formalism. This provides the possibility to assess the predictive power of chiral two- and three-nucleon forces in the variety of scattering observables. We study three-nucleon force effects on phase-shifts, cross sections and analyzing powers in first ab-initio studies of nucleon-{sup 4}He scattering with chiral two- and three-nucleon forces. Finally, we focus on heavier target nuclei using the NCSMC, e.g., in neutron-{sup 8}Be scattering and study the impact of the continuum on the spectrum of {sup 9}Be.

  4. Magnetic Surveys for Mapping of Ultramafic Bodies on the Site of the Ohi Nuclear Power Station, Central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuma, S.; Makino, M.; Miyakawa, A.; Nakatsuka, T.; Iwamori, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Kudo, S.; Yanagida, M.; Sasaki, T.; Sugimori, T.; Kitao, H.; Asahi, N.; Shiomi, T.; Higashida, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The Ohi nuclear power station is located at the northern Oshima Peninsula in the Wakasa Bay on the coast of Japan Sea, central Japan. The geology of the site of the power station is composed mainly of shales, diabases, gabbros and ultramafic rocks of the Paleozoic Yakuno Ophiolite. An evaluation of the power station on conformity to the new regulatory requirements for nuclear power plants has been conducted. Various surveys such as tectonic geomorphological, trenching and drilling were conducted to better understand the fracture zones in the gabbro and ultramafic complex. As a result, the fracture zones can be classified into two types: faults found only in the complex and landslides seen in the upper parts of the ultramafic bodies. Whereas, magnetic susceptibilities were measured for whole cores from drilling and the upper parts of the ultramafic bodies showed high magnetic susceptibilities (> 10-2 SI). To map the distribution of ultramafic bodies, we conducted magnetic surveys on ground and at sea around Daibahama beach in December 2015. A ground magnetic survey was carried out on a grid and along a specified line on a small peninsula and some reeves by using a proton magnetometer. A seaborne magnetic survey was also conducted by a small rubber boat on which a Cesium magnetometer was mounted. Both observed data were merged and an IGRF residual magnetic anomaly map was compiled. According to the map, several positive magnetic anomalies lie over the southeastern edge of the estimated distribution area of ultramafic bodies on land, while negative magnetic anomalies are dominant at the northwestern edge. Magnetic susceptibility and NRM measurements were carried out for columnar specimens sampled from drill cores. As a preliminary analysis, we conducted 2D modeling of the specific survey line on a basis of the rock magnetic measurements. A thin dipping-dike with a reverse magnetization can account for the observed magnetic anomalies. However there still remain

  5. $\\it{Ab}$ $\\it{initio}$ nuclear many-body perturbation calculations in the Hartree-Fock basis

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Baishan; Sun, Zhonghao; Vary, James P; Li, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Starting from realistic nuclear forces, the chiral N$^3$LO and JISP16, we have applied many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) to the structure of closed-shell nuclei, $^4$He and $^{16}$O. The two-body N$^3$LO interaction is softened by a similarity renormalization group transformation while JISP16 is adopted without renormalization. The MBPT calculations are performed within the Hartree-Fock (HF) bases. The angular momentum coupled scheme is used, which can reduce the computational task. Corrections up to the third order in energy and up to the second order in radius are evaluated. Higher-order corrections in the HF basis are small relative to the leading-order perturbative result. Using the anti-symmetrized Goldstone diagram expansions of the wave function, we directly correct the one-body density for the calculation of the radius, rather than calculate corrections to the occupation propabilities of single-particle orbits as found in other treatments. We compare our results with other methods where available a...

  6. UNEDF: Advanced Scientific Computing Collaboration Transforms the Low-Energy Nuclear Many-Body Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Nam, H; Nazarewicz, W; Bulgac, A; Hagen, G; Kortelainen, M; Maris, P; Pei, J C; Roche, K J; Schunck, N; Thompson, I; Vary, J P; Wild, S M

    2012-01-01

    The demands of cutting-edge science are driving the need for larger and faster computing resources. With the rapidly growing scale of computing systems and the prospect of technologically disruptive architectures to meet these needs, scientists face the challenge of effectively using complex computational resources to advance scientific discovery. Multidisciplinary collaborating networks of researchers with diverse scientific backgrounds are needed to address these complex challenges. The UNEDF SciDAC collaboration of nuclear theorists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists is developing a comprehensive description of nuclei and their reactions that delivers maximum predictive power with quantified uncertainties. This paper describes UNEDF and identifies attributes that classify it as a successful computational collaboration. We illustrate significant milestones accomplished by UNEDF through integrative solutions using the most reliable theoretical approaches, most advanced algorithms, and leadershi...

  7. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  8. [Analysis of fragments of intergenome spacers of human body observed in chromosomes containing no nuclear organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriyanova, N S; Nechvolodov, K K; Korsunenko, A V

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repetitions of rDNA provide so-called nuclear organizations (NOR). On the other hand, rDNA-structures are observed in some NOR chromosomes. It was demonstrated that, in addition to ribosome biogenesis, nucleoli provided a number of functions: cell cycle regulation, stress-induced response, transcription regulation, which often induced cell cascades. The mechanisms of the induction of rDNA segments in NOR chromosomes are obscure and require further research. About 1/3 repetitions are associated with nucleoli and SINE/Alu repetitions, homogeneous repetition, and tandem repetition. Perhaps, relative position of nucleoli and chromosomes may facilitate/prevent interaction of chromosomes with rDNA clusters. The variability of two larger repetitions in the central part of rMGS, LR1, and LR2 similar by -90% and separated by several hundred pairs of bases from each other was studied in our previous works. This work was devoted to the search for the LR1-LR2 segments in other chromosomes, characterization of their terminal tips at rupture points and genome areas of incorporation of the LR1-LR2 segments.

  9. Tripartite Motif-Containing Protein 22 Interacts with Class II Transactivator and Orchestrates Its Recruitment in Nuclear Bodies Containing TRIM19/PML and Cyclin T1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Forlani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Among interferon (IFN inducible antiviral factors both tripartite motif-containing protein 22 (TRIM22 and class II transactivator (CIITA share the capacity of repressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 proviral transcription. TRIM22 is constitutively expressed in a subset of U937 cell clones poorly permissive to HIV-1 replication, whereas CIITA has been shown to inhibit virus multiplication in both T lymphocytic and myeloid cells, including poorly HIV-1 permissive U937 cells, by suppressing Tat-mediated transactivation of HIV-1 transcription. Therefore, we tested whether TRIM22 and CIITA could form a nuclear complex potentially endowed with HIV-1 repressive functions. Indeed, we observed that TRIM22, independent of its E3 ubiquitin ligase domain, interacts with CIITA and promotes its recruitment into nuclear bodies. Importantly, TRIM19/promyelocytic leukemia (PML protein, another repressor of HIV-1 transcription also acting before proviral integration, colocalize in these nuclear bodies upon TRIM22 expression induced by IFN-γ. Finally, tTRIM22 nuclear bodies also contained CyclinT1, a crucial elongation factor of HIV-1 primary transcripts. These findings show that TRIM22 nuclear bodies are a site of recruitment of factors crucial for the regulation of HIV-1 transcription and highlight the potential existence of a concerted action between TRIM22, CIITA, and TRIM19/PML to maintain a state of proviral latency, at least in myeloid cells.

  10. TCP1 complex proteins interact with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and can co-localize in oligonucleotide-induced nuclear bodies in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xue-hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Prakash, Thazha P; Crooke, Stanley T

    2014-07-01

    Phosphorothioate (PS) antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have been successfully developed as drugs to reduce the expression of disease-causing genes. PS-ASOs can be designed to induce degradation of complementary RNAs via the RNase H pathway and much is understood about that process. However, interactions of PS-ASOs with other cellular proteins are not well characterized. Here we report that in cells transfected with PS-ASOs, the chaperonin T-complex 1 (TCP1) proteins interact with PS-ASOs and enhance antisense activity. The TCP1-β subunit co-localizes with PS-ASOs in distinct nuclear structures, termed phosphorothioate bodies or PS-bodies. Upon Ras-related nuclear protein (RAN) depletion, cytoplasmic PS-body-like structures were observed and nuclear concentrations of PS-ASOs were reduced, suggesting that TCP1-β can interact with PS-ASOs in the cytoplasm and that the nuclear import of PS-ASOs is at least partially through the RAN-mediated pathway. Upon free uptake, PS-ASOs co-localize with TCP1 proteins in cytoplasmic foci related to endosomes/lysosomes. Together, our results indicate that the TCP1 complex binds oligonucleotides with TCP1-β subunit being a nuclear PS-body component and suggest that the TCP1 complex may facilitate PS-ASO uptake and/or release from the endocytosis pathway. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Proposal of guidelines for structuring an independent regulation body for the Brazilian nuclear sector; Proposta de diretrizes para estruturacao de um orgao de regulacao independente para o setor nuclear brasileiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicoll Junior, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory bodies are responsible for regulation in various sectors of society. In Brazil, they work in various areas for the development of the country and have as main objective the social, economic and national development. The progress of new technologies in the nuclear field and their commercialization underscores the need for regulation according to international safety standards. The present research searches through an extensive review of the literature identify the international guidelines for regulatory bodies and make a comparative analysis between Brazil and five countries that have independent regulatory bodies in the nuclear sector. The purpose of the work is to contribute to the Brazilian public sectors, with an evaluation of the country's regulation in the perception of specialists and propose guidelines for the structuring of an independent regulatory body, respecting international agreements and the legislation in force in the country. (author)

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a ... of your child's body. top of page How is the procedure performed? Nuclear medicine imaging is usually ...

  13. Estimation of Whole Body Radiation Exposure to Nuclear Medicine Personnel During Synthesis of (177)Lutetium-labeled Radiopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Geetanjali; Mishra, Rajesh; Kumar, Praveen; Yadav, Madhav; Ballal, Sanjana; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Damle, Nishikant Avinash

    2017-01-01

    With rapid development in the field of nuclear medicine therapy, radiation safety of the personnel involved in synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals has become imperative. Few studies have been done on estimating the radiation exposure of personnel involved in the radio labeling of (177)Lu-compounds in western countries. However, data from the Indian subcontinent are limited. We have estimated whole body radiation exposure to the radiopharmacist involved in the labeling of: (177)Lu-DOTATATE, (177)Lu-PSMA-617, and (177)Lu-EDTMP. Background radiation was measured by keeping a pocket dosimeter around the workbench when no radioactive work was conducted. The same pocket dosimeter was given to the radiopharmacist performing the labeling of (177)Lu-compounds. All radiopharmaceuticals were synthesized by the same radiopharmacist with 3, 1 and 3 year experience, respectively, in radiolabeling the above compounds. One Curie (1 Ci) of (177)Lu was received fortnightly by our department. Data were collected for 12 syntheses of (177)Lu-DOTATATE, 8 syntheses of (177)Lu-PSMA-617, and 3 syntheses of (177)Lu-EDTMP. Mean time required to complete the synthesis was 0.81, 0.65, and 0.58 h, respectively. Mean whole body radiation exposure was 0.023 ± 0.01 mSv, 0.01 ± 0.002 mSv, and 0.002 ± 0.0006 mSv, respectively. Overall mean radiation dose for all the three (177)Lu-compounds was 0.014 mSv. Highest exposure was obtained during the synthesis of (177)Lu-DOTATATE. Our data suggest that the manual radiolabeling of (177)Lu compounds is safe, and the whole body radiation exposure to the involved personnel is well within prescribed limits.

  14. Hartree-Fock Many-Body Perturbation Theory for Nuclear Ground-States

    CERN Document Server

    Tichai, Alexander; Binder, Sven; Roth, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the order-by-order convergence behavior of many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) as a simple and efficient tool to approximate the ground-state energy of closed-shell nuclei. To address the convergence properties directly, we explore perturbative corrections up to 30th order and highlight the role of the partitioning for convergence. The use of a simple Hartree-Fock solution to construct the unperturbed basis leads to a convergent MBPT series for soft interactions, in contrast to, e.g., a harmonic oscillator basis. For larger model spaces and heavier nuclei, where a direct high-order MBPT calculation in not feasible, we perform third-order calculation and compare to advanced ab initio coupled-cluster calculations for the same interactions and model spaces. We demonstrate that third-order MBPT provides ground-state energies for nuclei up into tin isotopic chain that are in excellent agreement with the best available coupled-cluster results at a fraction of the computational cost.

  15. A Novel Distributed Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangyang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO is an improved version of particle swarm optimization (PSO and has shown superior performance on many optimization problems. But for now, it may not always satisfy the situations. Nowadays, problems become larger and more complex, and most serial optimization algorithms cannot deal with the problem or need plenty of computing cost. Fortunately, as an effective model in dealing with problems with big data which need huge computation, MapReduce has been widely used in many areas. In this paper, we implement QPSO on MapReduce model and propose MapReduce quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (MRQPSO which achieves parallel and distributed QPSO. Comparisons are made between MRQPSO and QPSO on some test problems and nonlinear equation systems. The results show that MRQPSO could complete computing task with less time. Meanwhile, from the view of optimization performance, MRQPSO outperforms QPSO in many cases.

  16. Spindle pole body-anchored Kar3 drives the nucleus along microtubules from another nucleus in preparation for nuclear fusion during yeast karyogamy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibeaux, Romain; Politi, Antonio Z; Nédélec, François; Antony, Claude; Knop, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Nuclear migration during yeast karyogamy, termed nuclear congression, is required to initiate nuclear fusion. Congression involves a specific regulation of the microtubule minus end-directed kinesin-14 motor Kar3 and a rearrangement of the cytoplasmic microtubule attachment sites at the spindle pole bodies (SPBs). However, how these elements interact to produce the forces necessary for nuclear migration is less clear. We used electron tomography, molecular genetics, quantitative imaging, and first principles modeling to investigate how cytoplasmic microtubules are organized during nuclear congression. We found that Kar3, with the help of its light chain, Cik1, is anchored during mating to the SPB component Spc72 that also serves as a nucleator and anchor for microtubules via their minus ends. Moreover, we show that no direct microtubule-microtubule interactions are required for nuclear migration. Instead, SPB-anchored Kar3 exerts the necessary pulling forces laterally on microtubules emanating from the SPB of the mating partner nucleus. Therefore, a twofold symmetrical application of the core principle that drives nuclear migration in higher cells is used in yeast to drive nuclei toward each other before nuclear fusion.

  17. Saturation of Nuclear Matter and Roles of Many-Body Forces: nuclear matter in neutron stars probed by nucleus-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Sakuragi, Y

    2016-01-01

    Yoichiro Nambu put a great foot print in nuclear physics in the era of its fundamental developments including his pioneering insight into essential ingredients of repulsive core of nuclear force and its relation to the saturation of nuclear matter. The present review article focuses onto recent developments of the interaction models between colliding nuclei in terms of Brueckner's G-matrix theory staring from realistic nuclear forces and the saturation property of symmetric nuclear matter as well as neutron-star matter. A recently proposed unique scenario of extracting the saturation property of nuclear matter and stiffness of neutron stars through the analysis of nucleus-nucleus elastic scattering in laboratories is presented in some detail.

  18. The translation initiation factor 3 subunit eIF3K interacts with PML and associates with PML nuclear bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salsman, Jayme; Pinder, Jordan; Tse, Brenda [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, P.O. Box 15000, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4R2 (Canada); Corkery, Dale [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Dellaire, Graham, E-mail: dellaire@dal.ca [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, P.O. Box 15000, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4R2 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2013-10-15

    The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) is a tumor suppressor protein that regulates a variety of important cellular processes, including gene expression, DNA repair and cell fate decisions. Integral to its function is the ability of PML to form nuclear bodies (NBs) that serve as hubs for the interaction and modification of over 90 cellular proteins. There are seven canonical isoforms of PML, which encode diverse C-termini generated by alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Recruitment of specific cellular proteins to PML NBs is mediated by protein–protein interactions with individual PML isoforms. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen employing peptide sequences unique to PML isoform I (PML-I), we identified an interaction with the eukaryotic initiation factor 3 subunit K (eIF3K), and in the process identified a novel eIF3K isoform, which we term eIF3K-2. We further demonstrate that eIF3K and PML interact both in vitro via pull-down assays, as well as in vivo within human cells by co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunofluorescence. In addition, eIF3K isoform 2 (eIF3K-2) colocalizes to PML bodies, particularly those enriched in PML-I, while eIF3K isoform 1 associates poorly with PML NBs. Thus, we report eIF3K as the first known subunit of the eIF3 translation pre-initiation complex to interact directly with the PML protein, and provide data implicating alternative splicing of both PML and eIF3K as a possible regulatory mechanism for eIF3K localization at PML NBs. - Highlights: • The PML-I C-terminus, encoded by exon 9, interacts with translation factor eIF3K. • We identify a novel eIF3K isoform that excludes exon 2 (eIF3K-2). • eIF3K-2 preferentially associates with PML bodies enriched in PML-I vs. PML-IV. • Alternative splicing of eIF3K regulates association with PML bodies.

  19. The effect of body weight on altered expression of nuclear receptors and cyclooxygenase-2 in human colorectal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rullier Eric

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological studies on risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC have mainly focused on diet, and being overweight is now recognized to contribute significantly to CRC risk. Overweight and obesity are defined as an excess of adipose tissue mass and are associated with disorders in lipid metabolism. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs and retinoid-activated receptors (RARs and RXRs are important modulators of lipid metabolism and cellular homeostasis. Alterations in expression and activity of these ligand-activated transcription factors might be involved in obesity-associated diseases, which include CRC. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 also plays a critical role in lipid metabolism and alterations in COX-2 expression have already been associated with unfavourable clinical outcomes in epithelial tumors. The objective of this study is to examine the hypothesis questioning the relationship between alterations in the expression of nuclear receptors and COX-2 and the weight status among male subjects with CRC. Method The mRNA expression of the different nuclear receptor subtypes and of COX-2 was measured in 20 resected samples of CRC and paired non-tumor tissues. The association between expression patterns and weight status defined as a body mass index (BMI was statistically analyzed. Results No changes were observed in PPARγ mRNA expression while the expression of PPARδ, retinoid-activated receptors and COX-2 were significantly increased in cancer tissues compared to normal colon mucosa (P ≤ 0.001. The weight status appeared to be an independent factor, although we detected an increased level of COX-2 expression in the normal mucosa from overweight patients (BMI ≥ 25 compared to subjects with healthy BMI (P = 0.002. Conclusion Our findings show that alterations in the pattern of nuclear receptor expression observed in CRC do not appear to be correlated with patient weight status. However, the analysis of COX-2

  20. Correlations in light nuclei and their relation to fine tuning and uncertainty quantifications of many body forces in low-energy nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lupu, Sergiu; Gazit, Doron

    2015-01-01

    The large nucleon-nucleon scattering length, and the isospin approximate symmetry, are low energy properties of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). These entail correlations in the binding energies of light nuclei, e.g., the A=3 iso-multiplet, and Tjon's correlation between the binding energy of three and four body nuclei. Using a new representation of these, we establish that they translate into a correlation between different short-range contributions to three body forces in chiral effective field theory of low-energy nuclear physics. We demonstrate that these correlations should be taken into account in order to avoid fine-tuning in the calibration of three body forces. We relate this to the role of correlations in uncertainty quantification of non-renormalizable effective field theories of the nuclear regime. In addition, we show that correlations can be useful in assessing the importance of forces induced by renormalization group (RG) transformations. We give numerical evidence that such RG transformations can...

  1. Nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Nazarewicz, W

    1999-01-01

    Current developments in nuclear structure are discussed from a theoretical perspective. The studies of the nuclear many-body system provide us with invaluable information about the nature of the nuclear interaction, nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales, and the modes of the nucleonic matter.

  2. Do nuclear bodies in oocytes of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Polyphaga, Tenebrionidae) contain two forms of RNA polymerase II?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogolyubov, D; Parfenov, V

    2004-02-01

    Late vitellogenic oocytes of the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, which are transcriptionally inert, contain numerous fibrogranular nuclear bodies (NBs). Previously, we have shown that these NBs contain both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms of RNA polymerase II (pol II) [Tissue Cell 33 (2001) 549]. The conclusion on the presence of phosphorylated pol II was based on our immunoelectron experiments with monoclonal antibody (mAb) H5 against the phosphorylated serine-2 of the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of pol II. Because the specificity of mAb H5 was recently questioned by demonstration of its cross-reaction with SR-proteins [J. Struct. Biol. 140 (2002) 154], we re-examined here the occurence of pol II in T. molitor oocyte NBs using other appropriate antibodies. We confirm the presence of phosphorylated pol II in NBs using the affinity-purified polyclonal antibody against the phosphorylated CTD. Using double immunogold labeling with this antibody plus mAb 8WG16 against the unphosphorylated CTD, we confirm the presence of two forms of pol II in NBs. Additionally, the presence of pol II in NBs was verified here using mAb ARNA3 against the epitope outside CTD. We suggest that at the transcriptionally inactive stage, T. molitor oocyte NBs represent storage domains for pol II disengaged from the transcription.

  3. Epstein - Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 suppresses reporter activity through modulation of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flemington Erik K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV encoded Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1 has been shown to increase the expression of promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML and the immunofluorescent intensity of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs. PML NBs have been implicated in the modulation of transcription and the association of reporter plasmids with PML NBs has been implicated in repression of reporter activity. Additionally, repression of various reporters in the presence of LMP1 has been noted. This study demonstrates that LMP1 suppresses expression of reporter activity in a dose responsive manner and corresponds with the LMP1 induced increase in PML NB intensity. Disruption of PML NBs with arsenic trioxide or a PML siRNA restores reporter activity. These data offer an explanation for previously conflicting data on LMP1 signaling and calls attention to the possibility of false-positives and false-negatives when using reporter assays as a research tool in cells expressing LMP1.

  4. Human Regulatory Protein Ki-1/57 Is a Target of SUMOylation and Affects PML Nuclear Body Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Ângela; Souza, Edmarcia E; Costa, Fernanda C; Meirelles, Gabriela V; Gonçalves, Kaliandra A; Santos, Marcos T; Bressan, Gustavo C; McComb, Mark E; Costello, Catherine E; Whelan, Stephen A; Kobarg, Jörg

    2017-09-01

    Ki-1/57 is a nuclear and cytoplasmic regulatory protein first identified in malignant cells from Hodgkin's lymphoma. It is involved in gene expression regulation on both transcriptional and mRNA metabolism levels. Ki-1/57 belongs to the family of intrinsically unstructured proteins and undergoes phosphorylation by PKC and methylation by PRMT1. Previous characterization of its protein interaction profile by yeast two-hybrid screening showed that Ki-1/57 interacts with proteins of the SUMOylation machinery, the SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme UBC9 and the SUMO E3 ligase PIAS3, which suggested that Ki-1/57 could be involved with this process. Here we identified seven potential SUMO target sites (lysine residues) on Ki-1/57 sequence and observed that Ki-1/57 is modified by SUMO proteins in vitro and in vivo. We showed that SUMOylation of Ki-1/57 occurred on lysines 213, 276, and 336. In transfected cells expressing FLAG-Ki-1/57 wild-type, its paralog FLAG-CGI-55 wild-type, or their non-SUMOylated triple mutants, the number of PML-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) is reduced compared with the control cells not expressing the constructs. More interestingly, after treating cells with arsenic trioxide (As2O3), the number of PML-NBs is no longer reduced when the non-SUMOylated triple mutant Ki-1/57 is expressed, suggesting that the SUMOylation of Ki-1/57 has a role in the control of As2O3-induced PML-NB formation. A proteome-wide analysis of Ki-1/57 partners in the presence of either SUMO-1 or SUMO-2 suggests that the involvement of Ki-1/57 with the regulation of gene expression is independent of the presence of either SUMO-1 or SUMO-2; however, the presence of SUMO-1 strongly influences the interaction of Ki-1/57 with proteins associated with cellular metabolism, maintenance, and cell cycle.

  5. Assessment of factors that affect the effectiveness of regulatory bodies: an application to the nuclear area; Avaliacao de fatores que afetam a eficacia de orgaos reguladores: uma aplicacao ao setor nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Ivan Pedro Salati de

    2005-09-15

    This work examines the main factors that affect the effectiveness of the non-economic regulatory process and establishes a model to propose actions to improve the regulation and the role of the regulatory body. The Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) is used and some tools for analysis, derived from the expectations of the stake holders, are added to the methodology. The stake holders taken into account are the public, the licensees, the supervisory bodies, other regulatory bodies, international organizations, concerned groups, and the regulatory body staff. The proposed actions aim to gradually change the organization, and the adopted methodology sees the organizational evolution as a continuum. Some elements of the Theory of Complexity are compared to the SSM concepts in order to validate the evolutionary approach. The model is applied to the specific case of,the nuclear regulation and the Brazilian regulatory body. Situations perceived as 'problem situations' are listed and some actions are proposed for improvement, including the establishment of performance indicators for effectiveness in nuclear regulation. (author)

  6. Flexible Coupling of Respiration and Vocalizations with Locomotion and Head Movements in the Freely Behaving Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Joseph Andrews; Boerner, Barbara Ciralli; Laplagne, Diego Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Quadrupedal mammals typically synchronize their respiration with body movements during rhythmic locomotion. In the rat, fast respiration is coupled to head movements during sniffing behavior, but whether respiration is entrained by stride dynamics is not known. We recorded intranasal pressure, head acceleration, instantaneous speed, and ultrasonic vocalizations from male and female adult rats while freely behaving in a social environment. We used high-speed video recordings of stride to understand how head acceleration signals relate to locomotion and developed techniques to identify episodes of sniffing, walking, trotting, and galloping from the recorded variables. Quantitative analysis of synchrony between respiration and head acceleration rhythms revealed that respiration and locomotion movements were coordinated but with a weaker coupling than expected from previous work in other mammals. We have recently shown that rats behaving in social settings produce high rates of ultrasonic vocalizations during locomotion bouts. Accordingly, rats emitted vocalizations in over half of the respiratory cycles during fast displacements. We present evidence suggesting that emission of these calls disrupts the entrainment of respiration by stride. The coupling between these two variables is thus flexible, such that it can be overridden by other behavioral demands.

  7. Flexible Coupling of Respiration and Vocalizations with Locomotion and Head Movements in the Freely Behaving Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Andrews Alves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quadrupedal mammals typically synchronize their respiration with body movements during rhythmic locomotion. In the rat, fast respiration is coupled to head movements during sniffing behavior, but whether respiration is entrained by stride dynamics is not known. We recorded intranasal pressure, head acceleration, instantaneous speed, and ultrasonic vocalizations from male and female adult rats while freely behaving in a social environment. We used high-speed video recordings of stride to understand how head acceleration signals relate to locomotion and developed techniques to identify episodes of sniffing, walking, trotting, and galloping from the recorded variables. Quantitative analysis of synchrony between respiration and head acceleration rhythms revealed that respiration and locomotion movements were coordinated but with a weaker coupling than expected from previous work in other mammals. We have recently shown that rats behaving in social settings produce high rates of ultrasonic vocalizations during locomotion bouts. Accordingly, rats emitted vocalizations in over half of the respiratory cycles during fast displacements. We present evidence suggesting that emission of these calls disrupts the entrainment of respiration by stride. The coupling between these two variables is thus flexible, such that it can be overridden by other behavioral demands.

  8. The interaction between herpes simplex virus 1 genome and promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs as a hallmark of the entry in latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Lomonte

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 is a human pathogen that establishes latency in the nucleus of infected neurons in the PNS and the CNS. At the transcriptional level latency is characterized by a quasi-complete silencing of the extrachromosomal viral genome that otherwise expresses more than 80 genes during the lytic cycle. In neurons, latency is anticipated to be the default transcriptional program; however, limited information exists on the molecular mechanisms that force the virus to enter the latent state. Our recent study demonstrates that the interaction of the viral genomes with the nuclear architecture and specifically the promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs is a major determinant for the entry of HSV-1 into latency (Maroui MA, Callé A et al. (2016. Latency entry of herpes simplex virus 1 is determined by the interaction of its genome with the nuclear environment. PLoS Pathogens 12(9: e1005834..

  9. Relationship between electron density and effective densities of body tissues for stopping, scattering and nuclear interaction of proton and ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    In treatment planning of charged-particle radiotherapy, patient heterogeneity is normally modeled as variable-density water to best reproduce the stopping power. This water-based model would cause substantial errors in multiple scattering and nuclear interaction as body tissues may deviate from water in elemental compositions. In this study, we physically defined distinctive effective densities for stopping, scattering, and nuclear interactions of proton and ions and constructed their conversion functions to correct the water-based model, using the standard elemental composition data for body tissues. As we took the electron density for the reference in the formulation, these conversion functions are generally valid for treatment planning systems that normally have a function to convert CT number to electron density or stopping-power ratio. The proposed extension in heterogeneity correction will enable accurate beam dose calculation without seriously sacrificing simplicity or efficiency of the water-based mod...

  10. Well behaved anisotropic compact star models in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasim, M. K.; Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Dayanandan, B.

    2016-11-01

    Anisotropic compact star models have been constructed by assuming a particular form of a metric function e^{λ}. We solved the Einstein field equations for determining the metric function e^{ν}. For this purpose we have assumed a physically valid expression of radial pressure (pr). The obtained anisotropic compact star model is representing the realistic compact objects such as PSR 1937 +21. We have done an extensive study about physical parameters for anisotropic models and found that these parameters are well behaved throughout inside the star. Along with these we have also determined the equation of state for compact star which gives the radial pressure is purely the function of density i.e. pr=f(ρ).

  11. Nuclear inclusions mimicking poly(A)-binding protein nuclear 1 inclusions in a case of inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia with a novel mutation in the valosin-containing protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Shiro; Shimizu, Toshio; Komori, Takashi; Mori-Yoshimura, Madoka; Minami, Narihiro; Hayashi, Yukiko K

    2016-07-01

    A middle-aged Japanese man presented with slowly progressive asymmetric weakness of legs and arm but had neither ptosis nor dysphagia. He had a family history of similar condition suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. A muscle biopsy showed mixture of neurogenic atrophy and myopathy with rimmed vacuoles. Furthermore we found intranuclear inclusions that had a fine structure mimicking that of inclusions reported in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Immunohistochemical staining for polyadenylate-binding nuclear protein 1, which is identified within the nuclear inclusions of OPMD, demonstrated nuclear positivity in this case. However, OPMD was thought unlikely based on the clinical features and results of genetic analyses. Instead, a novel mutation in valosin-containing protein, c.376A>T (p.Ile126Phe), was revealed. A diagnosis of inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia was made. This is the first report of polyadenylate-binding nuclear protein 1-positive nuclear inclusions in the muscle of this condition.

  12. 'Behaving well': the transition to respectable womanhood in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennott, Christie; A Mojola, Sanyu

    2016-12-09

    Few studies of the transition to adulthood in Africa analyse young people's own definitions of the events that confer adult status, and how adulthood is actually attained. This paper examines the experience of transitioning to womanhood in rural Mpumalanga Province, South Africa, drawing on interviews with 18 women aged 18-39. Three primary experiences characterised this transition: puberty and emerging body awareness, spending time with boys, and having a child. More important than the timing of these experiences, however, was whether women 'behaved well' and maintained respectability as they transitioned to adulthood. Behavioural standards reinforcing ideal femininity were focused on dress, manner and talk, and were particularly stringent for mothers. Findings emphasise the value of emic models of adulthood for understanding how youth experience this transition and provide an important counter-narrative to the literature focused primarily on the risk African youth face during this period of change in the life course.

  13. Microtubule-actin crosslinking factor 1 (Macf1) domain function in Balbiani body dissociation and nuclear positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Aguirre, Matias; Zhang, Hong; Jamieson-Lucy, Allison; Mullins, Mary C

    2017-09-07

    Animal-vegetal (AV) polarity of most vertebrate eggs is established during early oogenesis through the formation and disassembly of the Balbiani Body (Bb). The Bb is a structure conserved from insects to humans that appears as a large granule, similar to a mRNP granule composed of mRNA and proteins, that in addition contains mitochondria, ER and Golgi. The components of the Bb, which have amyloid-like properties, include germ cell and axis determinants of the embryo that are anchored to the vegetal cortex upon Bb disassembly. Our lab discovered in zebrafish the only gene known to function in Bb disassembly, microtubule-actin crosslinking factor 1a (macf1a). Macf1 is a conserved, giant multi-domain cytoskeletal linker protein that can interact with microtubules (MTs), actin filaments (AF), and intermediate filaments (IF). In macf1a mutant oocytes the Bb fails to dissociate, the nucleus is acentric, and AV polarity of the oocyte and egg fails to form. The cytoskeleton-dependent mechanism by which Macf1a regulates Bb mRNP granule dissociation was unknown. We found that disruption of AFs phenocopies the macf1a mutant phenotype, while MT disruption does not. We determined that cytokeratins (CK), a type of IF, are enriched in the Bb. We found that Macf1a localizes to the Bb, indicating a direct function in regulating its dissociation. We thus tested if Macf1a functions via its actin binding domain (ABD) and plectin repeat domain (PRD) to integrate cortical actin and Bb CK, respectively, to mediate Bb dissociation at the oocyte cortex. We developed a CRISPR/Cas9 approach to delete the exons encoding these domains from the macf1a endogenous locus, while maintaining the open reading frame. Our analysis shows that Macf1a functions via its ABD to mediate Bb granule dissociation and nuclear positioning, while the PRD is dispensable. We propose that Macf1a does not function via its canonical mechanism of linking two cytoskeletal systems together in dissociating the Bb. Instead

  14. Location of a possible miRNA processing site in SmD3/SmB nuclear bodies in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Yoichiro; Utsumi, Maki; Ohba, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yuichiro

    2007-09-01

    There has been much recent research on the contribution of microRNA (miRNA) in plant organogenesis and hormone action. In plants, it has been reported that Dicer-like 1 (DCL1), HYPONASTIC LEAVES1 (HYL1) and SERRATE (SE) are involved in the production of miRNAs. The means by which miRNAs are processed and transported is not well understood in detail, however. In this study, we investigated the intracellular localization and intermolecular interaction of these molecules using imaging techniques, including bimolecular fluorescence complementation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques, making use of various enhanced fluorescent proteins. We found that DCL1, HYL1 and SE formed bodies which localized in the nuclei. We were also able to locate the miRNA primary transcript using an MS2-tagged method on these bodies. It appears very likely that the observed DCL1-HYL1-SE nuclear body is involved in miRNA production. Co-expression of SmD3 or SmB proteins revealed the localization of DCL1-HYL1-SE complexes in the SmD3/SmB nuclear bodies.

  15. The embodiment of tourism among bisexually-behaving Dominican male sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Mark B

    2008-10-01

    While theories of "structure" and social inequality have increasingly informed global health efforts for HIV prevention--with growing recognition of the linkages between large-scale political and economic factors in the distribution and impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic--there is still little theorization of precisely how structural factors shape the very bodies and sexualities of specific populations and groups. In order to extend the theoretical understanding of these macro-micro linkages, this article examines how the growth of the tourism industry in the Dominican Republic has produced sexual practices and identities that reflect both the influence of large-scale structural processes and the resistant responses of local individuals. Drawing on social science theories of political economy, embodiment, and authenticity, I argue that an understanding of patterns of sexuality and HIV risk in the region requires analysis of how political-economic transformations related to tourism intersect with the individual experiences and practices of sexuality on the ground. The analysis draws on long-term ethnographic research with bisexually behaving male sex workers in two cities in the Dominican Republic, including participant observation, in-depth interviews, focus groups, and surveys. By examining the global and local values placed on these men's bodies and the ways sex workers use their bodies to broker tourists' pleasure, we may better understand how the large-scale structures of the tourism industry are linked to the specific meanings and practices of sexuality.

  16. Iran After the Bomb: How Would a Nuclear-Armed Tehran Behave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    public service of the RAND Corporation. CHILDREN AND FAMILIES EDUCATION AND THE ARTS ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT HEALTH AND HEALTH CARE INFRASTRUCTURE AND...www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5hZi_jDLvQSt2zT7C1HkzlaH2DuQw Cafiero, Giorgio, “Saudi Arabia and Qatar: Dueling Monarchies,” Foreign Policy

  17. Inspection of the brazilian nuclear regulatory body in the area of radiotherapy. A critical analysis; Inspecao do orgao regulador nuclear brasileiro na area de radioterapia. Uma analise critica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Ricardo Roberto de Azevedo

    2005-07-01

    The National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) is responsible in Brazil for the activities of licensing and control of radioactive installations in the radiotherapy medical area. The majority of these activities are developed by CNEN Co-ordination of Radioactive Installations (CORAD). One of the necessary stages for the development of licensing and control activities is the inspection of radiotherapy services (clinics and hospitals). Almost all of these inspections are carried out by CNEN Inst. of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD), through its Service of Medical Physics in Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine (SEFME). This work makes a survey of the main nonconformities found during ten years of inspections in radiotherapy services (1995 - 2004) and analyses the efficiency of these inspections in making the radiotherapy services develop their activities according to the norms in vigour in the country and adopt corrective actions against, at least, the nonconformities evidenced by CNEN inspectors. Additionally, it analyses the possibility of improvement and / or the optimisation of the process, through a procedure able to be unified and controlled, aiming a prompt communication to those involved in the licensing process (SEFME and CORAD) about the attendance by the radiotherapy services to the non-conformity items observed during the inspection. (author)

  18. Symmetry and geometry of the N-body problem. Application to the nuclear physics; Symetrie et geometrie du probleme a N-corps. Application a la physique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chau, H.T.P

    2002-10-01

    One of the main goals of classical and quantum physics is to solve the many-body problem. In nuclear theory, several methods have been developed and provide accurate results. In this thesis, we remind how symmetry can be used to obtain analytical solutions of the quantum many-body problem. We emphasize that unitary Lie algebras play a crucial role in quantum mechanics and propose and implement a method to build irreducible representations of this algebra from its highest-weight state. Calculations of bosonic and fermionic spectra are performed with realistic and with random interactions. Studies with rotational invariant two-body random interactions have unveiled high degree of order (a marked statistical preference is found for ground states with angular momentum equal to zero). In the second chapter of this thesis, it is argued that the spectral properties of this kind of interaction depend on the choice of the valence space. In particular, we propose a geometrical method to predict the properties of the ground state in certain cases. We also present numerical results when the geometrical approach can not be applied. In the third chapter, we study the link between quantum chaos and nuclear spectra calculated with realistic interactions. (author)

  19. Does urothelial cancer of bladder behave differently in young patients?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-hua; LI You-yuan; HU Zhi-quan; ZHU Hui; ZHUANG Qian-yuan; QI Yong; YE Zhang-qun

    2012-01-01

    Background Bladder urothelial cancer has been diagnosed at an increasing rate among young adults in China while the clinical outcomes remain highly controversial.To optimize the management of young patients with bladder cancer,we examined whether bladder urothelial cancer in young patients behaved differently from that in the elder patients.Methods From 1994 to 2008,a database of bladder urothelial cancer patients at a major tertiary medical center was retrospectively reviewed.The clinical and pathological parameters of patients who were less than 40 years of age and a series of patients older than 40 years of age as the control group during the same period were compared.A survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test,and Cox regression was performed to identify clinical parameters that affected the clinic outcomes.Results Young bladder cancer patients had a lower male-to-female ratio and were less likely to have advanced stages and high-grade cancers at the initial diagnosis.Tumors in young bladder cancer patients tended to be less multifocal at diagnosis.In addition,young patients had a lower recurrence rate and longer recurrence interval than older patients.The Kaplan-Meier curve and Log-rank test showed that young patients had significantly better cancer specific survival than old patients.The univariats and multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that tumor grade is the sole predictor for tumor recurrence in young patients.Conclusions Young patients with bladder cancer have favorable pathological features and clinical outcomes than older patients.These findings argue for more conservative management approaches for young patients with bladder cancer.

