WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear beam facility

  1. ISOL based radioactive nuclear beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, T.

    1991-07-01

    High-intensity and high-quality unstable nuclear beams can be realized by coupling an isotope separator on-line and a proper post accelerator in various primary beams. Some technical features and problems in the production of such beams are discussed. A brief description is given on 'Exotic Nuclei Arena' in Japanese Hadron Project. (author)

  2. Spallation RI beam facility and heavy element nuclear chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagame, Yuichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    An outline of the spallation RI (Radioactive Ion) beam facility is presented. Neutron-rich nuclides are produced in the reaction of high intensity (10-1000 {mu}A) protons with energy of 1.5 GeV and an uranium carbide target. Produced nuclides are ionized in an isotope separator on-line (ISOL) and accelerated by the JAERI tandem and the booster linac. Current progress and a future project on the development of the RI beam facility are given. Studies of transactinide elements, including the synthesis of superheavy elements, nuclear structure far from stability, and RI-probed material science are planned with RI beams. An outlook of the transactinide nuclear chemistry studies using neutron-rich RI beams is described. (author)

  3. Nuclear astrophysics at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    The potential for understanding spectacular stellar explosions such as novae, supernovae, and X-ray bursts will be greatly enhanced by the availability of the low-energy, high-intensity, accelerated beams of proton-rich radioactive nuclei currently being developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These beams will be utilized in absolute cross section measurements of crucial (p, γ) capture reactions in efforts to resolve the substantial qualitative uncertainties in current models of explosive stellar hydrogen burning outbursts. Details of the nuclear astrophysics research program with the unique HRIBF radioactive beams and a dedicated experimental endstation--centered on the Daresbury Recoil Separator--will be presented

  4. Establishment of nuclear data system - Feasibility study for neutron-beam= facility at pohang accelerator laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam Kung, Won; Koh, In Soo; Cho, Moo Hyun; Kim, Kui Nyun; Kwang, Hung Sik; Park, Sung Joo [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Nuclear data which have been produced by a few developed countries in the= past are essential elements to many disciplines, especially to nuclear engineering. As we promote our nuclear industry further to the level of advanced countries, we also have to establish the Nuclear Data System to produce and evaluate nuclear data independently. We have studied the possibility to build a neutron-beam facility utilizing accelerator facilities, technologies and man powers at pohang Accelerator Laboratory. We found specific parameters for the PAL 100-MeV electron linac based on the existing klystron, modulator, accelerating tubes and other facilities in the PAL; the beam energy is 60-100 MeV, the beam current for the short pulse (10 ns) is 2 A and for the long pulse is 500 mA and the pulse repetition rate is 60 Hz. We propose a neutron-beam facility using PAL 100-MeV electron linac where we can use a Ta-target for the neutron generation and three different time-of-flight beam lines (10 m, 20 m, and 100 m). One may find that the proposed neutron-beam facility is comparable with other operating neutron facilities in the world. We conclude that the proposed neutron-beam facility utilizing the existing accelerator facility in the PAL would be an excellent facility for neutron data production in combination with the ` Hanaro` facility in KAERI. 8 refs., 11 tabs., 12 figs. (author)

  5. Nuclear Astrophysics Data from Radioactive Beam Facilities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Alan A.

    2008-01-01

    The scientific aims of this project have been the evaluation and dissemination of key nuclear reactions in nuclear astrophysics, with a focus on ones to be studied at new radioactive beam facilities worldwide. These aims were maintained during the entire funding period from 2003 - 2006. In the following, a summary of the reactions evaluated during this period is provided. Year 1 (2003-04): 21 Na(p,γ) 22 Mg and 18 Ne(α,p) 21 Na - The importance of the 21 Na(p,γ) 22 Mg and the 18 Ne(α,p) 21 Na reactions in models of exploding stars has been well documented: the first is connected to the production of the radioisotope 22 Na in nova nucleosynthesis, while the second is a key bridge between the Hot-CNO cycles and the rp-process in X-ray bursts. By the end of Summer 2004, our group had updated these reaction rates to include all published data up to September 2004, and cast the reaction rates into standard analytical and tabular formats with the assistance of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's computational infrastructure for reaction rates. Since September 2004, ongoing experiments on these two reactions have been completed, with our group's participation in both: 21 Na(p,γ) 22 Mg at the TRIUMF-ISAC laboratory (DRAGON collaboration), and 18Ne(α,p) 21 Na at Argonne National Laboratory (collaboration with Ernst Rehm, Argonne). The data from the former was subsequently published and included in our evaluation. Publication from the latter still awaits independent confirmation of the experimental results. Year 2 (2004-05): The 25Al(p,γ) 26 Si and 13 N(p,γ)14O reactions - For Year 2, we worked on evaluations of the 25 Al(p,γ) 26 Si and 13 N(p,γ) 14 O reactions, in accordance with our proposed deliverables and following similar standard procedures to those used in Year 1. The 25 Al(p,γ) 26 Si reaction is a key uncertainty in the understanding the origin of galactic 26 Al, a target radioisotope for gamma ray astronomy; the 13 N(p,γ) 14 O reaction in turn is the trigger

  6. Compendium of Neutron Beam Facilities for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    The recent advances in the development of nuclear science and technology, demonstrating the globally growing economy, require highly accurate, powerful simulations and precise analysis of the experimental results. Confidence in these results is still determined by the accuracy of the atomic and nuclear input data. For studying material response, neutron beams produced from accelerators and research reactors in broad energy spectra are reliable and indispensable tools to obtain high accuracy experimental results for neutron induced reactions. The IAEA supports the accomplishment of high precision nuclear data using nuclear facilities in particular, based on particle accelerators and research reactors around the world. Such data are essential for numerous applications in various industries and research institutions, including the safety and economical operation of nuclear power plants, future fusion reactors, nuclear medicine and non-destructive testing technologies. The IAEA organized and coordinated the technical meeting Use of Neutron Beams for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements, in Budapest, Hungary, 10–14 December 2012. The meeting was attended by participants from 25 Member States and three international organizations — the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA). The objectives of the meeting were to provide a forum to exchange existing know-how and to share the practical experiences of neutron beam facilities and associated instrumentation, with regard to the measurement of high precision nuclear data using both accelerators and research reactors. Furthermore, the present status and future developments of worldwide accelerator and research reactor based neutron beam facilities were discussed. This publication is a summary of the technical meeting and additional materials supplied by the international

  7. Compendium of Neutron Beam Facilities for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements. Annex: Individual Reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    The recent advances in the development of nuclear science and technology, demonstrating the globally growing economy, require highly accurate, powerful simulations and precise analysis of the experimental results. Confidence in these results is still determined by the accuracy of the atomic and nuclear input data. For studying material response, neutron beams produced from accelerators and research reactors in broad energy spectra are reliable and indispensable tools to obtain high accuracy experimental results for neutron induced reactions. The IAEA supports the accomplishment of high precision nuclear data using nuclear facilities in particular, based on particle accelerators and research reactors around the world. Such data are essential for numerous applications in various industries and research institutions, including the safety and economical operation of nuclear power plants, future fusion reactors, nuclear medicine and non-destructive testing technologies. The IAEA organized and coordinated the technical meeting Use of Neutron Beams for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements, in Budapest, Hungary, 10–14 December 2012. The meeting was attended by participants from 25 Member States and three international organizations — the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA). The objectives of the meeting were to provide a forum to exchange existing know-how and to share the practical experiences of neutron beam facilities and associated instrumentation, with regard to the measurement of high precision nuclear data using both accelerators and research reactors. Furthermore, the present status and future developments of worldwide accelerator and research reactor based neutron beam facilities were discussed. This publication is a summary of the technical meeting and additional materials supplied by the international

  8. Radioactive nuclear beam facilities based on projectile fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherrill, B.M.

    1992-01-01

    The production of radioactive beams using direct separation techniques is discussed. The reaction mechanisms which can be used to produce radioactive beams with these techniques can be broadly divided into three groups, projectile fragmentation, nucleon transfer, and Coulomb disassociation. Radioactive nuclei produced in these ways have large forward momenta with relatively sharp angular distributions peaked near zero degrees which are suitable for collection with magnetic devices. Secondary beam intensities of up to a few percent of the primary beam intensity are possible, although depending on the production mechanism the beam emittance may be poor. Further beam purification can be achieved using atomic processes with profiled energy degraders. The features of the production reaction mechanism, separation techniques, and a review of world wide efforts are presented. The advantages and disadvantages of the method are presented, with discussion of techniques to overcome some of the disadvantages. (Author)

  9. Transcript of the workshop to discuss plans for a National High Intensity Radioactive Nuclear Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Following the ''First International Conference on Radioactive Nuclear Beams'' in Berkeley, a workshop was held on October 19, 1989 at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to discuss plans for a National High Intensity Radioactive Nuclear Beam (RNB) Facility. The purpose of the workshop was -- after having discussed during the conference the physics question that can be addressed with RNBs -- to evaluate more concretely the possibilities for actually constructing such a facility in this country. It is becoming increasingly apparent that facility producing beams of radioactive nuclei with extreme neutron-to-proton ratios is of high scientific interest and technically feasible. It would allow the study of nuclear structure and astrophysical reactions very far from the line of stable nuclei, and could provide new possibilities of reaching the long-sought island of stability of superheavy nuclei. Such facilities are under advanced consideration in Japan and at CERN in Europe. This paper contains a slightly edited transcript of the tape recording that was made of the workshop

  10. A nuclear physics program at the Rare Isotope Beams Accelerator Facility in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Bum Moon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the new physics possibilities that fall within the field of nuclear structure and astrophysics based on experiments with radioactive ion beams at the future Rare Isotope Beams Accelerator facility in Korea. This ambitious multi-beam facility has both an Isotope Separation On Line (ISOL and fragmentation capability to produce rare isotopes beams (RIBs and will be capable of producing and accelerating beams of wide range mass of nuclides with energies of a few to hundreds MeV per nucleon. The large dynamic range of reaccelerated RIBs will allow the optimization in each nuclear reaction case with respect to cross section and channel opening. The low energy RIBs around Coulomb barrier offer nuclear reactions such as elastic resonance scatterings, one or two particle transfers, Coulomb multiple-excitations, fusion-evaporations, and direct capture reactions for the study of the very neutron-rich and proton-rich nuclides. In contrast, the high energy RIBs produced by in-flight fragmentation with reaccelerated ions from the ISOL enable to explore the study of neutron drip lines in intermediate mass regions. The proposed studies aim at investigating the exotic nuclei near and beyond the nucleon drip lines, and to explore how nuclear many-body systems change in such extreme regions by addressing the following topics: the evolution of shell structure in areas of extreme proton to neutron imbalance; the study of the weak interaction in exotic decay schemes such as beta-delayed two-neutron or two-proton emission; the change of isospin symmetry in isobaric mirror nuclei at the drip lines; two protons or two neutrons radioactivity beyond the drip lines; the role of the continuum states including resonant states above the particle-decay threshold in exotic nuclei; and the effects of nuclear reaction rates triggered by the unbound proton-rich nuclei on nuclear astrophysical processes.

  11. Beam Test for Evaluating Applicabillity of High - Strength Reinforcement in Structure of Nuclear Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Sangjun; Lee, Byungsoo; Bang, Changjoon

    2014-01-01

    The high-strength rebar which has high yield strength can reduce the amount of rebar in concrete and widen its spacing so that it has better workability and higher economic benefits for the structure. However, the maximum yield strength of rebar is limited to 420MPa in the design criteria for structure of nuclear facility in Korea and USA. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power is progressing research to revise the limitation in the yield strength of rebar, which is suggested in the criteria of KEPIC and ACI, in order to apply 550 MPa high-strength rebar for the construction of a nuclear facility. This study is to review the applicability of high strength rebar in structure of a nuclear facility through a model beam test. After reviewing the shear capacity and reinforcement yield to assess the applicability of high-strength reinforcement in the structure of a nuclear facility, we make the following conclusions. When using high shear reinforcement with wider spacing, it has a similar shear capacity to normal reinforcement with narrower spacing. This means better workability and economic benefits can be achieved by widening the rebar spacing without brittle fracture in the elements. For future plans, the results of this test and supplementary test will be submitted to ACI349 committee as backup data to revise the standard for yield strength of high-strength rebar

  12. Beam Test for Evaluating Applicabillity of High - Strength Reinforcement in Structure of Nuclear Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Sangjun; Lee, Byungsoo; Bang, Changjoon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The high-strength rebar which has high yield strength can reduce the amount of rebar in concrete and widen its spacing so that it has better workability and higher economic benefits for the structure. However, the maximum yield strength of rebar is limited to 420MPa in the design criteria for structure of nuclear facility in Korea and USA. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power is progressing research to revise the limitation in the yield strength of rebar, which is suggested in the criteria of KEPIC and ACI, in order to apply 550 MPa high-strength rebar for the construction of a nuclear facility. This study is to review the applicability of high strength rebar in structure of a nuclear facility through a model beam test. After reviewing the shear capacity and reinforcement yield to assess the applicability of high-strength reinforcement in the structure of a nuclear facility, we make the following conclusions. When using high shear reinforcement with wider spacing, it has a similar shear capacity to normal reinforcement with narrower spacing. This means better workability and economic benefits can be achieved by widening the rebar spacing without brittle fracture in the elements. For future plans, the results of this test and supplementary test will be submitted to ACI349 committee as backup data to revise the standard for yield strength of high-strength rebar.

  13. Development of an external beam nuclear microprobe on the Aglae facility of the Louvre museum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calligaro, T.; Dran, J.-C. E-mail: dran@culture.fr; Ioannidou, E.; Moignard, B.; Pichon, L.; Salomon, J

    2000-03-01

    The external beam line of our facility has been recently equipped with the focusing system previously mounted on a classical nuclear microprobe. When using a 0.1 {mu}m thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} foil for the exit window and flowing helium on the sample under analysis, a beam spot as small as 10 {mu}m is attainable at a distance of 3 mm from the window. Elemental micromapping is performed by mechanical scanning. An electronic device has been designed which allows XY scanning by moving the sample under the beam by steps down to 0.1 {mu}m. Beam monitoring is carried out by means of the weak X-ray signal emitted by the exit foil and detected by a specially designed Si(Li) detector cooled by Peltier effect. The characteristics of external beams of protons and alpha particles are evaluated by means of resonance scanning and elemental mapping of a grid. An example of application is presented, dealing with elemental micro-mapping of inclusions in gemstones.

  14. Nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Here is given the decree (2000-1065) of the 25. of October 2000 reporting the publication of the convention between the Government of the French Republic and the CERN concerning the safety of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) and the SPS (Proton Supersynchrotron) facilities, signed in Geneva on July 11, 2000. By this convention, the CERN undertakes to ensure the safety of the LHC and SPS facilities and those of the operations of the LEP decommissioning. The French legislation and regulations on basic nuclear facilities (concerning more particularly the protection against ionizing radiations, the protection of the environment and the safety of facilities) and those which could be decided later on apply to the LHC, SPS and auxiliary facilities. (O.M.)

  15. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This paper describes many of the nuclear physics heavy-ion accelerator facilities in the US and the research programs being conducted. The accelerators described are: Argonne National Laboratory--ATLAS; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) (Proposed); Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--Bevalac; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--88-Inch Cyclotron; Los Alamos National Laboratory--Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF); Massachusetts Institute of Technology--Bates Linear Accelerator Center; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center--Nuclear Physics Injector; Texas AandM University--Texas AandM Cyclotron; Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL); University of Washington--Tandem/Superconducting Booster; and Yale University--Tandem Van de Graaff

  16. Nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    During September and October 2001, 15 events were recorded on the first grade and 1 on the second grade of the INES scale. The second grade event is in fact a re-classification of an incident that occurred on the second april 2001 at Dampierre power plant. This event happened during core refueling, a shift in the operation sequence led to the wrong positioning of 113 assemblies. A preliminary study of this event shows that this wrong positioning could have led, in other circumstances, to the ignition of nuclear reactions. Even in that case, the analysis made by EDF shows that the consequences on the staff would have been limited. Nevertheless a further study has shown that the existing measuring instruments could not have detected the power increase announcing the beginning of the chain reaction. The investigation has shown that there were deficiencies in the control of the successive operations involved in refueling. EDF has proposed a series of corrective measures to be implemented in all nuclear power plants. The other 15 events are described in the article. During this period 121 inspections have been made in nuclear facilities. (A.C.)

  17. Proton beam therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs

  18. Proton beam therapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  19. Overview of colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, J.C.; Month, M.

    1979-01-01

    A review is presented of the colliding beam facilities in existence today. The major high energy physics facilities around the world are described, and a view is presented of the beam collisions in which the instruments used to make the beams collide and those used to detect the products of particle interactions in the beam overlap region are described

  20. World new facilities for radioactive isotope beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motobayashi, T.

    2014-01-01

    The use of unstable nuclei in the form of energetic beams for nuclear physics studies is now entering into a new era. 'New-generation' facilities are either in operation, under construction or being planned. They are designed to provide radioactive isotope (RI) beams with very high intensities over a wide range of nuclides. These facilities are expected to provide opportunities to study nuclear structure, astrophysical nuclear processes and nuclear matter with large proton-neutron imbalance in grate detail. This article reports on the current status of such new-generation RI-beam facilities around the world. In order to cover different energy domains and to meet various scientific demands, the designs of RI-beam facilities are of a wide variety. For example, RIBF in Japan, FAIR in Germany and FRIB in US are based on the fragmentation scheme for beams with energies of a few hundred MeV/nucleon to GeV/nucleon, whereas Spiral2 in France, SPES in Italy, HIE-ISOLDE in Switzerland/France, and the future facility EURISOL in Europe are based on the ISOL method, and aim at providing lower-energy RI beams. There are a many other projects including upgrades of existing facilities in the three continents, America, Asia and Europe

  1. Double beam neutron radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1977-09-01

    The DR1 reactor at Risoe is used as a neutron source for neutron radiography. In the double-beam neutron radiography facility a neutron flux of an intensity of 1.4 and 1.8 x 10 6 n. cm -2 . s -1 reaches the object to be radiographed. The transport and exposure container used for neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel rods is described, and the exposure technique and procedure are reviewed. The mode by which single neutron radiographs are assembled and assessed is described. This report will be published in the ''Neutron Radiography Newsletter''. (author)

  2. Electron beam facilities and technologies developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Walis, L.; Zimek, Z.

    1992-01-01

    The operation of the first electron accelerator has been started at Institute /former Institute for Nuclear Research/ in 1971. This LAE-13/9 accelerator is a two-section lineac with adjustable energy of electrons: 5 to 13 MeV and the beam power up to 9 kW. The main technologies developed on the basis of LAE-13/9 are: sterilization, manufacturing of thermoshrinkable materials and modification of semiconductors. The accelerator is operated 4000 hours per year and used for small scale production and services in these fields. The other problems investigated in laboratory scale are: food preservation and hygenization, hygenization of municipal sewage sludge, and bio-conversion of pig-farm wastes into animal fodder. The laboratory experiments are basis for pilot construction and other industrial applications. The mentioned technology of thermoshrinkable tube production was implemented in industrial scale at ZWUT Czluchow which factory is equipped in the accelerator ILU-6 /20 kW, 2 MeV/. On the basis of similar unit a technological installation was built at Institute. The plant is furnished with a conveyer and the rewinding machines for tubes and tapes manufacturing. This allows continuous production of these materials. The plant will start operation next year and linear accelerator /10 MeV, 15 kW/ for this purpose is already delivered. The pilot plant for food preservation and hygenization has been built. It is equipped in small pilot accelerator 10 MeV, 1 kW and will be furnished with 10 MeV, 10 kW lineac this year. Beside of this technological lines Institute is furnished in Van de Graff accelerator /2, MeV, 100 μA/ and another laboratory unit LAE-10 /10 MeV, 10-100 ns 2 us/ is under construction. (J.P.N.)

  3. Future directions in particle and nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron beam facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geesaman, D.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [ed.

    1993-11-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics in particle and nuclear physics: hadron dynamics; lepton physics; spin physics; hadron and nuclear spectroscopy; hadronic weak interactions; and Eta physics. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  4. Future directions in particle and nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geesaman, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics in particle and nuclear physics: hadron dynamics; lepton physics; spin physics; hadron and nuclear spectroscopy; hadronic weak interactions; and Eta physics. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere

  5. The ISOLDE Facility: Radioactive beams at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The Isope Separation On-Line (ISOL) technique evolved from chemical techniques used to separate radioactive isotopes off-line from irradiated "targets". The ISOL targets of today, used at e.g. ISOLDE, can be of many different types and in different phases but the isotopes are always delivered at very low energies making the technique ideal for study of ground state properties and collections for other applications such as solid state physics and medical physics. The possibility of accelerating these low energy beams for nuclear structure studies, and in the long term future for neutrino physics, is now being explored at first generation radioactive beam facilities. The upgrade towards HIE-ISOLDE aim to consolidate ISOLDE's position as a world leading radioactive nuclear beam facility and it will be a pre-cursor to a future all European ISOL facility, EURISOL, with order of magnitudes higher radioactive beam intensities and energies. Prerequisite knowledge and references: None

  6. Yield calculations for a facility for short-lived nuclear beams

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, C L; Gomes, I; Heinz, A M; Nolen, Jerry A; Rehm, K E; Savard, G; Schiffer, J P

    2002-01-01

    Yields for a broad range of radioactive nuclei produced by spallation reactions, neutron-induced fission, in-flight projectile fragmentation and in-flight fission have been calculated for beams of stable nuclei at energies of 100-1000 MeV/u. Calculations of cross-sections and yields, attenuation effects due to absorption, production from secondary reactions, and transport efficiencies for mass selection are discussed. Rare isotope yields as functions of bombarding energies for both reaccelerated and directly produced fast-fragmentation beams are presented. This information provides a foundation for a cost-effective design of a next generation rare isotope accelerator.

  7. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.; Bisognano, J.J.; Diamond, W.I.; Hartline, B.K.; Leemann, C.W.; Mougey, J.; Sundelin, R.M.; York, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    On February 13, 1987, construction started on the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility - a 4-GeV, 200-μA, continuous beam, electron accelerator facility designed for nuclear physics research. The machine has a racetrack configuration with two antiparallel, 500-MeV, superconducting linac segments connected by beam lines to allow four passes of recirculation. The accelerating structure consists of 1500-MHz, five-cell niobium cavities developed at Cornell University. A liquid helium cryogenic system cools the cavities to an operating temperature of 2 K. Beam extraction after any three of the four passes allows simultaneous delivery of up to three beams of independently variable currents and different, but correlated, energies to the three experimental areas. Beam breakup thresholds exceed the design current by nearly two orders of magnitude. Project completion and the start of physics operations are scheduled for 1993. The total estimated cost is $255 million

  8. Physics with radioactive nuclear beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, R.N.; Tanihata, I.

    1992-01-01

    Recently developed facilities allow a wide range of new investigations of the reactions and properties of short-lived nuclei. These studies may help to solve puzzles of nuclear structure and the Big Bang. The purpose of nuclear physics is to measure properties of specific nuclides and infer from them global properties common to all nuclides. One goal, for example, is to understand nuclear sizes and matter distributions in terms of basic nuclear forces. Another is to understand the variation throughout the periodic table of the dominant quantum states, which are known as the open-quotes nuclear shell modelclose quotes states and are characterized, much as are atomic states, by a principal quantum number and by orbital and total angular momentum quantum numbers. In turn other nuclear phenomena, such as the collective excitations known as giant resonances, can be understood in terms of the shell-model configurations and basic nuclear parameters. Radioactive nuclear beam studies of reactions of short-lived nuclides have already yielded results with important ramifications in both nuclear physics and astrophysics. Nuclear physicists expect unstable nuclides to exhibit unusual structures or features that may test their understanding of known nuclear phenomena at extreme conditions, and perhaps even to reveal previously unknown nuclear phenomena, Astrophysicists, for their part, have known for several decades that processes in both Big Bang nucleosynthesis and stellar nucleosynthesis involve short-lived nuclides. Indeed, the original motivation for developing radioactive nuclear beams was astrophysical. 25 refs., 7 figs

  9. Physics with radioactive nuclear beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, R.N.

    1995-01-01

    Recently developed facilities allow a wide range of new investigations of the reactions and properties of short-lived nuclei. These studies may help to solve puzzles of nuclear structure and the Big Bang. The purpose of nuclear physics is to measure properties of specific nuclides and infer from them global properties common to all nuclides, for example, is to understand nuclear sizes and matter distributions in terms of basic nuclear forces. Another is to understand the variation throughout the periodic table of the dominant quantum states, which are known as the open-quotes nuclear shell model close quotes states and are characterized, much as are atomic states, by a principal quantum number and by orbital and total angular momentum quantum numbers. In turn other nuclear phenomena, such as the collective excitations known as giant resonances, can be understood in terms of the shell-model configurations and basic nuclear parameters. Radioactive nuclear beam studies of reactions of short-lived nuclides have already yielded results with important ramifications in both nuclear physics and astrophysics. Nuclear physicists expect unstable nuclides to exhibit unusual structures or features that may test their understanding of known nuclear phenomena at extreme conditions, and perhaps even to reveal previously unknown nuclear phenomena, Astrophysicists, for their part, have known for several decades that processes in both Big Bang nucleosynthesis and stellar nucleosynthesis involve short-lived nuclides. Indeed, the original motivation for developing radioactive nuclear beams was astrophysical. (author). 25 refs., 7 figs

  10. Beam trajectory simulation program at the National Institute of Nuclear Research Tandem Accelerator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murillo C, G.

    1996-01-01

    The main object of this thesis is to show in a clear and simple way to the people in general, the function of the Tandem Accelerator located on site the ININ facilities. For this presentation, a computer program was developed. The software written in C language in a structural form, simulates the ion production and its trajectory in a schematic and in an easy way to comprehend. According to the goals of this work, the simulation also shows details of some of the machine components like the source, the accelerator cavity, ,and the bombarding chamber. Electric and magnetic fields calculations are included for the 90 degrees bending magnet and quadrupoles. (Author)

  11. Cluster ion beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popok, V.N.; Prasalovich, S.V.; Odzhaev, V.B.; Campbell, E.E.B.

    2001-01-01

    A brief state-of-the-art review in the field of cluster-surface interactions is presented. Ionised cluster beams could become a powerful and versatile tool for the modification and processing of surfaces as an alternative to ion implantation and ion assisted deposition. The main effects of cluster-surface collisions and possible applications of cluster ion beams are discussed. The outlooks of the Cluster Implantation and Deposition Apparatus (CIDA) being developed in Guteborg University are shown

  12. A neutron beam facility at Spiral-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledoux, X.; Bauge, E.; Belier, G.; Ethvignot, T.; Taieb, J.; Varignon, C. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, DIF, 91 (France); Andriamonje, S.; Dore, D.; Dupont, E.; Gunsing, F.; Ridikas, D.; Takibayev, A. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SPhN, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Blideanu, V. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU/Senac, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, 33 (France); Ban, G.; Lecolley, F.R.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lecouey, J.L.; Marie, N.; Steckmeyer, J.C. [LPC, 14 - Caen (France); Dessagne, P.; Kerveno, M.; Rudolf, G. [IPHC, 57 - Strasbourg (France); Bem, P.; Mrazek, J.; Novak, J. [NPI, Rez (Czech Republic); Blomgren, J.; Pomp, S. [Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy (Sweden); Fischer, U.; Herber, S.; Simakov, S.P. [FZK, Karlsruhe (Germany); Jacquot, B.; Rejmund, F. [GANIL, 14 - Caen (France); Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Borcea, C.; Negoita, F.; Petrascu, M. [NIPNE, Bucharest (Romania); Oberstedt, S.; Plompen, A.J.M. [JRC/IRMM, Geel (Belgium); Shcherbakov, O. [PNPI, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Fallot, M. [Subatech, 44 - Nantes (France); Smith, A.G.; Tsekhanovich, I. [Manchester Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Serot, O.; Sublet, J.C. [CEA Cadarache, DEN, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Perrot, L.; Tassan-Got, L. [IPNO, 91 - Orsay (France); Caillaud, T.; Giot, L.; Landoas, O.; Ramillon, J.M.; Rosse, B.; Thfoin, I. [CIMAP, 14 - Caen (France); Balanzat, E.; Bouffard, S.; Guillous, S.; Oberstedt, A. [Orebro Univ. (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    The future Spiral-2 facility, dedicated to the production of intense radioactive ion beams, is based on a high-power superconducting driver Linac, delivering high-intensity deuteron, proton and heavy ion beams. These beams are particularly well suited to the production of neutrons in the 100 keV- 40 MeV energy range, a facility called 'Neutrons for Science' (NFS) will be built in the LINAG Experimental Area (LEA). NFS, operational in 2012, will be composed of a pulsed neutron beam for in-flight measurements and irradiation stations for activation measurements and material studies. Thick C and Be converters and a deuteron beam will produce an intense continuous neutron spectrum, while a thin {sup 7}Li target and a proton beam allow to generate quasi-mono-energetic neutrons. In the present work we show how the primary ion beam characteristics (energy, time resolution and intensity) are adequate to create a neutron time-of-flight facility delivering intense neutron fluxes in the 100 keV-40 MeV energy range. Irradiation stations for neutron, proton and deuteron reactions will also allow to perform cross-section measurements by means of the activation technique. Light-ion beams will be used to study radiation damage effects on materials for the nuclear industry. (authors)

  13. Beam Characterizations at Femtosecond Electron Beam Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Rimjaem, Sakhorn; Kangrang, Nopadol; Kusoljariyakul, Keerati; Rhodes, Michael W; Saisut, Jatuporn; Thongbai, Chitrlada; Vilaithong, Thiraphat; Wichaisirimongkol, Pathom; Wiedemann, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    The SURIYA project at the Fast Neutron Research Facility (FNRF) has been established and is being commissioning to generate femtosecond electron pulses. Theses short pulses are produced by a system consisting of an S-band thermionic cathode RF-gun, an alpha magnet as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a linear accelerator. The characteristics of its major components and the beam characterizations as well as the preliminary experimental results will be presented and discussed.

  14. Development of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatum, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) construction project has been completed and the first radioactive ion beam has been successfully accelerated. The project, which began in 1992, has involved numerous facility modifications. The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron has been converted from an energy booster for heavy ion beams to a light ion accelerator with internal ion source. A target-ion source and mass analysis system have been commissioned as key components of the facility's radioactive ion beam injector to the 25MV tandem electrostatic accelerator. Beam transport lines have been completed, and new diagnostics for very low intensity beams have been developed. Work continues on a unified control system. Development of research quality radioactive beams for the nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics communities continues. This paper details facility development to date

  15. Poster: The EURISOL Beta-beam facility

    CERN Document Server

    The beta-beam concept for the generation of an electron (anti-)neutrino beam was proposed by Piero Zucchelli (CERN) in 2002. A first study of the possibility of using the existing CERN machines for the acceleration for radioactive ions to a relativistic gamma of roughly 100, for later storage in a new decay ring of approximately the size of SPS, was made in 2002. The results from this very first short study were very encouraging.In 2004 it was decided to incorporate a design study for the beta-beam within the EURISOL DS proposal. EURISOL is a project name for a next-generation radioactive beam facility based on the ISOL method for the production of intense radioactive beams for nuclear physics, astrophysics and other applications. The proposal was accepted with the beta-beam task as an integral part. The design study officially started 1 February 2005 and will run for 4 years resulting in a conceptual design report for a beta-beam facility.

  16. Pumps for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The guide describes how the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) controls pumps and their motors at nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities. The scope of the control is determined by the Safety Class of the pump in question. The various phases of the control are: (1) review of construction plan, (2) control of manufacturing, and construction inspection, (3) commissioning inspection, and (4) control during operation. STUK controls Safety Class 1, 2 and 3 pumps at nuclear facilities as described in this guide. STUK inspects Class EYT (non-nuclear) pumps separately or in connection with the commissioning inspections of the systems. This guide gives the control procedure and related requirements primarily for centrifugal pumps. However, it is also applied to the control of piston pumps and other pump types not mentioned in this guide

  17. Decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, K.M.; Jenkins, C.E.; Waite, D.A.; Brooksbank, R.E.; Lunis, B.C.; Nemec, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the currently accepted alternatives for decommissioning retired light water reactor fuel cycle facilities and the current state of decommissioning technology. Three alternatives are recognized: Protective Storage; Entombment; and Dismantling. Application of these alternatives to the following types of facilities is briefly described: light water reactors; fuel reprocessing plants, and mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants. Brief descriptions are given of decommissioning operations and results at a number of sites, and recent studies of the future decommissioning of prototype fuel cycle facilities are reviewed. An overview is provided of the types of operations performed and tools used in common decontamination and decommissioning techniques and needs for improved technology are suggested. Planning for decommissioning a nuclear facility is dependent upon the maximum permitted levels of residual radioactive contamination. Proposed guides and recently developed methodology for development of site release criteria are reviewed. 21 fig, 32 references

  18. Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility Development and Status

    CERN Document Server

    Tatum, Alan

    2005-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) is a national user facility dedicated to nuclear structure, reactions, and nuclear astrophysics research with radioactive ion beams (RIBs) using the isotope separator on-line (ISOL) technique. An integrated strategic plan for physics, experimental systems, and RIB production facilities have been developed and implementation of the plan is under way. Specific research objectives are defined for studying the nature of nucleonic matter, the origin of elements, solar physics, and synthesis of heavy elements. Experimental systems upgrade plans include new detector arrays and beam lines, and expansion and upgrade of existing devices. A multifaceted facility expansion plan includes a $4.75M High Power Target Laboratory (HPTL), presently under construction, to provide a facility for testing new target materials, target geometries, ion sources, and beam preparation techniques. Additional planned upgrades include a second RIB production system (IRIS2), an external axi...

  19. Dismantling of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallec, Michele; Kus, Jean-Pierre; Mogavero, Robert; Genelot, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Although the operational life of nuclear plants is long (around 60 years for French reactors) it is nonetheless limited in time, the stopping of it being essentially due to the obsolescence of materials and processes or to economic or safety considerations. The nuclear power plants are then subjected to cleanup and dismantling operations which have different objectives and require specific techniques. The cleanup and/or dismantling of a nuclear power produces significant quantities of waste which is generally of a different nature to that produced during the operation of the concerned plant. The radioactive waste produced by these operations is destined to be sent to the waste disposal facilities of the French National Agency for the Management of Nuclear Waste. (authors)

  20. Robotics for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Akira; Nakayama, Ryoichi; Kubo, Katsumi

    1988-01-01

    It is highly desirable that automatic or remotely controlled machines perform inspection and maintenance tasks in nuclear facilities. Toshiba has been working to develop multi-functional robots, with one typical example being a master-slave manipulator for use in reprocessing facilities. At the same time, the company is also working on the development of multi-purpose intelligent robots. One such device, an automatic inspection robot, to be deployed along a monorail, performs inspection by means of image processing technology, while and advanced intelligent maintenance robot is equipped with a special wheel-locomotion mechanism and manipulator and is designed to perform maintenance tasks. (author)

  1. Nuclear astrophysics with radioactive beams: a TRIUMF perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shotter, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Explosive nuclear burning in stellar environments involves reactions with a wide range of isotopes. For isotopes that are unstable, information on relevant reaction rates can only generally be obtained at radioactive beam facilities. The ISAC facility at TRIUMF is purpose built to provide a wide range of radioactive beams for nuclear astrophysics purposes as well as a range of other science

  2. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Nuclear Physics program is a comprehensive program of interdependent experimental and theoretical investigation of atomic nuclei. Long range goals are an understanding of the interactions, properties, and structures of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter at the most elementary level possible and an understanding of the fundamental forces of nature by using nuclei as a proving ground. Basic ingredients of the program are talented and imaginative scientists and a diversity of facilities to provide the variety of probes, instruments, and computational equipment needed for modern nuclear research. Approximately 80% of the total Federal support of basic nuclear research is provided through the Nuclear Physics program; almost all of the remaining 20% is provided by the National Science Foundation. Thus, the Department of Energy (DOE) has a unique responsibility for this important area of basic science and its role in high technology. Experimental and theoretical investigations are leading us to conclude that a new level of understanding of atomic nuclei is achievable. This optimism arises from evidence that: (1) the mesons, protons, and neutrons which are inside nuclei are themselves composed of quarks and gluons and (2) quantum chromodynamics can be developed into a theory which both describes correctly the interaction among quarks and gluons and is also an exact theory of the strong nuclear force. These concepts are important drivers of the Nuclear Physics program

  3. ECR ion source based low energy ion beam facility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mass analyzed highly charged ion beams of energy ranging from a few keV to a few MeV plays an important role in various aspects of research in modern physics. In this paper a unique low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) set up at Nuclear Science Centre (NSC) for providing low and medium energy multiply charged ion ...

  4. Dismantling of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallec, M.; Kus, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear facilities have a long estimable lifetime but necessarily limited in time. At the end of their operation period, basic nuclear installations are the object of cleansing operations and transformations that will lead to their definitive decommissioning and then to their dismantling. Because each facility is somewhere unique, cleansing and dismantling require specific techniques. The dismantlement consists in the disassembly and disposing off of big equipments, in the elimination of radioactivity in all rooms of the facility, in the demolition of buildings and eventually in the reconversion of all or part of the facility. This article describes these different steps: 1 - dismantling strategy: main de-construction guidelines, expected final state; 2 - industries and sites: cleansing and dismantling at the CEA, EDF's sites under de-construction; 3 - de-construction: main steps, definitive shutdown, preparation of dismantling, electromechanical dismantling, cleansing/decommissioning, demolition, dismantling taken into account at the design stage, management of polluted soils; 4 - waste management: dismantlement wastes, national policy of radioactive waste management, management of dismantlement wastes; 5 - mastery of risks: risk analysis, conformability of risk management with reference documents, main risks encountered at de-construction works; 6 - regulatory procedures; 7 - international overview; 8 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  5. Filters in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, K.H.; Wilhelm, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The topics of the nine papers given include the behavior of HEPA filters during exposure to air flows of high humidity as well as of high differential pressure, the development of steel-fiber filters suitable for extreme operating conditions, and the occurrence of various radioactive iodine species in the exhaust air from boiling water reactors. In an introductory presentation the German view of the performance requirements to be met by filters in nuclear facilities as well as the present status of filter quality assurance are discussed. (orig.) [de

  6. Decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, S.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear facilities present a number of problems at the end of their working lives. They require dismantling and removal but public and environmental protection remain a priority. The principles and strategies are outlined. Experience of decommissioning in France and the U.K. had touched every major stage of the fuel cycle by the early 1990's. Decommissioning projects attempt to restrict waste production and proliferation as waste treatment and disposal are costly. It is concluded that technical means exist to deal with present civil plant and costs are now predictable. Strategies for decommissioning and future financial provisions are important. (UK)

  7. Nuclear reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wampole, N.C.

    1978-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of manitenance and inspections it is proposed for a nuclear reactor facility with a primary circuit containing liquid metal to provide a thermally insulated chamber, within which are placed a number of components of the primary circuit, as e.g. valves, recirculation pump, heat exchangers. The isolated placement permit controlled preheating on one hand, but prevents undesirable heating of adjacent load-bearing elements on the other. The chamber is provided with heating devices and, on the outside, with cooling devices; it is of advantage to fill it with an inert gas. (UWI) 891 HP [de

  8. Steel structures for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In the guide the requirements concerning design and fabrication of steel structures for nuclear facilities and documents to be submitted to the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) are presented. Furthermore, regulations concerning inspection of steel structures during construction of nuclear facilities and during their operation are set forth

  9. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunning, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    Collaborative studies are in progress in the U.K. between the U.K.A.E.A., the Generating Boards and other outside bodies, to identify the development issues and practical aspects of decommissioning redundant nuclear facilities. The various types of U.K.A.E.A. experimental reactors (D.F.R., W.A.G.R , S.G.H.W.R.) in support of the nuclear power development programme, together with the currently operating commercial 26 Magnox reactors in 11 stations, totalling some 5 GW will be retired before the end of the century and attention is focussed on these. The actual timing of withdrawal from service will be dictated by development programme requirements in the case of experimental reactors and by commercial and technical considerations in the case of electricity production reactors. Decommissioning studies have so far been confined to technical appraisals including the sequence logic of achieving specific objectives and are based on the generally accepted three stage progression. Stage 1, which is essentially a defuelling and coolant removal operation, is an interim phase. Stage 2 is a storage situation, the duration of which will be influenced by environmental pressures or economic factors including the re-use of existing sites. Stage 3, which implies removal of all active and non-active waste material and returning the site to general use, must be the ultimate objective. The engineering features and the radioactive inventory of the system must be assessed in detail to avoid personnel or environmental hazards during Stage 2. These factors will also influence decisions on the degree of Stage 2 decommissioning and its duration, bearing in mind that for Stage 3 activation may govern the waste disposal route and the associated radiation man-rem exposure during dismantling. Ideally, planning for decommissioning should be considered at the design stage of the facility. An objective of present studies is to identify features which would assist decommissioning of future systems

  10. Security culture for nuclear facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deeksha; Bajramovic, Edita

    2017-01-01

    Natural radioactive elements are part of our environment and radioactivity is a natural phenomenon. There are numerous beneficial applications of radioactive elements (radioisotopes) and radiation, starting from power generation to usages in medical, industrial and agriculture applications. But the risk of radiation exposure is always attached to operational workers, the public and the environment. Hence, this risk has to be assessed and controlled. The main goal of safety and security measures is to protect human life, health, and the environment. Currently, nuclear security considerations became essential along with nuclear safety as nuclear facilities are facing rapidly increase in cybersecurity risks. Therefore, prevention and adequate protection of nuclear facilities from cyberattacks is the major task. Historically, nuclear safety is well defined by IAEA guidelines while nuclear security is just gradually being addressed by some new guidance, especially the IAEA Nuclear Security Series (NSS), IEC 62645 and some national regulations. At the overall level, IAEA NSS 7 describes nuclear security as deterrence and detection of, and response to, theft, sabotage, unauthorized access, illegal transfer or other malicious acts involving nuclear, other radioactive substances and their associated facilities. Nuclear security should be included throughout nuclear facilities. Proper implementation of a nuclear security culture leads to staff vigilance and a high level of security posture. Nuclear security also depends on policy makers, regulators, managers, individual employees and members of public. Therefore, proper education and security awareness are essential in keeping nuclear facilities safe and secure.

  11. Nuclear fuel storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takashi; Isaka, Shinji.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the spent fuel storage capacity and reduce the installation cost in a nuclear fuel storage facility. Constitution: Fuels handled in the nuclear fuel storage device of the present invention include the following four types: (1) fresh fuels, (2) 100 % reactor core charged fuels, (3) spent fuels just after taking out and (4) fuels after a certain period (for example one half-year) from taking out of the reactor. Reactivity is high for the fuels (1), and some of fuels (2), while low in the fuels (3) (4), Source intensity is strong for the fuels (3) and some of the fuels (2), while it is low for the fuels (1) and (4). Taking notice of the fact that the reactivity, radioactive source intensity and generated after heat are different in the respective fuels, the size of the pool and the storage capacity are increased by the divided storage control. While on the other hand, since the division is made in one identical pool, the control method becomes important, and the working range is restricted by means of a template, interlock, etc., the operation mode of the handling machine is divided into four, etc. for preventing errors. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. Concrete structures for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The detailed requirements for the design and fabrication of the concrete structures for nuclear facilities and for the documents to be submitted to the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) are given in the guide. It also sets the requirements for the inspection of concrete structures during the construction and operation of facilities. The requirements of the guide primarily apply to new construction. As regards the repair and modification of nuclear facilities built before its publication, the guide is followed to the extent appropriate. The regulatory activities of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety during a nuclear facility's licence application review and during the construction and operation of the facility are summarised in the guide YVL 1.1

  13. Novel uses of a wide beam saddle field ion source for producing targets used in nuclear physics experiments at the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, J.P.; Thomas, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    The wide beam ion sputter source has several unique characteristics which make it very useful for producing, reducing the thickness or cleaning the surface of targets needed for nuclear physics experiments. A discussion of these techniques as well as the sputter source characteristics will be given. Sputter yields obtained utilizing the source are presented for a variety of materials common to nuclear target production

  14. Childhood leukemia around nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Information Bulletin highlights the conclusion made from an Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada (AECB) study on the incidence of childhood leukemia near nuclear facilities. All of the locations with the nuclear facilities are located in Ontario, the nuclear generating stations at Pickering and Bruce; the uranium mines and mills in Elliot Lake; the uranium refining facility in Port Hope; and nuclear research facilities located at Chalk River plus the small nuclear power plant in Rolphton. Two conclusions are drawn from the study: 1) while the rate of childhood leukemias made be higher or lower than the provincial average, there is no statistical evidence that the difference is due to anything but the natural variation in the occurrence of the disease; and 2) the rate of occurrence of childhood leukemia around the Pickering nuclear power station was slightly greater than the Ontario average both before and after the plant opened, but this, too , could be due to the natural variation

  15. Assembling of a low energy ion beam analysis facility and use of Nuclear Microprobe techniques in geological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utui, R

    1996-11-01

    In this work, both PIXE and ion beam induced luminescence, or just Ionoluminescence (IL) were used for geochemical studies. The possibility of rapid absolute quantification of elements in the ppm level by PIXE combined with the yet higher sensitivity of IL to transition metals and Rare Earth Elements (REE) activators, in the absence of quenching phenomena, allow for a synergic use of the two methods in geological applications with enhanced sensitivity. IL and PIXE were combined for studying REE distribution in apatite minerals and ion beam induced damage in inorganic material in general with emphasis to synthetically grown zircon crystals doped with REE. Due to the sensitivity of IL to changes in chemical bonding in the material, beam damage effects can be studied even at low integrated doses, through wavelength shift or fading of the induced light. Micro PIXE technique was used for studying profile concentrations of trace elements in pyrite grains and of elements used as geothermometers. Geothermometry allowed to assess the cooling rates in iron meteorites and the mineralization conditions in metamorphic rocks, attempting to describe the tectonic history of the terranes, with application in petrologic studies and geological prospecting. 148 refs.

  16. Assembling of a low energy ion beam analysis facility and use of Nuclear Microprobe techniques in geological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utui, R.

    1996-11-01

    In this work, both PIXE and ion beam induced luminescence, or just Ionoluminescence (IL) were used for geochemical studies. The possibility of rapid absolute quantification of elements in the ppm level by PIXE combined with the yet higher sensitivity of IL to transition metals and Rare Earth Elements (REE) activators, in the absence of quenching phenomena, allow for a synergic use of the two methods in geological applications with enhanced sensitivity. IL and PIXE were combined for studying REE distribution in apatite minerals and ion beam induced damage in inorganic material in general with emphasis to synthetically grown zircon crystals doped with REE. Due to the sensitivity of IL to changes in chemical bonding in the material, beam damage effects can be studied even at low integrated doses, through wavelength shift or fading of the induced light. Micro PIXE technique was used for studying profile concentrations of trace elements in pyrite grains and of elements used as geothermometers. Geothermometry allowed to assess the cooling rates in iron meteorites and the mineralization conditions in metamorphic rocks, attempting to describe the tectonic history of the terranes, with application in petrologic studies and geological prospecting. 148 refs

  17. Microdosimetric investigation at the therapeutic proton beam facility of CATANA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nardo, L; Moro, D; Colautti, P; Conte, V; Tornielli, G; Cuttone, G

    2004-01-01

    Proton beams (62 Mev) are used by the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of the Italian Institute of Nuclear Physics to treat eye melanoma tumours at the therapeutic facility called CATANA. A cylindrical slim tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) of 2.7 mm external diameter has been used to compare the radiation quality of two spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBP) at the CATANA proton beam.