  20. The nucleon-nucleon interaction and the nuclear many-body problem selected papers of Gerald E. Brown and T.T.S. Kuo

    CERN Document Server

    Kuo, Thomas T. S; Holt, Jeremy W; Lee, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of some key developments in the understanding of the nucleon-nucleon interaction and nuclear many-body theory. The main problems at the level of meson exchange physics have been solved, and we have an effective field theory using a phenomenological interaction pioneered by Achim Schwenk and Scott Bogner, which is nearly universally accepted as a unique low-momentum interaction that includes all experimental data to date. This understanding is based on a multi-step development in which different scientific insights and a wide range of physical and mat

  1. The biology of habitat dominance; can microbes behave as weeds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cray, Jonathan A; Bell, Andrew N W; Bhaganna, Prashanth; Mswaka, Allen Y; Timson, David J; Hallsworth, John E

    2013-09-01

    Competition between microbial species is a product of, yet can lead to a reduction in, the microbial diversity of specific habitats. Microbial habitats can resemble ecological battlefields where microbial cells struggle to dominate and/or annihilate each other and we explore the hypothesis that (like plant weeds) some microbes are genetically hard-wired to behave in a vigorous and ecologically aggressive manner. These 'microbial weeds' are able to dominate the communities that develop in fertile but uncolonized--or at least partially vacant--habitats via traits enabling them to out-grow competitors; robust tolerances to habitat-relevant stress parameters and highly efficient energy-generation systems; avoidance of or resistance to viral infection, predation and grazers; potent antimicrobial systems; and exceptional abilities to sequester and store resources. In addition, those associated with nutritionally complex habitats are extraordinarily versatile in their utilization of diverse substrates. Weed species typically deploy multiple types of antimicrobial including toxins; volatile organic compounds that act as either hydrophobic or highly chaotropic stressors; biosurfactants; organic acids; and moderately chaotropic solutes that are produced in bulk quantities (e.g. acetone, ethanol). Whereas ability to dominate communities is habitat-specific we suggest that some microbial species are archetypal weeds including generalists such as: Pichia anomala, Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas putida; specialists such as Dunaliella salina, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lactobacillus spp. and other lactic acid bacteria; freshwater autotrophs Gonyostomum semen and Microcystis aeruginosa; obligate anaerobes such as Clostridium acetobutylicum; facultative pathogens such as Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Pantoea ananatis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; and other extremotolerant and extremophilic microbes such as Aspergillus spp., Salinibacter ruber and Haloquadratum walsbyi. Some microbes

  2. Quantum Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm Based on Artificial Fish Swarm

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Yumin; Zhao Li

    2014-01-01

    Quantum behaved particle swarm algorithm is a new intelligent optimization algorithm; the algorithm has less parameters and is easily implemented. In view of the existing quantum behaved particle swarm optimization algorithm for the premature convergence problem, put forward a quantum particle swarm optimization algorithm based on artificial fish swarm. The new algorithm based on quantum behaved particle swarm algorithm, introducing the swarm and following activities, meanwhile using the a...

  3. Nuclear Theory - Nuclear Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenne, J. P.; Canton, L.; Kozier, K. S.

    2008-01-01

    The results from modern nuclear theory are accurate and reliable enough to be used for practical applications, in particular for scattering that involves few-nucleon systems of importance to nuclear power. Using well-established nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions that fit well the NN scattering data, and the AGS form of the three-body theory, we have performed precise calculations of low-energy neutron-deuteron (n+d) scattering. We show that three-nucleon force effects that have impact on the low-energy vector analyzing powers have no practical effects on the angular distribution of the n+d cross-section. There appear to be problems for this scattering in the evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF) libraries, at the incident neutron energies less than 3.2 MeV. Supporting experimental data in this energy region are rather old (>25 years), sparse and often inconsistent. Our three-body results at low energies, 50 keV to 10.0 MeV, are compared to the ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL (Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) -3.3 evaluated angular distributions. The impact of these results on the calculated reactivity for various critical systems involving heavy water is shown.

  4. Three-Body Force Effects on EOS of Asymmetric Nuclear Matter and Proton Fraction in Neutron Star Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Wei; A.Lejeune; U.Lombardo; J.F.Mathiot

    2003-01-01

    The three-body force effects on the equation of state and its iso-spin dependence of asymmetric nuclearmatter and on the proton fraction in neutron star matter have been investigated within Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approachby using a microscopic three-body force. It is shown that, even in the presence of the three-body force, the empiricalparabolic law of the energy per nucleon vs. isospin asymmetry β= ( N - Z) /A is fulfilled in the whole asymmetry range0≤β≤1 and also up to high density. The three-body force provides a strong enhancement of symmetry energy at highdensity in agreement with relativistic approaches. It also shows that the three-body force leads to a much more rapidincreasing of symmetry energy with density in relatively high density region and to a much lower threshold density forthe direct URCA process to occur in a neutron star as compared to the predictions adopting only pure two-body force.

  5. Interferon-induced antiviral Mx1 GTPase is associated with components of the SUMO-1 system and promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, O G; Ullrich, E; Kochs, G; Haller, O

    2001-12-10

    Mx proteins are interferon-induced large GTPases, some of which have antiviral activity against a variety of viruses. The murine Mx1 protein accumulates in the nucleus of interferon-treated cells and is active against members of the Orthomyxoviridae family, such as the influenza viruses and Thogoto virus. The mechanism by which Mx1 exerts its antiviral action is still unclear, but an involvement of undefined nuclear factors has been postulated. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we identified cellular proteins that interact with Mx1 protein. The Mx1 interactors were mainly nuclear proteins. They included Sp100, Daxx, and Bloom's syndrome protein (BLM), all of which are known to localize to specific subnuclear domains called promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML NBs). In addition, components of the SUMO-1 protein modification system were identified as Mx1-interacting proteins, namely the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO-1 and SAE2, which represents subunit 2 of the SUMO-1 activating enzyme. Analysis of the subcellular localization of Mx1 and some of these interacting proteins by confocal microscopy revealed a close spatial association of Mx1 with PML NBs. This suggests a role of PML NBs and SUMO-1 in the antiviral action of Mx1 and may allow us to discover novel functions of this large GTPase.

  6. A Geant4-based Simulation to Evaluate the Feasibility of Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) in Determining Atomic Compositions of Body Tissue in Cancer Diagnostics and Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbo, Yekaterina; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Liyanage, Nilanga

    2017-01-01

    Customarily applied in homeland security for identifying concealed explosives and chemical weapons, NRF (Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence) may have high potential in determining atomic compositions of body tissue. High energy photons incident on a target excite the target nuclei causing characteristic re-emission of resonance photons. As the nuclei of each isotope have well-defined excitation energies, NRF uniquely indicates the isotopic content of the target. NRF radiation corresponding to nuclear isotopes present in the human body is emitted during radiotherapy based on Bremsstrahlung photons generated in a linear electron accelerator. We have developed a Geant4 simulation in order to help assess NRF capabilities in detecting, mapping, and characterizing tumors. We have imported a digital phantom into the simulation using anatomical data linked to known chemical compositions of various tissues. Work is ongoing to implement the University of Virginia's cancer center treatment setup and patient geometry, and to collect and analyze the simulation's physics quantities to evaluate the potential of NRF for medical imaging applications. Preliminary results will be presented.

  7. Nuclear inclusion bodies of mutant and wild-type p53 in cancer: a hallmark of p53 inactivation and proteostasis remodeling by p53 aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Frederik; Saiz Rubio, Mirian; Hompes, Daphne; Naus, Evelyne; De Baets, Greet; Langenberg, Tobias; Hipp, Mark S; Houben, Bert; Claes, Filip; Charbonneau, Sarah; Blanco, Javier Delgado; Plaisance, Stephane; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Ramkissoon, Lori; Simons, Colinda; van den Brandt, Piet; Weijenberg, Matty; Van England, Manon; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Amant, Frederic; D'Hoore, André; Ligon, Keith L; Sagaert, Xavier; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2016-12-30

    Although p53 protein aggregates have been observed in cancer cell lines and tumour tissue, their impact in cancer remains largely unknown. Here, we extensively screened for p53 aggregation phenotypes in tumour biopsies and identified nuclear inclusion bodies (nIBs) of transcriptionally inactive mutant or wild-type p53 as the most frequent aggregation-like phenotype across six different cancer types. p53-positive nIBs co-stained with nuclear aggregation markers and shared molecular hallmarks of nIBs commonly found in neurodegenerative disorders. In cell culture, tumour-associated stress was a strong inducer of p53 aggregation and nuclear inclusion body formation. This was most prominent for mutant p53, but could also be observed in wild-type p53 cell lines for which nIB formation correlated to the loss of p53s transcriptional activity. Importantly, protein aggregation also fueled the dysregulation of the proteostasis network in the tumour cell by inducing a hyper-activated, oncogenic heat-shock response to which tumours are commonly addicted, and by overloading the proteasomal degradation system, an observation that was most pronounced for structurally destabilized mutant p53. Patients exhibiting tumours with p53-positive nIBs suffered from a poor clinical outcome similar to loss-of-p53-expression, and tumour biopsies displayed a differential proteostatic expression profile associated to p53-nIBs. p53-positive nIBs therefore highlight a malignant state of the tumour that results from the interplay between (i) the functional inactivation of p53 through mutation and/or aggregation and (ii) microenvironmental stress, a combination that catalyses proteostatic dysregulation. This study highlights several unexpected clinical, biological and therapeutically unexplored parallels between cancer and neurodegeneration.

  8. Current status and future needs of the BehavePlus Fire Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews

    2014-01-01

    The BehavePlus Fire Modeling System is among the most widely used systems for wildland fire prediction. It is designed for use in a range of tasks including wildfire behaviour prediction, prescribed fire planning, fire investigation, fuel hazard assessment, fire model understanding, communication and research. BehavePlus is based on mathematical models for fire...

  9. Calculation of three-body nuclear reactions with angular-momentum and parity-dependent optical potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Deltuva, A

    2016-01-01

    Angular-momentum or parity-dependent nonlocal optical potentials for nucleon-${}^{16}\\mathrm{O}$ scattering able to fit differential cross section data over the whole angular regime are developed and applied to the description of deuteron-${}^{16}\\mathrm{O}$ scattering in the framework of three-body Faddeev-type equations for transition operators. Differential cross sections and deuteron analyzing powers for elastic scattering and ${}^{16}\\mathrm{O}(d,p){}^{17}\\mathrm{O}$ transfer reactions are calculated using a number of local and nonlocal optical potentials and compared with experimental data. Angular-momentum or parity-dependence of the optical potential turns out to be quite irrelevant in the considered three-body reactions while nonlocality is essential for a successful description of the differential cross section data, especially in transfer reactions.

  10. Why does graphene behave as a weakly interacting system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Johannes; Barnes, Edwin; Das Sarma, S

    2014-09-05

    We address the puzzling weak-coupling perturbative behavior of graphene interaction effects as manifested experimentally, in spite of the effective fine structure constant being large, by calculating the effect of Coulomb interactions on the quasiparticle properties to next-to-leading order in the random phase approximation (RPA). The focus of our work is graphene suspended in vacuum, where electron-electron interactions are strong and the system is manifestly in a nonperturbative regime. We report results for the quasiparticle residue and the Fermi velocity renormalization at low carrier density. The smallness of the next-to-leading order corrections that we obtain demonstrates that the RPA theory converges rapidly and thus, in contrast to the usual perturbative expansion in the bare coupling constant, constitutes a quantitatively predictive theory of graphene many-body physics for any coupling strength.

  11. Whole-brain calcium imaging with cellular resolution in freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jeffrey; Shipley, Frederick; Linder, Ashley; Plummer, George; Liu, Mochi; Setru, Sagar; Shaevitz, Joshua; Leifer, Andrew

    The ability to acquire large-scale recordings of neuronal activity in awake and unrestrained animals is needed to provide new insights into how populations of neurons generate animal behavior. Acquiring this data, however, is challenging because it is difficult to track and image individual neurons as an animal deforms its posture and moves many body lengths. Here, we present an instrument capable of recording intracellular calcium transients from the majority of neurons in the head of a freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular resolution while simultaneously recording the animal's position, posture, and locomotion. 3D volumetric fluorescent images of neurons expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP6s are recorded at 6 head-volumes/s using spinning disk confocal microscopy. At the same time, we record low magnification images of the animal to measure the animals behavior and track its head as it moves. We develop a time independent neuronal matching algorithm that uses non-rigid point set registration and machine learning to correctly match neurons across time. Using this method, we are able to observe calcium transients from up to 90 neurons for over 4 min and correlate the neural activity with the animal's behavior.

  12. Body Motion and Graphing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; Tierney, Cornelia; Wright, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Analyzed two children's use of a computer-based motion detector to make sense of symbolic expressions (Cartesian graphs). Found three themes: (1) tool perspectives, efforts to understand graphical responses to body motion; (2) fusion, emergent ways of talking and behaving that merge symbols and referents; and (3) graphical spaces, when changing…

  13. Nuclear Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, Angela

    2003-04-01

    An account of recent studies in the field of theoretical nuclear structure is reported. These studies concern essentially research activities performed under the Italian project "Fisica Teorica del Nucleo e dei Sistemi a Molti Corpi". Special attention is addressed to results obtained during the last two years as regards the development of new many-body techniques as well as the interpretation of new experimental aspects of nuclear structure.

  14. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This report contains brief papers that discusses the following topics: Fundamental Symmetries in the Nucleus; Internucleon Interactions; Dynamics of Very Light Nuclei; Facets of the Nuclear Many-Body Problem; and Nuclear Instruments and Methods.

  15. Fusion body formation, germ tube anastomosis, and nuclear migration during the germination of urediniospores of the wheat leaf rust fungus, Puccinia triticina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiben; McCallum, Brent

    2009-12-01

    ABSTRACT Vegetative or parasexual recombination is thought to be a key mechanism for the genetic diversity of cereal rust fungi. The process of germ tube fusion leading to hyphal anastomosis and nuclear recombination was analyzed in wheat leaf rust fungus, Puccinia triticina. Germ tube anastomosis was observed in 27 P. triticina isolates, each representing a different virulence phenotype. Germ tube fusion bodies (GFBs), which appeared as viscid globules formed at tips of germ tubes, were essential for germ tube anastomosis. The formation of GFBs was affected by the urediniospore density and the length of illumination during germination. GFBs were formed at the highest frequency when urediniospores were spread to a concentration of 1 x 10(6) urediniospores/ml and incubated in dark for 12 to 24 h during germination. GFB attached to either the side of another germ tube ("tip to side") or to another GFB formed at the tip of a second germ tube ("tip to tip"). In "tip to side" anastomosis, two nuclei in the germ tube bearing the GFB migrated into the second germ tube through the GFB which resulted in four nuclei within this germ tube. In "tip to tip" anastomosis, nuclei in both germ tubes migrated into the fused GFB and all four nuclei came into close proximity. Urediniospores of isolates MBDS-3-115 and TBBJ-5-11 were stained with DAPI (4',6'diamine-2-phenylindole) and Nuclear Yellow (Hoechst S769121), respectively, and then mixed and germinated on water agar. Some fused GFBs contained nuclei stained with DAPI and nuclei stained with Nuclear Yellow in close proximity, demonstrating the fusion between genetically different P. triticina isolates. In some fused GFBs, "bridge-like" structures connecting different nuclei were observed.

  16. Updates of the nuclear equation of state for core-collapse supernovae and neutron Stars: effects of 3-body forces, QCD, and magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Mathews, G J; Olson, J P; Suh, I-S; Kajino, T; Maruyama, T; Hidaka, J; Ryu, C-Y; Cheoun, M-K; Lan, N Q

    2013-01-01

    We summarize several new developments in the nuclear equation of state for supernova simulations and neutron stars. We discuss an updated and improved Notre-Dame-Livermore Equation of State (NDL EoS) for use in supernovae simulations. This Eos contains many updates. Among them are the effects of 3- body nuclear forces at high densities and the possible transition to a QCD chiral and/or super-conducting color phase at densities. We also consider the neutron star equation of state and neutrino transport in the presence of strong magnetic fields. We study a new quantum hadrodynamic (QHD) equation of state for neutron stars (with and without hyperons) in the presence of strong magnetic fields. The parameters are constrained by deduced masses and radii. The calculated adiabatic index for these magnetized neutron stars exhibit rapid changes with density. This may provide a mechanism for star-quakes and flares in magnetars. We also investigate the strong magnetic field effects on the moments of inertia and spin down...

  17. Detection of O-propargyl-puromycin with SUMO and ubiquitin by click chemistry at PML-nuclear bodies during abortive proteasome activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uozumi, Naoki; Matsumoto, Hotaru [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Saitoh, Hisato, E-mail: hisa@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-05-27

    The amino-nucleoside antibiotic, puromycin, acts by covalently linking to elongating polypeptide chains on ribosomes to generate prematurely terminated immature polypeptides. The trafficking of puromycin-conjugated (puromycylated) immature polypeptides within cell has, however, remained elusive. In this study, using O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro), the distribution of puromycylated polypeptides was assessed in HeLa cells by click chemistry. Under standard culture conditions, OP-Puro signals were detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus with the highest concentrations in the nucleolus. Intriguingly, when proteasome activities were aborted using MG132, OP-Puro signals began to accumulate at promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in addition to the nucleolus. We also found promiscuous association of OP-Puro signals with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at PML-NBs, but not at the nucleolus, during abortive proteasome activities. This study reveals a previously unknown distribution of OP-Puro that argues for a nuclear function in regulating immature protein homeostasis. -- Highlights: •Click chemistry detects O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) signals in the nucleus. •OP-Puro accumulates at PML-NBs during abortive proteasome activities. •SUMO and ubiquitin are promiscuously associated with OP-Puro at PML-NBs. •The nucleus may function in immature protein homeostasis.

  18. Detection of O-propargyl-puromycin with SUMO and ubiquitin by click chemistry at PML-nuclear bodies during abortive proteasome activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uozumi, Naoki; Matsumoto, Hotaru; Saitoh, Hisato

    2016-05-27

    The amino-nucleoside antibiotic, puromycin, acts by covalently linking to elongating polypeptide chains on ribosomes to generate prematurely terminated immature polypeptides. The trafficking of puromycin-conjugated (puromycylated) immature polypeptides within cell has, however, remained elusive. In this study, using O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro), the distribution of puromycylated polypeptides was assessed in HeLa cells by click chemistry. Under standard culture conditions, OP-Puro signals were detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus with the highest concentrations in the nucleolus. Intriguingly, when proteasome activities were aborted using MG132, OP-Puro signals began to accumulate at promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in addition to the nucleolus. We also found promiscuous association of OP-Puro signals with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at PML-NBs, but not at the nucleolus, during abortive proteasome activities. This study reveals a previously unknown distribution of OP-Puro that argues for a nuclear function in regulating immature protein homeostasis.

  19. Nuclear Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Savage, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Lattice QCD is making good progress toward calculating the structure and properties of light nuclei and the forces between nucleons. These calculations will ultimately refine the nuclear forces, particularly in the three- and four-nucleon sector and the short-distance interactions of nucleons with electroweak currents, and allow for a reduction of uncertainties in nuclear many-body calculations of nuclei and their reactions. After highlighting their importance, particularly to the Nuclear Physics and High-Energy Physics experimental programs, I discuss the progress that has been made toward achieving these goals and the challenges that remain.

  20. Frequency-comb referenced collinear laser spectroscopy of Be+ for nuclear structure investigations and many-body QED tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, A.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Geppert, Ch.; Blaum, K.; Bissell, M. L.; Frömmgen, N.; Hammen, M.; Kreim, K.; Kowalska, M.; Krämer, J.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Sánchez, R.; Tiedemann, D.; Yordanov, D. T.; Zakova, M.

    2017-01-01

    Transition frequencies of the 2s ^2{{S}}_{1/2} → 2p ^2 {{P}}_{1/2, 3/2} transitions in Be^+ were measured in stable and short-lived isotopes at ISOLDE (CERN) using collinear laser spectroscopy and frequency-comb-referenced dye lasers. Quasi-simultaneous measurements in copropagating and counterpropagating geometry were performed to become independent from acceleration voltage determinations for Doppler-shift corrections of the fast ion beam. Isotope shifts and fine-structure splittings were obtained from the transition frequencies measured with a frequency comb with accuracies better than 1 MHz and led to a precise determination of the nuclear charge radii of ^{7,10-12}Be relative to the stable isotope 9Be. Moreover, an accurate determination of the 2 p fine-structure splitting allowed a test of high-precision bound-state QED calculations in the three-electron system. Here, we describe the laser spectroscopic method in detail, including several tests that were carried out to determine or estimate systematic uncertainties. Final values from two experimental runs at ISOLDE are presented, and the results are discussed.

  1. Frequency-comb based collinear laser spectroscopy of Be for nuclear structure investigations and many-body QED tests

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, A; Geppert, Ch; Blaum, K; Bissell, M L; Frömmgen, N; Hammen, M; Kreim, K; Kowalska, M; Krämer, J; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Sánchez, R; Tiedemann, D; Yordanov, D T; Zakova, M

    2016-01-01

    Absolute transition frequencies of the $2s\\,^2{\\rm{S}}_{1/2}$ $\\rightarrow$ $2p\\,^2{\\rm{P}}_{1/2,3/2}$ transitions in Be$^+$ were measured with a frequency comb in stable and short-lived isotopes at ISOLDE (CERN) using collinear laser spectroscopy. Quasi-simultaneous measurements in copropagating and counterpropagating geometry were performed to become independent from acceleration voltage determinations for Doppler-shift corrections of the fast ion beam. Isotope shifts and fine structure splittings were obtained from the absolute transition frequencies with accuracies better than 1\\,MHz and led to a precise determination of the nuclear charge radii of $^{7,10-12}$Be relative to the stable isotope $^9$Be. Moreover, an accurate determination of the $2p$ fine structure splitting allowed a test of high-precision bound-state QED calculations in the three-electron system. Here, we describe the laser spectroscopic method in detail, including several tests that were carried out to determine or estimate systematic un...

  2. Reproducibility and accuracy of body composition assessments in mice by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and time domain nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsdottir, Solveig; Carmody, Jill; Boozer, Carol N; Leduc, Charles A; Leibel, Rudolph L

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the accuracy and reproducibility of dual-energy absorptiometry (DXA; PIXImus(™)) and time domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR; Bruker Optics) for the measurement of body composition of lean and obese mice. SUBJECTS AND MEASUREMENTS: Thirty lean and obese mice (body weight range 19-67 g) were studied. Coefficients of variation for repeated (x 4) DXA and NMR scans of mice were calculated to assess reproducibility. Accuracy was assessed by comparing DXA and NMR results of ten mice to chemical carcass analyses. Accuracy of the respective techniques was also assessed by comparing DXA and NMR results obtained with ground meat samples to chemical analyses. Repeated scans of 10-25 gram samples were performed to test the sensitivity of the DXA and NMR methods to variation in sample mass. RESULTS: In mice, DXA and NMR reproducibility measures were similar for fat tissue mass (FTM) (DXA coefficient of variation [CV]=2.3%; and NMR CV=2.8%) (P=0.47), while reproducibility of lean tissue mass (LTM) estimates were better for DXA (1.0%) than NMR (2.2%) (advantages compared to DXA, such as speed of measurement and the ability to scan unanesthetized animals.

  3. Substrate profiling of human vaccinia-related kinases identifies coilin, a Cajal body nuclear protein, as a phosphorylation target with neurological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-García, Marta; Vázquez-Cedeira, Marta; Kellerman, Efrat; Renbaum, Paul; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Lazo, Pedro A

    2011-12-21

    Protein phosphorylation by kinases plays a central role in the regulation and coordination of multiple biological processes. In general, knowledge on kinase specificity is restricted to substrates identified in the context of specific cellular responses, but kinases are likely to have multiple additional substrates and be integrated in signaling networks that might be spatially and temporally different, and in which protein complexes and subcellular localization can play an important role. In this report the substrate specificity of atypical human vaccinia-related kinases (VRK1 and VRK2) using a human peptide-array containing 1080 sequences phosphorylated in known signaling pathways has been studied. The two kinases identify a subset of potential peptide targets, all of them result in a consensus sequence composed of at least four basic residues in peptide targets. Linear peptide arrays are therefore a useful approach in the characterization of kinases and substrate identification, which can contribute to delineate the signaling network in which VRK proteins participate. One of these target proteins is coilin; a basic protein located in nuclear Cajal bodies. Coilin is phosphorylated in Ser184 by both VRK1 and VRK2. Coilin colocalizes and interacts with VRK1 in Cajal bodies, but not with the mutant VRK1 (R358X). VRK1 (R358X) is less active than VRK1. Altered regulation of coilin might be implicated in several neurological diseases such as ataxias and spinal muscular atrophies.

  4. Body searching for freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Bortolás

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyze how the previous council of class of the third bimester/ 2000 is accomplished, as well as to observe students’s resistance to the rules of Escola Estadual de 1º Grau Tancredo Neves – Santa Maria – RS. Although the school follows a pegagogical liberating proposal based on Paulo Freire’s view, the council of class still call their students well behaved and badly behaved during their disciplinary practices. In that scenary the body is viewed and treated through a ‘docility’ situation, through disciplinary techniques which are expressed by the performance and control of the body. This study points out to the need of reflexivity on body and the production of subjectivity behind school walls. It also promotes a closer relationship between both education and physical education within academic and school fields.

  5. The Human Cytomegalovirus IE1 Protein Antagonizes PML Nuclear Body-Mediated Intrinsic Immunity via the Inhibition of PML De Novo SUMOylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Eva-Maria; Scherer, Myriam; Reuter, Nina; Schweininger, Johannes; Muller, Yves A; Stamminger, Thomas

    2017-02-15

    PML nuclear bodies (NBs) are accumulations of cellular proteins embedded in a scaffold-like structure built by SUMO-modified PML/TRIM19. PML and other NB proteins act as cellular restriction factors against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV); however, this intrinsic defense is counteracted by the immediate early protein 1 (IE1) of HCMV. IE1 directly interacts with the PML coiled-coil domain via its globular core region and disrupts NB foci by inducing a loss of PML SUMOylation. Here, we demonstrate that IE1 acts via abrogating the de novo SUMOylation of PML. In order to overcome reversible SUMOylation dynamics, we made use of a cell-based assay that combines inducible IE1 expression with a SUMO mutant resistant to SUMO proteases. Interestingly, we observed that IE1 expression did not affect preSUMOylated PML; however, it clearly prevented de novo SUMO conjugation. Consistent results were obtained by in vitro SUMOylation assays, demonstrating that IE1 alone is sufficient for this effect. Furthermore, IE1 acts in a selective manner, since K160 was identified as the main target lysine. This is strengthened by the fact that IE1 also prevents As2O3-mediated hyperSUMOylation of K160, thereby blocking PML degradation. Since IE1 did not interfere with coiled-coil-mediated PML dimerization, we propose that IE1 affects PML autoSUMOylation either by directly abrogating PML E3 ligase function or by preventing access to SUMO sites. Thus, our data suggest a novel mechanism for how a viral protein counteracts a cellular restriction factor by selectively preventing the de novo SUMOylation at specific lysine residues without affecting global protein SUMOylation. The human cytomegalovirus IE1 protein acts as an important antagonist of a cellular restriction mechanism that is mediated by subnuclear structures termed PML nuclear bodies. This function of IE1 is required for efficient viral replication and thus constitutes a potential target for antiviral strategies. In this paper, we further

  6. Role of the SUMO-interacting motif in HIPK2 targeting to the PML nuclear bodies and regulation of p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Ki Sa; Lee, Yun-Ah [Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eui Tae [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung-Rock [Department of Biochemistry, Research Center for Aging and Geriatrics, Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-190 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jin-Hyun [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Cheol Yong, E-mail: choicy@skku.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is a key regulator of various transcription factors including p53 and CtBP in the DNA damage signaling pathway. PML-nuclear body (NB) is required for HIPK2-mediated p53 phosphorylation at Ser46 and induction of apoptosis. Although PML-NB targeting of HIPK2 has been shown, much is not clear about the molecular mechanism of HIPK2 recruitment to PML-NBs. Here we show that HIPK2 colocalizes specifically with PML-I and PML-IV. Mutational analysis showed that HIPK2 recruitment to PML-IV-NBs is mediated by the SUMO-interaction motifs (SIMs) of both PML-IV and HIPK2. Wild-type HIPK2 associated with SUMO-conjugated PML-IV at a higher affinity than with un-conjugated PML-IV, while the association of a HIPK2 SIM mutant with SUMO-modified PML-IV was impaired. In colony formation assays, HIPK2 strongly suppressed cell proliferation, but HIPK2 SIM mutants did not. In addition, activation and phosphorylation of p53 at the Ser46 residue were impaired by HIPK2 SIM mutants. These results suggest that SIM-mediated HIPK2 targeting to PML-NBs is crucial for HIPK2-mediated p53 activation and induction of apoptosis.

  7. The DNA binding property of PML/RARA but not the integrity of PML nuclear bodies is indispensable for leukemic transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Liu

    Full Text Available PML/RARA is the oncoprotein driving acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. It suppresses genes expression by recruitment of a number of transcriptional repressors, resulting in differentiation block and malignant transformation of hematopoietic cells. Here, we found that mice primary hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs, transduced by DNA-binding-defective PML/RARA mutants, were deficient in colony formation. Further experiments showed that DNA-binding-defective PML/RARA mutants could not repress the transcription of retinoic acid regulated genes. Intriguingly, there were no significant differences of the micro-speckled intracellular distribution between the mutants and wild-type PML/RARA. Some retinoic acid target genes regulated by PML/RARA are involved in not only differentiation block but also hematopoietic cell self-renewal. Altogether, our data demonstrate that direct DNA-binding is essential for PML/RARA to immortalize hematopoietic cells, while disruption of PML-nuclear body does not seem to be a prerequisite for hematopoietic cell transformation.

  8. Mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, disrupts the recruitment of SMN, the spinal muscular atrophy protein to nuclear Cajal bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariya, Shingo; Re, Diane B; Jacquier, Arnaud; Nelson, Katelyn; Przedborski, Serge; Monani, Umrao R

    2012-08-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are among the most common motor neuron diseases to afflict the human population. A deficiency of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein causes SMA and is also reported to be an exacerbating factor in the development of ALS. However, pathways linking the two diseases have yet to be defined and it is not clear precisely how the pathology of ALS is aggravated by reduced SMN or whether mutant proteins underlying familial forms of ALS interfere with SMN-related biochemical pathways to exacerbate the neurodegenerative process. In this study, we show that mutant superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), a cause of familial ALS, profoundly alters the sub-cellular localization of the SMN protein, preventing the formation of nuclear 'gems' by disrupting the recruitment of the protein to Cajal bodies. Overexpressing the SMN protein in mutant SOD1 mice, a model of familial ALS, alleviates this phenomenon, most likely in a cell-autonomous manner, and significantly mitigates the loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord and in culture dishes. In the mice, the onset of the neuromuscular phenotype is delayed and motor function enhanced, suggestive of a therapeutic benefit for ALS patients treated with agents that augment the SMN protein. Nevertheless, this finding is tempered by an inability to prolong survival, a limitation most likely imposed by the inexorable denervation that characterizes ALS and eventually disrupts the neuromuscular synapses even in the presence of increased SMN.

  9. Age differences in how consumers behave following exposure to DTC advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLorme, Denise E; Huh, Jisu; Reid, Leonard N

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted to provide additional evidence on how consumers behave following direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising exposure and to determine if there are differences in ad-prompted acts (drug inquiry and drug requests) between different age groups (i.e., older, mature, and younger adults). The results suggest that younger, mature, and older consumers are all moved to act by DTC drug ads, but that each age group behaves in different ways. Somewhat surprisingly, age was not predictive of ad-prompted behavior. DTC advertising was no more effective at moving older consumers to behave than their younger counterparts. These results suggest that age does not matter that much when it comes to the "moving power" of prescription drug advertising, even though research indicates that older consumers are more vulnerable to the persuasive effects of communication.

  10. Practical Conditions for Well-behaved-ness of Anisotropic Voronoi Diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Canas, Guillermo D

    2012-01-01

    Recently, simple conditions for well-behaved-ness of anisotropic Voronoi diagrams have been proposed. While these conditions ensure well-behaved-ness of two types of practical anisotropic Voronoi diagrams, as well as the geodesic-distance one, in any dimension, they are both prohibitively expensive to evaluate, and not well-suited for typical problems in approximation or optimization. We propose simple conditions that can be efficiently evaluated, and are better suited to practical problems of approximation and optimization. The practical utility of this analysis is enhanced by the fact that orphan-free anisotropic Voronoi diagrams have embedded triangulations as duals.

  11. Hippocampal activity during transient respiratory events in the freely behaving cat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poe, G R; Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Rector, D M;

    1996-01-01

    We measured dorsal hippocampal activity accompanying sighs and apnea using reflectance imaging and electrophysiologic measures in freely behaving cats. Reflected 660-nm light from a 1-mm2 area of CA1 was captured during sighs and apnea at 25 Hz through a coherent image conduit coupled to a charge...

  12. A family of well-behaved Karmarkar spacetimes describing interior of relativistic stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, K. Newton [National Defence Academy, Department of Physics, Pune (India); Pant, Neeraj [National Defence Academy, Department of Mathematics, Pune (India)

    2016-10-15

    We present a family of new exact solutions for relativistic anisotropic stellar objects by considering a four-dimensional spacetime embedded in a five-dimensional pseudo Euclidean space, known as Class I solutions. These solutions are well behaved in all respects, satisfy all energy conditions, and the resulting compactness parameter is also within Buchdahl limit. The well-behaved nature of the solutions for a particular star solely depends on the index n. We have discussed the solutions in detail for the neutron star XTE J1739-285 (M = 1.51M {sub CircleDot}, R = 10.9 km). For this particular star, the solution is well behaved in all respects for 8 ≤ n ≤ 20. However, the solutions with n < 8 possess an increasing trend of the sound speed and the solutions belonging to n > 20 disobey the causality condition. Further, the well-behaved nature of the solutions for PSR J0348+0432 (2.01M {sub CircleDot}, 11 km), EXO 1785-248 (1.3M {sub CircleDot}, 8.85 km), and Her X-1 (0.85M {sub CircleDot}, 8.1 km) are specified by the index n with limits 24 ≤ n ≤ 54, 1.5 ≤ n ≤ 4, and 0.8 ≤ n ≤ 2.7, respectively. (orig.)

  13. BEHAVE: fire behavior prediction and fuel modeling system--FUEL subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Burgan; Richard C. Rothermel

    1984-01-01

    This manual documents the fuel modeling procedures of BEHAVE--a state-of-the-art wildland fire behavior prediction system. Described are procedures for collecting fuel data, using the data with the program, and testing and adjusting the fuel model.

  14. BEHAVE: fire behavior prediction and fuel modeling system - BURN subsystem, Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews; Carolyn H. Chase

    1989-01-01

    This is the third publication describing the BEHAVE system of computer programs for predicting behavior of wildland fires. This publication adds the following predictive capabilities: distance firebrands are lofted ahead of a wind-driven surface fire, probabilities of firebrands igniting spot fires, scorch height of trees, and percentage of tree mortality. The system...

  15. BEHAVE: fire behavior prediction and fuel modeling system-BURN Subsystem, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews

    1986-01-01

    Describes BURN Subsystem, Part 1, the operational fire behavior prediction subsystem of the BEHAVE fire behavior prediction and fuel modeling system. The manual covers operation of the computer program, assumptions of the mathematical models used in the calculations, and application of the predictions.

  16. A family of well-behaved Karmarkar spacetime describing interior of relativistic stars

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Ksh Newton

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting a family of new exact solutions for relativistic anisotropic stellar objects by considering four dimensional spacetime embedded in five dimensional Pseudo Euclidean space known as Class I solutions. These solutions are well-behaved in all respects and free from central singularities. It also satisfies all energy conditions and the resulting compactness parameter is within Buchdahl limit. Here we discovered that the mass of compact stars represented by these solution depends on the parameter n and the radius rb. The well-behaved nature of the solutions depends on mass and radius of the chosen stars. We have discussed the solutions in detail for the neutron star XTE J1739-217 (M = 1.51$M_\\odot$, R = 10.9 km). For the particle star, the solution is well behaved in all respects for n = 8 to n = 20, where the solutions with n 20 disobeyed causality condition. However, for PSR J0348+0432 (2.01$M_\\odot$, 11km), the parameter n may approach upto 25 and the solution is well-behaved.

  17. Understanding the cause of an unreadable nuclear medicine image: a case of unexpected results with 123I whole-body scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skweres, Justin; Yang, Zhiyun; Gonzalez-Toledo, Eduardo

    2014-12-01

    When unexpected results are obtained with standard image collection, the nuclear medicine physician must consider many technical factors that may have contributed. When image quality is poor, prior radiotracer administration, among other things, should always be considered. Our case demonstrates how knowledge of patient history and basic principles of nuclear medicine physics allows recognition of the septal penetration artifact. This allows the nuclear medicine physician to tailor the exam to an individual patient and obtain the most useful diagnostic information for the clinician.

  18. Accuracy of Whole-Body DWI for Metastases Screening in a Diverse Group of Malignancies: Comparison With Conventional Cross-Sectional Imaging and Nuclear Scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruthikunnan, Samir Mustaffa; Kadavigere, Rajagopal; Karegowda, Lakshmikanth Halegubbi

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the role of whole-body (WB) DWI as a screening modality for the detection of metastases and to compare it to conventional cross-sectional imaging modalities or nuclear scintigraphy in a population with various histopathologic malignancies. WB DWI and conventional imaging (CT, MRI, or scintigraphy) were performed for patients with known malignancies for metastatic workup, and these patients were followed up for a period of 1 year. Two radiologists assessed WB DW images separately, and conventional images were assessed by the senior radiologist. The metastatic lesions were classified into four regions: liver, lung, skeletal system, and lymph nodes. The reference standard was considered on the basis of histopathologic confirmation or clinical follow-up of the metastatic lesions. WB DWI was slightly inferior to conventional imaging modalities for the detection of hepatic metastases (sensitivity, 86.6% vs 93.3%; specificity, 91.6% vs 95.8%; and accuracy, 89.7% vs 94.8%) and skeletal metastases (sensitivity, 81.8% vs 89.4%; specificity, 86.4% vs 94.3%; and accuracy, 85.2% vs 93.0%); however, the differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.625 for hepatic metastases and p = 0.0953 for skeletal metastases, McNemar test). WB DWI was statistically significantly inferior to conventional imaging for the detection of lymph node metastases (sensitivity, 74.0% vs 81.5%; specificity, 87.9% vs 90.1%; accuracy, 81.4% vs 86.0%; p = 0.0389). WB DWI was statistically significantly inferior to conventional imaging for the detection of pulmonary metastases (sensitivity, 33.3% vs 100.0%; specificity, 90.9% vs 100.0%; accuracy, 60.8% vs 100.0%; p = 0.045). WB DWI can be used for screening hepatic and skeletal metastases, but its reliability as the sole imaging sequence for the detection of lymph nodal and pulmonary metastases is poor and, at present, it cannot replace conventional imaging modalities.

  19. Combinatorial Clustering Algorithm of Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization and Cloud Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Yuan Shan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a combinatorial clustering algorithm of cloud model and quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (COCQPSO to solve the stochastic problem. The algorithm employs a novel probability model as well as a permutation-based local search method. We are setting the parameters of COCQPSO based on the design of experiment. In the comprehensive computational study, we scrutinize the performance of COCQPSO on a set of widely used benchmark instances. By benchmarking combinatorial clustering algorithm with state-of-the-art algorithms, we can show that its performance compares very favorably. The fuzzy combinatorial optimization algorithm of cloud model and quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (FCOCQPSO in vague sets (IVSs is more expressive than the other fuzzy sets. Finally, numerical examples show the clustering effectiveness of COCQPSO and FCOCQPSO clustering algorithms which are extremely remarkable.

  20. Evolving Models of Pavlovian Conditioning: Cerebellar Cortical Dynamics in Awake Behaving Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel M. ten Brinke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three decades of electrophysiological research on cerebellar cortical activity underlying Pavlovian conditioning have expanded our understanding of motor learning in the brain. Purkinje cell simple spike suppression is considered to be crucial in the expression of conditional blink responses (CRs. However, trial-by-trial quantification of this link in awake behaving animals is lacking, and current hypotheses regarding the underlying plasticity mechanisms have diverged from the classical parallel fiber one to the Purkinje cell synapse LTD hypothesis. Here, we establish that acquired simple spike suppression, acquired conditioned stimulus (CS-related complex spike responses, and molecular layer interneuron (MLI activity predict the expression of CRs on a trial-by-trial basis using awake behaving mice. Additionally, we show that two independent transgenic mouse mutants with impaired MLI function exhibit motor learning deficits. Our findings suggest multiple cerebellar cortical plasticity mechanisms underlying simple spike suppression, and they implicate the broader involvement of the olivocerebellar module within the interstimulus interval.

  1. Nuclear Structure Near the Drip Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, W.

    1998-08-10

    Experiments with beams of unstable nuclei will make it possible to look closely into many aspects of the nuclear many-body problem. Theoretically, exotic nuclei represent a formidable challenge for the nuclear many-body theories and their power to predict nuclear properties in nuclear terra incognita.

  2. A VLSI Neural Monitoring System With Ultra-Wideband Telemetry for Awake Behaving Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, E; Mollazadeh, M; Hu, C; Wei Tang; Culurciello, E; Thakor, V

    2011-04-01

    Long-term monitoring of neuronal activity in awake behaving subjects can provide fundamental information about brain dynamics for neuroscience and neuroengineering applications. Here, we present a miniature, lightweight, and low-power recording system for monitoring neural activity in awake behaving animals. The system integrates two custom designed very-large-scale integrated chips, a neural interface module fabricated in 0.5 μm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology and an ultra-wideband transmitter module fabricated in a 0.5 μm silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) technology. The system amplifies, filters, digitizes, and transmits 16 channels of neural data at a rate of 1 Mb/s. The entire system, which includes the VLSI circuits, a digital interface board, a battery, and a custom housing, is small and lightweight (24 g) and, thus, can be chronically mounted on small animals. The system consumes 4.8 mA and records continuously for up to 40 h powered by a 3.7-V, 200-mAh rechargeable lithium-ion battery. Experimental benchtop characterizations as well as in vivo multichannel neural recordings from awake behaving rats are presented here.

  3. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive ... NIBIB-funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page How does the nuclear medicine procedure work? With ordinary x-ray examinations, an image is ... placed over the patient's body. SPECT involves the rotation of the gamma camera heads around the patient's ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... placed over the patient's body. SPECT involves the rotation of the gamma camera heads around the patient's ... the child has been sedated, you will receive specific instructions to be followed after leaving the nuclear ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. jaundice in newborns and older children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid gland. top ... to be followed after leaving the nuclear medicine facility. Through the natural process of radioactive decay, the ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... organs and tissues in your body. Hybrid imaging techniques (PET/CT, SPECT/CT and PET/MR) are ... equipment look like? The special camera and imaging techniques used in nuclear medicine include the gamma camera ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... including many types of cancers, heart disease, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurological disorders and other abnormalities within the body. Because nuclear medicine procedures are able to pinpoint molecular activity within ...

  9. Do gallstones found before sleeve gastrectomy behave the same as those formed after surgery due to weight loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Alexandria; Tarboush, Moayad; Manatsathit, Wuttiporn; Meguid, Ahmed; Szpunar, Suzanna; Hawasli, Abdelkader

    2016-11-01

    Gallstone formation is prevalent in the bariatric population and after weight loss. We believe that gallstones found preoperatively behave differently and may not cause significant complications as those developing after weight loss. Thus, prophylactic cholecystectomy before or during sleeve gastrectomy (SG) may not be necessary. Patients undergoing SG from January 2011 to May 2012 were evaluated for the presence of gallstones and development of symptoms or need for cholecystectomy postoperatively. Group 1 (n = 18) had gallstones preoperatively. Group 2 (n = 29) developed gallstones after weight loss. Both groups' demographics were similar. Symptomatic gallstones occurred in 1 patient (5.6%) in group 1 and in 9 patients (31.0%) in group 2 (P = .19). Percent excess body mass index loss (%EBL) was 58 ± 24% vs 70 ± 22% (P = .11) with a mean follow-up of 8.9 ± 6.2 and 14.7 ± 3.9 months for group 1 and group 2, respectively (P = .005). Asymptomatic gallstones found before SG tend to have less risk of becoming symptomatic than those formed after weight loss. There was no statistical significant difference because of small sample. Prophylactic cholecystectomy, however, may not be warranted in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nuclear Power Plant Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, George A.

    1975-01-01

    The author recognizes a body of basic knowledge in nuclear power plant technoogy that can be taught in school programs, and lists the various courses, aiming to fill the anticipated need for nuclear-trained manpower--persons holding an associate degree in engineering technology. (Author/BP)

  11. (Nuclear theory: Annual report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iachello, F.; Alhassid, Y.; Kusnezov, D.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses topics on : nuclear structure models; algebraic models of hadronic structure; nuclear reactions; hot rotating nuclei; chaos in nuclei; signatures of the quark-gluon plasma; hadronic spectroscopy; octupole collectivity in nuclei; finite-temperature methods for the many-body problem; and classical limit of algebraic hamiltonians. (LSP)

  12. [Nuclear theory: Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iachello, F.; Alhassid, Y.; Kusnezov, D.

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses topics on : nuclear structure models; algebraic models of hadronic structure; nuclear reactions; hot rotating nuclei; chaos in nuclei; signatures of the quark-gluon plasma; hadronic spectroscopy; octupole collectivity in nuclei; finite-temperature methods for the many-body problem; and classical limit of algebraic hamiltonians. (LSP)

  13. Vented nuclear fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Leonard N.; Kaznoff, Alexis I.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear fuel cell for use in a thermionic nuclear reactor in which a small conduit extends from the outside surface of the emitter to the center of the fuel mass of the emitter body to permit escape of volatile and gaseous fission products collected in the center thereof by virtue of molecular migration of the gases to the hotter region of the fuel.

  14. Nuclear Power Plant Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, George A.

    1975-01-01

    The author recognizes a body of basic knowledge in nuclear power plant technoogy that can be taught in school programs, and lists the various courses, aiming to fill the anticipated need for nuclear-trained manpower--persons holding an associate degree in engineering technology. (Author/BP)

  15. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ... Anesthesia Safety X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Videos related to Foreign Body Retrieval ...

  16. Functional recordings from awake, behaving rodents through a microchannel based regenerative neural interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Russell K.; Choi, Yoonsu; Bellamkonda, Ravi; English, Arthur

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Neural interface technologies could provide controlling connections between the nervous system and external technologies, such as limb prosthetics. The recording of efferent, motor potentials is a critical requirement for a peripheral neural interface, as these signals represent the user-generated neural output intended to drive external devices. Our objective was to evaluate structural and functional neural regeneration through a microchannel neural interface and to characterize potentials recorded from electrodes placed within the microchannels in awake and behaving animals. Approach. Female rats were implanted with muscle EMG electrodes and, following unilateral sciatic nerve transection, the cut nerve was repaired either across a microchannel neural interface or with end-to-end surgical repair. During a 13 week recovery period, direct muscle responses to nerve stimulation proximal to the transection were monitored weekly. In two rats repaired with the neural interface, four wire electrodes were embedded in the microchannels and recordings were obtained within microchannels during proximal stimulation experiments and treadmill locomotion. Main results. In these proof-of-principle experiments, we found that axons from cut nerves were capable of functional reinnervation of distal muscle targets, whether regenerating through a microchannel device or after direct end-to-end repair. Discrete stimulation-evoked and volitional potentials were recorded within interface microchannels in a small group of awake and behaving animals and their firing patterns correlated directly with intramuscular recordings during locomotion. Of 38 potentials extracted, 19 were identified as motor axons reinnervating tibialis anterior or soleus muscles using spike triggered averaging. Significance. These results are evidence for motor axon regeneration through microchannels and are the first report of in vivo recordings from regenerated motor axons within microchannels in a small

  17. Sampling phasic dopamine signaling with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in awake, behaving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, S M; Cone, J J; Ng-Evans, S; McCutcheon, J E; Roitman, M F

    2015-01-05

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical technique that permits the in vivo measurement of extracellular fluctuations in multiple chemical species. The technique is frequently utilized to sample sub-second (phasic) concentration changes of the neurotransmitter dopamine in awake and behaving rats. Phasic dopamine signaling is implicated in reinforcement, goal-directed behavior, and locomotion, and FSCV has been used to investigate how rapid changes in striatal dopamine concentration contribute to these and other behaviors. This unit describes the instrumentation and construction, implantation, and use of components required to sample and analyze dopamine concentration changes in awake rats with FSCV.

  18. Pareto-Ranking Based Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization for Multiobjective Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A study on pareto-ranking based quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO for multiobjective optimization problems is presented in this paper. During the iteration, an external repository is maintained to remember the nondominated solutions, from which the global best position is chosen. The comparison between different elitist selection strategies (preference order, sigma value, and random selection is performed on four benchmark functions and two metrics. The results demonstrate that QPSO with preference order has comparative performance with sigma value according to different number of objectives. Finally, QPSO with sigma value is applied to solve multiobjective flexible job-shop scheduling problems.

  19. An Improved Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm with Elitist Breeding for Unconstrained Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Lun Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization with elitist breeding (EB-QPSO for unconstrained optimization is presented and empirically studied in this paper. In EB-QPSO, the novel elitist breeding strategy acts on the elitists of the swarm to escape from the likely local optima and guide the swarm to perform more efficient search. During the iterative optimization process of EB-QPSO, when criteria met, the personal best of each particle and the global best of the swarm are used to generate new diverse individuals through the transposon operators. The new generated individuals with better fitness are selected to be the new personal best particles and global best particle to guide the swarm for further solution exploration. A comprehensive simulation study is conducted on a set of twelve benchmark functions. Compared with five state-of-the-art quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization algorithms, the proposed EB-QPSO performs more competitively in all of the benchmark functions in terms of better global search capability and faster convergence rate.

  20. A Novel Quantum-Behaved Bat Algorithm with Mean Best Position Directed for Numerical Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Binglian; Zhu, Wenyong; Liu, Zijuan; Duan, Qingyan; Cao, Long

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel quantum-behaved bat algorithm with the direction of mean best position (QMBA). In QMBA, the position of each bat is mainly updated by the current optimal solution in the early stage of searching and in the late search it also depends on the mean best position which can enhance the convergence speed of the algorithm. During the process of searching, quantum behavior of bats is introduced which is beneficial to jump out of local optimal solution and make the quantum-behaved bats not easily fall into local optimal solution, and it has better ability to adapt complex environment. Meanwhile, QMBA makes good use of statistical information of best position which bats had experienced to generate better quality solutions. This approach not only inherits the characteristic of quick convergence, simplicity, and easy implementation of original bat algorithm, but also increases the diversity of population and improves the accuracy of solution. Twenty-four benchmark test functions are tested and compared with other variant bat algorithms for numerical optimization the simulation results show that this approach is simple and efficient and can achieve a more accurate solution.

  1. An Improved Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm with Elitist Breeding for Unconstrained Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen-Lun; Wu, Angus; Min, Hua-Qing

    2015-01-01

    An improved quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization with elitist breeding (EB-QPSO) for unconstrained optimization is presented and empirically studied in this paper. In EB-QPSO, the novel elitist breeding strategy acts on the elitists of the swarm to escape from the likely local optima and guide the swarm to perform more efficient search. During the iterative optimization process of EB-QPSO, when criteria met, the personal best of each particle and the global best of the swarm are used to generate new diverse individuals through the transposon operators. The new generated individuals with better fitness are selected to be the new personal best particles and global best particle to guide the swarm for further solution exploration. A comprehensive simulation study is conducted on a set of twelve benchmark functions. Compared with five state-of-the-art quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization algorithms, the proposed EB-QPSO performs more competitively in all of the benchmark functions in terms of better global search capability and faster convergence rate.

  2. Whole-brain calcium imaging with cellular resolution in freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jeffrey P; Shipley, Frederick B; Linder, Ashley N; Plummer, George S; Liu, Mochi; Setru, Sagar U; Shaevitz, Joshua W; Leifer, Andrew M

    2016-02-23

    The ability to acquire large-scale recordings of neuronal activity in awake and unrestrained animals is needed to provide new insights into how populations of neurons generate animal behavior. We present an instrument capable of recording intracellular calcium transients from the majority of neurons in the head of a freely behaving Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular resolution while simultaneously recording the animal's position, posture, and locomotion. This instrument provides whole-brain imaging with cellular resolution in an unrestrained and behaving animal. We use spinning-disk confocal microscopy to capture 3D volumetric fluorescent images of neurons expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP6s at 6 head-volumes/s. A suite of three cameras monitor neuronal fluorescence and the animal's position and orientation. Custom software tracks the 3D position of the animal's head in real time and two feedback loops adjust a motorized stage and objective to keep the animal's head within the field of view as the animal roams freely. We observe calcium transients from up to 77 neurons for over 4 min and correlate this activity with the animal's behavior. We characterize noise in the system due to animal motion and show that, across worms, multiple neurons show significant correlations with modes of behavior corresponding to forward, backward, and turning locomotion.

  3. Quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization with collaborative attractors for nonlinear numerical problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianyu; Jiao, Licheng; Ma, Wenping; Shang, Ronghua

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, an improved quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (CL-QPSO), which adopts a new collaborative learning strategy to generate local attractors for particles, is proposed to solve nonlinear numerical problems. Local attractors, which directly determine the convergence behavior of particles, play an important role in quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO). In order to get a promising and efficient local attractor for each particle, a collaborative learning strategy is introduced to generate local attractors in the proposed algorithm. Collaborative learning strategy consists of two operators, namely orthogonal operator and comparison operator. For each particle, orthogonal operator is used to discover the useful information that lies in its personal and global best positions, while comparison operator is used to enhance the particle's ability of jumping out of local optima. By using a probability parameter, the two operators cooperate with each other to generate local attractors for particles. A comprehensive comparison of CL-QPSO with some state-of-the-art evolutionary algorithms on nonlinear numeric optimization functions demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  4. Dynamic Network Traffic Flow Prediction Model based on Modified Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongying Jin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at effectively predicting the dynamic network traffic flow based on quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization algorithm. Firstly, the dynamic network traffic flow prediction problem is analyzed through formal description. Secondly, the structure of the network traffic flow prediction model is given. In this structure, Users can used a computer to start the traffic flow prediction process, and data collecting module can collect and return the data through the destination device. Thirdly, the dynamic network traffic flow prediction model is implemented based on BP Neural Network. Particularly, in this paper, the BP Neural Network is trained by a modified quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization(QPSO. We modified the QPSO by utilizing chaos signals to implement typical logistic mapping and pursuing the fitness function of a particle by a set of optimal parameters. Afterwards, based on the above process, dynamic network traffic flow prediction model is illustrated. Finally, a series of experiments are conduct to make performance evaluation, and related analyses for experimental results are also given

  5. Examining transactional influences between reading achievement and antisocially-behaving friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sara A; Mikolajewski, Amy J; Johnson, Wendy; Schatschneider, Christopher; Taylor, Jeanette

    2014-12-01

    The association between poorer academic outcomes and having antisocial friends is reliably demonstrated yet not well understood. Genetically sensitive designs uniquely allow for measuring genetic vulnerabilities and/or environmental risk in the association of antisocial friend behavior and poor school achievement, allowing for a better understanding of the nature of the association. This study included 233 pairs of twins from the Florida Twin Project on Reading. First, the role of antisocial friends as an environmental moderator of reading comprehension was examined. Antisocial friends significantly moderated the nonshared environmental variance in reading comprehension, with increased variation at lower levels of association with antisocial friends, with niche-picking indicated. Second, the role of reading comprehension as an environmental moderator of antisocial friends was examined. Reading comprehension significantly moderated the nonshared environmental variance in associating with antisocial friends, with increased variance at lower levels of reading comprehension and indication that common genetic influences contributed to higher reading achievement and better-behaved friends. In total, these results suggested reciprocal influences between reading achievement and antisocially-behaving friends. The impact of antisocial friends appeared to be limited in the extent to which they can undermine reading achievement, and high reading achievement appeared to support less association with antisocial friends.

  6. Path planning for UAV based on quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yangguang; Ding, Mingyue; Zhou, Chengping; Cai, Chao; Sun, Yangguang

    2009-10-01

    Based on quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO), a novel path planner for unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is employed to generate a safe and flyable path. The standard particle swarm optimization (PSO) and quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO) are presented and compared through a UAV path planning application. Every particle in swarm represents a potential path in search space. For the purpose of pruning the search space, constraints are incorporated into the pre-specified cost function, which is used to evaluate whether a particle is good or not. As the system iterated, each particle is pulled toward its local attractor, which is located between the personal best position (pbest) and the global best position (gbest) based on the interaction of particles' individual searches and group's public search. For the sake of simplicity, we only consider planning the projection of path on the plane and assume threats are static instead of moving. Simulation results demonstrated the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed approach.

  7. Cajal bodies and histone locus bodies in Drosophila and Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizami, Z F; Deryusheva, S; Gall, J G

    2010-01-01

    The organization of the cell nucleus into specialized compartments is important for nuclear function. We address the significance of compartmentalization by studying the Cajal body, an evolutionarily conserved nuclear organelle proposed to be involved in such diverse functions as assembly of the spliceosome, assembly of the transcription machinery, and modification of spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs. The Cajal body is typically identified by the presence of coilin, a protein of poorly defined function. Here, we demonstrate that coilin is not a unique Cajal body marker but also occurs in a related yet distinct nuclear organelle known as the histone locus body in both Drosophila and Xenopus. We stress the importance of multiple markers not only for identification of nuclear bodies but also for assessing their functional significance.

  8. Nuclear Confidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident provides valuable lessons for China national nuclear Corp.as it continues to expand its operations AS Japan’s Fukushima nuclear crisis sparks a global debate over nuclear safety,China National Nuclear Corp. (CNNC),the country’s largest nuclear plant operator, comes under the spotlight.

  9. The nuclear symmetry energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, M.; Burgio, G. F.

    2016-11-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy characterizes the variation of the binding energy as the neutron to proton ratio of a nuclear system is varied. This is one of the most important features of nuclear physics in general, since it is just related to the two component nature of the nuclear systems. As such it is one of the most relevant physical parameters that affect the physics of many phenomena and nuclear processes. This review paper presents a survey of the role and relevance of the nuclear symmetry energy in different fields of research and of the accuracy of its determination from the phenomenology and from the microscopic many-body theory. In recent years, a great interest was devoted not only to the Nuclear Matter symmetry energy at saturation density but also to its whole density dependence, which is an essential ingredient for our understanding of many phenomena. We analyze the nuclear symmetry energy in different realms of nuclear physics and astrophysics. In particular we consider the nuclear symmetry energy in relation to nuclear structure, astrophysics of Neutron Stars and supernovae, and heavy ion collision experiments, trying to elucidate the connections of these different fields on the basis of the symmetry energy peculiarities. The interplay between experimental and observational data and theoretical developments is stressed. The expected future developments and improvements are schematically addressed, together with most demanded experimental and theoretical advances for the next few years.

  10. Paraspeckles: a novel nuclear domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Archa H; Lam, Yun Wah; Leung, Anthony K L

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cell nucleus contains distinct classes of subnuclear bodies, including nucleoli, splicing speckles, Cajal bodies, gems, and PML bodies. Many nuclear proteins are known to interact dynamically with one or other of these bodies, and disruption of the specific organization of nuclear...... relocalize quantitatively to unique cap structures at the nucleolar periphery when transcription is inhibited. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified a novel nuclear compartment, termed paraspeckles, found in both primary and transformed human cells. Paraspeckles contain at least three RNA binding proteins that all...

  11. Paraspeckles. A novel nuclear domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Archa H; Lam, Yun Wah; Leung, Anthony K L

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cell nucleus contains distinct classes of subnuclear bodies, including nucleoli, splicing speckles, Cajal bodies, gems, and PML bodies. Many nuclear proteins are known to interact dynamically with one or other of these bodies, and disruption of the specific organization of nuclear...... relocalize quantitatively to unique cap structures at the nucleolar periphery when transcription is inhibited. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified a novel nuclear compartment, termed paraspeckles, found in both primary and transformed human cells. Paraspeckles contain at least three RNA binding proteins that all...

  12. Study of stochastic approaches of the n-bodies problem: application to the nuclear fragmentation; Etude des approches stochastiques du probleme a N corps: application a la multifragmentation nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarnera, A.

    1996-07-09

    In the last decade nuclear physics research has found, with the observation of phenomena such as multifragmentation or vaporization, the possibility to get a deeper insight into the nuclear matter phase diagram. For example, a spinodal decomposition scenario has been proposed to explain the multifragmentation: because of the initial compression, the system may enter a region, the spinodal zone, in which the nuclear matter is no longer stable, and so any fluctuation leads to the formation of fragments. This thesis deals with spinodal decomposition within the theoretical framework of stochastic mean filed approaches, in which the one-body density function may experience a stochastic evolution. We have shown that these approaches are able to describe phenomena, such as first order phase transitions, in which fluctuations and many-body correlations plan an important role. In the framework of stochastic mean-filed approaches we have shown that the fragment production by spinodal decomposition is characterized by typical time scales of the order of 100 fm/c and by typical size scales around the Neon mass. We have also shown that these features are robust and that they are not affected significantly by a possible expansion of the system or by the finite size of nuclei. We have proposed as a signature of the spinodal decomposition some typical partition of the largest fragments. The study and the comparison with experimental data, performed for the reactions Xe + Cu at 45 MeV/A and Xe + Sn at 50 MeV/A, have shown a remarkable agreement. Moreover we would like to stress that the theory does not contain any adjustable parameter. These results seem to give a strong indication of the possibility to observe a spinodal decomposition of nuclei. (author).

  13. Local domains of motor cortical activity revealed by fiber-optic calcium recordings in behaving nonhuman primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelsberger, Helmuth; Zainos, Antonio; Alvarez, Manuel; Romo, Ranulfo; Konnerth, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Brain mapping experiments involving electrical microstimulation indicate that the primary motor cortex (M1) directly regulates muscle contraction and thereby controls specific movements. Possibly, M1 contains a small circuit “map” of the body that is formed by discrete local networks that code for specific movements. Alternatively, movements may be controlled by distributed, larger-scale overlapping circuits. Because of technical limitations, it remained unclear how movement-determining circuits are organized in M1. Here we introduce a method that allows the functional mapping of small local neuronal circuits in awake behaving nonhuman primates. For this purpose, we combined optic-fiber–based calcium recordings of neuronal activity and cortical microstimulation. The method requires targeted bulk loading of synthetic calcium indicators (e.g., OGB-1 AM) for the staining of neuronal microdomains. The tip of a thin (200 µm) optical fiber can detect the coherent activity of a small cluster of neurons, but is insensitive to the asynchronous activity of individual cells. By combining such optical recordings with microstimulation at two well-separated sites of M1, we demonstrate that local cortical activity was tightly associated with distinct and stereotypical simple movements. Increasing stimulation intensity increased both the amplitude of the movements and the level of neuronal activity. Importantly, the activity remained local, without invading the recording domain of the second optical fiber. Furthermore, there was clear response specificity at the two recording sites in a trained behavioral task. Thus, the results provide support for movement control in M1 by local neuronal clusters that are organized in discrete cortical domains. PMID:24344287

  14. Fuzzy Neural Networks Learning by Variable-Dimensional Quantum-behaved Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionary learning of fuzzy neural networks (FNN consists of structure learning to determine the proper number of fuzzy rules and parameters learning to adjust the network parameters. Many optimization algorithms can be applied to evolve FNN. However the search space of most algorithms has fixed dimension, which can not suit to dynamic structure learning of FNN. We propose a novel technique, which is named the variable-dimensional quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization algorithm (VDQPSO, to address the problem. In the proposed algorithm, the optimum dimension, which is unknown at the beginning, is updated together with the position of swarm. The optimum dimension converged at the end of the optimization process corresponds to a unique FNN structure where the optimum parameters can be achieved. The results of the prediction of chaotic time series experiment show that the proposed technique is effective. It can evolve to optimum or near-optimum FNN structure and optimum parameters.

  15. Quantum Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization with Neighborhood Search for Numerical Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Fu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO algorithm is a new PSO variant, which outperforms the original PSO in search ability but has fewer control parameters. However, QPSO as well as PSO still suffers from premature convergence in solving complex optimization problems. The main reason is that new particles in QPSO are generated around the weighted attractors of previous best particles and the global best particle. This may result in attracting too fast. To tackle this problem, this paper proposes a new QPSO algorithm called NQPSO, in which one local and one global neighborhood search strategies are utilized to balance exploitation and exploration. Moreover, a concept of opposition-based learning (OBL is employed for population initialization. Experimental studies are conducted on a set of well-known benchmark functions including multimodal and rotated problems. Computational results show that our approach outperforms some similar QPSO algorithms and five other state-of-the-art PSO variants.

  16. An Analog Front End for Recording Neuronal Activity in Freely Behaving Small Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Min; ZHANG Xiao; ZHANG Chun-feng; CAO Mao-yong; LI Cai-fang; KONG Hui-min; QIN Feng-ju; YAN Yu-qin

    2007-01-01

    Abstract.Extracting characteristic brain signals and simultaneous recording animals behaving could help us to understand the complex behavior of neuronal ensembles. Here,a system was established to record local field potentials (LFP) and extracellular signal or multiple-unit discharge and behavior synchronously by utilizing electrophysiology and integrated circuit technique. It comprised microelectrodes and micro-driver assembly, analog front end ( AFE), while a computer ( Pentium Ⅲ ) was used as the platform for the graphic user interface, which was developed using the LabVIEW programming language. It was designed as a part of ongoing research to develop a portable wireless neural signal recording system. We believe that this information will be useful for the research of brain-computer interface.

  17. Project description: Foundations and tools for building well-behaved systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katajainen, Jyrki; Elmasry, Amr; Elverkilde, Jon Daniel

    We aim at doing basic research on the theoretical foundations on how to build reliable, safe, and fast software systems, and developing tools that make the construction and maintenance of such systems easier. The theoretical questions taken up are related to algorithms, exception safety, and memory...... management, among other things, and the practical implementation calls for tools to test that components are well-behaved.Our goals are: 1) To study the foundation of a program library in order to gain new knowledge and thereby optimize existing components. 2) To develop software tools which make...... construction of reliable components easier and are of general interest. 3) To build a program library, the development of which can be used as a reality exercise when training software developers....

  18. An Abstract Coalgebraic Approach to Process Equivalence for Well- Behaved Operational Semantics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klin, Bartek

    -called bialgebraic framework of Turi and Plotkin is an abstract generalization of the well-known structural operational semantics format GSOS, and provides a theory of operational semantic rules for which bisimulation equivalence is a congruence. The first part of this thesis aims at extending that framework...... is then specialized to the case of trace equivalence, completed trace equivalence and failures equivalence. In the two latter cases, novel congruence formats are obtained, extending the current state of the art in this area of research. The second part of the thesis aims at extending the bialgebraic framework......This thesis is part of the programme aimed at finding a mathematical theory of well-behaved structural operational semantics. General and basic results shown in 1997 in a seminal paper by Turi and Plotkin are extended in two directions, aiming at greater expressivity of the framework. The so...

  19. Application of quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization to motor imagery EEG classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Yen

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we propose a recognition system for single-trial analysis of motor imagery (MI) electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Applying event-related brain potential (ERP) data acquired from the sensorimotor cortices, the system chiefly consists of automatic artifact elimination, feature extraction, feature selection and classification. In addition to the use of independent component analysis, a similarity measure is proposed to further remove the electrooculographic (EOG) artifacts automatically. Several potential features, such as wavelet-fractal features, are then extracted for subsequent classification. Next, quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO) is used to select features from the feature combination. Finally, selected sub-features are classified by support vector machine (SVM). Compared with without artifact elimination, feature selection using a genetic algorithm (GA) and feature classification with Fisher's linear discriminant (FLD) on MI data from two data sets for eight subjects, the results indicate that the proposed method is promising in brain-computer interface (BCI) applications.

  20. Parameters estimation online for Lorenz system by a novel quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Fei; Li Zhuo-Qiu; Tong Heng-Qing

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (NQPSO) for the estimation of chaos'unknown parameters by transforming them into nonlinear functions' optimization. By means of the techniques in the following three aspects: contracting the searching space self-adaptively; boundaries restriction strategy; substituting the particles' convex combination for their centre of mass, this paper achieves a quite effective search mechanism with fine equilibrium between exploitation and exploration. Details of applying the proposed method and other methods into Lorenz systems axe given, and experiments done show that NQPSO has better adaptability, dependability and robustness. It is a successful approach in unknown parameter estimation online especially in the cases with white noises.

  1. An Image Enhancement Method Using the Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization with an Adaptive Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Image enhancement techniques are very important to image processing, which are used to improve image quality or extract the fine details in degraded images. In this paper, two novel objective functions based on the normalized incomplete Beta transform function are proposed to evaluate the effectiveness of grayscale image enhancement and color image enhancement, respectively. Using these objective functions, the parameters of transform functions are estimated by the quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO. We also propose an improved QPSO with an adaptive parameter control strategy. The QPSO and the AQPSO algorithms, along with genetic algorithm (GA and particle swarm optimization (PSO, are tested on several benchmark grayscale and color images. The results show that the QPSO and AQPSO perform better than GA and PSO for the enhancement of these images, and the AQPSO has some advantages over QPSO due to its adaptive parameter control strategy.

  2. Calcium neuroimaging in behaving zebrafish larvae using a turn-key light field camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Perez, Carlos; Lauri, Antonella; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Cappetta, Michele; Erdmann, Arne; Westmeyer, Gil Gregor

    2015-09-01

    Reconstructing a three-dimensional scene from multiple simultaneously acquired perspectives (the light field) is an elegant scanless imaging concept that can exceed the temporal resolution of currently available scanning-based imaging methods for capturing fast cellular processes. We tested the performance of commercially available light field cameras on a fluorescent microscopy setup for monitoring calcium activity in the brain of awake and behaving reporter zebrafish larvae. The plenoptic imaging system could volumetrically resolve diverse neuronal response profiles throughout the zebrafish brain upon stimulation with an aversive odorant. Behavioral responses of the reporter fish could be captured simultaneously together with depth-resolved neuronal activity. Overall, our assessment showed that with some optimizations for fluorescence microscopy applications, commercial light field cameras have the potential of becoming an attractive alternative to custom-built systems to accelerate molecular imaging research on cellular dynamics.

  3. A study on the nuclear foreign policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jae Soo; Lee, H. M.; Jun, E. J.; Lee, D. H.; Lee, B. W.; Won, B. C.; Kim, H. J.

    2011-12-15

    This study addresses four arenas to assist national nuclear foreign policies under international nuclear nonproliferation regimes. Firstly, this study analyzes the trends of the international nuclear non-proliferation regime, which includes the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the international nuclear export control regime, and fissile material cut-off treaty. Secondly, this study analyzes the trends of international nuclear organizations and fora, which include the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as a central body of international nuclear diplomacy and technical cooperation and International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC) as a forum for international nuclear cooperation. Thirdly, this study analyzes the nuclear foreign policy of the U. S. Administration and reviews bilateral nuclear cooperation agreement between the ROK and the other countries including the U. S. Lastly, this study analyzes the nuclear issues of North Korea and Iran and multilateral nuclear approaches as assurances of nuclear fuel supply.

  4. Conformations of fungal .BETA.-D-glucans in the fruit body of edible fungi assessed by cross polarization-magic angle spinning carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    大野, 尚仁; 安達, 禎之; 宿前, 利郎

    1988-01-01

    .... Bull., 34, 2555 (1986); Saito et al., Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn., 59, 2903 (1986)). In this paper, the glucan conformations in the fruit bodies of several edible fungi were examined by using carbon-13 cross polarization-magic angle spinning (CP/MAS...

  5. On a family of well behaved perfect fluid balls as astrophysical objects in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.

    2011-07-01

    A family of well behaved perfect fluid balls has been derived starting with the metric potential g 44= B(1+ Cr 2) n for all positive integral values of n. For n≥4, the members of this family are seen to satisfy the various physical conditions e.g. c 2 ρ≥ p≥0, dp/ dr1. Also the pressure, energy density, velocity of sound and ratio of pressure and energy density are of monotonically decreasing towards the pressure free interface ( r= a). The fluid balls join smoothly with the Schwarzschild exterior model at r= a. The well behaved perfect fluid balls so obtained are utilised to construct the superdense star models with their surface density 2×1014 gm/cm3. We have found that the maximum mass of the fluid balls corresponding to various values of n are decreasing with the increasing values of n. Over all maximum mass for the whole family turns out to be 4.1848 M Θ and the corresponding radius as 19.4144 km while the red shift at the centre and red shift at surface as Z 0=1.6459 and Z a =0.6538 respectively this all happens for n=4. It is interesting to note that for higher values of n viz n≥170, the physical data start merging with that of Kuchowicz superdense star models and hence the family of fluid models tends to the Kuchowicz fluid models as n→∞. Consequently the maximum mass of the family of solution can not be less than 1.6096 M Θ which is the maximum mass occupied by the Kuchowicz superdense ball. Hence each member of the family for n≥4 provides the astrophysical objects like White dwarfs, Quark star, typical neutron star.

  6. Imaging the Dynamics of Neocortical Population Activity in Behaving and Freely Moving Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinvald, Amiram; Petersen, Carl C H

    2015-01-01

    The development of functional imaging techniques applicable to neuroscience and covering a wide range of spatial and temporal scales has greatly facilitated the exploration of the relationships between cognition, behaviour and electrical brain activity. For mammals, the neocortex plays a particularly profound role in generating sensory perception, controlling voluntary movement, higher cognitive functions and planning goal-directed behaviours. Since these remarkable functions of the neocortex cannot be explored in simple model preparations or in anesthetised animals, the neural basis of behaviour must be explored in awake behaving subjects. Because neocortical function is highly distributed across many rapidly interacting regions, it is essential to measure spatiotemporal dynamics of cortical activity in real-time. Extensive work in anesthetised mammals has shown that in vivo Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging (VSDI) reveals the neocortical population membrane potential dynamics at millisecond temporal resolution and subcolumnar spatial resolution. Here, we describe recent advances indicating that VSDI is also already well-developed for exploring cortical function in behaving monkeys and mice. The first animal model, the non-human primate, is well-suited for fundamental exploration of higher-level cognitive function and behavior. The second animal model, the mouse, benefits from a rich arsenal of molecular and genetic technologies. In the monkey, imaging from the same patch of cortex, repeatedly, is feasible for a long period of time, up to a year. In the rodent, VSDI is applicable to freely moving and awake head-restrained mice. Interactions between different cortical areas and different cortical columns can therefore now be dynamically mapped through VSDI and related to the corresponding behaviour. Thus by applying VSDI to mice and monkeys one can begin to explore how behaviour emerges from neuronal activity in neuronal networks residing in different cortical areas.

  7. Decoding of intentional actions from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) in freely-behaving infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Zachery R; Cruz-Garza, Jesus; Tse, Teresa; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2014-01-01

    The mirror neuron system (MNS) in humans is thought to enable an individual's understanding of the meaning of actions performed by others and the potential imitation and learning of those actions. In humans, electroencephalographic (EEG) changes in sensorimotor a-band at central electrodes, which desynchronizes both during execution and observation of goal-directed actions (i.e., μ suppression), have been considered an analog to MNS function. However, methodological and developmental issues, as well as the nature of generalized μ suppression to imagined, observed, and performed actions, have yet to provide a mechanistic relationship between EEG μ-rhythm and MNS function, and the extent to which EEG can be used to infer intent during MNS tasks remains unknown. In this study we present a novel methodology using active EEG and inertial sensors to record brain activity and behavioral actions from freely-behaving infants during exploration, imitation, attentive rest, pointing, reaching and grasping, and interaction with an actor. We used 5-band (1-4Hz) EEG as input to a dimensionality reduction algorithm (locality-preserving Fisher's discriminant analysis, LFDA) followed by a neural classifier (Gaussian mixture models, GMMs) to decode the each MNS task performed by freely-behaving 6-24 month old infants during interaction with an adult actor. Here, we present results from a 20-month male infant to illustrate our approach and show the feasibility of EEG-based classification of freely occurring MNS behaviors displayed by an infant. These results, which provide an alternative to the μ-rhythm theory of MNS function, indicate the informative nature of EEG in relation to intentionality (goal) for MNS tasks which may support action-understanding and thus bear implications for advancing the understanding of MNS function.