  18. Microdosimetric investigation at the therapeutic proton beam facility of Catana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Nardo, L.; Moro, D.; Colautti, P.; Conte, V.; Tornielli, G.; Cuttone, G.

    2004-01-01

    Proton beams (62 Mev) are used by the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of the Italian Inst. of Nuclear Physics to treat eye melanoma tumours at the therapeutic facility called CATANA. A cylindrical slim tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) of 2.7 mm external diameter has been used to compare the radiation quality of two spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBP) at the CATANA proton beam. (authors)

  19. Omega: A 24-beam UV irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, M.C.; Beich, W.; Delettrez, J.

    1985-01-01

    The authors report on the characterization and performance of the 24-beam Omega laser facility under full third harmonic (351-nm) upconversion. This system provides for the first time a multibeam laser facility for the illumination of spherical targets with UV laser light in symmetric irradiation conditions with energies in the kilojoule range. This facility is capable of providing sufficient irradiation uniformity to test concepts of direct drive laser fusion with UV-driven ablation targets. The results of initial studies of ablatively driven DT-fueled glass microballoon targets will be described. The 24-beam Omega Nd:phosphate glass facility is capable of providing at 1054 nm output powers in excess of 10 TW in short ( 10 4 full system shots to date) irradiation facility with beam synchronism of approx. =3 psec, beam placement accuracy on target of 10 μm, and interbeam energy variance of approx. =2%. From measured target plane intensity distributions, overall illumination uniformity with tangentially focused beams is estimated to be approx. =5%. In 1984, a symmetric set of six beams was upconverted to 351-nm radiation using the polarization-mismatch scheme developed by Craxton. Monolithic cells of 20-cm clear aperture containing both frequency and doubler and tripler type II KDP crystals in index-matching propylene carbonate liquid were incorporated to output of six of the Omega beams with a full set of UV beam diagnostics

  20. Nuclear astrophysics with radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, C.A.; Gade, A.

    2010-01-01

    The quest to comprehend how nuclear processes influence astrophysical phenomena is driving experimental and theoretical research programs worldwide. One of the main goals in nuclear astrophysics is to understand how energy is generated in stars, how elements are synthesized in stellar events and what the nature of neutron stars is. New experimental capabilities, the availability of radioactive beams and increased computational power paired with new astronomical observations have advanced the present knowledge. This review summarizes the progress in the field of nuclear astrophysics with a focus on the role of indirect methods and reactions involving beams of rare isotopes.

  1. The continuous electron beam accelerator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    Tunnel construction and accelerator component development, assembly, and testing are under way at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. CEBAF's 4-GeV, 200-μA superconducting recirculating accelerator will provide cw beam to simultaneous experiments in three end stations for studies of the nuclear many-body system, its quark substructure, and the strong and electroweak interactions governing this form of matter. Prototype accelerating cavities, assembled in cryostats and tested on site, continue to exceed performance specifications. An on-site liquid helium capability supports cryostat development and cavity testing. Major elements of the accelerator instrumentation and control hardware and software are in use in cryogenics, rf, and injector tests. Prototype rf systems have been operated and prototype klystrons have been ordered. The initial, 100-keV, room-temperature region of the 45-MeV injector is operational and meets specifications. CEBAF's end stations have been conceptually designed; experimental equipment conceptual designs will be completed in 1989. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Radioactive ion beam facilities in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The past two decades have seen extraordinarily rapid development of radioactive beam physics throughout the world and in particular in Europe. The important scientific advances have stemmed from a large number of facilities. Previously existing stable beam machines have been adapted to produce rare isotope beams and dedicated facilities have come on-line. This talk gives an overview of the present European installations highlighting their complementary nature. The European roadmap calls for the construction of two next generation facilities: FAIR making use of projectile fragmentation and EURISOL based on the ISOL technique. The future FAIR facility will be described and the path towards EURISOL presented in the light of the construction of 'intermediate' generation facilities SPIRAL2, HIE ISOLDE and SPES and results from the ongoing EURISOL Design Study.

  3. Earthquake engineering for nuclear facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Kuno, Michiya

    2017-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive compilation of earthquake- and tsunami-related technologies and knowledge for the design and construction of nuclear facilities. As such, it covers a wide range of fields including civil engineering, architecture, geotechnical engineering, mechanical engineering, and nuclear engineering, for the development of new technologies providing greater resistance against earthquakes and tsunamis. It is crucial both for students of nuclear energy courses and for young engineers in nuclear power generation industries to understand the basics and principles of earthquake- and tsunami-resistant design of nuclear facilities. In Part I, "Seismic Design of Nuclear Power Plants", the design of nuclear power plants to withstand earthquakes and tsunamis is explained, focusing on buildings, equipment's, and civil engineering structures. In Part II, "Basics of Earthquake Engineering", fundamental knowledge of earthquakes and tsunamis as well as the dynamic response of structures and foundation ground...

  4. Environmental monitoring of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, M.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives of one environmental monitoring program for nuclear facilities, are presented. The program in Federal Republic of Germany, its goals, its basic conditions, its regulations, and its dose limits are emphasized. (E.G.) [pt

  5. Radioactive ion beam facilities at INFN LNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rifuggiato, D; Calabretta, L; Celona, L; Chines, F; Cosentino, L; Cuttone, G; Finocchiaro, P; Pappalardo, A; Re, M; Rovelli, A

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive ion beams are produced at INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) by means of the two operating accelerators, the Tandem and the Superconducting Cyclotron (CS), originally designed to accelerate stable beams. Both the ISOL (Isotope Separation On Line) and the IFF (In-Flight Fragmentation) methods are exploited to produce RIBs in two different ways at different energies: in the first case, the Cyclotron is the primary accelerator and the Tandem accelerates the secondary beams, while in the second case radioactive fragments are produced by the Cyclotron beam in a thin target with energies comparable to the primary beam energy. The ISOL facility is named EXCYT (Exotics at the Cyclotron and Tandem) and was commissioned in 2006, when the first radioactive beam ( 8 Li) has been produced. The IFF installation is named FRIBs (in Flight Radioactive Ion Beams), and it has started to produce radioactive beams in 2001, placing a thin target in the extraction beam line of the Cyclotron. The development of both facilities to produce and accelerate radioactive ion beams at LNS, is briefly described, with some details on the future prospects that are presently under consideration or realization.

  6. Nuclear facilities licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, A.J.M. de.

    1978-01-01

    The need for the adoption of a legal and normative system, defining objectives, pescriptions and the process of nuclear licensing and building of nuclear power plants in Brazil is enphasized. General rules for the development of this system are presented. The Brazilian rules on the matter are discussed. A general view of the German legal system for nuclear power plant licensing and the IAEA recommendations on the subject are finally presented. (A.L.S.L.) [pt

  7. Facilities for radiotherapy with ion beams status and worldwide developments

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, B H

    1999-01-01

    Forty-five years after the first ion beam therapy in Berkeley around 25,000 cancer patients worldwide have been treated successfully. Ion accelerators, designed for nuclear research, delivered most of this treatment. The first hospital-based facility started operation in 1998 at Loma Linda California, the first for heavier ions at Chiba, Japan in 1994 and the first commercially delivered facilities started operation in 1998 at Kashiwa, Japan. In 2000, the Harvard Medical Centre, Boston, US, will commence operation and several new facilities are planned or under construction worldwide, although none in Australia. This paper will discuss the physical and biological advantages of ion beams over x-rays and electrons. In the treatment of cancer patients ion beam therapy is especially suited for localised tumours in radiation sensitive areas like skull or spine. Heavier ions are also effective in anoxic tumour cells (found around the normally oxygenated cell population). An additional advantage of the heavier carbo...

  8. Fatigue damage of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The conference on the fatigue damage of nuclear facilities, organized by the SFEN (french society of nuclear energy), took place at Paris the 23. of november 2000. Eleven papers were presented, showing the state of the art and the research programs in the domain of the sizing rules, safety, installations damage, examination and maintenance. (A.L.B.)

  9. Decontamination of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-seven papers were presented at this conference in five sessions. Topics covered include regulation, control and consequences of decontamination; decontamination of components and facilities; chemical and non-chemical methods of decontamination; and TMI decontamination experience

  10. Facilities inventory protection for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    The fact that shut-down applications have been filed for nuclear power plants, suggests to have a scrutinizing look at the scopes of assessment and decision available to administrations and courts for the protection of facilities inventories relative to legal and constitutional requirements. The paper outlines the legal bases which need to be observed if purposeful calculation is to be ensured. Based on the different actual conditions and legal consequences, the author distinguishes between 1) the legal situation of facilities licenced already and 2) the legal situation of facilities under planning during the licencing stage. As indicated by the contents and restrictions of the pertinent provisions of the Atomic Energy Act and by the corresponding compensatory regulation, the object of the protection of facilities inventor in the legal position of the facility owner within the purview of the Atomic Energy Act, and the licensing proper. Art. 17 of the Atomic Energy Act indicates the legislators intent that, once issued, the licence will be the pivotal point for regulations aiming at protection and intervention. (orig./HSCH) [de

  11. Socket welds in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, P.A.; Torres, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    Socket welds are easier and faster to make than are butt welds. However, they are often not used in nuclear facilities because the crevices between the pipes and the socket sleeves may be subject to crevice corrosion. If socket welds can be qualified for wider use in facilities that process nuclear materials, the radiation exposures to welders can be significantly reduced. The current tests at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) are designed to determine if socket welds can be qualified for use in the waste processing system at a nuclear fuel processing plant

  12. The decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niel, J.Ch.; Rieu, J.; Lareynie, O.; Delrive, L.; Vallet, J.; Girard, A.; Duthe, M.; Lecomte, C.; Rozain, J.P.; Nokhamzon, J.G.; Davoust, M.; Eyraud, J.L.; Bernet, Ph.; Velon, M.; Gay, A.; Charles, Th.; Leschaeva, M.; Dutzer, M.; Maocec, Ch.; Gillet, G.; Brut, F.; Dieulot, M.; Thuillier, D.; Tournebize, F.; Fontaine, V.; Goursaud, V.; Birot, M.; Le Bourdonnec, Th.; Batandjieva, B.; Theis, St.; Walker, St.; Rosett, M.; Cameron, C.; Boyd, A.; Aguilar, M.; Brownell, H.; Manson, P.; Walthery, R.; Wan Laer, W.; Lewandowski, P.; Dorms, B.; Reusen, N.; Bardelay, J.; Damette, G.; Francois, P.; Eimer, M.; Tadjeddine, A.; Sene, M.; Sene, R.

    2008-01-01

    This file includes five parts: the first part is devoted to the strategies of the different operators and includes the following files: the decommissioning of nuclear facilities Asn point of view, decommissioning of secret nuclear facilities, decommissioning at the civil Cea strategy and programs, EDF de-construction strategy, Areva strategy for decommissioning of nuclear facilities; the second one concerns the stakes of dismantling and includes the articles as follow: complete cleanup of buildings structures in nuclear facilities, decommissioning of nuclear facilities and safety assessment, decommissioning wastes management issues, securing the financing of long-term decommissioning and waste management costs, organizational and human factors in decommissioning projects, training for the decommissioning professions: the example of the Grenoble University master degree; the third part is devoted to the management of dismantling work sites and includes the different articles as follow: decommissioning progress at S.I.C.N. plant, example of decommissioning work site in Cea Grenoble: Siloette reactor decommissioning, matters related to decommissioning sites, decommissioning of french nuclear installations: the viewpoint of a specialist company, specificities of inspections during decommissioning: the Asn inspector point of view; the fourth part is in relation with the international approach and includes as follow: IAEA role in establishing a global safety regime on decommissioning, towards harmonization of nuclear safety practices in Europe: W.E.N.R.A. and the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, EPA superfund program policy for decontamination and decommissioning, progress with remediation at Sellafield, progress and experiences from the decommissioning of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant in Belgium, activities of I.R.S.N. and its daughter company Risk-audit I.r.s.n./G.r.s. international in the field of decommissioning of nuclear facilities in eastern countries

  13. The US nuclear science user facilities - 5276

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    The primary mission of the NSUF (Nuclear Science User Facilities) is to provide access, at no cost to the researcher, to world-class, state-of-the art capabilities and expertise to advance nuclear science and technology through high impact research. Through the NSUF, nuclear energy researchers can access specialized and often unique and expensive equipment and facilities, as well as the accompanying expertise, including nuclear test reactors, ion beam accelerators, hot cell post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment, synchrotron beam lines, and advanced radiologically qualified materials science PIE instrumentation. The NSUF can also support the design and fabrication of an irradiation experiment, the transport of that experiment to and from the reactor, the PIE activities, the analysis and interpretation of the data, and final material disposition. A special feature of the NSUF is its Sample Library of irradiated specimens made available to users that reduces investigation time and costs. Enhancing the Sample Library for future applications of advanced instrumentation and new ideas is a key goal of the NSUF. Similar to the effort on building a Sample Library, the NSUF is creating a searchable database of the infrastructure available to DOE-NE (Department Of Energy - Office of Nuclear Energy) supported researchers

  14. The ISOL exotic beam facility at LNS: the EXCYT project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciavola, G.; Calabretta, L.; Cuttone, G.; Di Bartolo, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Gammino, S.; Gu, M.; Migneco, E.; Raia, G.; Rifuggiato, D.; Rovelli, A.; Vinciguerra, D.; Qin, J.; Wollnik, H.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the EXCYT project (exotics with cyclotron and tandem) is the development of a facility for producing and accelerating exotic beams from 0.2 up to 8 MeV/amu. EXCYT is based on the ''two accelerators'' method. A K=800 superconducting cyclotron, axially injected by the ECR ion source SERSE, will deliver the primary beam. Such a beam will produce the required nuclear species in a modified ISOLDE type target-source complex. When required, a 15 MV tandem Van der Graaff will accelerate the secondary beams. Both accelerators are existing and operational at Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud. Concerning the status of the project, progress has been made in most of the key issues of the project, like the construction of SERSE, cyclotron upgrading, modification of the existing building, high resolution mass separator, and diagnostic equipment for low energy, low intensity beams. (orig.)

  15. The ISOL exotic beam facility at LNS: the EXCYT project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciavola, G.; Calabretta, L.; Cuttone, G.; Di Bartolo, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Gammino, S.; Gu, M.; Migneco, E.; Raia, G.; Rifuggiato, D.; Rovelli, A.; Vinciguerra, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Qin, J. [Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); Wollnik, H. [Giessen Univ. (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    The aim of the EXCYT project (exotics with cyclotron and tandem) is the development of a facility for producing and accelerating exotic beams from 0.2 up to 8 MeV/amu. EXCYT is based on the ``two accelerators`` method. A K=800 superconducting cyclotron, axially injected by the ECR ion source SERSE, will deliver the primary beam. Such a beam will produce the required nuclear species in a modified ISOLDE type target-source complex. When required, a 15 MV tandem Van der Graaff will accelerate the secondary beams. Both accelerators are existing and operational at Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud. Concerning the status of the project, progress has been made in most of the key issues of the project, like the construction of SERSE, cyclotron upgrading, modification of the existing building, high resolution mass separator, and diagnostic equipment for low energy, low intensity beams. (orig.). 8 refs.

  16. CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    This book describes the conceptual design of, and the planning for, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), which will be a high-intensity, continuous-wave electron linear accelerator (linac) for nuclear physics. Its principal scientific goal is to understand the quark structure, behavior, and clustering of individual nucleons in the nuclear medium, and simultaneously to understand the forces governing this behavior. The linac will consist of 1 GeV of accelerating structure, split into two antiparallel 0.5-GeV segments. The segments will be connected by a beam transport system to circulate the electron beams from one segment to the other for up to four complete passes of acceleration. The maximum beam energy will be 4 GeV at a design current of 200 microamperes. The accelerator complex will also include systems to extract three continuous beams from the linac and to deliver them to three experimental halls equipped with detectors and instrumentation for nuclear physics research. The accelerating structure will be kept superconducting within insulated cryostats filled with liquid helium produced at a central helium refrigerator and distributed to the cryostats via insulated transfer lines. An injector, instrumentation and controls for the accelerator, radio-frequency power systems, and several support facilities will also be provided. A cost estimate based on the Work Breakdown Structure has been completed. Assuming a five-year construction schedule starting early in FY 1987, the total estimated cost is $236 million (actual year dollars), including contingency

  17. Ventilation of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    In this work an examination is made of ventilation problems in nuclear installations, of the fuel cycle or the handling of radioactive compounds. The study covers the detection of radioactive aerosols, purification, iodine trapping, ventilation equipment and its maintenance, engineering, safety of ventilation, fire efficiency, operation, regulations and normalization [fr

  18. Sciences with radioactive nuclear beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawase, Yoichi

    1992-01-01

    The unstable nuclei which are produced with accelerators and nuclear reactors and are far apart from the stability line have been used mainly in nuclear physics field as the object of the systematic research on atomic nucleus structure. Recently, the projects for developing the advanced research in many fields by accelerating the obtained unstable nuclei have been proposed. The unstable nucleus beam which was accelerated to high energy and controlled precisely keeps the possibility of qualitatively improve further conventional ion beam science, and it is expected as the breakthrough in the interdisciplinary basic research related to atomic energy, therefore, its recent trend in the world is explained, hoping for the new development. The stable isotopes existing naturally distribute along the N-Z straight line, and as they are apart from the natural stability line, they become unstable to beta decay, and their life becomes short exponentially. The significance of unstable nucleus beam science and its recent trend, the production of unstable nucleus beam, the interdisciplinary research using unstable nucleus beam, and the present state and future plan in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University are reported. (K.I.)

  19. Upgrade and Development of Nuclear Data Production Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-04-15

    It is necessary to improve the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF) in order to be used as a nuclear data production facility for users in both domestic and abroad. We improved following items: (1) upgrade the electron linac, (2) collimators inside the TOF beam pipe, (3) the development and installation of an automatic sample changer, (4) the extension of the TOF beam line, and (5) the data acquisition system. We would like to establish a utilization system for users to measure the nuclear data at the PNF. To do this, we made manuals for the accelerator operation and the data acquisition system. We also made an application form to apply for users to measure the nuclear data in both domestic and abroad. The main object of the Pohang Neutron Facility is to measure the nuclear data in the neutron energy region from thermal neutron to few hundreds of eV. In addition to neutron beams produced at the PNF, photon and electron beams are produced in this facility. We thus utilize this facility for other fields, such as test facility for detectors, activation experiments, polarized neutron beam source, and so on. In addition to these, we could use this facility for training students

  20. Upgrade and development of nuclear data production test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namkung, Won; Ko, I. S.; Cho, M. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Kang, H. S. [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G. N. [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Koh, S. K. [Univ. of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Ro, T. I. [Donga Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, G. U. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-04-15

    It is necessary to improve the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF) in order to be used as a nuclear data production facility for users in both domestic and abroad. We improved following items: upgrade the electron linac, collimators inside the TOF beam pipe, the development and installation of an automatic sample changer, the extension of the TOF beam line, and the data acquisition system. We would like to establish a utilization system for users to measure the nuclear data at the PNF. To do this, we made manuals for the accelerator operation and the data acquisition system. We also made an application form to apply for users to measure the nuclear data in both domestic and abroad. The main object of the Pohang Neutron Facility is to measure the nuclear data in the neutron energy region from thermal neutron to few hundreds of eV. In addition to neutron beams produced at the PNF, photon and electron beams are produced in this facility. We thus utilize this facility for other fields, such as test facility for detectors, activation experiments, polarized neutron beam source, and so on. In addition to these, we could use this facility for training students.

  1. LAMPF: a nuclear research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingston, M.S.

    1977-09-01

    A description is given of the recently completed Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) which is now taking its place as one of the major installations in this country for the support of research in nuclear science and its applications. Descriptions are given of the organization of the Laboratory, the Users Group, experimental facilities for research and for applications, and procedures for carrying on research studies

  2. Nuclear Station Facilities Improvement Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooks, R. W.; Lunardini, A. L.; Zaben, O.

    1991-01-01

    An effective facilities improvement program will include a plan for the temporary relocation of personnel during the construction of an adjoining service building addition. Since the smooth continuation of plant operation is of paramount importance, the phasing plan is established to minimize the disruptions in day-to-day station operation and administration. This plan should consider the final occupancy arrangements and the transition to the new structure; for example, computer hookup and phase-in should be considered. The nuclear industry is placing more emphasis on safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. In order to do this, more emphasis is placed on operations and maintenance. This results in increased size of managerial, technical and maintenance staffs. This in turn requires improved office and service facilities. The facilities that require improvement may include training areas, rad waste processing and storage facilities, and maintenance facilities. This paper discusses an approach for developing an effective program to plan and implement these projects. These improvement projects can range in magnitude from modifying a simple system to building a new structure to allocating space for a future project. This paper addresses the planning required for the new structures with emphasis on site location, space allocation, and internal layout. Since facility planning has recently been completed by Sargent and Leyden at six U. S. nuclear stations, specific examples from some of those plants are presented. Site planning and the establishment of long-range goals are of the utmost importance when undertaking a facilities improvement program for a nuclear station. A plan that considers the total site usage will enhance the value of both the new and existing facilities. Proper planning at the beginning of the program can minimize costs and maximize the benefits of the program

  3. Disaster countermeasures around nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsuta, Yoshinori

    1982-01-01

    The following matters are described. Safety regulation administration for nuclear power plants; nuclear disaster countermeasures in the United States; disaster countermeasures around nuclear facilities (a report of the ad hoc committee in Nuclear Safety Commission), including general requirements, the scope of areas to take the countermeasures, emergency environmental monitoring, guidelines for taking the countermeasures, and emergency medical treatment. In the nuclear safety administration, the system of stationing safety expert personnel on the sites of nuclear power generation and qualifying the persons in charge of reactor operation in the control room is also introduced. As for the disaster countermeasures, such as the detection of an abnormal state, the notification of the abnormality to various organs concerned, the starting of emergency environmental monitoring, the establishment of the countermeasure headquarters, and emergency measures for the local people. (Mori, K.)

  4. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed

  5. Introduction to nuclear facilities engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapy, Georges

    2012-06-01

    Engineering, or 'engineer's art', aims at transforming simple principle schemes into operational facilities often complex especially when they concern the nuclear industry. This transformation requires various knowledge and skills: in nuclear sciences and technologies (nuclear physics, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, material properties, radiation protection..), as well as in non-nuclear sciences and technologies (civil engineering, mechanics, electricity, computer sciences, instrumentation and control..), and in the regulatory, legal, contractual and financial domains. This book explains how this huge body of knowledge and skills must be organized and coordinated to create a reliable, exploitable, available, profitable and long-lasting facility, together with respecting extremely high safety, quality, and environmental impact requirements. Each aspect of the problem is approached through the commented presentation of nuclear engineering macro-processes: legal procedures and administrative authorizations, nuclear safety/radiation protection/security approach, design and detailed studies, purchase of equipments, on-site construction, bringing into operation, financing, legal, contractual and logistic aspects, all under the global control of a project management. The 'hyper-complexness' of such an approach leads to hard points and unexpected events. The author identifies the most common ones and proposes some possible solutions to avoid, mitigate or deal with them. In a more general way, he proposes some thoughts about the performance factors of a nuclear engineering process

  6. Meteorological instrumentation for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A.C.L. da.

    1983-01-01

    The main requirements of regulatory agencies, concerning the meteorological instrumentation needed for the licensing of nuclear facilities are discussed. A description is made of the operational principles of sensors for the various meteorological parameters and associated electronic systems. An analysis of the problems associated with grounding of a typical meteorological station is presented. (Author) [pt

  7. Nuclear reactor containing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Masataka; Murase, Michio.

    1994-01-01

    In a reactor containing facility, a condensation means is disposed above the water level of a cooling water pool to condensate steams of the cooling water pool, and return the condensated water to the cooling water pool. Upon occurrence of a pipeline rupture accident, steams generated by after-heat of a reactor core are caused to flow into a bent tube, blown from the exit of the bent tube into a suppression pool and condensated in a suppression pool water, thereby suppressing the pressure in the reactor container. Cooling water in the cooling water pool is boiled by heat conduction due to the condensation of steams, then the steams are exhausted to the outside of the reactor container to remove the heat of the reactor container to the outside of the reactor. In addition, since cooling water is supplied to the cooling water pool quasi-permanently by gravity as a natural force, the reactor container can be cooled by the cooling water pool for a long period of time. Since the condensation means is constituted with a closed loop and interrupted from the outside, radioactive materials are never released to the outside. (N.H.)

  8. Nuclear power generation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Mitsuji.

    1996-01-01

    Main steams are introduced from a moisture separation device for removing moisture content of the main steams to a low pressure turbine passing through a cross-around pipe. A condensate desalter comprising a mixed floor-type desalting tower using granular ion exchange resins is disposed at the downstream of the main condensator by way of condensate pipelines, and a feedwater heater is disposed at the downstream. Structural members of the main condensator are formed by weather proof steels. Low alloy steels are used partially or entirely for the cross-around pipe, gas extraction pipelines, heat draining pipelines, inner structural members other than pipelines in the feedwater heater, and the body and the inner structural members of the moisture separator. Titanium or a titanium alloy is used for the pipelines in the main condensator. With such a constitution, BWR type reactor facilities, in which the concentration of cruds inflown to the condensate cleanup system is reduced to simplify the condensate cleanup device can be obtained. (I.N.)

  9. Radiation protection in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piechowski, J.; Lochard, J.; Lefaure, Ch.; Schieber, C.; Schneider, Th; Lecomte, J.F.; Delmont, D.; Boitel, S.; Le Fauconnier, J.P.; Sugier, A; Zerbib, J.C.; Barbey, P.

    1998-01-01

    Close ties exist between nuclear safety and radiation protection. Nuclear safety is made up of all the arrangements taken to prevent accidents occurring in nuclear facilities, these accidents would certainly involved a radiological aspect. Radiation protection is made up of all the arrangements taken to evaluate and reduce the impact of radiation on workers or population in normal situations or in case of accident. In the fifties the management of radiological hazards was based on the quest for minimal or even zero risk. This formulation could lead to call some activities in question whereas the benefits for the whole society were evident. Now a new attitude more aware of the real risks and of no wasting resources prevails. This attitude is based on the ALARA principle whose purpose is to maintain the exposure to radiation as low as reasonably achievable taking into account social and economic concerns. This document regroups articles illustrating different aspects of the radiation protection in nuclear facilities such as a research center, a waste vitrification workshop and a nuclear power plant. The surveillance of radiological impacts of nuclear sites on environment is examined, a point is made about the pending epidemiologic studies concerning La Hague complex. (A.C.)

  10. Nuclear materials facility safety initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peddicord, K.L.; Nelson, P.; Roundhill, M.; Jardine, L.J.; Lazarev, L.; Moshkov, M.; Khromov, V.V.; Kruchkov, E.; Bolyatko, V.; Kazanskij, Yu.; Vorobeva, I.; Lash, T.R.; Newton, D.; Harris, B.

    2000-01-01

    Safety in any facility in the nuclear fuel cycle is a fundamental goal. However, it is recognized that, for example, should an accident occur in either the U.S. or Russia, the results could seriously delay joint activities to store and disposition weapons fissile materials in both countries. To address this, plans are underway jointly to develop a nuclear materials facility safety initiative. The focus of the initiative would be to share expertise which would lead in improvements in safety and safe practices in the nuclear fuel cycle.The program has two components. The first is a lab-to-lab initiative. The second involves university-to-university collaboration.The lab-to-lab and university-to-university programs will contribute to increased safety in facilities dealing with nuclear materials and related processes. These programs will support important bilateral initiatives, develop the next generation of scientists and engineers which will deal with these challenges, and foster the development of a safety culture

  11. Physical security of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, H.

    1987-01-01

    A serious problem with present security systems at nuclear facilities is that the threats and standards prepared by the NRC and DOE are general, and the field offices are required to develop their own local threats and, on that basis, to prepared detailed specifications for security systems at sites in their jurisdiction. As a result, the capabilities of the systems vary across facilities. Five steps in particular are strongly recommended as corrective measures: 1. Those agencies responsible for civil nuclear facilities should jointly prepare detailed threat definitions, operational requirements, and equipment specifications to protect generic nuclear facilities, and these matters should be issued as policy. The agencies should provide sufficient detail to guide the design of specific security systems and to identify candidate components. 2. The DOE, NRC, and DOD should explain to Congress why government-developed security and other military equipment are not used to upgrade existing security systems and to stock future ones. 3. Each DOE and NRC facility should be assessed to determine the impact on the size of the guard force and on warning time when personnel-detecting radars and ground point sensors are installed. 4. All security guards and technicians should be investigated for the highest security clearance, with reinvestigations every four years. 5. The processes and vehicles used in intrafacility transport of nuclear materials should be evaluated against a range of threats and attack scenarios, including violent air and vehicle assaults. All of these recommendations are feasible and cost-effective. The appropriate congressional subcommittees should direct that they be implemented as soon as possible

  12. The GSI plans for an international accelerator facility for beams of ions and antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suemmerer, K.

    2003-01-01

    GSI proposes to build a next-generation facility for research with relativistic beams of ions and antiprotons. This facility allows a broad range of topics in nuclear and astrophysics, plasma and atomic physics to be addressed. The topic most interesting in the context of this conference is physics with high-intensity beams of exotic nuclei. In addition, a short overview of the opportunities in the other fields of nuclear physics is given

  13. Laundry monitor for nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishibashi, Mitsuo (Toshiba Corp., Fuchu (Japan). Fuchu Works)

    1984-06-01

    A laundry monitor has been developed for the detection and cleansification of radiation contamination on the clothes, headgear, footgear, etc. of workers in nuclear facilities. With this monitor, measurement is made irrespective of the size and shape of the objects; a large-area plastic scintillation detector is incorporated; it has stable and highly sensitive characteristics, with the merits of swift measurement, economical operation and easy maintenance. Connected with a folding machine, automatic carrying and storing compartment through a conveyor, it is capable of saving energy and man power, contributing to scheduled operation, and improving the efficiency of the facilities.

  14. Laundry monitor for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Mitsuo

    1984-01-01

    A laundry monitor has been developed for the detection and cleansification of radiation contamination on the clothes, headgear, footgear, etc. of workers in nuclear facilities. With this monitor, measurement is made irrespective of the size and shape of the objects ; a large-area plastic scintillation detector is incorporated ; it has stable and highly sensitive characteristics, with the merits of swift measurement, economical operation and easy maintenance. Connected with a folding machine, automatic carrying and storing compartment through a conveyor, it is capable of saving energy and man power, contributing to scheduled operation, and improving the efficiency of the facilities. (author)

  15. A radioactive ion beam facility using photofission

    CERN Document Server

    Diamond, W T

    1999-01-01

    Use of a high-power electron linac as the driver accelerator for a Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility is proposed. An electron beam of 30 MeV and 100 kW can produce nearly 5x10 sup 1 sup 3 fissions/s from an optimized sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U target and about 60% of this from a natural uranium target. An electron beam can be readily transmitted through a thin window at the exit of the accelerator vacuum system and transported a short distance through air to a water-cooled Bremsstrahlung-production target. The Bremsstrahlung radiation can, in turn, be transported through air to the isotope-production target. This separates the accelerator vacuum system, the Bremsstrahlung target and the isotope-production target, reducing remote handling problems. The electron beam can be scanned over a large target area to reduce the power density on both the Bremsstrahlung and isotope-production targets. These features address one of the most pressing technological challenges of a high-power RIB facility, namely the production o...

  16. Particulate filtration in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The removal of particulate radioactive material from exhaust air or gases is an essential feature of virtually all nuclear facilities. Recent IAEA publications have covered the broad designs of off-gas and air cleaning systems for the range of nuclear power plants and other facilities. This report is a complementary guidebook that examines in detail the latest developments in the design, operation, maintenance and testing of fibrous air filters. The original draft of the report was prepared by three consultants, M.W. First, of the School of Public Health, Harvard University, United States of America, K.S. Robinson, from the UKAEA Harwell Laboratory, United Kingdom, and H.G. Dillmann, of the Kernforschungzentrum, Karlsruhe, Germany. The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM), at which the report was reviewed and much additional information contributed, was attended by 11 experts and was held in Vienna, from 30 May to 3 June 1988. 64 refs, 41 figs, 10 tabs

  17. PROJECTIZING AN OPERATING NUCLEAR FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, N

    2007-01-01

    This paper will discuss the evolution of an operations-based organization to a project-based organization to facilitate successful deactivation of a major nuclear facility. It will describe the plan used for scope definition, staff reorganization, method estimation, baseline schedule development, project management training, and results of this transformation. It is a story of leadership and teamwork, pride and success. Workers at the Savannah River Site's (SRS) F Canyon Complex (FCC) started with a challenge--take all the hazardous byproducts from nearly 50 years of operations in a major, first-of-its-kind nuclear complex and safely get rid of them, leaving the facility cold, dark, dry and ready for whatever end state is ultimately determined by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). And do it in four years, with a constantly changing workforce and steadily declining funding. The goal was to reduce the overall operating staff by 93% and budget by 94%. The facilities, F Canyon and its adjoined sister, FB Line, are located at SRS, a 310-square-mile nuclear reservation near Aiken, S.C., owned by DOE and managed by Washington Group International subsidiary Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC). These facilities were supported by more than 50 surrounding buildings, whose purpose was to provide support services during operations. The radiological, chemical and industrial hazards inventory in the old buildings was significant. The historical mission at F Canyon was to extract plutonium-239 and uranium-238 from irradiated spent nuclear fuel through chemical processing. FB Line's mission included conversion of plutonium solutions into metal, characterization, stabilization and packaging, and storage of both metal and oxide forms. The plutonium metal was sent to another DOE site for use in weapons. Deactivation in F Canyon began when chemical separations activities were completed in 2002, and a cross-functional project team concept was implemented to successfully

  18. Environmental monitoring of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1988-01-01

    Environmental monitoring of nuclear facilities is part of general monitoring for environmental radioactivity all over the territory of the Federal Republic of Germany. General principles of environmental monitoring were formulated by the ICRP in 1965. In 1974 guidelines for measures of monitoring the environment of NPP incorporating LWR were drafted, which helped to standardize environmental monitoring programs. Since 1958, data on environmental radioactivity from measurements by authorized laboratories have been published in reports. (DG)

  19. Decommissioning of nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.V.; Vasil'chenko, V.N.; Klyuchnikov, A.A.; Yashchenko, Ya.V.

    2005-01-01

    This is the first manual in Ukraine giving the complete review of the decommissioning process of the nuclear power facilities including the issues of the planning, design documentation development, advanced technology description. On the base of the international and domestic experience, the issues on the radwaste management, the decontamination methods, the equipment dismantling, the remote technology application, and also the costs estimate at decommissioning are considered. The special attention to the personnel safety provision, population and environment at decommissioning process is paid

  20. Physics and Technology for the Next Generation of Radioactive Ion Beam Facilities: EURISOL

    CERN Document Server

    Kadi, Y; Catherall, R; Giles, T; Stora, T; Wenander, F K

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of artificial radioactivity in 1935, nuclear scientists have developed tools to study nuclei far from stability. A major breakthrough came in the eighties when the first high energy radioactive beams were produced at Berkeley, leading to the discovery of neutron halos. The field of nuclear structure received a new impetus, and the major accelerator facilities worldwide rivalled in ingenuity to produce more intense, purer and higher resolution rare isotope beams, leading to our much improved knowledge and understanding of the general evolution of nuclear properties throughout the nuclear chart. However, today, further progress is hampered by the weak beam intensities of current installations which correlate with the difficulty to reach the confines of nuclear binding where new phenomena are predicted, and where the r-process path for nuclear synthesis is expected to be located. The advancement of Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) science calls for the development of so-called next-generation facil...

  1. Computer Security at Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavina, A.

    2013-01-01

    This series of slides presents the IAEA policy concerning the development of recommendations and guidelines for computer security at nuclear facilities. A document of the Nuclear Security Series dedicated to this issue is on the final stage prior to publication. This document is the the first existing IAEA document specifically addressing computer security. This document was necessary for 3 mains reasons: first not all national infrastructures have recognized and standardized computer security, secondly existing international guidance is not industry specific and fails to capture some of the key issues, and thirdly the presence of more or less connected digital systems is increasing in the design of nuclear power plants. The security of computer system must be based on a graded approach: the assignment of computer system to different levels and zones should be based on their relevance to safety and security and the risk assessment process should be allowed to feed back into and influence the graded approach

  2. Childhood leukemia around nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatch, M.

    1992-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies on health effects of living near nuclear facilities have been rare and, indeed, radiobiological models would not predict any detectable increase in cancer risk to the general public from very low levels of radioactivity emitted by nuclear installations. Thus recent evidence suggesting an excess of childhood leukemias in the vicinity of certain nuclear sites in the United Kingdom has generated considerable controversy. To help resolve the uncertainty and enhance interpretability of results, future epidemiologic studies will need to be designed with great care (and within realistic cost limits). This commentary suggests three areas for methodologic consideration: 1. definition and modelling of radiation exposure; 2. selection of cancer sites and sensitive subgroups, and 3. use of incidence of mortality data. Specific suggestions for further epidemiologic research are offered as well. (author). 8 refs

  3. Terrorist threats of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jozsef Solymosi; Jozser Ronaky; Zoltan Levai; Arpad Vincze; Laszlo Foldi

    2004-01-01

    More than one year has passed since the terrible terrorist attacks against the United States. The tragic event fundamentally restructured our security policy approach and made requirements of countering terrorism a top priority of the 21st century. In one year a lot of studies were published and the majority of them analyses primarily the beginnings of terrorism then focus on the interrelations of causes and consequences of the attacks against the WTC. In most of the cases the authors can only put their questions most of which have remained unanswered to date. Meanwhile, in a short while after the attacks the secret assessments of threat levels of potential targets and areas were also prepared. One of the high priority fields is the issue of nuclear, biological, and chemical security, in short NBC-security. Here and now we focus on component N, that is the assessment techniques of nuclear security in short, without aiming at completeness. Our definite objective is to make non-expert readers understand - and present a concrete example as it is done in risk analysis - the real danger-level of nuclear facilities and especially the terrorist threat. Our objective is not to give tips to terrorists but to provide them with deterring arguments and at the same time calm worried people. In our communique we give an overview of international practice of nuclear antiterrorism and of preventive nuclear protection in Hungary. (author)

  4. ORNL 150 keV neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, W.L.; Kim, J.; Menon, M.M.; Schilling, G.

    1977-01-01

    The 150 keV neutral beam test facility provides for the testing and development of neutral beam injectors and beam systems of the class that will be needed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and The Next Step (TNS). The test facility can simulate a complete beam line injection system and can provide a wide range of experimental operating conditions. Herein is offered a general description of the facility's capabilities and a discussion of present system performance

  5. Electron beam facility for divertor target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, A.; Gagen-Torn, V.; Giniyatulin, R.N.

    1994-01-01

    To test different concepts of divertor targets and bumpers an electron beam facility was assembled in Efremov Institute. It consists of a vacuum chamber (3m 3 ), vacuum pump, electron beam gun, manipulator to place and remove the samples, water loop and liquid metal loop. The following diagnostics of mock-ups is stipulated: (1) temperature distribution on the mock-up working surface (scanning pyrometer and infra-red imager); (2) temperature distribution over mocked-up thickness in 3 typical cross-sections (thermo-couples); (3) cracking dynamics during thermal cycling (acoustic-emission method), (4) defects in the mock-up before and after tests (ultra-sonic diagnostics, electron and optical microscopes). Carbon-based and beryllium mock-ups are made for experimental feasibility study of water and liquid-metal-cooled divertor/bumper concepts

  6. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Nuclear Science Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wender, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-06-19

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facilities for Nuclear Science consist of a high-energy "white" neutron source (Target 4) with 6 flight paths, three low-energy nuclear science flight paths at the Lujan Center, and a proton reaction area. The neutron beams produced at the Target 4 complement those produced at the Lujan Center because they are of much higher energy and have shorter pulse widths. The neutron sources are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam of the LANSCE linear accelerator. With these facilities, LANSCE is able to deliver neutrons with energies ranging from a milli-electron volt to several hundreds of MeV, as well as proton beams with a wide range of energy, time and intensity characteristics. The facilities, instruments and research programs are described briefly.

  7. Environmental monitoring of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulos, D.; Winter, M.

    1982-01-01

    Environmental monitoring adds to the control of emissions of radioactive substances from nuclear facilities. The radioactive substances released with the exhaust air and the liquid effluent result in impact levels in the immediate vicinity, which must be ascertained by measurement. Impact control serves for the quantitative assessment of man-made radioactivity in different media of relevant pathways and for the direct assessment of the radiation exposure of the public living in the vicinity. In this way, the radiation exposure of the environment, which can be calculated if the emission data and the meteorological diffusion parameters are known, is controlled directly. (orig./RW)

  8. Nuclear fuel treatment facility for 'Mutsu'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Toshio; Fujimura, Kazuo; Horiguchi, Eiji; Kobayashi, Tetsuji; Tamekiyo, Yoshizou

    1989-01-01

    A new fixed mooring harbor in Sekinehama and surrounding land facilities to accommodate a test voyage for the nuclear-powered ship 'Mutsu' in 1990 were constructed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Kobe Steel took part in the construction of the nuclear fuel treatment process in various facilities, beginning in October, 1988. This report describes the outline of the facility. (author)

  9. Improvements of present radioactive beam facilities and new projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.C.

    1995-01-01

    A short overview is given over scheduled improvements of present radioactive beam facilities and of new projects. In order to put these into a coherent context the paper starts with a general section about the making of radioactive beams. (author)

  10. Mixed beams for the nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint, A.; Breese, M.B.H.; Legge, G.L.F. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Recently the Micro-Analytical Research Centre (MARC) at Melbourne University has developed a technique to provide mixed beams of ions for a magnetically focussed nuclear microprobe. Such a mixed beam is defined as two (or more) beams of different species ions that can quickly and easily be made to have the same magnetic rigidity R{sub m} = (mE/q{sup 2}) and therefore be transported, focused and scanned the same in a magnetic nuclear microprobe. The production of mixed beams in an electrostatically focussed micro- probe have already been demonstrated. This paper will show how mixed beams can be produced on a single-ended accelerator. Indications of how to produce them on a tandem will also be given. Applications of these mixed beams in micro-lithography, scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) imaging and ion beam induced charge (IBIC) imaging will also be presented. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Mixed beams for the nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint, A; Breese, M B.H.; Legge, G L.F. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-12-31

    Recently the Micro-Analytical Research Centre (MARC) at Melbourne University has developed a technique to provide mixed beams of ions for a magnetically focussed nuclear microprobe. Such a mixed beam is defined as two (or more) beams of different species ions that can quickly and easily be made to have the same magnetic rigidity R{sub m} = (mE/q{sup 2}) and therefore be transported, focused and scanned the same in a magnetic nuclear microprobe. The production of mixed beams in an electrostatically focussed micro- probe have already been demonstrated. This paper will show how mixed beams can be produced on a single-ended accelerator. Indications of how to produce them on a tandem will also be given. Applications of these mixed beams in micro-lithography, scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) imaging and ion beam induced charge (IBIC) imaging will also be presented. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  12. SPES: A new cyclotron-based facility for research and applications with high-intensity beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, M.; Campo, D.; Antonini, P.; Lombardi, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Andrighetto, A.; Monetti, A.; Scarpa, D.; Esposito, J.; Silvestrin, L.

    2017-06-01

    In 2016, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy) started the commissioning of a new accelerator facility based on a high-power cyclotron able to deliver proton beams up to 70 MeV of energy and 700 μA current. Such a machine is the core of the Selective Production of Exotic Species (SPES) project whose main goal is to provide exotics beam for nuclear and astrophysics research and to deliver high-intensity proton beams for medical applications and neutrons generator.

  13. Application of robotics in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, J.S.; Fisher, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Industrial robots and other robotic systems have been successfully applied at the Savannah River nuclear site. These applications, new robotic systems presently under development, general techniques for the employment of robots in nuclear facilities, and future systems are discussed

  14. Present and future radioactive nuclear beam developments at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decrock, P.

    1996-01-01

    A scheme for building an ISOL-based radioactive nuclear beam facility at the Argonne Physics Division, is currently evaluated. The feasibility and efficiency of the different steps in the proposed production- and acceleration cycles are being tested. At the Dynamitron Facility of the ANL Physics Division, stripping yields of Kr, Xe and Ph beams in a windowless gas cell have been measured and the study of fission of 238 U induced by fast neutrons from the 9 Be(dn) reaction is in progress. Different aspects of the post-acceleration procedure are currently being investigated. In parallel with this work, energetic radioactive beams such as 17 F, 18 F and 56 Ni have recently been developed at Argonne using the present ATLAS facility

  15. Tritium transport around nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Sweet, C.W.

    1981-01-01

    The transport and cycling of tritium around nuclear facilities is reviewed with special emphasis on studies at the Savannah River Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina. These studies have shown that the rate of deposition from the atmosphere, the site of deposition, and the subsequent cycling are strongly influenced by the compound with which the tritium is associated. Tritiated hydrogen is largely deposited in the soil, while tritiated water is deposited in the greatest quantity in the vegetation. Tritiated hydrogen is converted in the soil to tritiated water that leaves the soil slowly, through drainage and transpiration. Tritiated water deposited directly to the vegetation leaves the vegetation more rapidly after exposure. Only a small part of the tritium entering the vegetation becomes bound in organic molecules. However, it appears tht the existence of soil organic compounds with tritium concentrations greater than the equilibrium concentration in the associated water can be explained by direct metabolism of tritiated hydrogen in vegetation

  16. Neutron skyshine from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Hayashi, Katsumi.

    1984-01-01

    The advance in neutron skyshine research and the significance are first described. Then, skyshine calculation methods in 1980s particularly and the skyshine experiment in Japan with various nuclear facilities (reactors, D-T neutron sources, accelerators) are reviewed. In comparison with such experiment usable as bench mark, the skyshine calculation methods (Monte Carlo method, transport calculation method) are evaluated for their accuracy and merits and demerits. The values by Monte Carlo calculation were in agreement within about 30 % with the experimental values. Those by DOT 3.5 calculation were twice as large as the experimental values. Those by PALLAS calculation were in good agreement in dose with the experimental values, but the spectra were considerably different. The values by SKYSHINE-2 were in good agreement with the experimental values, but since the ground effect was ignored, the values may deviate from the experimental ones if it is taken into account. (Mori, K.)