  8. Nuclear safeguards; Salvaguardias nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurron, O.

    2015-07-01

    Safeguards control at the Juzbado Plant is implemented through the joint IAEA/EURATOM partnership approach in force within the European Union for all nuclear facilities. this verification agreement is designed to minimize burden on the operators whilst ensuring that both inspectorate achieve the objectives related to their respective safeguards regimes. This paper outlines the safeguards approaches followed by the inspectorate and the particularities of the Juzbado Plants nuclear material accountancy and control system. (Authors)

  9. Dynamic Nature of Cleavage Bodies and Their Spatial Relationship to DDX1 Bodies, Cajal Bodies, and Gems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Roy, Ken; Katyal, Sachin; Sun, Xuejun; Bléoo, Stacey; Godbout, Roseline

    2006-01-01

    DDX1 bodies, cleavage bodies, Cajal bodies (CBs), and gems are nuclear suborganelles that contain factors involved in RNA transcription and/or processing. Although all four nuclear bodies can exist as distinct entities, they often colocalize or overlap with each other. To better understand the relationship between these four nuclear bodies, we examined their spatial distribution as a function of the cell cycle. Here, we report that whereas DDX1 bodies, CBs and gems are present throughout interphase, CPSF-100-containing cleavage bodies are predominantly found during S and G2 phases, whereas CstF-64-containing cleavage bodies are primarily observed during S phase. All four nuclear bodies associate with each other during S phase, with cleavage bodies colocalizing with DDX1 bodies, and cleavage bodies/DDX1 bodies residing adjacent to gems and CBs. Although inhibitors of RNA transcription had no effect on DDX1 bodies or cleavage bodies, inhibitors of DNA replication resulted in loss of CstF-64-containing cleavage bodies. A striking effect on nuclear structures was observed with latrunculin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, resulting in the formation of needlelike nuclear spicules made up of CstF-64, CPSF-100, RNA, and RNA polymerase II. Our results suggest that cleavage body components are highly dynamic in nature. PMID:16371507

  10. Dynamic nature of cleavage bodies and their spatial relationship to DDX1 bodies, Cajal bodies, and gems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Roy, Ken; Katyal, Sachin; Sun, Xuejun; Bléoo, Stacey; Godbout, Roseline

    2006-03-01

    DDX1 bodies, cleavage bodies, Cajal bodies (CBs), and gems are nuclear suborganelles that contain factors involved in RNA transcription and/or processing. Although all four nuclear bodies can exist as distinct entities, they often colocalize or overlap with each other. To better understand the relationship between these four nuclear bodies, we examined their spatial distribution as a function of the cell cycle. Here, we report that whereas DDX1 bodies, CBs and gems are present throughout interphase, CPSF-100-containing cleavage bodies are predominantly found during S and G2 phases, whereas CstF-64-containing cleavage bodies are primarily observed during S phase. All four nuclear bodies associate with each other during S phase, with cleavage bodies colocalizing with DDX1 bodies, and cleavage bodies/DDX1 bodies residing adjacent to gems and CBs. Although inhibitors of RNA transcription had no effect on DDX1 bodies or cleavage bodies, inhibitors of DNA replication resulted in loss of CstF-64-containing cleavage bodies. A striking effect on nuclear structures was observed with latrunculin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, resulting in the formation of needlelike nuclear spicules made up of CstF-64, CPSF-100, RNA, and RNA polymerase II. Our results suggest that cleavage body components are highly dynamic in nature.

  11. Effect of a body-tie structure fabricated by partial trench isolation on the suppression of floating body effect induced soft errors in SOI SRAM investigated using nuclear probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abo, Satoshi, E-mail: abo@cqst.osaka-u.ac.jp [Center for Quantum Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Masuda, Naoyuki; Wakaya, Fujio [Center for Quantum Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Onoda, Shinobu; Makino, Takahiro; Hirao, Toshio; Ohshima, Takeshi [Semiconductor Analysis and Radiation Effects Group, Environment and Industrial Materials Research Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Iwamatsu, Toshiaki; Oda, Hidekazu [Advanced Device Technology Department, Production and Technology Unit, Devices and Analysis Technology Division, Renesas Electronics Corporation, 751, Horiguchi, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Takai, Mikio [Center for Quantum Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    Soft errors induced by proton, helium and oxygen ion irradiations were measured as a function of distance between a body electrode under partial trench isolation and a metal pad connected to a tungsten via for the first metal layer of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) static random access memory. Abnormal drain charges induced by ion irradiations with various distances in the SOI metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor were simulated to be compared with the experimental results. The soft errors were found to depend on the distance between the body electrode and the metal pad in the case of the abnormal drain charge, which is induced by incident ions, lower than the critical charge of the SRAM cells. The soft errors did not depend on the distance for the abnormal drain charges higher than the critical charge.

  12. Application of instruments of nuclear physics to the calculation of theoretical dose distributions in various organs of the human body for beams used in hadrontherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliszewska Weronika

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The area of interests of nuclear physics are studies of reactions, wherein atomic nuclei of projectile collide with target nuclei. An amount of energy lost by projectile nucleus during its passing through the target is a major issue – it is important to know how charged particles interact with matter. It is possible to afford this knowledge by using theoretical programs that calculate energy loss applying the Bethe-Bloch equation. Hadrontherapy, which is a field of still growing interest, is based on the interactions of charged particles with matter. Therefore, there exists a need of creating a simple model that could be used to the calculation of dose distributions in biological matter. Two programs (SRIM, Xeloss, used to the calculation of energy loss by nuclear physicist, have been adapted to determine the dose distributions in analogues of human tissues. Results of the calculations with those programs for beams used in hadrontherapy (e.g. 1H, 12C will be compared with experimental data available in references.

  13. The Nuclear Symmetry Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Baldo, M

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy characterizes the variation of the binding energy as the neutron to proton ratio of a nuclear system is varied. This is one of the most important features of nuclear physics in general, since it is just related to the two component nature of the nuclear systems. As such it is one of the most relevant physical parameters that affect the physics of many phenomena and nuclear processes. This review paper presents a survey of the role and relevance of the nuclear symmetry energy in different fields of research and of the accuracy of its determination from the phenomenology and from the microscopic many-body theory. In recent years, a great interest was devoted not only to the Nuclear Matter symmetry energy at saturation density but also to its whole density dependence, which is an essential ingredient for our understanding of many phenomena. We analyze the nuclear symmetry energy in different realms of nuclear physics and astrophysics. In particular we consider the nuclear symmetry ene...

  14. Nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, David (Bishop Luffa Comprehensive School, Chichester (UK))

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear Physics covers the aspects of radioactivity and nuclear physics dealt with in the syllabuses of all the A-level examination boards; in particular, it provides detailed coverage of the Joint Matriculation Board option in nuclear physics. It deals with the discovery of the atomic nucleus, the physics of nuclear processes, and nuclear technology. (author).

  15. Implementation of the quality management system in the regulatory body (Peruvian Institute for Nuclear Energy, Lima, Peru); Implementacion del sistema de gestion de calidad en el organo regulador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina Gironzini, E., E-mail: medina@ipen.gob.pe [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN), Lima (Peru)

    2013-07-01

    One of the functions of the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN), Lima, Peru is the control of sources of ionizing radiation. For this, they have the Oficina Tecnica de la Autoridad Nacional (OTAN) which has the necessary infrastructure to issue technical standards, conducting inspections, issuing authorizations and punish according to the existing legislation. OTAN has decided to address this issue and is taking into account the IAEA recommendations, especially the Safety Requirements GS-R-3: Management System facilities and activities and offering advice on the establishment and improvement of integrated management systems, including safety requirements that are not in the ISO 9001 standard and are also considered the requirements of technological safety, security, quality, economic, environmental and health. The working plan is detailed and the activities that are carried out after the scientific visit to a regulator organ, which has experience in the execution of a Quality Management System, consequence of a work initiated for more than four decades ago.

  16. Aqueous alteration in CR chondrites: Meteorite parent body processes as analogue for long-term corrosion processes relevant for nuclear waste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlok, Andreas; Libourel, Guy

    2013-02-01

    Aqueous alteration of carbonaceous chondrites is one of the fundamental processes on accreting planetesimals that changes pristine materials from the formation of the Solar System. The study of mineralogical, petrological and chemical changes resulting from this alteration provides insight into the physical and chemical setting of forming planetesimals. CR chondrites provide samples for all stages of aqueous alteration, from type 3 to 1 (entirely hydrated), and are thus suited to study the alteration of pristine materials in a coherent sequence. Vitrification is a common way to store and stabilize fission products and minor actinides resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear spent fuel in a nuclear boro-silica glass in steel containers. The waste material has to be stored safely for a period of at least 105-106 years in a clay-rich geological repository. Laboratory experiments being too short to follow the long-term evolution of these materials, we analyzed the mineralogical, petrological and chemical changes in a series of CR chondrites (Renazzo CR2, Al Rais CR2, and GRO 95577 CR1) to serve as analogues. Rims of secondary materials around metal grains in contact to the fine-grained matrix serve as analogue to the interface between steel containment and the surrounding clay-rich geological layer, while chondrule glassy mesostasis is used as a proxy of the nuclear glass. With increasing degree of aqueous alteration in the sequence, Renazzo → Al Rais → GRO 95577, the size of the rims increase. Fe-rich alteration rims are ˜10 μm in thickness around metal grains in the fine-grained matrix in Renazzo. In Al Rais, multi-layered structures of interchanging Fe, S and P/Ca-rich layers appear, with a thickness of up to ˜30 μm. In the highly altered GRO 95577, extensive inner and external rims of secondary phases reach up to ˜200 μm into the surrounding matrix. In chondrules, metal in contact with the altered mesostasis shows similar trends, but with thinner

  17. A Study on the Nuclear Foreign Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Wook; Lee, H. M.; Ko, H. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Oh, K. B.; Yang, M. H.; Lee, K. S

    2007-12-15

    This study approaches the international trends related to nuclear non-proliferation in four aspects. First, this study analyzes the trend of the international nuclear non-proliferation regime, which includes the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the international nuclear export control regime and proposals for assurance of nuclear fuel supply. Second, this study analyzes the trend of international nuclear organizations, which includes the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a central body of development of nuclear technology and international nuclear diplomacy, and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA), a intergovernmental organization to consist of a group of nuclear advanced countries. Third, this study analyzes the trends of the U.S.'s nuclear foreign policies, particularly nuclear non-proliferation. Fourth, this study analyzes the nuclear issues of North Korea and Iran as they cause serious concerns to a international society.

  18. GABAB receptor blockade enhances theta and gamma rhythms in the hippocampus of behaving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, L Stan; Shen, Bixia

    2007-01-01

    The participation of GABA(B) receptors in hippocampal EEG generation was studied by intracerebroventricular (icv) and intracerebral infusions of GABA(B) receptor antagonist p-(3-aminopropyl)-p-diethoxymethyl-phosphinic acid (CGP35348) in freely behaving rats. During awake-immobility, icv CGP35348 induced a theta rhythm and increased gamma waves (30-100 Hz) in the hippocampus. The immobility theta peaked at 6-7 Hz and had a theta phase in CA1 stratum radiatum of approximately 160 degrees with reference to the theta at the alveus, when compared with approximately 130 degrees during walking. Immobility theta power peaks at 6-7 Hz was also found in normal rats, and it was detected in 27% of the EEG segments during immobility. Incidence of immobility theta increased to 87.5% after 480 nmol of CGP35348 icv. Muscarinic antagonist scopolamine (5 mg/kg, ip) suppressed the induction of immobility theta and the gamma power increase after icv CGP35348. CGP35348 icv did not significantly change the hippocampal theta power at 7-8 Hz during walking (theta fundamental), but it increased power at 12-15 Hz, at the second harmonic of theta. CGP35348 icv also increased 30-50 Hz gamma power during walking. Medial septal infusion of CGP35348 (12 nmol in 0.4 microl) increased the power and the frequency of the hippocampal theta second harmonic during walking, but did not increase gamma activity. Infusion of CGP35348 (8 nmol in 0.4 microl) in the hippocampus increased the local gamma activity at 30-100 Hz, but did not induce immobility theta or affect the walking theta rhythm. In conclusion, icv GABA(B) receptor blockade increased an atropine-sensitive input that generated an immobility theta rhythm, while GABA(B) receptor blockade of the medial septum increased atropine-resistant theta harmonics possibly generated by apical dendritic spikes. GABA(B) receptor blockade may enhance cognitive task performance by activating hippocampal theta and gamma rhythms in behaving rats.

  19. Nuclear ventriculography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ventriculography (RNV); Multiple gate acquisition scan (MUGA); Nuclear cardiology; Cardiomyopathy - nuclear ventriculography ... 56. Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby ...

  20. Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  1. Changes of Nuclear Factor-κ B Activity in Splenic T Cells from Total Body Irradiated Mouse%全身照射小鼠脾脏T细胞NF-κB活性的改变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱波; 罗成基; 程晓明; 郭朝华; 邹仲敏; 周进明

    2000-01-01

    @@ 核因子-κB(nuclear factor-κB,NF-κB)作为重要的核转录因子,可与多种基因的启动子或增强子特定区域结合而广泛参与多种基因表达的调控[1].全身照射(total body irradi-ation,TBI)是骨髓移植前预处理的方案之一.本研究以8.0Gy全身照射小鼠为骨髓移植前放疗预处理模型,观察脾脏T细胞内NF-κB的活性改变,从核因子水平阐明TBI对脾脏T细胞的影响.

  2. A caspase-3-cleaved fragment of the glial glutamate transporter EAAT2 is sumoylated and targeted to promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies in mutant SOD1-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Stuart L; Boston-Howes, William; Lavina, Zeno S; Gustincich, Stefano; Brown, Robert H; Pasinelli, Piera; Trotti, Davide

    2007-11-02

    EAAT2 (excitatory amino acid transporter 2) is a high affinity, Na+-dependent glutamate transporter of glial origin that is essential for the clearance of synaptically released glutamate and prevention of excitotoxicity. During the course of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and in a transgenic mutant SOD1 mouse model of the disease, expression and activity of EAAT2 is remarkably reduced. We previously showed that some of the mutant SOD1 proteins exposed to oxidative stress inhibit EAAT2 by triggering caspase-3 cleavage of EAAT2 at a single defined locus. This gives rise to two fragments that we termed truncated EAAT2 and COOH terminus of EAAT2 (CTE). In this study, we report that analysis of spinal cord homogenates prepared from mutant G93A-SOD1 mice reveals CTE to be of a higher molecular weight than expected because it is conjugated with SUMO-1. The sumoylated CTE fragment (CTE-SUMO-1) accumulates in the spinal cord of these mice as early as presymptomatic stage (70 days of age) and not in other central nervous system areas unaffected by the disease. The presence and accumulation of CTE-SUMO-1 is specific to ALS mice, since it does not occur in the R6/2 mouse model for Huntington disease. Furthermore, using an astroglial cell line, primary culture of astrocytes, and tissue samples from G93A-SOD1 mice, we show that CTE-SUMO-1 is targeted to promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies. Since one of the proposed functions of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies is regulation of gene transcription, we suggest a possible novel mechanism by which the glial glutamate transporter EAAT2 could contribute to the pathology of ALS.

  3. Evolution of a proto-neutron star with a nuclear many-body equation of state: Neutrino luminosity and gravitational wave frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelio, Giovanni; Lovato, Alessandro; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Benhar, Omar; Pons, José A.; Ferrari, Valeria

    2017-08-01

    In a core-collapse supernova, a huge amount of energy is released in the Kelvin-Helmholtz phase subsequent to the explosion, when the proto-neutron star cools and deleptonizes as it loses neutrinos. Most of this energy is emitted through neutrinos, but a fraction of it can be released through gravitational waves. We model the evolution of a proto-neutron star in the Kelvin-Helmholtz phase using a general relativistic numerical code, and a recently proposed finite temperature, many-body equation of state; from this we consistently compute the diffusion coefficients driving the evolution. To include the many-body equation of state, we develop a new fitting formula for the high density baryon free energy at finite temperature and intermediate proton fraction. We estimate the emitted neutrino signal, assessing its detectability by present terrestrial detectors, and we determine the frequencies and damping times of the quasinormal modes which would characterize the gravitational wave signal emitted in this stage.

  4. Plutonium and the risk of cancer. A comparative analysis of Pu-body burdens due to releases from nuclear plants (Chelyabinsk-65, Gomel area) and global fallout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohryakov, V F; Syslova, C G; Skryabin, A M

    1994-03-01

    Results of the analysis of dynamic body burdens of Pu in adult inhabitants of Chelyabinsk-65 (not occupationally exposed) and different areas of the Gomel region are presented for 1990-1991. The data are based on radiochemical analyses of Pu in human organs and tissues. Comparison with the published data on global Pu and our data for human autopsies (Ufa, Russia) revealed that estimates of Pubody burdens in Chelyabinsk-65 residents were up to 30 times higher than global levels and depended on the period of residence in town. The Pu body contents of Gomel citizens 4-5 years after the Chernobyl accident are on average 3-4 times higher than the global levels. Activity of Pu-238 in various organs constitutes 4.7-26.0% (on the average 13.5 +/- 5.0%) of the total alpha-activity of Pu-238 and Pu-239, 240. The expected number of cancers induced by incorporated plutonium is approximately the same for the two population groups despite their different sizes and does not differ from the global level by more than one order of magnitude.

  5. A New Mutated Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimizer for Digital IIR Filter Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Xu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive infinite impulse response (IIR filters have shown their worth in a wide range of practical applications. Because the error surface of IIR filters is multimodal in most cases, global optimization techniques are required for avoiding local minima. In this paper, we employ a global optimization algorithm, Quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO that was proposed by us previously, and its mutated version in the design of digital IIR filter. The mechanism in QPSO is based on the quantum behaviour of particles in a potential well and particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm. QPSO is characterized by fast convergence, good search ability, and easy implementation. The mutated QPSO (MuQPSO is proposed in this paper by using a random vector in QPSO to increase the randomness and to enhance the global search ability. Experimental results on three examples show that QPSO and MuQPSO are superior to genetic algorithm (GA, differential evolution (DE algorithm, and PSO algorithm in quality, convergence speed, and robustness.

  6. Quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization: analysis of individual particle behavior and parameter selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun; Fang, Wei; Wu, Xiaojun; Palade, Vasile; Xu, Wenbo

    2012-01-01

    Quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO), motivated by concepts from quantum mechanics and particle swarm optimization (PSO), is a probabilistic optimization algorithm belonging to the bare-bones PSO family. Although it has been shown to perform well in finding the optimal solutions for many optimization problems, there has so far been little analysis on how it works in detail. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the QPSO algorithm. In the theoretical analysis, we analyze the behavior of a single particle in QPSO in terms of probability measure. Since the particle's behavior is influenced by the contraction-expansion (CE) coefficient, which is the most important parameter of the algorithm, the goal of the theoretical analysis is to find out the upper bound of the CE coefficient, within which the value of the CE coefficient selected can guarantee the convergence or boundedness of the particle's position. In the experimental analysis, the theoretical results are first validated by stochastic simulations for the particle's behavior. Then, based on the derived upper bound of the CE coefficient, we perform empirical studies on a suite of well-known benchmark functions to show how to control and select the value of the CE coefficient, in order to obtain generally good algorithmic performance in real world applications. Finally, a further performance comparison between QPSO and other variants of PSO on the benchmarks is made to show the efficiency of the QPSO algorithm with the proposed parameter control and selection methods.

  7. How Do Children Behave Regarding Their Birth Order in Dental Setting?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Ghaderi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Prediction of child cooperation level in dental setting is an important issue for a dentist to select the proper behavior management method. Many psychological studies have emphasized the effect of birth order on patient behavior and personality; however, only a few researches evaluated the effect of birth order on child’s behavior in dental setting. Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the influence of children ordinal position on their behavior in dental setting. Materials and Method: A total of 158 children with at least one primary mandibular molar needing class I restoration were selected. Children were classified based on the ordinal position; first, middle, or last child as well as single child. A blinded examiner recorded the pain perception of children during injection based on Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and Sound, Eye and Movement (SEM scale. To assess the child's anxiety, the questionnaire known as “Dental Subscale of the Children's Fear Survey Schedule” (CFSS-DS was employed. Results: The results showed that single children were significantly less cooperative and more anxious than the other children (p<0.001. The middle children were significantly more cooperative in comparison with the other child's position (p< 0.001. Conclusion: Single child may behave less cooperatively in dental setting. The order of child birth must also be considered in prediction of child’s behavior for behavioral management.

  8. Testing the hypothesis of the Earth's magnetosphere behaving like an avalanching system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Y. Lui

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The global auroral dissipation power as observed by the imager on the Polar spacecraft is used as a proxy for the power dissipation of the Earth's magnetosphere to examine whether or not the magnetosphere is an avalanching system. It is found that the probability density distributions for the area and power of auroral activity sites have a power law component within a finite scale range, suggestive of a scale-free nature in this finite-size system. This property is robust, prevailing with variations in the threshold used to define auroral activity sites and in the strength of the external driver, namely, the solar wind. The statistical characteristics on the temporal evolution of auroral sites are then examined, which leads to a criterion that can be used to predict about 42min in advance the total energy dissipation during the lifetime of an auroral activity site. The scale-free characteristics of auroral activity appears to be an intrinsic feature of the magnetosphere based on a comparison of the probability density distribution in the total auroral brightness power with that of the solar wind power input parameters in the same period as the auroral observations. These results are consistent with the hypothesis of the magnetosphere behaving like an avalanching system.

  9. A Novel Gas Turbine Engine Health Status Estimation Method Using Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyi Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate gas turbine engine health status estimation is very important for engine applications and aircraft flight safety. Due to the fact that there are many to-be-estimated parameters, engine health status estimation is a very difficult optimization problem. Traditional gas path analysis (GPA methods are based on the linearized thermodynamic engine performance model, and the estimation accuracy is not satisfactory on conditions that the nonlinearity of the engine model is significant. To solve this problem, a novel gas turbine engine health status estimation method has been developed. The method estimates degraded engine component parameters using quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO algorithm. And the engine health indices are calculated using these estimated component parameters. The new method was applied to turbine fan engine health status estimation and is compared with the other three representative methods. Results show that although the developed method is slower in computation speed than GPA methods it succeeds in estimating engine health status with the highest accuracy in all test cases and is proven to be a very suitable tool for off-line engine health status estimation.

  10. Dopamine Modulates Delta-Gamma Phase-Amplitude Coupling in the Prefrontal Cortex of Behaving Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Andino-Pavlovsky

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine release and phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling (CFC have independently been implicated in prefrontal cortex (PFC functioning. To causally investigate whether dopamine release affects phase-amplitude comodulation between different frequencies in local field potentials (LFP recorded from the medial PFC (mPFC of behaving rats, we used RuBiDopa, a light-sensitive caged compound that releases the neurotransmitter dopamine when irradiated with visible light. LFP power did not change in any frequency band after the application of light-uncaged dopamine, but significantly strengthened phase-amplitude comodulation between delta and gamma oscillations. Saline did not exert significant changes, while injections of dopamine and RuBiDopa produced a slow increase in comodulation for several minutes after the injection. The results show that dopamine release in the medial PFC shifts phase-amplitude comodulation from theta-gamma to delta-gamma. Although being preliminary results due to the limitation of the low number of animals present in this study, our findings suggest that dopamine-mediated modification of the frequencies involved in comodulation could be a mechanism by which this neurotransmitter regulates functioning in mPFC.

  11. Changes in Activity of the Same Thalamic Neurons to Repeated Nociception in Behaving Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yeowool; Cho, Jeiwon

    2015-01-01

    The sensory thalamus has been reported to play a key role in central pain sensory modulation and processing, but its response to repeated nociception at thalamic level is not well known. Current study investigated thalamic response to repeated nociception by recording and comparing the activity of the same thalamic neuron during the 1st and 2nd formalin injection induced nociception, with a week interval between injections, in awake and behaving mice. Behaviorally, the 2nd injection induced greater nociceptive responses than the 1st. Thalamic activity mirrored these behavioral changes with greater firing rate during the 2nd injection. Analysis of tonic and burst firing, characteristic firing pattern of thalamic neurons, revealed that tonic firing activity was potentiated while burst firing activity was not significantly changed by the 2nd injection relative to the 1st. Likewise, burst firing property changes, which has been consistently associated with different phases of nociception, were not induced by the 2nd injection. Overall, data suggest that repeated nociception potentiated responsiveness of thalamic neurons and confirmed that tonic firing transmits nociceptive signals.

  12. Activity of Caudate Nucleus Neurons in a Visual Fixation Paradigm in Behaving Cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Nagypál

    Full Text Available Beside its motor functions, the caudate nucleus (CN, the main input structure of the basal ganglia, is also sensitive to various sensory modalities. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of visual stimulation on the CN by using a behaving, head-restrained, eye movement-controlled feline model developed recently for this purpose. Extracellular multielectrode recordings were made from the CN of two cats in a visual fixation paradigm applying static and dynamic stimuli. The recorded neurons were classified in three groups according to their electrophysiological properties: phasically active (PAN, tonically active (TAN and high-firing (HFN neurons. The response characteristics were investigated according to this classification. The PAN and TAN neurons were sensitive primarily to static stimuli, while the HFN neurons responded primarily to changes in the visual environment i.e. to optic flow and the offset of the stimuli. The HFNs were the most sensitive to visual stimulation; their responses were stronger than those of the PANs and TANs. The majority of the recorded units were insensitive to the direction of the optic flow, regardless of group, but a small number of direction-sensitive neurons were also found. Our results demonstrate that both the static and the dynamic components of the visual information are represented in the CN. Furthermore, these results provide the first piece of evidence on optic flow processing in the CN, which, in more general terms, indicates the possible role of this structure in dynamic visual information processing.

  13. Characteristics of fast-spiking neurons in the striatum of behaving monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Inokawa, Hitoshi; Hori, Yukiko; Pan, Xiaochuan; Matsuzaki, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Kae; Samejima, Kazuyuki; Shidara, Munetaka; Kimura, Minoru; Sakagami, Masamichi; Minamimoto, Takafumi

    2016-04-01

    Inhibitory interneurons are the fundamental constituents of neural circuits that organize network outputs. The striatum as part of the basal ganglia is involved in reward-directed behaviors. However, the role of the inhibitory interneurons in this process remains unclear, especially in behaving monkeys. We recorded the striatal single neuron activity while monkeys performed reward-directed hand or eye movements. Presumed parvalbumin-containing GABAergic interneurons (fast-spiking neurons, FSNs) were identified based on narrow spike shapes in three independent experiments, though they were a small population (4.2%, 42/997). We found that FSNs are characterized by high-frequency and less-bursty discharges, which are distinct from the basic firing properties of the presumed projection neurons (phasically active neurons, PANs). Besides, the encoded information regarding actions and outcomes was similar between FSNs and PANs in terms of proportion of neurons, but the discharge selectivity was higher in PANs than that of FSNs. The coding of actions and outcomes in FSNs and PANs was consistently observed under various behavioral contexts in distinct parts of the striatum (caudate nucleus, putamen, and anterior striatum). Our results suggest that FSNs may enhance the discharge selectivity of postsynaptic output neurons (PANs) in encoding crucial variables for a reward-directed behavior.

  14. Seeing the whole picture: A comprehensive imaging approach to functional mapping of circuits in behaving zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feierstein, C E; Portugues, R; Orger, M B

    2015-06-18

    In recent years, the zebrafish has emerged as an appealing model system to tackle questions relating to the neural circuit basis of behavior. This can be attributed not just to the growing use of genetically tractable model organisms, but also in large part to the rapid advances in optical techniques for neuroscience, which are ideally suited for application to the small, transparent brain of the larval fish. Many characteristic features of vertebrate brains, from gross anatomy down to particular circuit motifs and cell-types, as well as conserved behaviors, can be found in zebrafish even just a few days post fertilization, and, at this early stage, the physical size of the brain makes it possible to analyze neural activity in a comprehensive fashion. In a recent study, we used a systematic and unbiased imaging method to record the pattern of activity dynamics throughout the whole brain of larval zebrafish during a simple visual behavior, the optokinetic response (OKR). This approach revealed the broadly distributed network of neurons that were active during the behavior and provided insights into the fine-scale functional architecture in the brain, inter-individual variability, and the spatial distribution of behaviorally relevant signals. Combined with mapping anatomical and functional connectivity, targeted electrophysiological recordings, and genetic labeling of specific populations, this comprehensive approach in zebrafish provides an unparalleled opportunity to study complete circuits in a behaving vertebrate animal.

  15. Frequency tuning in the behaving mouse: different bandwidths for discrimination and generalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia de Hoz

    Full Text Available When faced with sensory stimuli, an organism may be required to detect very small differences in a physical parameter (discrimination, while in other situations it may have to generalize over many possible values of the same physical parameter. This decision may be based both on learned information and on sensory aspects of perception. In the present study we describe frequency processing in the behaving mouse using both discrimination and generalization as two key aspects of behaviour. We used a novel naturalistic behavioural apparatus designed for mice, the Audiobox, and paradigm contingencies that were identical for both auditory discrimination and generalization, the latter measured using latent inhibition. Mice learned to discriminate between frequencies that were an octave apart in a single trial. They showed significant discrimination between tone frequencies that were as close as 4-7%, and had d' of about 1 for ΔF of around 10%. In contrast, pre-exposure frequencies that were half an octave or less below the conditioned tone elicited latent inhibition, showing a generalization bandwidth of at least half an octave. Thus, in the same apparatus and using the same general memory paradigm, mice showed generalization gradients that were considerably wider than their discrimination threshold, indicating that environmental requirements and previous experience can determine whether the same two frequencies will be considered same or different. Remarkably, generalization gradients paralleled the typical bandwidths established in the auditory periphery and midbrain, suggesting that frequencies may be considered similar when falling within the same critical band.

  16. Nuclear manpower training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, In Suk; Lee, H. Y.; Joe, B. J.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, E. J.; Yoo, B. H.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, W. K.; Jun, H. I.; Yang, K. N.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, I. H.; Kim, M. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Hyun, H. Y.; Choi, I. G.; Hong, C. S.; Won, J. Y.; Nam, J. Y.; Lee, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. the scope and contents are as follows: 1. Regional and interregional training courses 2. Training courses assisted by foreign experts 3. Training courses for nuclear industry personnel 4. Training courses for internal staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. This Nuclear Training Center executed the open-door training courses for 2,400 engineers/scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations by means of offering 51 training courses during the fiscal year 1996. (author). 23 refs.

  17. Experimental verification of proton beam monitoring in a human body by use of activity image of positron-emitting nuclei generated by nuclear fragmentation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Teiji; Miyatake, Aya; Inoue, Kazumasa; Gomi-Miyagishi, Tomoko; Kohno, Ryosuke; Kameoka, Satoru; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Ogino, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Proton therapy is a form of radiotherapy that enables concentration of dose on a tumor by use of a scanned or modulated Bragg peak. Therefore, it is very important to evaluate the proton-irradiated volume accurately. The proton-irradiated volume can be confirmed by detection of pair-annihilation gamma rays from positron-emitting nuclei generated by the nuclear fragmentation reaction of the incident protons on target nuclei using a PET apparatus. The activity of the positron-emitting nuclei generated in a patient was measured with a PET-CT apparatus after proton beam irradiation of the patient. Activity measurement was performed in patients with tumors of the brain, head and neck, liver, lungs, and sacrum. The 3-D PET image obtained on the CT image showed the visual correspondence with the irradiation area of the proton beam. Moreover, it was confirmed that there were differences in the strength of activity from the PET-CT images obtained at each irradiation site. The values of activity obtained from both measurement and calculation based on the reaction cross section were compared, and it was confirmed that the intensity and the distribution of the activity changed with the start time of the PET imaging after proton beam irradiation. The clinical use of this information about the positron-emitting nuclei will be important for promoting proton treatment with higher accuracy in the future.

  18. Frequency of transferrin receptor positive reticulocytes (TF-Ret) in blood as an indicator of total-body radiation exposure: a pilot study in nuclear medicine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Klaus; Haenscheid, Heribert; Biko, Johannes; Hategan, Maria; Kaiser, Franz; Kreissl, Michael; Lorenz, Reinhard; Samnick, Samuel; Schirbel, Andreas; Varazashvili, Lali; Verchenya, Stanislav; Reiners, Christoph

    2012-11-01

    Approximately 3-20% of all reticulocytes in blood of healthy persons are immature and transferrin receptor positive (Tf-Ret). Tf-Ret were measured by flow cytometry in 27 patients treated with three different radiopharmaceuticals labeled with (131)I and in 25 healthy controls. Patients were chronically exposed within 6 days to blood doses from 0.18-1.89 Gy (D6). Typically, two-thirds of D6 was administered within the first day (D1). The study had to be confined to intra-subject investigations due to high biological variability of Tf-Ret counts. A significant radiation-induced decline was found in patients D1 doses that were ≥0.5 Gy. Tf-Ret frequency declined during the first 4 to 5 days of nuclear therapy to about 30-60% of its initial value, and increased in the following 3 days without reaching the initial value. At the time of nadir, the relative frequency of Tf-Ret was more depressed than that of reticulocytes and lymphocytes. The relative Tf-Ret frequency at nadir could be fitted to the equation: %-Tf-Ret=exp-(D1/D(o)). D(o) was found to be 1.0 ± 0.4 Gy (Mean ± SEM). The study shows that Tf-Ret frequency in blood might be a good parameter for estimation of the radiation dose to red marrow.

  19. Challenges in Nuclear Structure Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    2016-01-01

    The goal of nuclear structure theory is to build a comprehensive microscopic framework in which properties of nuclei and extended nuclear matter, and nuclear reactions and decays can all be consistently described. Due to novel theoretical concepts, breakthroughs in the experimentation with rare isotopes, increased exchange of ideas across different research areas, and the progress in computer technologies and numerical algorithms, nuclear theorists have been quite successful in solving various bits and pieces of the nuclear many-body puzzle and the prospects are exciting. This article contains a brief, personal perspective on the status of the field.

  20. Early Intake of Radiocesium by Residents Living Near the TEPCO Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant after the Accident. Part 1: Internal Doses Based on Whole-body Measurements by NIRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunjoo; Kurihara, Osamu; Kunishima, Naoaki; Nakano, Takashi; Tani, Kotaro; Hachiya, Misao; Momose, Takumaro; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Hosoda, Masahiro; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    The Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident in 2011 resulted in a release of radionuclides into the environment (I: 142.9 PBq, Cs:12.4 PBq). This study presents the results of internal doses to 174 residents living near the FDNPP at the time of the accident based on whole-body (WB) measurements performed by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) during the period between 27 June and 28 July 2011. The 174 subjects consisted of 125 adults (≥18-y) and 49 children ( females) was observed in the adults but not the children. In this study, the committed effective dose (CED) from Cs and Cs was calculated based on individual WB contents (Cs) corrected against body size, the observed body content ratio of Cs to Cs, and the assumed intake scenario (namely, acute inhalation of Type F compounds on 12 March 2011 when the first explosive event occurred at the site of the FDNPP). The 90th-percentile CED value for the adults was around 0.1 mSv and the maximum CED (0.63 mSv) was found in an elderly male. Comparable CED results were obtained in other WB measurements subsequently performed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in a similar manner to that of the NIRS, suggesting that the contribution of ingestion to the WB content observed would be trivial for most of the JAEA subjects. The intake ratio of I to Cs was evaluated to be 3~5 based on the I thyroid measurement data of Tokonami et al. Using the average intake ratio of 3.8, the resulting median and maximum thyroid-equivalent doses to the adult subjects of this study were estimated at 3.5 mSv and 84 mSv, respectively.

  1. MATLAB-based automated patch-clamp system for awake behaving mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Niraj S; Siegel, Jennifer J; Taylor, William; Chitwood, Raymond A; Johnston, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Automation has been an important part of biomedical research for decades, and the use of automated and robotic systems is now standard for such tasks as DNA sequencing, microfluidics, and high-throughput screening. Recently, Kodandaramaiah and colleagues (Nat Methods 9: 585-587, 2012) demonstrated, using anesthetized animals, the feasibility of automating blind patch-clamp recordings in vivo. Blind patch is a good target for automation because it is a complex yet highly stereotyped process that revolves around analysis of a single signal (electrode impedance) and movement along a single axis. Here, we introduce an automated system for blind patch-clamp recordings from awake, head-fixed mice running on a wheel. In its design, we were guided by 3 requirements: easy-to-use and easy-to-modify software; seamless integration of behavioral equipment; and efficient use of time. The resulting system employs equipment that is standard for patch recording rigs, moderately priced, or simple to make. It is written entirely in MATLAB, a programming environment that has an enormous user base in the neuroscience community and many available resources for analysis and instrument control. Using this system, we obtained 19 whole cell patch recordings from neurons in the prefrontal cortex of awake mice, aged 8-9 wk. Successful recordings had series resistances that averaged 52 ± 4 MΩ and required 5.7 ± 0.6 attempts to obtain. These numbers are comparable with those of experienced electrophysiologists working manually, and this system, written in a simple and familiar language, will be useful to many cellular electrophysiologists who wish to study awake behaving mice.

  2. Differing presynaptic contributions to LTP and associative learning in behaving mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Madroñal

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapse is an excellent experimental model for studying the interactions between short- and long-term plastic changes taking place following high-frequency stimulation (HFS of Schaffer collaterals and during the acquisition and extinction of a classical eyeblink conditioning in behaving mice. Input/output curves and a full-range paired-pulse study enabled determining the optimal intensities and inter-stimulus intervals for evoking paired-pulse facilitation (PPF or depression (PPD at the CA3-CA1 synapse. Long-term potentiation (LTP induced by HFS lasted ≈ 10 days. HFS-induced LTP evoked an initial depression of basal PPF. Recovery of PPF baseline values was a steady and progressive process lasting ≈ 20 days, i.e., longer than the total duration of the LTP. In a subsequent series of experiments, we checked whether PPF was affected similarly during activity-dependent synaptic changes. Animals were conditioned using a trace paradigm, with a tone as a conditioned stimulus (CS and an electrical shock to the trigeminal nerve as an unconditioned stimulus (US. A pair of pulses (40 ms interval was presented to the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway to evoke field EPSPs (fEPSPs during the CS-US interval. Basal PPF decreased steadily across conditioning sessions (i.e., in the opposite direction to that during LTP, reaching a minimum value during the 10th conditioning session. Thus, LTP and classical eyeblink conditioning share some presynaptic mechanisms, but with an opposite evolution. Furthermore, PPF and PPD might play a homeostatic role during long-term plastic changes at the CA3-CA1 synapse.

  3. Head-mounted LED for optogenetic experiments of freely-behaving animal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ki Yong; Gnade, Andrew G.; Rush, Alexander D.; Patten, Craig D.

    2016-03-01

    Recent developments in optogenetics have demonstrated the ability to target specific types of neurons with sub-millisecond temporal precision via direct optical stimulation of genetically modified neurons in the brain. In most applications, the beam of a laser is coupled to an optical fiber, which guides and delivers the optical power to the region of interest. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are an alternative light source for optogenetics and they provide many advantages over a laser based system including cost, size, illumination stability, and fast modulation. Their compact size and low power consumption make LEDs suitable light sources for a wireless optogenetic stimulation system. However, the coupling efficiency of an LED's output light into an optical fiber is lower than a laser due to its noncollimated output light. In typical chronic optogenetic experiment, the output of the light source is transmitted to the brain through a patch cable and a fiber stub implant, and this configuration requires two fiber-to-fiber couplings. Attenuation within the patch cable is potential source of optical power loss. In this study, we report and characterize a recently developed light delivery method for freely-behaving animal experiments. We have developed a head-mounted light source that maximizes the coupling efficiency of an LED light source by eliminating the need for a fiber optic cable. This miniaturized LED is designed to couple directly to the fiber stub implant. Depending on the desired optical power output, the head-mounted LED can be controlled by either a tethered (high power) or battery-powered wireless (moderate power) controller. In the tethered system, the LED is controlled through 40 gauge micro coaxial cable which is thinner, more flexible, and more durable than a fiber optic cable. The battery-powered wireless system uses either infrared or radio frequency transmission to achieve real-time control. Optical, electrical, mechanical, and thermal

  4. Riding on the fast lane: how sea turtles behave in post-nesting migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.-H.; Cheng, I.-J.; Centurioni, L.

    2014-07-01

    Sea turtles are known as powerful swimmers. How do they behave when riding in strong currents during their migrations? In this study, three, satellite-tagged, post-nesting green turtles travelled from Lanyu Island, east of Taiwan, partly within the Kuroshio to their foraging sites approximately 1000 km away in the Ryukyu Archipelago. Their swimming behaviors were analyzed by comparing their migration velocities estimated from Argos tag data with ocean currents derived from a data simulation model and from AVISO advection estimates. Results suggest that the turtles take advantage of Kuroshio during the initial portion of their migration routes. They must then make a great effort to swim eastward, at speeds over 1 m s-1, toward their foraging sites to avoid being carried off course by the strong current. The cues that might cause the change in swimming direction were evaluated with a Principle Component Analysis. The factors considered are ambient current velocity, wind, eddy activity (vorticity), magnetic field (latitude) and water temperature. The analysis shows that the ambient current and water temperature are negatively correlated with the eastward swimming velocity. This suggests that the changes in ocean current and a drop of water temperature, likely due to eddies impinging on the Kuroshio, may trigger the eastward swimming. Despite the differences among migratory routes of three Argos-tagged turtles after leaving the Kuroshio, they all reached foraging sites in the same general area. That suggests there may be more complex cues that guide the turtles to their foraging sites during their post-nesting migrations.

  5. Action potential waveform variability limits multi-unit separation in freely behaving rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Stratton

    Full Text Available Extracellular multi-unit recording is a widely used technique to study spontaneous and evoked neuronal activity in awake behaving animals. These recordings are done using either single-wire or multiwire electrodes such as tetrodes. In this study we have tested the ability of single-wire electrodes to discriminate activity from multiple neurons under conditions of varying noise and neuronal cell density. Using extracellular single-unit recording, coupled with iontophoresis to drive cell activity across a wide dynamic range, we studied spike waveform variability, and explored systematic differences in single-unit spike waveform within and between brain regions as well as the influence of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR on the similarity of spike waveforms. We also modelled spike misclassification for a range of cell densities based on neuronal recordings obtained at different SNRs. Modelling predictions were confirmed by classifying spike waveforms from multiple cells with various SNRs using a leading commercial spike-sorting system. Our results show that for single-wire recordings, multiple units can only be reliably distinguished under conditions of high recording SNR (≥ 4 and low neuronal density (≈ 20,000/ mm(3. Physiological and behavioural changes, as well as technical limitations typical of awake animal preparations, reduce the accuracy of single-channel spike classification, resulting in serious classification errors. For SNR <4, the probability of misclassifying spikes approaches 100% in many cases. Our results suggest that in studies where the SNR is low or neuronal density is high, separation of distinct units needs to be evaluated with great caution.

  6. Nuclear control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Wan Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    International cooperation in nuclear industries requires nuclear control as prerequisites. The concept of nuclear control is based on the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapon (NPT). The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) plays central role in implementing nuclear control. Nuclear control consists of nuclear safeguards, physical protection, and export/import control. Each member state of NPT is subject to the IAEA`s safeguards by concluding safeguards agreements with the IAEA. IAEA recommends member states to implement physical protection on nuclear materials by `The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material` and `The Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material` of IAEA. Export/Import Control is to deter development of nuclear weapons by controlling international trade on nuclear materials, nuclear equipments and technology. Current status of domestic and foreign nuclear control implementation including recent induction of national inspection system in Korea is described and functions of recently set-up Technology Center for Nuclear Control (TCNC) under the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) are also explained. 6 tabs., 11 refs. (Author).

  7. Nuclear lattice simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epelbaum E.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We review recent progress on nuclear lattice simulations using chiral effective field theory. We discuss lattice results for dilute neutron matter at next-to-leading order, three-body forces at next-to-next-toleading order, isospin-breaking and Coulomb effects, and the binding energy of light nuclei.

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... like? Special camera or imaging devices used in nuclear medicine include the gamma camera and single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT). The gamma camera, also called a scintillation camera, detects radioactive energy that is emitted from the patient's body and ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Most nuclear medicine exams will involve an injection in a vein in your child’s arm or hand. Your child should ... body, they offer the potential to identify disease in its earliest stages as well as a patient’s ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The special camera and imaging techniques used in nuclear medicine include the gamma camera and single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT). The gamma camera, also called a scintillation camera, detects radioactive energy that is emitted from the patient's body and ...

  11. Weighing the Evidence: Likability and Trait Attributions of a Peer as a Function of Behavioral Characteristics, Body Weight, and Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robert; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Used vignettes to investigate children's integration of information on behavior, body weight, and sex when forming peer impressions. Found that positively behaving peers were liked more and attributed more positive traits than negatively behaving peers. Also found that boys, but not girls, believed that peers would evaluate average weight,…

  12. Drosophila Cajal bodies: accessories not included

    OpenAIRE

    Matera, A. Gregory

    2006-01-01

    Cajal bodies are nuclear sites of small ribonucleoprotein (RNP) remodeling and maturation. A recent study describes the discovery of the Drosophila Cajal body, revealing some interesting insights into the subnuclear organization of RNA processing machineries among different species.

  13. Television and Social Learning: Some Relationships Between Viewing Violence and Behaving Aggressively (Overview).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Robert M.

    Observational learning requires exposure to modeling cues, acquisition of the ability to reproduce what is seen or heard, and acceptance of the model's behavior as a guide for one's own actions, as imitation, counter-imitation, disinhibition, or inhibition. In this overview paper, the author considers a large body of research, especially that…

  14. Enhancing Appearance and Sports Performance: Are Female Collegiate Athletes Behaving More like Males?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Susan M.; Gorrow, Teena R.; Schneider, Sidney R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors designed this study to determine if differences exist between male and female collegiate athletes' supplement use and behaviors to modify body appearance. Participants: Collegiate athletes who participated in this study were 241 females and 210 males, aged 17 to 28 years. Method: Participants completed a questionnaire about…

  15. Body Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Contact Us Text size | Print | Body Image Developing a positive body image and a healthy mental attitude is crucial to ... on for tips to have a healthy body image. Topics About body image When you look in ...

  16. Few-body physics

    OpenAIRE

    Briceño, Raúl A.

    2014-01-01

    Few-body hadronic observables play an essential role in a wide number of processes relevant for both particle and nuclear physics. In order for Lattice QCD to offer insight into the interpretation of few-body states, a theoretical infrastructure must be developed to map Euclidean-time correlation functions to the desired Minkowski-time few-body observables. In this talk, I review the formal challenges associated with the studies of such systems via Lattice QCD, as first introduced by Maiani a...

  17. Advances in nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, Erich

    1975-01-01

    Review articles on three topics of considerable current interest make up the present volume. The first, on A-hypernuclei, was solicited by the editors in order to provide nuclear physicists with a general description of the most recent developments in a field which this audience has largely neglected or, perhaps, viewed as a novelty in which a bizarre nuclear system gave some information about the lambda-nuclear intersection. That view was never valid. The very recent developments reviewed here-particularly those pertaining to hypernuclear excitations and the strangeness exchange reactions-emphasize that this field provides important information about the models and central ideas of nuclear physics. The off-shell behavior of the nucleon-nucleon interaction is a topic which was at first received with some embarrassment, abuse, and neglect, but it has recently gained proper attention in many nuclear problems. Interest was first focused on it in nuclear many-body theory, but it threatened nuclear physicists'comf...

  18. Nuclear Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  19. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  20. Nuclear Ambitions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    China will begin to build the world’s first third-generation nuclear power plant at the Sanmen Nuclear Power Project in Sanmen City, coastal Zhejiang Province, in March 2009, accord-ing to the State Nuclear Power Technology Corp.

  1. Panel report: nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Joseph A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hartouni, Edward P [LLNL

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear science is at the very heart of the NNSA program. The energy produced by nuclear processes is central to the NNSA mission, and nuclear reactions are critical in many applications, including National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsules, energy production, weapons, and in global threat reduction. Nuclear reactions are the source of energy in all these applications, and they can also be crucial in understanding and diagnosing the complex high-energy environments integral to the work of the NNSA. Nuclear processes are complex quantum many-body problems. Modeling and simulation of nuclear reactions and their role in applications, coupled tightly with experiments, have played a key role in NNSA's mission. The science input to NNSA program applications has been heavily reliant on experiment combined with extrapolations and physical models 'just good enough' to provide a starting point to extensive engineering that generated a body of empirical information. This body of information lacks the basic science underpinnings necessary to provide reliable extrapolations beyond the domain in which it was produced and for providing quantifiable error bars. Further, the ability to perform additional engineering tests is no longer possible, especially those tests that produce data in the extreme environments that uniquely characterize these applications. The end of testing has required improvements to the predictive capabilities of codes simulating the reactions and associated applications for both well known and well characterized cases as well as incompletely known cases. Developments in high performance computing, computational physics, applied mathematics and nuclear theory have combined to make spectacular advances in the theory of fission, fusion and nuclear reactions. Current research exploits these developments in a number of Office of Science and NNSA programs, and in joint programs such as the SciDAC (Science Discovery through Advanced Computing) that

  2. Imaging neuronal populations in behaving rodents: paradigms for studying neural circuits underlying behavior in the mammalian cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jerry L; Andermann, Mark L; Keck, Tara; Xu, Ning-Long; Ziv, Yaniv

    2013-11-06

    Understanding the neural correlates of behavior in the mammalian cortex requires measurements of activity in awake, behaving animals. Rodents have emerged as a powerful model for dissecting the cortical circuits underlying behavior attributable to the convergence of several methods. Genetically encoded calcium indicators combined with viral-mediated or transgenic tools enable chronic monitoring of calcium signals in neuronal populations and subcellular structures of identified cell types. Stable one- and two-photon imaging of neuronal activity in awake, behaving animals is now possible using new behavioral paradigms in head-fixed animals, or using novel miniature head-mounted microscopes in freely moving animals. This mini-symposium will highlight recent applications of these methods for studying sensorimotor integration, decision making, learning, and memory in cortical and subcortical brain areas. We will outline future prospects and challenges for identifying the neural underpinnings of task-dependent behavior using cellular imaging in rodents.

  3. Large-Scale Fluorescence Calcium-Imaging Methods for Studies of Long-Term Memory in Behaving Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jercog, Pablo; Rogerson, Thomas; Schnitzer, Mark J

    2016-05-02

    During long-term memory formation, cellular and molecular processes reshape how individual neurons respond to specific patterns of synaptic input. It remains poorly understood how such changes impact information processing across networks of mammalian neurons. To observe how networks encode, store, and retrieve information, neuroscientists must track the dynamics of large ensembles of individual cells in behaving animals, over timescales commensurate with long-term memory. Fluorescence Ca(2+)-imaging techniques can monitor hundreds of neurons in behaving mice, opening exciting avenues for studies of learning and memory at the network level. Genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicators allow neurons to be targeted by genetic type or connectivity. Chronic animal preparations permit repeated imaging of neural Ca(2+) dynamics over multiple weeks. Together, these capabilities should enable unprecedented analyses of how ensemble neural codes evolve throughout memory processing and provide new insights into how memories are organized in the brain. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  4. Chaos in body-vortex interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johan Rønby; Aref, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    The model of body–vortex interactions, where the fluid flow is planar, ideal and unbounded, and the vortex is a point vortex, is studied. The body may have a constant circulation around it. The governing equations for the general case of a freely moving body of arbitrary shape and mass density...... of a circle is integrable. As the body is made slightly elliptic, a chaotic region grows from an unstable relative equilibrium of the circle-vortex case. The case of a cylindrical body of any shape moving in fluid otherwise at rest is also integrable. A second transition to chaos arises from the limit between...... and an arbitrary number of point vortices are presented. The case of a body and a single vortex is then investigated numerically in detail. In this paper, the body is a homogeneous, elliptical cylinder. For large body–vortex separations, the system behaves much like a vortex pair regardless of body shape. The case...

  5. Nuclear spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ajzenberg-Selove, Fay

    1960-01-01

    Nuclear Spectroscopy, Part B focuses on the ways in which experimental data may be analyzed to furnish information about nuclear parameters and nuclear models in terms of which the data are interpreted.This book discusses the elastic and inelastic potential scattering amplitudes, role of beta decay in nuclear physics, and general selection rules for electromagnetic transitions. The nuclear shell model, fundamental coupling procedure, vibrational spectra, and empirical determination of the complex potential are also covered. This publication is suitable for graduate students preparing for exper

  6. New Window into the Human Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Michael Vannier, MD, a former NASA engineer, recognized the similarity between NASA's computerized image processing technology and nuclear magnetic resonance. With technical assistance from Kennedy Space Center, he developed a computer program for Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology enabling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to scan body tissue for earlier diagnoses. Dr. Vannier feels that "satellite imaging" has opened a new window into the human body.

  7. Spermatozoa-li ke cell invaders, nuclear vlimata, in human neoplasia

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Spermatozoa-like cells (nuclear vlimata) have been identified in malignant cell cultures and embryonic cells, also common in the cytology and histology of all types of human neoplasia even after chemotherapy. A new mechanism of invasion of malignant cells has been described, according to which neoplastic cells behave and function as parasites using host-cells to divide, survive and eventually produce nuclear vlimata (bullets). Nuclear vlimata are the end ce...

  8. Resonances in nuclear few-body systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afnan, I.R. [Flinders Univ. (Australia)

    1993-04-01

    The author demonstrates that the method of contour rotation in momentum space is equivalent to the mapping of the Schroedinger equation in coordinate space onto that part of the second energy plane where resonance poles reside. In this way the author can demonstrate that resonances are eigenstates of the Hamiltonian with complex eigenvalues. The corresponding eigenstates are normalizable. This idea will be demonstrated in a model of {sup 5}Li as an {alpha}N system where the Coulomb energy difference between {sup 5}Li and {sup 5}He is calculated exactly, and by perturbation theory, for both the J{sup {pi}} = 3/2{sup {minus}} and 1/2{sup {minus}} resonances. To show how these ideas can be implemented for the Faddeev equations, the author first determines the low lying spectrum of the A=6 nuclei as an {alpha}NN system, and then demonstrates the possible formation of a {Sigma}-hypertriton as a YNN resonance near the threshold for {Sigma} production in {Lambda}d scattering.

  9. Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Briceño, Raúl A; Luu, Thomas C

    2014-01-01

    One of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low- energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path ...

  10. Nuclear choreography: interpretations from living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Susan M; Spector, David L

    2003-04-01

    The advent of green fluorescent protein technology, its use in photobleaching experiments and the development of methods to rapidly acquire images and analyze complex datasets have opened the door to unraveling the mechanisms of nuclear functions in living cells. Studies over the past few years have characterized the movement of chromatin, nuclear proteins and nuclear bodies and, in some cases, correlated their dynamics with energy dependence, cell cycle progression, developmental changes, factor targeting and nuclear position. The mechanisms by which nuclear components move or are restrained have important implications for understanding not only the efficacy of nuclear functions but also the regulation of developmental programs and cellular growth.

  11. Nuclear Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    This chapter first gives a survey on the history of the discovery of nuclear fission. It briefly presents the liquid-drop and shell models and their application to the fission process. The most important quantities accessible to experimental determination such as mass yields, nuclear charge distribution, prompt neutron emission, kinetic energy distribution, ternary fragment yields, angular distributions, and properties of fission isomers are presented as well as the instrumentation and techniques used for their measurement. The contribution concentrates on the fundamental aspects of nuclear fission. The practical aspects of nuclear fission are discussed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0720-2_57 of Vol. 6.

  12. Nuclear Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, E G [ed.

    1989-01-01

    This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  13. Nuclear and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear and Particle Physics provides an introductory course on nuclear and particle physics for undergraduate and early-graduate students, which the author has taught for several years at the University of Zurich. It contains fundamentals on both nuclear and particle physics, giving emphasis to the discovery and history of developments in the field, and is experimentally/phenomenologically oriented. It contains detailed derivations of formulae such as 2–3 body phase space, the Weinberg-Salam model, and neutrino scattering. Originally published in German as Kern- und Teilchenphysik, several sections have been added to this new English version to cover modern topics, including updates on neutrinos, the Higgs boson, the top quark and bottom quark physics.

  14. Dissociation of dorsal hippocampal regional activation under the influence of stress in freely behaving rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes ePassecker

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Stress has deleterious effects on brain, body and behaviour in humans and animals alike. The present work investigated how 30-minute acute photic stress exposure impacts on spatial information processing in the main subregions of the dorsal hippocampal formation (CA1, CA3 and Dentate Gyrus, a brain structure prominently implicated in memory and spatial representation. Recordings were performed from spatially tuned hippocampal and dentate gyrus cells in rats while animals foraged in a square arena for food. The stress procedure induced a decrease in firing frequencies in CA1 and CA3 place cells while sparing locational characteristics. In contrast to the CA1-CA3 network, acute stress failed to induce major changes in the DG neuronal population. These data demonstrate a clear dissociation of the effects of stress on the main hippocampal sub-regions. Our findings further support the notion of decreased hippocampal excitability arising from stress in areas CA1 and CA3, but not in dentate gyrus.

  15. Facing danger: How do people behave in times of need? The case of adult attachment styles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsachi eEin-Dor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bowlby’s (1982 attachment theory has generated an enormous body of research and conceptual elaborations. Although attachment theory and research propose that attachment security provides a person with many adaptive advantages, during all phases of the life cycle, numerous studies indicate that almost half of the human species can be classified as insecurely attached or insecure with respect to attachment. It seems odd that evolution left humans in this vulnerable position, unless there are some advantages to individuals or groups, under at least some conditions, of anxious and avoidant attachment styles. I argue that a social group containing members with different attachment patterns may be more conducive to survival than a homogeneous group of securely attached individuals because each attachment disposition has specific adaptive advantages that promote the survival of the individual and people around him or her when facing threats and perils. In making this argument, I extend the scope of attachment theory and research by considering a broader range of adaptive functions of insecure attachment strategies, and present data to support my argument.

  16. Universe made of baryonic gravitating particles behaves as a \\Lambda CDM Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Portilla, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Using an approximate solution to the $N$-body problem in general relativity, and the \\emph{principle of local isotropy at any point}, we construct a cosmological model, with zero curvature, for a universe composed uniquely by collision-less gravitating point-particles. The result is not, as currently thought, a null pressure Friedman model, but one that reproduces quite well the dark phenomena. We assume that there exist three consecutive ages with this property, formed by free atoms, stars and galaxies, respectively. Certainly, we are using a highly idealized view of the very complicated process going from uncoupled atoms to galaxies, but it allows us to obtain that the energy density at each epoch is of the form $ \\rho(a)=\\frac{3H_0^2}{8\\pi G}\\left(\\frac{\\Omega_{ba}(1+\\alpha)}{a^3}+ f(a)\\right) $, where $\\alpha$ is a constant, that we identify with the dark matter, and $f(a)$ a function of the scale factor, which is zero at galaxy formation and \\emph{practically constant at the present epoch}, constant that...

  17. [Cajal bodies and histone locus bodies: molecular structure and function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodiuchenko, T A; Krasikova, A V

    2014-01-01

    The review provides modern classification of evolutionarily conserved coilin-containing nuclear bodies of somatic and germ cells that is based on the characteristic features of their molecular composition and the nature of their functions. The main differences between Cajal bodies and histone locus bodies, which are involved in the biogenesis of small nuclear spliceosomal and nucleolar RNAs and in the 3'-end processing of histone precursor messenger RNA, respectively, are considered. It is shown that a significant contribution to the investigation of the diversity of coilin-containing bodies was made by the studies on the architecture of the RNA processing machinery in oocyte nuclei in a number of model organisms. The characteristics features of the molecular composition of coilin-containing bodies in the nuclei of growing oocytes (the so-called germinal vesicles) of vertebrates, including amphibians and birds, are described.

  18. Chiral nuclear thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorilla, Salvatore; Weise, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the equation of state of nuclear matter for arbitrary isospin-asymmetry up to three loop order in the free energy density in the framework of in-medium chiral perturbation theory. In our approach 1\\pi- and 2\\pi-exchange dynamics with the inclusion of the \\Delta-isobar excitation as an explicit degree of freedom, corresponding to the long- and intermediate-range correlations, are treated explicitly. Few contact terms fixed to reproduce selected known properties of nuclear matter encode the short-distance physics. Two-body as well as three-body forces are systematically included. We find a critical temperature of about 15 MeV for symmetric nuclear matter. We investigate the dependence of the liquid-gas first-order phase transition on isospin-asymmetry. In the same chiral framework we calculate the chiral condensate of isospin-symmetric nuclear matter at finite temperatures. The contribution of the \\Delta-isobar excitation is essential for stabilizing the condensate. As a result, we find no indicati...

  19. An Arbitrary Waveform Wearable Neuro-stimulator System for Neurophysiology Research on Freely Behaving Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samani, Mohsen Mosayebi; Mahnam, Amin; Hosseini, Nasrin

    2014-04-01

    Portable wireless neuro-stimulators have been developed to facilitate long-term cognitive and behavioral studies on the central nervous system in freely moving animals. These stimulators can provide precisely controllable input(s) to the nervous system, without distracting the animal attention with cables connected to its body. In this study, a low power backpack neuro-stimulator was developed for animal brain researches that can provides arbitrary stimulus waveforms for the stimulation, while it is small and light weight to be used for small animals including rats. The system consists of a controller that uses an RF link to program and activate a small and light microprocessor-based stimulator. A Howland current source was implemented to produce precise current controlled arbitrary waveform stimulations. The system was optimized for ultra-low power consumption and small size. The stimulator was first tested for its electrical specifications. Then its performance was evaluated in a rat experiment when electrical stimulation of medial longitudinal fasciculus induced circling behavior. The stimulator is capable of delivering programmed stimulations up to ± 2 mA with adjusting steps of 1 μA, accuracy of 0.7% and compliance of 6 V. The stimulator is 15 mm × 20 mm × 40 mm in size, weights 13.5 g without battery and consumes a total power of only 5.l mW. In the experiment, the rat could easily carry the stimulator and demonstrated the circling behavior for 0.1 ms current pulses of above 400 μA. The developed system has a competitive size and weight, whereas providing a wide range of operation and the flexibility of generating arbitrary stimulation patterns ideal for long-term experiments in the field of cognitive and neuroscience research.

  20. Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Alessandro

    2005-04-01

    The activity of the Italian nuclear physicists community in the field of Nuclear Astrophysics is reported. The researches here described have been performed within the project "Fisica teorica del nucleo e dei sistemi a multi corpi", supported by the Ministero dell'Istruzione, dell'Università e della Ricerca.

  1. Cajal bodies in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafarga, Miguel; Tapia, Olga; Romero, Ana M; Berciano, Maria T

    2016-09-14

    Cajal is commonly regarded as the father of modern neuroscience in recognition of his fundamental work on the structure of the nervous system. But Cajal also made seminal contributions to the knowledge of nuclear structure in the early 1900s, including the discovery of the "accessory body" later renamed "Cajal body" (CB). This important nuclear structure has emerged as a center for the assembly of ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) required for splicing, ribosome biogenesis and telomere maintenance. The modern era of CB research started in the 1990s with the discovery of coilin, now known as a scaffold protein of CBs, and specific probes for small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). In this review, we summarize what we have learned in the recent decades concerning CBs in post-mitotic neurons, thereby ruling out dynamic changes in CB functions during the cell cycle. We show that CBs are particularly prominent in neurons, where they frequently associate with the nucleolus. Neuronal CBs are transcription-dependent nuclear organelles. Indeed, their number dynamically accommodates to support the high neuronal demand for splicing and ribosome biogenesis required for sustaining metabolic and bioelectrical activity. Mature neurons have canonical CBs enriched in coilin, survival motor neuron protein and snRNPs. Disruption and loss of neuronal CBs associate with severe neuronal dysfunctions in several neurological disorders such as motor neuron diseases. In particular, CB depletion in motor neurons seems to reflect a perturbation of transcription and splicing in spinal muscular atrophy, the most common genetic cause of infant mortality.

  2. Nuclear stress test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Persantine stress test; Thallium stress test; Stress test - nuclear; Adenosine stress test; Regadenoson stress test; CAD - nuclear stress; Coronary artery disease - nuclear stress; Angina - nuclear ...

  3. Synthetic tactile perception induced by transcranial alternating-current stimulation can substitute for natural sensory stimulus in behaving rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Ruiz, Javier; Ammann, Claudia; Leal-Campanario, Rocío; Ruffini, Giulio; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M

    2016-01-21

    The use of brain-derived signals for controlling external devices has long attracted the attention from neuroscientists and engineers during last decades. Although much effort has been dedicated to establishing effective brain-to-computer communication, computer-to-brain communication feedback for "closing the loop" is now becoming a major research theme. While intracortical microstimulation of the sensory cortex has already been successfully used for this purpose, its future application in humans partly relies on the use of non-invasive brain stimulation technologies. In the present study, we explore the potential use of transcranial alternating-current stimulation (tACS) for synthetic tactile perception in alert behaving animals. More specifically, we determined the effects of tACS on sensory local field potentials (LFPs) and motor output and tested its capability for inducing tactile perception using classical eyeblink conditioning in the behaving animal. We demonstrated that tACS of the primary somatosensory cortex vibrissa area could indeed substitute natural stimuli during training in the associative learning paradigm.

  4. Synthetic tactile perception induced by transcranial alternating-current stimulation can substitute for natural sensory stimulus in behaving rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Ruiz, Javier; Ammann, Claudia; Leal-Campanario, Rocío; Ruffini, Giulio; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of brain-derived signals for controlling external devices has long attracted the attention from neuroscientists and engineers during last decades. Although much effort has been dedicated to establishing effective brain-to-computer communication, computer-to-brain communication feedback for “closing the loop” is now becoming a major research theme. While intracortical microstimulation of the sensory cortex has already been successfully used for this purpose, its future application in humans partly relies on the use of non-invasive brain stimulation technologies. In the present study, we explore the potential use of transcranial alternating-current stimulation (tACS) for synthetic tactile perception in alert behaving animals. More specifically, we determined the effects of tACS on sensory local field potentials (LFPs) and motor output and tested its capability for inducing tactile perception using classical eyeblink conditioning in the behaving animal. We demonstrated that tACS of the primary somatosensory cortex vibrissa area could indeed substitute natural stimuli during training in the associative learning paradigm. PMID:26790614

  5. Chronic monitoring of cortical hemodynamics in behaving, freely-moving rats using a miniaturized head-mounted optical microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, Iliya; Gad, Raanan; Koletar, Margaret; Ringuette, Dene; Stefanovic, Bojana; Levi, Ofer

    2016-03-01

    Growing interest within the neurophysiology community in assessing healthy and pathological brain activity in animals that are awake and freely-behaving has triggered the need for optical systems that are suitable for such longitudinal studies. In this work we report label-free multi-modal imaging of cortical hemodynamics in the somatosensory cortex of awake, freely-behaving rats, using a novel head-mounted miniature optical microscope. The microscope employs vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) at three distinct wavelengths (680 nm, 795 nm, and 850 nm) to provide measurements of four hemodynamic markers: blood flow speeds, HbO, HbR, and total Hb concentration, across a > 2 mm field of view. Blood flow speeds are extracted using Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI), while oxygenation measurements are performed using Intrinsic Optical Signal Imaging (IOSI). Longitudinal measurements on the same animal are made possible over the course of > 6 weeks using a chronic window that is surgically implanted into the skull. We use the device to examine changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation in superficial cortical blood vessels and tissue in response to drug-induced absence-like seizures, correlating motor behavior with changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation in the brain.

  6. A movable microelectrode array for chronic basal ganglia single-unit electrocorticogram co-recording in freely behaving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaobin; Zeng, Jia; Chen, Ting; Lin, Yuanxiang; Yu, Lianghong; Li, Ying; Lin, Zhangya; Wu, Xiyue; Chen, Fuyong; Kang, Dezhi; Zhang, Shizhong

    2014-09-01

    The basal ganglia-cortical circuits are important for information process to brain function. However, chronic recording of single-unit activities in the basal ganglia nucleus has not yet been well established. We present a movable bundled microwire array for chronic subthalamic nucleus (STN) single-unit electrocorticogram co-recording. The electrode assembly contains a screw-advanced microdrive and a microwire array. The array consists of a steel guide tube, five recording wires and one referenced wire which form the shape of a guiding hand, and one screw electrode for cortico-recording. The electrode can acquire stable cortex oscillation-driven STN firing units in rats under different behaving conditions for 8 weeks. We achieved satisfying signal-to-noise ratio, portions of cells retaining viability, and spike waveform similarities across the recording sections. Using this method, we investigated neural correlations of the basal ganglia-cortical circuits in different behaving conditions. This method will become a powerful tool for multi-region recording to study normal statements or movement disorders.

  7. Mechanically, the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis behaves like a shell inflated by a pressure of about 1 MPa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léna eBeauzamy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In plants, the shoot apical meristem contains the stem cells and is responsible for the generation of all aerial organs. Mechanistically, organogenesis is associated with an auxin-dependent local softening of the epidermis. This has been proposed to be sufficient to trigger outgrowth, because the epidermis is thought to be under tension and stiffer than internal tissues in all the aerial part of the plant. However, this has not been directly demonstrated in the shoot apical meristem. Here we tested this hypothesis in Arabidopsis using indentation methods and modeling. We considered two possible scenarios: either the epidermis does not have unique properties and the meristem behaves as a homogeneous linearly-elastic tissue, or the epidermis is under tension and the meristem exhibits the response of a shell under pressure. Large indentation depths measurements with a large tip (~size of the meristem were consistent with a shell-like behavior. This also allowed us to deduce a value of turgor pressure, estimated at 0.82 ± 0.16 MPa. Indentation with atomic force microscopy provided local measurements of pressure in the epidermis, further confirming the values obtained from large deformations. Altogether, our data demonstrate that the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem behaves like a shell under a MPa range pressure and support a key role for the epidermis in shaping the shoot apex.

  8. Nuclear questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrani, M. [Physics World (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-01

    The future of nuclear power has returned to centre stage. Freezing weather on both sides of the Atlantic and last month's climate-change talks in Montreal have helped to put energy and the future of nuclear power right back on the political agenda. The issue is particularly pressing for those countries where existing nuclear stations are reaching the end of their lives. In the UK, prime minister Tony Blair has commissioned a review of energy, with a view to deciding later this year whether to build new nuclear power plants. The review comes just four years after the Labour government published a White Paper on energy that said the country should keep the nuclear option open but did not follow this up with any concrete action. In Germany, new chancellor and former physicist Angela Merkel is a fan of nuclear energy and had said she would extend the lifetime of its nuclear plants beyond 2020, when they are due to close. However, that commitment has had to be abandoned, at least for the time being, following negotiations with her left-wing coalition partners. The arguments in favour of nuclear power will be familiar to all physicists - it emits almost no carbon dioxide and can play a vital role in maintaining a diverse energy supply. To over-rely on imported supplies of oil and gas can leave a nation hostage to fortune. The arguments against are equally easy to list - the public is scared of nuclear power, it generates dangerous waste with potentially huge clean-up costs, and it is not necessarily cheap. Nuclear plants could also be a target for terrorist attacks. Given political will, many of these problems can be resolved, or at least tackled. China certainly sees the benefits of nuclear power, as does Finland, which is building a new 1600 MW station - the world's most powerful - that is set to open in 2009. Physicists, of course, are essential to such developments. They play a vital role in ensuring the safety of such plants and developing new types of

  9. Cajal bodies and coilin—moving towards function

    OpenAIRE

    Ogg, Stephen C.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2002-01-01

    Many nuclear factors are concentrated within nonmembrane-bound subnuclear bodies. The Cajal body is an example of a conserved nuclear compartment that has been linked to molecular disease. Recent studies have shown Cajal bodies to be surprisingly mobile and offer clues about their function in the cell.

  10. Nuclear reactor downcomer flow deflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, Charles B. (Greensburg, PA); Altman, David A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

    2011-02-15

    A nuclear reactor having a coolant flow deflector secured to a reactor core barrel in line with a coolant inlet nozzle. The flow deflector redirects incoming coolant down an annulus between the core barrel and the reactor vessel. The deflector has a main body with a front side facing the fluid inlet nozzle and a rear side facing the core barrel. The rear side of the main body has at least one protrusion secured to the core barrel so that a gap exists between the rear side of the main body adjacent the protrusion and the core barrel. Preferably, the protrusion is a relief that circumscribes the rear side of the main body.

  11. What You Should Know About Pediatric Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    What You Should Know About Pediatric Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Safety www.imagegently.org What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine uses radioactive isotopes to create pictures of the human body. ...

  12. Management of nuclear training center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, In Suk; Lee, Han Young; Cho, Boung Jae; Lee, Seung Hee; Lee, Eoi Jin; You, Byung Hoon; Lee, Won Ku; Jeon, Hyung Ryeon; Seo, Kyung Won; Kim, Young Joong; Kim, Ik Hyun; Hyun, Ha Il; Choi, Il Ki; Hong, Choon Sun; Won, Jong Yeul; Joo, Yong Chang; Nam, Jae Yeul; Sin, Eun Jeong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. The scope and contents are as follows : 1. Regional and interregional training courses, 2. Training courses assisted by foreign experts, 3. Training courses for nuclear industry personnel, 4. Training courses for internal staff-members, 5. Training courses under the law. The nuclear training center executed the open-door training courses for 2,699 engineers/scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations by means of offering 69 training courses during the fiscal year 1995. (Author) .new.

  13. Nuclear Physics from Lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Detmold, Silas Beane, Konstantinos Orginos, Martin Savage

    2011-01-01

    We review recent progress toward establishing lattice Quantum Chromodynamics as a predictive calculational framework for nuclear physics. A survey of the current techniques that are used to extract low-energy hadronic scattering amplitudes and interactions is followed by a review of recent two-body and few-body calculations by the NPLQCD collaboration and others. An outline of the nuclear physics that is expected to be accomplished with Lattice QCD in the next decade, along with estimates of the required computational resources, is presented.

  14. Bacillus cereus G9241 Makes Anthrax Toxin and Capsule like Highly Virulent B. anthracis Ames but Behaves like Attenuated Toxigenic Nonencapsulated B. anthracis Sterne in Rabbits and Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Bacillus cereus G9241 Makes Anthrax Toxin and Capsule like Highly Virulent B. anthracis Ames but Behaves like...G9241 for mice requires the presence of both plasmids. The Bacillus cereus group, of which Bacillus anthracis, Bacil- lus thuringiensis , and B... Bacillus cereus G9241 Makes Anthrax Toxin and Capsule like Highly Virulent B. anthracis Ames but Behaves like Attenuated Toxigenic Nonencapsulated B

  15. Body Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2000-01-01

    Body clocks” are biological methods of controling body activities.Every living thing has one. In humans, a body clock controls normal periods of sleeping and waking. It controls the time swhen you are most likely to feel pain.Eating, sleeping and exercising at about the same time each day will help keep body activities normal. But changes in your life, a new job, for example, destroy the balance and thus cause health problems.

  16. Nuclear reaction

    CERN Multimedia

    Penwarden, C

    2001-01-01

    At the European Research Organization for Nuclear Research, Nobel laureates delve into the mysteries of particle physics. But when they invited artists from across the continent to visit their site in Geneva, they wanted a new kind of experiment.

  17. Nuclear Disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher

    1982-01-01

    Material about nuclear disarmament and the arms race should be included in secondary school curricula. Teachers can present this technical, controversial, and frightening material in a balanced and comprehensible way. Resources for instructional materials are listed. (PP)

  18. Nuclear Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Morgan C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-23

    PowerPoint presentation targeted for educational use. Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  19. Nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, M. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Bruxelles (Belgium); Takahashi, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Garching (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding of the Universe, or at least some of its many faces, through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. It attempts to find as many nuclear physics imprints as possible in the macrocosm, and to decipher what those messages are telling us about the varied constituent objects in the Universe at present and in the past. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress made in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other subfields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Notwithstanding the accomplishment, many long-standing problems remain to be solved, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endangering old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experimental and theoretical components. On top of the fact that large varieties of nuclei have to be dealt with, these nuclei are immersed in highly unusual environments which may have a significant impact on their static properties, the diversity of their transmutation modes, and on the probabilities of these modes. In order to have a chance of solving some of the problems nuclear astrophysics is facing, the astrophysicists and nuclear physicists are obviously bound to put their competence in common, and have sometimes to benefit from the help of other fields of physics, like particle physics, plasma physics or solid-state physics. Given the highly varied and complex aspects, we pick here some specific nuclear

  20. Nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, M.; Takahashi, K.

    1999-03-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding of the Universe, or at least some of its many faces, through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. It attempts to find as many nuclear physics imprints as possible in the macrocosm, and to decipher what those messages are telling us about the varied constituent objects in the Universe at present and in the past. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress made in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other subfields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Notwithstanding the accomplishment, many long-standing problems remain to be solved, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endangering old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experimental and theoretical components. On top of the fact that large varieties of nuclei have to be dealt with, these nuclei are immersed in highly unusual environments which may have a significant impact on their static properties, the diversity of their transmutation modes, and on the probabilities of these modes. In order to have a chance of solving some of the problems nuclear astrophysics is facing, the astrophysicists and nuclear physicists are obviously bound to put their competence in common, and have sometimes to benefit from the help of other fields of physics, like particle physics, plasma physics or solid-state physics. Given the highly varied and complex aspects, we pick here some specific nuclear

  1. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  2. North Korea, Nuclear Weapons, and No Good Options?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, Michael David

    2013-01-01

    How would Pyongyang’s development of the capability to target the United States with nuclear weapons influence North Korea’s foreign policy? I argue that it would cause more dangerous crises than those of the last decade, and predict that these crises would eventually cause Kim Jong Un and his...... senior military associates to experience fear of imminent nuclear war or conventional regime change. I show that the effect of such fear would depend on whether or not Kim believes that he has control over the occurrence of these events. I argue that if he experiences fear and believes that he has some...... control over whether these extreme events actually happen, he will moderate his nuclear threats and behave more like other experienced nuclear powers. But if he experiences fear and believes that he has no control, he will likely pursue policies that could cause nuclear war. I use this insight...