  17. Environmental assessment: Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This Environmental Assessment has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to fulfill its obligations pursuant to Sect. 102 of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (Public Law 91-190). The proposed federal action addressed in this document is DOE's funding of a Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Newport News, Virginia. DOE intends to contract with the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) for operation of CEBAF, a continuous wave (CW) linear accelerator system (linac) capable of providing high-duty-factor beams throughout the energy range from 0.5 to 4.0 GeV. CEBAF will be the first of its kind worldwide and will offer a multi-GeV energy, high-intensity, high-duty-factor electron beam for use by the US nuclear physics community in research on the states of nuclear matter and the short-distance behavior of nuclei. The CEBAF project is largely in the conceptual design stage, with some components in the preliminary design stage. Construction is anticipated to begin in 1987 and be completed by 1992

  18. Nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geesaman, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    The important contributions Multi-GeV hadron beam facilities can make to the field of Nuclear Physics have been recognized by the community for a decade. Such a facility has featured prominently in each NSAC planning exercise in this period. As Nuclear Physicists realize they must become more concerned with the quark structure of nuclei and the applications of Quantum Chromodynamics to many body systems, the need for experiments at such facilities has become more urgent. In this talk, I will present a personal view of some of the significant recent Nuclear Physics results with multi-GeV hadron facilities, the most important opportunities which can open up to us in the future, and demonstrate how our field must take advantage of these opportunities to progress. I will also report on the recent discussions in the community to make this possible

  19. TFTR neutral-beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turitzin, N.M.; Newman, R.A.

    1981-11-01

    TFTR Neutral Beam System will have thirteen discharge ion sources, each with its own power supply. Twelve of these will be utilized for supplemental heating of the TFTR tokamak plasma, while the thirteenth will be dedicated to an off-machine test chamber for source development and/or conditioning. A test installation for one source was set up using prototype equipment to discover and correct possible deficiencies, and to properly coordinate the equipment. This test facility represents the first opportunity for assembling an integrated system of hardware supplied by diverse vendors, each of whom designed and built his equipment to performance specifications. For the installation and coordination of the different portions of the total system, particular attention was given to personnel safety and safe equipment operation. This paper discusses various system components, their characteristics, interconnection and control. Results of the recently initiated test phase will be reported at a later date

  20. Nonreactor nuclear facilities: standards and criteria guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynda, W.J.; Junker, L.; Karol, R.C.; Lobner, P.R.; Goldman, L.A.

    1981-09-01

    This guide is a source document that identifies standards, codes, and guides that address the nuclear safety considerations pertinent to nuclear facilities as defined in DOE Order 5480.1, Chapter V, Safety of Nuclear Facilities. The guidance and criteria provided are directed toward areas of safety usually addressed in a Safety Analysis Report. The areas of safety include, but are not limited to, siting, principal design criteria and safety system design guidelines, radiation protection, accident analysis, and quality assurance. The guide is divided into two sections: general guidelines and appendices. Those guidelines that are broadly applicable to most nuclear facilities are presented in the general guidelines. These general guidelines may have limited applicability to subsurface facilities such as waste repositories. Guidelines specific to the various types or categories of nuclear facilities are presented in the appendices. These facility-specific appendices provide guidelines and identify standards and criteria that should be considered in addition to, or in lieu of, the general guidelines

  1. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, John D.; Batygin, Yuri K.; Gonzales, Fermin; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Kutac, Vincent G.; Martinez, Derwin; Sedillo, James Daniel; Pillai, Chandra; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Smith, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H - beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  2. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batygin, Yuri K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Fermin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  3. The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beams Facility (HRIBF) - getting ready to do experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapira, D.; Lewis, T.A.

    1998-01-01

    The conversion of the HHIRF facility to a Radioactive Ion Beam facility started in 1994. In this ISOL type facility the Cyclotron has been re-fitted as a driver providing high intensity proton beams which react with the target from which the radioactive products are extracted and then accelerated in the Tandem Electrostatic Accelerator to the desired energy for nuclear science studies. Facilities for nuclear physics experiments are at different stages of development: A Recoil Mass Spectrometer (RMS) with a complement of detectors at the focal plane and around the target is used primarily for nuclear structure studies. A large recoil separator combining velocity and momentum selection, with its complement of focal plane detectors, will be dedicated to measurements relevant to nuclear astrophysics. The Enge Split Pole spectrograph is being re-fitted for operation in a gas filled mode, making it a more versatile tool for nuclear reaction studies. With the new experimental equipment being commissioned and the prospects of running experiments with low intensity radioactive beams a significant effort to develop equipment for beam diagnostics is underway. Some of the efforts and results in developing beam diagnostic tools will be described

  4. Nonreactor nuclear facilities: Standards and criteria guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynda, W.J.; Scarlett, C.H.; Tanguay, G.E.; Lobner, P.R.

    1986-09-01

    This guide is a source document that identifies standards, codes, and guides that address the nuclear safety considerations pertinent to nuclear facilities as defined in DOE 5480.1A, Chapter V, ''Safety of Nuclear Facilities.'' The guidance and criteria provided is directed toward areas of safety usually addressed in a Safety Analysis Report. The areas of safety include, but are not limited to, siting, principal design criteria and safety system design guidelines, radiation protection, accident analysis, conduct of operations, and quality assurance. The guide is divided into two sections: general guidelines and appendices. Those guidelines that are broadly applicable to most nuclear facilities are presented in the general guidelines. Guidelines specific to the various types or categories of nuclear facilities are presented in the appendices. These facility-specific appendices provide guidelines and identify standards and criteria that should be considered in addition to, or in lieu of, the general guidelines. 25 figs., 62 tabs

  5. Synchrotron light beam and a synchrotron light experiment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masami

    1980-01-01

    In the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, about two years ago, the requirements of synchrotron light beam in respective measuring instruments were discussed. Then, also the arrangement (lattice) of a storage ring, the nature of synchrotron light beam, a synchrotron light experiment facility and the arrangement of the beam lines were studied. During the period of two years since then, due to the changes in the circumstances, the design of the lattice was altered. Accordingly, the arrangement of the beam lines and of measuring instruments were largely changed. At this point, the results of discussions in various meetings are described, though they may still be subject to future changes, with due consideration to beam, environment and beam lines required for the design of the measuring instruments: (1) storage ring and synchrotron light beam, (2) requirements on small beam size and beam stability, (3) a synchrotron light experiment facility. (J.P.N.)

  6. Base isolation for nuclear power and nuclear material facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidinger, J.M.; Kircher, C.A.; Vaidya, N.; Constantinou, M.; Kelly, J.M.; Seidensticker, R.; Tajirian, F.F.; Ovadia, D.

    1989-01-01

    This report serves to document the status of the practice for the use of base isolation systems in the design and construction of nuclear power and nuclear material facilities. The report first describes past and current (1989) applications of base isolation in nuclear facilities. The report then provides a brief discussion of non-nuclear applications. Finally, the report summarizes the status of known base-isolation codes and standards

  7. Policy on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    This Regulatory Policy Statement describes the policy of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) on the decommissioning of those facilities defined as nuclear facilities in the Atomic Energy Control (AEC) Regulations. It is intended as a formal statement, primarily for the information of licensees, or potential licensees, of the regulatory process and requirements generally applicable to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities licensed and regulated by the AECB pursuant to the authority of the AEC Act and Regulations

  8. Estimating Fire Risks at Industrial Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutts, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has a wide variety of nuclear production facilities that include chemical processing facilities, machine shops, production reactors, and laboratories. Current safety documentation must be maintained for the nuclear facilities at SRS. Fire Risk Analyses (FRAs) are used to support the safety documentation basis. These FRAs present the frequency that specified radiological and chemical consequences will be exceeded. The consequence values are based on mechanistic models assuming specific fire protection features fail to function as designed

  9. Beam profile monitors for a tagged photon beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arends, J.; Breuer, M.; Dahmen, H.D.; Detemple, P.; Schneider, W.; Urban, D.; Zucht, B.

    1991-01-01

    A beam profile monitor for electron and photon beams is described, which operates at the low intensities encountered in a tagged bremsstrahlung beam environment, typically 10 10 electrons/s and 10 7 photons/s. The method is based on a wire scanner and utilizes the presence of a tagging spectrometer. The accuracy of the measurements can be tuned in a wide range to meet the requirements set by the actual beam parameters. Examples of measured electron and photon beam profiles at the tagged photon beam of the PHOENICS experiment at the electron stretcher ring ELSA in Bonn are given. (orig.)

  10. Waste management considerations in nuclear facility decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, H.K.; Murphy, E.S.

    1981-01-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear facilities involves the management of significant quantities of radioactive waste. This paper summarizes information on volumes of waste requiring disposal and waste management costs developed in a series of decommissioning studies performed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. These studies indicate that waste management is an important cost factor in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Alternatives for managing decommissioning wastes are defined and recommendations are made for improvements in waste management practices

  11. A new ion beam facility based on a 3 MV Tandetron™ at IFIN-HH, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Ghiță, D. G.; Moșu, D. V.; Călinescu, C. I.; Podaru, N. C.; Mous, D. J. W.; Ursu, I.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2015-09-01

    A 3 MV Tandetron™ accelerator system has been installed and commissioned at the "Horia Hulubei" National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN-HH, Măgurele, Romania. The main purpose of this machine is to strengthen applied nuclear physics research ongoing in our institute for more than four decades. The accelerator system was developed by High Voltage Engineering Europa B.V. (HVE) and comprises three high energy beam lines. The first beam line is dedicated to ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques: Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry - RBS, Nuclear Reaction Analysis - NRA, Particle Induced X-ray and γ-ray Emission - PIXE and PIGE and micro-beam experiments - μ-PIXE. The second beam line is dedicated to high energy ion implantation experiments and the third beam line was designed mainly for nuclear cross-sections measurements used in nuclear astrophysics. A unique feature, the first time in operation at an accelerator facility is the Na charge exchange canal (CEC), which is used to obtain high intensity beams of He- of at least 3 μA. The results of the acceptance tests demonstrate the huge potential of this new facility in various fields, from IBA to radiation hardness studies and from medical or environmental applications to astrophysics. The main features of the accelerator are presented in this paper.

  12. Visitor centres at nuclear facility sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Communications strategies in the nuclear field are often based on the creation of visitor centres at nuclear facility sites. Today, the design, as well as the realization and management of such centres has become a specialized function, and its role is very complementary to the nuclear operator's. It also uses the latest technology in the field of audio-visual, experiment and interactivity. This publication contains the proceedings of an international seminar organized by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency on the role of visitor centres at nuclear facility sites. It includes the main papers presented at this Seminar

  13. BEAM LINE DESIGN FOR THE CERN HIRADMAT TEST FACILITY

    CERN Document Server

    Hessler, C; Goddard, B; Meddahi, M; Weterings, W

    2009-01-01

    The LHC phase II collimation project requires beam shock and impact tests of materials used for beam intercepting devices. Similar tests are also of great interest for other accelerator components such as beam entrance/exit windows and protection devices. For this purpose a dedicated High Radiation Material test facility (HiRadMat) is under study. This facility may be installed at CERN at the location of a former beam line. This paper describes the associated beam line which is foreseen to deliver a 450 GeV proton beam from the SPS with an intensity of up to 3×1013 protons per shot. Different beam line designs will be compared and the choice of the beam steering and diagnostic elements will be discussed, as well as operational issues.

  14. Beam Line Design for the CERN Hiradmat Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Hessler, C; Goddard, B; Meddahi, M; Weterings, W

    2010-01-01

    The LHC phase II collimation project requires beam shock and impact tests of materials used for beam intercepting devices. Similar tests are also of great interest for other accelerator components such as beam entrance/exit windows and protection devices. For this purpose a dedicated High Radiation Material test facility (HiRadMat) is under study. This facility may be installed at CERN at the location of a former beam line. This paper describes the associated beam line which is foreseen to deliver a 450 GeV proton beam from the SPS with an intensity of up to 3×10**13 protons per shot. Different beam line designs will be compared and the choice of the beam steering and diagnostic elements will be discussed, as well as operational issues.

  15. Study on HVAC system in nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeg, S. Y.; Song, W. S.; Oh, Y. O.; Ju, Y. S.; Hong, K. P.

    2003-01-01

    Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system in nuclear facility should be equipped and constructed more stable and allowable than that in common facility. The purpose of HVAC system is the maintenance of optimum working environment, the protection of worker against a contaminated air and the prevention of atmospheric contamination due to an outward ventilation, etc.. The basic scheme of a safety operation of nuclear facility is to prevent the atmospheric contamination even in low level. The adaptability of HVAC system which is in operation. In this study, the design requirements of HVAC system in nuclear facility and the HVAC systems in foreign countries are reviewed, and the results can be utilized in the design of HVAC system in nuclear facility

  16. Development of the RRR cold neutron beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovotti, Osvaldo; Masriera, Nestor; Lecot, Carlos; Hergenreder, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes some general design issues on the neutron beam facilities (cold neutron source and neutron beam transport system) of the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) for the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The description covers different aspect of the design: the requirements that lead to an innovative design, the overall design itself, the definition of a technical approach in order to develop the necessary design solutions, and finally the organizational framework by which international expertise from five different institutions is integrated. From the technical viewpoint, the RRR-CNS is a liquid Deuterium (LD2) moderator, sub-cooled to ensure maximum moderation efficiency, flowing within a closed natural circulation thermosyphon loop. The thermosyphon is surrounded by a zirconium alloy CNS vacuum containment that provides thermal insulation and a multiple barriers scheme to prevent Deuterium from mixing with water or air. Consistent with international practice, this vessel is designed to withstand any hypothetical energy reaction should Deuterium and air mix in its interior. The 'cold' neutrons are then taken by the NBTS and transported by the neutron guide system into the reactor beam hall and neutron guide hall, where neutron scattering instruments are located. From the management viewpoint, the adopted distributed scheme is successful to manage the complex interfacing between highly specialized technologies, allowing a smooth integration within the project. (author)

  17. Future prospects for radioactive nuclear beams in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1993-05-01

    In 1989 this author proposed the construction of a dedicated, flexible, radioactive nuclear beams facility that would provide intense beams of nearly all elements for a program of scientific studies in nuclear structure, nuclear reaction dynamics, astrophysics, high-spin physics, nuclei far from stability, material- and surface science, and atomic- and hyperfine-interaction physics. The initial name proposed for the new facility was ''IsoSpin Factory'' to underscore the key feature of this new physics tool; it was later changed to ''IsoSpin Laboratory'' (ISL). The ISL is now supported by a broad base of nuclear scientists and has been identified in the US Long Range Plan on Nuclear Science as one of the new potential construction projects for the second part of this decade. Since 1989 a number of conferences and workshops has been held in which the scientific and technical case for RNB facilities has been made. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the North American plan for the ISL, which was initially summarized in a ''White Paper'' but has since evolved in its scientific and technical scop

  18. Nuclear photon science with inverse compton photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Mamoru

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments of the synchrotron radiation facilities and intense lasers are now guiding us to a new research frontier with probes of a high energy GeV photon beam and an intense and short pulse MeV γ-ray beam. New directions of the science developments with photo-nuclear reactions are discussed. The inverse Compton γ-ray has two good advantages for searching for a microscopic quantum world; they are 1) good emittance and 2) high linear and circular polarizations. With these advantages, photon beams in the energy range from MeV to GeV are used for studying hadron structure, nuclear structure, astrophysics, materials science, as well as for applying medical science. (author)

  19. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    this report is intended to provide a convenient summary of the world's major nuclear physics accelerator facility with emphasis on those facilities supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Previous editions of this report have contained only DOE facilities. However, as the extent of global collaborations in nuclear physics grows, gathering summary information on the world's nuclear physics accelerator facilities in one place is useful. Therefore, the present report adds facilities operated by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as well as the leading foreign facilities, with emphasis on foreign facilities that have significant outside user programs. The principal motivation for building and operating these facilities is, of course, basic research in nuclear physics. The scientific objectives for this research were recently reviewed by the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee, who developed a long range plan, Nuclei, Nucleons, and Quarks -- Nuclear Science in the 1990's. Their report begins as follows: The central thrust of nuclear science is the study of strongly interacting matter and of the forces that govern its structure and dynamics; this agenda ranges from large- scale collective nuclear behavior through the motions of individual nucleons and mesons, atomic nuclei, to the underlying distribution of quarks and gluons. It extends to conditions at the extremes of temperature and density which are of significance to astrophysics and cosmology and are conducive to the creation of new forms of strongly interacting matter; and another important focus is on the study of the electroweak force, which plays an important role in nuclear stability, and on precision tests of fundamental interactions. The present report provides brief descriptions of the accelerator facilities available for carrying out this agenda and their research programs

  20. Nuclear physics with advanced brilliant gamma beams at ELI–NP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ur Călin A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics facility is dedicated to nuclear physics studies with the use of extreme electromagnetic radiation. One of the main research system to be installed and operated in the facility is an outstanding high brilliance gamma beam system. The Gamma Beam System of ELI–NP will produce intense, quasi–monochromatic gamma beams via inverse Compton scattering of short laser pulses on relativistic electron beam pulses. The gamma beams available at ELI–NP will allow for the performance of photo-nuclear reactions aiming to reveal the intimate structure of the atomic nucleus. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, photo-fission, photo-disintegration reactions above the particle threshold will be used to study the dipole response of nuclei, the structure of the Pygmy resonances, nuclear processes relevant for astrophysics, production and study of exotic neutron–rich nuclei.

  1. A new slow positron beam facility using a compact cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Masafumi

    1998-01-01

    In 1993, Sumitomo Heavy Industries became the first in the world to successfully produce a slow positron beam using a compact cyclotron. Slow positron beam production using an accelerator had mainly consisted of using an electron linear accelerator (LINAC). However, the newly developed system that uses a compact cyclotron enabled cost reduction, downsizing of equipment, production of a DC slow positron beam, a polarized slow positron beam, and other benefits. After that, a genuine slow positron beam facility was developed with the construction of compact cyclotron No.2, and beam production in the new facility has already been started. The features of this new slow positron beam facility are explained below. 1) It is the world's first compact slow positron beam facility using a compact cyclotron. 2) It is the only genuine slow positron beam facility in the world which incorporates the production and use of a slow positron beam in the design stage of the cyclotron. To use a slow positron beam for non-destructive detection of lattice defects in semiconductor material, it is necessary to convert the beam into ultra-short pulses of several hundreds of pico-seconds. Sumitomo Heavy Industries has devised a new short-pulsing method (i.e. an induction bunching method) that enables the conversion of a slow positron beam into short pulses with an optimum pulsing electric field change, and succeeded in converting a slow positron beam into short pulses using this method for the first time in the world. Non-destructive detection of lattice defects in semiconductor material using this equipment has already been started, and some information about the depth distribution, size, density, etc. of lattice defects has already been obtained. (J.P.N.)

  2. Lifting devices in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rule is valid for lifts, cranes, winches, rail travel trolleys, load lifting devices and fuel element changing devices for light-water reactors, insofar as these are used in plants to produce or to fission nuclear fuels or to process irradiated nuclear fuels or in the storage or other use of nuclear fuels. (LH) [de

  3. Drive beam stabilisation in the CLIC Test Facility 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, L.; Corsini, R.; Persson, T.; Skowroński, P. K.; Adli, E.

    2018-06-01

    The proposed Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) uses a high intensity, low energy drive beam to produce the RF power needed to accelerate a lower intensity main beam with 100 MV/m gradient. This scheme puts stringent requirements on drive beam stability in terms of phase, energy and current. The consequent experimental work was carried out in CLIC Test Facility CTF3. In this paper, we present a novel analysis technique in accelerator physics to find beam drifts and their sources in the vast amount of the continuously gathered signals. The instability sources are identified and adequately mitigated either by hardware improvements or by implementation and commissioning of various feedbacks, mostly beam-based. The resulting drive beam stability is of 0.2°@ 3 GHz in phase, 0.08% in relative beam energy and about 0.2% beam current. Finally, we propose a stabilisation concept for CLIC to guarantee the main beam stability.

  4. Accelerator development for a radioactive beam facility based on ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-01-01

    The existing superconducting linac ATLAS is in many respects an ideal secondary beam accelerator for an ISOL (Isotope separator on-line) type radioactive beam facility. Such a facility would require the addition of two major accelerator elements: a low charge state injector for the existing heavy ion linac, and a primary beam accelerator providing 220 MV of acceleration for protons and light ions. Development work for both of these elements, including the option of superconducting cavities for the primary beam accelerator is discussed

  5. Accelerator development for a radioactive beam facility based on ATLAS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-01-08

    The existing superconducting linac ATLAS is in many respects an ideal secondary beam accelerator for an ISOL (Isotope separator on-line) type radioactive beam facility. Such a facility would require the addition of two major accelerator elements: a low charge state injector for the existing heavy ion linac, and a primary beam accelerator providing 220 MV of acceleration for protons and light ions. Development work for both of these elements, including the option of superconducting cavities for the primary beam accelerator is discussed.

  6. A facility for liquid-phase radiation experiments on heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuglik, Z; Zvara, I; Yakushev, A B; Timokhin, S N [Flerov Lab. of Nuclear Reactions, Dubna (Russian Federation). Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research

    1994-05-01

    The facility for liquid-phase radiation experiments installed on the beam line of the U-400 cyclotron in the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna, is described. The accelerator provides intermediate energy (some 10 MeV/nucleon) beams of ions ranging from Li to Xe. Preliminary results on the radiolysis of the Fricke solution and malachite green in ethanol by {sup 11}B, {sup 24}Mg and {sup 40}Ca ions are presented. (author).

  7. The ELI–NP facility for nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ur, C.A.; Balabanski, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Gales, S.; Morjan, I.; Tesileanu, O.; Ursescu, D.; Ursu, I.; Zamfir, N.V.

    2015-01-01

    Extreme Light Infrastructure–Nuclear Physics (ELI–NP) is aiming to use extreme electromagnetic fields for nuclear physics research. The facility, currently under construction at Magurele–Bucharest, will comprise a high power laser system and a very brilliant gamma beam system. The technology involved in the construction of both systems is at the limits of the present-day’s technological capabilities. The high power laser system will consist of two 10 PW lasers and it will produce intensities of up to 10 23 –10 24 W/cm 2 . The gamma beam, produced via Compton backscattering of a laser beam on a relativistic electron beam, will be characterized by a narrow bandwidth (<0.5%) and tunable energy of up to almost 20 MeV. The research program of the facility covers a broad range of key topics in frontier fundamental physics and new nuclear physics. A particular attention is given to the development of innovative applications. In the present paper an overview of the project status and the overall performance characteristics of the main research equipment will be given. The main fundamental physics and applied research topics proposed to be studied at ELI–NP will also be briefly reviewed

  8. Importance of tests in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillemard, B.

    1985-10-01

    In nuclear facilities, safety related systems and equipments are subject, along their whole service-life, to numerous tests. This paper analyses the role of tests in the successive stages of design, construction, exploitation of a nuclear facility. It examines several aspects of test quality control: definition of needs, test planning, intrinsic quality of each test, control of interfaces (test are both the end and the starting point of many actions concerned by quality) and the application [fr

  9. Thin layer activation (TLA) experiment of piston ring F.J product by using nuclear facility proton beam 12.5 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudarmono; Silakhuddin

    2002-01-01

    The experiment of thin layer activation of piston ring F.J product, was done. The purpose of this experiment are to measure material wearing level by using concentration method. The experiment was carried out by activated piston ring proton beam with energy 12,5 MeV and beam current 1 μA for 30 minutes then was continued by wearing process. The measurement of the wear result activity was carried out by pouring the total of volume of lubricant oil for radioactivity measurement. Measurement of the activity level used the gamma spectroscopy. The minimum wearing duration that can detects a wear was 5 hours. The activity count was 1.230 pulse per 30 seconds which is in accordance with a wear in order of 8 mg of Fe material on 1 liter oil lubricant, this result is same with the result of T. Delvigne namely is less than 10 mgr

  10. Methodology and technology of decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear facilities is a topic of great interest to many Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) because of the large number of older nuclear facilities which are or soon will be retired from service. In response to increased international interest in decommissioning and to the needs of Member States, the IAEA's activities in this area have increased during the past few years and will be enhanced considerably in the future. A long range programme using an integrated systems approach covering all the technical, regulatory and safety steps associated with the decommissioning of nuclear facilities is being developed. The database resulting from this work is required so that Member States can decommission their nuclear facilities in a safe time and cost effective manner and the IAEA can effectively respond to requests for assistance. The report is a review of the current state of the art of the methodology and technology of decommissioning nuclear facilities including remote systems technology. This is the first report in the IAEA's expanded programme and was of benefit in outlining future activities. Certain aspects of the work reviewed in this report, such as the recycling of radioactive materials from decommissioning, will be examined in depth in future reports. The information presented should be useful to those responsible for or interested in planning or implementing the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

  11. Auxiliary facilities on nuclear ship 'MUTSU'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Shotaro; Takigami, Yoshio.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear ship 'MUTSU' has been moored at SEKINEHAMA, MUTU City in AOMORI Prefecture and several tests and works are being carried out on the ship. The construction of the auxiliary facilities for these works on the ship was completed in safety in August 1988. After that the facilities have fulfilled their function. The outlines of design, fabrication and construction of the facilities are described in this paper. (author)

  12. Knowledge Management in Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strba, M.

    2007-01-01

    Rebirth of and return to nuclear energy conditioned by an increasing worldwide energy consumption and decreasing fuel sources such as crude oil, gas and oil has aroused the question how to maintain nuclear knowledge obtained by previous generations and at the same time to deliver it to their successors in as complete form as possible. (author)

  13. Nuclear astrophysics experiments with Pohang neutron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong Duk; Yoo, Gwang Ho

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics experiments for fundamental understanding of Big Bang nucleosynthesis was performed at Pohang Neutron Facility. Laboratory experiments, inhomogeneous Big Bang nucleosynthesis and S-process were used for nucleosynthesis. For future study, more study on S-process for the desired data and nuclear network calculation are necessary

  14. Quality management in nuclear facilities decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garonis, Omar H.

    2002-01-01

    Internationally, the decommissioning organizations of nuclear facilities carry out the decommissioning according to the safety requirements established for the regulatory bodies. Some of them perform their activities in compliance with a quality assurance system. This work establishes standardization through a Specifications Requirement Document, for the management system of the nuclear facilities decommissioning organizations. It integrates with aspects of the quality, environmental, occupational safety and health management systems, and also makes these aspects compatible with all the requirements of the nuclear industry recommended for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (author)

  15. Radioiodine removal in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Technical means are reviewed available for the retention of radioiodine in nuclear power plants and fuel reprocessing plants, its immobilization, storage, and disposal. The removal of iodine species from gaseous effluents of nuclear power plants using impregnated activated charcoal is dealt with. Various scrubbing techniques for trapping iodine from the head-end and dissolver off-gases are discussed as well as solid adsorbents for iodine which may be used to clean up other gaseous streams. Current practices and activities for radioiodine treatment and management in Belgian, Dutch, Swedish, USSR and UK nuclear installations are presented

  16. Extraction and beam transfer for the SHiP facility

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, Brennan; Borburgh, Jan; Balhan, Bruno; Le Godec, Gilles; Zerlauth, Markus; Tommasini, Davide; Kain, Verena; Cornelis, Karel; Wenninger, Jorg; Jensen, Lars; Todd, Benjamin; Bauche, Jeremie; Puccio, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    This document summarises the key feasibility issues associated with the SPS extraction and beam transfer systems required for the SHiP facility. It describes the expected performance limits of the electrostatic septa, the expected beam losses during extraction and consequences, the design of the new beamline geometry and equipment systems and the expected extracted spill structure.

  17. Significant incidents in nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    In contrast to nuclear power plants, events in nuclear fuel cycle facilities are not well documented. The INES database covers all the nuclear fuel cycle facilities; however, it was developed in the early 1990s and does not contain information on events prior to that. The purpose of the present report is to collect significant events and analyze them in order to give a safety related overview of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Significant incidents were selected using the following criteria: release of radioactive material or exposure to radiation; degradation of items important to safety; and deficiencies in design, quality assurance, etc. which include criticality incidents, fire, explosion, radioactive release and contamination. This report includes an explanation, where possible, of root causes, lessons learned and action taken. 4 refs, 4 tabs.

  18. Integrated engineering system for nuclear facilities building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomura, H.; Miyamoto, A.; Futami, F.; Yasuda, S.; Ohtomo, T.

    1995-01-01

    In the construction of buildings for nuclear facilities in Japan, construction companies are generally in charge of the building engineering work, coordinating with plant engineering. An integrated system for buildings (PROMOTE: PROductive MOdeling system for Total nuclear Engineering) described here is a building engineering system including the entire life cycle of buildings for nuclear facilities. A Three-dimensional (3D) building model (PRO-model) is to be in the core of the system (PROMOTE). Data sharing in the PROMOTE is also done with plant engineering systems. By providing these basic technical foundations, PROMOTE is oriented toward offering rational, highquality engineering for the projects. The aim of the system is to provide a technical foundation in building engineering. This paper discusses the characteristics of buildings for nuclear facilities and the outline of the PROMOTE. (author)

  19. Significant incidents in nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    In contrast to nuclear power plants, events in nuclear fuel cycle facilities are not well documented. The INES database covers all the nuclear fuel cycle facilities; however, it was developed in the early 1990s and does not contain information on events prior to that. The purpose of the present report is to collect significant events and analyze them in order to give a safety related overview of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Significant incidents were selected using the following criteria: release of radioactive material or exposure to radiation; degradation of items important to safety; and deficiencies in design, quality assurance, etc. which include criticality incidents, fire, explosion, radioactive release and contamination. This report includes an explanation, where possible, of root causes, lessons learned and action taken. 4 refs, 4 tabs

  20. Childhood leukaemia around nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojcik, Andrzej (Centre for Radiation Protection Research, GMT Dept., Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden)); Feychting, Maria (Inst. of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-06-15

    In December 2007 the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) published a report on the incidence of childhood cancers among children living in the vicinity of 16 German nuclear power plants. The results show a significantly enhanced risk of leukaemia in children aged below 5 years, who live within 5 km from a nuclear power plant. The study is known as KiKK (Epidemiologische Studie zu Kinderkrebs in der Umgebung von Kernkraftwerken) and stirred considerable concern about the safety of nuclear installations. In this review we summarise the present state-of-the art regarding childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of nuclear installations and present the main results of the KiKK study with a critical evaluation

  1. Childhood leukaemia around nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcik, Andrzej; Feychting, Maria

    2010-06-01

    In December 2007 the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) published a report on the incidence of childhood cancers among children living in the vicinity of 16 German nuclear power plants. The results show a significantly enhanced risk of leukaemia in children aged below 5 years, who live within 5 km from a nuclear power plant. The study is known as KiKK (Epidemiologische Studie zu Kinderkrebs in der Umgebung von Kernkraftwerken) and stirred considerable concern about the safety of nuclear installations. In this review we summarise the present state-of-the art regarding childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of nuclear installations and present the main results of the KiKK study with a critical evaluation

  2. Technical Cybersecurity Controls for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jinseok; Ryou, Jaecheol; Kim, Youngmi; Jeong, Choonghei

    2014-01-01

    To strengthen cybersecurity for nuclear facilities, many countries take a regulatory approach. For example, US Government issued several regulations . Title 10, of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 73.54, 'Protection of Digital Computer and Communication Systems and Networks (10 CFR 73.54) for cybersecurity requirements and Regulatory Guide 5.71 (RG. 5.71) for cybersecurity guidance and so on. In the case of Korea, Korean Government issued '8.22 Cybersecurity of I and C systems (KINS/RG-NO8.22). In particular, Reg. 5.71 provides a list of security controls to address the potential cyber risks to a nuclear facilities. Implementing and adopting security controls, we can improve the level of cybersecurity for nuclear facilities. RG 5.71 follows the recommendation of NIST SP 800-53. NIST standard provides security controls for IT systems. And NRC staff tailored the controls in NIST standards to unique environments of nuclear facilities. In this paper, we are going to analysis and compare NRC RG 5.71 and NIST SP800-53, in particular, for technical security controls. If RG 5.71 omits the specific security control that is included in SP800-53, we would review that omitting is adequate or not. If RG 5.71 includes the specific security control that is not included in SP800-53, we would also review the rationale. And we are going to some security controls to strengthen cybersecurity of nuclear facilities. In this paper, we compared and analyzed of two regulation in technical security controls. RG 5.71 that is based on NIST standard provides well-understood security controls for nuclear facility. But some omitting from NIST standard can threaten security state of nuclear facility

  3. Technical Cybersecurity Controls for Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jinseok; Ryou, Jaecheol [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youngmi; Jeong, Choonghei [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    To strengthen cybersecurity for nuclear facilities, many countries take a regulatory approach. For example, US Government issued several regulations . Title 10, of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 73.54, 'Protection of Digital Computer and Communication Systems and Networks (10 CFR 73.54) for cybersecurity requirements and Regulatory Guide 5.71 (RG. 5.71) for cybersecurity guidance and so on. In the case of Korea, Korean Government issued '8.22 Cybersecurity of I and C systems (KINS/RG-NO8.22). In particular, Reg. 5.71 provides a list of security controls to address the potential cyber risks to a nuclear facilities. Implementing and adopting security controls, we can improve the level of cybersecurity for nuclear facilities. RG 5.71 follows the recommendation of NIST SP 800-53. NIST standard provides security controls for IT systems. And NRC staff tailored the controls in NIST standards to unique environments of nuclear facilities. In this paper, we are going to analysis and compare NRC RG 5.71 and NIST SP800-53, in particular, for technical security controls. If RG 5.71 omits the specific security control that is included in SP800-53, we would review that omitting is adequate or not. If RG 5.71 includes the specific security control that is not included in SP800-53, we would also review the rationale. And we are going to some security controls to strengthen cybersecurity of nuclear facilities. In this paper, we compared and analyzed of two regulation in technical security controls. RG 5.71 that is based on NIST standard provides well-understood security controls for nuclear facility. But some omitting from NIST standard can threaten security state of nuclear facility.

  4. Radiation protection at nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, K.; Momose, T.; Furuta, S.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation protection methodologies concerning individual monitoring, workplace monitoring and environmental monitoring in nuclear fuel facilities have been developed and applied to facilities in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories (NCL) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for over 40 y. External exposure to photon, beta ray and neutron and internal exposure to alpha emitter are important issues for radiation protection at these facilities. Monitoring of airborne and surface contamination by alpha and beta/photon emitters at workplace is also essential to avoid internal exposure. A critical accident alarm system developed by JAEA has been proved through application at the facilities for a long time. A centralised area monitoring system is effective for emergency situations. Air and liquid effluents from facilities are monitored by continuous monitors or sampling methods to comply with regulations. Effluent monitoring has been carried out for 40 y to assess the radiological impacts on the public and the environment due to plant operation. (authors)

  5. Building a medical system for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Mitsuya

    2016-01-01

    To build a medical system for nuclear facilities, I explained what kinds of actions were performed with the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident and what kinds of actions are going to be performed in the future. We examined the health and medical care of the emergency workers in nuclear facilities including TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant from 2014 to 2015 in the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW). We carried out a detailed hearing from stakeholders of electric companies and medical institutions about the medical system in nuclear facilities carrying out urgent activities. It has been said that the electric company is responsible to maintain the medical system for affected workers in nuclear facilities. However, TEPCO could not find the medical staff, such as doctors, by their own effort at the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident. The network of doctors familiar with emergency medical care support dispatched the medical staff after July of 2011. The stakeholders indicated that the following six tasks must be resolved: (1) the fact that no electric company performs the action of bringing up medical staff who can be dispatched into nuclear facilities in emergencies in 2015; (2) bringing up personnel in charge of radiation management and logistics other than the medical staff, such as doctors; (3) cooperation with the community medicine system given the light and shade by nuclear facilities; (4) performing training for the many concurrent wounded based on the scenario of a severe accident; (5) indicating both the condition of the contract and the guarantee of status that is appropriate for dispatched medical staffs; and (6) clarifying the organization of the network of stakeholders. The stakeholders showed the future directionality as follows: (1) To recruit the medical staff expected to be dispatched into nuclear facilities, (2) to carry out the discussion and conveyance training to strengthen cooperation with

  6. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international co-operation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and nuclear materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers

  7. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international co-operation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and nuclear materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers [es

  8. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international co-operation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and nuclear materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers

  9. The radioactive ion beams facility project for the legnaro laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecchio, Luigi B.

    1999-04-01

    In the frame work of the Italian participation to the project of a high intensity proton facility for the energy amplifier and nuclear waste transmutations, LNL is involving in the design and construction of prototypes of the injection system of the 1 GeV linac that consists of a RFQ (5 MeV, 30 mA) followed by a 100 MeV linac. This program has been already financially supported and the work is actually in progress. In this context, the LNL has been proposed a project for the construction of a second generation facility for the production of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) by using the ISOL method. The final goal consists in the production of neutron rich RIBs with masses ranging from 80 to 160 by using primary beams of protons, deuterons and light ions with energy of 100 MeV and 100 kW power. This project is proposed to be developed in about 10 years from now and intermediate milestones and experiments are foreseen and under consideration for the next INFN five year plan (1999-2003). In such period of time is proposed the construction of a proton/deuteron accelerator of 10 MeV energy and 10 mA current, consisting of a RFQ (5 MeV, 30 mA) and a linac (10 MeV, 10 mA), and of a neutron area dedicated to the RIBs production, to the BNCT applications and to the neutron physics. Some remarks on the production methods will be presented. The possibility of producing radioisotopes by means of the fission induced by neutrons will be investigated and the methods of production of neutrons will be discussed.

  10. Methodology for analyzing risk at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Hosik; Lee, Nayoung; Ham, Taekyu; Seo, Janghoon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new methodology for evaluating the risk at nuclear facilities was developed. • Five measures reflecting all factors that should be concerned to assess risk were developed. • The attributes on NMAC and nuclear security culture are included as attributes for analyzing. • The newly developed methodology can be used to evaluate risk of both existing facility and future nuclear system. - Abstract: A methodology for evaluating risks at nuclear facilities is developed in this work. A series of measures is drawn from the analysis of factors that determine risks. Five measures are created to evaluate risks at nuclear facilities. These include the legal and institutional framework, material control, physical protection system effectiveness, human resources, and consequences. Evaluation attributes are developed for each measure and specific values are given in order to calculate the risk value quantitatively. Questionnaires are drawn up on whether or not a state has properly established a legal and regulatory framework (based on international standards). These questionnaires can be a useful measure for comparing the status of the physical protection regime between two countries. Analyzing an insider threat is not an easy task and no methodology has been developed for this purpose. In this study, attributes that could quantitatively evaluate an insider threat, in the case of an unauthorized removal of nuclear materials, are developed by adopting the Nuclear Material Accounting & Control (NMAC) system. The effectiveness of a physical protection system, P(E), could be analyzed by calculating the probability of interruption, P(I), and the probability of neutralization, P(N). In this study, the Tool for Evaluating Security System (TESS) code developed by KINAC is used to calculate P(I) and P(N). Consequence is an important measure used to analyze risks at nuclear facilities. This measure comprises radiological, economic, and social damage. Social and

  11. ISOL science at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beene, James R [ORNL; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL; Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Jones, K. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Nazarewicz, Witold [ORNL; Stracener, Daniel W [ORNL; Tatum, B Alan [ORNL; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The Holi eld Radioactive Ion Beam Facility, located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is operated as a National User Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy, producing high quality ISOL beams of short-lived, radioactive nuclei for studies of exotic nuclei, astrophysics research, and various societal applications. The primary driver, the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron, produces rare isotopes by bombarding highly refractory targets with light ions. The radioactive isotopes are ionized, formed into a beam, mass selected, injected into the 25-MV Tandem, accelerated, and used in experiments. This article reviews HRIBF and its science.

  12. An irradiation facility with a horizontal beam for radiobiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czub, J.; Banas, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Choinski, J.; Jaskola, M.; Korman, A.; Szeflinski, Z.; Wojcik, A.

    2006-01-01

    A facility with a horizontal beam for radiobiological experiments with heavy ions has been designed and constructed at the Heavy Ion Laboratory in Warsaw Univ.. The facility is optimal to investigate the radiobiological effects of charged heavy particles on a cellular or molecular level as in the region of the Bragg peak. (authors)

  13. Synthetic methods for beam to beam power balancing capability of large laser facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guangyu; Zhang Xiaomin; Zhao Runchang; Zheng Wanguo; Yang Xiaoyu; You Yong; Wang Chengcheng; Shao Yunfei

    2011-01-01

    To account for output power balancing capability of large laser facilities, a synthetic method with beam to beam root-mean-square is presented. Firstly, a conversion process for the facilities from original data of beam powers to regular data is given. The regular data contribute to the normal distribution approximately, and then a corresponding simple method of root-mean-square for beam to beam power balancing capability is given.Secondly, based on theory of total control charts and cause-selecting control charts, control charts with root-mean-square are established which show short-term variety of power balancing capability of the facilities. Mean rate of failure occurrence is also defined and used to describe long-term trend of global balancing capabilities of the facilities. Finally, advantages of the intuitive and efficient diagnosis for synthetic methods are illustrated by analysis of experimental data. (authors)

  14. A neutron beam facility for radioactive ion beams and other applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecchio, L. B.

    1999-06-01

    In the framework of the Italian participation in the project of a high intensity proton facility for the energy amplifier and nuclear waste transmutations, LNL is involved in the design and construction of same prototypes of the injection system of the 1 GeV linac that consists of a RFQ (5 MeV, 30 mA) followed by a 100 MeV linac. This program has already been supported financially and the work is in progress. In this context LNL has proposed a project for the construction of a second generation facility for the production of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) by means of the ISOL method. The final goal is the production of neutron rich RIBs with masses ranging from 30 to 150 by using primary beams of protons, deuterons and light ions with energy of 100 MeV and 100 kW power. This project is expected to be developed in about 10 years from new and intermediate milestones and experiments are foreseen and under consideration for the next INFN five year plan (1999-2003). During that period the construction of a proton/deuteron accelerator of 10 MeV energy and 10 mA current, consisting of a RFQ (5 MeV, 30 mA) and a linac (10 MeV, 10 mA), and of a neutron area dedicated to the RIBs production and to the neutron physics, is proposed. Some remarks on the production methods will be presented. The possibility of producing radioisotopes by means of the fission induced by neutrons will be investigated and the methods of production of neutrons will be discussed. Besides the RIBs production, neutron beams for the BNCT applications and neutron physics are also planned.

  15. Target irradiation facility and targetry development at 160 MeV proton beam of Moscow linac

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuikov, B L; Konyakhin, N A; Vincent, J

    1999-01-01

    A facility has been built and successfully operated with the 160 MeV proton beam of Moscow Meson factory LINAC, Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) of Russian Academy of Science, Troitsk. The facility was created for various isotope production goals as well as for fundamental nuclear investigations at high intensity beam (100 mu A and more). An important part of the facility targetry system is a high-intensity beam monitoring collimator device. Measurements of the temperature distribution between collimator sectors, cooling water flow and temperature, and the beam current, provide an opportunity to compute beam losses and beam position. The target holder design allows easy insertion by manipulator and simultaneous bombardment of several different targets of various types and forms, and variation of proton energy on each target over a wide range below 160 MeV. The main target utilized for commercial sup 8 sup 2 Sr isotope production is metallic rubidium in a stainless-steel container. A regular wet chemistry ...

  16. Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

    2013-01-01

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  17. Accelerator complex for a radioactive ion beam facility at ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolen, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Since the superconducting heavy ion linac ATLAS is an ideal post-accelerator for radioactive beams, plans are being developed for expansion of the facility with the addition of a driver accelerator, a production target/ion source combination, and a low q/m pre-accelerator for radioactive ions. A working group including staff from the ANL Physics Division and current ATLAS users are preparing a radioactive beam facility proposal. The present paper reviews the specifications of the accelerators required for the facility

  18. Computer Security at Nuclear Facilities (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The possibility that nuclear or other radioactive material could be used for malicious purposes cannot be ruled out in the current global situation. States have responded to this risk by engaging in a collective commitment to strengthen the protection and control of such material and to respond effectively to nuclear security events. States have agreed to strengthen existing instruments and have established new international legal instruments to enhance nuclear security worldwide. Nuclear security is fundamental in the management of nuclear technologies and in applications where nuclear or other radioactive material is used or transported. Through its Nuclear Security Programme, the IAEA supports States to establish, maintain and sustain an effective nuclear security regime. The IAEA has adopted a comprehensive approach to nuclear security. This recognizes that an effective national nuclear security regime builds on: the implementation of relevant international legal instruments; information protection; physical protection; material accounting and control; detection of and response to trafficking in such material; national response plans; and contingency measures. With its Nuclear Security Series, the IAEA aims to assist States in implementing and sustaining such a regime in a coherent and integrated manner. The IAEA Nuclear Security Series comprises Nuclear Security Fundamentals, which include objectives and essential elements of a State's nuclear security regime; Recommendations; Implementing Guides; and Technical Guidance. Each State carries the full responsibility for nuclear security, specifically: to provide for the security of nuclear and other radioactive material and associated facilities and activities; to ensure the security of such material in use, storage or in transport; to combat illicit trafficking and the inadvertent movement of such material; and to be prepared to respond to a nuclear security event. This publication is in the Technical Guidance

  19. Overview of linac applications at future radioactive beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolen, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    There is considerable interest worldwide in the research which could be done at a next generation, advanced radioactive beam facility. To generate high quality, intense beams of accelerated radionuclides via the open-quotes isotope separator on-lineclose quotes (ISOL) method requires two major accelerator components: a high power (100 kW) driver device to produce radionuclides in a production target/ion source complex, and a secondary beam accelerator to produce beams of radioactive ions up to energies on the order of 10 MeV per nucleon over a broad mass range. In reviewing the technological challenges of such a facility, several types of modem linear accelerators appear well suited. This paper reviews the properties of the linacs currently under construction and those proposed for future facilities for use either as the driver device or the radioactive beam post-accelerator. Other choices of accelerators, such as cyclotrons, for either the driver or secondary beam devices of a radioactive beam complex will also be compared. Issues to be addressed for the production accelerator include the choice of ion beam types to be used for cost-effective production of radionuclides. For the post-accelerator the choice of ion source technology is critical and dictates the charge-to-mass requirements at the injection stage

  20. Nuclear material inventory estimation in a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.E.; Beyerlein, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    A new approach in the application of modern system identification and estimation techniques is proposed to help nuclear reprocessing facilities meet the nuclear accountability requirement proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The proposed identification and estimation method considers the material inventory in a portion of the chemical separations area of a reprocessing facility. The method addresses the nonlinear aspects of the problem, the time delay through the separation facility, and the lack of measurement access. The method utilizes only input-output measured data and knowledge of the uncertainties associated with the process and measured data. 14 refs

  1. Beam position and phase measurements of microampere beams at the Michigan State University REA3 facility

    CERN Document Server

    Crisp, J; Durickovic, B; Kiupel, G; Krause, S; Leitner, D; Nash, S; Rodriguez, J A; Russo, T; Webber, R; Wittmer, W; Eddy, N; Briegel, C; Fellenz, B; Slimmer, D; Wendt, M

    2013-01-01

    A high power CW, heavy ion linac will be the driver accelerator for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) being designed at Michigan State University (MSU). The linac requires a Beam Position Monitoring (BPM) system with better than 100 micron resolution at 100 microamperes beam current. A low beam current test of the candidate technology, button pick-ups and direct digital down-conversion signal processing, was conducted in the ReA3 re-accelerated beam facility at Michigan State University. The test is described. Beam position and phase measurement results, demonstrating ~250 micron and ~1.5 degree resolution in a 45 kHz bandwidth for a 1.0 microampere beam current, are reported.

  2. Operational status of nuclear facilities in Japan. 2008 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This document is a summary of the outline of the safety regulation administration of nuclear facilities as well as various data on the commercial nuclear power reactor facilities, research and development nuclear power reactor facilities, fabrication facilities, reprocessing facilities, and disposal facilities in fiscal year 2007 (from April 2007 to March 2008). I sincerely hope this document is used widely by many people engaged in work related to ensuring nuclear safety. (J.P.N.)

  3. Operational status of nuclear facilities in Japan. 2010 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This document is a summary of the outline of the safety regulation administration of nuclear facilities as well as various data on the commercial nuclear power reactor facilities, research and development nuclear power reactor facilities, fabrication facilities, reprocessing facilities, and disposal facilities in fiscal year 2009 (from April 2009 to March 2010). We sincerely hope this document is used widely by many people engaged in work related to ensuring nuclear safety. (author)

  4. Over view of nuclear fuel cycle examination facility at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Key-Soon; Kim, Eun-Ga; Joe, Kih-Soo; Kim, Kil-Jeong; Kim, Ki-Hong; Min, Duk-Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-09-01

    Nuclear fuel cycle examination facilities at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) consist of two post-irradiation examination facilities (IMEF and PIEF), one chemistry research facility (CRF), one radiowaste treatment facility (RWTF) and one radioactive waste form examination facility (RWEF). This paper presents the outline of the nuclear fuel cycle examination facilities in KAERI. (author)

  5. Data acquisition system for medium power neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.R. Jr.; Francis, J.E. Jr.; Hammons, C.E.; Dagenhart, W.K.

    1978-06-01

    The Medium Power Neutral Beam Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was constructed in order to develop, test, and condition powerful neutral beam lines for the Princeton Large Torus experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The data acquisition system for the test stand monitors source performance, beam characteristics, and power deposition profiles to determine if the beam line is operating up to its design specifications. The speed of the computer system is utilized to provide near-real-time analysis of experimental data. Analysis of the data is presented as numerical tabulation and graphic display

  6. Optics calculations and beam line design for the JANNuS facility in Orsay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvin, N.; Henry, S.; Flocard, H.; Fortuna, F.; Kaitasov, O.; Pariset, P.; Pellegrino, S.; Ruault, M.O.; Serruys, Y.; Trocelier, P.

    2007-01-01

    JANNuS (Joint Accelerators for Nano-Science and Nuclear Simulation) will be a unique user facility in Europe dedicated to material modification by ion beam implantation and irradiation. The main originality of the project is that it will be possible to perform implantation and irradiation with simultaneous multiple ions beams and in situ characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation or ion beam analysis. This facility will be composed of two experimental platforms located in two sites: the CEA-SRMP in Saclay and the CNRS-CSNSM in Orsay. This paper will focus on the design of two new transport beam lines for the Orsay site. One of the most challenging parts of the JANNuS project (Orsay site) is to design two new beam lines in order to inject, into a 200 kV TEM, two different ion beams (low and medium energy) coming from two existing pieces of equipment: a 2 MV Tandem accelerator and a 190 kV ion implanter. For these new beam lines, first order beam calculations have been done using transfer matrix formalism. A genetic algorithm has been written and adapted to perform the optimization of the beam line parameters. Then, using the SIMION code, field maps of the electrostatic elements (quadrupoles, spherical sectors) have been calculated and ion trajectories have been simulated. We studied specifically the optical aberrations induced by the electrostatic spherical deflectors. Finally, the results of the first order calculations and the field map simulations show a good agreement

  7. CERN AWAKE Facility Readiness for First Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Chiara; Butterworth, Andrew; Damerau, Heiko; Döbert, Steffen; Fedosseev, Valentin; Feldbaumer, Eduard; Gschwendtner, Edda; Höfle, Wolfgang; Pardons, Ans; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Vincke, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The AWAKE project at CERN was approved in August 2013 and since then a big effort was made to be able to probe the acceleration of electrons before the "2019-2020 Long Shutdown". The next steps in this challenging schedule will be a dry run of all the beam line systems, at the end of the HW commissioning in June 2016, and the first proton beam sent to the plasma cell one month later. The current status of the project is presented together with an outlook over the foreseen works for operation with electrons in 2018.

  8. First radioactive beams at ACCULINNA-2 facility and first proposed experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezbakh, A. A.; Beekman, W.; Chudoba, V.; Fomichev, A. S.; Golovkov, M. S.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Grigorenko, L. V.; Kaminski, G.; Krupko, S. A.; Mentel, M.; Nikolskii, E. Yu.; Parfenova, Yu. L.; Plucinski, P.; Sidorchuk, S. I.; Slepnev, R. S.; Sharov, P. G.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Zalewski, B.

    2018-04-01

    New fragment separator ACCULINNA-2 was installed at the primary beam line of the U-400M cyclotron in 2016. Recently, first radioactive ion beams were obtained. The design parameters of new facility were experimentally confirmed. Intensity, purity and transverse profile of several secondary beams at the final focal plane were studied. The intensities obtained for the secondary beams of 14B, 12Be, 9;11Li, 6;8He in the fragmentation reaction 15N (49.7 AMeV) + Be (2 mm) are in average 15 times higher in comparison to the ones produced at its forerunner ACCULINNA separator. The ACCULINNA-2 separator will become a backbone facility at the FLNR for the research in the field of light exotic nuclei in the vicinity of the nuclear drip lines. The planned first experiment, aimed for the observation of the 7H nucleus at ACCULINNA-2, is outlined.

  9. Brennilis nuclear facilities. 2009 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This annual report is established on account of article 21 of the 2006-686 French law from June 13, 2006, relative to the transparency and safety in the nuclear domain. It describes, first, the nuclear facilities of Brennilis, and then the measures taken to ensure their safety (personnel radioprotection, actions implemented for nuclear safety improvement, organisation in crisis situation, external and internal controls, technical assessment of the facilities, administrative procedures carried out in 2009), incidents and accidents registered in 2009, radioactive and chemical effluents released by the facilities in the environment, other pollutions, management of radioactive wastes, and, finally, the actions carried out in the domain of transparency and public information. A glossary and the viewpoint of the Committee of Hygiene, safety and working conditions about the content of the document conclude the report. (J.S.)

  10. Civaux nuclear facilities. 2009 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This annual report is established on account of article 21 of the 2006-686 French law from June 13, 2006, relative to the transparency and safety in the nuclear domain. It describes, first, the nuclear facilities of Civaux, and then the measures taken to ensure their safety (personnel radioprotection, actions implemented for nuclear safety improvement, organisation in crisis situation, external and internal controls, technical assessment of the facilities, administrative procedures carried out in 2009), incidents and accidents registered in 2009, radioactive and chemical effluents released by the facilities in the environment, other pollutions, management of radioactive wastes, and, finally, the actions carried out in the domain of transparency and public information. A glossary and the viewpoint of the Committee of Hygiene, safety and working conditions about the content of the document conclude the report. (J.S.)

  11. Chooz nuclear facilities. 2009 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This annual report is established on account of article 21 of the 2006-686 French law from June 13, 2006, relative to the transparency and safety in the nuclear domain. It describes, first, the nuclear facilities of Chooz, and then the measures taken to ensure their safety (personnel radioprotection, actions implemented for nuclear safety improvement, organisation in crisis situation, external and internal controls, technical assessment of the facilities, administrative procedures carried out in 2009), incidents and accidents registered in 2009, radioactive and chemical effluents released by the facilities in the environment, other pollutions, management of radioactive wastes, and, finally, the actions carried out in the domain of transparency and public information. A glossary and the viewpoint of the Committee of Hygiene, safety and working conditions about the content of the document conclude the report. (J.S.)

  12. Environmental monitoring around the Swedish Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondesson, A.; Luening, M.; Wallberg, L.; Wijk, H.

    1999-01-01

    The environmental monitoring programme for the nuclear facilities has shown that the radioactive discharges increase the concentrations of some radionuclides in the local marine environment around the Swedish nuclear facilities. Samples from the terrestrial environment rarely show increased radionuclide concentrations. From a radiological point of view the most important nuclide in the environmental samples usually is CS-137. However, the largest part of the present concentrations of Cs-137 in the Swedish environment originate from the Chernobyl accident. The concentrations of radionuclides that can be found in biota around the nuclear facilities are much lower than the concentration levels that are known to give acute damage to organisms. The total radiation doses from the discharges of radionuclides are small. (au)

  13. Institutionalizing Safeguards By Design for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, James B.; Kovacic, Donald N.; Whitaker, J. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Safeguards for nuclear facilities can be significantly improved by developing and implementing methodologies for integrating proliferation resistance into the design of new facilities. This paper proposes a method to systematically analyze a facility's processes, systems, equipment, structures and management controls to ensure that all relevant proliferation scenarios that could potentially result in unacceptable consequences have been identified, evaluated and mitigated. This approach could be institutionalized into a country's regulatory structure similar to the way facilities are licensed to operate safely and are monitored through inspections and incident reporting to ensure compliance with domestic and international safeguards. Furthermore, taking credit for existing systems and equipment that have been analyzed and approved to assure a facility's reliable and safe operations will reduce the overall cost of implementing intrinsic and extrinsic proliferation-resistant features. The ultimate goal is to integrate safety, reliability, security and safeguards operations into the design of new facilities to effectively and efficiently prevent diversion, theft and misuse of nuclear material and sensitive technologies at both the facility and state level. To facilitate this approach at the facility level, this paper discusses an integrated proliferation resistance analysis (IPRA) process. If effectively implemented, this integrated approach will also facilitate the application of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards

  14. AECL's strategy for decommissioning Canadian nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubert, W.M.; Pare, F.E.; Pratapagiri, G.

    1992-01-01

    The Canadian policy on decommissioning of nuclear facilities as defined in the Atomic Energy Control Act and Regulations is administered by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), a Federal Government agency. It requires that these facilities be decommissioned according to approved plans which are to be developed by the owner of the nuclear facility during its early stages of design and to be refined during its operating life. In this regulatory environment, Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) has developed a decommissioning strategy for power stations which consists of three distinctive phases. After presenting AECL's decommissioning philosophy, its foundations are explained and it is described how it has and soon will be applied to various facilities. A brief summary is provided of the experience gained up to date on the implementation of this strategy. (author) 3 figs.; 1 tab

  15. National facility for neutron beam research

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this talk, the growth of neutron beam research (NBR) in India over the past five decades is traced beginning with research at Apsara. A range of problems in condensed matter physics could be studied at CIRUS, followed by sophisticated indegenous instrumentation and research at Dhruva. The talk ends with an overview ...

  16. The ISOLDE Facility: Radioactive beams at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Some of the experimental techniques used will be introduced; more focus will be put on what physics questions can be answered by using radioactive beams. A brief overview is given of the present and future European developments in this rapidly evolving field. Prerequisite knowledge: none

  17. Conducting Computer Security Assessments at Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    Computer security is increasingly recognized as a key component in nuclear security. As technology advances, it is anticipated that computer and computing systems will be used to an even greater degree in all aspects of plant operations including safety and security systems. A rigorous and comprehensive assessment process can assist in strengthening the effectiveness of the computer security programme. This publication outlines a methodology for conducting computer security assessments at nuclear facilities. The methodology can likewise be easily adapted to provide assessments at facilities with other radioactive materials

  18. Quality Assurance for Operation of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C. G.; Kwon, H. I.; Kim, K. H.; Oh, Y. W.; Lee, Y. G.; Ha, J. H.; Lim, N. J.

    2008-12-01

    This report describes QA activities performed within 'Quality Assurance for Nuclear facility project' and results thereof. Efforts were made to maintain and improve quality system of nuclear facilities. Varification activities whether quality system was implemented in compliance with requirements. QA department assisted KOLAS accredited testing and calibration laboratories, ISO 9001 quality system, establishment of QA programs for R and D, and carried out reviews and surveys for development of quality assurance technologies. Major items of this report are as follows : - Development and Improvement of QA Programs - QA Activities - Assessment of Effectiveness and Adequacy for QA Programs

  19. Emergency planning and preparedness for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear installations are designed, constructed and operated in such a way that the probability for an incident or accident is very low and the probability for a severe accident with catastrophic consequences is extremely small. These accidents represent the residual risk of the nuclear installation, and this residual risk can be decreased on one hand by a better design, construction and operation and on the other hand by planning and taking emergency measures inside the facility and in the environment of the facility. By way of introduction and definition it may be indicated to define some terms pertaining to the subject in order to make for more uniform understanding. (orig./DG)

  20. National facility for neutron beam research

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The first fully automated computer controlled diffractometer was designed and commissioned ... missioning the spectrometers at the reactor with help from Nuclear Physics Division workshop ... ical extensions of the work carried out at CIRUS.

  1. The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Present status and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.; Beene, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) is a first generation national user facility for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics research with radioactive ion beams (RIBs). The reconfiguration, construction, and equipment commissioning phases have been completed and the beam development program is in progress. In this article, descriptions of the facility and newly implemented experimental equipment for use in the nuclear and astrophysics programs will be given and an outline of the initial experimental program will be presented. Special target ion source related problems, endemic to the production of specific short lived RIBs will be discussed. In addition, plans, which involve either a 200 MeV or a 1 GeV proton linac driver for a second generation ISOL facility, will be presented

  2. Ion sources for initial use at the Holifield radioactive ion beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will use the 25-MV tandem accelerator for the acceleration of radioactive ion beams to energies appropriate for research in nuclear physics; negative ion beams are, therefore, required for injection into the tandem accelerator. Because charge exchange is an efficient means for converting initially positive ion beams to negative ion beams, both positive and negative ion sources are viable options for use at the facility; the choice of the type of ion source will depend on the overall efficiency for generating the radioactive species of interest. A high-temperature version of the CERN-ISOLDE positive ion source has been selected and a modified version of the source designed and fabricated for initial use at the HRIBF because of its low emittance, relatively high ionization efficiencies and species versatility, and because it has been engineered for remote installation, removal and servicing as required for safe handling in a high-radiation-level ISOL facility. Prototype plasma-sputter negative ion sources and negative surfaceionization sources are also under design consideration for generating negative radioactive ion beams from high electron-affinity elements. A brief review of the HRIBF will be presented, followed by a detailed description of the design features, operational characteristics, ionization efficiencies, and beam qualities (emittances) of these sources

  3. Defocusing beam line design for an irradiation facility at the TAEA SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencer, A.; Demirköz, B.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Yiğitoğlu, M.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic components must be tested to ensure reliable performance in high radiation environments such as Hi-Limu LHC and space. We propose a defocusing beam line to perform proton irradiation tests in Turkey. The Turkish Atomic Energy Authority SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility was inaugurated in May 2012 for radioisotope production. The facility has also an R&D room for research purposes. The accelerator produces protons with 30 MeV kinetic energy and the beam current is variable between 10 μA and 1.2 mA. The beam kinetic energy is suitable for irradiation tests, however the beam current is high and therefore the flux must be lowered. We plan to build a defocusing beam line (DBL) in order to enlarge the beam size, reduce the flux to match the required specifications for the irradiation tests. Current design includes the beam transport and the final focusing magnets to blow up the beam. Scattering foils and a collimator is placed for the reduction of the beam flux. The DBL is designed to provide fluxes between 107 p /cm2 / s and 109 p /cm2 / s for performing irradiation tests in an area of 15.4 cm × 21.5 cm. The facility will be the first irradiation facility of its kind in Turkey.

  4. Life Management and Safety of Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbri, S.; Diluch, A.; Vega, G., E-mail: fabbri@cnea.gov.ar [Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-10-15

    The nuclear programme in Argentina includes: nuclear power and related supplies, medical and industrial applications, waste management, research and development and human training. Nuclear facilities require life management programs that allow a safe operation. Safety is the first priority for designers and operators. This can be attained with defence in depth: regular inspections and maintenance procedures to minimize failure risks. CNEA objectives in this area are to possess the necessary capability to give safe and fast technical support. Within this scheme, one of the main activities undertaken by CNEA is to provide technological assistance to the nuclear plants and research reactors. As a consequence of an increasing concern about safety and ageing a Life Management Department for safe operation was created to take care of these subjects. The goal is to elaborate a Safety Evaluation Process for the critical components of nuclear plants and other facilities. The overall objectives of a safety process are to ensure a continuous safe, reliable and effective operation of nuclear facilities and it means the implementation of the defence in deep concept to enhance safety for the protection of the public, the workers and the environment. (author)

  5. Stakeholder involvement in decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Significant numbers of nuclear facilities will need to be decommissioned in the coming decades. In this context, NEA member countries are placing increasing emphasis on the involvement of stakeholders in the associated decision procedures. This study reviews decommissioning experience with a view to identifying stakeholder concerns and best practice in addressing them. The lessons learnt about the end of the facility life cycle can also contribute to better foresight in siting and building new facilities. This report will be of interest to all major players in the field of decommissioning, in particular policy makers, implementers, regulators and representatives of local host communities

  6. The beam diagnostic instruments in Beijing radioactive ion-beam facilities isotope separator on-line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Y.; Cui, B.; Ma, R.; Tang, B.; Chen, L.; Huang, Q.; Jiang, W.

    2014-01-01

    The beam diagnostic instruments for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facilities Isotope Separator On-Line are introduced [B. Q. Cui, Z. H. Peng, Y. J. Ma, R. G. Ma, B. Tang, T. Zhang, and W. S. Jiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 266, 4113 (2008); T. J. Zhang, X. L. Guan, and B. Q. Cui, in Proceedings of APAC 2004, Gyeongju, Korea, 2004, http://www.jacow.org , p. 267]. For low intensity ion beam [30–300 keV/1 pA–10 μA], the beam profile monitor, the emittance measurement unit, and the analyzing slit will be installed. For the primary proton beam [100 MeV/200 μA], the beam profile scanner will be installed. For identification of the nuclide, a beam identification unit will be installed. The details of prototype of the beam diagnostic units and some experiment results will be described in this article

  7. Muon Beam Studies in the H4 beam line and the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++)

    CERN Document Server

    Margraf, Rachel; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    In this note, we present detailed simulation results for the trajectory of a muon beam, traversing beam zones PPE-134 and PPE-154, produced by a 150 GeV positive hadron beam incident on collimators 9 & 10 in the H4 beam line when these collimators are placed off-beam axis to stop all hadrons and electrons. Using G4Beamline, a GEANT-4 based Monte-Carlo program, the trajectory of the muon beam has been studied for several field strengths of the GOLIATH magnet, as well as for different polarities. The position of the beam at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++), located downstream the PPE-144 area, is also presented. In addition, two configurations of the two XTDV’s present in the line (XTDV.022.520 and XTDV.022.610) have been studied, with the purpose to simulate the pion contamination of the beam both in PPE134 and GIF++.

  8. Muon Beam Studies in the H4 beam line and the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++)

    CERN Document Server

    Margraf, Rachel; CERN. Geneva. EN Department

    2017-01-01

    In this report, I summarize my work of detailed study and optimization of the muon beam configuration of H4 beam line in SPS North Area. Using Monte-Carlo simulations, I studied the properties and behavior of the muon beam in combination with the field of the large, spectrometer “ GOLIATH” magnet at -1.5, -1.0, 0, 1.0 and 1.5 Tesla, which is shown to affect the central x position of the muon beam that is delivered to the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++). I also studied the muon beam for different configurations of the two XTDV beam dumps upstream of GIF++ in the H4 beam line. I will also discuss my role in mapping the magnetic field of the GOLIATH magnet in the H4 beam line.

  9. The JANNUS Saclay facility: A new platform for materials irradiation, implantation and ion beam analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrino, S., E-mail: stephanie.pellegrino@cea.fr [CEA, INSTN, UEPTN, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Trocellier, P.; Miro, S.; Serruys, Y.; Bordas, E.; Martin, H. [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chaabane, N.; Vaubaillon, S. [CEA, INSTN, UEPTN, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gallien, J.P.; Beck, L. [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-02-15

    The third accelerator of the multi-ion irradiation platform JANNUS (Joint Accelerators for Nanosciences and NUclear Simulation), a 6SDH-2 Pelletron from National Electrostatic Corporation, Middleton was installed at Saclay in October 2009. The first triple beam irradiation combining Fe, He and H ion beams has been performed in March 2010. In the first part of this paper, we give a technical description of the triple beam facility, its performances and experimental capabilities. Typically, damage dose up to 100 dpa can be reached in 10 h irradiation with heavy ion beams, with or without simultaneous bombardment by protons, helium-4 ions or any other heavy ion beam. In the second part of this paper, we illustrate some IBA results obtained after irradiation and implantation experiments.

  10. Dual-beam operation of the Astra Gemini laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan Parry; Nicola Booth; Oleg Chekhlov; John Collier; Edwin Divall; Klaus Ertel; Peta Foster; Steve Hawkes; Chris Hooker; Victoria Marshall

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Gemini is a Petawatt class Ti:Sapphire laser system at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK. It was designed as a dual beam laser, with two independently configurable 800 nm beams delivering 15 J to target in 30 fs pulse duration, giving 0.5 PW peak power per beam. It is capable of reaching intensities over 10 22 W/cm 2 . Gemini can achieve a maximum repetition rate of one shot every 20 seconds, allowing it to deliver hundreds of shots per day; a feature which makes it unique among PW lasers. Already this has proved valuable in experiments involving electron acceleration in gas jets. The first Gemini beamline became operational in 2008. Commissioning of the second beam was deferred to allow earlier access to the facility by experimental scientists, and to develop operational experience. In this mode, Gemini has already produced significant results from a number of advanced plasma physics experiments. The second beam of Gemini is now coming online, with the first dual beam experiment starting in June 2010. The flexibility offered by two short pulse, ultra high intensity beams is another aspect that makes this laser system unique. The dual beams enable versatile configurations and illumination geometries, facilitating a wider range of experiments than is possible with only a single beam. Operationally however, it introduces additional factors which must be monitored and controlled in order to achieve experimental success. The beams must be timed with respect to each other with accuracy less than the pulse duration. The beam foci must also be overlapped spatially, and the stability of both these factors maintained over extended periods. We report on the second beam commissioning process, including the latest results on the characteristics, stability and spatio-temporal overlap of the two beams. We present details of amplifier performance, along with measurements of beam quality, focal spot, pulse duration and contrast, to give a

  11. Nuclear energy: Environmental issues at DOE's nuclear defense facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    GAO's review of nine Department of Energy defense facilities identified a number of significant environmental issues: (1) eight facilities have groundwater contaminated with radioactive and/or hazardous substances to high levels; (2) six facilities have soil contamination in unexpected areas, including offsite locations; (3) four facilities are not in full compliance with the Clean Water Act; and (4) all nine facilities are significantly changing their waste disposal practices to obtain a permit under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. GAO is recommending that DOE develop and overall groundwater and soil protection strategy that would provide a better perspective on the environmental risks and impacts associated with operating DOE's nuclear defense facilities. GAO also recommends that DOE allow outside independent inspections of the disposal practices used for any waste DOE self-regulates and revise its order governing the management of hazardous and mixed waste

  12. The high-energy dual-beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaletta, D.

    1984-07-01

    This proposal presents a new experimental facility at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) to study the effects of irradiation on the first wall and blanket materials of a fusion reactor. A special effort is made to demonstrate the advantages of the Dual Beam Technique (DBT) as a future research tool for materials development within the European Fusion Technology Programme. The Dual-Beam-Technique allows the production both of helium and of damage in thick metal and ceramic specimens by simultaneous irradiation with high energy alpha particles and protons produced by the two KfK cyclotrons. The proposal describes the Dual Beam Technique the planned experimental activities and the design features of the Dual Beam Facility presently under construction. (orig.) [de

  13. A beam optics study of the biomedical beam line at a proton therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Chong Cheoul; Kim, Jong-Won

    2007-01-01

    A biomedical beam line has been designed for the experimental area of a proton therapy facility to deliver mm to sub-mm size beams in the energy range of 20-50 MeV using the TRANSPORT/TURTLE beam optics codes and a newly-written program. The proton therapy facility is equipped with a 230 MeV fixed-energy cyclotron and an energy selection system based on a degrader and slits, so that beam currents available for therapy decrease at lower energies in the therapeutic beam energy range of 70-230 MeV. The new beam line system is composed of an energy-degrader, two slits, and three quadrupole magnets. The minimum beam sizes achievable at the focal point are estimated for the two energies of 50 and 20 MeV. The focused FWHM beam size is approximately 0.3 mm with an expected beam current of 20 pA when the beam energy is reduced to 50 MeV from 100 MeV, and roughly 0.8 mm with a current of 10 pA for a 20 MeV beam

  14. SETT facility of International Nuclear Security Academy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Hyung Min

    2012-01-01

    After the Cold War was put to an end, the international community, especially the Western world, was concerned about Soviet nuclear materials falling into wrong hands, especially of terrorists. Later, the growing threat posed by terrorist networks such as the Taliban and al Qaeda led to a global campaign to deny such networks materials which may be used for the development of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). The 9 11 attacks made a section of the international community highly apprehensive of WMD terrorism, especially its nuclear version. From this point of view, it is clear that nuclear facilities which contain nuclear materials are very attractive targets for those who have intention of nuclear terror

  15. SETT facility of International Nuclear Security Academy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hyung Min [Korea Institute of Nuclear Non-proliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    After the Cold War was put to an end, the international community, especially the Western world, was concerned about Soviet nuclear materials falling into wrong hands, especially of terrorists. Later, the growing threat posed by terrorist networks such as the Taliban and al Qaeda led to a global campaign to deny such networks materials which may be used for the development of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). The 9 11 attacks made a section of the international community highly apprehensive of WMD terrorism, especially its nuclear version. From this point of view, it is clear that nuclear facilities which contain nuclear materials are very attractive targets for those who have intention of nuclear terror

  16. Ion beams from high-current PF facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadowski, M [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Pulsed beams of fast deuterons and impurity or admixture ions emitted from high-current PF-type facilities operated in different laboratories are dealt with. A short comparative analysis of time-integrated and time-resolved studies is presented. Particular attention is paid to the microstructure of such ion beams, and to the verification of some theoretical models. (author). 5 figs., 19 refs.

  17. Neutron fluence measurement in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho L, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of present work is to determine the fluence of neutrons in nuclear facilities using two neutron detectors designed and built at Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico. The two neutron detectors are of the passive type, based on solid state nuclear tracks detectors (SSNTD). One of the two neutron detectors was used to determine the fluence distribution of the ports at the nuclear research reactor TRIGA Mark III, which belongs to ININ. In these facilities is important to know the neutron fluence distribution characteristic to carried out diverse kind of research activities. The second neutron detector was employed in order to carry out environmental neutron surveillance. The detector has the property to separate the thermal, intermediate and fast components of the neutron fluence. This detector was used to measure the neutron fluence at hundred points around the primary container of the first Mexican Nuclear Power plant 'Laguna Verde'. This last detector was also used to determine the neutron fluence in some points of interest, around and inside a low scattering neutron room at the 'Centro de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes' of the ININ, to know the background neutron field produced by the neutron sources used there. The design of the two neutron detector and the results obtained for each of the surveying facilities, are described in this work. (Author)

  18. Image processing technology for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Yong Beom; Kim, Woong Ki; Park, Soon Young

    1993-05-01

    Digital image processing technique is being actively studied since microprocessors and semiconductor memory devices have been developed in 1960's. Now image processing board for personal computer as well as image processing system for workstation is developed and widely applied to medical science, military, remote inspection, and nuclear industry. Image processing technology which provides computer system with vision ability not only recognizes nonobvious information but processes large information and therefore this technique is applied to various fields like remote measurement, object recognition and decision in adverse environment, and analysis of X-ray penetration image in nuclear facilities. In this report, various applications of image processing to nuclear facilities are examined, and image processing techniques are also analysed with the view of proposing the ideas for future applications. (Author)

  19. Gas processing at DOE nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacox, J.

    1995-02-01

    The term {open_quotes}Gas Processing{close_quotes} has many possible meanings and understandings. In this paper, and panel, we will be using it to generally mean the treatment of gas by methods other than those common to HVAC and Nuclear Air Treatment. This is only a working guideline not a rigorous definition. Whether a rigorous definition is desirable, or even possible is a question for some other forum. Here we will be discussing the practical aspects of what {open_quotes}Gas Processing{close_quotes} includes and how existing Codes, Standards and industry experience can, and should, apply to DOE and NRC Licensed facilities. A major impediment to use of the best engineering and technology in many nuclear facilities is the administrative mandate that only systems and equipment that meet specified {open_quotes}nuclear{close_quotes} documents are permissible. This paper will highlight some of the limitations created by this approach.

  20. A systems approach to nuclear facility monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argo, P.E.; Doak, J.E.; Howse, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    Sensor technology for use in nuclear facility monitoring has reached an advanced stage of development. Research on where to place these sensors in a facility and how to combine their outputs in a meaningful fashion does not appear to be keeping pace. In this paper, the authors take a global view of the problem where sensor technology is viewed as only one piece of a large puzzle. Other pieces of this puzzle include the optimal location and type of sensors used in a specific facility, the rate at which sensors record information, and the risk associated with the materials/processes at a facility. If the data are analyzed off-site, how will they be transmitted? Is real-time analysis necessary? Is one monitoring only the facility itself, or might one also monitor the processing that occurs there (e.g., tank levels and concentrations)? How is one going to combine the outputs from the various sensors to give us an accurate picture of the state of the facility? This paper will not try to answer all these questions, but rather it will attempt to stimulate thought in this area by formulating a systems approach to the problem demonstrated by a prototype system and a system proposed for an actual facility. The focus will be on the data analysis aspect of the problem. Future work in this area should focus on recommendations and guidelines for a monitoring system based upon the type of facility and processing that occurs there

  1. Tritium surveillance around nuclear facilities in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Y.; Kasida, Y.

    1978-01-01

    In order to measure the tritium levels in the environmental water around the nuclear facilities, the tritium surveillance program began in 1967 locally at Tsuruga and Mihama districts. Nowadays it has been expanded to the ten commercial nuclear power stations and three nuclear facilities. For samples whose tritium concentration is believed less than about 100 pCi/l, they were electrolytically enriched, and then counted by the liquid scintillation counter. Some of samples believed higher than 100 pCi/l were analysed without any enrichment by the low background liquid scintillation counters, Aloka LB 600 or Aloka LB 1. The results of each station are listed in Table. The sampling points corresponding to each results are shown in Figure. Tritium from the effluent was not reflected in all the land water and the tap water around the nuclear power stations and the nuclear facilities. Tritium concentration in rivers, streams, and reservoirs (pools) decreased exponentially from about 600 pCi/l in 1967 to about 150 pCi/l in 1972 at Tsuruga and Mihama, and 360 pCi/l in 1968 to 120 pCi/l in 1973 at Genkai, with the half life of about 2.5 years in both cases. After around 1972, tritium levels of river system in all districts of Japan kept nearly constant up to the end of 1975 and they were in the range from 100 to 300 pCi/l corresponding to the districts. Thereafter, it seems to start to decrease again in 1976. Sea water sampled at the intake of the station or on the seashore far from the outlet was regarded not to be influenced by the effluent from the nuclear reactors or facilities. Tritium concentration in these coastal waters decreased from 100 - 300 pCi/l in 1971 to 30 - 40 pCi/l in 1972 in Fukushima, Ibaraki and Fukui prefectures. (author)

  2. Nuclear Structure Studies at the Future FAIR facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio, Berta

    2010-01-01

    This article is intended to be an introduction to studies of nuclear structure at the future FAIR facility. It addresses interested readers not necessarily expert in the field. It outlines the physics aims and experiments to be carried out at FAIR in the field of nuclear structure and astrophysics. Starting with a brief description of what can be achieved in experiments with intense, high quality stable beams the article leads the reader to how beams of unstable radioactive nuclei will be produced and exploited at FAIR. The characteristics of the beams from the main separation device, the Super-FRS, are outlined and the limitations they impose on experiment are discussed. The various setups at the three experimental branches associated with the Super-FRS are described. The aims of the various experimental setups, how they complement each other and the physics they will address are all explained. The concept of the r-process of nucleosynthesis is outlined at the beginning and used as a running example of how useful it will be to be able to carry out experiments with beams of short-lived, exotic ions.

  3. CERN accelerator school: Antiprotons for colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, P.; Newman, S.

    1984-01-01

    This is a specialized course which addresses a wide spectrum of theoretical and technological problems confronting the designer of an antiproton facility for high-energy-physics research. A broad and profound basis is provided by the lecturers' substantial experience gained over many years with CERN's unique equipment. Topics include beam optics, special lattices for antiproton accumulation and storage rings, antiproton production, stochastic cooling, acceleration and storage, r.f. noise, r.f. beam manipulations, beam-beam interaction, beam stability due to ion accumulation, and diagnostics. The SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) panti p collider, LEAR (the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN), antiprotons in the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings), the new antiproton collector (ACOL) and gas jet targets are also discussed. A table is included listing the parameters of all CERN's accelerators and storage rings. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  4. Gas separation techniques in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hioki, Hideaki; Morisue, Tetsuo; Ohno, Masayoshi

    1983-01-01

    The literatures concerning the gas separation techniques which are applied to the waste gases generated from nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, uranium enrichment and the instrumentation of nuclear facilities are reviewed. The gas permeability and gas separation performance of membranes are discussed in terms of rare gas separation. The investigation into the change of the gas permeability and mechanical properties of membranes with exposure to radiation is reported. The theoretical investigation of the separating cells used for the separation of rare gas and the development of various separating cells are described, and the theoretical and experimental investigations concerning rare gas separation using cascades are described. The application of membrane method to nuclear facilities is explained showing the examples of uranium enrichment, the treatment of waste gases from nuclear reactor buildings and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, the monitoring of low level β-emitters in stacks, the detection of failed fuels and the detection of water leak in fast breeder reactors. (Yoshitake, I.)

  5. Prospects for high-power radioactive beam facilities worldwide

    CERN Document Server

    Nolen, Jerry A

    2003-01-01

    Advances in accelerators, targets, ion sources, and experimental instrumentation are making possible ever more powerful facilities for basic and applied research with short-lived radioactive isotopes. There are several current generation facilities, based on a variety of technologies, operating worldwide. These include, for example, those based on the in-flight method such as the recently upgraded National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University, the facility at RIKEN in Japan, GANIL in Caen, France, and GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. Present facilities based on the Isotope-Separator On-Line method include, for example, the ISOLDE laboratory at CERN, HRIBF at Oak Ridge, and the new high-power facility ISAC at TRIUMF in Vancouver. Next-generation facilities include the Radioactive-Ion Factory upgrade of RIKEN to higher energy and intensity and the upgrade of ISAC to a higher energy secondary beam; both of these projects are in progress. A new project, LINAG, to upgrade the capabilities at...

  6. Pt. 1: Decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Pt. 2: Methods of decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinkilberg, W.

    1982-01-01

    In the present paper the different steps of dismantlement of nuclear facilities are dealt with. First the planning principles for decomminconing are discussed and then the planning of the reactorblock dismantlement in the FR2 research reactor is described. (RW)

  7. Upgrading the AGS polarized beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratner, L.G.

    1991-01-01

    Although present techniques for crossing depolarizing resonances in circular accelerators work, they are very time-consuming to implement and were only able to provide about a 40% polarized beam at 22 GeV in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). We propose to install a partial ''Siberian Snake'' solenoid in the AGS to eliminate the need to correct imperfection resonances and to make other modifications in our intrinsic resonance correctors. This will allow us to reach an energy of 25 GeV with 70% polarization and will enable the AGS to be an efficient injector of polarized protons into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), as well as being able to carry on a fixed-target program with minimum set-up time. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  8. The physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The latest review (1993) of this document was of limited scope and resulted in changes to the text of INFCIRC/225/Rev.2 designed to make the categorization table in that document consistent with the categorization table contained in the Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials. Consequently, a comprehensive review of INFCIRC/225 has not been conducted since 1989. Consequently, a meeting of national experts was convened from 2-5 June 1998 and from 27-29 October 1998 for a thorough review of INFCIRC/225/Rev.3. The revised document reflects the recommendations of the national experts to improve the structure and clarity of the document and to take account of improved technology and current international and national practices. In particular, a chapter has been added which provides specific recommendations related to sabotage of nuclear facilities and nuclear material. As a result of this addition, the title has been changed to 'The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities'. The recommendations presented in this IAEA document reflect a broad consensus among Member States on the requirements which should be met by systems for the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. It is hoped that they will provide helpful guidance for Member States.

  9. The physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    The latest review (1993) of this document was of limited scope and resulted in changes to the text of INFCIRC/225/Rev.2 designed to make the categorization table in that document consistent with the categorization table contained in the Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials. Consequently, a comprehensive review of INFCIRC/225 has not been conducted since 1989. Consequently, a meeting of national experts was convened from 2-5 June 1998 and from 27-29 October 1998 for a thorough review of INFCIRC/225/Rev.3. The revised document reflects the recommendations of the national experts to improve the structure and clarity of the document and to take account of improved technology and current international and national practices. In particular, a chapter has been added which provides specific recommendations related to sabotage of nuclear facilities and nuclear material. As a result of this addition, the title has been changed to 'The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities'. The recommendations presented in this IAEA document reflect a broad consensus among Member States on the requirements which should be met by systems for the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. It is hoped that they will provide helpful guidance for Member States

  10. The proposed INEL intense slow positron source, beam line, and positron microscope facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowitz, H.; Denison, A.B.; Brown, B.

    1993-01-01

    A program is currently underway at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to design and construct an Intense Slow Positron Beam Facility with an associated Positron Microscope. Positron beams have been shown to be valuable research tools and have potential application in industrial processing and nondestructive evaluation (microelectronics, etc.). The limit of resolution or overall usefulness of the technique has been limited because of lack of sufficient intensity. The goal of the INEL positron beam is ≥ 10 12 slow e+/s over a 0.03 cm diameter which represents a 10 3 to 10 4 advancement in beam current over existing beam facilities. The INEL is an ideal site for such a facility because of the nuclear reactors capable of producing intense positron sources and the personnel and facilities capable of handling high levels of radioactivity. A design using 58 Co with moderators and remoderators in conjunction with electrostatic positron beam optics has been reached after numerous computer code studies. Proof-of-principle electron tests have demonstrated the feasibility of the large area source focusing optics. The positron microscope development is occurring in conjunction with the University of Michigan positron microscope group. Such a Beam Facility and associated Intense Slow Positron Source (ISPS) can also be utilized for the generation and study of positron, and positron electron plasmas at ≤ 10 14 particles/cm 3 with plasma temperatures ranging from an eV to many keV, as well as an intense x-ray source via positron channeling radiation. The possibility of a tunable x-ray laser based on channeling positron radiation also exists. In this discussion the authors will present a progress report on various activities associated with the INEL ISPS

  11. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities using current criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shum, E.Y.; Swift, J.J.; Malaro, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    When a licensed nuclear facility ceases operation, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for ensuring that the facility and its site are decontaminated to an acceptable level so that it is safe to release that facility and site for unrestricted public use. Currently, the NRC is developing decommissioning criteria based on reducing public doses from residual contamination in soils and structures at sites released for unrestricted use to as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). Plans are to quantify ALARA in terms of an annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to an average member of the most highly exposed population group. The NRC is working on a regulatory guidance document to provide a technical basis for translating residual contamination levels to annual dose levels. Another regulatory guide is being developed to provide guidance to the licensee on how to conduct radiological surveys to demonstration compliance with the NRC decommissioning criteria. The methods and approaches used in these regulatory guides on the decommissioning of a nuclear facility are discussed in the paper

  12. Hematite nuclear fuel cycle facility decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, K.

    2004-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Company LLC ('Westinghouse') acquired a nuclear fuel processing plant at Hematite, Missouri ('Hematite', the 'Facility', or the 'Plant') in April 2000. The plant has subsequently been closed, and its operations have been relocated to a newer, larger facility. Westinghouse has announced plans to complete its clean-up, decommissioning, and license retirement in a safe, socially responsible, and environmentally sound manner as required by internal policies, as well as those of its parent company, British Nuclear Fuels plc. ('BNFL'). Preliminary investigations have revealed the presence of environmental contamination in various areas of the facility and grounds, including both radioactive contamination and various other substances related to the nuclear fuel processing operations. The disparity in regulatory requirements for radiological and nonradiological contaminants, the variety of historic and recent operations, and the number of previous owners working under various contractual arrangements for both governmental and private concerns has resulted in a complex project. This paper discusses Westinghouse's efforts to develop and implement a comprehensive decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) strategy for the facility and grounds. (author)

  13. International safeguards in large scale nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, D.; Heil, J.

    1977-01-01

    The trend in the energy sector in most of the industrialized areas of the world shows rather clearly, that the rate of installation of nuclear plants will be very high and that the largest possible units of nuclear material handling and storage facilities will be built. Various experiments and analyses of measurement methods relevant to safeguards, in typical nuclear facilities like a fuel reprocessing or a fabrication plant, have shown that the associated measurement errors as obtained under normal operating conditions are such that they are mainly dominated by systematic errors and that such systematic errors may lie in the range of percentages of the measured amount so that a material balance in such a plant could not normally be closed with high accuracy. The simplest way of going around the problem would be to increase the frequency of striking a material balance over a given period of time. This could however lead to an anormous increase in the technical and financial burden for the operator of a facility. The present paper analyses this problem in some detail for some facilities and shows that with a properly developed information system in such plants and a combination of containment, surveillance and accountancy measures, safeguards statements for relatively low significant amounts can be made with the attainable range of measurement accuracies

  14. Neutron beam facilities at the Replacement Research Reactor, ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.

    2003-01-01

    The exciting development for Australia is the construction of a modern state-of-the-art 20-MW Replacement Research Reactor which is currently under construction to replace the aging reactor (HIFAR) at ANSTO in 2006. To cater for advanced scientific applications, the replacement reactor will provide not only thermal neutron beams but also a modern cold-neutron source moderated by liquid deuterium at approximately -250 deg C, complete with provision for installation of a hot-neutron source at a later stage. The latest 'supermirror' guides will be used to transport the neutrons to the Reactor Hall and its adjoining Neutron Guide Hall where a suite of neutron beam instruments will be installed. These new facilities will expand and enhance ANSTO's capabilities and performance in neutron beam science compared with what is possible with the existing HIFAR facilities, and will make ANSTO/Australia competitive with the best neutron facilities in the world. Eight 'leading-edge' neutron beam instruments are planned for the Replacement Research Reactor when it goes critical in 2006, followed by more instruments by 2010 and beyond. Up to 18 neutron beam instruments can be accommodated at the Replacement Research Reactor, however, it has the capacity for further expansion, including potential for a second Neutron Guide Hall. The first batch of eight instruments has been carefully selected in conjunction with a user group representing various scientific interests in Australia. A team of scientists, engineers, drafting officers and technicians has been assembled to carry out the Neutron Beam Instrument Project to successful completion. Today, most of the planned instruments have conceptual designs and are now being engineered in detail prior to construction and procurement. A suite of ancillary equipment will also be provided to enable scientific experiments at different temperatures, pressures and magnetic fields. This paper describes the Neutron Beam Instrument Project and gives

  15. Selection and design of ion sources for use at the Holifield radioactive ion beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.; Haynes, D.L.; Mills, G.D.; Olsen, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will use the 25 MV tandem accelerator for the acceleration of radioactive ion beams to energies appropriate for research in nuclear physics; negative ion beams are, therefore, required for injection into the tandem accelerator. Because charge exchange is an efficient means for converting initially positive ion beams to negative ion beams, both positive and negative ion sources are viable options for use at the facility. The choice of the type of ion source will depend on the overall efficiency for generating the radioactive species of interest. Although direct-extraction negative ion sources are clearly desirable, the ion formation efficiencies are often too low for practical consideration; for this situation, positive ion sources, in combination with charge exchange, are the logical choice. The high-temperature version of the CERN-ISOLDE positive ion source has been selected and a modified version of the source designed and fabricated for initial use at the facility because of its low emittance, relatively high ionization efficiencies, and species versatility, and because it has been engineered for remote installation, removal, and servicing as required for safe handling in a high-radiation-level ISOL facility. The source will be primarily used to generate ion beams from elements with intermediate to low electron affinities. Prototype plasma-sputter negative ion sources and negative surface-ionization sources are under design consideration for generating radioactive ion beams from high-electron-affinity elements. The design features of these sources and expected efficiencies and beam qualities (emittances) will be described in this report

  16. Iraq nuclear facility dismantlement and disposal project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, J R; Danneels, J [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kenagy, W D [U.S. Department of State, Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation, Office of Nuclear Energy, Safety and Security, Washington, DC (United States); Phillips, C J; Chesser, R K [Center for Environmental Radiation Studies, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The Al Tuwaitha nuclear complex near Baghdad contains a significant number of nuclear facilities from Saddam Hussein's dictatorship. Because of past military operations, lack of upkeep and looting there is now an enormous radioactive waste problem at Al Tuwaitha. Al Tuwaitha contains uncharacterised radioactive wastes, yellow cake, sealed radioactive sources, and contaminated metals. The current security situation in Iraq hampers all aspects of radioactive waste management. Further, Iraq has never had a radioactive waste disposal facility, which means that ever increasing quantities of radioactive waste and material must be held in guarded storage. The Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the NDs Program) has been initiated by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to assist the Government of Iraq (GOI) in eliminating the threats from poorly controlled radioactive materials, while building human capacities so that the GOI can manage other environmental cleanups in their country. The DOS has funded the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to provide technical assistance to the GOI via a Technical Cooperation Project. Program coordination will be provided by the DOS, consistent with U.S. and GOI policies, and Sandia National Laboratories will be responsible for coordination of participants and for providing waste management support. Texas Tech University will continue to provide in-country assistance, including radioactive waste characterization and the stand-up of the Iraq Nuclear Services Company. The GOI owns the problems in Iraq and will be responsible for the vast majority of the implementation of the NDs Program. (authors)

  17. A system approach to nuclear facility monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argo, P.E.; Doak, J.E.; Howse, J.W.

    1996-09-01

    Sensor technology for use in nuclear facility monitoring has reached and advanced stage of development. Research on where to place these sensors in a facility and how to combine their outputs in a meaningful fashion does not appear to be keeping pace. In this paper, we take a global view of the problem where sensor technology is viewed as only one piece of a large puzzle. Other pieces of this puzzle include the optimal location and type of sensors used in a specific facility, the rate at which sensors record information, and the risk associated with the materials/processes at a facility. If the data are analyzed off-site, how will they be transmitted? Is real-time analysis necessary? Are we monitoring only the facility itself, or might we also monitor the processing that occurs there? How are we going to combine the output from the various sensors to give us an accurate picture of the state of the facility? This paper will not try to answer all these questions, but rather it will attempt to stimulate thought in this area by formulating a systems approach to the problem demonstrated by a prototype system and a systems proposed for an actual facility. Our focus will be on the data analysis aspect of the problem.