  3. A concise guide to nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is an important component of modern medicine. This easy-to-use book is designed to acquaint readers with the basic principles of nuclear medicine, the instrumentation used, the gamut of procedures available, and the basis for selecting specific diagnostic or therapeutic procedures and interpreting results. After an introductory chapter on the history, technical basis, and scope of nuclear medicine, a series of chapters are devoted to the application of nuclear medicine techniques in the different body systems. In addition, the use of nuclear medicine methods within oncology is

  4. Super obese behave different from simple and morbid obese patients in the changes of body composition after tailored one anastomosis gastric bypass (BAGUA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Caballero, M; Reyes-Ortiz, A; García, M; Martínez-Moreno, J M; Toval-Mata, J-A-

    2014-05-01

    Introducción: Los pacientes súper obesos se comportan de manera distinta a los pacientes con obesidad simple y obesidad mórbida cuando alcanzan los cambios finales de la composición corporal (CC) tras la cirugía bariátrica. Esto nos condujo a individualizar la anastomosis única de derivación gástrica (BAGUA) para conseguir mejores resultados en estos pacientes. Pacientes y métodos: Estudiamos a 83 pacientes (37 diabéticos y 46 no diabéticos, con IMC ≥30) que completaron todos las visitas de evaluación (preoperatorio, 10 días, 1, 3, 6 y 12 meses) tras la cirugía personalizada BAGUA para la obesidad. Empleamos el analizador de la composición corporal Tanita CC-420 MA mediante el método de impedancia de un única frecuencia para analizar la evolución de la CC en pacientes clasificados por el IMC 30 - 34,9, 35 - 50, y > 50. Resultados: Mientras que el exceso de peso preoperatorio mostró unas reducciones drásticas tras la cirugía BAGUA personalizada en todos los grupos, los súper obesos tuvieron una CC final diferente. Los diabéticos retuvieron más masa grasa y grasa visceral, mientras que los súper obesos mostraban el doble (14 kg) que los pacientes con obesidad simple (6 kg), perdieron más masa muscular y tuvieron un mayor metabolismo basal. La CC final se altera en todos sus parámetros si se añade la diabetes. Conclusiones: La reducción del exceso de peso preoperatorio está motivada en gran medida por el efecto de la cirugía BAGUA personalizada. Los pacientes con un IMC entre 30-50 se comportan de forma homogénea en la CC tras la cirugía mientras que los pacientes con un IMC > 50 se comportan diferentemente. Los súper obsesos pierden menos peso, retienen más masa grasa, grasa visceral, masa ósea y agua total. Este efecto debería tratarse con una cirugía más agresiva midiendo todo el intestino delgado para realizar una exclusión adecuada (personalizada) para conseguir unos efectos homogéneos.

  5. Side scan sonar image segmentation based on neutrosophic set and quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhu; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Hongmei; Hu, Jun; Jian, Xiaomin

    2016-09-01

    To fulfill side scan sonar (SSS) image segmentation accurately and efficiently, a novel segmentation algorithm based on neutrosophic set (NS) and quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the neutrosophic subset images are obtained by transforming the input image into the NS domain. Then, a co-occurrence matrix is accurately constructed based on these subset images, and the entropy of the gray level image is described to serve as the fitness function of the QPSO algorithm. Moreover, the optimal two-dimensional segmentation threshold vector is quickly obtained by QPSO. Finally, the contours of the interested target are segmented with the threshold vector and extracted by the mathematic morphology operation. To further improve the segmentation efficiency, the single threshold segmentation, an alternative algorithm, is recommended for the shadow segmentation by considering the gray level characteristics of the shadow. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed algorithm are assessed with experiments of SSS image segmentation.

  6. Cooperative Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization with Dynamic Varying Search Areas and Lévy Flight Disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desheng Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel variant of cooperative quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (CQPSO algorithm with two mechanisms to reduce the search space and avoid the stagnation, called CQPSO-DVSA-LFD. One mechanism is called Dynamic Varying Search Area (DVSA, which takes charge of limiting the ranges of particles’ activity into a reduced area. On the other hand, in order to escape the local optima, Lévy flights are used to generate the stochastic disturbance in the movement of particles. To test the performance of CQPSO-DVSA-LFD, numerical experiments are conducted to compare the proposed algorithm with different variants of PSO. According to the experimental results, the proposed method performs better than other variants of PSO on both benchmark test functions and the combinatorial optimization issue, that is, the job-shop scheduling problem.

  7. Performance Improvement of Spaceborne SAR Using Antenna Pattern Synthesis Based on Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jin Won

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study improves the performance of a spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR system using an antenna mask design method and antenna pattern synthesis algorithms for an active phased array SAR system. The SAR antenna is an important component that affects the SAR system performance because it is closely related to the antenna pattern. This study proposes a method for antenna mask design that is based on several previous studies as well as the antenna pattern synthesis algorithm, which is based on quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO for an active phased array SAR system. The performance of the designed antenna masks and synthesized patterns demonstrate that the proposed mask design method and antenna pattern synthesis algorithm based on QPSO can be used to improve the SAR system performance for spaceborne applications.

  8. Solid-state ring laser gyro behaving like its helium-neon counterpart at low rotation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sylvain; Gutty, François; Feugnet, Gilles; Loil, Eric; Pocholle, Jean-Paul

    2009-12-15

    Nonlinear couplings induced by crystal diffusion and spatial inhomogeneities of the gain have been suppressed over a broad range of angular velocities in a solid-state ring laser gyro by vibrating the gain crystal at 168 kHz and 0.4 microm along the laser cavity axis. This device behaves in the same way as a typical helium-neon ring laser gyro, with a zone of frequency lock-in (or dead band) resulting from the backscattering of light on the cavity mirrors. Furthermore, it is shown that the level of angular random-walk noise in the presence of mechanical dithering depends only on the quality of the cavity mirrors, as is the case with typical helium-neon ring laser gyros.

  9. Imaging brain activity during seizures in freely behaving rats using a miniature multi-modal imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, Iliya; Koletar, Margaret M; Ringuette, Dene; Gad, Raanan; Jeffrey, Melanie; Carlen, Peter L; Stefanovic, Bojana; Levi, Ofer

    2016-09-01

    We report on a miniature label-free imaging system for monitoring brain blood flow and blood oxygenation changes in awake, freely behaving rats. The device, weighing 15 grams, enables imaging in a ∼ 2 × 2 mm field of view with 4.4 μm lateral resolution and 1 - 8 Hz temporal sampling rate. The imaging is performed through a chronically-implanted cranial window that remains optically clear between 2 to > 6 weeks after the craniotomy. This imaging method is well suited for longitudinal studies of chronic models of brain diseases and disorders. In this work, it is applied to monitoring neurovascular coupling during drug-induced absence-like seizures 6 weeks following the craniotomy.

  10. Neurosharing: large-scale data sets (spike, LFP) recorded from the hippocampal-entorhinal system in behaving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuseki, Kenji; Diba, Kamran; Pastalkova, Eva; Teeters, Jeff; Sirota, Anton; Buzsáki, György

    2014-01-01

    Using silicon-based recording electrodes, we recorded neuronal activity of the dorsal hippocampus and dorsomedial entorhinal cortex from behaving rats. The entorhinal neurons were classified as principal neurons and interneurons based on monosynaptic interactions and wave-shapes. The hippocampal neurons were classified as principal neurons and interneurons based on monosynaptic interactions, wave-shapes and burstiness. The data set contains recordings from 7,736 neurons (6,100 classified as principal neurons, 1,132 as interneurons, and 504 cells that did not clearly fit into either category) obtained during 442 recording sessions from 11 rats (a total of 204.5 hours) while they were engaged in one of eight different behaviours/tasks. Both original and processed data (time stamp of spikes, spike waveforms, result of spike sorting and local field potential) are included, along with metadata of behavioural markers. Community-driven data sharing may offer cross-validation of findings, refinement of interpretations and facilitate discoveries.

  11. Few-body physics

    CERN Document Server

    Briceño, Raúl A

    2014-01-01

    Few-body hadronic observables play an essential role in a wide number of processes relevant for both particle and nuclear physics. In order for Lattice QCD to offer insight into the interpretation of few-body states, a theoretical infrastructure must be developed to map Euclidean-time correlation functions to the desired Minkowski-time few-body observables. In this talk, I review the formal challenges associated with the studies of such systems via Lattice QCD, as first introduced by Maiani and Testa, and I also review the methodology to circumvent said limitations. The first main example of the latter is the formalism by Luscher to analyze elastic scattering and a second is the method by Lellouch and Luscher to analyze weak decays. I discus recent theoretical generalizations of these frameworks that allow for the determination of scattering amplitudes, resonances, nonlocal contribution to matrix elements, and form factors below and above inelastic thresholds. Finally, I outline outstanding problems, includin...

  12. Differential contributions of microglial and neuronal IKKβ to synaptic plasticity and associative learning in alert behaving mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrargyri, Vasiliki; Vega-Flores, Germán; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M; Probert, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    Microglia are CNS resident immune cells and a rich source of neuroactive mediators, but their contribution to physiological brain processes such as synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory is not fully understood. In this study, we used mice with partial depletion of IκB kinase β, the main activating kinase in the inducible NF-κB pathway, selectively in myeloid lineage cells (mIKKβKO) or excitatory neurons (nIKKβKO) to measure synaptic strength at hippocampal Schaffer collaterals during long-term potentiation (LTP) and instrumental conditioning in alert behaving individuals. Resting microglial cells in mIKKβKO mice showed less Iba1-immunoreactivity, and brain IL-1β mRNA levels were selectively reduced compared with controls. Measurement of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) evoked by stimulation of the CA3-CA1 synapse in mIKKβKO mice showed higher facilitation in response to paired pulses and enhanced LTP following high frequency stimulation. In contrast, nIKKβKO mice showed normal basic synaptic transmission and LTP induction but impairments in late LTP. To understand the consequences of such impairments in synaptic plasticity for learning and memory, we measured CA1 fEPSPs in behaving mice during instrumental conditioning. IKKβ was not necessary in either microglia or neurons for mice to learn lever-pressing (appetitive behavior) to obtain food (consummatory behavior) but was required in both for modification of their hippocampus-dependent appetitive, not consummatory behavior. Our results show that microglia, through IKKβ and therefore NF-κB activity, regulate hippocampal synaptic plasticity and that both microglia and neurons, through IKKβ, are necessary for animals to modify hippocampus-driven behavior during associative learning. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Nuclear reaction studies: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaler, R.M.

    1986-11-19

    A principal focus of recent research has been the three-body problem. A great deal of effort has been devoted to the creation of a computer program to calculate physical observables in the three body problem below 1 GeV. Successful results have been obtained for the triton. Additional work concerns scattering of K/sup +/ mesons from nuclei, antinucleon physics, relativistic nuclear physics and inclusive reactions. (DWL)

  14. Nuclear instrumentation cable end seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Collins P.; Brown, Donald P.

    1979-01-01

    An improved coaxial end seal for hermetically sealed nuclear instrumentation cable exhibiting an improved breakdown pulse noise characteristic under high voltage, high temperature conditions. A tubular insulator body has metallized interior and exterior surface portions which are braze sealed to a center conductor and an outer conductive sheath. The end surface of the insulator body which is directed toward the coaxial cable to which it is sealed has a recessed surface portion within which the braze seal material terminates.

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch ...

  17. General Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Nuclear Medicine Nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of ... limitations of General Nuclear Medicine? What is General Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses ... limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  2. Body contact and body language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Helle Dagmar

    2008-01-01

    Body contact and body language are unique and existential and, although culturally dependent and socially embodied, they are also universal communication forms. For small children all over the world, warm, close and nourishing body contact is fundamental to their embodied experi­ence of themselve...

  3. Behaving Like a Lady

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雕文

    2004-01-01

    Mr West wanted to buy his wife a Christmas present, but he was always very busy, so he was never able to find time to go to the shops. At last, when it was the week before Christmas, and the shops were very crowded, he thought that he could not wait any longer. He worked in an office, and usually had lunch in a restaurant, but one day he bought some sandwiches, ate them quickly and went out to a big shop near his office during his lunch time.

  4. Teachers Behaving Badly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Chuck

    2003-01-01

    Incivility by teachers can turn into behavior that injures careers. Workplace "mobbing" or bullying begins when an individual becomes the target of disrespectful and harmful behavior. Recounts experiences of two teachers. Offers suggestions to school leaders to stop this incivility. (MLF)

  5. Buildings behaving badly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Student, Jillian; Papyrakis, Elissaios; Beukering, van Pieter

    2017-01-01

    Heating buildings contributes to approximately 36 % of Europe’s energy demand and several EU member states have adopted mandatory energy labels to improve energy efficiency by promoting home weatherization investments. This paper focuses on the perception of the energy label for residential building

  6. Production Functions Behaving Badly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredholm, Thomas

    This paper reconsiders Anwar Shaikh's critique of the neoclassical theory of growth and distribution based on its use of aggregate production functions. This is done by reconstructing and extending Franklin M. Fisher's 1971 computer simulations, which Shaikh used to support his critique. Together...... with other recent extensions to Shaikh's seminal work, my results support and strengthen the evidence against the use of aggregate production functions....

  7. Teachers Behaving Badly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Chuck

    2003-01-01

    Incivility by teachers can turn into behavior that injures careers. Workplace "mobbing" or bullying begins when an individual becomes the target of disrespectful and harmful behavior. Recounts experiences of two teachers. Offers suggestions to school leaders to stop this incivility. (MLF)

  8. Buildings behaving badly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Student, Jillian; Papyrakis, Elissaios; Beukering, van Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Heating buildings contributes to approximately 36 % of Europe’s energy demand and several EU member states have adopted mandatory energy labels to improve energy efficiency by promoting home weatherization investments. This paper focuses on the perception of the energy label for residential building

  9. Modern topics in theoretical nuclear physics

    OpenAIRE

    Jennings, B. K.; Schwenk, A.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past five years there have been profound advances in nuclear physics based on effective field theory and the renormalization group. In this brief, we summarize these advances and discuss how they impact our understanding of nuclear systems and experiments that seek to unravel their unknowns. We discuss future opportunities and focus on modern topics in low-energy nuclear physics, with special attention to the strong connections to many-body atomic and condensed matter physics, as wel...

  10. Nuclear scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friar, J.L.

    1998-12-01

    Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

  11. Nuclear Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Friar, J L

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the $\\pi$-$\\gamma$ force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

  12. Nuclear astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Arnould, M

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding some of the many facets of the Universe through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other sub-fields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Many long-standing problems remain to be solved, however, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endanger old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experime...

  13. Nuclear Dynamics with Effective Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Epelbaum, Evgeny

    2013-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the international workshop on "Nuclear Dynamics with Effective Field Theories" held at Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Germany from July 1 to 3, 2013. The workshop focused on effective field theories of low-energy QCD, chiral perturbation theory for nuclear forces as well as few- and many-body physics. Included are a short contribution per talk.

  14. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through the area being examined and gives off energy in the form of gamma rays which are detected by a special camera and computer to create images of the inside of your body. If you’re scheduled for a nuclear medicine exam, there are several things you can ...

  15. Nuclear Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHARLES K.EBINGER; JOHN P.BANKS

    2010-01-01

    @@ In President Barack Obama's State of the Union address in January 2009,he called for the building of "a new generation of safe,clean nuclear power plants" This was followed by his highprofile speech in Prague in April 2009,in which he noted the need "to harness the power of nuclear energy on behalf of our efforts to combat climate change."In December 2009 in Copenhagen,he pledged the United States will reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions 17 percent from 2005 levels by 2020.

  16. Cajal body function in genome organization and transcriptome diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Iain A; Sturgill, David; Sung, Myong-Hee; Hager, Gordon L; Dundr, Miroslav

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear bodies contribute to non-random organization of the human genome and nuclear function. Using a major prototypical nuclear body, the Cajal body, as an example, we suggest that these structures assemble at specific gene loci located across the genome as a result of high transcriptional activity. Subsequently, target genes are physically clustered in close proximity in Cajal body-containing cells. However, Cajal bodies are observed in only a limited number of human cell types, including neuronal and cancer cells. Ultimately, Cajal body depletion perturbs splicing kinetics by reducing target small nuclear RNA (snRNA) transcription and limiting the levels of spliceosomal snRNPs, including their modification and turnover following each round of RNA splicing. As such, Cajal bodies are capable of shaping the chromatin interaction landscape and the transcriptome by influencing spliceosome kinetics. Future studies should concentrate on characterizing the direct influence of Cajal bodies upon snRNA gene transcriptional dynamics. Also see the video abstract here.

  17. Nuclear winter or nuclear fall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, André

    Climate is universal. If a major modern nuclear war (i.e., with a large number of small-yield weapons) were to happen, it is not even necessary to have a specific part of the world directly involved for there to be cause to worry about the consequences for its inhabitants and their future. Indeed, smoke from fires ignited by the nuclear explosions would be transported by winds all over the world, causing dark and cold. According to the first study, by Turco et al. [1983], air surface temperature over continental areas of the northern mid-latitudes (assumed to be the nuclear war theatre) would fall to winter levels even in summer (hence the term “nuclear winter”) and induce drastic climatic conditions for several months at least. The devastating effects of a nuclear war would thus last much longer than was assumed initially. Discussing to what extent these estimations of long-term impacts on climate are reliable is the purpose of this article.

  18. Few-body physics: Then and now

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friar, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    This review describes past progress in selected topics of few-body nuclear physics, as well as calculations and experiments that the author believes necessary for further orderly progress. Review also gives specific data on binding energies and nuclear radii. 36 references.

  19. Afferent Input Selects NMDA Receptor Subtype to Determine the Persistency of Hippocampal LTP in Freely Behaving Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Jesús J.; Buschler, Arne; Köhr, Georg; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2016-01-01

    The glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is critically involved in many forms of hippocampus-dependent memory that may be enabled by synaptic plasticity. Behavioral studies with NMDAR antagonists and NMDAR subunit (GluN2) mutants revealed distinct contributions from GluN2A- and GluN2B-containing NMDARs to rapidly and slowly acquired memory performance. Furthermore, studies of synaptic plasticity, in genetically modified mice in vitro, suggest that GluN2A and GluN2B may contribute in different ways to the induction and longevity of synaptic plasticity. In contrast to the hippocampal slice preparation, in behaving mice, the afferent frequencies that induce synaptic plasticity are very restricted and specific. In fact, it is the stimulus pattern and not variations in afferent frequency that determine the longevity of long-term potentiation (LTP) in vivo. Here, we explored the contribution of GluN2A and GluN2B to LTP of differing magnitudes and persistence in freely behaving mice. We applied differing high-frequency stimulation (HFS) patterns at 100 Hz to the hippocampal CA1 region, to induce NMDAR-dependent LTP in wild-type (WT) mice, that endured for 24 h (late (L)-LTP). In GluN2A-knockout (KO) mice, E-LTP (HFS, 50 pulses) was significantly reduced in magnitude and duration, whereas LTP (HFS, 2 × 50 pulses) and L-LTP (HFS, 4 × 50 pulses) were unaffected compared to responses in WT animals. By contrast, pharmacological antagonism of GluN2B in WT had no effect on E-LTP but significantly prevented LTP. E-LTP and LTP were significantly impaired by GluN2B antagonism in GluN2A-KO mice. These data indicate that the pattern of afferent stimulation is decisive for the recruitment of distinct GluN2A and GluN2B signaling pathways that in turn determine the persistency of hippocampal LTP. Whereas brief bursts of patterned stimulation preferentially recruit GluN2A and lead to weak and short-lived forms of LTP, prolonged, more intense, afferent activation recruits

  20. Afferent input selects NMDA receptor subtype to determine the persistency of hippocampal LTP in freely behaving mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Javier Ballesteros

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR is critically involved in many forms of hippocampus-dependent memory that may be enabled by synaptic plasticity. Behavioral studies with NMDAR antagonists and NMDAR subunit (GluN2 mutants revealed distinct contributions from GluN2A- and GluN2B-containing NMDARs to rapidly and slowly acquired memory performance. Furthermore, studies of synaptic plasticity, in genetically modified mice in vitro, suggest that GluN2A and GluN2B may contribute in different ways to the induction and longevity of synaptic plasticity. In contrast to the hippocampal slice preparation, in behaving mice, the afferent frequencies that induce synaptic plasticity are very restricted and specific. In fact, it is the stimulus pattern, and not variations in afferent frequency that determine the longevity of long-term potentiation (LTP. Here, we explored the contribution of GluN2A and GluN2B to LTP of differing magnitudes and persistencies in freely behaving mice. We applied differing high-frequency stimulation (HFS patterns at 100 Hz to the hippocampal CA1 region, to induce NMDAR-dependent LTP in wild-type (WT mice, that endured for 24h (late (L-LTP. In GluN2A-KO mice, E-LTP (HFS, 50 pulses was significantly reduced in magnitude and duration, whereas LTP (HFS, 2 x 50 pulses and L-LTP (HFS, 4 x 50 pulses were unaffected compared to responses in WT animals. By contrast, pharmacological antagonism of GluN2B in WT had no effect on E-LTP but significantly prevented LTP. E- LTP and LTP were significantly impaired by GluN2B antagonism in GluN2A-KO mice. These data indicate that the pattern of afferent stimulation is decisive for the recruitment of distinct GluN2A and GluN2B signaling pathways that in turn determine the persistency of hippocampal LTP. Whereas brief bursts of patterned stimulation preferentially recruit GluN2A and lead to weak and short-lived forms of LTP, prolonged, more intense, afferent activation recruits GluN2B

  1. Perturbative nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, Silas R; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2009-01-01

    We present a new formulation of effective field theory for nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions which treats pion interactions perturbatively, and we offer evidence that the expansion converges satisfactorily to third order in the expansion, which we have computed analytically for s and d wave NN scattering. Starting with the Kaplan-Savage-Wise (KSW) expansion about the nontrivial fixed point corresponding to infinite NN scattering length, we cure the convergence problems with that theory by summing to all orders the singular short distance part of the pion tensor interaction. This method makes possible a host of high precision analytic few-body calculations in nuclear physics.

  2. Nuclear Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHARLES; K.; EBINGER; JOHN; P.; BANKS

    2010-01-01

    The United States needs a comprehensive policy and market-based solutions to address the challenges and demands of energy provision in President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address in January 2009, he called for the building of "a new generation of safe, clean nuclear power plants." This was followed by his high- profile speech in Prague in April 2009,

  3. Nuclear Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum Services.

    This document is a report on a course in nuclear science for the high school curriculum. The course is designed to provide a basic but comprehensive understanding of the atom in the light of modern knowledge, and to show how people attempt to harness the tremendous energy liberated through fission and fusion reactions. The course crosses what are…

  4. Bog bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels

    2015-01-01

    the bog bodies have been studied using medical and natural scientific methods, and recently many bog bodies have been re-examined using especially modern, medical imaging techniques. Because of the preservation of soft tissue, especially the skin, it has been possible to determine lesions and trauma...

  5. Body punk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kevin

    BODYPUNK - A Treatise on male body builders and the meaning of the body in the shadow of an Anti Doping Campaign Based on a qualitative study, the thesis investigates the visual representation of the male bodybuilder found in the national anti doping campaign: ‗ "The hunt has begun" along...

  6. Body Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more about how the body works, what basic human anatomy is, and what happens when parts of the body don't function properly. Blood Bones, Muscles, and Joints Brain and Nervous System Digestive System Endocrine System Eyes Female Reproductive System Heart and Circulatory System Immune ...

  7. Body Language

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JosephDeVeto

    2004-01-01

    When we speak,we use much more than just words. We also communicate with our face. our hands,and even our own body. This Kind of communication ean be called “body language” or “non-verbal eommunieation”. Non-verbal

  8. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, W.

    1998-01-12

    One of the frontiers of today�s nuclear science is the �journey to the limits� of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena, but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this series of lectures, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  9. Nuclear chiral dynamics and thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Jeremy W.; Kaiser, Norbert; Weise, Wolfram

    2013-11-01

    This presentation reviews an approach to nuclear many-body systems based on the spontaneously broken chiral symmetry of low-energy QCD. In the low-energy limit, for energies and momenta small compared to a characteristic symmetry breaking scale of order 1 GeV, QCD is realized as an effective field theory of Goldstone bosons (pions) coupled to heavy fermionic sources (nucleons). Nuclear forces at long and intermediate distance scales result from a systematic hierarchy of one- and two-pion exchange processes in combination with Pauli blocking effects in the nuclear medium. Short distance dynamics, not resolved at the wavelengths corresponding to typical nuclear Fermi momenta, are introduced as contact interactions between nucleons. Apart from a set of low-energy constants associated with these contact terms, the parameters of this theory are entirely determined by pion properties and low-energy pion-nucleon scattering observables. This framework (in-medium chiral perturbation theory) can provide a realistic description of both isospin-symmetric nuclear matter and neutron matter, with emphasis on the isospin-dependence determined by the underlying chiral NN interaction. The importance of three-body forces is emphasized, and the role of explicit Δ(1232)-isobar degrees of freedom is investigated in detail. Nuclear chiral thermodynamics is developed and a calculation of the nuclear phase diagram is performed. This includes a successful description of the first-order phase transition from a nuclear Fermi liquid to an interacting Fermi gas and the coexistence of these phases below a critical temperature Tc. Density functional methods for finite nuclei based on this approach are also discussed. Effective interactions, their density dependence and connections to Landau Fermi liquid theory are outlined. Finally, the density and temperature dependences of the chiral (quark) condensate are investigated.

  10. Prosthetic Avian Vocal Organ Controlled by a Freely Behaving Bird Based on a Low Dimensional Model of the Biomechanical Periphery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, Ezequiel M.; Perl, Yonatan Sanz; Goller, Franz; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the parallels found with human language production and acquisition, birdsong is an ideal animal model to study general mechanisms underlying complex, learned motor behavior. The rich and diverse vocalizations of songbirds emerge as a result of the interaction between a pattern generator in the brain and a highly nontrivial nonlinear periphery. Much of the complexity of this vocal behavior has been understood by studying the physics of the avian vocal organ, particularly the syrinx. A mathematical model describing the complex periphery as a nonlinear dynamical system leads to the conclusion that nontrivial behavior emerges even when the organ is commanded by simple motor instructions: smooth paths in a low dimensional parameter space. An analysis of the model provides insight into which parameters are responsible for generating a rich variety of diverse vocalizations, and what the physiological meaning of these parameters is. By recording the physiological motor instructions elicited by a spontaneously singing muted bird and computing the model on a Digital Signal Processor in real-time, we produce realistic synthetic vocalizations that replace the bird's own auditory feedback. In this way, we build a bio-prosthetic avian vocal organ driven by a freely behaving bird via its physiologically coded motor commands. Since it is based on a low-dimensional nonlinear mathematical model of the peripheral effector, the emulation of the motor behavior requires light computation, in such a way that our bio-prosthetic device can be implemented on a portable platform. PMID:22761555

  11. Cancer Feature Selection and Classification Using a Binary Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization and Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maolong Xi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the feature gene selection for cancer classification, which employs an optimization algorithm to select a subset of the genes. We propose a binary quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (BQPSO for cancer feature gene selection, coupling support vector machine (SVM for cancer classification. First, the proposed BQPSO algorithm is described, which is a discretized version of original QPSO for binary 0-1 optimization problems. Then, we present the principle and procedure for cancer feature gene selection and cancer classification based on BQPSO and SVM with leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV. Finally, the BQPSO coupling SVM (BQPSO/SVM, binary PSO coupling SVM (BPSO/SVM, and genetic algorithm coupling SVM (GA/SVM are tested for feature gene selection and cancer classification on five microarray data sets, namely, Leukemia, Prostate, Colon, Lung, and Lymphoma. The experimental results show that BQPSO/SVM has significant advantages in accuracy, robustness, and the number of feature genes selected compared with the other two algorithms.

  12. Prosthetic avian vocal organ controlled by a freely behaving bird based on a low dimensional model of the biomechanical periphery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel M Arneodo

    Full Text Available Because of the parallels found with human language production and acquisition, birdsong is an ideal animal model to study general mechanisms underlying complex, learned motor behavior. The rich and diverse vocalizations of songbirds emerge as a result of the interaction between a pattern generator in the brain and a highly nontrivial nonlinear periphery. Much of the complexity of this vocal behavior has been understood by studying the physics of the avian vocal organ, particularly the syrinx. A mathematical model describing the complex periphery as a nonlinear dynamical system leads to the conclusion that nontrivial behavior emerges even when the organ is commanded by simple motor instructions: smooth paths in a low dimensional parameter space. An analysis of the model provides insight into which parameters are responsible for generating a rich variety of diverse vocalizations, and what the physiological meaning of these parameters is. By recording the physiological motor instructions elicited by a spontaneously singing muted bird and computing the model on a Digital Signal Processor in real-time, we produce realistic synthetic vocalizations that replace the bird's own auditory feedback. In this way, we build a bio-prosthetic avian vocal organ driven by a freely behaving bird via its physiologically coded motor commands. Since it is based on a low-dimensional nonlinear mathematical model of the peripheral effector, the emulation of the motor behavior requires light computation, in such a way that our bio-prosthetic device can be implemented on a portable platform.

  13. The malate synthase of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a linked surface protein that behaves as an anchorless adhesin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Maristela

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM. This is a pulmonary mycosis acquired by inhalation of fungal airborne propagules that can disseminate to several organs and tissues leading to a severe form of the disease. Adhesion and invasion to host cells are essential steps involved in the internalization and dissemination of pathogens. Inside the host, P. brasiliensis may use the glyoxylate cycle for intracellular survival. Results Here, we provide evidence that the malate synthase of P. brasiliensis (PbMLS is located on the fungal cell surface, and is secreted. PbMLS was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and polyclonal antibody was obtained against this protein. By using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy, PbMLS was detected in the cytoplasm and in the cell wall of the mother, but mainly of budding cells of the P. brasiliensis yeast phase. PbMLSr and its respective polyclonal antibody produced against this protein inhibited the interaction of P. brasiliensis with in vitro cultured epithelial cells A549. Conclusion These observations indicated that cell wall-associated PbMLS could be mediating the binding of fungal cells to the host, thus contributing to the adhesion of fungus to host tissues and to the dissemination of infection, behaving as an anchorless adhesin.

  14. Synaesthetic Colours Can Behave More like Recalled Colours, as Opposed to Physical Colours that Can Be Seen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek H. Arnold

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Grapheme-color synaesthesia is an atypical condition characterized by coloured sensations when reading achromatic text. Different forms have been characterized, but this is somewhat controversial. In associative grapheme-colour synaesthesia, written graphemes can automatically trigger a sensation of colour in the ‘mind's eye’, but hearing the name of a grapheme does not. This allowed us explore the precision with which synaesthetes match triggered synaesthetic colours across separate presentations, versus the precision for recalled experiences cued by spoken graphemes. We recorded CIE coordinates, and found that matches for triggered sensations were equally variable relative to recalled experiences. To ensure this was not due to insensitivity of our apparatus, we next had synaesthetes and age-matched controls either match the colour of a circular patch while they could see it, or from memory after it had disappeared. Both synaesthetes and controls were more variable when matching from memory, and synaesthetes were more precise when matching colour hue, but not brightness. Interestingly, the variance of synaesthetes' recalled matches in this experiment matched that associated with synaesthetic colours in the first experiment. Overall, our data suggests that, for associative grapheme-colour synaesthetes, synaesthetic colours behave more like recalled colours, as opposed to physical colours that can be seen.

  15. Cancer Feature Selection and Classification Using a Binary Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization and Support Vector Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Maolong; Sun, Jun; Liu, Li; Fan, Fangyun; Wu, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the feature gene selection for cancer classification, which employs an optimization algorithm to select a subset of the genes. We propose a binary quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (BQPSO) for cancer feature gene selection, coupling support vector machine (SVM) for cancer classification. First, the proposed BQPSO algorithm is described, which is a discretized version of original QPSO for binary 0-1 optimization problems. Then, we present the principle and procedure for cancer feature gene selection and cancer classification based on BQPSO and SVM with leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV). Finally, the BQPSO coupling SVM (BQPSO/SVM), binary PSO coupling SVM (BPSO/SVM), and genetic algorithm coupling SVM (GA/SVM) are tested for feature gene selection and cancer classification on five microarray data sets, namely, Leukemia, Prostate, Colon, Lung, and Lymphoma. The experimental results show that BQPSO/SVM has significant advantages in accuracy, robustness, and the number of feature genes selected compared with the other two algorithms.

  16. Anticancer Agents: Does a Phosphonium Behave Like a Gold(I) Phosphine Complex? Let a "Smart" Probe Answer!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Moussa; Dondaine, Lucile; Adolle, Anais; Sampaio, Carla; Chotard, Florian; Richard, Philippe; Denat, Franck; Bettaieb, Ali; Le Gendre, Pierre; Laurens, Véronique; Goze, Christine; Paul, Catherine; Bodio, Ewen

    2015-06-11

    Gold phosphine complexes, such as auranofin, have been recognized for decades as antirheumatic agents. Clinical trials are now underway to validate their use in anticancer or anti-HIV treatments. However, their mechanisms of action remain unclear. A challenging question is whether the gold phosphine complex is a prodrug that is administered in an inactive precursor form or rather that the gold atom remains attached to the phosphine ligand during treatment. In this study, we present two novel gold complexes, which we compared to auranofin and to their phosphonium analogue. The chosen ligand is a phosphine-based smart probe, whose strong fluorescence depends on the presence of the gold atom. The in vitro biological action of the gold complexes and the phosphonium derivative were investigated, and a preliminary in vivo study in healthy zebrafish larvae allowed us to evaluate gold complex biodistribution and toxicity. The different analyses carried out showed that these gold complexes were stable and behaved differently from phosphonium and auranofin, both in vitro and in vivo. Two-photon microscopy experiments demonstrated that the cellular targets of these gold complexes are not the same as those of the phosphonium analogue. Moreover, despite similar IC50 values in some cancer cell lines, gold complexes displayed a low toxicity in vivo, in contrast to the phosphonium salt. They are therefore suitable for future in vivo investigations.

  17. Awake behaving electrophysiological correlates of forelimb hyperreflexia, weakness and disrupted muscular synchronization following cervical spinal cord injury in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzer, Patrick Daniel; Meyers, Eric Christopher; Sloan, Andrew Michael; Maliakkal, Reshma; Ruiz, Andrea; Kilgard, Michael Paul; Rennaker, Robert LeMoine

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury usually occurs at the level of the cervical spine and results in profound impairment of forelimb function. In this study, we recorded awake behaving intramuscular electromyography (EMG) from the biceps and triceps muscles of the impaired forelimb during volitional and reflexive forelimb movements before and after unilateral cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI) in rats. C5/C6 hemicontusion reduced volitional forelimb strength by more than 50% despite weekly rehabilitation for one month post-injury. Triceps EMG during volitional strength assessment was reduced by more than 60% following injury, indicating reduced descending drive. Biceps EMG during reflexive withdrawal from a thermal stimulus was increased by 500% following injury, indicating flexor withdrawal hyperreflexia. The reduction in volitional forelimb strength was significantly correlated with volitional and reflexive biceps EMG activity. Our results support the hypothesis that biceps hyperreflexia and descending volitional drive both significantly contribute to forelimb strength deficits after cSCI and provide new insight into dynamic muscular dysfunction after cSCI. The use of multiple automated quantitative measures of forelimb dys-function in the rodent cSCI model will likely aid the search for effective regenerative, pharmacological, and neuroprosthetic treatments for spinal cord injury. PMID:27033345

  18. Abnormal burst patterns of single neurons recorded in the substantia nigra reticulata of behaving 140 CAG Huntington's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy-Nakhnikian, Alexander; Dorner, Jenelle L; Fischer, Benjamin I; Bower-Bir, Nathan D; Rebec, George V

    2012-03-14

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder that causes neurological pathology in the basal ganglia and related circuitry. A key site of HD pathology is striatum, the principal basal ganglia input structure; striatal pathology likely changes basal ganglia output but no existing studies address this issue. In this report, we characterize single-neuron activity in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNr) of awake, freely behaving 140 CAG knock-in (KI) mice at 16-40 weeks. KI mice are a well characterized model of adult HD and are mildly symptomatic in this age range. As the primary basal ganglia output nucleus in rodents, the SNr receives direct innervation from striatum, as well as indirect influence via polysynaptic inputs. We analyzed 32 single neurons recorded from KI animals and 44 from wild-type (WT) controls. We found increased burst rates, without a concordant change in spike discharge rate, in KI animals relative to WTs. Furthermore, although metrics of burst structure, such as the inter-spike interval in bursts, do not differ between groups, burst rate increases with age in KI, but not WT, animals. Our findings suggest that altered basal ganglia output is a physiological feature of early HD pathology.

  19. Temporally-structured acquisition of multidimensional optical imaging data facilitates visualization of elusive cortical representations in the behaving monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, David B; Hildesheim, Rina; Grinvald, Amiram

    2013-11-15

    Fundamental understanding of higher cognitive functions can greatly benefit from imaging of cortical activity with high spatiotemporal resolution in the behaving non-human primate. To achieve rapid imaging of high-resolution dynamics of cortical representations of spontaneous and evoked activity, we designed a novel data acquisition protocol for sensory stimulation by rapidly interleaving multiple stimuli in continuous sessions of optical imaging with voltage-sensitive dyes. We also tested a new algorithm for the "temporally structured component analysis" (TSCA) of a multidimensional time series that was developed for our new data acquisition protocol, but was tested only on simulated data (Blumenfeld, 2010). In addition to the raw data, the algorithm incorporates prior knowledge about the temporal structure of the data as well as input from other information. Here we showed that TSCA can successfully separate functional signal components from other signals referred to as noise. Imaging of responses to multiple visual stimuli, utilizing voltage-sensitive dyes, was performed on the visual cortex of awake monkeys. Multiple cortical representations, including orientation and ocular dominance maps as well as the hitherto elusive retinotopic representation of orientation stimuli, were extracted in only 10s of imaging, approximately two orders of magnitude faster than accomplished by conventional methods. Since the approach is rather general, other imaging techniques may also benefit from the same stimulation protocol. This methodology can thus facilitate rapid optical imaging explorations in monkeys, rodents and other species with a versatility and speed that were not feasible before.

  20. The Neurochip-2: an autonomous head-fixed computer for recording and stimulating in freely behaving monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanos, Stavros; Richardson, Andrew G; Shupe, Larry; Miles, Frank P; Fetz, Eberhard E

    2011-08-01

    The Neurochip-2 is a second generation, battery-powered device for neural recording and stimulating that is small enough to be carried in a chamber on a monkey's head. It has three recording channels, with user-adjustable gains, filters, and sampling rates, that can be optimized for recording single unit activity, local field potentials, electrocorticography, electromyography, arm acceleration, etc. Recorded data are stored on a removable, flash memory card. The Neurochip-2 also has three separate stimulation channels. Two "programmable-system-on-chips" (PSoCs) control the data acquisition and stimulus output. The PSoCs permit flexible real-time processing of the recorded data, such as digital filtering and time-amplitude window discrimination. The PSoCs can be programmed to deliver stimulation contingent on neural events or deliver preprogrammed stimuli. Access pins to the microcontroller are also available to connect external devices, such as accelerometers. The Neurochip-2 can record and stimulate autonomously for up to several days in freely behaving monkeys, enabling a wide range of novel neurophysiological and neuroengineering experiments. © 2011 IEEE

  1. Changes in ensemble activity of hippocampus CA1 neurons induced by chronic morphine administration in freely behaving mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F; Jiang, H; Zhong, W; Wu, X; Luo, J

    2010-12-15

    The hippocampus plays an important role in the formation of new memories and spatial navigation. Recently, growing evidence supports the view that it is also involved in addiction to opiates and other drugs. Theoretical and experimental studies suggest that hippocampal neural-network oscillations at specific frequencies and unit firing patterns reflect information of learning and memory encoding. Here, using multichannel recordings from the hippocampal CA1 area in behaving mice, we investigated the phase correlations between the theta (4-10 Hz) and gamma (40-100 Hz) oscillations, and the timing of spikes modulated by these oscillations. Local field potentials and single unit recordings in the CA1 area of mice receiving chronic morphine treatment revealed that the power of the theta rhythm was strongly increased; at the same time, the theta frequency during different behavioral states shifted markedly, and the characteristic coupling of theta and gamma oscillations was altered. Surprisingly, though the gamma oscillation frequency changed, the power of gamma lacking theta did not. Moreover, the timing of pyramidal cell spikes relative to the theta rhythm and the timing of interneuron spikes relative to the gamma rhythm changed during chronic morphine administration. Furthermore, these responses were impaired by a selective D1/D5 receptor antagonist intra-hippocampus injection. These results indicate that chronic morphine administration induced the changes of ensemble activity in the CA1 area, and these changes were dependent on local dopamine receptor activation.