  18. Deactivating a major nuclear fuels reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBaron, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes three key processes used in deactivating the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility, a large, complex nuclear reprocessing facility, 15 months ahead of schedule and $77 million under budget. The organization was reengineered to refine its business processes and more effectively organize around the deactivation work scope. Multi-disciplined work teams were formed to be self-sufficient and empowered to make decisions and perform work. A number of benefits were realized by reengineering. A comprehensive process to develop end points which clearly identified specific results and the post-project facility configuration was developed so all areas of a facility were addressed. Clear and specific end points allowed teams to focus on completing deactivation activities and helped ensure there were no unfulfilled end-of-project expectations. The RCRA regulations require closure of permitted facilities within 180 days after cessation of operations which may essentially necessitate decommissioning. A more cost effective approach was adopted which significantly reduced risk to human health and the environment by taking the facility to a passive, safe, inexpensive-to-maintain surveillance and maintenance condition (deactivation) prior to disposition. PUREX thus became the first large reprocessing facility with active TSD [treatment, storage, and disposal] units to be deactivated under the RCRA regulations

  19. Testing lifting systems in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kling, H.; Laug, R.

    1984-01-01

    Lifting systems in nuclear facilities must be inspected at regular intervals after having undergone their first acceptance test. These inspections are frequently carried out by service firms which not only employ the skilled personnel required for such jobs but also make available the necessary test equipment. The inspections in particular include a number of sophisticated load tests for which test load systems have been developed to allow lifting systems to be tested so that reactor specific boundary conditions are taken into account. In view of the large number of facilities to be inspected, the test load system is a modular system. (orig.) [de

  20. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayer, J.E.; Clark, A.T.; Loysen, P.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Mishima, J.; Owczarski, P.C.; Gregory, W.S.; Nichols, B.D.

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to calculate source term releases from accident scenarios manually or by computer. A major feature of the AAH is development of accident sample problems to provide input to source term analysis methods and transport computer codes. Sample problems and illustrative examples for different accident types are included in the AAH

  1. Fermilab Test Beam Facility Annual Report. FY 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States). et al.

    2015-01-01

    Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) operations are summarized for FY 2014. It is one of a series of publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the individual experiments that ran at FTBF. Each experiment section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was edited for inclusion in this summary.

  2. Nuclear training facilities at the Royal Naval College, Greenwich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head, J.L.; Lowther, C.A.; Marsh, J.R.W.

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes some of the nuclear training facilities at the Royal Naval College and the way the facilities are used in the training of personnel for the Naval nuclear propulsion programme. (author)

  3. The neutron beam facility at the Australian replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.; Kennedy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The Australian federal government gave ANSTO final approval to build a research reactor to replace HIFAR on August 25th 1999. The replacement reactor is to be a multipurpose reactor with a thermal neutron flux of 3 x 10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 and having improved capabilities for neutron beam research and for the production of radioisotopes for pharmaceutical, scientific and industrial use. The replacement reactor will commence operation in 2005 and will cater for Australian scientific, industrial and medical needs well into the 21st century. The scientific capabilities of the neutron beams at the replacement reactor are being developed in consultation with representatives from academia, industry and government research laboratories to provide a facility for condensed matter research in physics, chemistry, materials science, life sciences, engineering and earth sciences. Cold, thermal and hot neutron sources are to be installed, and neutron guides will be used to position most of the neutron beam instruments in a neutron guide hall outside the reactor confinement building. Eight instruments are planned for 2005, with a further three to be developed by 2010. A conceptual layout for the neutron beam facility is presented including the location of the planned suite of neutron beam instruments. The reactor and all the associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, is to be built by an accredited reactor builder in a turnkey contract. Tenders have been called for December 1999, with selection of contractor planned by June 2000. The neutron beam instruments will be developed by ANSTO and other contracted organisations in consultation with the user community and interested overseas scientists. The facility will be based, as far as possible, around a neutron guide hall that is be served by three thermal and three cold neutron guides. Efficient transportation of thermal and cold neutrons to the guide hall requires the use of modern super

  4. Nuclear power plant simulation facility evaluation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.M.; Carter, R.J.; Laughery, K.R. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology for evaluation of nuclear power plant simulation facilities with regard to their acceptability for use in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) operator licensing exam is described. The evaluation is based primarily on simulator fidelity, but incorporates some aspects of direct operator/trainee performance measurement. The panel presentation and paper discuss data requirements, data collection, data analysis and criteria for conclusions regarding the fidelity evaluation, and summarize the proposed use of direct performance measurment. While field testing and refinement of the methodology are recommended, this initial effort provides a firm basis for NRC to fully develop the necessary methodology

  5. Management of tritium at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This report presents extending summaries of the works of the participants to an IAEA co-ordinated research programme, ''Handling Tritium - bearing effluents and wastes''. The subjects covered include production of tritium in nuclear power plants (mainly heavy water and light water reactors), as well as at reprocessing plants; removal and enrichment of tritium at nuclear facilities; conditioning methods and characteristics of immobilized tritium of low and high concentration; some potential methods of storage and disposal of tritium. In addition to the conclusions of this three-years work, possible activities in the field are recommended

  6. Case for one nuclear waste facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgate, S.A.

    1979-01-01

    There should be only one nuclear waste disposal facility, and that should be located adjacent to the Nevada Test Site where prior experience has demonstrated the relative impervious nature of bomb produced cavities. Federal dedication in perpetuity, security, management, experience, stratigraphy, and land values dictate the location. Proven natural mineral aqueous surface chemistry assures against radioactive migration. An additional level of assurance - stress engineering - a new technology, can be developed to mimic, far exceed, and then be applied retroactively, similar to the same phenomena occurring in underground nuclear explosions

  7. Performing a nuclear facility EMI audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.R.J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses several questions which may arise when performing a nuclear facility EMI audit. Among the issues addressed are how a nuclear electrical power plant can ensure that it has taken adequate EMC measures to protect it from hostile electromagnetic ambient environments, means by which these measures can be implemented with sufficient integrity and reliability, and how often an inspection or audit should be performed to assess the EMC measures. Means of assessing EMI hardening and effective control of aging effects are also discussed. 2 figs

  8. Developing of the protocol for electron beam food irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petreska, Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    By establishing the needs for institution of new technologies in the process of food processing, in this case a randomized choice of electron beam accelerator facility, arises the need for designing a protocol for safe and secure performance of the facility. The protocol encompasses safety and security measures for protection from ionizing radiation of the individuals who work at the facility, as well as, the population and the environment in the immediate neighborhood of the facility. Thus, the adopted approach is the establishment of appropriate systems responding to the protocol. Dosimetry system, which includes appropriate procedures for accurate measure and recording of the absorbed dose values, according to the provisions for protection from ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation protection system and providing the safety and security of the facility for food processing by means of ionizing radiation. System for providing quality and safety control of the facility for food processing by means of ionizing radiation. Pursuant to the designed a protocol for safe and secure performance of the facility for electron beam food processing, contributes to protection against ionizing radiation as occupationally exposed persons as well the population. (Author)

  9. A facility for liquid-phase radiation experiments on heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuglik, Z.; Zvara, I.; Yakushev, A.B.; Timokhin, S.N.

    1992-01-01

    The title facility is described, installed on a beam line of the 4-meter U-400 cyclotron in the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna. The accelerator provides intermediate energy (some 10 MeV/nucleon) beams of ions from Li to Xe. Preliminary results on the radiolysis of two liquid systems -Fricke solution and malachite green in ethanol - by 11 B, 24 Mg, and 40 Ca ions are presented. Some experimental problems and uncertainities faced at the quantitative evaluation of the data are discussed. 62 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  10. A facility for liquid-phase radiation experiments on heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuglik, Z; Zvara, I; Yakushev, A B; Timokhin, S N

    1993-12-31

    The title facility is described, installed on a beam line of the 4-meter U-400 cyclotron in the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna. The accelerator provides intermediate energy (some 10 MeV/nucleon) beams of ions from Li to Xe. Preliminary results on the radiolysis of two liquid systems -Fricke solution and malachite green in ethanol - by {sup 11}B, {sup 24}Mg, and {sup 40}Ca ions are presented. Some experimental problems and uncertainities faced at the quantitative evaluation of the data are discussed. 62 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs.

  11. Defocusing beam line design for an irradiation facility at the TAEA SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Gencer, A.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Yiğitoğlu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic components must be tested to ensure reliable performance in high radiation environments such as Hi-Limu LHC and space. We propose a defocusing beam line to perform proton irradiation tests in Turkey. The Turkish Atomic Energy Authority SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility was inaugurated in May 2012 for radioisotope production. The facility has also an R&D room for research purposes. The accelerator produces protons with 30 MeV kinetic energy and the beam current is variable between View the MathML source10μA and View the MathML source1.2mA. The beam kinetic energy is suitable for irradiation tests, however the beam current is high and therefore the flux must be lowered. We plan to build a defocusing beam line (DBL) in order to enlarge the beam size, reduce the flux to match the required specifications for the irradiation tests. Current design includes the beam transport and the final focusing magnets to blow up the beam. Scattering foils and a collimator is placed for the reduction of the beam ...

  12. Nuclear facilities in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The information brochure is a survey of installed nuclear facilities in Germany, presenting on one page each a picture of a nuclear power plant together with the main relevant data, or of other type of nuclear facilities belonging to the nuclear fuel cycle (such as fuel production plant, fuel production plant, fuel element storage facilities, and facilities for spent fuel and waste management). (UA) [de

  13. Advanced ion beam calorimetry for the test facility ELISE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocentini, R.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Ruf, B.; Wünderlich, D.; Bonomo, F.; Pimazzoni, A.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2015-01-01

    The negative ion source test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment) is in operation since beginning of 2013 at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP) in Garching bei München. The large radio frequency driven ion source of ELISE is about 1×1 m 2 in size (1/2 the ITER source) and can produce a plasma for up to 1 h. Negative ions can be extracted and accelerated by an ITER-like extraction system made of 3 grids with an area of 0.1 m 2 , for 10 s every 3 minutes. A total accelerating voltage of up to 60 kV is available, i.e. a maximum ion beam power of about 1.2 MW can be produced. ELISE is equipped with several beam diagnostic tools for the evaluation of the beam characteristics. In order to evaluate the beam properties with a high level of detail, a sophisticated diagnostic calorimeter has been installed in the test facility at the end of 2013, starting operation in January 2014. The diagnostic calorimeter is split into 4 copper plates with separate water calorimetry for each of the plates. Each calorimeter plate is made of 15×15 copper blocks, which act as many separate inertial calorimeters and are attached to a copper plate with an embedded cooling circuit. The block geometry and the connection with the cooling plate are optimized to accurately measure the time-averaged power of the 10 s ion beam. The surface of the blocks is covered with a black coating that allows infrared (IR) thermography which provides a 2D profile of the beam power density. In order to calibrate the IR thermography, 48 thermocouples are installed in as many blocks, arranged in two vertical and two horizontal rows. The paper describes the beam calorimetry in ELISE, including the methods used for the IR thermography, the water calorimetry and the analytical methods for beam profile evaluation. It is shown how the maximum beam inhomogeneity amounts to 13% in average. The beam divergence derived by IR thermography ranges between 1° and 4° and

  14. Environmental radiation monitoring around the nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Geun Sik and others

    2001-02-01

    Environmental Radiation Monitoring was carried out with measurement of environment. Radiation and environmental radioactivity analysis around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactor. The results of environmental radiation monitoring around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactor are the follows : The average level of environmental radiation dose measured by NaI scintillation counter and accumulated radiation dose by TLD was almost same level compared with the past years. Gross {alpha}, {beta} radioactivity in environmental samples showed a environmental level. {gamma}-radionuclides in water samples were not detected. But only radionuclide K-40, which is natural radionuclide, was detected in the all samples and Cs-137 was detected in the surface soil and discharge sediment. The average level of environmental radiation dose around Seoul Research Reactor was almost same level compared with the past years, and Be-7 and Cs-137 were detected in some surface soil and discharge sediment by {gamma}-spectrometry.

  15. Environmental radiation monitoring around the nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Young Ho

    2000-02-01

    Environmental radiation monitoring was carried out with measurement of environment radiation and environmental radioactivity analysis around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactor. The results of environmental radiation monitoring around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactor are the follows: The average level of environmental radiation dose measured by NaI scintillation counter and accumulated radiation dose by TLD was almost some level compared with the past years. Gross α, β radioactivity in environmental samples showed a environmental level. γ-radionuclides in water sample were not detected. But only radionuclide K-40, which is natural radionuclide, was detected in the all samples and Cs-137 was detected in the surface soil and discharge sediment. The average level of environmental radiation dose around Seoul Research Reactor was almost same level compared with the past years, and Be-7 and Cs-137 were detected in some surface soil and discharge sediment by γ-spectrometry. (author)

  16. Industrial fans used in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Industrial fans are widely used in nuclear facilities, and their most common use is in building ventilation. To control the spread of contamination, airflows are maintained at high levels. Therefore, the selection of the fan and fan control are important to the safety of people, equipment and the environment. As a result, 80% of all energy used in nuclear facilities is fan energy. Safety evolves from the durability, control and redundancy in the system. In new or retrofit installations, testing and qualification of fans and systems are completed prior to start-up. Less important but necessary is the energy conservation aspect of fan selection and installations. Fan efficiency, type of control and system installation are evaluated for energy use

  17. Environmental radiation monitoring around the nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Young Ho

    2000-02-01

    Environmental radiation monitoring was carried out with measurement of environment radiation and environmental radioactivity analysis around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactor. The results of environmental radiation monitoring around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactor are the follows: The average level of environmental radiation dose measured by NaI scintillation counter and accumulated radiation dose by TLD was almost some level compared with the past years. Gross {alpha}, {beta} radioactivity in environmental samples showed a environmental level. {gamma}-radionuclides in water sample were not detected. But only radionuclide K-40, which is natural radionuclide, was detected in the all samples and Cs-137 was detected in the surface soil and discharge sediment. The average level of environmental radiation dose around Seoul Research Reactor was almost same level compared with the past years, and Be-7 and Cs-137 were detected in some surface soil and discharge sediment by {gamma}-spectrometry. (author)

  18. Environmental radiation monitoring around the nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Young Ho; Lee, M.H. [and others

    1999-02-01

    Environmental radiation monitoring was carried out with measurement of environment radiation and environmental radioactivity analysis around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul research reactor. The results of environmental radiation monitoring around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul research reactor are the follows : The average level of environmental radiation dose measured by NaI scintillation counter and accumulated radiation dose by TLD was almost same level compared with the past years. Gross {alpha}, {beta} radioactivity in environmental samples showed a environmental level. {gamma}-radionuclides in water samples were not detected. But only radionuclide K-40, which is natural radionuclide, was detected in the all samples and Cs-137 was detected in the surface soil and discharge sediment. The average level of environmental radiation dose around Seoul research reactor was almost same level compared with the past years, and Be-7 and Cs-137 were detected in some surface soil and discharge sediment by {gamma}-spectrometry. (author). 3 refs., 50 tabs., 12 figs.

  19. Protection of nuclear facilities against outer aggressions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aussourd, P.; Candes, P.; Le Quinio, R.

    1976-01-01

    The various types of outer aggressions envisaged in safety analysis for nuclear facilities are reviewed. These outer aggressions are classified as natural and non-natural phenomena, the latter depending on the human activities in the vicinity of nuclear sites. The principal natural phenomena able to constitute aggressions are atmospheric phenomena (strong winds, snow storms, hail, frosting mists), hydrologie phenomena such as tides, surges, flood, low waters, and geologic phenomena such as earthquakes. Artificial phenomena are concerned with aircraft crashes, projectiles, fire, possible ruptures of dams, and intentional human aggressions. The protection against intentional human aggressions is of two sorts: first, the possibility of access to the installations mostly sensitive to sabotage are to be prevented or reduced, secondly redundant circuits and functions must be separated for preventing their simultaneous destruction in the case when sabotage actors have reach the core of the facility [fr

  20. Environmental radiation monitoring around the nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Geun Sik and others

    2001-02-01

    Environmental Radiation Monitoring was carried out with measurement of environment. Radiation and environmental radioactivity analysis around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactor. The results of environmental radiation monitoring around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactor are the follows : The average level of environmental radiation dose measured by NaI scintillation counter and accumulated radiation dose by TLD was almost same level compared with the past years. Gross α, β radioactivity in environmental samples showed a environmental level. γ-radionuclides in water samples were not detected. But only radionuclide K-40, which is natural radionuclide, was detected in the all samples and Cs-137 was detected in the surface soil and discharge sediment. The average level of environmental radiation dose around Seoul Research Reactor was almost same level compared with the past years, and Be-7 and Cs-137 were detected in some surface soil and discharge sediment by γ-spectrometry

  1. Neutron measurements from beam-target reactions at the ELISE neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xufei, X.; Fan, T.; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Bonomo, F.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Grünauer, F.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of 2.5 MeV neutron emission from beam-target reactions performed at the ELISE neutral beam test facility are presented in this paper. The measurements are used to study the penetration of a deuterium beam in a copper dump, based on the observation of the time evolution of the neutron counting rate from beam-target reactions with a liquid scintillation detector. A calculation based on a local mixing model of deuterium deposition in the target up to a concentration of 20% at saturation is used to evaluate the expected neutron yield for comparison with data. The results are of relevance to understand neutron emission associated to beam penetration in a solid target, with applications to diagnostic systems for the SPIDER and MITICA Neutral Beam Injection prototypes

  2. Perspectives for photonuclear research at the Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipescu, D.; Balabanski, D.L.; Constantin, P.; Gales, S.; Tesileanu, O.; Ur, C.A.; Ursu, I.; Zamfir, N.V. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for R and D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP), Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Anzalone, A.; La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C. [INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); Belyshev, S.S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Physics Faculty, Moscow (Russian Federation); Camera, F. [Departement of Physics, University of Milano, Milano (Italy); INFN section of Milano, Milano (Italy); Csige, L.; Krasznahorkay, A. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA Atomki), Institute of Nuclear Research, Post Office Box 51, Debrecen (Hungary); Cuong, P.V. [Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Centre of Nuclear Physics, Institute of Physics, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Mazzocchi, C. [University of Warsaw, Warszawa (Poland); Derya, V.; Zilges, A. [University of Cologne, Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cologne (Germany); Gai, M. [University of Connecticut, LNS at Avery Point, Connecticut, Groton (United States); Gheorghe, I. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for R and D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP), Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); University of Bucharest, Nuclear Physics Department, Post Office Box MG-11, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Ishkhanov, B.S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Physics Faculty, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, A.A.; Orlin, V.N.; Stopani, K.A.; Varlamov, V.V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Pietralla, N. [Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Institut fur Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Sin, M. [University of Bucharest, Nuclear Physics Department, Post Office Box MG-11, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Utsunomiya, H. [Konan University, Department of Physics, Kobe (Japan); University of Tokyo, Center for Nuclear Study, Saitama (Japan); Weller, H.R. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, North Carolina, Durham (United States); Duke University, Department of Physics, North Carolina, Durham (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The perspectives for photonuclear experiments at the new Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility are discussed in view of the need to accumulate novel and more precise nuclear data. The parameters of the ELI-NP gamma beam system are presented. The emerging experimental program, which will be realized at ELI-NP, is presented. Examples of day-one experiments with the nuclear resonance fluorescence technique, photonuclear reaction measurements, photofission experiments and studies of nuclear collective excitation modes and competition between various decay channels are discussed. The advantages which ELI-NP provides for all these experiments compared to the existing facilities are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Air filters for use at nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linder, P [Aktiebolaget Atomenergi, Studsvik, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1970-12-01

    The ventilation system of a nuclear facility plays a vital role in ensuring that the air in working areas and the environment remains free from radioactive contamination. An earlier IAEA publication, Techniques for Controlling Air Pollution from the Operation of Nuclear Facilities, Safety Series No. 17, deals with the design and operation of ventilation systems at nuclear facilities. These systems are usually provided with air-cleaning devices which remove the contaminants from the air. This publication is intended as a guide to those who are concerned with the design of air-filtering systems and with the testing, operation and maintenance of air-filter installations at nuclear facilities. Emphasis is mainly placed on so-called high-efficiency particulate air filters (HEPA filters) and on providing general information on them. Besides describing the usual filter types, their dimensions and construction materials, the guidebook attempts to explain their properties and behaviour under different operating conditions. It also gives advice on testing and handling the filters so that effective and safe performance is ensured. The guidebook should serve as an introduction to the use of high efficiency particulate air filters in countries where work with radioactive materials has only recently commenced. The list of references at the end of the book indicates sources of more advanced information for those who already have comprehensive experience in this field. It is assumed here that the filters are obtained from a manufacturer, and the guidebook thus contains no information on the design and development of the filter itself, nor does it deal with the cleaning of the intake air to a plant, with gas sorption or protective respiratory equipment.

  4. Computer codes for ventilation in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulcey, P.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the authors present some computer codes, developed in the last years, for ventilation and radioprotection. These codes are used for safety analysis in the conception, exploitation and dismantlement of nuclear facilities. The authors present particularly: DACC1 code used for aerosol deposit in sampling circuit of radiation monitors; PIAF code used for modelization of complex ventilation system; CLIMAT 6 code used for optimization of air conditioning system [fr

  5. Air filters for use at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linder, P.

    1970-01-01

    The ventilation system of a nuclear facility plays a vital role in ensuring that the air in working areas and the environment remains free from radioactive contamination. An earlier IAEA publication, Techniques for Controlling Air Pollution from the Operation of Nuclear Facilities, Safety Series No. 17, deals with the design and operation of ventilation systems at nuclear facilities. These systems are usually provided with air-cleaning devices which remove the contaminants from the air. This publication is intended as a guide to those who are concerned with the design of air-filtering systems and with the testing, operation and maintenance of air-filter installations at nuclear facilities. Emphasis is mainly placed on so-called high-efficiency particulate air filters (HEPA filters) and on providing general information on them. Besides describing the usual filter types, their dimensions and construction materials, the guidebook attempts to explain their properties and behaviour under different operating conditions. It also gives advice on testing and handling the filters so that effective and safe performance is ensured. The guidebook should serve as an introduction to the use of high efficiency particulate air filters in countries where work with radioactive materials has only recently commenced. The list of references at the end of the book indicates sources of more advanced information for those who already have comprehensive experience in this field. It is assumed here that the filters are obtained from a manufacturer, and the guidebook thus contains no information on the design and development of the filter itself, nor does it deal with the cleaning of the intake air to a plant, with gas sorption or protective respiratory equipment

  6. Cathodic protection of a nuclear fuel facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses corrosion on buried process piping and tanks at a nuclear fuel facility and the steps taken to design a system to control underground corrosion. Collected data have indicated that cathodic protection is needed to supplement the regular use of high-integrity, corrosion-resistant coatings; wrapping systems; special backfills; and insulation material. The technical approach discussed in this article is generally applicable to other types of power and/or industrial plants with extensive networks of underground steel piping

  7. Decommissioning engineering systems for nuclear facilities and knowledge inheritance for decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Information on construction, operation and maintenance of a nuclear facility is essential in order to plan and implement the decommissioning of the nuclear facility. A decommissioning engineering system collects these information efficiently, retrieves necessary information rapidly, and support to plan the reasonable decommissioning as well as the systematic implementation of dismantling activities. Then, knowledge of workers involved facility operation and dismantling activities is important because decommissioning of nuclear facility will be carried out for a long period. Knowledge inheritance for decommissioning has been carried out in various organizations. This report describes an outline of and experiences in applying decommissioning engineering systems in JAEA and activities related to knowledge inheritance for decommissioning in some organizations. (author)

  8. Nuclear Structure Studies On Exotic Nuclei With Radioactive Beams - Present Status And Future Perspectives At FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter Egelhof

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of nuclear reactions using radioactive beams in inverse kinematics gives access to a wide field of nuclear structure studies in the region far off stability. The basic concept and the methods involved are briefly discussed, and an overview including some selected examples of recent results obtained with radioactive beams from the present fragment separator at GSI Darmstadt is presented. The experimental conditions expected at the future international facility FAIR will, among others, allow for a substantial improvement in intensity and quality of radioactive beams as compared to present facilities. Therefore, it is expected that FAIR will provide unique opportunities for nuclear structure studies on nuclei far off stability, and will allow to explore new regions in the chart of nuclides of high interest for nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. A brief overview on the new facility, and on the experimental setups planned for nuclear structure research with radioactive beams is given. For nuclear reaction studies several complex, highly efficient, high resolution, and universal detection systems such as R 3 B, EXL, ELISe, etc. are presently under design and construction. A brief overview on the research objectives and the technical realization will be presented. (author)

  9. ERC Maintenance Implementation Plan for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franquero, R.C.

    1997-05-01

    The inactive and surplus facilities assigned to the Environmental Restoration Contractor are shut down and have no operating production processes or production materials except for residual contamination. There is a minimal number of operating systems to support surveillance and maintenance or decontamination and decommissioning activities (D ampersand D). These systems may include heating and ventilation, air conditioning, lighting, and other electrical systems. Inactive and surplus facilities will be subject to periodic long-term surveillance to ensure the integrity of structures until D ampersand D. D ampersand D projects are of relatively short duration and end with all systems deactivated. Therefore, a rigorous in-depth maintenance program such as that required for producing nuclear facilities is not required or cost effective

  10. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies

  11. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

  12. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

    1989-09-01

    The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords

  13. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

    1989-09-01

    The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

  14. Neutron beam facilities at the replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: On September 3rd 1997 the Australian Federal Government announced their decision to replace the HIFAR research reactor by 2005. The proposed reactor will be a multipurpose reactor with improved capabilities for neutron beam research and for the production of radioisotopes for pharmaceutical, scientific and industrial use. The neutron beam facilities are intended to cater for Australian scientific needs well into the 21st century. In the first stage of planning the neutron Beam Facilities at the replacement reactor, a Consultative Group was formed (BFCG) to determine the scientific capabilities of the new facility. Members of the group were drawn from academia, industry and government research laboratories. The BFCG submitted their report in April 1998, outlining the scientific priorities to be addressed. Cold and hot neutron sources are to be included, and cold and thermal neutron guides will be used to position most of the instruments in a neutron guide hall outside the reactor confinement building. In 2005 it is planned to have eight instruments installed with a further three to be developed by 2010, and seven spare instrument positions for development of new instruments over the life of the reactor. A beam facilities technical group (BFTG) was then formed to prepare the engineering specifications for the tendering process. The group consisted of some members of the BFCG, several scientists and engineers from ANSTO, and scientists from leading neutron scattering centres in Europe, USA and Japan. The BFTG looked in detail at the key components of the facility such as the thermal, cold and hot neutron sources, neutron collimators, neutron beam guides and overall requirements for the neutron guide hall. The report of the BFTG, completed in August 1998, was incorporated into the draft specifications for the reactor project, which were distributed to potential reactor vendors. An assessment of the first stage of reactor vendor submissions was completed in

  15. The new vertical neutron beam line at the CERN n-TOF facility design and outlook on the performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiß, C., E-mail: christina.weiss@cern.ch [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Chiaveri, E.; Girod, S.; Vlachoudis, V.; Aberle, O. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Barros, S. [Instituto Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Bergström, I. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Berthoumieux, E. [Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique (CEA) Saclay – Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Calviani, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Guerrero, C.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M. [Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Tsinganis, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) (Greece); Andrzejewski, J. [Uniwersytet Łódzki, Lodz (Poland); Audouin, L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/IN2P3 – IPN, Orsay (France); Bacak, M. [Atominstitut, Technische Universität Wien (Austria); Balibrea-Correa, J. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Barbagallo, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bari (Italy); Bécares, V. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); and others

    2015-11-01

    At the neutron time-of-flight facility n-TOF at CERN a new vertical beam line was constructed in 2014, in order to extend the experimental possibilities at this facility to an even wider range of challenging cross-section measurements of interest in astrophysics, nuclear technology and medical physics. The design of the beam line and the experimental hall was based on FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations, aiming at maximizing the neutron flux, reducing the beam halo and minimizing the background from neutrons interacting with the collimator or back-scattered in the beam dump. The present paper gives an overview on the design of the beam line and the relevant elements and provides an outlook on the expected performance regarding the neutron beam intensity, shape and energy resolution, as well as the neutron and photon backgrounds.

  16. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements for the LANSCE Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing beam profile measurement systems, commonly known as Wire Scanners (WS). Using the principal of secondary electron emission, the WS measurement system moves a wire or fiber across an impinging particle beam, sampling a projected transverse-beam distribution. Because existing WS actuators and electronic components are either no longer manufactured or home-built with antiquated parts, a new WS beam profile measurement is being designed, fabricated, and tested. The goals for these new WS's include using off-the-shelf components while eliminating antiquated components, providing quick operation while allowing for easy maintainability, and tolerating external radioactivation. The WS measurement system consists of beam line actuators, a cable plant, an electronics processor chassis, and software located both in the electronics chassis (National Instruments LabVIEW) and in the Central Control Room (EPICS-based client software). This WS measurement system will measure Hand H{sup +} LANSCE-facility beams and will also measure less common beams. This paper describes these WS measurement systems.

  17. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements for the LANSCE Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, John D.; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Martinez, Derwin; Pillai, Chandra; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Sedillo, James Daniel; Smith, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing beam profile measurement systems, commonly known as Wire Scanners (WS). Using the principal of secondary electron emission, the WS measurement system moves a wire or fiber across an impinging particle beam, sampling a projected transverse-beam distribution. Because existing WS actuators and electronic components are either no longer manufactured or home-built with antiquated parts, a new WS beam profile measurement is being designed, fabricated, and tested. The goals for these new WS's include using off-the-shelf components while eliminating antiquated components, providing quick operation while allowing for easy maintainability, and tolerating external radioactivation. The WS measurement system consists of beam line actuators, a cable plant, an electronics processor chassis, and software located both in the electronics chassis (National Instruments LabVIEW) and in the Central Control Room (EPICS-based client software). This WS measurement system will measure Hand H + LANSCE-facility beams and will also measure less common beams. This paper describes these WS measurement systems.

  18. Radioactive waste management from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    This report has been published as a NSA (Nuclear Systems Association, Japan) commentary series, No. 13, and documents the present status on management of radioactive wastes produced from nuclear facilities in Japan and other countries as well. Risks for radiation accidents coming from radioactive waste disposal and storage together with risks for reactor accidents from nuclear power plants are now causing public anxiety. This commentary concerns among all high-level radioactive waste management from nuclear fuel cycle facilities, with including radioactive wastes from research institutes or hospitals. Also included is wastes produced from reactor decommissioning. For low-level radioactive wastes, the wastes is reduced in volume, solidified, and removed to the sites of storage depending on their radioactivities. For high-level radioactive wastes, some ten thousand years must be necessary before the radioactivity decays to the natural level and protection against seismic or volcanic activities, and terrorist attacks is unavoidable for final disposals. This inevitably results in underground disposal at least 300 m below the ground. Various proposals for the disposal and management for this and their evaluation techniques are described in the present document. (S. Ohno)

  19. Improvement of management systems for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The area of Quality Management/ Quality Assurance has been changed dramatically over the past years. The nuclear facilities moved from the 'traditional' Quality Assurance approach towards Quality Management Systems, and later a new concept of Integrated Management Systems was introduced. The IAEA is developing a new set of Standards on Integrated Management Systems, which will replace the current 50-C-Q/SG-Q1-Q14 Code. The new set of document will require the integration of all management areas into one coherent management system. The new set of standards on Management Systems promotes the concept of the Integrated Management Systems. Based on new set a big number of documents are under preparation. These documents will address the current issues in the management systems area, e.g. Management of Change, Continuous Improvement, Self-assessment, and Attributes of effective management, etc. Currently NPES is providing a number of TC projects and Extra Budgetary Programmes to assist Member States in this area. The new Standards on Management Systems will be published in 2006. A number of Regulatory bodies already indicated that they would take the new Management System Standards as a basis for the national regulation. This fact will motivate a considerable change in the management of nuclear utilities, requiring a new approach. This activity is suitable for all IAEA Members States with large or limited nuclear capabilities. The service is directed to provide assistance for the management of all organizations carrying on or regulating nuclear activities and facilities

  20. Emergency planning and preparedness for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In order to review the advances made over the past seven years in the area of emergency planning and preparedness supporting nuclear facilities and consider developments which are on the horizon, the IAEA at the invitation of the Government of Italy, organized this International Symposium in co-operation with the Italian Commission for Nuclear and Alternative Energy Sources, Directorate of Nuclear Safety and Health Protection (ENEA-DISP). There were over 250 designated participants and some 70 observers from 37 Member States and four international organizations in attendance at the Symposium. The Symposium presentations were divided into sessions devoted to the following topics: emergency planning (20 papers), accident assessment (30 papers), protective measures and recovery operations (10 papers) and emergency preparedness (16 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  1. Russian Federal nuclear center facilities for nuclear spectroscopy investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilkaev, R.I.; Punin, V.T.; Abramovich, S.N.

    2001-01-01

    Russian Federal Nuclear Center facilities for Spectroscopy investigation in the field of nuclear spectroscopy are described. Here are discussed basic properties of used radiation sources, facilities and technologies for target material production and manufacture of targets from rare, high-toxic or radioactive materials. Here are also reported basic features of complex detector systems and technologies for manufacture of scintillation detectors with special properties VNIIEF was founded as a weapons laboratory. The development of nuclear and thermonuclear bombs was followed by a wide complex of nuclear-physics investigations. Naturally, data on nuclear-physics properties of active and structure materials being part of nuclear weapons were of greatest interest.At the initial stage of work on the development of nuclear weapons the information on nuclear constants of materials including the most important neutron ones was rather scant. Data published in scientific literature had low exactness and were insecure. Results of measurements sometimes differed greatly by various groups of investigators. At the same time it was clear that, for example, a 1,5-times mistake in the fission cross-section could cause a several times mistake in the choice of uranium or plutonium mass, which is necessary for the bomb development. These circumstances determined importance of the nuclear-physics investigations. Demands on knowledge of process details occurring inside the nuclei conditioned by a problem of developing and improving of nuclear weapons and atomic power are rather limited. However, the further development of nuclear industry has proved a well-known point that this knowledge being accumulated forms a critical mass that leads to an explosive situation in the elaboration both of ideological and technological aspects of these problems. It is the tendency of inside development of nuclear science that has conditioned preparedness of knowledge about intranuclear processes for

  2. Broad-beam, high current, metal ion implantation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed a high current metal ion implantation facility with which high current beams of virtually all the solid metals of the Periodic Table can be produced. The facility makes use of a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source which is operated in a pulsed mode, with pulse width 0.25 ms and repetition rate up to 100 pps. Beam extraction voltage is up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion charge state multiplicity; beam current is up to several Amperes peak and around 10 mA time averaged delivered onto target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we describe the facility and some of the implants that have been carried out using it, including the 'seeding' of silicon wafers prior to CVD with titanium, palladium or tungsten, the formation of buried iridium silicide layers, and actinide (uranium and thorium) doping of III-V compounds. 16 refs., 6 figs

  3. Experiments with radioactive nuclear beams II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera R, E.F.; Martinez Q, E.; Gomez C, A.; Lizcano C, D.; Garcia M, H.; Rosales M, P.

    2001-12-01

    The studies of nuclear reactions with heavy ions have been carried out for years for the group of heavy ions of the laboratory of the Accelerator of the ININ. Especially in the last years the group has intruded in the studies of nuclear reactions with radioactive beams, frontier theme at world level. Presently Technical Report is presented in detailed form the experimental methods and the analysis procedures of the research activities carried out by the group. The chpater II is dedicated to the procedures used in the analysis of the last two experiments with radioactive beams carried out by the group. In the chapter III is presented the procedure followed to carrying out an extended analysis with the CCDEF code, to consider the transfer channel of nucleons in the description of the fusion excitation functions of a good number of previously measured systems by the group. Finally, in the chapter IV the more important steps to continue in the study of the reaction 12 C + 12 C experiment drifted to be carried out using the available resources of the Tandem Accelerator Laboratory of the ININ are described. At the end of each chapter some of the more representative results obtained in the analysis are presented and emphasis on the scientific production generated by the group for each case is made. (Author)

  4. Production and use of radioactive nuclear beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanihata, Isao

    1994-01-01

    Two different production method of radioactive nuclear beams (RNB) are reviewed, in this paper. One is the secondary beam method that use a high-energy heavy-ion reaction and a separator and the other is the reacceleration method. The RNB is also expected to have following properties that are useful to the application in wider research and technical usage; 1. any elements and isotopes can be used as a beam. 2. it is easy to control a position and a depth of the implantation. 3. an extremely sensitive detection is possible because they emit radiations. 4. one can select the lifetime among the isotopes suitable for a specific phenomenon. 5. one can select a spin among the isotopes for specific selectivity to the phenomenon. These useful properties of the RNB and a few recent examples of study are discussed. Among them are the discovery of the neutron skin and the neutron halo in nuclei near the limit of existence, the first determinations of reactions relevant to the synthesis of the heavy elements in the universe, and an application to the PET. (J.P.N.)

  5. New nuclear facilities and their analytical applications in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.Y.; He, X.; Ma, Y.H.; Ding, Y.Y.; Chai, Z.F.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear analytical techniques are a family of modern analytical methods that are based on nuclear reactions, nuclear effects, nuclear radiations, nuclear spectroscopy, nuclear parameters, and nuclear facilities. Because of their combined characteristics of sensitivity and selectivity, they are widely used in projects ranging from life sciences to deep-space exploration. In this review article, new nuclear facilities and their analytical applications in China are selectively reviewed, covering the following aspects: large scientific facilities, national demands, and key scientific issues with the emphasis on the new achievements. (orig.)

  6. The case for exotic beams at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    The case is presented for modifying the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide beams of proton-rich exotic isotopes, that do not occur terrestrially. A program of nuclear structure studies for light- and medium-mass, nearly self-conjugate nuclei and for heavy, proton-rich, quasibound nuclei is outlined, as are studies of hydrogen-burning reactions that occur in nucleosynthetic processes. Such a scientific program will provide a unique future for nuclear physics research at ORNL consistent with the long standing tradition of this laboratory

  7. Development and Commissioning of an External Beam Facility in the Union College Ion Beam Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoskowitz, Joshua; Clark, Morgan; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2015-10-01

    We have developed an external beam facility for the 1.1-MV tandem Pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion Beam Analysis Laboratory. The beam is extracted from an aluminum pipe through a 1 / 4 ' ' diameter window with a 7.5- μm thick Kapton foil. This external beam facility allows us to perform ion beam analysis on samples that cannot be put under vacuum, including wet samples and samples too large to fit into the scattering chamber. We have commissioned the new facility by performing proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of several samples of environmental interest. These include samples of artificial turf, running tracks, and a human tooth with an amalgam filling. A 1.7-MeV external proton beam was incident on the samples positioned 2 cm from the window. The resulting X-rays were measured using a silicon drift detector and were analyzed using GUPIX software to determine the concentrations of elements in the samples. The results on the human tooth indicate that while significant concentrations of Hg, Ag, and Sn are present in the amalgam filling, only trace amounts of Hg appear to have leached into the tooth. The artificial turf and running tracks show rather large concentrations of a broad range of elements and trace amounts of Pb in the turf infill.

  8. Financing Strategies for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Shropshire; Sharon Chandler

    2005-01-01

    To help meet our nation's energy needs, reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel is being considered more and more as a necessary step in a future nuclear fuel cycle, but incorporating this step into the fuel cycle will require considerable investment. This report presents an evaluation of financing scenarios for reprocessing facilities integrated into the nuclear fuel cycle. A range of options, from fully government owned to fully private owned, was evaluated using a DPL (Dynamic Programming Language) 6.0 model, which can systematically optimize outcomes based on user-defined criteria (e.g., lowest life-cycle cost, lowest unit cost). Though all business decisions follow similar logic with regard to financing, reprocessing facilities are an exception due to the range of financing options available. The evaluation concludes that lowest unit costs and lifetime costs follow a fully government-owned financing strategy, due to government forgiveness of debt as sunk costs. Other financing arrangements, however, including regulated utility ownership and a hybrid ownership scheme, led to acceptable costs, below the Nuclear Energy Agency published estimates. Overwhelmingly, uncertainty in annual capacity led to the greatest fluctuations in unit costs necessary for recovery of operating and capital expenditures; the ability to determine annual capacity will be a driving factor in setting unit costs. For private ventures, the costs of capital, especially equity interest rates, dominate the balance sheet; the annual operating costs dominate the government case. It is concluded that to finance the construction and operation of such a facility without government ownership could be feasible with measures taken to mitigate risk, and that factors besides unit costs should be considered (e.g., legal issues, social effects, proliferation concerns) before making a decision on financing strategy

  9. Proposal for an intense slow positron beam facility at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waeber, W.B.; Taqqu, D.; Zimmermann, U.; Solt, G.

    1990-05-01

    In the domain of condensed matter physics and materials sciences monoenergetic slow positrons in the form of highest intensity beams are demonstrated to be extreamly useful and considered to be highly needed. This conclusion has been reached and the scientific relevance of the positron probe has been highlighted at an international workshop in November 1989 at PSI, where the state of the art and the international situation on slow positron beams, the fields of application of intense beams and the technical possibilities at PSI for installing intense positron sources have been evaluated. The participants agreed that a high intensity beam as a large-scale user facility at PSI would serve fundamental and applied research. The analysis of responses given by numerous members of a widespread positron community has revealed a large research potential in the domain of solid-state physics, atomic physics and surface, thin-film and defect physics, for example. The excellent feature of slow positron beams to be a suitable probe also for lattice defects near surfaces or interfaces has attracted the interest not only of science but also of industry.In this report we propose the installation of an intense slow positron beam facility at PSI including various beam lines of different qualities and based on the Cyclotron production of β + emitting source material and on a highest efficiency moderation scheme which exceeds standard moderation efficiencies by two orders of magnitude. In its proposed form, the project is estimated to be realizable in the nineties and costs will amount to between 15 and 20 MSFr. (author) 10 figs., 6 tabs., 78 refs

  10. ICT security- aspects important for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thunem, Atoosa P-J.

    2005-09-01

    Rapid application growth of complex Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in every society and state infrastructure as well as industry has revealed vulnerabilities that eventually have given rise to serious security breaches. These vulnerabilities together with the course of the breaches from cause to consequence are gradually about to convince the field experts that ensuring the security of ICT-driven systems is no longer possible by only relying on the fundaments of computer science, IT, or telecommunications. Appropriating knowledge from other disciplines is not only beneficial, but indeed very necessary. At the same time, it is a common observation today that ICT-driven systems are used everywhere, from the nuclear, aviation, commerce and healthcare domains to camera-equipped web-enabled cellular phones. The increasing interdisciplinary and inter-sectoral aspects of ICT security worldwide have been providing updated and useful information to the nuclear domain, as one of the emerging users of ICT-driven systems. Nevertheless, such aspects have also contributed to new and complicated challenges, as ICT security for the nuclear domain is in a much more delicate manner than for any other domains related to the concept of safety, at least from the public standpoint. This report addresses some important aspects of ICT security that need to be considered at nuclear facilities. It deals with ICT security and the relationship between security and safety from a rather different perspective than usually observed and applied. The report especially highlights the influence on the security of ICT-driven systems by all other dependability factors, and on that basis suggests a framework for ICT security profiling, where several security profiles are assumed to be valid and used in parallel for each ICT-driven system, sub-system or unit at nuclear facilities. The report also covers a related research topic of the Halden Project with focus on cyber threats and

  11. No nuclear power. No disposal facility?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinhals, J. [DMT GmbH und Co.KG, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Countries with a nuclear power programme are making strong efforts to guarantee the safe disposal of radioactive waste. The solutions in those countries are large disposal facilities near surface or in deep geological layers depending on the activity and half-life of the nuclides in the waste. But what will happen with the radioactive waste in countries that do not have NPPs but have only low amounts of radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities as well as from research reactors? Countries producing only low amounts of radioactive waste need convincing solutions for the safe and affordable disposal of their radioactive waste. As they do not have a fund by an operator of nuclear power plants, those countries need an appropriate and commensurate solution for the disposal of their waste. In a first overview five solutions seem to be appropriate: (i) the development of multinational disposal facilities by using the existing international knowhow; (ii) common disposal with hazardous waste; (iii) permanent storage; (iv) use of an existing mine or tunnel; (v) extension of the borehole disposal concept for all the categories of radioactive wastes.

  12. Financing the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Decommissioning of both commercial and R and D nuclear facilities is expected to increase significantly in the coming years, and the largest of such industrial decommissioning projects could command considerable budgets. It is important to understand the costs of decommissioning projects in order to develop realistic cost estimates as early as possible based on preliminary decommissioning plans, but also to develop funding mechanisms to ensure that future decommissioning expenses can be adequately covered. Sound financial provisions need to be accumulated early on to reduce the potential risk for residual, unfunded liabilities and the burden on future generations, while ensuring environmental protection. Decommissioning planning can be subject to considerable uncertainties, particularly in relation to potential changes in financial markets, in energy policies or in the conditions and requirements for decommissioning individual nuclear installations, and such uncertainties need to be reflected in regularly updated cost estimates. This booklet offers a useful overview of the relevant aspects of financing the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. It provides information on cost estimation for decommissioning, as well as details about funding mechanisms and the management of funds based on current practice in NEA member countries. (authors)

  13. Beam Diagnostics for the BNL Energy Recovery Linac Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, Peter; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Michael; Connolly, Roger; Dawson, William; Degen, Chris; DellaPenna, Al; Gassner, David; Kesselman, Martin; Kewish, Jorg; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Mead, Joseph; Oerter, Brian; Russo, Tom; Vetter, Kurt; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2004-01-01

    An Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) test facility is presently under construction at BNL. The goals of this test facility are first to demonstrate stable intense CW electron beam with parameters typical for the RHIC e-cooling project (and potentially for eRHIC), second to test novel elements of the ERL (high current CW photo-cathode, superconducting RF cavity with HOM dampers, and feedback systems), and finally to test lattice dependence of stability criteria. Planned diagnostics include position monitors, loss monitors, transverse profile monitors (both optical and wires), scrapers/halo monitors, a high resolution differential current monitor, phase monitors, an energy spread monitor, and a fast transverse monitor (for beam break-up studies and the energy feedback system). We discuss diagnostics challenges that are unique to this project, and present preliminary system specifications. In addition, we include a brief discussion of the timing system

  14. Decontamination and Decommissioning Project for the Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. H.; Paik, S. T.; Park, S. W. and others

    2006-02-15

    The final goal of this project is to complete safely and successfully the decommissioning of the Korean Research Reactor no.1 (KRR-1) and the Korean Research Reactor no.2 (KRR-2), and uranium conversion plant (UCP). The dismantling of the reactor hall of the KRR-2 was planned to complete till the end of 2004, but it was delayed because of a few unexpected factors such as the development of a remotely operated equipment for dismantling of the highly radioactive parts of the beam port tubes. In 2005, the dismantling of the bio-shielding concrete structure of the KRR-2 was finished and the hall can be used as a temporary storage space for the radioactive waste generated during the decommissioning of the KRR-1 and KRR-2. The cutting experience of the shielding concrete by diamond wire saw and the drilling experience by a core boring machine will be applied to another nuclear facility dismantling. An effective management tool of the decommissioning projects, named DECOMIS, was developed and the data from the decommissioning projects were gathered. This system provided many information on the daily D and D works, waste generation, radiation dose, etc., so an effective management of the decommissioning projects is expected from next year. The operation experience of the uranium conversion plant as a nuclear fuel cycle facility was much contributed to the localization of nuclear fuels for both HWR and PWR. It was shut down in 1993 and a program for its decontamination and dismantling was launched in 2001 to remove all the contaminated equipment and to achieve the environment restoration. The decommissioning project is expected to contribute to the development of the D and D technologies for the other domestic fuel cycle facilities and the settlement of the new criteria for decommissioning of the fuel cycle related facilities.

  15. Beam Position Monitoring in the CSU Accelerator Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Joshua; Vankeuren, Max; Watras, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    A Beam Position Monitoring (BPM) system is an integral part of an accelerator beamline, and modern accelerators can take advantage of newer technologies and designs when creating a BPM system. The Colorado State University (CSU) Accelerator Facility will include four stripline detectors mounted around the beamline, a low-noise analog front-end, and digitization and interface circuitry. The design will support a sampling rate greater than 10 Hz and sub-100 μm accuracy.

  16. CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] scientific program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, F.

    1986-01-01

    The principal scientific mission of the Continuous Electron Beam Facility (CEBAF) is to study collective phenomena in cold (or normal) nucler matter in order to understand the structure and behavior of macroscopic systems constructed from nuclei. This document discusses in broad popular terms those issues which the CEBAF experimental and theoretical program are designed to address. Specific experimental programs currently planned for CEBAF are also reivewed. 35 refs., 19 figs

  17. Testing optimization sequence for the beam port facility of PSBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekar, K.B.; Azmy, Y.Y.; Unlu, K.

    2005-01-01

    We present preliminary testing results of the modular code package prepared for the size and shape optimization of the beam tube device of the beam port facility at the Penn State Breazeale Reactor (PSBR). In the test cases, using the Min-max algorithm as an optimizer and multidimensional, neutral particle transport code TORT as a transport solver in the physics calculation, we optimize the shape of the D 2 O moderator of the beam tube device. We illustrate the modular nature of the optimization package, validation tests of the physics model, and preliminary optimization calculation via the whole code package. Results obtained so far indicate the drum-shaped D 2 O moderator tank is over-designed in size and does not possess the almost hemi-spherical optimal shape computed by our new package. (authors)

  18. Research Facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, H.

    1996-01-01

    The proceedings of the ENS Class 1 Topical Meeting on Research facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy include contributions on large research facilities, designed for tests in the field of nuclear energy production. In particular, issues related to facilities supporting research and development programmes in connection to the operation of nuclear power plants as well as the development of new concepts in material testing, nuclear data measurement, code validation, fuel cycle, reprocessing, and waste disposal are discussed. The proceedings contain 63 papers

  19. High-risk facilities. Emergency management in nuclear, chemical and hazardous waste facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloepfer, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The book on emergency management in high-risk facilities covers the following topics: Change in the nuclear policy, risk management of high-risk facilities as a constitutional problem - emergency management in nuclear facilities, operational mechanisms of risk control in nuclear facilities, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for nuclear facilities, operational mechanism of the risk control in chemical plants, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for chemical facilities, operational mechanisms of the risk control in hazardous waste facilities, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for hazardous waste facilities, civil law consequences in case of accidents in high-risk facilities, criminal prosecution in case of accidents in high-risk facilities, safety margins as site risk for emission protection facilities, national emergency management - strategic emergency management structures, warning and self-protection of the public in case of CBRN hazards including aspects of the psych-social emergency management.

  20. Deuteron beam interaction with lithium jet in a neutron source test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.

    1996-01-01

    Testing and evaluating candidate fusion reactor materials in a high-flux, high-energy neutron environment are critical to the success and economic feasibility of a fusion device. The current understanding of materials behavior in fission-like environments and existing fusion facilities is insufficient to ensure the necessary performance of future fusion reactor components. An accelerator-based deuterium-lithium system to generate the required high neutron flux for material testing is considered to be the most promising approach in the near future. In this system, a high-energy (30-40 MeV) deuteron beam impinges on a high-speed (10-20 m/s) lithium jet to produce the high-energy (≥14 MeV) neutrons required to simulate a fusion environment via the Li (d,n) nuclear stripping reaction. Interaction of the high-energy deuteron beam and the subsequent response of the high-speed lithium jet are evaluated in detail. Deposition of the deuteron beam, jet-thermal hydraulic response, lithium-surface vaporization rate, and dynamic stability of the jet are modeled. It is found that lower beam kinetic energies produce higher surface temperature and consequently higher Li vaporization rates. Larger beam sizes significantly reduce both bulk and surface temperatures. Thermal expansion and dynamic velocities (normal to jet direction) due to beam energy deposition and momentum transfer are much lower than jet flow velocity and decrease substantially at lower beam current densities. (orig.)

  1. Deuteron beam interaction with Li jet for a neutron source test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.

    1995-09-01

    Testing and evaluating candidate fusion reactor materials in a high-flux, high-energy neutron environment are critical to the success and economic feasibility of a fusion device. The current understanding of materials behavior in fission-like environments and existing fusion facilities is insufficient to ensure the necessary performance of future fusion reactor components. An accelerator-based deuterium-lithium system to generate the required high neutron flux for material testing is considered to be the most promising approach in the near future. In this system, a high-energy (30-40 MeV) deuteron beam impinges on a high-speed (10-20 m/s) lithium jet to produce the high-energy (>14 MeV) neutrons required to simulate a fusion environment via the Li (d,n) nuclear stripping reaction. Interaction of the high-energy deuteron beam and the subsequent response of the high-speed lithium jet are evaluated in detail. Deposition of the deuteron beam, jet-thermal hydraulic response, lithium-surface vaporization rate, and dynamic stability of the jet are modeled. It is found that lower beam kinetic energies produce higher surface temperature and consequently higher Li vaporization rates. Larger beam sizes significantly reduce both bulk and surface temperatures. Thermal expansion and dynamic velocities (normal to jet direction) due to beam energy deposition and momentum transfer are much lower than jet flow velocity and decrease substantially at lower beam current densities

  2. Emergency facility control device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehara, Morihiko.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the reliability of a nuclear reactor by allowing an emergency facility to be manually started and stopped to make its operation more convenient and eliminate the possibility of erroneous operation in an emergency. Constitution: There are provided a first water level detector for detecting a level lower than the first low water level in a reactor container and a second water level detector for detecting a level lower than the second low water level lower than the first low water level, and an emergency facility can be started and stopped manually only when the level is higher than the second low water level, but the facility will be started regardless of the state of the manual operation when the level is lower than the second low water level. Thus, the emergency facility can be started by manual operation, but will be automatically started so as to secure the necessary minimum operation if the level becomes lower than the second low water level and the stopping operation thereafter is forgotten. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Beam Diagnostics Systems for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaret, R D; Boyd, R D; Bliss, E S; Gates, A J; Severyn, J R

    2001-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser focuses 1.8 megajoules of ultraviolet light (wavelength 351 nanometers) from 192 beams into a 600-micrometer-diameter volume. Effective use of this output in target experiments requires that the power output from all of the beams match within 8% over their entire 20-nanosecond waveform. The scope of NIF beam diagnostics systems necessary to accomplish this task is unprecedented for laser facilities. Each beamline contains 110 major optical components distributed over a 510-meter path, and diagnostic tolerances for beam measurement are demanding. Total laser pulse energy is measured with 2.8% precision, and the interbeam temporal variation of pulse power is measured with 4% precision. These measurement goals are achieved through use of approximately 160 sensor packages that measure the energy at five locations and power at three locations along each beamline using 335 photodiodes, 215 calorimeters, and 36 digitizers. Successful operation of such a system requires a high level of automation of the widely distributed sensors. Computer control systems provide the basis for operating the shot diagnostics with repeatable accuracy, assisted by operators who oversee system activities and setup, respond to performance exceptions, and complete calibration and maintenance tasks

  4. The ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility towards SPIDER operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toigo, V.; Dal Bello, S.; Gaio, E.; Luchetta, A.; Pasqualotto, R.; Zaccaria, P.; Bigi, M.; Chitarin, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Pomaro, N.; Serianni, G.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Antoni, V.; Aprile, D.; Baltador, C.; Barbisan, M.; Battistella, M.; Boldrin, M.; Brombin, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; De Lorenzi, A.; Delogu, R.; De Muri, M.; Fellin, F.; Ferro, A.; Gambetta, G.; Grando, L.; Jain, P.; Maistrello, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marconato, N.; Pavei, M.; Peruzzo, S.; Pilan, N.; Pimazzoni, A.; Piovan, R.; Recchia, M.; Rizzolo, A.; Sartori, E.; Siragusa, M.; Spada, E.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Taliercio, C.; Valente, M.; Veltri, P.; Zamengo, A.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zaupa, M.; Boilson, D.; Graceffa, J.; Svensson, L.; Schunke, B.; Decamps, H.; Urbani, M.; Kushwah, M.; Chareyre, J.; Singh, M.; Bonicelli, T.; Agarici, G.; Garbuglia, A.; Masiello, A.; Paolucci, F.; Simon, M.; Bailly-Maitre, L.; Bragulat, E.; Gomez, G.; Gutierrez, D.; Mico, G.; Moreno, J.-F.; Pilard, V.; Chakraborty, A.; Baruah, U.; Rotti, C.; Patel, H.; Nagaraju, M. V.; Singh, N. P.; Patel, A.; Dhola, H.; Raval, B.; Fantz, U.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Kraus, W.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Schiesko, L.; Wimmer, C.; Wünderlich, D.; Cavenago, M.; Croci, G.; Gorini, G.; Rebai, M.; Muraro, A.; Tardocchi, M.; Hemsworth, R.

    2017-08-01

    SPIDER is one of two projects of the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility under construction in Padova, Italy, at the Consorzio RFX premises. It will have a 100 keV beam source with a full-size prototype of the radiofrequency ion source for the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) and also, similar to the ITER diagnostic neutral beam, it is designed to operate with a pulse length of up to 3600 s, featuring an ITER-like magnetic filter field configuration (for high extraction of negative ions) and caesium oven (for high production of negative ions) layout as well as a wide set of diagnostics. These features will allow a reproduction of the ion source operation in ITER, which cannot be done in any other existing test facility. SPIDER realization is well advanced and the first operation is expected at the beginning of 2018, with the mission of achieving the ITER heating and diagnostic NBI ion source requirements and of improving its performance in terms of reliability and availability. This paper mainly focuses on the preparation of the first SPIDER operations—integration and testing of SPIDER components, completion and implementation of diagnostics and control and formulation of operation and research plan, based on a staged strategy.

  5. An irradiation facility with a horizontal beam for radiobiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czub, J.; Adamus, T.; Banas, D.

    2006-01-01

    A facility with a horizontal beam for radiobiological experiments with heavy ions has been designed and constructed at the Heavy Ion Laboratory in Warsaw University. The facility is optimal to investigate the radiobiological effects of charged heavy particles on a cellular or molecular level as the plateau of the Bragg curve as well as in the Bragg peak. The passive beam spread out by a thin scattering foil provides a homogeneous irradiation field over an area of at least 1 x 1 cm 2 . For in vitro irradiation of biological samples the passive beam spreading combined with the x - y mechanical scanning of the irradiated sample was found to be an optimum solution. Using x - y step motor, the homogenous beam of ions with the energy loss range in the cells varied from 1 MeV/μm to 200 keV/μm is able to cover a 6 cm in diameter Petri dish that holds the biological samples. Moreover on-line fluence monitoring based on single-particle counting is performed to determine the dose absorbed by cells. Data acquisition system for dosimetry and ion monitoring based on a personal computer is described. (author)

  6. Storage facilities of spent nuclear fuel in dry for Mexican nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmeron V, J. A.; Camargo C, R.; Nunez C, A.; Mendoza F, J. E.; Sanchez J, J.

    2013-10-01

    In this article the relevant aspects of the spent fuel storage and the questions that should be taken in consideration for the possible future facilities of this type in the country are approached. A brief description is proposed about the characteristics of the storage systems in dry, the incorporate regulations to the present Nuclear Regulator Standard, the planning process of an installation, besides the approaches considered once resolved the use of these systems; as the modifications to the system, the authorization periods for the storage, the type of materials to store and the consequent environmental impact to their installation. At the present time the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) considers the possible generation of two authorization types for these facilities: Specific, directed to establish a new nuclear installation with the authorization of receiving, to transfer and to possess spent fuel and other materials for their storage; and General, focused to those holders that have an operation license of a reactor that allows them the storage of the nuclear fuel and other materials that they possess. Both authorizations should be valued according to the necessities that are presented. In general, this installation type represents a viable solution for the administration of the spent fuel and other materials that require of a temporary solution previous to its final disposal. Its use in the nuclear industry has been increased in the last years demonstrating to be appropriate and feasible without having a significant impact to the health, public safety and the environment. Mexico has two main nuclear facilities, the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde of the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) and the facilities of the TRIGA Reactor of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) that will require in a future to use this type of disposition installation of the spent fuel and generated wastes. (Author)

  7. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Chong Hun; Choi, Wang Kyu; Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Gye Nam

    2004-02-01

    Technology development of surface decontamination in the uranium conversion facility before decommissioning, technology development of component decontamination in the uranium conversion facility after decommissioning, uranium sludge treatment technology development, radioactive waste soil decontamination technology development at the aim of the temporary storage soil of KAERI, Optimum fixation methodology derivation on the soil and uranium waste, and safety assessment methodology development of self disposal of the soil and uranium waste after decontamination have been performed in this study. The unique decontamination technology applicable to the component of the nuclear facility at room temperature was developed. Low concentration chemical decontamination technology which is very powerful so as to decrease the radioactivity of specimen surface under the self disposal level was developed. The component decontamination technology applicable to the nuclear facility after decommissioning by neutral salt electro-polishing was also developed. The volume of the sludge waste could be decreased over 80% by the sludge waste separation method by water. The electrosorption method on selective removal of U(VI) to 1 ppm of unrestricted release level using the uranium-containing lagoon sludge waste was tested and identified. Soil decontamination process and equipment which can reduce the soil volume over 90% were developed. A pilot size of soil decontamination equipment which will be used to development of real scale soil decontamination equipment was designed, fabricated and demonstrated. Optimized fixation methodology on soil and uranium sludge was derived from tests and evaluation of the results. Safety scenario and safety evaluation model were development on soil and uranium sludge aiming at self disposal after decontamination

  8. Human factors methods in DOE nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, C.T.; Banks, W.W.; Waters, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of developing a series of guidelines for the use of human factors standards, procedures, and methods to be used in nuclear facilities. This paper discusses the philosophy and process being used to develop a DOE human factors methods handbook to be used during the design cycle. The following sections will discuss: (1) basic justification for the project; (2) human factors design objectives and goals; and (3) role of human factors engineering (HFE) in the design cycle

  9. Guidance for air sampling at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breslin, A.J.

    1976-11-01

    The principal uses of air sampling at nuclear facilities are to monitor general levels of radioactive air contamination, identify sources of air contamination, and evaluate the effectiveness of contaminant control equipment, determine exposures of individual workers, and provide automatic warning of hazardous concentrations of radioactivity. These applications of air sampling are discussed with respect to standards of occupational exposure, instrumentation, sample analysis, sampling protocol, and statistical treatment of concentration data. Emphasis is given to the influence of spacial and temporal variations of radionuclide concentration on the location, duration, and frequency of air sampling

  10. Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of the Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects (ENFDP) program is to provide the NRC licensing staff with data which will allow an assessment of radiation exposure during decommissioning and the implementation of ALARA techniques. The data will also provide information to determine the funding level necessary to ensure timely and safe decommissioning operations. Actual decommissioning costs, methods and radiation exposures are compared with those estimated by the Battelle-PNL and ORNL NUREGs on decommissioning. Exposure reduction techniques applied to decommissioning activities to meet ALARA objectives are described. The lessons learned concerning various decommissioning methods are evaluated

  11. Innovative ways of decontaminating nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremmer, Jan; Gentes, Sascha; Ambos, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The great variety of surfaces to be decontaminated in a nuclear power plant increases demand for economic solutions and efficient processing systems. The Institute for Technology and Management in Building (TMB) of the University of Karlsruhe (TH) is working on this task in the new professorship of Sascha Gentes and, together with sat Kerntechnik GmbH, developing innovative techniques and tools for surface decontamination. In this effort, sat.Kerntechnik GmbH contributes 50% to the funding of the new professorship at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, the merger of the University of Karlsruhe and the Karlsruhe Research Center. The new professorship will extend its work also to various other innovative concepts to be employed not only in demolition but also in maintenance and operation of nuclear facilities. Above and beyond theoretical approaches, practical solutions are in the focus of work. For this reason, new developments are elaborated in close cooperation with the respective users. (orig.)

  12. Environmental radiation monitoring around the nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Woo

    2012-03-15

    Environmental Radiation Monitoring was carried out with measurement of environment. radiation and environmental radioactivity analysis on the sites of KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactors and their environments. The average level of environmental radiation dose measured by an ERM and the accumulated radiation dose by a TLD were almost same level compared with the previous years. The activity of gross {alpha} and gross {beta}, Tritium, Uranium and Strontium in environmental samples showed a environmental level. The {gamma}-radionuclides such as natural radionuclides 40K or 7Be were detected in pine needle and food. The nuclear radionuclides 134Cs, 137Cs or 131I were temporarily detected in the samples of air particulate and rain in April and of fall out in 2nd quarter from the effect of Fukusima accident.

  13. Robotic inspection of nuclear waste storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulbright, R.; Stephens, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    The University of South Carolina and the Westinghouse Savannah River Company have developed a prototype mobile robot designed to perform autonomous inspection of nuclear waste storage facilities. The Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI) navigates and inspects rows of nuclear waste storage drums, in isles as narrow as 34 inches with drums stacked three high on each side. SWAMI reads drum barcodes, captures drum images, and monitors floor-level radiation levels. The topics covered in this article reporting on SWAMI include the following: overall system design; typical mission scenario; barcode reader subsystem; video subsystem; radiation monitoring subsystem; position determination subsystem; onboard control system hardware; software development environment; GENISAS, a C++ library; MOSAS, an automatic code generating tool. 10 figs

  14. Nuclear structure physics at RI beam factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear structure physics is becoming extremely interesting owing to recent development of RI beam factories. Among various interesting developments in this field, I will focus upon two subjects. One is the breaking of the usual magic numbers in unstable nuclei, and the other is the invention of a new method for quantum many-body problems: Quantum Monte Carlo diagonalization method (QMCD). For the first subject, I will discuss the vanishing of N=8 and 20 magic numbers in 11 Li and 32 Mg, respectively. For the latter, I will present brief description of the theory and results of some applications including the one to 64 Ge, a proton-rich unstable nucleus. (author)

  15. The n_TOF facility: Neutron beams for challenging future measurements at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaveri, E.; Aberle, O.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea, J.; Barbagallo, M.; Bečvář, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brown, A.; Caamaño, M.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cardella, R.; Casanovas, A.; Cerutti, F.; Chen, Y. H.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cosentino, L.; Damone, L. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Dupont, E.; Durán, I.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Göbel, K.; García, A. R.; Gawlik, A.; Gilardoni, S.; Glodariu, T.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Harada, H.; Heinitz, S.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Kalamara, A.; Kavrigin, P.; Kimura, A.; Kivel, N.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kurtulgil, D.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Meo, S. Lo; Lonsdale, S. J.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Masi, A.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Maugeri, E. A.; Mazzone, A.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Musumarra, A.; Negret, A.; Nolte, R.; Oprea, A.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Porras, I.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Radeck, D.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schumann, D.; Smith, A. G.; Sosnin, N. V.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Woods, P. J.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2017-09-01

    The CERN n_TOF neutron beam facility is characterized by a very high instantaneous neutron flux, excellent TOF resolution at the 185 m long flight path (EAR-1), low intrinsic background and coverage of a wide range of neutron energies, from thermal to a few GeV. These characteristics provide a unique possibility to perform high-accuracy measurements of neutron-induced reaction cross-sections and angular distributions of interest for fundamental and applied Nuclear Physics. Since 2001, the n_TOF Collaboration has collected a wealth of high quality nuclear data relevant for nuclear astrophysics, nuclear reactor technology, nuclear medicine, etc. The overall efficiency of the experimental program and the range of possible measurements has been expanded with the construction of a second experimental area (EAR-2), located 20 m on the vertical of the n_TOF spallation target. This upgrade, which benefits from a neutron flux 30 times higher than in EAR-1, provides a substantial extension in measurement capabilities, opening the possibility to collect data on neutron cross-section of isotopes with short half-lives or available in very small amounts. This contribution will outline the main characteristics of the n_TOF facility, with special emphasis on the new experimental area. In particular, we will discuss the innovative features of the EAR-2 neutron beam that make possible to perform very challenging measurements on short-lived radioisotopes or sub-mg samples, out of reach up to now at other neutron facilities around the world. Finally, the future perspectives of the facility will be presented.

  16. Decommissioning and deactivation of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anasco, Roberto; Harriague, Santiago; Hey, Alfredo M.; Fabbri, Silvio; Garonis, Omar H.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) is responsible for the decommissioning and deactivation of all relevant nuclear facilities in Argentina. A D and D Subprogram was created in 2000, within Technology Branch of the CNEA, in order to fulfill this responsibility. The D and D Subprogram has organized its activities in four fields: Planning; Technology development; Human resources development and training; International cooperation. The paper describes the work already done in those 4 areas, as well as the nuclear facilities existing in the country. Planning is being developed for the decommissioning of research reactors, beginning with RA-1, as well as for the Atucha I nuclear power station. An integral Management System has been developed, compatibilizing requirements from ISO 9001, ISO 14001, the national norm for Safety and Occupational Health (equivalent to BS 8800), and IAEA 50-SG Q series. Technology development is for the time being concentrated on mechanical decontamination and concrete demolition. A review has been made of technologies already developed both by CNEA and Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. (the nuclear power utility) in areas of chemical and electrochemical decontamination, cutting techniques and robotics. Human resources development has been based on training abroad in the areas of decontamination, cutting techniques, quality assurance and planning, as well as on specific courses, seminars and workshops. An IAEA regional training course on D and D has been given on April 2002 at CNEA's Constituyentes Atomic Center, with the assistance of 22 university graduates from 13 countries in the Latin American and Caribbean Region, and 11 from Argentina. CNEA has also given fellowships for PhD and Master thesis on the subject. International cooperation has been intense, and based on: - IAEA Technical Cooperation Project and experts missions; - Cooperation agreement with the US Department of Energy; - Cooperation agreement with Germany

  17. Waste management practices in decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    Several thousand sites exist in the United States where nuclear activities have been conducted over the past 30 to 40 years. Questions regarding potential public health hazards due to residual radioactivity and radiation fields at abandoned and inactive sites have prompted careful ongoing review of these sites by federal agencies including the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). In some instances, these reviews are serving to point out poor low-level waste management practices of the past. Many of the sites in question lack adequate documentation on the radiological conditions at the time of release for unrestricted use or were released without appropriate restrictions. Recent investigations have identified residual contamination and radiation levels on some sites which exceed present-day standards and guidelines. The NRC, DOE, and Environmental Protection Agency are all involved in developing decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) procedures and guidelines which will assure that nuclear facilities are decommissioned in a manner that will be acceptable to the nuclear industry, various regulatory agencies, other stakeholders, and the general public

  18. SPES: exotic beams for nuclear physics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Vasquez, J.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Calderolla, M.; Prete, G.

    2014-01-01

    The SPES project at Laboratori di Legnaro of INFN (Italy) is concentrating on the production of neutron-rich radioactive nuclei for nuclear physics experiments using uranium fission at a rate of 10 13 fission/s. The emphasis on neutron-rich isotopes is justified by the fact that this vast territory has been little explored. The Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) will be produced by the ISOL technique using proton induced fission on a direct target of UCx. The most critical element of the SPES project is the Multi-Foil Direct Target. Up to the present time, the proposed target represents an innovation in terms of its capability to sustain the primary beam power. This talk will present the status of the project financed by INFN, which is actually in the construction phase at Legnaro. In particular, developments related to the target and the ion-source activities using the surface ion source, plasma ion source, and laser ion source techniques will be reported. (author)

  19. Radiological dose assessment from the operation of Daeduk nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Won Tae; Kim, Eun Han; Suh, Kyung Suk; Choi, Young Gil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    The objective of this project is to assure the public acceptance for nuclear facilities, and the environmental safety from the operation of Daeduk nuclear facilities, such as HANARO research reactor, nuclear fuel processing facilities and others. For identifying the integrity of their facilities, the maximum individual doses at the site boundary and on the areas with high population density were assessed. Also, the collective doses within radius 80 km from the site were assessed. The radiation impacts for residents around the site from the operation of Daeduk nuclear facilities in 1999 were neglectable. 8 refs., 10 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  20. Neutron beam facilities at the Australian Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Shane; Robinson, Robert; Hunter, Brett

    2001-01-01

    Australia is building a research reactor to replace the HIFAR reactor at Lucas Heights by the end of 2005. Like HIFAR, the Replacement Research Reactor will be multipurpose with capabilities for both neutron beam research and radioisotope production. It will be a pool-type reactor with thermal neutron flux (unperturbed) of 4 x 10 14 n/cm 2 /sec and a liquid D 2 cold neutron source. Cold and thermal neutron beams for neutron beam research will be provided at the reactor face and in a large neutron guide hall. Supermirror neutron guides will transport cold and thermal neutrons to the guide hall. The reactor and the associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, is to be built by INVAP S.E. under contract. The neutron beam instruments will be developed by ANSTO, in consultation with the Australian user community. This status report includes a review the planned scientific capabilities, a description of the facility and a summary of progress to date. (author)

  1. The role of economic incentives in nuclear waste facility siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    There is a need to provide some public benefit and/or reward for accepting a ''locally unwanted land use'' (LULU) facility such as a nuclear waste storage or disposal facility. This paper concludes that DOE, Congress and the states should immediately quantify an economic incentive for consideration ''up front'' by society on siting decisions for nuclear waste storage and disposal facilities

  2. Creation of a new-generation research nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girchenko, A.A.; Matyushin, A.P.; Kudryavtsev, E.M.; Skopin, V.P.; Shchepelev, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    The SO-2M research nuclear facility operated on the industrial area of the institute. The facility is now removed from service. In view of this circumstance, it is proposed to restore the facility at the new qualitative level, i.e., to create a new-generation research nuclear facility with a very high safety level consisting of a subcritical bench and a proton accelerator (electronuclear facility). Competitive advantages and design features have been discussed and the productive capacity of the research nuclear facility under development has been evaluated [ru

  3. Proceeding of the 7. Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y; Jujuratisbela, Uju; Aziz, Ferhat; Su'ud, Zaki; Suprawhardana, M. Salman

    2002-02-01

    The seventh proceedings of seminar safety and technology of nuclear power plant and nuclear facilities, held by National Nuclear Energy Agency. The Aims of seminar is to exchange and disseminate information about safety and nuclear Power Plant Technology and Nuclear Facilities consist of technology; high temperature reactor and application for national development sustain able and high technology. This seminar level all aspects technology, Power Reactor research reactor, high temperature reactor and nuclear facilities. The article is separated by index

  4. Database for environmental monitoring at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raceanu, M.; Varlam, C.; Enache, A.; Faurescu, I.

    2006-01-01

    To ensure that an assessment could be made of the impact of nuclear facilities on the local environment, a program of environmental monitoring must be established well in advance of nuclear facilities operation. Enormous amount of data must be stored and correlated starting with: location, meteorology, type sample characterization from water to different kind of food, radioactivity measurement and isotopic measurement (e.g. for C-14 determination, C-13 isotopic correction it is a must). Data modelling is a well known mechanism describing data structures at a high level of abstraction. Such models are often used to automatically create database structures, and to generate code structures used to access databases. This has the disadvantage of losing data constraints that might be specified in data models for data checking. Embodiment of the system of the present application includes a computer-readable memory for storing a definitional data table for defining variable symbols representing respective measurable physical phenomena. The definitional data table uniquely defines the variable symbols by relating them to respective data domains for the respective phenomena represented by the symbols. Well established rules of how the data should be stored and accessed, are given in the Relational Database Theory. The theory comprise of guidelines such as the avoidance of duplicating data using technique call normalization and how to identify the unique identifier for a database record. (author)

  5. Database for environmental monitoring in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raceanu, Mircea; Varlam, Carmen; Iliescu, Mariana; Enache, Adrian; Faurescu, Ionut

    2006-01-01

    To ensure that an assessment could be made of the impact of nuclear facilities on the local environment, a program of environmental monitoring must be established well before of nuclear facility commissioning. Enormous amount of data must be stored and correlated starting with: location, meteorology, type sample characterization from water to different kind of foods, radioactivity measurement and isotopic measurement (e.g. for C-14 determination, C-13 isotopic correction it is a must). Data modelling is a well known mechanism describing data structures at a high level of abstraction. Such models are often used to automatically create database structures, and to generate the code structures used to access the databases. This has the disadvantage of losing data constraints that might be specified in data models for data checking. Embodiment of the system of the present application includes a computer-readable memory for storing a definitional data table for defining variable symbols representing the corresponding measurable physical quantities. Developing a database system implies setting up well-established rules of how the data should be stored and accessed what is commonly called the Relational Database Theory. This consists of guidelines regarding issues as how to avoid duplicating data using the technique called normalization and how to identify the unique identifier for a database record. (authors)

  6. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs.

  7. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs

  8. Establishment of the Neutron Beam Research Facility at the OPAL Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, S.J.; Robinson, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Australia's first research reactor, HIFAR, reached criticality in January 1958. At that time Australia's main agenda was establishment of a nuclear power program. HIFAR operated for nearly 50 years, providing a firm foundation for the establishment of Australia's second generation research Reactor OPAL, which reached criticality in August 006. In HIFAR's early years a neutron beam facility was established for materials characterization, partly in aid of the nuclear energy agenda and partly in response to interest from Australia's scientific community. By the time Australia's nuclear energy program ceased (in the 1970s), radioisotope production and research had also been established at Lucas Heights. Also, by this time the neutron beam facility for scientific research had evolved into a major utilization programme, warranting establishment of an independent body to facilitate scientific access (the Australian Institute for Nuclear Science and Engineering). In HIFAR's lifetime, ANSTO established a radiopharmaceuticals service for the Australian medical community and NDT silicon production was also established and grew to maturity. So when time came to determine the strategy for nuclear research in Australia into the 21st century, it was clear that the replacement for HIFAR should be multipurpose, with major emphases on scientific applications of neutron beams and medical isotope production. With this strategy in mind, ANSTO set about to design and build OPAL with a world-class neutron beam facility, capable of supporting a large and diverse scientific research community. The establishment of the neutron beam facility became the mission of the Bragg Institute management team. This journey began in 1997 with establishment of a working budget, and reached its first major objective when OPAL reached 20 MW thermal power nearly one decade later (in 2006). The first neutron beam instruments began operation soon after (in 2007), and quickly proved themselves to be

  9. Nuclear facility safeguards as specified by the Czechoslovak administrative law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, J.; Svab, J.

    1978-01-01

    A study is presented of the legal aspects of nuclear safeguards for the operation of nuclear power facilities evaluating the development of the legal arrangement over the past five years, i.e., encoding nuclear safeguards for nuclear facilities in the new building regulations (Act No. 50/1976 Coll. of Laws on Urban Planning and Building Regulations and implementing provisions). It also discusses the juridical position of State surveillance over the nuclear safety of nuclear facilities and its relation to surveillance carried out by specialized bodies of the State work safety inspection and to surveillance carried out by hygiene inspection bodies. (J.S.)

  10. Remote maintenance system for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Masafumi

    1993-01-01

    In the facilities related to atomic energy, from the viewpoint of the reduction of radiation exposure of workers and the heightening of the rate of operation of the facilities, the development of remote maintenance system is regarded as important. Meidensha Electric Manufacturing Co., Ltd. developed the bilateral control type manipulator, BILARM-83, in 1979, and has developed high performance manipulator systems. As the design of the plant that realizes the remote operation maintenance of process machinery and equipment during plant operation, the remote maintenance system by canyon cell techniques, which was adopted in Savannah River plant, USA, and has been operated for nearly 50 years, has been known. The concept of the full remote maintenance system by large scale cell techniques was shown and has been developed by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. In order to realize the remote maintenance of such large scale cells, Meidensha is developing the both arm type bilateral servo manipulator, the single arm type power manipulator, the transport system for moving them, the power and signal system and so on. Those systems were adopted for the glass solidification facilities. (K.I.)

  11. IAEA safeguards in new nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catton, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Durbin, K. [United States Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Hamilton, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Martikka, E. [STUK, Helsinki (Finland); Poirier, S.; Sprinkle, J. K.; Stevens, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Whitlock, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The inclusion of international safeguards early in the design of nuclear facilities offers an opportunity to reduce project risk. It also has the potential to minimize the impact of safeguards activities on facility operations. Safeguards by design (SBD) encourages stakeholders to become familiar with the requirements of their safeguards agreements and to decide when and how they will fulfil those requirements. As one example, modular reactors are at a design stage where SBD can have a useful impact. Modular reactors might be turnkey projects where the operator takes ownership after commissioning. This comes with a legal obligation to comply with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards requirements. Some of the newcomer countries entering the reactor market have little experience with IAEA safeguards and the associated non-proliferation obligations. To reduce delays or cost increments, one can embed safeguards considerations in the bid and design phases of the project, along with the safety and security considerations. SBD does not introduce any new requirements - it is a process whereby facility designers facilitate the implementation of the existing safeguards requirements. In short, safeguards experts share their expertise with the designers and vice versa. Once all parties understand the fundamentals of all of the operational constraints, they are better able to decide how best to address them. This presentation will provide an overview of SBD activities. (author)

  12. Seismic design standardization of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, G.R.; Vaze, K.K.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs) of Nuclear Facilities have to be designed for normal operating loads such as dead weight, pressure, temperature etc., and accidental loads such as earthquakes, floods, extreme, wind air craft impact, explosions etc. Man made accidents such as aircraft impact, explosions etc., some times may be considered as design basis event and some times taken care by providing administrative controls. This will not be possible in the case of natural events such as earthquakes, flooding, extreme winds etc. Among natural events earthquakes are considered as most devastating and need to be considered as design basis event. It is generally felt design of SSCs for earthquake loads is very time consuming and expensive. Conventional seismic design approaches demands for large number of supports for systems and components. This results in large space occupation and in turn creates difficulties for maintenance and in service inspection of systems and components. In addition, complete exercise of design need to be repeated for plants being located at different sites due to different seismic demands. However, advanced seismic response control methods will help to standardize the seismic design meeting the safety and economy. These methods adopt passive, semi active and active devices, and base isolators to control the seismic response. In nuclear industry, it is advisable to go for passive devices to control the seismic responses. Ideally speaking, these methods will make the designs made for normal loads can also satisfy the seismic demand without calling for change in material, geometry, layout etc. in the SSCs. This paper explain the basic ideas of seismic response control methods, demonstrate the effectiveness of control methods through case studies and eventually give the procedure to be adopted for seismic design standardization of nuclear facilities

  13. Considerations about the licensing process of special nuclear industrial facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talarico, M.A., E-mail: talaricomarco@hotmail.com [Marinha do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao do Porgrama de Submarino com Propulsao Nuclear; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    This paper brings a discussion about the challenges involved in the development of a new kind of nuclear facility in Brazil, a naval base for nuclear submarines, with attention to the licensing process and considerations about the risk-informed decision making application to the licensing process. Initially, a model of such a naval base, called in this work, special industrial facility, is proposed, with its systems and respective sets of basic requirements, in order to make it possible the accomplishment of the special industrial facility support function to the nuclear submarine. A discussion about current challenges to overcome in this project is presented: the challenges due to the new characteristics of this type of nuclear facility; existence of several interfaces between the special industrial facilities systems and nuclear submarine systems in design activities; lack of specific regulation in Brazil to allow the licensing process of special industrial facilities by the nuclear safety authority; and comments about the lack of information from reference nuclear facilities, as is the case with nuclear power reactors (for example, the German Grafenrheinfeld nuclear plant is the reference plant for the Brazilian Angra 2 nuclear plant). Finally, in view of these challenges, an analysis method of special industrial facility operational scenarios to assist the licensing process is proposed. Also, considerations about the application of risk-informed decision making to the special industrial facility activity and licensing process in Brazil are presented. (author)

  14. Considerations about the licensing process of special nuclear industrial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talarico, M.A.; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e

    2015-01-01

    This paper brings a discussion about the challenges involved in the development of a new kind of nuclear facility in Brazil, a naval base for nuclear submarines, with attention to the licensing process and considerations about the risk-informed decision making application to the licensing process. Initially, a model of such a naval base, called in this work, special industrial facility, is proposed, with its systems and respective sets of basic requirements, in order to make it possible the accomplishment of the special industrial facility support function to the nuclear submarine. A discussion about current challenges to overcome in this project is presented: the challenges due to the new characteristics of this type of nuclear facility; existence of several interfaces between the special industrial facilities systems and nuclear submarine systems in design activities; lack of specific regulation in Brazil to allow the licensing process of special industrial facilities by the nuclear safety authority; and comments about the lack of information from reference nuclear facilities, as is the case with nuclear power reactors (for example, the German Grafenrheinfeld nuclear plant is the reference plant for the Brazilian Angra 2 nuclear plant). Finally, in view of these challenges, an analysis method of special industrial facility operational scenarios to assist the licensing process is proposed. Also, considerations about the application of risk-informed decision making to the special industrial facility activity and licensing process in Brazil are presented. (author)

  15. Complementary safety assessment assessment of nuclear facilities - Tricastin facility - AREVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This complementary safety assessment analyses the robustness of the Areva part of the Tricastin nuclear site to extreme situations such as those that led to the Fukushima accident. This study includes the following facilities: Areva NC Pierrelatte, EURODIF production, Comurhex Pierrelatte, Georges Besse II plant and Socatri. Robustness is the ability for the plant to withstand events beyond which the plant was designed. Robustness is linked to safety margins but also to the situations leading to a sudden deterioration of the accidental sequence. Moreover, safety is not only a matter of design or engineered systems but also a matter of organizing: task organization (including subcontracting) as well as the setting of emergency plans or the inventory of nuclear materials are taken into consideration in this assessment. This report is divided into 10 main chapters: 1) the feedback experience of the Fukushima accident; 2) description of the site and its surroundings; 3) featuring of the site's activities and installations; 4) accidental sequences; 5) protection from earthquakes; 6) protection from floods; 7) protection from other extreme natural disasters; 8) the loss of electrical power and of the heat sink; 9) the management of severe accidents; and 10) subcontracting policy. This analysis has identified 5 main measures to be taken to limit the risks linked to natural disasters: -) continuing the program for replacing the current conversion plant and the enrichment plant; -) renewing the storage of hydrofluoric acid at the de-fluorination workshop; -) assessing the seismic behaviour of some parts of the de-fluorination workshop and of the fluorine fabrication workshop; -) improving the availability of warning and information means in case of emergency; and -) improving the means to mitigate accidental gaseous releases. (A.C.)

  16. Research in artificial intelligence for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The application of artificial intelligence, in the form of expert systems and neural networks, to the control room activities in a nuclear power plant has the potential to reduce operator error and increase plant safety, reliability, and efficiency. Furthermore, artificial intelligence can increase efficiency and effectiveness in a large number of nonoperating activities (testing, routine maintenance, outage planning, equipment diagnostics, and fuel management) and in research facility experiments. Recent work at the University of Tennessee has demonstrated the feasibility of using neural networks to identify six different transients introduced into the simulation of a steam generator of a nuclear power plant. This work is now being extended to utilize data from a nuclear power plant training simulator. In one configuration, the inputs to the neural network are a subset of the quantities that are typical of those available from the safety parameter display system. The outputs of the network represent the various states of the plant (e.g., normal operation, coolant leakage, inadequate core flow, excessive peak fuel temperature, etc.). Training of the neural network is performed by introducing various faults or conditions to be diagnosed into the simulator. The goal of this work is to demonstrate a neural network diagnostic system that could provide advice to the operators in accordance with the emergency operating procedures

  17. EPICS - MDSplus integration in the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchetta, Adriano; Manduchi, Gabriele; Barbalace, Antonio; Soppelsa, Anton; Taliercio, Cesare

    2011-01-01

    SPIDER, the ITER-size ion-source test bed in the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility, is a fusion device requiring a complex central system to provide control and data acquisition, referred to as CODAS. The CODAS software architecture will rely on EPICS and MDSplus, two open-source, collaborative software frameworks, targeted at control and data acquisition, respectively. EPICS has been selected as ITER CODAC middleware and, as the final deliverable of the Neutral Beam Test Facility is the procurement of the ITER Heating Neutral Beam Injector, we decided to adopt this ITER technology. MDSplus is a software package for data management, supporting advanced concepts, such as platform and underlying hardware independence, self description data, and data driven model. The combined use of EPICS and MDSplus is not new in fusion, but their level of integration will be new in SPIDER, achieved by a more refined data access layer. The paper presents the integration software to use effectively EPICS and MDSplus, including the definition of appropriate EPICS records to interact with MDSplus. The MDSplus and EPICS archive concepts are also compared on the basis of performance tests and data streaming is investigated by ad-hoc measurements.

  18. Interim Storage Facility for LLW of Decommissioning Nuclear Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, S.; Ugolini, D.; Basile, F. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Nuclear Decommissioning and Facility Management Unit, TP 800, Via E. Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra - VA (Italy)

    2009-06-15

    JRC-Ispra has initiated a Decommissioning and Waste Management (D and WM) Programme of all its nuclear facilities. In the frame of this programme, it has been decided to build an interim storage facility to host conditioned low level waste (LLW) that had been produced during the operation of JRC-Ispra nuclear research reactors and laboratories and that will be produced from their decommissioning. This paper presents the main characteristics of the facility. The storage ISFISF has a rectangular shape with uniform height and it is about 128 m long, 41 m wide and 9 m high. The entire surface affected by the facility, including screening area and access roads, is about 27.000 m{sup 2}. It is divided in three sectors, a central one, about 16 m long, for loading/unloading operations and operational services and two lateral sectors, each about 55 m long, for the conditioned LLW storage. Each storage sector is divided by a concrete wall in two transversal compartments. The ISFISF, whose operational lifetime is 50 years, is designed to host the conditioned LLW boxed in UNI CP-5.2 packages, 2,5 m long, 1.65 m wide, and 1,25 m high. The expected nominal inventory of waste is about 2100 packages, while the maximum storage is 2540 packages, thus a considerably large reserve capacity is available. The packages will be piled in stacks of maximum number of five. The LLW is going to be conditioned with a cement matrix. The maximum weight allowed for each package has been fixed at 16.000 kg. The total radioactivity inventory of waste to be hosted in the facility is about 30 TBq (mainly {beta}/{gamma} emitters). In order to satisfy the structural, seismic, and, most of all, radiological requirements, the external walls of the ISFISF are made of pre-fabricated panels, 32 cm thick, consisting of, from inside to outside, 20 cm of reinforced concrete, 7 cm of insulating material, and again 5 cm of reinforced concrete. For the same reason the roof is made with pre-fabricated panels in

  19. Measurement of nuclear cross sections using radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizcano, D.; Aguilera, E.F.; Martinez Q, E.

    1999-01-01

    One of the main applications of the production and use of nuclear radioactive beams is the measurement of nuclear cross sections. In this work is used a 6 He nuclear radioactive beam (β emitting with half life 806.7 ms) for the study of the reaction 6 + 209 Bi which could have several products. This investigation was realized in collaboration with the personnel of the Nuclear Structure laboratory at the University of Notre Dame (U.S.A.) and the National institute of Nuclear Research and CONACyT by Mexico. (Author)

  20. Beam based alignment at the KEK accelerator test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, M.; Nelson, J.; Woodley, M.; Wolski, A.

    2002-01-01

    The KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) damping ring is a prototype low emittance source for the NLC/JLC linear collider. To achieve the goal normalized vertical emittance gey = 20 nm-rad, magnet placement accuracy better than 30 mm must be achieved. Accurate beam-based alignment (BBA) is required. The ATF arc optics uses a FOBO cell with two horizontally focusing quadrupoles, two sextupoles and a horizontally defocusing gradient dipole, all of which must be aligned with BBA. BBA at ATF uses the quadrupole and sextupole trim windings to find the trajectory through the center of each magnet. The results can be interpreted to assess the accuracy of the mechanical alignment and the beam position monitor offsets

  1. Operational status of nuclear facilities in Japan. 2012 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This document is a compilation which provides an outline of the administration of nuclear facility safety regulations as well as various data including operational status, the status of periodical and safety inspections, the status of issues, and radiation management on nuclear power reactor facilities, reactor facilities in the research and development stage, and fabrication, reprocessing, disposal, and storage facilities in fiscal year 2011 (from April 2011 to March 2012). (J.P.N.)

  2. Governments' role in decommissioning nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guindon, S.; Wendling, R.D.; Gordelier, S.; Soederberg, O.; Averous, J.; Orlando, D.

    2005-01-01

    Many nuclear power plants will reach the end of their operating lives over the next 20 years; some may be life-extended, others may not. This development will precipitate enhanced industrial and regulatory activities in the area of decommissioning. We are also witnessing in many countries a significant shift in the role of government itself: new pressures on governments, such as enhanced attention on environmental impact/mitigation and strategies to implement market-oriented approaches in a variety of sectors, including the energy sector are driving the public policy agenda. The paper will examine the range of policy issues, drawing from recent NEA studies on decommissioning policies and the recent NEA study on Government and Nuclear Energy and, strategies and costs, and other current trends and developments in the nuclear industry and in the nuclear policy fields. The paper will reflect on issues to be addressed during the conference and draw conclusions on the appropriate role of government in this area. Decommissioning policy is very specific and focused: it is not a high level policy/political issue in most instances and rarely gets the same attention as the issue surrounding the future of nuclear energy itself and public concerns regarding safety, waste and economics. One reason why decommissioning does not get the same attention as for example disposal of spent nuclear fuel might be the fact that technology is available for decommissioning, while technology for disposal of spent nuclear fuel is under development. High profile or not, it will remain an important issue for governments and industry alike particularly because of the cost and long lead times involved. In some instances, governments are the owners of the facilities to be decommissioned. In addition, decommissioning factors into issues surrounding the economics of nuclear energy and the sustainability of the nuclear option. Based on results of the Tarragona Seminar (Spain, September 2-4, 2003) and

  3. Remote handling technology for nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Akira; Maekawa, Hiromichi; Ohmura, Yutaka

    1997-01-01

    Design and R and D on nuclear fuel cycle facilities has intended development of remote handling and maintenance technology since 1977. IHI has completed the design and construction of several facilities with remote handling systems for Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), and Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (JNFL). Based on the above experiences, IHI is now undertaking integration of specific technology and remote handling technology for application to new fields such as fusion reactor facilities, decommissioning of nuclear reactors, accelerator testing facilities, and robot simulator-aided remote operation systems in the future. (author)

  4. Physical protection nuclear facilities against sabotage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: INFCIRC 225 Rev. 4 has introduced the Design Basis Threat, DBT, as a key element of the states physical protection system. The DBT is a definition which determines the level of physical protection of nuclear material during use, storage, transport and of nuclear facilities. It the basis for physical protection concepts and for the design of measures the operator or licensee has to provide. By this means it is also a definition of the responsibility for the physical protection which the operator accepts with the license. The new chapter designated to the physical protection against sabotage which has resulted also in the amendment of the title in INFCIRC 225 demonstrates the grown international concern about the potential consequences of sabotage. More than the physical protection against unauthorized removal the physical protection against sabotage has interfaces with the nuclear safety field. The basis of protection against sabotage therefore is much more based on the facility design-the safety design of the facility. Using the DBT the competent authority is in the position to determine the level of protection against sabotage and the remaining risk which has to be accepted. This risk of course depends on the real threat which is not known in advance. The acceptance of the remaining risk depends on both the assessment of the threat, its credibility and the potential consequences. There has been no serious act of sabotage in the past nor an attempt of. Despite of this the Harnun attack of the Japanese underground and some other recent terrorist activities could have given reasons to reconsider what threat might be credible. The German physical protection system has been developed since the increasing terrorist activities in the 1970s. From the beginning the protection against sabotage played an important role in the German system of physical protection. The requirements for the physical protection against unauthorized removal and against sabotage were

  5. Master Training in Radiological Protection Facilities Radioactive and Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdu, G.; Mayo, P.; Campayo, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The master includes general aspects of radiation protection in nuclear facilities. also an advanced module to acquire a high level training highlights as nuclear decommissioning, shielding calculation using advanced codes, particle accelerators, international law, etc.