  2. Spatial and temporal characteristics of V1 microstimulation during chronic implantation of a microelectrode array in a behaving macaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. S.; Parker, R. A.; House, P. A.; Bagley, E.; Wendelken, S.; Normann, R. A.; Greger, B.

    2012-12-01

    Objective. It has been hypothesized that a vision prosthesis capable of evoking useful visual percepts can be based upon electrically stimulating the primary visual cortex (V1) of a blind human subject via penetrating microelectrode arrays. As a continuation of earlier work, we examined several spatial and temporal characteristics of V1 microstimulation. Approach. An array of 100 penetrating microelectrodes was chronically implanted in V1 of a behaving macaque monkey. Microstimulation thresholds were measured using a two-alternative forced choice detection task. Relative locations of electrically-evoked percepts were measured using a memory saccade-to-target task. Main results. The principal finding was that two years after implantation we were able to evoke behavioural responses to electric stimulation across the spatial extent of the array using groups of contiguous electrodes. Consistent responses to stimulation were evoked at an average threshold current per electrode of 204 ± 49 µA (mean ± std) for groups of four electrodes and 91 ± 25 µA for groups of nine electrodes. Saccades to electrically-evoked percepts using groups of nine electrodes showed that the animal could discriminate spatially distinct percepts with groups having an average separation of 1.6 ± 0.3 mm (mean ± std) in cortex and 1.0° ± 0.2° in visual space. Significance. These results demonstrate chronic perceptual functionality and provide evidence for the feasibility of a cortically-based vision prosthesis for the blind using penetrating microelectrodes.

  3. Mechanical characteristics of rat vibrissae: resonant frequencies and damping in isolated whiskers and in the awake behaving animal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Mitra J.; Johnson, Nicholas J.; Towal, R. Blythe; Assad, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the natural resonance properties and damping characteristics of rat macrovibrissae (whiskers). Isolated whiskers rigidly fixed at the base showed first-mode resonance peaks between 27 and 260 Hz, principally depending on whisker length. These experimentally measured resonant frequencies were matched using a theoretical model of the whisker as a conical cantilever beam, with Young's modulus as the only free parameter. The best estimate for Young's modulus was approximately 3-4 GPa. Results of both vibration and impulse experiments showed that the whiskers are strongly damped, with damping ratios between 0.11 and 0.17. In the behaving animal, whiskers that deflected past an object were observed to resonate but were damped significantly more than isolated whiskers. The time course of damping varied depending on the individual whisker and the phase of the whisking cycle, which suggests that the rat may modulate biomechanical parameters that affect damping. No resonances were observed for whiskers that did not contact the object or during free whisking in air. Finally, whiskers on the same side of the face were sometimes observed to move in opposite directions over the full duration of a whisk. We discuss the potential roles of resonance during natural exploratory behavior and specifically suggest that resonant oscillations may be important in the rat's tactile detection of object boundaries.

  4. Automatic control: the vertebral column of dogfish sharks behaves as a continuously variable transmission with smoothly shifting functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Marianne E; Ewoldt, Randy H; Long, John H

    2016-09-15

    During swimming in dogfish sharks, Squalus acanthias, both the intervertebral joints and the vertebral centra undergo significant strain. To investigate this system, unique among vertebrates, we cyclically bent isolated segments of 10 vertebrae and nine joints. For the first time in the biomechanics of fish vertebral columns, we simultaneously characterized non-linear elasticity and viscosity throughout the bending oscillation, extending recently proposed techniques for large-amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) characterization to large-amplitude oscillatory bending (LAOB). The vertebral column segments behave as non-linear viscoelastic springs. Elastic properties dominate for all frequencies and curvatures tested, increasing as either variable increases. Non-linearities within a bending cycle are most in evidence at the highest frequency, 2.0 Hz, and curvature, 5 m(-1) Viscous bending properties are greatest at low frequencies and high curvatures, with non-linear effects occurring at all frequencies and curvatures. The range of mechanical behaviors includes that of springs and brakes, with smooth transitions between them that allow for continuously variable power transmission by the vertebral column to assist in the mechanics of undulatory propulsion.

  5. Few-body problems

    CERN Document Server

    Hadjimichael, E

    1986-01-01

    This volume consists of two review articles. E Hadjimichael's contribution, 'The Nuclear Three-Body Systems', concentrates on recent experimental and theoretical progress achieved in the field. Together with a pedagogical survey of the theoretical framework extensive discussion on the 3N system in the continuum and reactions of electromagnetic probes with 3N systems are provided. 'Four-Nucleon Transfer Reactions' by W Oelert reviews many aspects of a-particle transfer studies. A careful and balanced presentation of both theory and experiment is given. Reasonable agreement between the two is ob

  6. hnRNPs H, H' and F behave differently with respect to posttranslational cleavage and subcellular localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Vorum, H; Baandrup, U

    1999-01-01

    cytoplasmic localization in other cells. The different fates may reflect differences in functional roles that so far only have included nuclear functions. The presence of significant quantities of hnRNP F in the cytoplasm of many cells indicates that it also may have a functional role here. Udgivelsesdato...

  7. Nuclear Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contents: V Dinucleons, published in The Physical Review , v93 n4 p908-909, 15 Feb 1954; Concentration of a Cyclotron Beam by Strong Focusing Lenses...published in The Review of Scientific Instruments, v25 n4 p365-367, Apr 1954; and Photon Splitting in a Nuclear Electrostatic Field, published in The Physical Review , v94 n2 p367-368, 15 Apr 1954.

  8. Nucleolar ultrastructure in bovine nuclear transfer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaňka, Jiří; Smith, Steven Dale; Soloy, Eva

    1999-01-01

    (nonactivated) or S phase (activated) cytoplasts. Control embryos were fixed at the two-, four-, early eight- and late eight-cell stages; nuclear transfer embryos were fixed at 1 and 3 hr post fusion and at the two-, four-, and eight-cell stages. Control embryos possessed a nucleolar precursor body throughout...... at 1 hr after fusion and, by 3 hr after fusion, it was restored again. At this time, the reticulated fibrillo-granular nucleolus had an almost round shape. The nucleolar precursor body seen in the two-cell stage nuclear transfer embryos consisted of intermingled filamentous components and secondary...... time intervals after fusion. In the two-cell stage nuclear transfer embryo, the originally reticulated nucleolus of the donor blastomere had changed into a typical nucleolar precursor body consisting of a homogeneous fibrillar structure. A primary vacuole appeared in the four-cell stage nuclear...

  9. Nucleolar ultrastructure in bovine nuclear transfer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaňka, Jiří; Smith, Steven Dale; Soloy, Eva

    1999-01-01

    (nonactivated) or S phase (activated) cytoplasts. Control embryos were fixed at the two-, four-, early eight- and late eight-cell stages; nuclear transfer embryos were fixed at 1 and 3 hr post fusion and at the two-, four-, and eight-cell stages. Control embryos possessed a nucleolar precursor body throughout...... at 1 hr after fusion and, by 3 hr after fusion, it was restored again. At this time, the reticulated fibrillo-granular nucleolus had an almost round shape. The nucleolar precursor body seen in the two-cell stage nuclear transfer embryos consisted of intermingled filamentous components and secondary...... time intervals after fusion. In the two-cell stage nuclear transfer embryo, the originally reticulated nucleolus of the donor blastomere had changed into a typical nucleolar precursor body consisting of a homogeneous fibrillar structure. A primary vacuole appeared in the four-cell stage nuclear...

  10. Body Piercing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most common body piercing. Other common places to pierce include the eyebrow, nose, tongue, lip, belly button, nipples, and genitals. Some people also pierce their ear cartilage (the hard part of the ...

  11. BODY CONDITION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Andrew Taylor

    seasonal variation that could be used in management decisions. ... To assess muscle and fat content, the leg was completely separated into meat, bone, ..... The seasonal variation in body condition of mountain reedbuck can be explained by ...

  12. Nuclear Waffles

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, A S; Briggs, C M; Caplan, M E; Horowitz, C J

    2014-01-01

    The dense neutron-rich matter found in supernovae and neutron stars is expected to form complex nonuniform phases referred to as nuclear pasta. The pasta shapes depend on density, temperature and proton fraction and determine many transport properties in supernovae and neutron star crusts. We use two recently developed hybrid CPU/GPU codes to perform large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with $51200$ and $409600$ nucleons of nuclear pasta. From the output of the MD simulations we characterize the topology and compute two observables, the radial distribution function $g(r)$ and the structure factor $S(q)$, for systems with proton fractions $Y_p=0.10, 0.20, 0.30$ and $0.40$ at about one third of nuclear saturation density and temperatures near $1.0$ MeV. We observe that the two lowest proton fraction systems simulated, $Y_p=0.10$ and $0.20$, equilibrate quickly and form liquid-like structures. Meanwhile, the two higher proton fraction systems, $Y_p=0.30$ and $0.40$, take a longer time to equilibrate a...

  13. The Nuclear Born Oppenheimer Method and Nuclear Rotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettili, Nouredine

    2008-10-01

    In this presentation, we want to discuss how to apply the Nuclear Born Oppenheimer (NBO) formalism to the description of nuclear rotations. This application will be illustrated on nuclei that are axially-symmetric and even (but non-closed shell). We will focus, in particular, on the derivation of expressions for the energy and for the moment of inertia. In addition, we will examine the connection of the NBO method with the self-consistent cranking model. We will compare the moment of inertia generated by the NBO method with the Thouless-Valantin formula and hence establish a connection between the NBO method and the large body of experimental data.

  14. Body Language

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王芳

    2008-01-01

    @@ For Teachers: The Wordless Language Spoken by Everyone by Pamela Osment An old saying goes:"Actions speak louder than words."That's true according to communication experts.Some studies show that up to 90 percent of communication is nonverbal.Though you might say one thing,your body movements may indicate something entirely different.This nonverbal way of communicating is called body language.The Universal(通用的)Language

  15. A study on the nuclear foreign policy analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Keun Bae; Choi, Y. M.; Lee, D. J.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, B. W.; Cho, I. H.; Ko, H. S.

    1996-12-01

    This study aims to analyses recent trends of international situation relating to nuclear non-proliferation and the adverse conditions in Korea`s pursuing self-support of such technology, so that it may map out effective strategies for the promotion of nuclear energy. This study analyses developments of international nuclear non-proliferation regime, which plays a main role in preventing the international proliferation of nuclear weapons. This study includes NPT, IAEA safeguards system, international export control regimes, CTBT, and NWFZs as the subjects of analysis. Second theme is international organizations concerning nuclear activities. This study mainly analyses IAEA activities which pursues the promotion of peaceful use of nuclear energy and nuclear non-proliferation simultaneously as a pivotal body of international nuclear cooperation. Third focus of this study is Northeast Asian circumstances pertaining to nuclear non-proliferation. The study looks into the DPRK nuclear issues, and reviews the developments of the proposed regional body for nuclear cooperation and the discussion on the Northeast Asian NWFZ. Fourth, but the most influential to Korean nuclear activities, is the U. S. nuclear policy, since U. S. takes the overwhelming initiative in the field of international nuclear non-proliferation. Therefore, this study gives much weight in analyzing the structure, procedures, recent trend, and pending issues of U. S. nuclear policy. (author). 78 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs.

  16. A study on the nuclear foreign policy analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Keun Bae; Choi, Y. M.; Lee, D. J.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, B. W.; Cho, I. H.; Ko, H. S.

    1996-12-01

    This study aims to analyses recent trends of international situation relating to nuclear non-proliferation and the adverse conditions in Korea`s pursuing self-support of such technology, so that it may map out effective strategies for the promotion of nuclear energy. This study analyses developments of international nuclear non-proliferation regime, which plays a main role in preventing the international proliferation of nuclear weapons. This study includes NPT, IAEA safeguards system, international export control regimes, CTBT, and NWFZs as the subjects of analysis. Second theme is international organizations concerning nuclear activities. This study mainly analyses IAEA activities which pursues the promotion of peaceful use of nuclear energy and nuclear non-proliferation simultaneously as a pivotal body of international nuclear cooperation. Third focus of this study is Northeast Asian circumstances pertaining to nuclear non-proliferation. The study looks into the DPRK nuclear issues, and reviews the developments of the proposed regional body for nuclear cooperation and the discussion on the Northeast Asian NWFZ. Fourth, but the most influential to Korean nuclear activities, is the U. S. nuclear policy, since U. S. takes the overwhelming initiative in the field of international nuclear non-proliferation. Therefore, this study gives much weight in analyzing the structure, procedures, recent trend, and pending issues of U. S. nuclear policy. (author). 78 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs.

  17. Nuclear Waste Management, Nuclear Power, and Energy Choices Public Preferences, Perceptions, and Trust

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Hundreds of studies have investigated public perceptions and preferences about nuclear power, waste management, and technology. However there is clear lack of uniformity in the style, aims and methods applied.  Consequently, the body of results is inconsistent and it is difficult to isolate relevant patterns or interpretations. Nuclear Waste Management, Nuclear Power and Energy Choices: Public Preferences, Perceptions and Trust presents a theoretical base for public reactions then classifies and reviews the large body of surveys carried out over the past decade.   Particular focus is placed on residents within 50 miles US nuclear waste facilities due to the disproportionate presence of nuclear factors in their lives such as the legacy of nuclear waste disposal and job dependency. The motivations and reasons for their views such as fear, attraction to the economic benefits, trust of site managers and federal agencies, cultural views, personal history, and demographic attributes of the people are also conside...

  18. Nuclear photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habs, D.; Günther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    With the planned new γ-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 1013 γ/s and a band width of ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-3, a new era of γ beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIγS facility at Duke University (USA) with 108 γ/s and ΔEγ/Eγ≈3ṡ10-2. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for γ beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused γ beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the γ beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for γ beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for γ beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the γ-beam facility, the γ-beam optics and γ detectors. We can trade γ intensity for band width, going down to ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-6 and address individual nuclear levels. The term "nuclear photonics" stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with γ-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, γ beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to μm resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  19. Comparison the relationship between the levels of insulin resistance, hs-CRP, percentage of body fat and serum osteoprotegerin/receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand in prediabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgir, Oktay; Yavuz, Mehmet; Bilgir, Ferda; Akan, Ozden Y; Bayindir, Aslı G; Calan, Mehmet; Bozkaya, Giray; Yuksel, Arif

    2017-01-31

    BACKGROUND Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPN) are soluble members of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. Growing evidence suggest that there is link between inflammation, insulin resistance and OPG, sRANKL. We aimed to ascertain whether OPG and sRANKL levels are altered in prediabetic subjects and there is association between OPG, sRANKL and metabolic parameters.

  20. Zolpidem reduces hippocampal neuronal activity in freely behaving mice: a large scale calcium imaging study with miniaturized fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdyyeva, Tamara; Otte, Stephani; Aluisio, Leah; Ziv, Yaniv; Burns, Laurie D; Dugovic, Christine; Yun, Sujin; Ghosh, Kunal K; Schnitzer, Mark J; Lovenberg, Timothy; Bonaventure, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic drugs for cognitive and psychiatric disorders are often characterized by their molecular mechanism of action. Here we demonstrate a new approach to elucidate drug action on large-scale neuronal activity by tracking somatic calcium dynamics in hundreds of CA1 hippocampal neurons of pharmacologically manipulated behaving mice. We used an adeno-associated viral vector to express the calcium sensor GCaMP3 in CA1 pyramidal cells under control of the CaMKII promoter and a miniaturized microscope to observe cellular dynamics. We visualized these dynamics with and without a systemic administration of Zolpidem, a GABAA agonist that is the most commonly prescribed drug for the treatment of insomnia in the United States. Despite growing concerns about the potential adverse effects of Zolpidem on memory and cognition, it remained unclear whether Zolpidem alters neuronal activity in the hippocampus, a brain area critical for cognition and memory. Zolpidem, when delivered at a dose known to induce and prolong sleep, strongly suppressed CA1 calcium signaling. The rate of calcium transients after Zolpidem administration was significantly lower compared to vehicle treatment. To factor out the contribution of changes in locomotor or physiological conditions following Zolpidem treatment, we compared the cellular activity across comparable epochs matched by locomotor and physiological assessments. This analysis revealed significantly depressive effects of Zolpidem regardless of the animal's state. Individual hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells differed in their responses to Zolpidem with the majority (∼ 65%) significantly decreasing the rate of calcium transients, and a small subset (3%) showing an unexpected and significant increase. By linking molecular mechanisms with the dynamics of neural circuitry and behavioral states, this approach has the potential to contribute substantially to the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of CNS disorders.

  1. Adenosine A(2A) receptor modulation of hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapse plasticity during associative learning in behaving mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontinha, Bruno M; Delgado-García, José M; Madroñal, Noelia; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M; Gruart, Agnès

    2009-06-01

    Previous in vitro studies have characterized the electrophysiological and molecular signaling pathways of adenosine tonic modulation on long-lasting synaptic plasticity events, particularly for hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). However, it remains to be elucidated whether the long-term changes produced by endogenous adenosine in the efficiency of synapses are related to those required for learning and memory formation. Our goal was to understand how endogenous activation of adenosine excitatory A(2A) receptors modulates the associative learning evolution in conscious behaving mice. We have studied here the effects of the application of a highly selective A(2A) receptor antagonist, SCH58261, upon a well-known associative learning paradigm-classical eyeblink conditioning. We used a trace paradigm, with a tone as the conditioned stimulus (CS) and an electric shock presented to the supraorbital nerve as the unconditioned stimulus (US). A single electrical pulse was presented to the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway to evoke field EPSPs (fEPSPs) in the pyramidal CA1 area during the CS-US interval. In vehicle-injected animals, there was a progressive increase in the percentage of conditioning responses (CRs) and in the slope of fEPSPs through conditioning sessions, an effect that was completely prevented (and lost) in SCH58261 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) -injected animals. Moreover, experimentally evoked LTP was impaired in SCH58261-injected mice. In conclusion, the endogenous activation of adenosine A(2A) receptors plays a pivotal effect on the associative learning process and its relevant hippocampal circuits, including activity-dependent changes at the CA3-CA1 synapse.

  2. Feedback controlled piezo-motor microdrive for accurate electrode positioning in chronic single unit recording in behaving mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sungwook; Cho, Jeiwon; Lee, Semin; Park, Kitae; Kim, Jinseok; Huh, Yeowool; Yoon, Eui-Sung; Shin, Hee-Sup

    2011-02-15

    The microdrive is one of the most essential tools for extracellular, single-unit recordings in freely behaving animals to detect and isolate the single-unit activities from brain regions of interest. Due to the increasing number of neuroscience research projects using genetically engineered mice, the demand for effective recording devices in freely moving mice is also increasing. Although manually and automatically operated microdrive devices are available, they are limited in terms of size, weight, accuracy, manipulability, and convenience for single-unit recording in mice. The present study proposed a novel microdrive that employs a small, lightweight piezo-motor and a magnetoresistive (MR) sensor with a closed-loop position feedback control system. The total weight of the device is 1.82 g, which is perfectly suitable for application to mice. Most importantly, the proposed microdrive is capable of monitoring and adjusting electrode movement on-line by integrating a closed-loop feedback control system, which enhances the accuracy of micro-advancement of the electrode by utilizing position feedback. The performance of this newly developed microdrive was extensively evaluated for both mechanical and physiological concerns at both free-loading and various-loading conditions, including agarose gel matrix and then the hippocampus and thalamus of mice. In summary, this proposed microdrive can enhance the quality of recording single unit activities in freely moving mice in terms of the size and weight of the device, the convenience and accuracy of manipulation, and, most of all, in isolating single neurons and recording stability by providing accurate positioning of an electrode.

  3. Zolpidem reduces hippocampal neuronal activity in freely behaving mice: a large scale calcium imaging study with miniaturized fluorescence microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Berdyyeva

    Full Text Available Therapeutic drugs for cognitive and psychiatric disorders are often characterized by their molecular mechanism of action. Here we demonstrate a new approach to elucidate drug action on large-scale neuronal activity by tracking somatic calcium dynamics in hundreds of CA1 hippocampal neurons of pharmacologically manipulated behaving mice. We used an adeno-associated viral vector to express the calcium sensor GCaMP3 in CA1 pyramidal cells under control of the CaMKII promoter and a miniaturized microscope to observe cellular dynamics. We visualized these dynamics with and without a systemic administration of Zolpidem, a GABAA agonist that is the most commonly prescribed drug for the treatment of insomnia in the United States. Despite growing concerns about the potential adverse effects of Zolpidem on memory and cognition, it remained unclear whether Zolpidem alters neuronal activity in the hippocampus, a brain area critical for cognition and memory. Zolpidem, when delivered at a dose known to induce and prolong sleep, strongly suppressed CA1 calcium signaling. The rate of calcium transients after Zolpidem administration was significantly lower compared to vehicle treatment. To factor out the contribution of changes in locomotor or physiological conditions following Zolpidem treatment, we compared the cellular activity across comparable epochs matched by locomotor and physiological assessments. This analysis revealed significantly depressive effects of Zolpidem regardless of the animal's state. Individual hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells differed in their responses to Zolpidem with the majority (∼ 65% significantly decreasing the rate of calcium transients, and a small subset (3% showing an unexpected and significant increase. By linking molecular mechanisms with the dynamics of neural circuitry and behavioral states, this approach has the potential to contribute substantially to the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of CNS disorders.

  4. Head and cervical spine posture in behaving rats: implications for modeling human conditions involving the head and cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, C; Choong, W Y; Teh, W; Buxton, A J; Bolton, P S

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to define the temporal and spatial (postural) characteristics of the head and cervical vertebral column (spine) of behaving rats in order to better understand their suitability as a model to study human conditions involving the head and neck. Time spent in each of four behavioral postures was determined from video tape recordings of rats (n = 10) in the absence and presence of an intruder rat. Plain film radiographic examination of a subset of these rats (n = 5) in each of these postures allowed measurement of head and cervical vertebral column positions adopted by the rats. When single they were quadruped or crouched most (∼80%) of the time and bipedal either supported or free standing for only ∼10% of the time. The introduction of an intruder significantly (P cervical spine was orientated (median, 25-75 percentile) near vertical (18.8°, 4.2°-30.9°) when quadruped, crouched (15.4°, 7.6°-69.3°) and bipedal supported (10.5°, 4.8°-22.6°) but tended to be less vertical oriented when bipedal free standing (25.9°, 7.7°-39.3°). The range of head positions relative to the cervical spine was largest when crouched (73.4°) and smallest when erect free standing (17.7°). This study indicates that, like humans, rats have near vertical orientated cervical vertebral columns but, in contrast to humans, they displace their head in space by movements at both the cervico-thoracic junction and the cranio-cervical regions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  6. Learning-Dependent Potentiation in the Vibrissal Motor Cortex Is Closely Related to the Acquisition of Conditioned Whisker Responses in Behaving Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Garcia, Jose Maria; Troncoso, Julieta; Munera, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    The role of the primary motor cortex in the acquisition of new motor skills was evaluated during classical conditioning of vibrissal protraction responses in behaving mice, using a trace paradigm. Conditioned stimulus (CS) presentation elicited a characteristic field potential in the vibrissal motor cortex, which was dependent on the synchronized…

  7. Learning-Dependent Potentiation in the Vibrissal Motor Cortex Is Closely Related to the Acquisition of Conditioned Whisker Responses in Behaving Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Garcia, Jose Maria; Troncoso, Julieta; Munera, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    The role of the primary motor cortex in the acquisition of new motor skills was evaluated during classical conditioning of vibrissal protraction responses in behaving mice, using a trace paradigm. Conditioned stimulus (CS) presentation elicited a characteristic field potential in the vibrissal motor cortex, which was dependent on the synchronized…

  8. Nuclear tele medicine; Telemedicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, L.; Hernandez, F.; Fernandez, R. [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Imagenologia Diagnostica, Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The great majority of the digital images of nuclear medicine are susceptible of being sent through internet. This has allowed that the work in diagnosis cabinets by image it can benefit of this modern technology. We have presented in previous congresses works related with tele medicine, however, due to the speed in the evolution of the computer programs and the internet, becomes necessary to make a current position in this modality of work. (Author)

  9. A study on the nuclear foreign policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Keun Bae; Choi, Y. M.; Lee, D. J.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, B. W.; Ko, H. S

    1997-12-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze and foresee the international trends related to nuclear activities, especially nuclear non-proliferation activities among others, and to suggest desirable policy direction so as to mitigate hurdles that may hinder the expansion of utilization and development of nuclear energy in Korea. This study approaches the trends of international nuclear arena in five aspects as follows. First, this study analyzes the trends of the global multilateral nuclear non-proliferation regime in Chapter II, which includes the NPT, the IAEA safeguards system, the international export control regime, the CTBT, and the treaties on nuclear weapon-free zone. Second, this study analyzes the trends of various international nuclear organizations in Chapter III, which include IAEA, OECD/NEA, and CTBTO. Third, this study reviews and analyzes regional situations in the northeast Asia surrounding Korea in Chapter IV, inter alia, pending concerns over the North Korean nuclear activities and proposed Northeast Asian nuclear cooperatively bodies such as ASIATOM, etc. Fourth, in Chapter V, this study analyzes issues concerning bilateral nuclear relationship. Especially this study analyzes nuclear cooperating agreements in general, and suggests a model agreement for the government to use when negotiating nuclear cooperation agreements with other countries. Furthermore, this study analyzes the trends of bilateral cooperation with the U.S., Canada, and Australia focusing on the standing bilateral nuclear committees. Fifth, Chapter VI especially deals with the framework of the U. S.`s nuclear non-proliferation policy, focusing on the issues such as the disposition of weapons-usable excess plutonium and the nuclear cooperation with China. (author). 44 refs., 15 tabs., 2 figs.

  10. The nuclear arsenals and nuclear disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaby, F

    1998-01-01

    Current world stockpiles of nuclear weapons and the status of treaties for nuclear disarmament and the ultimate elimination of nuclear weapons are summarised. The need for including stockpiles of civil plutonium in a programme for ending production and disposing of fissile materials is emphasized, and the ultimate difficulty of disposing of the last few nuclear weapons discussed.

  11. Spermatozoa-like cell invaders (nuclear vlimata) in human neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logothetou-Rella, H

    1993-07-01

    Spermatozoa-like cells (nuclear vlimata) have been identified in malignant cell cultures and embryonic cells, also common in the cytology and histology of all types of human neoplasia even after chemotherapy. A new mechanism of invasion of malignant cells has been described, according to which neoplastic cells behave and function as parasites using host-cells to divide, survive and eventually produce nuclear vlimata (bullets). Nuclear vlimata are the end cell products of incomplete, unequal, assymetrical division of neoplastic cells. The nuclear vlima exhibits similar morphology to spermatozoa and virus (head with, or without, tail) and invades the cytoplasm and/or nucleus of surrounding host-cells by a similar mechanism to sperm-oocyte interaction (fertilization) or viral cell infection, in the events of nuclear vlima-->tumor-->nuclear vlima-->tumor. The nuclear vlima head contains and transfers DNA, and when incorporated into the host-nucleus is indistinguishable from nucleoli and when in the cytoplasm is similar to sperm pronucleus, observed after sperm penetration of the oocyte. Function of nuclear vlimata is directly dependent on the specific extracellular matrix produced by malignant cells, consisting of glycosaminoglycans-protease-membranes. This mechanism of invasion constitutes the link of all scientific information concerning human neoplasia.

  12. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-02-01

    One of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, quantum chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three-nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between LQCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from LQCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  13. Nuclear energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandin, Karl; Jagers, Peter; Kullander, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy can play a role in carbon free production of electrical energy, thus making it interesting for tomorrow's energy mix. However, several issues have to be addressed. In fission technology, the design of so-called fourth generation reactors show great promise, in particular in addressing materials efficiency and safety issues. If successfully developed, such reactors may have an important and sustainable part in future energy production. Working fusion reactors may be even more materials efficient and environmental friendly, but also need more development and research. The roadmap for development of fourth generation fission and fusion reactors, therefore, asks for attention and research in these fields must be strengthened.

  14. Body Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The high-tech art of digital signal processing (DSP) was pioneered at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the mid-1960s for use in the Apollo Lunar Landing Program. Designed to computer enhance pictures of the Moon, this technology became the basis for the Landsat Earth resources satellites and subsequently has been incorporated into a broad range of Earthbound medical and diagnostic tools. DSP is employed in advanced body imaging techniques including Computer-Aided Tomography, also known as CT and CATScan, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). CT images are collected by irradiating a thin slice of the body with a fan-shaped x-ray beam from a number of directions around the body's perimeter. A tomographic (slice-like) picture is reconstructed from these multiple views by a computer. MRI employs a magnetic field and radio waves, rather than x-rays, to create images.

  15. Signifying Bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

     In our everyday lives we strive to stay healthy and happy, while we live as our selves, engage with each other, and discover an infinite world of possibilities. Health arises and diminishes as human beings draw on a vibrant ecology of actions, interactions and coactions. Intricate processes...... of biosemiosis connect signifying bodies with their natural surroundings, cultural activities and subjective experiences. Health stretches all the way from the ecosocial surroundings, through the skin and into the self-organizing processes of every living cell. Signifying Bodies lays out a new approach to health...... and health care. Eschewing all forms of dualism, the authors emphasise the interdependency of how we act, think, feel and function. They advocate a relational turn in health care, in which bodies live and learn from suffering and care. In this view, health is inseparable from both living beings...

  16. The UAE. Lessons learned from a new nuclear regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraev, Kamen [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is building four South Korean APR-1400 reactors at the Barakah nuclear site. The first is scheduled to enter into commercial operation in 2017. Christer Viktorsson, Director General of the United Arabic Emirate's(UAE) Federal Office for Nuclear Regulation, talks to NucNet about the challenges of establishing a nuclear regulatory body from scratch in a country where nuclear stations have never been built before.

  17. Theoretical descriptions of compound-nuclear reactions: open problems & challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, Brett V; Hussein, Mahir S

    2014-01-01

    Compound-nuclear processes play an important role for nuclear physics applications and are crucial for our understanding of the nuclear many-body problem. Despite intensive interest in this area, some of the available theoretical developments have not yet been fully tested and implemented. We revisit the general theory of compound-nuclear reactions, discuss descriptions of pre-equilibrium reactions, and consider extensions that are needed in order to get cross section information from indirect measurements.

  18. Nuclear forces and ab initio calculations of atomic nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear forces and the nuclear many-body problem have been some of Gerry Brown's main topics in his so productive life as a theoretical physicist. In this talk, I outline how Gerry's work laid the foundations of the modern theory of nuclear forces and ab initio calculations of atomic nuclei. I also present some recent developments obtained in the framework of nuclear lattice simulations.

  19. The evolution of whole-body imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Deirdre E

    2012-02-01

    This article reviews the evolution of whole-body imaging, discussing the history and development of radiography, nuclear medicine, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), combined PET-CT, and magnetic resonance imaging. The obstacles hindering progress toward whole-body imaging using each of these modalities, and the technical advances that were developed to overcome them, are reviewed. The effectiveness and the limitations of whole-body imaging with each of these techniques are also briefly discussed.

  20. Body Rainbow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Phubu did not know how long hehad walked after leaving Baxoi, buthe did know that he was halfwaybetween home and Lhasa. Feelingthe weight of the sack containingPhumo's body on his back, Fhubuhad calmed down from the grief anddesperation. He had just one wish:to carry Phumo to Lhasa. He knewthat Phumo had gone, and her soulwas no longer in this body. But hewas determined to finish the trip, notonly because he had promised so, butalso that he believed that it would beredemption for him.

  1. Body parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayiter, Elif

    2010-01-01

    In this project, the artist wishes to examine corporeality in the virtual realm, through the usage of the (non)-physical body of the avatar. An art installation created in the virtual world of Second Life, which is meant to be accessed with site specific avatars, will provide the creative platform whereby this investigation is undertaken. Thus, "body parts" seeks to challenge the residents of virtual environments into connecting with the virtual manifestations, i.e., avatars of others in an emotionally expressive/intimate manner.

  2. Chiral nucleon-nucleon forces in nuclear structure calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coraggio L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Realistic nuclear potentials, derived within chiral perturbation theory, are a major breakthrough in modern nuclear structure theory, since they provide a direct link between nuclear physics and its underlying theory, namely the QCD. As a matter of fact, chiral potentials are tailored on the low-energy regime of nuclear structure physics, and chiral perturbation theory provides on the same footing two-nucleon forces as well as many-body ones. This feature fits well with modern advances in ab-initio methods and realistic shell-model. Here, we will review recent nuclear structure calculations, based on realistic chiral potentials, for both finite nuclei and infinite nuclear matter.

  3. Chiral nucleon-nucleon forces in nuclear structure calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Coraggio, L; Holt, J W; Itaco, N; Machleidt, R; Marcucci, L E; Sammarruca, F

    2016-01-01

    Realistic nuclear potentials, derived within chiral perturbation theory, are a major breakthrough in modern nuclear structure theory, since they provide a direct link between nuclear physics and its underlying theory, namely the QCD. As a matter of fact, chiral potentials are tailored on the low-energy regime of nuclear structure physics, and chiral perturbation theory provides on the same footing two-nucleon forces as well as many-body ones. This feature fits well with modern advances in ab-initio methods and realistic shell-model. Here, we will review recent nuclear structure calculations, based on realistic chiral potentials, for both finite nuclei and infinite nuclear matter.

  4. Large-Scale Self-Consistent Nuclear Mass Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Stoitsov, M V; Dobaczewski, J; Nazarewicz, W

    2006-01-01

    The program of systematic large-scale self-consistent nuclear mass calculations that is based on the nuclear density functional theory represents a rich scientific agenda that is closely aligned with the main research directions in modern nuclear structure and astrophysics, especially the radioactive nuclear beam physics. The quest for the microscopic understanding of the phenomenon of nuclear binding represents, in fact, a number of fundamental and crucial questions of the quantum many-body problem, including the proper treatment of correlations and dynamics in the presence of symmetry breaking. Recent advances and open problems in the field of nuclear mass calculations are presented and discussed.

  5. Equilibration within a semiclassical off-shell transport approach 24.10.Cn; 24.10.-i; 25.70.-z; Many-body theory; Nuclear-reaction models and methods; Low and intermediate energy heavy-ion reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cassing, W

    2000-01-01

    Equilibration times for nuclear matter configurations -- modelling intermediate and high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions -- are evaluated within the semiclassical off-shell transport approach developed recently. The transport equations are solved for a finite box in coordinate space employing periodic boundary conditions. The off-shell transport model is shown to give proper off-shell equilibrium distributions in the limit t-> infinity for the nucleon and DELTA-resonance spectral functions. We find that equilibration times within the off-shell approach are only slightly enhanced as compared to the on-shell limit for the momentum configurations considered.

  6. Applications of nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A. C.

    2017-02-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.

  7. The Babee’s Book, or a « lytyl reporte » of how young people should behave (1475

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Thomas

    2008-08-01

    , meanings, social standards in society. Its intention is to shape man, to transform him so that his body will become the result of a social moulding. Eventually, it is about orienting individual behaviow in society, about teaching him good manners by inculcating « savoir-vivre ». The Babee’s Book, an Anglo-Norman manual on education and courtesy released in the 15th Century for young English noblemen, provides a good example of what is expected of a page, of how to behave in society of behaviow, to which are added moral precepts inspired, among others, by Caton. This treatise on good manners insists on table manners, an important moment in medieval sociability, but it also gives moral advice, new codes of behaviow, new rules on life in society related to how to be and appear.

  8. Nuclear Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Habs, D; Jentschel, M; Thirolf, P G

    2012-01-01

    With new gamma-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest with 10^13 g/s and a bandwidth of Delta E_g/E_g ~10^-3, a new era of g-beams with energies <=20 MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIGS facility (Duke Univ., USA) with 10^8 g/s and Delta E_g/E_g~0.03. Even a seeded quantum FEL for g-beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused g-beams. We describe a new experiment at the g-beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for g-beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for g-beams are being developed. Thus we have to optimize the system of the g-beam facility, the g-beam optics and g-detectors. We can trade g-intensity for band width, going down to Delta E_g/E_g ~ 10^-6 and address individual nuclear levels. 'Nuclear pho...

  9. Diadenosine Homodinucleotide Products of ADP-ribosyl Cyclases Behave as Modulators of the Purinergic Receptor P2X7*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzone, Santina; Basile, Giovanna; Chothi, Madhu Parakkottil; Nobbio, Lucilla; Usai, Cesare; Jacchetti, Emanuela; Schenone, Angelo; Guse, Andreas H.; Di Virgilio, Francesco; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2010-01-01

    ADP-ribosyl cyclases from both vertebrates and invertebrates were previously shown to produce two isomers of P1,P2 diadenosine 5′,5′"-P1, P2-diphosphate, P18 and P24, from cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) and adenine. P18 and P24 are characterized by an unusual N-glycosidic linkage in one of the adenylic mononucleotides (Basile, G., Taglialatela-Scafati, O., Damonte, G., Armirotti, A., Bruzzone, S., Guida, L., Franco, L., Usai, C., Fattorusso, E., De Flora, A., and Zocchi, E. (2005) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 102, 14509–14514). P24, but not P18, proved to increase the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in HeLa cells and to negatively affect mitochondrial function. Here we show that micromolar P24, but not P18, triggers a slow and sustained influx of extracellular Ca2+ through the opening of the purinergic receptor/channel P2X7. On the other hand, P18 inhibits the Ca2+ influx induced by 0.6 mm ATP in HEK293 cells stably transfected with P2X7, with an IC50 of ∼1 μm. Thus, P18 is devoid of intrinsic P2X7 stimulatory activity and behaves as an ATP antagonist. A P2X7-mediated increase of the basal [Ca2+]i has been demonstrated to negatively affect Schwann cell (SC) function in rats with the inherited, peripheral neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A) (Nobbio, L., Sturla, L., Fiorese, F., Usai, C., Basile, G., Moreschi, I., Benvenuto, F., Zocchi, E., De Flora, A., Schenone, A., and Bruzzone S. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 23146–23158). Preincubation of CMT1A SC with 200 nm P18 restored the basal [Ca2+]i to values similar to those recorded in wild-type SC. These results identify P18 as a new P2X7 antagonist, potentially useful in the treatment of CMT1A. PMID:20439466

  10. Effects on serotonin of (-)nicotine and dimethylphenylpiperazinium in the dorsal raphe and nucleus accumbens of freely behaving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Z; Strecker, R E; McKenna, J T; Thakkar, M M; McCarley, R W; Tao, R

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neurochemical mechanism underlying the effect of nicotine and dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release in the dorsal raphe nucleus and nucleus accumbens of freely behaving rats. For comparison, lobeline, cytisine and RJR-2403 were also investigated. It was found that all drugs, when infused locally, evoked an increase of 5-HT in the dorsal raphe nucleus. However, the magnitudes of the 5-HT increase were comparatively different between the drugs in the ranking of their potency: DMPP>RJR 2403>nicotine>lobeline>cytisine. Both methyllycaconitine, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist and methyllycaconitine, a selective alpha7-containing nAChR antagonist blocked the effects of nicotine and DMPP, suggesting that alpha7 subunit mediated the increases in 5-HT. However, DMPP was reported to increase 5-HT using non-nAChR mechanism [Lendvai B, Sershen H, Lajtha A, Santha E, Baranyi M, Vizi ES (1996) Differential mechanisms involved in the effect of nicotinic agonists DMPP and lobeline to release [3H]5-HT from rat hippocampal slices. Neuropharmacology 35:1769-1777]. To test if 5-HT carriers were involved, a selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor citalopram (1 microM) was infused into the dorsal raphe nucleus before administration of nicotine or DMPP. As a result, citalopram significantly blocked the effect of DMPP, whereas it had no influence on nicotine. Finally, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) was used to test whether the increases in 5-HT were depolarization-dependent. Administration of 8-OH-DPAT (0.1 mg/kg, s.c.) produced significant decreases in 5-HT in the animals treated with nicotine. In contrast, the effect of DMPP was not altered by 8-OH-DPAT, suggesting that the increases in 5-HT were independent of cell membrane depolarization. In conclusion, there are different mechanisms involved in nicotine- and DMPP-evoked increases in 5-HT. This

  11. Diadenosine homodinucleotide products of ADP-ribosyl cyclases behave as modulators of the purinergic receptor P2X7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzone, Santina; Basile, Giovanna; Chothi, Madhu Parakkottil; Nobbio, Lucilla; Usai, Cesare; Jacchetti, Emanuela; Schenone, Angelo; Guse, Andreas H; Di Virgilio, Francesco; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2010-07-02

    ADP-ribosyl cyclases from both vertebrates and invertebrates were previously shown to produce two isomers of P1,P2 diadenosine 5',5'"-P1, P2-diphosphate, P18 and P24, from cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) and adenine. P18 and P24 are characterized by an unusual N-glycosidic linkage in one of the adenylic mononucleotides (Basile, G., Taglialatela-Scafati, O., Damonte, G., Armirotti, A., Bruzzone, S., Guida, L., Franco, L., Usai, C., Fattorusso, E., De Flora, A., and Zocchi, E. (2005) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 102, 14509-14514). P24, but not P18, proved to increase the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in HeLa cells and to negatively affect mitochondrial function. Here we show that micromolar P24, but not P18, triggers a slow and sustained influx of extracellular Ca(2+) through the opening of the purinergic receptor/channel P2X7. On the other hand, P18 inhibits the Ca(2+) influx induced by 0.6 mm ATP in HEK293 cells stably transfected with P2X7, with an IC(50) of approximately 1 mum. Thus, P18 is devoid of intrinsic P2X7 stimulatory activity and behaves as an ATP antagonist. A P2X7-mediated increase of the basal [Ca(2+)](i) has been demonstrated to negatively affect Schwann cell (SC) function in rats with the inherited, peripheral neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A) (Nobbio, L., Sturla, L., Fiorese, F., Usai, C., Basile, G., Moreschi, I., Benvenuto, F., Zocchi, E., De Flora, A., Schenone, A., and Bruzzone S. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 23146-23158). Preincubation of CMT1A SC with 200 nm P18 restored the basal [Ca(2+)](i) to values similar to those recorded in wild-type SC. These results identify P18 as a new P2X7 antagonist, potentially useful in the treatment of CMT1A.

  12. Who Donates Their Bodies to Science? The Combined Role of Gender and Migration Status Among California Whole-body Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Asad, Asad Lugman; Anteby, Michel James; Garip, Filiz

    2014-01-01

    The number of human cadavers available for medical research and training, as well as organ transplantation, is limited. Researchers disagree about how to increase the number of whole-body bequeathals, citing a shortage of donations from the one group perceived as most likely to donate from attitudinal survey data—educated white males over 65. This focus on survey data, however, suffers from two main limitations: First, it reveals little about individuals' actual registration or donation behav...

  13. Body Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, David E.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses how the use of body language in Chinese fiction strikes most Westerners as unusual, if not strange. Considers that, although this may be the result of differences in gestures or different conventions in fiction, it is a problem for translators, who handle the differences by various strategies, e.g., omission or expansion. (NKA)

  14. Dictionary of nuclear engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sube, R.

    1985-01-01

    Ralf Sube, an experienced compiler of three wellknown four-language reference works has now prepared this glossary of nuclear engineering terms in English, German, French and Russian. Based on the proven lexicography of the Technik-Worterbuch series, it comprises about 30,000 terms in each language covering the following: Nuclear and Atomic Physics; Nuclear Radiation and Isotopes; Nuclear Materials; Nuclear Facilties; Nuclear Power Industry; Nuclear Weapons.

  15. Evolution of Nuclear Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, David

    2008-01-01

    Two-body relaxation times of nuclear star clusters are short enough that gravitational encounters should substantially affect their structure in 10 Gyr or less. In nuclear star clusters without massive black holes, dynamical evolution is a competition between core collapse, which causes densities to increase, and heat input from the surrounding galaxy, which causes densities to decrease. The maximum extent of a nucleus that can resist expansion is derived numerically for a wide range of initial conditions; observed nuclei are shown to be compact enough to resist expansion, although there may have been an earlier generation of low-density nuclei that were dissolved. An evolutionary model for NGC 205 is presented which suggests that the nucleus of this galaxy has already undergone core collapse. Adding a massive black hole to a nucleus inhibits core collapse, and nuclear star clusters with black holes always expand, due primarily to heat input from the galaxy. The expansion rate is smaller for larger black hole...

  16. Capacitor-based detection of nuclear magnetization: nuclear quadrupole resonance of surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorovič, Alan; Apih, Tomaž; Kvasić, Ivan; Lužnik, Janko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko; Strle, Drago; Muševič, Igor

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate excitation and detection of nuclear magnetization in a nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) experiment with a parallel plate capacitor, where the sample is located between the two capacitor plates and not in a coil as usually. While the sensitivity of this capacitor-based detection is found lower compared to an optimal coil-based detection of the same amount of sample, it becomes comparable in the case of very thin samples and even advantageous in the proximity of conducting bodies. This capacitor-based setup may find its application in acquisition of NQR signals from the surface layers on conducting bodies or in a portable tightly integrated nuclear magnetic resonance sensor.

  17. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biberian, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    . Bloch ions / T. A. Chubb. II. Inhibited diffusion driven surface transmutations / T. A. Chubb. III. Bloch nuclides, Iwamura transmutations, and Oriani showers / T. A. Chubb. Bose-Einstein condensate. Theoretical study of nuclear reactions induced by Bose-Einstein condensation in Pd / K.-I. Tsuchiya and H. Okumura. Proposal for new experimental tests of the Bose-Einstein condensation mechanism for low-energy nuclear reaction and transmutation processes in deuterium loaded micro- and nano-scale cavities / Y. E. Kim ... [et al.]. Mixtures of charged bosons confined in harmonic traps and Bose-Einstein condensation mechanism for low-energy nuclear reactions and transmutation processes in condensed matters / Y. E. Kim and A. L. Zubarev. Alternative interpretation of low-energy nuclear reaction processes with deuterated metals based on the Bose-Einstein condensation mechanism / Y. E. Kim and T. O. Passell. Multi-body fusion. [symbol]He/[symbol]He production ratios by tetrahedral symmetric condensation / A. Takahashi. Phonon coupling. Phonon-exchange models: some new results / P. L. Hagelstein. Neutron clusters. Cold fusion phenomenon and solid state nuclear physics / H. Kozima. Neutrinos, magnetic monopoles. Neutrino-driven nuclear reactions of cold fusion and transmutation / V. Filimonov. Light monopoles theory: an overview of their effects in physics, chemistry, biology, and nuclear science (weak interactions) / G. Lochak. Electrons clusters and magnetic monopoles / M. Rambaut. Others. Effects of atomic electrons on nuclear stability and radioactive decay / D. V. Filippov, L. I. Urutskoev, and A. A. Rukhadze. Search for erzion nuclear catalysis chains from cosmic ray erzions stopping in organic scintillator / Yu. N. Bazhutov and E. V. Pletnikov. Low-energy nuclear reactions resulting as picometer interactions with similarity to K-shell electron capture / H. Hora ... [et al.] -- 5. Other topics. On the possible magnetic mechanism of shortening the runaway of RBMK-1000 reactor

  18. Progress of nuclear safety research. 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anoda, Yoshinari; Kudo, Tamotsu; Tobita, Tohru (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] (and others)

    2002-11-01

    JAERI is conducting nuclear safety research primarily at the Nuclear Safety Research Center in close cooperation with the related departments in accordance with the Long Term Plan for Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy and Annual Plan for Safety Research issued by the Japanese government. The fields of conducting safety research at JAERI are the engineering safety of nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and radioactive waste management as well as advanced technology for safety improvement or assessment. Also, JAERI has conducted international collaboration to share the information on common global issues of nuclear safety and to supplement own research. Moreover, when accidents occurred at nuclear facilities, JAERI has taken a responsible role by providing technical experts and investigation for assistance to the government or local public body. This report summarizes the nuclear safety research activities of JAERI from April 2000 through April 2002 and utilized facilities. This report also summarizes the examination of the ruptured pipe performed for assistance to the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) for investigation of the accident at the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Unit-1 on November, 2001. (author)

  19. Nuclear "waffles"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, A. S.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Horowitz, C. J.

    2014-11-01

    Background: The dense neutron-rich matter found in supernovae and inside neutron stars is expected to form complex nonuniform phases, often referred to as nuclear pasta. The pasta shapes depend on density, temperature and proton fraction and determine many transport properties in supernovae and neutron star crusts. Purpose: To characterize the topology and compute two observables, the radial distribution function (RDF) g (r ) and the structure factor S (q ) , for systems with proton fractions Yp=0.10 ,0.20 ,0.30 , and 0.40 at about one-third of nuclear saturation density, n =0.050 fm-3 , and temperatures near k T =1 MeV . Methods: We use two recently developed hybrid CPU/GPU codes to perform large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with 51 200 and 409 600 nucleons. From the output of the MD simulations we obtain the two desired observables. Results: We compute and discuss the differences in topology and observables for each simulation. We observe that the two lowest proton fraction systems simulated, Yp=0.10 and 0.20 , equilibrate quickly and form liquidlike structures. Meanwhile, the two higher proton fraction systems, Yp=0.30 and 0.40 , take a longer time to equilibrate and organize themselves in solidlike periodic structures. Furthermore, the Yp=0.40 system is made up of slabs, lasagna phase, interconnected by defects while the Yp=0.30 systems consist of a stack of perforated plates, the nuclear waffle phase. Conclusions: The periodic configurations observed in our MD simulations for proton fractions Yp≥0.30 have important consequences for the structure factors S (q ) of protons and neutrons, which relate to many transport properties of supernovae and neutron star crust. A detailed study of the waffle phase and how its structure depends on temperature, size of the simulation, and the screening length showed that finite-size effects appear to be under control and, also, that the plates in the waffle phase merge at temperatures slightly above 1.0 MeV and

  20. hnRNPs H, H' and F behave differently with respect to posttranslational cleavage and subcellular localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Vorum, H; Baandrup, U

    1999-01-01

    hnRNPs H, H' and F belong to a subfamily of the hnRNPs sharing a high degree of sequence identity. Eukaryotic expression and specific C-terminal antibodies were used to demonstrate great variation in the intracellular fate of the proteins. hnRNPs H and H' become posttranslational cleaved into C......-terminal 35 kDa proteins (H(C), H'(C)) and possibly into N-terminal 22 kDa proteins. No detectable cleavage was observed for hnRNP F. hnRNP H/H' is almost exclusively localized to the nucleus of many cell types while hnRNP F varies from a predominant nuclear localization in some cells to a predominant...... cytoplasmic localization in other cells. The different fates may reflect differences in functional roles that so far only have included nuclear functions. The presence of significant quantities of hnRNP F in the cytoplasm of many cells indicates that it also may have a functional role here. Udgivelsesdato...

  1. Nuclear nirvana?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacks, T.

    1997-06-10

    This article describes a proposed method of processing high-level radioactive wastes from existing PWR reactors and weapons grade plutonium to produce relatively benign medium-level wastes, which is easier to handle and store. The energy amplifier proposed by Carlo Rubbia, ex-director-general of CERN, causes fission to occur as a result of nuclear cascades, rather than chain reactions, by bombarding a thorium-based mixture of radioactive materials with a high-intensity beam of sub-atomic particles. He claims that, as it depends largely on proven technology it could be in commercial operation with ten years, well ahead of even a prototype fusion reactor and thus provide a viable, sustainable and more environmentally acceptable power source. (Author).

  2. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  3. The Effects of Nuclear Weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    deposited con the ground. The extensive 9.141 The activity of strontium-90, atmospheric nuclear tesi programs con- as of radioactive materials in...main a reiult of radiation exposure and hem- disadvantage is that an appreciable de- ,rrhage, so that symptoms of anemia , crease in tne platelet count...such radiation. In Hiroshima ceiving combined injuries. The avail- 4 COMBINED INJURIES 589 able data do indicate, however, that some anemia and the body

  4. Compartmentalization and Functionality of Nuclear Disorder: Intrinsic Disorder and Protein-Protein Interactions in Intra-Nuclear Compartments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanchi Meng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The cell nucleus contains a number of membrane-less organelles or intra-nuclear compartments. These compartments are dynamic structures representing liquid-droplet phases which are only slightly denser than the bulk intra-nuclear fluid. They possess different functions, have diverse morphologies, and are typically composed of RNA (or, in some cases, DNA and proteins. We analyzed 3005 mouse proteins localized in specific intra-nuclear organelles, such as nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinuclear compartment and compared them with ~29,863 non-nuclear proteins from mouse proteome. Our analysis revealed that intrinsic disorder is enriched in the majority of intra-nuclear compartments, except for the nuclear pore and lamina. These compartments are depleted in proteins that lack disordered domains and enriched in proteins that have multiple disordered domains. Moonlighting proteins found in multiple intra-nuclear compartments are more likely to have multiple disordered domains. Protein-protein interaction networks in the intra-nuclear compartments are denser and include more hubs compared to the non-nuclear proteins. Hubs in the intra-nuclear compartments (except for the nuclear pore are enriched in disorder compared with non-nuclear hubs and non-nuclear proteins. Therefore, our work provides support to the idea of the functional importance of intrinsic disorder in the cell nucleus and shows that many proteins associated with sub-nuclear organelles in nuclei of mouse cells are enriched in disorder. This high level of disorder in the mouse nuclear proteins defines their ability to serve as very promiscuous binders, possessing both large quantities of potential disorder-based interaction sites and the ability of a single such site to be involved in a large number of interactions.

  5. Nuclear exoticism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2016-07-01

    Extreme states of nuclearmatter (such that feature high spins, large deformations, high density and temperature, or a large excess of neutrons and protons) play an important role in studying fundamental properties of nuclei and are helpful in solving the problem of constructing the equation of state for nuclear matter. The synthesis of neutron-rich nuclei near the nucleon drip lines and investigation of their properties permit drawing conclusions about the positions of these boundaries and deducing information about unusual states of such nuclei and about their decays. At the present time, experimental investigations along these lines can only be performed via the cooperation of leading research centers that possess powerful heavy-ion accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and the heavy-ion cyclotrons at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna), where respective experiments are being conducted by physicists from about 20 JINR member countries. The present article gives a survey of the most recent results in the realms of super neutron-rich nuclei. Implications of the change in the structure of such nuclei near the nucleon drip lines are discussed. Information about the results obtained by measuring the masses (binding energies) of exotic nuclei, the nucleon-distribution radii (neutron halo) and momentum distributions in them, and their deformations and quantum properties is presented. It is shown that the properties of nuclei lying near the stability boundaries differ strongly from the properties of other nuclei. The problem of the stability of nuclei that is associated with the magic numbers of 20 and 28 is discussed along with the effect of new magic numbers.

  6. Few-body physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briceno, Raul [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Few-body hadronic observables play an essential role in a wide number of processes relevant for both particle and nuclear physics. In order for Lattice QCD to offer insight into the interpretation of few-body states, a theoretical infrastructure must be developed to map Euclidean-time correlation functions to the desired Minkowski-time few-body observables. In this talk, I will first review the formal challenges associated with the studies of such systems via Lattice QCD, as first introduced by Maiani and Testa, and then review methodology to circumvent said limitations. The first main example of the latter is the formalism of Luscher to analyze elastic scattering and a second is the method of Lellouch & Luscher to analyze weak decays. I will then proceed to discus recent theoretical generalizations of these frameworks that allow for the determination of scattering amplitudes, resonances, transition and elastic form factors. Finally, I will outline outstanding problems, including those that are now beginning to be addressed.

  7. Reconversion of nuclear weapons

    CERN Document Server

    Kapitza, Sergei P

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear predicament or nuclear option. Synopsis of three lectures : 1- The physical basis of nuclear technology. Physics of fission. Chain reaction in reactors and weapons. Fission fragments. Separration of isotopes. Radiochemistry.2- Nuclear reactors with slow and fast neutrons. Power, size, fuel and waste. Plutonium production. Dose rate, shielding and health hazard. The lessons of Chernobyl3- Nuclear weapons. Types, energy, blast and fallout. Fusion and hydrogen bombs. What to do with nuclear weapons when you cannot use them? Testing. Nonmilittary use. Can we get rid of the nuclear weapon? Nuclear proliferation. Is there a nuclear future?

  8. No Nuclear Worries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    China National Nuclear Corp.will learn lessons from the Fukushima accident while expanding its operations As Japan’s Fukushima nuclear crisis sparks a global debate over nuclear safety,China National Nuclear Corp.(CNNC),the country’s largest nuclear power operator,comes under

  9. Trends in Nuclear Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Schatz, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Astrophysics is a vibrant field at the intersection of nuclear physics and astrophysics that encompasses research in nuclear physics, astrophysics, astronomy, and computational science. This paper is not a review. It is intended to provide an incomplete personal perspective on current trends in nuclear astrophysics and the specific role of nuclear physics in this field.

  10. Analysis of nuclear activity of ten polar ring galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Freitas-Lemes, P; Dors, O L; Faúndez-Abans, M

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of mass from the interaction process that forms the polar ring galaxies is a factor that favors the conditions necessary to trigger nonthermal nuclear activities.. This fact encouraged the chemical analysis of ten polar ring galaxies. In order to verify the presence of an active nucleus in these galaxias, we built diagnostic diagrams using lines H{\\beta}, [OIII], [HI], H{\\alpha}, [NII], and [SII] and classified the type of nuclear activity. For galaxies that do not show shock, the parameters N2 and O3N2 were also determined. From this sample, we identified seven galaxies with an active nucleus and three that behave as HII regions. One galaxy with an active nucleus was classified as Seyfert. Although our data do not provide a statistically significant sample, we can speculate that polar ring galaxies are a setting conducive to trigger non-thermal nuclear activities.

  11. Sacralising Bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, Ravinder

    2010-01-01

    In post-revolution Iran, the sacred notion of martyrdom has been transformed into a routine act of government – a moral sign of order and state sovereignty. Moving beyond the debates of the secularisation of the sacred and the making sacred of the secular, this article argues that the moment...... of sacralisation is realised through co-production within a social setting when the object of sacralisation is recognised as such by others. In contemporary Iran, however, the moment of sacralising bodies by the state is also the moment of its own subversion as the political-theological field of martyrdom......-sacrifice became central to the mass mobilisation against the monarchy. Once the revolutionary government came into existence, this sacred tradition was regulated to create ‘martyrs’ as a fixed category, in order to consolidate the legacy of the revolution. In this political theatre, the dead body is a site...

  12. Structure of the insect oocyte nucleus with special reference to interchromatin granule clusters and cajal bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogolyubov, Dmitry; Parfenov, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear structure of insect oocyte is described with reference to interchromatin granule clusters and Cajal bodies. It is suggested that the intranuclear structure is determined by the ovary organization and reflects the sources of oocyte RNA. Inactivated oocyte chromosomes in meroistic ovaries form a karyosphere, and their features are discussed. In insects with panoistic ovaries, the organization and molecular composition of complicated oocyte Cajal bodies are discussed, and the homology between a structure located inside Cajal bodies and interchromatin granule clusters is proved. Along with revealing some essential Cajal body components and factors involved in RNA polymerase II transcription, we analyze the absence of RNAP II itself from oocyte Cajal bodies of Acheta. In insects with meroistic ovaries, Cajal bodies of Drosophila and homology of Panorpa nuclear bodies to Cajal bodies and their peculiarities are described, because the nuclear bodies may share some features of both Cajal bodies and interchromatin granule clusters to represent a single nuclear domain.

  13. WRAP53 Is Essential for Cajal Body Formation and for Targeting the Survival of Motor Neuron Complex to Cajal Bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Salah Mahmoudi; Sofia Henriksson; Irene Weibrecht; Stephen Smith; Ola Söderberg; Staffan Strömblad; Klas G Wiman; Marianne Farnebo

    2010-01-01

    The WRAP53 gene gives rise to a p53 antisense transcript that regulates p53. This gene also encodes a protein that directs small Cajal body-specific RNAs to Cajal bodies. Cajal bodies are nuclear organelles involved in diverse functions such as processing ribonucleoproteins important for splicing. Here we identify the WRAP53 protein as an essential factor for Cajal body maintenance and for directing the survival of motor neuron (SMN) complex to Cajal bodies. By RNA interference and immunofluo...

  14. BODIES WHICH ARE OPEN TO GIVE LIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Daniele de Moraes

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article purposes a consideration on themes relevant to Jean-Luc Nancy’s theory, by means of two short-stories by Clarice Lispector, two poems – one by Manuel Bandeira and one by Cecília Meireles – and one movie by Alain Resnais. Concerning all these examples, the aim is to deal with issues related to meaning, body, absence, touch and the eroticism movement – and to investigate traces of the body denial as an absolute truth or as a closure of meaning in the female characters, since they sometimes behave themselves as saints, sometimes as whores. In Noli me tangere, an essay by Jean-Luc Nancy based on a Biblical episode, we become aware that the contact between resuscitated Jesus and Maria Magdalena does not actually happen – and this is a motive scene for composing a consideration on the chosen corpus.

  15. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Teresińska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bożena; Królicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which ac...

  16. Semi-classical methods in nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, David M.

    These lecture notes present an introduction to some semi-classical techniques which have applications in nuclear physics. Topics discussed include the WKB method, approaches based on the Feynman path integral, the Gutzwiller trace formula for level density fluctuations and the Thomas-Fermi approximation and the Vlasov equation for many-body problems. There are applications to heavy ion fusion reactions, bremsstrahlung emission in alpha decay and nuclear response functions.

  17. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Teresińska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bożena; Królicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which ac...

  18. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  19. Mean nuclear volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O.; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bichel, P.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the following nine parameters with respect to their prognostic value in females with endometrial cancer: four stereologic parameters [mean nuclear volume (MNV), nuclear volume fraction, nuclear index and mitotic index], the immunohistochemical expression of cancer antigen (CA125...

  20. Cold nuclear fusion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang Zhenqiang Huang Yuxiang

    2013-01-01

    ...... And with a magnetic moment of light nuclei controlled cold nuclear collide fusion, belongs to the nuclear energy research and development in the field of applied technology "cold nuclear collide fusion...

  1. Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

    1950-06-23

    Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

  2. Integration of silicon-based neural probes and micro-drive arrays for chronic recording of large populations of neurons in behaving animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michon, Frédéric; Aarts, Arno; Holzhammer, Tobias; Ruther, Patrick; Borghs, Gustaaf; McNaughton, Bruce; Kloosterman, Fabian

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Understanding how neuronal assemblies underlie cognitive function is a fundamental question in system neuroscience. It poses the technical challenge to monitor the activity of populations of neurons, potentially widely separated, in relation to behaviour. In this paper, we present a new system which aims at simultaneously recording from a large population of neurons from multiple separated brain regions in freely behaving animals. Approach. The concept of the new device is to combine the benefits of two existing electrophysiological techniques, i.e. the flexibility and modularity of micro-drive arrays and the high sampling ability of electrode-dense silicon probes. Main results. Newly engineered long bendable silicon probes were integrated into a micro-drive array. The resulting device can carry up to 16 independently movable silicon probes, each carrying 16 recording sites. Populations of neurons were recorded simultaneously in multiple cortical and/or hippocampal sites in two freely behaving implanted rats. Significance. Current approaches to monitor neuronal activity either allow to flexibly record from multiple widely separated brain regions (micro-drive arrays) but with a limited sampling density or to provide denser sampling at the expense of a flexible placement in multiple brain regions (neural probes). By combining these two approaches and their benefits, we present an alternative solution for flexible and simultaneous recordings from widely distributed populations of neurons in freely behaving rats.

  3. Nuclear energy data 2010

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    This 2010 edition of Nuclear Energy Data , the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of official statistics and country reports on nuclear energy, provides key information on plans for new nuclear plant construction, nuclear fuel cycle developments as well as current and projected nuclear generating capacity to 2035 in OECD member countries. This comprehensive overview provides authoritative information for policy makers, experts and other interested stakeholders.

  4. Consolidation: Thwarting Nuclear Theft

    OpenAIRE

    Bunn, Matthew G.; Harrell, Eben

    2013-01-01

    At the first nuclear security summit in April 2010, the assembled leaders agreed on the goal of securing all vulnerable nuclear material worldwide within four years, including consolidating plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) to fewer locations and minimizing the use of HEU “where technically and economically feasible.†Reducing the number of buildings and sites where nuclear weapons and weapons-usable nuclear material exist is a key element of preventing nuclear theft and nuclear ...

  5. Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18

    The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

  6. Nuclear Entalpies

    CERN Document Server

    Rozynek, J

    2013-01-01

    In a compressed Nuclear Matter (NM) an increasing pressure between the nucleons starts to increase the ratio of a nucleon Fermi to average single particle energy and in accordance with the Hugenholtz-van Hove theorem the longitudinal Momentum Sum Rule (MSR) is broken in a Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) approach. We propose to benefit from the concept of enthalpy in order to show how to fulfill the MSR above a saturation density with pressure corrections. As a result a nucleon mass can decrease with density, making the Equation of State (EoS) softer. The course of the EoS in our modified RMF model is close to a semi-empirical estimate and to results obtained from extensive DBHF calculations with a Bonn A potential, which produce the EoS stiff enough to describe neutron star properties (mass-radius constraint), especially the most massive known neutron star. The presented model has proper saturation properties, including good values of a compressibility and a spin-orbit term.

  7. Body contact and body language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Helle Dagmar

    2008-01-01

    and the boundaries between self and world. In western societies, the modern premises for contact are in some ways developing from close contact to virtual communication. With this breadth of perspective in mind, the ques­tion is whether conscious and experimental work with body contact and body language in move......­ment psychology and education provide potential for intense personal develop­ment as well as for social and cultural learning processes. This performative research project originates from the research project entitled, Movement Psy­chol­ogy: The Language of the Body and the Psy­chol­ogy of Movement based...... on the Dance Therapy Form Dansergia. The author, who is a practi­tioner-researcher, is methodologically inspir­ed by phenomenology, performative methods and a narrative and auto-ethnographic approach. The project will be presented in an organic, cre­at­ive and performative way. Through a moving dia...

  8. Nuclear Data and Nuclear Model Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Developing nuclear data needs towards to sustainable development on fission reactor design and many nuclear applications out the field of fission reactor technology that are growing economicsignificance and that have substantial data requirements are introduced. International standard codes used in nuclear data evaluations and calculations are introduced and compared each other. Generally

  9. Nuclear energy data 2011

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

     . Nuclear Energy Data, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports on nuclear energy, contains official information provided by OECD member country governments on plans for new nuclear plant construction, nuclear fuel cycle developments as well as current and projected nuclear generating capacity to 2035. For the first time, it includes data for Chile, Estonia, Israel and Slovenia, which recently became OECD members. Key elements of this edition show a 2% increase in nuclear and total electricity production and a 0.5% increase in nuclear generating ca

  10. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, Hans M. [Federation of American Scientists, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-05-09

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  11. A potent effect of strong $\\bar{\\mbox{p}}-$p nuclear forces on the rate of the low-energy three-body protonium formation reaction: $\\bar{\\mbox{p}} + (\\mbox{p}\\mu^-)_{1s} \\rightarrow (\\bar{\\mbox{p}} \\mbox{p})_{\\alpha} + \\mu^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Sultanov, Renat A; Adhikari, Sadhan K

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the strong $\\bar{\\rm p}-$p nuclear interaction in a three-charge-particle system with arbitrary masses is investigated. Specifically, the ($\\bar{\\rm p},\\ \\mu^-$,\\ p) system is considered. A numerical computation in the framework of a detailed few-body approach is carried out for the following protonium (antiprotonic hydrogen) production three-body reaction: $\\bar{\\mbox{p}} +(\\mbox{p}\\mu^-)_{1s} \\rightarrow (\\bar{\\mbox{p}}\\rm{p})_{1s} + \\mu^-$. Here, p is a proton, $\\bar{\\mbox{p}}$ is an antiproton, $\\mu^-$ is a muon, and a bound state of $\\mbox{p}^+$ and its counterpart $\\bar{\\mbox{p}}$ is protonium: $Pn = (\\bar{\\mbox{p}}\\mbox{p})$. The low-energy cross sections and rates of the $Pn$ formation reaction are computed in the framework of a Faddeev-like equation formalism. The strong $\\bar{\\mbox{p}}-$p interaction is included in these calculations within a first order approximation. It was found, that the inclusion of this strong interaction results in a quite significant correction to the output of...

  12. Signifying Bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

     In our everyday lives we strive to stay healthy and happy, while we live as our selves, engage with each other, and discover an infinite world of possibilities. Health arises and diminishes as human beings draw on a vibrant ecology of actions, interactions and coactions. Intricate processes...... and health care. Eschewing all forms of dualism, the authors emphasise the interdependency of how we act, think, feel and function. They advocate a relational turn in health care, in which bodies live and learn from suffering and care. In this view, health is inseparable from both living beings...... of, for example, how rheumatoid arthritis sufferers view their treatment, how decisions are made in simulated emergencies, and how therapists and homeopaths use distributed language and cognition with their clients....

  13. Theoretical Aspects of Science with Radioactive Nuclear Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Dobaczewski, J; Dobaczewski, Jacek; Nazarewicz, Witold

    1997-01-01

    Physics of radioactive nuclear beams is one of the main frontiers of nuclear science today. Experimentally, thanks to technological developments, we are on the verge of invading the territory of extreme N/Z ratios in an unprecedented way. Theoretically, nuclear exotica represent a formidable challenge for the nuclear many-body theories and their power to predict nuclear properties in nuclear terra incognita. It is important to remember that the lesson learned by going to the limits of the nuclear binding is also important for normal nuclei from the neighborhood of the beta stability valley. And, of course, radioactive nuclei are crucial astrophysically; they pave the highway along which the nuclear material is transported up in the proton and neutron numbers during the complicated synthesis process in stars.

  14. Reliability of sprinkler systems. Exploration and analysis of data from nuclear and non-nuclear installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roenty, V.; Keski-Rahkonen, O.; Hassinen, J.P. [VTT Building and Transport, Espoo (Finland)

    2004-12-01

    Sprinkler systems are an important part of fire safety of nuclear installations. As a part of effort to make fire-PSA of our utilities more quantitative a literature survey from open sources worldwide of available reliability data on sprinkler systems was carried out. Since the result of the survey was rather poor quantitatively, it was decided to mine available original Finnish nuclear and non-nuclear data, since nuclear power plants present a rather small device population. Sprinklers are becoming a key element for the fire safety in modern, open non-nuclear buildings. Therefore, the study included both nuclear power plants and non-nuclear buildings protected by sprinkler installations. Data needed for estimating of reliability of sprinkler systems were collected from available sources in Finnish nuclear and non-nuclear installations. Population sizes on sprinkler system installations and components therein as well as covered floor areas were counted individually from Finnish nuclear power plants. From non-nuclear installations corresponding data were estimated by counting relevant things from drawings of 102 buildings, and plotting from that sample needed probability distributions. The total populations of sprinkler systems and components were compiled based on available direct data and these distributions. From nuclear power plants electronic maintenance reports were obtained, observed failures and other reliability relevant data were selected, classified according to failure severity, and stored on spreadsheets for further analysis. A short summary of failures was made, which was hampered by a small sample size. From non-nuclear buildings inspection statistics from years 1985.1997 were surveyed, and observed failures were classified and stored on spreadsheets. Finally, a reliability model is proposed based on earlier formal work, and failure frequencies obtained by preliminary data analysis of this work. For a model utilising available information in the non-nuclear

  15. Accountability and non-proliferation nuclear regime: a review of the mutual surveillance Brazilian-Argentine model for nuclear safeguards; Accountability e regime de nao proliferacao nuclear: uma avaliacao do modelo de vigilancia mutua brasileiro-argentina de salvaguardas nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, Roberto Salles

    2014-08-01

    The regimes of accountability, the organizations of global governance and institutional arrangements of global governance of nuclear non-proliferation and of Mutual Vigilance Brazilian-Argentine of Nuclear Safeguards are the subject of research. The starting point is the importance of the institutional model of global governance for the effective control of non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. In this context, the research investigates how to structure the current arrangements of the international nuclear non-proliferation and what is the performance of model Mutual Vigilance Brazilian-Argentine of Nuclear Safeguards in relation to accountability regimes of global governance. For that, was searched the current literature of three theoretical dimensions: accountability, global governance and global governance organizations. In relation to the research method was used the case study and the treatment technique of data the analysis of content. The results allowed: to establish an evaluation model based on accountability mechanisms; to assess how behaves the model Mutual Vigilance Brazilian-Argentine Nuclear Safeguards front of the proposed accountability regime; and to measure the degree to which regional arrangements that work with systems of global governance can strengthen these international systems. (author)

  16. Nano-thermometers with thermo-sensitive polymer grafted USPIOs behaving as positive contrast agents in low-field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannecart, Adeline; Stanicki, Dimitri; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N.; Lecommandoux, Sébastien; Thévenot, Julie; Bonduelle, Colin; Trotier, Aurélien; Massot, Philippe; Miraux, Sylvain; Sandre, Olivier; Laurent, Sophie

    2015-02-01

    Two commercial statistical copolymers of ethylene oxide and propylene oxide, Jeffamine® M-2005 (PEO5-st-PPO37) and M-2070 (PEO46-st-PPO13), exhibiting lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water, were grafted onto the surface of ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) using silanization and amide-bond coupling reactions. The LCSTs of the polymers in solution were measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In accordance with the compositions of EO vs. PO, the transition temperature was measured to be 22 +/- 2 °C for M-2005 by both DLS and NMR, while the LCST was much higher, 52 +/- 2 °C, for M-2070 (a second transition was also detected above 80 °C by NMR in that case, ascribed to the full dehydration of chains at the molecular level). The resulting polymer-grafted USPIOs exhibit a temperature-responsive colloidal behaviour, their surface reversibly changing from hydrophilic below LCST to hydrophobic above it. This phenomenon was utilised to design thermo-sensitive contrast agents for MRI. Transverse relaxivities (r2) of the USPIO@PEO5-st-PPO37 core-shell nanoparticles were measured at 8.25, 20, 60, and 300 MHz. Nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion (NMRD) profiles, giving longitudinal relaxivities (r1) between 0.01 and 60 MHz, were acquired at temperatures ranging from 15 to 50 °C. For all tested frequencies except 300 MHz, both r1 and r2 decrease with temperature and show an inflection point at 25 °C, near the LCST. To illustrate the interest of such polymer-coated USPIOs for MRI thermometry, sample tubes were imaged on both low-field (8.25 MHz/0.194 Tesla) and high-field (300 MHz/7.05 Tesla) MRI scanners with either T1- or T2*-weighted spin echo sequences. The positive contrast on low-field MR images and the perfect linearity of the signal with a T2*-weighted sequence over the entire temperature range 15-50 °C render these LCST polymer coated USPIOs interesting positive contrast agents

  17. Nuclear structures in Tribolium castaneum oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogolyubov, Dmitry S; Batalova, Florina M; Kiselyov, Artyom M; Stepanova, Irina S

    2013-10-01

    The first ultrastructural and immunomorphological characteristics of the karyosphere (karyosome) and extrachromosomal nuclear bodies in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, are presented. The karyosphere forms early in the diplotene stage of meiotic prophase by the gathering of all oocyte chromosomes in a limited nuclear volume. Using the BrUTP assay, T. castaneum oocyte chromosomes united in the karyosphere maintain their transcriptional activity until the end of oocyte growth. Hyperphosphorylated RNA polymerase II and basal transcription factors (TFIID and TFIIH) were detected in the perichromatin region of the karyosphere. The T. castaneum karyosphere has an extrachromosomal capsule that separates chromosomes from the rest of the nucleoplasm. Certain structural proteins (F-actin, lamin B) were found in the capsule. Unexpectedly, the karyosphere capsule in T. castaneum oocytes was found to be enriched in TMG-capped snRNAs, which suggests that the capsule is not only a structural support for the karyosphere, but may be involved in biogenesis of snRNPs. We also identified the counterparts of 'universal' extrachromosomal nuclear domains, Cajal bodies (CBs) and interchromatin granule clusters (IGCs). Nuclear bodies containing IGC marker protein SC35 display some features unusual for typical IGCs. SC35 domains in T. castaneum oocytes are predominantly fibrillar complex bodies that do not contain trimethyl guanosine (TMG)-capped small nuclear (sn) RNAs. Microinjections of 2'-O-methyl (U)22 probes into the oocytes allowed revealing poly(A)+ RNAs in these nuclear domains. Several proteins related to mRNA export (heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein core protein A1, export adapters Y14 and Aly and export receptor NXF1) were also detected there. We believe that unusual SC35 nuclear domains of T. castaneum oocytes are possibly involved in mRNP but not snRNP biogenesis.

  18. JPRS Report, Nuclear Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    I Foreign Ministry on Algerian Nuclear Reactor [ZHONGGUO XINWEN SHE] .............................. I...Nuclear Facilities Urged [Seoul YONHAP] .................................................... 5 WPK’s ’Anti- War , Anti-Nuke’ Policy Viewed [KCNA...34 JPRS-TND-91-008 31 May 1991 CHINA 1 Algerian Nuclear Reactor Algeria signed a protocol on nuclear cooperation, in which China agreed

  19. Ensuring Nuclear Safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The Fukushima accident precipitates overall safety inspection by China Guangdong Nuclear Power Holding Corp The Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan had barely made headlines around the world when China Guangdong Nuclear Power Holding Corp.(CGNPC),a nuclear power magnate in China,organized

  20. Energy from nuclear fission(*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripani M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main features of nuclear fission as physical phenomenon will be revisited, emphasizing its peculiarities with respect to other nuclear reactions. Some basic concepts underlying the operation of nuclear reactors and the main types of reactors will be illustrated, including fast reactors, showing the most important differences among them. The nuclear cycle and radioactive-nuclear-waste production will be also discussed, along with the perspectives offered by next generation nuclear assemblies being proposed. The current situation of nuclear power in the world, its role in reducing carbon emission and the available resources will be briefly illustrated.