  6. Radioactive ion beam production challenges at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigs, M.J.; Alton, G.D.; Dowling, D.T.; Haynes, D.L.; Jones, C.M.; Juras, R.C.; Lane, S.N.; Mills, G.D.; Mosko, S.W.; Olsen, D.K.; Tatum, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    The radioactive ion beam (RIB) project at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) will provide for reconfiguration of the HHIRF accelerator system to enable provision of low-intensity RIBs for nuclear and astrophysics research. As we have progressed with the design of the reconfiguration, we have encountered several challenges that were not immediately obvious when first contemplating the project. The challenges do not seem insurmountable but should keep life interesting for those of us doing the work. A brief review of the project will allow a better understanding of the challenges in RIB production. Radioactive ion beams will be produced with the Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL) postacceleration technique. In particular, radioactive atoms will be produced by reactions in the thick stopping target of an ISOL-type target-ion source assembly using intense beams from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron equipped with a light-ion internal source. This ISOL target-ion source assembly will be mounted on a high-voltage platform with a mass separator. The target ion source will operate at potentials up to 50 kV with respect to the high voltage platform. The radioactive atoms produced by nuclear reactions in the target diffuse to the surface of the heated target material, desorb from this surface, and effuse through a heated transfer tube into an ion source where ionization and extraction take place. Two types of ion sources will be initially considered. A Forced Electron Beam Induced Arc Discharge source, similar to those used by the ISOLDE facility at CERN and by the UNISOR facility at ORNL, will be built to produce positive ions. These positive ions will be focused through an alkali vapor charge-exchange canal to produce negative ions for tandem injection. In addition, a direct negative surface ionization addition or modification to the above source will be built and investigated

  7. Decommissioning of the LURE Nuclear Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, N.; Horodynski, J.M.; Robert, P.; Tadjeddine, A.

    2013-01-01

    With the goal of obtaining the decommissioning of the LURE nuclear facility, three of its accelerators were dismantled and another was modified to be below the thresh- old of 'Installation Nucleaire de Base' status. Operations were carried out with the strategy of mechanical dismantling with no cutting process. As the civil engineering radioactivity level was low, a great majority of it has been left in place with no process- ing, but compensatory measures have been taken for public and environmental protection. The overall result of these operations is a gain in both cost and operating time. They also contribute to a significant decrease in the risks, including radiological ones. The radiological impact after decommissioning remains acceptable. (authors)

  8. Ventilation safety of facilities comprising nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guirlet, J.

    1982-01-01

    The reliability of the ventilation is one of the most important aspects in the prevention of the nuisances that a nuclear installation can provide, since the ventilation is located at the last barrier. A certain number of essential points have been recalled here. But it is necessary to bear in mind other requirements such as the limitation in the number of crossovers, the answers to be found should the system fail, the need to show that ventilation systems do not in themselves bring other nuisances such as noise, irradiation or contamination hazards, likelyhood of recycling the contamination, vibrations, fire. Finally, it is absolutely essential, right from the project stage, that the design ensures that very good accessibility, very easy dismantling and handling, as well as all the facilities needed to make sure of the initial and periodic tests, are guaranteed [fr

  9. Radiation safely culture in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coates, R.

    2018-01-01

    The importance of developing a sound radiation safety culture is a relatively new development in the practical application of radiation protection in operational facilities. It is instructive to trace the evolution of the fundamental approaches to controlling operational exposures, staring with the engineering-based 'Distance, Shielding and Time' mantra, through the growing emphasis on ALARA and systematic management-based approaches, towards a recognition of the importance of developing a more 'hearts and minds' approach based within the wider safety culture of the organization. The underlying requirements for developing a strong radiation safety culture are not novel, and are largely identical to those necessary for nuclear safety culture, which is why an integrated approach to culture within the organization is essential

  10. Environmental Radiation Monitoring Around the Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Geun Sik; Lee, Chang Woo

    2008-05-15

    Environmental Radiation Monitoring was carried out with measurement of environment. radiation and environmental radioactivity analysis on the sites of KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul Research Reactors and their environments. The average level of environmental radiation dose measured by an ERM and the accumulated radiation dose by a TLD were almost same level compared with the previous years. The activity of gross {alpha} and gross {beta}, Tritium, Uraniu and Strontium in environmental samples showed a environmental level. The radioactivities of most {gamma}-radionuclides in air particulate, surface water and ground water were less than MDA except {sup 40}K or {sup 7}Be which are natural radionuclides. However, not only {sup 40}K or {sup 7}Be but also {sup 137}Cs were detected at the background level in surface soil, discharge sediment and fallout or pine needle.

  11. Automated entry control system for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ream, W.K.; Espinoza, J.

    1985-01-01

    An entry control system to automatically control access to nuclear facilities is described. The design uses a centrally located console, integrated into the regular security system, to monitor the computer-controlled passage into and out of sensitive areas. Four types of entry control points are used: an unmanned enclosed portal with metal and SNM detectors for contraband detection with positive personnel identification, a bypass portal for contraband search after a contraband alarm in a regular portal also with positive personnel identification, a single door entry point with positive personnel identification, and a single door entry point with only a magnetic card-type identification. Security force action is required only as a response to an alarm. The integration of the entry control function into the security system computer is also described. The interface between the entry control system and the monitoring security personnel utilizing a color graphics display with touch screen input is emphasized. 2 refs., 7 figs

  12. Utilizations of filtered neutron beams at Dalat nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hien, P.D.; Chau, L.N.; Tan, V.H.; Hiep, N.T.; Phuong, L.B.

    1992-01-01

    Neutron beam utilizations in basic and applied researches have been important activities at the Dalat nuclear reactor. The neutron filters with single crystal of silicon are used to produce thermal neutrons at the tangential horizontal channel and quasi-monoenergetic 144 KeV and 54 KeV neutrons at the piercing beam tube. The paper presents some relevant characteristics of the filtered neutron beams at the two horizontal channels. Applications of neutron beams in prompt gamma-ray activation analysis and in nuclear data measurements are briefly described. (author)

  13. Prospects for exotic beam facilities in North America

    CERN Document Server

    Nolen, J A

    2002-01-01

    There are several nuclear physics laboratories in North America that have on-going research using energetic and stopped radioactive beams. These include the large ISOL-type programs ISAC at TRIUMF and HRIBF at Oak Ridge and the in-flight fragmentation program at the NSCL of Michigan State University. There are also smaller, more specialized, programs using a variety of techniques at the 88-inch cyclotron of Berkeley, ATLAS at Argonne, the Cyclotron Institute of Texas A&M University, the Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Notre Dame University, and the Nuclear Structure Laboratory at SUNY/Stony Brook. There are also three projects on the horizon in North America for new capabilities in both the near term and more distant future. The intensities of the in-flight fragment beams at the NSCL will be increased dramatically very soon as the Coupled Cyclotron Project will be completed and commissioned for research by mid-2001. A new project, ISAC-II, has been approved in Canada. For the longer term, the United State...

  14. Report on operation of nuclear facilities in 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) prepared a report on nuclear safety in the republic of Slovenia in 1991 as part of its regular practice of reporting on its work to the Government and the National Assembly of the Republic of Slovenia. The report is divided into three thematic chapters covering the activities of the SNSA, the operation of nuclear facilities in Slovenia, the activity of international missions in Slovenia and the operation of nuclear facilities around the world.

  15. Seismic evaluation of existing nuclear facilities. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Programmes for re-evaluation and upgrading of safety of existing nuclear facilities are presently under way in a number of countries around the world. An important component of these programmes is the re-evaluation of the seismic safety through definition of new seismic parameters at the site and evaluation of seismic capacity of structures, equipment and distribution systems following updated information and criteria. The Seminar is intended to provide a forum for the exchange of information and discussion of the state-of-the-art on seismic safety of nuclear facilities in operation or under construction. Both analytical and experimental techniques for the evaluation of seismic capacity of structures, equipment and distribution systems are discussed. Full scale and field tests of structures and components using shaking tables, mechanical exciters, explosive and shock tests, and ambient vibrations are included in the seminar programme with emphasis on recent case histories. Presentations at the Seminar also include analytical techniques for the determination of dynamic properties of soil-structure systems from experiments as well as calibration of numerical models. Methods and criteria for seismic margin assessment based on experience data obtained from the behaviour of structures and components in real earthquakes are discussed. Guidelines for defining technical requirements for capacity re-evaluation (i.e. acceptable behaviour limits and design and implementation of structure and components upgrades are also presented and discussed. The following topics were covered during 7 sessions: earthquake experience and seismic re-evaluation; country experience in seismic re-evaluation programme; generic WWER studies; analytical methods for seismic capacity re-evaluation; experimental methods for seismic capacity re-evaluation; case studies.

  16. Radiochemical analysis of military nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayramov, A.A.; Bayramova, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text : Radiochemical Analysis is a branch of analytical chemistry comprising an aggregate of methods for qualitatively determining the composition and content of radioisotopes in the products of transformations. Safety and minimization of radiation impact on human and environment are important demand of operation of Military Nuclear Facilities (MNF). In accordance of recommendations of International Commission on Radiological Protection there are next objects of radiochemical analysis: 1) potential sources of radiochemical pollution; 2) environment (objects of environment, human environment including buildings, agricultural production, water, air et al.); 3) human himself (determination of dose from external and internal radiation, chemical poisoning). The chemical analysis can be carried out using, for example, the Gas Chromatography instrument whish separates chemical mixtures and identifies the components at a molecular level. It is one of the most accurate tools for analyzing environmental samples. The Gas Chromatography works on the principle that a mixture will separate into individual substances when heated. The heated gases are carried through a column with an inert gas (such as helium). As the separated substances emerge from the column opening, they flow into the Mass Spectrometry. Mass spectrometry identifies compounds by the mass of the analyte molecule. Newly developed portable Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry are techniques that can be used to separate volatile organic compounds and pesticides. Other uses of Gas Chromatography, combined with other separation and analytical techniques, have been developed for radionuclides, explosive compounds such as royal demolition explosive and trinitrotoluene, and metals. So, based on the many years experience of operation of dangerous MNF, in concordance with norms of radiation and chemical safety it was considered that the tasks of the radiochemical analysis of Military Nuclear Facilities include

  17. Seismic evaluation of existing nuclear facilities. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Programmes for re-evaluation and upgrading of safety of existing nuclear facilities are presently under way in a number of countries around the world. An important component of these programmes is the re-evaluation of the seismic safety through definition of new seismic parameters at the site and evaluation of seismic capacity of structures, equipment and distribution systems following updated information and criteria. The Seminar is intended to provide a forum for the exchange of information and discussion of the state-of-the-art on seismic safety of nuclear facilities in operation or under construction. Both analytical and experimental techniques for the evaluation of seismic capacity of structures, equipment and distribution systems are discussed. Full scale and field tests of structures and components using shaking tables, mechanical exciters, explosive and shock tests, and ambient vibrations are included in the seminar programme with emphasis on recent case histories. Presentations at the Seminar also include analytical techniques for the determination of dynamic properties of soil-structure systems from experiments as well as calibration of numerical models. Methods and criteria for seismic margin assessment based on experience data obtained from the behaviour of structures and components in real earthquakes are discussed. Guidelines for defining technical requirements for capacity re-evaluation (i.e. acceptable behaviour limits and design and implementation of structure and components upgrades are also presented and discussed. The following topics were covered during 7 sessions: earthquake experience and seismic re-evaluation; country experience in seismic re-evaluation programme; generic WWER studies; analytical methods for seismic capacity re-evaluation; experimental methods for seismic capacity re-evaluation; case studies

  18. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities: a growing activity in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anasco, Raul

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power plants and nuclear facilities are no different from normal buildings and factories. Eventually, they become worn-out or old fashioned, too expensive to maintain or remodel. Decommissioning a nuclear facility is different from retiring other types because of the radioactivity involved. The most important consideration in nuclear decommissioning is to protect workers and the public from exposure to harmful levels of radiation. General criteria and strategies for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities are described as well as the present decommissioning activities of the Argentine CNEA (author)

  19. Nuclear chemistry counting facilities: requirements definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, D.W.; Baker, J.

    1979-01-01

    In an effort to upgrade outdated instrumentation and to take advantage of current and imminent technologies the Nuclear Chemistry Division at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is about to undertake a major upgrade of their low level radiation counting and analysis facilities. It is expected that such a project will make a more coordinated data acquisition and data processing system, reduce manual data handling operations and speed up data processing throughput. Before taking on a systems design it is appropriate to establish a definition of the requirements of the facilities. This report examines why such a project is necessary in the context of the current and projected operations, needs, problems, risks and costs. The authors also address a functional specification as a prelude to a system design and the design constraints implicit in the systems implementation. Technical, operational and economic assessments establish necessary boundary conditions for this discussion. This report also establishes the environment in which the requirements definition may be considered valid. The validity of these analyses is contingent on known and projected technical, scientific and political conditions

  20. CEBAF/SURA [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility]/[Southeastern Universities Research Association] 1988 summer workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, F.; Lightbody, J.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains papers from a summer workshop of the continuous electron beam accelerator facility. Some topics of these papers are: spectrometers; electron scattering from deuterons; relativistic correlations in nuclear matter; pion production on 3 He and 3 H; quantum electrodynamic processes in crystals; 12 C(e,e'p) x reaction; deuteron polarization tensor and relativistic spin rotation; electromagnetic excitation of nuclei; electron distortion and structure functions in (e,e'p) reactions; and reaction mechanism of 4 He(e,e'p) 3 H

  1. Nuclear analytical techniques with neutron beams at the Univ. of Texas at Austin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenlue, K.; Wehring, B.W.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron beams produced by nuclear research reactors can be used for analytical chemical analysis by measuring nuclear radiation produced by neutron capture. Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) and neutron depth profiling (NDP) are two such analytical techniques. For the last three decades, these techniques have been applied at a number of research reactors around the world. Within the last 4 yr, we have developed NDP and PGAA facilities at The University of Texas at Austin research reactor, a 1-MW TRIGA Mark II reactor. Brief descriptions of the facilities and summaries of activities for these analytical techniques at the University of Texas at Austin are provided in this paper

  2. Protection of nuclear facilities and nuclear materials against malevolent actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornu, P.; Aurelle, J.; Jalouneix, J.

    2001-01-01

    The french approach for considering malevolent actions affecting the design and operation of nuclear facilities is aimed at determining the extent to which the facilities are protected. When carrying out these studies, operating organizations have to demonstrate that their are complying with the objectives set by the Competent Authority for reducing the risk of internal or external malevolent actions. The approach to be followed consist to determine the sensitivity of each zone and to estimate the vulnerability of the most critical zones to each type of aggression. The sensitivity can be defined by the level of the radiological consequences resulting from a malevolent action. The estimation of the vulnerability is made of the extent to which it is difficult to carry out a malevolent action. if need be, counter-measures are taken to protect zones for which the consequences would be unacceptable compared to the force of the aggression. Counter-measures are intended both to minimise sensitivity and make it more difficult to carry out the aggression envisaged. Acceptable consequences are taken as being those leading to levels of radioactive releases less than, or equal to, those taken into account in the facility safety case. This implies that the vulnerability of the most sensitive zones should be reduced to a minimum so that an acceptable level of protection can be provided for these areas. Emphasis will be paid on the defence in depth approach organized around prevention, management and mitigation measures. (authors)

  3. A trend of robotics in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Ryoichi

    1993-01-01

    In order to operate stably nuclear power stations, the periodic inspection determined by the law has been carried out once every year in Japan. For reducing the radiation exposure of workers and improving work efficiency and work quality, the automation and the use of robots have been promoted. Also in fuel reprocessing plants and the facilities for storing radioactive wastes, the remotely operated devices for handling uranium and plutonium are indispensable. The course of the development of the robots for nuclear power plants classified by ages is shown. The research and development have been advanced from special automatic machines of first generation since 1965, through versatile robots of second generation since 1980 to intellectual robots of third generation since 1985. Automatic fuel exchanger, control rod moving mechanism and the ultrasonic flaw detector for pipings are those of first generation. As those of second generation, various movable inspection robots and the manipulators for them were developed. The ultimate working robot completed in 1990 is that of third generation. As the trend of the practical use, monorail type inspection robots and underwater inspection robots and various manipulators are reported. (K.I.)

  4. Opening and construction of facilities in succession for particle beam therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Takashi; Yamamoto, Kazutaka; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Totoki, Tadahide; Hoshino, Junichi; Aoki, Takashi; Yoshiyuki, Takeshi; Hirabayashi, Masayuki; Nakamura, Fumito

    2011-01-01

    This feature article describes the current state of practical particle beam therapy of cancer, its future prospect, recent opening/construction of its facilities and manufacturers' view with following 9 topics presented by relevant experts. Gunma University (topic 1) started the carbon ion therapy from Mar., 2010, and has treated more than 100 cancer patients to aim the treatment of about 600 patients/year after several years. Fukui Prefectural Hospital Proton Therapy Center (topic 2) started from this March with proton beams for patients with its therapeutic standard, in cooperation with insurance companies and hotels for patients' convenience. Medipolis Proton Therapy and Research Center (Kagoshima Pref.) (topic 3) started this year with proton beams for 13 patients hitherto with reference protocol of Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center. A new stereotactic irradiation system of proton beams for breast cancer has been developed. Construction of Saga Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Tosu (Saga Pref.) (topic 4) began this year to be completed in 2013. Aizawa Hospital (Nagano Pref.) (topic 5) plans to introduce the small-sized proton accelerator-gantry system (Sumitomo Heavy Ind., Ltd.) aiming the practice in 2013. Association for Nuclear Technology in Medicine (topic 6) reports the trends of current and future construction inside/outside Japan. Manufacturers comment their respective business: high-speed scanning irradiation system, next generation handling system of patient and particle beam therapy information system by Toshiba (topic 7); designation of the whole heavy ion beam therapy system (with NIRS), proton beam (as in topic 5) and system of BNCT (boron neutron-capture therapy) (Kyoto Univ.) by Sumitomo Heavy Ind., Ltd. (topic 8); and small-size proton therapeutic machine with 4D tracing capability for patient's movement (Hokkaido Univ.) and with spot-scanning irradiation technique by Hitachi (topic 9). (author)

  5. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Pil Soo

    2003-01-01

    In 1996, it was concluded that the first Korea research reactor (KRR-1) and the second Korea research reactor (KRR-2) would be shut down and decommissioned. The main reason for the decommissioning was that the facilities became old and has become surrounded by the urbanised community. And many difficulties, including the higher cost, were faced according to the enhanced regulations. Another reason was the introduction of a new research reactor 'HANARO' in 1995. A project to decommission the reactors was launched on January of 1997 with a goal of release of the site and buildings for unrestricted use by 2008. All the radioactive wastes generated are to be transported to the national repository, planned by the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP), and the final evaluation of the residual radioactivity will be made before the clearance of the site. As a first step of the project, a decommissioning plan, including the assessment of the environmental impact and the quality assurance program, was prepared and submitted to the government in 1998. It was approved, after its safety evaluation, by the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) in November of 2000. After some preparative works such as documentation of procedures, the decontamination and dismantling works for the laboratories and hot cells of KRR-2 were started in September, 2001 and finished in December, 2002. The spent fuels that had been generated from the reactors were transferred to the United States in 1998 and no spent fuel remained at the site. All the liquid waste, both operational and decommissioning, was very low in its radioactivity and was treated in a natural evaporation facility of 200 m3/year capacity, developed by KAERI. Especially the laundry waste was treated in a membrane filtering unit for the removal of surfactants before being introduced to the natural evaporator. The solid wastes were segregated and packed in the container of 4 m3, designed according to the ISO-1496, and also in

  6. A Swedish nuclear fuel facility and public acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Bengt A [ABB Atom (Sweden)

    1989-07-01

    For more than ten years the ABB Atom Nuclear Fuel Facility has gained a lot of public attention in Sweden. When the nuclear power debate was coming up in the middle of the seventies, the Nuclear Fuel Facility very soon became a spectacular object. It provided a possibility to bring factual information about nuclear power to the public. Today that public interest still exists. For ABB Atom the Facility works as a tool of information activities in several ways, as a solid base for ABB Atom company presentations. but also as a very practical demonstration of the nuclear power technology to the public. This is valid especially to satisfy the local school demand for a real life object complementary to the theoretical nuclear technology education. Beyond the fact that the Nuclear Fuel Facility is a very effective fuel production plant, it is not too wrong to see it as an important resource for education as well as a tool for improved public relations.

  7. A Swedish nuclear fuel facility and public acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Bengt A.

    1989-01-01

    For more than ten years the ABB Atom Nuclear Fuel Facility has gained a lot of public attention in Sweden. When the nuclear power debate was coming up in the middle of the seventies, the Nuclear Fuel Facility very soon became a spectacular object. It provided a possibility to bring factual information about nuclear power to the public. Today that public interest still exists. For ABB Atom the Facility works as a tool of information activities in several ways, as a solid base for ABB Atom company presentations. but also as a very practical demonstration of the nuclear power technology to the public. This is valid especially to satisfy the local school demand for a real life object complementary to the theoretical nuclear technology education. Beyond the fact that the Nuclear Fuel Facility is a very effective fuel production plant, it is not too wrong to see it as an important resource for education as well as a tool for improved public relations

  8. Study on system integration of robots operated in nuclear fusion facility and nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Kiyoshi

    2004-07-01

    A present robot is required to apply to many fields such as amusement, welfare and protection against disasters. The are however only limited numbers of the robots, which can work under the actual conditions as a robot system. It is caused by the following reasons: (1) the robot system cannot be realized by the only collection of the elemental technologies, (2) the performance of the robot is determined by that of the integrated system composed of the complicated elements with many functions, and (3) the respective elements have to be optimized in the integrated robot system with a well balance among them, through their examination, adjustment and improvement. Therefore, the system integration of the robot composed of a large number of elements is the most critical issue to realize the robot system for actual use. In the present paper, I describe the necessary approaches and elemental technologies to solve the issues on the system integration of the typical robot systems for maintenance in the nuclear fusion facility and rescue in the accident of the nuclear power plant facilities. These robots work under the intense radiation condition and restricted space in place of human. In particular, I propose a new approach to realize the system integration of the robot for actual use from the viewpoints of not only the environment and working conditions but also the restructure and optimization of the required elemental technologies with a well balance in the robot system. Based on the above approach, I have a contribution to realize the robot systems working under the actual conditions for maintenance in the nuclear fusion facility and rescue in the accident of the nuclear power plant facilities. (author)

  9. Safety study of fire protection for nuclear fuel cycle facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Insufficiencies in the fire protection system of the nuclear reactor facilities were pointed out when the fire occurred due to the Niigata prefecture-Chuetsu-oki Earthquake in July, 2007. This prompted the revision of the fire protection safety examination guideline for nuclear reactors as well as commercial guidelines. The commercial guidelines have been endorsed by the regulatory body. Now commercial fire protection standards for nuclear facilities such as the design guideline and the management guideline for protecting fire in the Light Water Reactors (LWRs) are available, however, those to apply to the nuclear fuel cycle facilities such as mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility (MFFF) have not been established. For the improvement of fire protection system of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the development of a standard for the fire protection, corresponding to the commercial standard for LWRs were required. Thus, Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) formulated a fire protection guidelines for nuclear fuel cycle facilities as a standard relevant to the fire protection of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities considering functions specific to the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. In formulating the guidelines, investigation has been conduced on the commercial guidelines for nuclear reactors in Japan and the standards relevant to the fire protection of nuclear facilities in USA and other countries as well as non-nuclear industrial fire protection standards. The guideline consists of two parts; Equipments and Management, as the commercial guidances of the nuclear reactor. In addition, the acquisition of fire evaluation data for a components (an electric cabinet, cable, oil etc.) targeted for spread of fire and the evaluation model of fire source were continued for the fire hazard analysis (FHA). (author)

  10. Progress report of the innovated KIST ion beam facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joonkon; Eliades, John A.; Yu, Byung-Yong; Lim, Weon Cheol; Chae, Keun Hwa; Song, Jonghan, E-mail: jonghansong@gmail.com

    2017-01-15

    The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST, Seoul, Republic of (S.) Korea) ion beam facility consists of three electrostatic accelerators: a 400 kV single ended ion implanter, a 2 MV tandem accelerator system and a 6 MV tandem accelerator system. The 400 kV and 6 MV systems were purchased from High Voltage Engineering Europa (HVEE, Netherlands) and commissioned in 2013, while the 2 MV system was purchased from National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC, USA) in 1995. These systems are used to provide traditional ion beam analysis (IBA), isotope ratio analysis (ex. accelerator mass spectrometry, AMS), and ion implantation/irradiation for domestic industrial and academic users. The main facility is the 6 MV HVEE Tandetron system that has an AMS line currently used for {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36} Cl, {sup 41}Ca and {sup 129}I analyses, and three lines for IBA that are under construction. Here, these systems are introduced with their specifications and initial performance results.

  11. Radiological and the other safety aspects in the operation of electron beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loterina, Roel Alamares

    2003-01-01

    The radiological safety aspects of the operation of an electron beam facility in general and the 3 MeV ALURTRON electron beam facility of the Malaysian Institute of Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) in particular were reviewed and evaluated. Evaluation was made based on existing records as well as actual monitoring around facility. Area monitoring results using TLDs are within permissible levels. The maximum reading of 7.29 mSv measured in year 2000 is very low as compared to the annual dose limit of 50 mSv/year. In general, the shielding for the installation is adequate and no significant radiation leakage were detected based on radiation survey results. However, measured radiation levels with a maximum of 1.9 mSv/h at the sampling ports easily exceed the limit of 25μSv/h. The facility is equipped with safety features, such as interlocked system, adequate shielding, engineered safety design of irradiation and accelerator rooms, and accessories such as conveyor system and product handling system. Warning lights and signals are adequately installed around the facility. Other identified hazards that may affect the operator, workers, and personnel were also evaluated based on previous records of monitoring. The ozone concentration levels with a maximum reading of 0.05 ppm measured in the environment of the facility are within the threshold limit value of 0.1 ppm. The measured noise levels at all locations around facility are generally below the maximum permissible level of 80dB. The ALURTRON has achieved a minimum safety requirement to warrant its full operation without relying on administrative controls and procedures to ensure safety in operation. (Auth.)

  12. Some technical aspects of the nuclear material accounting and control at nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, O.A.; Babaev, N.S.; Gryazev, V.M.; Gadzhiev, G.I.; Gabeskiriya, V.Ya.

    1977-01-01

    The possibilities of nuclear material accounting and control are discussed at nuclear facilities of fuel cycle (WWER-type reactor, fuel fabrication plant, reprocessing plant and uranium enrichment facility) and zero energy fast reactor facility. It is shown that for nuclear material control the main method is the accounting with the application isotopic correlations at the reprocessing plant and enrichment facility. Possibilities and limitations of the application of destructive and non-destructive methods are discussed for nuclear material determinations at fuel facilities and their role in the accounting and safeguards systems as well as possibilities of the application of neutron method at a zero energy fast reactor facility [ru

  13. Investigation of plasma–surface interaction at plasma beam facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnaev, V., E-mail: kurnaev@plasma.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoe sh. 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Vizgalov, I.; Gutorov, K. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoe sh. 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Tulenbergenov, T.; Sokolov, I.; Kolodeshnikov, A.; Ignashev, V.; Zuev, V.; Bogomolova, I. [Institute of Atomic Energy, National Nuclear Center the Republic of Kazakhstan, Street Krasnoarmejsky, 10, 071100 Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Klimov, N. [SRC RF TRINITI, ul. Pushkovykh, vladenie 12, Troitsk, 142190 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    The new Plasma Beam Facility (PBF) has been put into operation for assistance in testing of plasma faced components at Material Science Kazakhstan Tokamak (KTM). PBF includes a powerful electron gun (up to 30 kV, 1 A) and a high vacuum chamber with longitudinal magnetic field coils (up to 0.2 T). The regime of high vacuum electron beam transportation is used for thermal tests with power density at the target surface up to 10 GW/m{sup 2}. The beam plasma discharge (BPD) regime with a gas-puff is used for generation of intensive ion fluxes up to 3 ⋅ 10{sup 22} m{sup −2} s{sup −1}. Initial tests of the KTM PBF’s capabilities were carried out: various discharge regimes, carbon deposits cleaning, simultaneous thermal and ion impacts on radiation cooled refractory targets. With a water-cooled target the KTM PBF could be used for high heat flux tests of materials (validated by the experiment with W mock-up at the PR-2 PBF)

  14. Maintenance schemes for the ITER neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaccaria, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Masiello, A.; Coniglio, A.; Antoni, V.; Cordier, J.J.; Hemsworth, R.; Jones, T.; Di Pietro, E.; Mondino, P.L.

    2004-01-01

    The ITER neutral beam test facility (NBTF) is planned to be built, after the approval of the ITER construction and the choice of the ITER site, with the agreement of the ITER International Team and of the JA and RF participant teams. The key purpose is to progressively increase the performance of the first ITER injector and to demonstrate its reliability at the maximum operation parameters: power delivered to the plasma 16.5 MW, beam energy 1 MeV, accelerated D - ion current 40 A, pulse length 3600 s. Several interventions for possible modifications and for maintenance are expected during the early operation of the ITER injector in order to optimize the beam generation, aiming and steering. The maintenance scheme and the related design solutions are therefore a very important aspect to be considered for the NBTF design. The paper describes consistently the many interrelated aspects of the design, such as the optimisation of the vessel and cryopump geometry, in order to get a better maintenance flexibility, an easier man access and a larger access for diagnostic and monitoring. (authors)

  15. Stochastic Optimization for Nuclear Facility Deployment Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Ross Daniel

    Single-use, low-enriched uranium oxide fuel, consumed through several cycles in a light-water reactor (LWR) before being disposed, has become the dominant source of commercial-scale nuclear electric generation in the United States and throughout the world. However, it is not without its drawbacks and is not the only potential nuclear fuel cycle available. Numerous alternative fuel cycles have been proposed at various times which, through the use of different reactor and recycling technologies, offer to counteract many of the perceived shortcomings with regards to waste management, resource utilization, and proliferation resistance. However, due to the varying maturity levels of these technologies, the complicated material flow feedback interactions their use would require, and the large capital investments in the current technology, one should not deploy these advanced designs without first investigating the potential costs and benefits of so doing. As the interactions among these systems can be complicated, and the ways in which they may be deployed are many, the application of automated numerical optimization to the simulation of the fuel cycle could potentially be of great benefit to researchers and interested policy planners. To investigate the potential of these methods, a computational program has been developed that applies a parallel, multi-objective simulated annealing algorithm to a computational optimization problem defined by a library of relevant objective functions applied to the Ver ifiable Fuel Cycle Simulati on Model (VISION, developed at the Idaho National Laboratory). The VISION model, when given a specified fuel cycle deployment scenario, computes the numbers and types of, and construction, operation, and utilization schedules for, the nuclear facilities required to meet a predetermined electric power demand function. Additionally, it calculates the location and composition of the nuclear fuels within the fuel cycle, from initial mining through

  16. Safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This publication covers the broad scope of requirements for fuel cycle facilities that, in light of the experience and present state of technology, must be satisfied to ensure safety for the lifetime of the facility. Topics of specific reference include aspects of nuclear fuel generation, storage, reprocessing and disposal. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. The safety objective, concepts and safety principles; 3. Legal framework and regulatory supervision; 4. The management system and verification of safety; 5. Siting of the facility; 6. Design of the facility; 7. Construction of the facility; 8. Commissioning of the facility; 9. Operation of the facility; 10. Decommissioning of the facility; Appendix I: Requirements specific to uranium fuel fabrication facilities; Appendix II: Requirements specific to mixed oxide fuel fabrication facilities; Appendix III: Requirements specific to conversion facilities and enrichment facilities

  17. Thin and thick targets for radioactive ion beam production at SPIRAL1 facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, P.; Bajeat, O.; Delahaye, P.; Dubois, M.; Kuchi, V.; Maunoury, L.

    2018-05-01

    The upgrade of the Système de Production d'Ions Radioactifs Accélérés en Ligne (SPIRAL1) facility will deliver its new Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) by summer 2017. The goal of the upgrade is an improvement of the performances of the installation in terms of isotopes species and ion charge states [1]. Ion beams are produced using the Isotope Separator On Line Method, consisting in an association of a primary beam of stable ions, a hot target and an ion source. The primary beam impinges on the material of the target. Radioactive isotopes are produced by nuclear reactions and propagate up to the source, where they are ionized and accelerated to create a RIB. One advantage of SPIRAL1 driver is the variety of its available primary beams, from carbon to uranium with energies up to 95 MeV/A. Within the SPIRAL1 upgrade, they will be combined with targets made of a large choice of materials, extending in this way the number of possible nuclear reactions (fusion-evaporation, transfer, fragmentation) for producing a wider range of isotopes, up to regions of the nuclide chart still scarcely explored. Depending on the reaction process, on the collision energy and on the primary beam power, thin and thick targets are used. As their functions can be different, their design must cope with specific constraints which will be described. After a presentation of the goals of present and future SPIRAL1 Target Ion Source System, the main target features, studies and designs under progress are presented.

  18. The State Surveillance over Nuclear Safety of Nuclear Facilities Act No. 28/1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Act lays down responsibilities of the Czechoslovak Atomic Energy Commission in the field of state surveillance over nuclear safety of nuclear facilities; determines the responsibilities of nuclear safety inspectors in their inspection activities; specifies duties of bodies and corporations responsible for nuclear safety of nuclear facilities; stipulates the obligation to set up emergency plans; and specifies penalties imposed on corporations and individuals for noncompliance with nuclear safety provisions. The Act entered into force on 4 April 1984. (J.B.)

  19. A possible biomedical facility at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosanjh, M; Jones, B; Myers, S

    2013-05-01

    A well-attended meeting, called "Brainstorming discussion for a possible biomedical facility at CERN", was held by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics on 25 June 2012. This was concerned with adapting an existing, but little used, 78-m circumference CERN synchrotron to deliver a wide range of ion species, preferably from protons to at least neon ions, with beam specifications that match existing clinical facilities. The potential extensive research portfolio discussed included beam ballistics in humanoid phantoms, advanced dosimetry, remote imaging techniques and technical developments in beam delivery, including gantry design. In addition, a modern laboratory for biomedical characterisation of these beams would allow important radiobiological studies, such as relative biological effectiveness, in a dedicated facility with standardisation of experimental conditions and biological end points. A control photon and electron beam would be required nearby for relative biological effectiveness comparisons. Research beam time availability would far exceed that at other facilities throughout the world. This would allow more rapid progress in several biomedical areas, such as in charged hadron therapy of cancer, radioisotope production and radioprotection. The ethos of CERN, in terms of open access, peer-reviewed projects and governance has been so successful for High Energy Physics that application of the same to biomedicine would attract high-quality research, with possible contributions from Europe and beyond, along with potential new funding streams.

  20. Nuclear orientation facility at Charles University in Prague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotter, M.; Trhlik, M.; Hubalovsky, S.; Srnka, A.; Dupak, J.; Ota, J.; Pari, P.

    2000-01-01

    A low temperature nuclear orientation facility was installed at Charles University in the laboratory of the Department of Low Temperature Physics on the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics in Prague. The solid state as well as nuclear physics research is pursued on this facility. (author)

  1. Some electron beam welding equipments for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, H.; Rodier, R.; Sayegh, G.

    1978-01-01

    Results of various electron beam welding equipment developed for the nuclear industry obtained from a 100 kW electron beam machine to weld thick plates made of stainless steel and reactor steel, and from some equipment with local vacuum to weld pipes onto a pipe wall. (orig.) [de

  2. Decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance to regulatory bodies and operating organizations on planning and provision for the safe management of the decommissioning of non-reactor nuclear fuel cycle facilities. While the basic safety considerations for the decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities are similar to those for nuclear power plants, there are important differences, notably in the design and operating parameters for the facilities, the type of radioactive material and the support systems available. It is the objective of this Safety Guide to provide guidance for the shutdown and eventual decommissioning of such facilities, their individual characteristics being taken into account

  3. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities involving operations with uranium and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shum, E.Y.; Neuder, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    When a licensed nuclear facility ceases operation, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) ensures that the facility and its site are decontaminated to acceptable levels so they may safely be released for unrestricted public use. Because specific environmental standards or broad federal guidelines governing release of residual radioactive contamination have not been issued, NRC has developed ad hoc cleanup criteria for decommissioning nuclear facilities that involved uranium and thorium. Cleanup criteria include decontamination of buildings, equipment, and land. We will address cleanup criteria and their rationale; procedures for decommissioning uranium/thorium facilities; radiological survey designs and procedures; radiological monitoring and measurement; and cost-effectiveness to demonstrate compliance

  4. Radioactive ion beam facility at Louvain-La-Neuve, Belgium and its features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintalapudi, S.N.

    1991-01-01

    Use of radioactive ion beams for the study of nuclear structure as well as the astrophysical reaction cross sections become the current interest in physics. A full-fledged facility based on two coupled cyclotrons comprising a compact high current cyclotron and a medium energy cyclotron with an intermediate target and ion source system has been recently commissioned at the Louvain-La-Neuve University in Belgium by its accelerator group and has been successfully used for the measurement of cross sections for the primordial nucleosynthesis reactions of astrophysical interest, directly. A brief description of the system, its operational features together with some details of the target and the ion source arrangement for the production of the radioactive ion beams and their acceleration to energies required for the proposed studies is presented. Description of the reactions studied by the Louvain La Neuve group for astrophysical interest is also given. (author). 20 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Upgrading the accelerator facility at Nuclear Science Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, A.; Prakash, P.N.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we first describe what the linac consists of, then give the deliverable beam parameters and highlight some of the technically challenging aspects. At the end some of the possible new experimental facilities are briefly mentioned that would exploit the new range of ion beams effectively. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  6. Compressed beam directed particle nuclear energy generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salisbury, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to the generation of energy from the fusion of atomic nuclei which are caused to travel towards each other along collision courses, orbiting in common paths having common axes and equal radii. High velocity fusible ion beams are directed along head-on circumferential collision paths in an annular zone wherein beam compression by electrostatic focusing greatly enhances head-on fusion-producing collisions. In one embodiment, a steady radial electric field is imposed on the beams to compress the beams and reduce the radius of the spiral paths for enhancing the particle density. Beam compression is achieved through electrostatic focusing to establish and maintain two opposing beams in a reaction zone

  7. Emission of Tc-99 from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxenburger, H.J.; Schuettelkopf, H.; Bohn, B.

    1984-11-01

    No noticeable Tc-activities are emitted from nuclear power stations. The emissions with the gaseous effluents exceed but rarely the detection limit of 25 nCi/h. Likewise, the emission with the liquid effluents remains below the detection limit of about 0.5 nCi/m 3 . Neither can a remarkable emission be recorded from the facilities of the Central Decontamination Services Department (HDB) of KfK. The emissions from the evaporation system for low level solutions and from the evaporation system for low level solutions and from the incineration facility for solid wastes do not exceed or rarely exceed to a minor extent the detection limit of 0.3 pCi/m 3 waste air. Also with the liquid effluents only minor Tc-amounts are discharged of 0.3 nCi/m 3 at the maximum. In the distillate of the medium level solutions discharged from the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant (WAK) to HDB as so-called tritiated water 2 nCi/m 3 Tc-99 at the maximum are contained. Only in the gaseous effluents from the evaporation system for medium level solutions emissions of up to 14 pCi/m 3 can be detected. The detection limits are almost permanently exceeded by the gaseous effluents from WAK. Small amounts of Tc-99 of 7 pCi/m 3 exhaust air at the maximum are released to the environment. However, the amount of Tc accumulated over the sampling period is insignificant from the radioecological point of view. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Final report on DOE nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    Risk analysis policy and guidance should be developed, especially for the non-DOE nuclear facilities. Minimum standards should be set on issues including risk management, the scope and depth of risk analysis (e.g., site-wide analysis, worker risk), and approaches to treatment of external events. Continued vigilance is required in maintaining operation staffing levels at the DOE research and testing reactors. Safety Analysis Reports should be updated to reflect the evolving configurations of the facilities and the current safety analysis requirements. The high-level waste storage programs at Hanford, Savannah River and INEL were evaluated. The Department of Energy has not adopted a cleanup policy with specific, clear objectives. DOE should define the respective roles of Headquarters, the field offices, and the M ampersand O contractors. The proposed budget priority setting system should not be implemented. The plan to develop a nation-wide programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) should be rethought. An environmental impact statement on the total cleanup program is inconsistent with the localized nature of cleanup decisionmaking. DOE must provide for significant improvements in its radiation protection and safety programs to meet current, and future, technical, engineering, and scientific procedures and practices for controlling sources and contamination, performing external and internal dosimetry, and implementing incident response plans, including applicable protective action guides. The culture of safety is not yet well established at Rocky Flats. The philosophy of the Department of Energy and the management of Rocky Flats is not understood, accepted and believed by the work force. The Advisory Committee has serious concerns about whether DOE's current program at WIPP will be able to demonstrate, in a timely manner, compliance with EPA's proposed long-term performance and human intrusion requirements for disposal of TRU and high-level radioactive wastes

  9. Development of beam instruments at JAERI cyclotron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, Susumu; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Ishibori, Ikuo; Agematsu, Takashi; Yokota, Watalu; Nara, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshiteru; Arakawa, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    A beam phase monitor and two kinds of fluence distribution monitors have been developed for measuring characteristics of cyclotron beams. The beam phase monitor provides a beam phase signal for tuning a beam chopping system and a beam phase selection system. A two-dimensional fluence distribution on a large area is measured with fluence distribution monitors. (author)

  10. European Nuclear Decommissioning Training Facility II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demeulemeester, Y.

    2005-01-01

    SCK-CEN co-ordinates a project called European Nuclear Decommissioning Training Facility II (EUNDETRAF II) in the Sixth Framework Programme on Community activities in the field of research, technological development and demonstration for the period 2002 to 2006. This was a continuation of the FP5 project EUNDETRAF. EUNDETRAF II is a consortium of main European decommissioners, such as SCK-CEN, EWN (Energie Werke Nord, Greifswald Germany), Belgatom (Belgium), SOGIN Societa Gestione Impiantio Nucleari, Italy), Universitaet Hannover (Germany), RWE NUKEM (United Kingdom), DECOM Slovakia Slovakia), CEA Centre d'Energie Atomique, France), UKAEA (United Kingdom's Atomic Energy Agency, United Kingdom) and NRG (Nuclear Research and consultancy Group, Netherlands). The primary objective of this project is to bring together this vast skill base and experience; to consolidate it for easy assimilation and to transfer to future generations by organising a comprehensive training programme.Each training course has a one-week theoretical and a one-week practical component. The theoretical part is for a broader audience and consists of lectures covering all the main aspects of a decommissioning. The practical part of the course includes site visits and desk top solutions of anticipated decommissioning problems. Due to operational constraints and safety considerations, the number of participants to this part of the course is strictly limited. The partners intend to organise altogether two two-week EUNDETRAF II training courses over a period of three years. Another goal is to disseminate the existing theory as well as the practical know-how to personnel of the third countries. Finally it is important to bring together the principal decommissioning organisations undertaking various decommissioning activities. The project creates a forum for regular contacts to exchange information and experiences for mutual benefit of these organisations as well as to enhance skill base in Europe to

  11. Modern tornado design of nuclear and other potentially hazardous facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.; Zhao, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Tornado wind loads and other tornado phenomena, including tornado missiles and differential pressure effects, have not usually been considered in the design of conventional industrial, commercial, or residential facilities in the United States; however, tornado resistance has often become a design requirement for certain hazardous facilities, such as large nuclear power plants and nuclear materials and waste storage facilities, as well as large liquefied natural gas storage facilities. This article provides a review of current procedures for the design of hazardous industrial facilities to resist tornado effects. 23 refs., 19 figs., 13 tabs

  12. Remote intelligent nuclear facility monitoring in LabVIEW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucewicz, J.C.; Argo, P.E.; Caffrey, M.; Loveland, R.C.; McNeil, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    A prototype system implemented in LabVIEW for the intelligent monitoring of the movement of radioactive' material within a nuclear facility is presented. The system collects and analyzes radiation sensor and video data to identify suspicious movement of material within the facility. The facility system also transmits wavelet- compressed data to a remote system for concurrent monitoring. 2 refs., 2 figs

  13. The present status of the Daresbury Nuclear Structure Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, R.G.P.

    1983-01-01

    This paper covers the development of the Daresbury Nuclear Structure Facility from 1973 to the present. At that point, the design study had been completed for a tandem to operate initially at 20 MeV and to undergo eventual upgrading to 30 MeV, and a fully costed proposal had been submitted to the Science Research Council. In 1974, planning permission was obtained, and full financial authorization was given to proceed to the 20 MeV stage. The design of the accelerator fell into two areas. The first of these covered those aspects of the design based on known techniques and calculable properties such as the ion beam optics and dynamics and associated equipment. The second area dealt with the less certain design aspects: the behavior of insulators, their protection, the properties of charging mechanisms, accelerator tubes and vacuum systems, and the operation of a computerized control system in a hostile high-voltage environment. This paper describes the research programs and the pilot and test equipment employed to overcome these uncertainties and goes on to discuss a variety of experiments conducted at the present facility

  14. Status of the realization of the neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toigo, Vanni

    2015-01-01

    The ITER Neutral Beam Injectors (NBI) are required to deliver 16.5 MW of additional heating power to the plasma, accelerating negative ions up to -1 MV with a beam current of 40A lasting up to 1 hour. Since these outstanding requirements were never achieved all together so far, the realization of a Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF), called PRIMA, currently under construction in Padova, was launched with the aim to test the operation of the NB injector and to study the relevant physical and technological issues, in advance to the implementation in ITER. Two projects are under development: MITICA and SPIDER. MITICA is a full scale prototype of the ITER NB injector; the design is based on a similar scheme and layout, with the same power supply system and also the control and protection systems are being designed according to the ITER rules and constraints. The HV components are procured by JADA; the low voltage ones and the injector are procured by F4E. SPIDER project is an ion source with the same characteristics of the ITER one, specifically addressed to study the issues related to the RF operation; for this reason, the beam energy is limited to 100keV. It can generate both Hydrogen and Deuterium Ions; the design includes provisions to filter electrons and also to allow the use of cesium to attain the high values of current density required. SPIDER is procured by F4E and INDA. The construction of PRIMA buildings and auxiliaries, started in autumn 2008, was completed in summer 2015. SPIDER plant systems procurement is well advanced and some systems are under installation or site acceptance tests. In 2016 integrated commissioning and power supply integrated tests will be performed followed by the beginning of the first experimental phase. MITICA design was completed; many procurement contracts have been signed or will be launched in the next months. Installation activity will start in December 2015 with the installation of the first HV power supply components provided

  15. PRTR/309 building nuclear facility preliminary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornwell, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    The hazard classification of the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR)/309 building as a ''Radiological Facility'' and the office portions as ''Other Industrial Facility'' are documented by this report. This report provides: a synopsis of the history and facility it's uses; describes major area of the facility; and assesses the radiological conditions for the facility segments. The assessment is conducted using the hazard category threshold values, segmentation methodology, and graded approach guidance of DOE-STD-1027-92

  16. Seismic safety assessment of nuclear facilities other than NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coman, O.; Dragomirescu, A.; Kope, F.; Zemtev, N.

    2003-01-01

    Many research nuclear facilities are much simpler as compared with a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) and the accident scenarios corresponding to an external initiating events and the relevant shutdown paths are much easier to be identified. Therefore, simpler methods than an EE-PSA can be often involved in the evaluation of the overall risk associated to such nuclear facilities in respect to External Event Hazards. (author)

  17. Theme day: corrosion and surface treatments in nuclear facilities. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-02-01

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the theme day organized by the Bourgogne Nuclear Pole on the topic of corrosion and surface treatments in nuclear facilities. Eleven presentations (slides) are compiled in this document: 1 - Introduction - PNB centre of competitiveness and R and D activities (A. Mantovan, PNB); 2 - Corrosion damage (M. Foucault, Areva NP - Centre Technique Le Creusot); 3 - Corrosion mechanisms (R. Oltra, UB-ICB); 4 - Examples of expertise management (C. Duret-Thual, Institut de la corrosion/Corrosion Institute); 5 - General framework of surface treatments (C. Nouveau, ENSAM Cluny Paris Tech); 6 - Surfaces et interfaces characterisation - Part A (C. Langlade, Y. Gachon, UTBM and HEF); 7 - Surfaces et interfaces characterisation - Part B (C. Langlade, Y. Gachon, UTBM and HEF); 8 - Ion beam surface treatment (Y. Le Guellec, Quertech Ingenierie); 9 - Impact surface treatment (G. Saout, Sonats); 10 - Metal oxides Characterisation by US laser (R. Oltra, UB-ICB); 11 - Detection and Characterisation of intergranular corrosion (Y. Kernin, Stephane Bourgois, Areva Intercontrole)

  18. Environmental radiation monitoring around the nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.D.; Lee, Y.B.; Lee, W.Y.; Park, D.W.; Chung, B.G.

    1980-01-01

    For the KAERI site, various environmental samples were collected three times a month, and the natural environmental radiation levels were also measured at each sampling point. Measurements for gross alpha and beta radioactivities of the samples were routinely measured for all samples. Strontium-90 concentrations were also analysed for the fallout and air samples collected daily basis on the roof of the main building. Accumulated exposure including the possibility of determination of low level environmental radiation field by employing thermoluminescent dosimeter, CaSO 4 : Dsub(y)-0.4 teflon disc type, at 6 posts in on-site of the KAERI. As for Kori site, at 19 points of ON, OFF-site, and at the same time the environmental radiation exposure rate at each sampling point were measured. Several environmental samples such as surface soil, pine needles, water samples, milk sample and pasture samples were collected and analysed on a quarterly basis. As a result of the survey it can be said that no significant release of radiation to the environment due to the operations of nuclear facilities including research reactor at the KAERI and power reactor at the Kori has been found during the period of the survey and monitoring. (author)

  19. Water intaking facility of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Kazuhito; Iwata, Nobukatsu; Ochiai, Kanehiro.

    1994-01-01

    In a water intaking facility of a nuclear power plant, a dam is disposed at a position near a sea shore for preventing sea water introduced in open conduit from flowing to the outer sea upon ebbing of tsunamis. The upper end of the dam is set lower than the lower end of a water-intake pipe of a sea water pump of an ordinary system. A water-intake pipe is disposed to such a length that a sea water pump of an emergency system continues to suck the sea water when the water level of the introduced sea water is lowered than the upper end of the dam during the ebb tide. In addition, a means for stopping the operation of the sea water pump of the ordinary system upon starting of the ebb is disposed. Upon reactor scram for occurrence of earthquakes and the like, either the sea water pump in the ordinary system or the seawater pump in the emergency system operates to ensure required amount of sea water for cooling the reactor. In addition, even if the level of the sea water is lowered than the upper end of the dam, since the sea water pump in the emergency system continues to suck sea water, unnecessary suction for sea water by the ordinary sea water pumps can be eliminated. (N.H.)

  20. Optimization of the irradiation beam in the BNCT research facility at IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Vinicius Alexandre de

    2014-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapeutic technique for the treatment of some types of cancer whose useful energy comes from a nuclear reaction that occurs when thermal neutron impinges upon a Boron-10 atom. In Brazil there is a research facility built along the beam hole number 3 of the IEA-R1 research reactor at IPEN, which was designed to perform BNCT research experiments. For a good performance of the technique, the irradiation beam should be mostly composed of thermal neutrons with a minimum as possible gamma and above thermal neutron components. This work aims to monitor and evaluate the irradiation beam on the sample irradiation position through the use of activation detectors (activation foils) and also to propose, through simulation using the radiation transport code, MCNP, new sets of moderators and filters which shall deliver better irradiation fields at the irradiation sample position In this work, a simulation methodology, based on a MCNP card, known as wwg (weight window generation) was studied, and the neutron energy spectrum has been experimentally discriminated at 5 energy ranges by using a new set o activation foils. It also has been concluded that the BNCT research facility has the required thermal neutron flux to perform studies in the area and it has a great potential for improvement for tailoring the irradiation field. (author)

  1. Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) approach to nuclear facility maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina is a 300+ square mile facility owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), the prime contractor; Bechtel Savannah River, Incorporated (BSRI) is a major subcontractor. The site has used all of the five nuclear reactors and it has the necessary nuclear materials processing facilities, as well as waste management and research facilities. The site has produced materials for the US nuclear arsenal and various isotopes for use in space research and nuclear medicine for more than 30 years. In 1989, WSRC took over as prime contractor, replacing E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. At this time, a concentrated effort began to more closely align the operating standards of this site with those accepted by the commercial nuclear industry of the United States. Generally, this meant acceptance of standards of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) for nuclear-related facilities at the site. The subject of this paper is maintenance of nuclear facilities and, therefore, excludes discussion of the maintenance of non-nuclear facilities and equipment

  2. Regulatory control of nuclear facility valves and their actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The methods and procedures by which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) regulates valves and their actuators in nuclear power plants and in other nuclear facilities are specified in the guide. The scope of regulation depends on the Safety Class of the valve and the actuator in question. The Safety Classification principles for the systems, structures and components of the nuclear power plants are described in the guide YVL 2.1 and the regulatory control of the nuclear facility safety valves is described in the guide YVL 5.4

  3. Report on operation of nuclear facilities in Slovenia in 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) is responsible for: nuclear safety, transport of nuclear and radioactive materials, safeguarding nuclear materials, and conducting regulatory process related to liability for nuclear damage, qualification and training of operators at nuclear facilities, quality assurance and inspection of nuclear facilities. The major nuclear facility supervised by SNSA is the Nuclear Power Plant in Krsko with a pressurized water reactor of 632 MW electric power. Beside the nuclear power plant, TRIGA Mark 11 Research Reactor of 250 kW thermal power operates within the Reactor Center of Jozef Stefan Institute. There is an interim storage of low and medium radioactive waste at the Reactor Center. Also the Uranium mine Zirovski Vrh was supervised by SNSA. All the nuclear power facilities in Republic of Slovenia were operating safely in 1991. There were no significant events that could be evaluated as a safety problem or a breach of technical specifications. A great part of activities of SNSA was focused on the next visit of the IAEA OSART team (Operational Safety Assessment Review Team) in Krsko Nuclear Power Plant and on the visit of the INSARR mission (Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors) for the TRIGA Mark 11 Research Reactor. (author)

  4. Data bank for nuclear-physical studies in educational facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boboshin, I.N.; Varlamov, V.V.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Kapitonov, I.M.; Lenskaya, N.A.; Surgutanov, V.V.; Khoronenko, A.A.; Chernyaev, A.P.

    1986-01-01

    Purposes and tasks of nuclear data Centers of the USSR Ministry of Education are discussed in short. Files of both bibliographic and factographic nuclear-physical data widely used with the Centres to provide the state organizations and scientists, first of all educational facilities, with nuclear data to increase effectiveness of fundamental and applied investigations and educational process are described

  5. Multi-beam Mossbauer scattering facility. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Mossbauer instrument construction which was financed by the DOE grant of $74,065 and MU matching funds of $52,000 is essentially completed and awaiting installation at the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) facility. All of the DOE funds have been spent and all of the matching funds plus about $4,000 to $5,000 of additional physics department funds have been committed to finishing the first phase of the new instrument, QUEGS--II (for QUAsiElastic Gamma-ray Scattering--generation II). This phase includes computer controls, detectors, and instrumentation for two of the four beam lines afforded by QUEGS-II. Included in this commitment of funds is $8,700 for equipment and machine shop services which have not yet been paid and $19,700 for a Ge detector for which bids are ready to be let

  6. Experimental support at proton--proton colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, K.

    1977-01-01

    Proton--proton colliding beam facilities have a number of special features which increase the importance of support for experiments when compared to fixed target accelerators: (1) the laboratory system is very close to the center-of-mass system; this affects the geometry and general size of the experiments; (2) the primary p--p interaction is inaccessible, that is, it takes place in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber; and (3) the experiment detection system is necessarily inside the machine structure and becomes very closely linked to it in many respects. An overall picture is given of experimental support based on experience at the CERN ISR under the following headings: Experimental Areas, Scheduling, Intersection Vacuum Chambers, Machine Background, and Magnets for Experiments. The first two of these topics concern the requirements in space and time of an experiment, while the last three are all related to the close interaction between experiment and machine

  7. High resolution muon computed tomography at neutrino beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suerfu, B.; Tully, C.G.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pion decay pipe at a neutrino beam facility and what can be achieved for momentum resolution in a muon spectrometer. Such an imaging system can be applied in archaeology, art history, engineering, material identification and whenever there is a need to image inside a transportable object constructed of dense materials

  8. Electron beam welding: study of process capabilities and limitations towards development of nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vadolia, Gautam; Singh, Kongkham Premjit

    2015-01-01

    Electron beam (EB) welding technology is an established and widely adopted technique in nuclear research and development area. Electron Beam welding is thought of as a candidate process for ITER Vacuum Vessel Fabrication. Dhruva Reactor @ BARC, Mumbai and Niobium Superconducting accelerator Cavitity @ BARC has adopted the EB welding technique as a fabrication route. The highly concentrated energy input of the electron beam has added the advantages over the conventional welding as being less HAZ and provided smooth and clean surface. EB Welding has also been used for the joining of various reactive and refractory materials. EB system as heat source has also been used for vacuum brazing application. The Welding Institute (TWI) has demonstrated that EBW is potentially suitable to produce high integrity joints in 50 mm pure copper. TWI has also examined 150 kV Reduced Pressure Electron Beam (RPEB) gun in welding 140 mm and 147 mm thickness Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (SA 508 grade). EBW in 10 mm thick SS316 plates were studied at IPR and results were encouraging. In this paper, the pros and cons and role of electron beam process will be studied to analyze the importance of electron beam welding in nuclear components fabrication. Importance of establishing the high precision Wire Electro Discharge Machining (WEDM) facility will also be discussed. (author)

  9. Recent optimization of the beam-optical characteristics of the 6 MV van de Graaff accelerator for high brightness beams at the iThemba LABS NMP facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradie, J. L.; Eisa, M. E. M.; Celliers, P. J.; Delsink, J. L. G.; Fourie, D. T.; de Villiers, J. G.; Maine, P. M.; Springhorn, K. A.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.

    2005-04-01

    With the aim of improving the reliability and stability of the beams delivered to the nuclear microprobe at iThemba LABS, as well as optimization of the beam characteristics along the van de Graaff accelerator beamlines in general, relevant modifications were implemented since the beginning of 2003. The design and layout of the beamlines were revised. The beam-optical characteristics through the accelerator, from the ion source up to the analysing magnet directly after the accelerator, were calculated and the design optimised, using the computer codes TRANSPORT, IGUN and TOSCA. The ion source characteristics and optimal operating conditions were determined on an ion source test bench. The measured optimal emittance for 90% of the beam intensity was about 50π mm mrad for an extraction voltage of 6 kV. These changes allow operation of the Nuclear Microprobe at proton energies in the range 1 MeV-4 MeV with beam intensities of tenths of a pA at the target surface. The capabilities of the nuclear microprobe facility were evaluated in the improved beamline, with particular emphasis to bio-medical samples.

  10. Recent optimization of the beam-optical characteristics of the 6 MV van de Graaff accelerator for high brightness beams at the iThemba LABS NMP facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conradie, J.L.; Eisa, M.E.M.; Celliers, P.J.; Delsink, J.L.G.; Fourie, D.T.; Villiers, J.G. de; Maine, P.M.; Springhorn, K.A.; Pineda-Vargas, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    With the aim of improving the reliability and stability of the beams delivered to the nuclear microprobe at iThemba LABS, as well as optimization of the beam characteristics along the van de Graaff accelerator beamlines in general, relevant modifications were implemented since the beginning of 2003. The design and layout of the beamlines were revised. The beam-optical characteristics through the accelerator, from the ion source up to the analysing magnet directly after the accelerator, were calculated and the design optimised, using the computer codes TRANSPORT, IGUN and TOSCA. The ion source characteristics and optimal operating conditions were determined on an ion source test bench. The measured optimal emittance for 90% of the beam intensity was about 50π mm mrad for an extraction voltage of 6 kV. These changes allow operation of the Nuclear Microprobe at proton energies in the range 1 MeV-4 MeV with beam intensities of tenths of a pA at the target surface. The capabilities of the nuclear microprobe facility were evaluated in the improved beamline, with particular emphasis to bio-medical samples

  11. Childhood leukemia around five nuclear facilities in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elaguppillai, V.

    1992-05-01

    As a result of public concern over the incidence of leukemia around the Sellafield nuclear fuel reprocessing plant, the Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board commissioned a study to test for similar clustering around licensed nuclear facilities in Ontario. In this study the incidence and mortality of leukemia among children up to the age of 14 years born within a radius of about 25 km from five different types of facilities were compared to the provincial average. The facilities considered were the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, the Bruce Nuclear Power Development, the uranium conversion facility at Port Hope, the uranium mine and mill facilities in Elliot Lake, and the Chalk River Laboratories. The ratio of observed to expected childhood leukemias was around unity at the 95 percent confidence level, indicating that the occurrence of the disease is not significantly different from the provincial average. The sample size is not large enough to distinguish between a change occurrence and a true excess or deficit. (table)

  12. STACY and TRACY: nuclear criticality experimental facilities under construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, I.; Takeshita, I.; Yanagisawa, H.; Tsujino, T.

    1992-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is constructing a Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility, NUCEF, where the following research themes essential for evaluating safety problems relating to back-end technology in nuclear fuel cycle facilities will be studied: nuclear criticality safety research; research on advanced reprocessing processes and partitioning; and research on transuranic waste treatment and disposal. To perform nuclear criticality safety research related to the reprocessing of light water reactor spent fuels, two criticality experimental facilities, STACY and TRACY, are under construction. STACY (Static Criticality Facility) will be used for the study of criticality conditions of solution fuels, uranium, plutonium and their mixtures. TRACY (Transient Criticality Facility) will be used to investigate criticality accident phenomena with uranium solutions. The construction progress and experimental programmes are described in this Paper. (author)

  13. A Study on the Ion Beam Extraction using Duo-PiGatron Ion source for Vertical Type Ion Beam Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bom Sok; Lee, Chan young; Lee, Jae Sang [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC), we have started ion beam service in the new beam utilization building since March this year. For various ion beam irradiation services, we are developed implanters such as metal (150keV/1mA), gaseous (200keV/5mA) and high current ion beam facility (20keV/150mA). One of the new one is a vertical type ion beam facility without acceleration tube (60keV/20mA) which is easy to install the sample. After the installation is complete, it is where you are studying the optimal ion beam extraction process. Detailed experimental results will be presented. Vertical Type Ion Beam Facility without acceleration tube of 60keV 20mA class was installed. We successfully extracted 60keV 20mA using Duo- PiGatron Ion source for Vertical Type Ion Beam Facility. Use the BPM and Faraday-cup, is being studied the optimum conditions of ion beam extraction.

  14. Research and test facilities required in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Experimental facilities are essential research tools both for the development of nuclear science and technology and for testing systems and materials which are currently being used or will be used in the future. As a result of economic pressures and the closure of older facilities, there are concerns that the ability to undertake the research necessary to maintain and to develop nuclear science and technology may be in jeopardy. An NEA expert group with representation from ten member countries, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the European Commission has reviewed the status of those research and test facilities of interest to the NEA Nuclear Science Committee. They include facilities relating to nuclear data measurement, reactor development, neutron scattering, neutron radiography, accelerator-driven systems, transmutation, nuclear fuel, materials, safety, radiochemistry, partitioning and nuclear process heat for hydrogen production. This report contains the expert group's detailed assessment of the current status of these nuclear research facilities and makes recommendations on how future developments in the field can be secured through the provision of high-quality, modern facilities. It also describes the online database which has been established by the expert group which includes more than 700 facilities. (authors)

  15. General problems specific to hot nuclear materials research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bart, G.

    1996-01-01

    During the sixties, governments have installed hot nuclear materials research facilities to characterize highly radioactive materials, to describe their in-pile behaviour, to develop and test new reactor core components, and to provide the industry with radioisotopes. Since then, the attitude towards the nuclear option has drastically changed and resources have become very tight. Within the changed political environment, the national research centres have defined new objectives. Given budgetary constraints, nuclear facilities have to co-operate internationally and to look for third party research assignments. The paper discusses the problems and needs within experimental nuclear research facilities as well as industrial requirements. Special emphasis is on cultural topics (definition of the scope of nuclear research facilities, the search for competitive advantages, and operational requirements), social aspects (overageing of personnel, recruitment, and training of new staff), safety related administrative and technical issues, and research needs for expertise and state of the art analytical infrastructure

  16. Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Air Force facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, David F.

    The Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program is an initiative within the US Air Force to acquire and validate advanced technologies that could be used to sustain superior capabilities in the area or space nuclear propulsion. The SNTP Program has a specific objective of demonstrating the feasibility of the particle bed reactor (PBR) concept. The term PIPET refers to a project within the SNTP Program responsible for the design, development, construction, and operation of a test reactor facility, including all support systems, that is intended to resolve program technology issues and test goals. A nuclear test facility has been designed that meets SNTP Facility requirements. The design approach taken to meet SNTP requirements has resulted in a nuclear test facility that should encompass a wide range of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) test requirements that may be generated within other programs. The SNTP PIPET project is actively working with DOE and NASA to assess this possibility.

  17. Materials science and biophysics applications at the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, U., E-mail: uwahl@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-12-15

    The ISOLDE isotope separator facility at CERN provides a variety of radioactive ion beams, currently more than 800 different isotopes from {approx}70 chemical elements. The radioisotopes are produced on-line by nuclear reactions from a 1.4 GeV proton beam with various types of targets, outdiffusion of the reaction products and, if possible, chemically selective ionisation, followed by 60 kV acceleration and mass separation. While ISOLDE is mainly used for nuclear and atomic physics studies, applications in materials science and biophysics account for a significant part (currently {approx}15%) of the delivered beam time, requested by 18 different experiments. The ISOLDE materials science and biophysics community currently consists of {approx}80 scientists from more than 40 participating institutes and 21 countries. In the field of materials science, investigations focus on the study of semiconductors and oxides, with the recent additions of nanoparticles and metals, while the biophysics studies address the toxicity of metal ions in biological systems. The characterisation methods used are typical radioactive probe techniques such as Moessbauer spectroscopy, perturbed angular correlation, emission channeling, and tracer diffusion studies. In addition to these 'classic' methods of nuclear solid state physics, also standard semiconductor analysis techniques such as photoluminescence or deep level transient spectroscopy profit from the application of radioactive isotopes, which helps them to overcome their chemical 'blindness' since the nuclear half life of radioisotopes provides a signal that changes in time with characteristic exponential decay or saturation curves. In this presentation an overview will be given on the recent research activities in materials science and biophysics at ISOLDE, presenting some of the highlights during the last five years, together with a short outlook on the new developments under way.

  18. High energy nuclear beams at Berkeley: present and future possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    The primary goal of the Bevalac research program continues to be the study of nuclear matter at extreme conditions of temperature and baryon density while still addressing more conventional aspects of nuclear physics. Future plans are for a colliding beam machine in the energy range of 20 GeV/n. The conceptual design and basin requirements for such a relativistic nuclear collider (RNC) are outlined. In addition the central physics themes to be addressed by an RNC are briefly discussed

  19. Criteria, standards and policies regarding decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detilleux, E.; Lennemann, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    At the end of this century, there will probably be around 2500 operating nuclear power reactors, along with all the other nuclear fuel cycle facilities supporting their operation. Eventually these facilities, one by one, will be shut down and it will be necessary to dispose of them as with any redundant industrial facility or plant. Some parts of a nuclear fuel cycle facility can be dismantled by conventional methods, but those parts which have become contaminated with radioactive nuclear products or induced radioactivity must be subject to rigid controls and restrictions and handled by special dismantling and disposal procedures. In many cases, the resulting quantity of radioactive waste is likely to be relatively large and dismantling quite costly. Decommissioning nuclear facilities is a multifaceted problem involving planners, design engineers, operators, waste managers and regulatory authorities. Preparation for decommissioning should begin as early as site selection and plant design. The corner stone for the preparation of a decommissioning programme is the definition of its extent, meeting the requirements for public and environmental protection during the period that the radioactive material is of concern. The paper discusses the decontamination and decommissioning experience at the Eurochemic fuel reprocessing plant, the implications and the knowledge gained from this experience. It includes the results of technical reviews made by the Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD and the International Atomic Energy Agency regarding decommissioning nuclear facilities. The paper notes the special planning that should be arranged between those responsible for the nuclear facility and competent public authorities who should jointly make a realistic determination of the eventual disposition of the nuclear facility, even before it is built. Recommendations cover the responsibilities of nuclear plant entrepreneurs, designers, operators, and public and regulatory authorities

  20. Status of neutron beam utilization at the Dalat nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dien, Nguyen Nhi; Hai, Nguyen Canh

    2003-01-01

    The 500-kW Dalat nuclear research reactor was reconstructed from the USA-made 250-kW TRIGA Mark II reactor. After completion of renovation and upgrading, the reactor has been operating at its nominal power since 1984. The reactor is used mainly for radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, neutron beam researches and reactor physics study. In the framework of the reconstruction and renovation project of the 1982-1984 period, the reactor core, the control and instrumentation system, the primary and secondary cooling systems, as well as other associated systems were newly designed and installed by the former Soviet Union. Some structures of the reactor, such as the reactor aluminum tank, the graphite reflector, the thermal column, horizontal beam tubes and the radiation concrete shielding have been remained from the previous TRIGA reactor. As a typical configuration of the TRIGA reactor, there are four neutron beam ports, including three radial and one tangential. Besides, there is a large thermal column. Until now only two-neutron beam ports and the thermal column have been utilized. Effective utilization of horizontal experimental channels is one of the important research objectives at the Dalat reactor. The research program on effective utilization of these experimental channels was conducted from 1984. For this purpose, investigations on physical characteristics of the reactor, neutron spectra and fluxes at these channels, safety conditions in their exploitation, etc. have been carried out. The neutron beams, however, have been used only since 1988. The filtered thermal neutron beams at the tangential channel have been extracted using a single crystal silicon filter and mainly used for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), neutron radiography (NR) and transmission experiments (TE). The filtered quasi-monoenergetic keV neutron beams using neutron filters at the piercing channel have been used for nuclear data measurements, study on

  1. Ground test facility for nuclear testing of space reactor subsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quapp, W.J.; Watts, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    Two major reactor facilities at the INEL have been identified as easily adaptable for supporting the nuclear testing of the SP-100 reactor subsystem. They are the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) and the Loss of Fluid Test Reactor (LOFT). In addition, there are machine shops, analytical laboratories, hot cells, and the supporting services (fire protection, safety, security, medical, waste management, etc.) necessary to conducting a nuclear test program. This paper presents the conceptual approach for modifying these reactor facilities for the ground engineering test facility for the SP-100 nuclear subsystem. 4 figs

  2. Design aspects of radiological safety in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patkulkar, D.S.; Purohit, R.G.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    In order to keep operational performance of a nuclear facility high and to keep occupational and public exposure ALARA, radiological safety provisions must be reviewed at the time of facility design. Deficiency in design culminates in deteriorated system performance and non adherence to safety standards and could sometimes result in radiological incident. Important radiological aspects relevant to safety were compiled based on operating experiences, design deficiencies brought out from past nuclear incidents, experience gained during maintenance, participation in design review of upcoming nuclear facilities and radiological emergency preparedness

  3. Training of nuclear facility personnel: boon or boondoggle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remick, F.J.

    1975-01-01

    The training of nuclear facility personnel has been a requirement of the reactor licensing process for over two decades. However, the training of nuclear facility personnel remains a combination of boon and boondoggle. The opportunity to develop elite, well trained, professionally aggressive reactor operation staffs is not being realized to its full potential. Improvements in the selection of personnel, training programs, operational tools and professional pride can result in improved plant operation and contribute to improved plant capacity factors. Industry, regulatory agencies, professional societies and universities can do much to improve standards and quality of the training of nuclear facility personnel and to improve the professional level of plant operation

  4. History of health studies around nuclear facilities: a methodologival consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuhata, G.K.; Smith, M.W.

    1981-01-01

    A brief historical review was made of low-level radiation studies for general populations living around nuclear facilities. In addition, technical and methodological problems were identified and discussed which often arise in all epidemiological studies designed to determine the possible health effects of low-level radiation released from nuclear facilities. Need for extremely large populations for prospective cancer studies was discussed, but accompanying ascertainment difficulties were also emphasized. More epidemiological studies are needed to provide adequate assessment of the potential health hazards of nuclear facilities

  5. Increased nuclear safety and reliability through power beaming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coomes, E.P.; Widrig, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Space satellites and platforms currently include self-contained power systems to supply the energy necessary to accomplish mission objectives. With power beaming, the power system is separate from the satellite and the two are connected by an energy beam. This approach is analogous to earth-based central station power generation and distribution over transmission lines to various customers. In space, power is produced by power satellites (central power generating stations) and transmitted via energy beams to individual users. Power beaming has the ability to provide an order of magnitude increase in power availability over solar-based power systems with less mass on orbit. The technologies needed for power beaming are being developed today under existing programs directed by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the US Department of Energy. A space power architecture based on power beaming would greatly increase the safety and reliability of employing nuclear power in space

  6. Criteria, standards and policies regarding decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detilleux, E.; Lennemann, W.

    1977-01-01

    The paper discusses the decontamination and decommissioning experiences encountered at the Eurochemic fuel reprocessing plant, their implications and the knowledge gained from these experiences. It includes the results of technical reviews made by the Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD and the International Atomic Energy Agency regarding decommissioning nuclear facilities. The conlusions which are presented should weigh heavily in the considerations of the national authorities involved in regulating nuclear power programmes. The paper notes the special planning that should be arranged between those responsible for the nuclear facility and competent public authorities who jointly should make a realistic determination of the eventual disposition of the nuclear facility, even before it is built. Recommendations cover the responsibilities of nuclear plant entrepreneurs, designers, operators, and public and regulatory authorities [fr

  7. Nuclear and particle physics with inverse compton γ-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Mamoru

    2004-01-01

    A new facility for GeV γ-ray beams in the energy range of 1.5 - 2.4 GeV is now used to develop hadron physics, and lead to an important finding of ''Penta-quark'' hadron, Θ + particle at 1540 MeV. The experimental results to observe φ and K + mesons guide us to a new look of quark dynamics with strangeness quarks. A beam line for MeV γ-rays is discussed in view of the observation of the parity violation due to the weak-strong coupling in nuclear medium. (author)

  8. Beneficial Re-use of Decommissioned Former Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.

    1997-01-01

    With the decision to decommission a nuclear facility, it is necessary to evaluate whether to fully demolish a facility or to re-use the facility in some capacity. This evaluation is often primarily driven by both the past mission of the site and the facility and the site's perceived future mission. In the case where the facility to be decommissioned is located within a large research or industrial complex and represents a significant resource to the site's future mission, it may be a perfect candidate to be re-used in some fashion. However, if the site is a rather remote older facility with little chance of being modified to today's standards for its re-use, the chances for its re-use will be substantially reduced. In this presentation, some specific cases of former nuclear facilities being decommissioned and re-used will be reviewed and some factors required to be considered in making this decision will be reviewed

  9. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities: Decontamination, disassembly and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The term 'decommissioning', as used within the nuclear industry, means the actions taken at the end of a facility's useful life to retire the facility from service in a manner that provides adequate protection for the health and safety of the decommissioning workers, the general public, and for the environment. These actions can range from merely closing down the facility and a minimal removal of radioactive material coupled with continuing maintenance and surveillance, to a complete removal of residual radioactivity in excess of levels acceptable for unrestricted use of the facility and its site. This latter condition, unrestricted use, is the ultimate goal of all decommissioning actions at retired nuclear facilities. The purpose of this report is to provide an information base on the considerations important to decommissioning, the methods available for decontamination and disassembly of a nuclear facility, the management of the resulting radioactive wastes, and the areas of decommissioning methodology where improvements might be made. Specific sections are devoted to each of these topics, and conclusions are presented concerning the present status of each topic. A summary of past decommissioning experience in Member States is presented in the Appendix. The report, with its discussions of necessary considerations, available operational methods, and waste management practices, together with supporting references, provides an appreciation of the activities that comprise decommissioning of nuclear facilities. It is anticipated that the information presented in the report should prove useful to persons concerned with the development of plans for the decommissioning of retired nuclear facilities

  10. Supervision of the safety culture in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-11-01

    This brochure issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate ENSI reports on safety culture aspects in nuclear facilities and ENSI’s activities as a supervisory instance. ENSI is the independent supervisory authority for the nuclear sector in Switzerland. A definition of safety culture is presented and the development of the concepts used in its monitoring are discussed. The main attributes of a good safety culture are discussed. Further, the conceptual basics and principles of such monitoring are looked at and the methods used for the supervision of safety culture in nuclear facilities are described

  11. Nuclear Science: a survey of funding, facilities, and manpower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    In 1973 the Committee on Nuclear Science of the National Research Council initiated a re-examination of aspects (funding, manpower, and facilities) of the organization and operation of nuclear science research in order to evaluate any changes in the preceding four years and implications of such changes. The reports of the three ad hoc panels established for this purpose (funding and level of effort, nuclear facilities, manpower and education) are presented. Although they identify current problems in nuclear science, these reports do not provide simple solutions; rather, they attempt to provide updated information for use as background for continuing decisions

  12. Astrophysical r- and rp-processes, and radioactive nuclear beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, Richard N.

    1998-01-01

    The modern description of the r-process follows naturally from α-rich freezeout, thought to occur in the hot neutrino wind just beyond the nascent neutron star in a type II supernova. Initially, all pre-existing nuclei are reduced to α-particles and neutrons. As the environment cools, nuclei up to about mass 90 to 100 u are synthesized, in nuclear statistical equilibrium, in about 1 s. In the next few seconds, the remaining neutrons are captured to form the r-process progenitors, which then decay to the r-process nuclides. The rp-process occurs in a high-temperature H-rich environment. It is one of the processes that synthesize the p-process nuclei, the most neutron-poor nuclei in the periodic table. It is thought to occur during the explosion of a C-O white dwarf in a type Ia supernova or in a binary system during accretion onto a white dwarf or a neutron star. It appears to be capable of forming the p-nuclei up to about mass 90 u. Both processes pass through nuclei that are far from stability. Thus, their description requires the masses, half-lives, decay modes, and structure of these nuclei. The next generation of radioactive beam facilities promises to allow the study of many such nuclei. (author)

  13. A GIF++ Gamma Irradiation Facility at the SPS H4 Beam Line

    CERN Document Server

    Capéans-Garrido, M; Linssen, L; Moll, M; Rembser, C

    2009-01-01

    The current document describes a proposal to implement a new gamma irradiation facility, combined with a high-energy particle beam in the SPS H4 beam line in hall EHN1. This new GIF++ facility is motivated by strong needs from the LHC and sLHC detector and accelerator communities for the tests of LHC components and systems.

  14. Measurement of nuclear cross sections using radioactive beams; Medicion de secciones eficaces nucleares usando haces radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizcano, D.; Aguilera, E.F.; Martinez Q, E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    One of the main applications of the production and use of nuclear radioactive beams is the measurement of nuclear cross sections. In this work is used a {sup 6} He nuclear radioactive beam ({beta} emitting with half life 806.7 ms) for the study of the reaction {sup 6} + {sup 209} Bi which could have several products. This investigation was realized in collaboration with the personnel of the Nuclear Structure laboratory at the University of Notre Dame (U.S.A.) and the National institute of Nuclear Research and CONACyT by Mexico. (Author)

  15. Experimental Program for the CLIC test facility 3 test beam line

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Dobert, S; Olvegaard, M; Schulte, D; Syratchev, I; Lillestol, Reidar

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility 3 Test Beam Line is the first prototype for the CLIC drive beam decelerator. Stable transport of the drive beam under deceleration is a mandatory component in the CLIC two-beam scheme. In the Test Beam Line more than 50% of the total energy will be extracted from a 150 MeV, 28 A electron drive beam, by the use of 16 power extraction and transfer structures. A number of experiments are foreseen to investigate the drive beam characteristics under deceleration in the Test Beam Line, including beam stability, beam blow up and the efficiency of the power extraction. General benchmarking of decelerator simulation and theory studies will also be performed. Specially designed instrumentation including precision BPMs, loss monitors and a time-resolved spectrometer dump will be used for the experiments. This paper describes the experimental program foreseen for the Test Beam Line, including the relevance of the results for the CLIC decelerator studies.

  16. Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities: a literature search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sande, W.E.; Freeman, H.D.; Hanson, M.S.; McKeever, R.

    1975-05-01

    is bibliography includes 429 unclassified references to the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The references are arranged in chronological order and cover the period from 1944 through 1974. Subject and author indexes are e provided. (U.S.)

  17. Ensuring the safety of nuclear facilities located in large cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazantsev, E.P.; Kolyadin, V.I.; Bylkin, B.K.; Zverkov, Yu.A.

    2002-01-01

    The problems of ensuring the safety of nuclear facilities and other facilities representing a radiation hazard (hereinafter referred to as 'nuclear facilities') which are located in large cities are considered in the light of the experience with the 'Kurchatov Institute' Russian Research Centre. The accumulation of substantial quantities of spent nuclear fuel and radwaste at the Centre was an inevitable consequence of the military and civilian nuclear research programmes which started there in 1943. A comprehensive programme has been developed for reducing the impact of ionizing radiation on the Centre's personnel, the population living near the Centre and the local environment. The authors describe the basic elements of a programme for decommissioning reactor facilities and eliminating spent fuel and radwaste storage sites and also describe how the programme is progressing. (author)

  18. Trend of development of robots for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Hideo; Sasaki, Masayoshi

    1984-01-01

    Robot technology becomes more and more important in the field of atomic energy industries. Hitachi Ltd. has energetically engaged in the development of the robot technology for nuclear facilities, recognizing these situations. The course of the development of robot technology and the robots for nuclear facilities is described. As the practical examples of the robots for nuclear facilities, there have been automatic fuel exchangers, the remotely operated automatic exchangers for control rod driving mechanism, automatic and semi-automatic ultrasonic flaw detectors and so on. As the robots for nuclear facilities under development, control rod driving mechanism disassembling and cleaning system, the volume reduction device for spent fuel channel boxes and control rods and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  19. Childhood leukaemia around Canadian nuclear facilities. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, E.A.; McLaughlin, J.; Anderson, T.W.

    1989-05-01

    A ninefold excess risk of leukaemia, as observed in vicinity of the Sellafield facility, was not observed amongst children born to mothers residing in the areas around nuclear research facilities and uranium mining, milling and refining facilities in Ontario. In the vicinity of nuclear research facilities, the rate of leukaemia was, in fact, less than expected. In the areas around the uranium mining, milling and refining facilities; leukaemia occurred slightly more frequently than expected; however, due to small frequencies these results may have risen by chance. A slightly greater than expected occurrence of leukaemia was also detected, which may well have been due to chance, in an exploratory study of the areas around nuclear power generating stations in Ontario

  20. Regulatory system for control of nuclear facilities in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollah, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    All human activities have associated risks. Nuclear programme is no exception. The Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC), constituted in February 1973 through the promulgation of the Presidential order 15 of 1973. Functions of BAEC include research and development in peaceful application of atomic energy, generation of electricity and promotion of international relations congenial to implementation of its programmes and projects. In 1993 the Government of Bangladesh promulgated the law on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control. Considering the human resources, expertise and facilities needed for implementation of the provisions of the NSRC law, BAEC was entrusted with the responsibility to enforce it. The responsibilities of the BAEC cover nuclear and radiological safety within the installations of BAEC and radiological safety in the manifold applications of radioisotopes and radiation sources within the country. An adequate and competent infrastructure has been built to cater to the diverse nuclear and radiation protection requirements of all nuclear facilities in Bangladesh, arising at different stages from site selection to day-to-day operation. In addition, periodic inspections of the nuclear facilities are carried out. The licensing and regulatory inspection systems for controlling of nuclear installations and radiation sources are established. The paper describes the legal provisions, responsibilities and organization of BAEC with special emphasis on nuclear safety and radiation protection of nuclear facilities in Bangladesh. (author)

  1. CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] design overview and project status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leemann, C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and specifications of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. Beam performance objectives are discussed, as well as the recirculating linac concept, the injector, cavities, cryogenic system, beam transport and optics, rf system and construction progress. 19 refs., 10 figs

  2. INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

    2011-07-18

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  3. Development of simplified decommissioning cost estimation code for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Mitsuo; Shiraishi, Kunio; Ishigami, Tsutomu

    2010-01-01

    The simplified decommissioning cost estimation code for nuclear facilities (DECOST code) was developed in consideration of features and structures of nuclear facilities and similarity of dismantling methods. The DECOST code could calculate 8 evaluation items of decommissioning cost. Actual dismantling in the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was evaluated; unit conversion factors used to calculate the manpower of dismantling activities were evaluated. Consequently, unit conversion factors of general components could be classified into three kinds. Weights of components and structures of the facility were necessary for calculation of manpower. Methods for evaluating weights of components and structures of the facility were studied. Consequently, the weight of components in the facility was proportional to the weight of structures of the facility. The weight of structures of the facility was proportional to the total area of floors in the facility. Decommissioning costs of 7 nuclear facilities in the JAEA were calculated by using the DECOST code. To verify the calculated results, the calculated manpower was compared with the manpower gained from actual dismantling. Consequently, the calculated manpower and actual manpower were almost equal. The outline of the DECOST code, evaluation results of unit conversion factors, the evaluation method of the weights of components and structures of the facility are described in this report. (author)

  4. Integration of facility modeling capabilities for nuclear nonproliferation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Humberto; Burr, Tom; Coles, Garill A.; Edmunds, Thomas A.; Garrett, Alfred; Gorensek, Maximilian; Hamm, Luther; Krebs, John; Kress, Reid L.; Lamberti, Vincent; Schoenwald, David; Tzanos, Constantine P.; Ward, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  5. Integration Of Facility Modeling Capabilities For Nuclear Nonproliferation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

    2011-01-01

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  6. Childhood leukaemia around Canadian nuclear facilities. Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, E.A.; McLaughlin, J.; Anderson, T.W.

    1991-06-01

    Prompted by findings of increased occurrence of childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of some nuclear facilities in the United Kingdom, this study aimed to investigate whether the frequency of leukaemia among children born to mothers living near nuclear facilities in Ontario differed from the provincial average. The Ontario Cancer Registry was used to identify 1894 children aged 0 to 14 years who died from leukaemia between 1950 and 1987, and 1814 children who were diagnosed with leukaemia between 1964 and 1986. Residence at birth and death was obtained from birth and death certificates. Analyses were performed separately for nuclear research and development facilities; uranium mining, milling and refining facilities; and, nuclear generating stations; and for areas within the same county as the facility and 'nearby' - within a 25-km radius of the facility. Risk estimates were calculated as the ratio of the observed (O) number of events over the expected (E) number. In the vicinity of nuclear research and development facilities the rate of leukaemia was less than expected and within the bound of chance variation. In the areas around the uranium mining, milling and refining facilities and nuclear power plants leukaemia occurred slightly more frequently than expected, but due to small frequencies these differences may have arisen due to chance. Large differences between observed and expected rates were not detected around any of the Ontario facilities. This study was large enough to detect excess risks of the magnitude reported in the United Kingdom, but it was not large enough to discriminate between the observed relative risks and a chance finding. Levels of leukaemia detected near nuclear generating stations indicate the need for further investigation. (20 tabs., 15 figs., 32 refs.)

  7. Validity evaluation of internal exposure in nuclear facility decommission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoli; Chen Dahua; You Zeyun

    2012-01-01

    During nuclear facility decommission under construction, it is very important for workers to wear respirator to avoid harm of Am aerosols. So the protection effect of respirator is very important. The protection effect of respirator was calculated and evaluated according to the data achieved from engineering practice. The result shows that the protection effect is better than target management value and the respirator is effective to protect workers from harm of Am aerosols. The respirator is applied to other nuclear facility decommission. (authors)

  8. Safety study of fire protection for nuclear fuel cycle facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    Based on the investigation of fire protection standards for domestic and foreign nuclear facilities, the fire protection guideline for nuclear fuel cycle facility has been completed. In 2012, trial operation is started by private company using the guideline. In addition, the acquisition of fire evaluation data for a components (electric cable) targeted for spread of fire and the evaluation model of fire source were continued for the fire hazard analysis (FHA). (author)

  9. Deactivation and Storage Issues Shared by Fossil and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas S. LaGuardia

    1998-01-01

    The deactivation of a power plant, be it nuclear or fossil fueled, requires that the facility be placed in a safe and stable condition to prevent unacceptable exposure of the public or the environment to hazardous materials until the facility can be decommissioned. The conditions at two Texas plants are examined. These plants are fossil fueled, but their conditions might be duplicated at a nuclear plant

  10. A Regulators Systematic Approach to Physical Protection for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, Stephan; Doulgeris, Nicholas; Leask, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This paper outlines the framework for a physical protection regime which needs to be incorporated into the design and construction phases of nuclear facility. The need for physical protection considerations at the outset of the design of nuclear facilities is explained. It also discusses about the consequences of malicious activity and the management of risk. Various risk and consequences evaluations are undertaken, notably using design basis threat methodology. (author)

  11. Physical protection of facilities and special nuclear materials in france

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanpierre, G.

    1980-01-01

    Physical protection of nuclear facilities and special nuclear materials is subject in France to a national governmental regulation which provides for the basic principles to be taken into account and the minimal level of protection deemed necessary. But the responsibility of implementation is left to the facility management and the resulting decentralization allows for maximum efficiency. All safeguards measures comply with the commitments taken at the international level by the French government

  12. Safety study of fire protection for nuclear fuel cycle facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Based on the investigation of fire protection standards for domestic and foreign nuclear facilities, the fire protection guideline for nuclear fuel cycle facility has been completed. In 2012, trial operation is started by private company using the guideline. In addition, the acquisition of fire evaluation data for a components (electric cable) targeted for spread of fire and the evaluation model of fire source were continued for the fire hazard analysis (FHA). (author)

  13. Security Culture in Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susyanta-Widyatmaka; Koraag, Venuesiana-Dewi; Taswanda-Taryo

    2005-01-01

    In nuclear related field, there are three different cultures: safety, safeguards and security culture. Safety culture has established mostly in nuclear industries, meanwhile safeguards and security culture are relatively new and still developing. The latter is intended to improve the physical protection of material and nuclear facility. This paper describes concept, properties and factors affecting security culture and interactions among these cultures. The analysis indicates that anybody involving in nuclear material and facility should have strong commitment and awareness of such culture to establish it. It is concluded that the assessment of security culture outlined in this paper is still preliminary for developing and conduction rigorous security culture implemented in a much more complex facility such as nuclear power plant

  14. The cost of decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report sets out the results of a National Audit Office investigation to determine the extent of the potential Government liability for nuclear decommissioning, how this is to be financed and the possible implications for the taxpayer. Further effort are needed to improve the nuclear industry's estimates, improve efficiency and face up to the costs of decommissioning. This should also ensure that the full cost of nuclear energy is identified. (author)

  15. Nuclear Security Recommendations on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities (INFCIRC/225/Revision 5): Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This publication, Revision 5 of Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities (INFCIRC/225), is intended to provide guidance to States and their competent authorities on how to develop or enhance, implement and maintain a physical protection regime for nuclear material and nuclear facilities, through the establishment or improvement of their capabilities to implement legislative and regulatory programmes. The recommendations presented in this publication reflect a broad consensus among IAEA Member States on the requirements which should be met for the physical protection of nuclear materials and nuclear facilities.

  16. Analysis of general specifications for nuclear facilities environmental monitoring vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    At present, with the nuclear energy more increasingly extensive application, the continuous stable radiation monitoring has become the focus of the public attention. The main purpose of the environmental monitoring vehicle for the continuous monitoring of the environmental radiation dose rate and the radionuclides concentration in the medium around nuclear facilities is that the environmental radiation level and the radioactive nuclides activity in the environment medium are measured. The radioactive pollution levels, the scope contaminated and the trends of the pollution accumulation are found out. The change trends for the pollution are observed and the monitoring results are explained. The domestic demand of the environmental monitoring for the nuclear facilities is shown in this report. The changes and demands of the routine environmental monitoring and the nuclear emergency monitoring are researched. The revision opinions for EJ/T 981-1995 General specifications for nuclear facilities environmental monitoring vehicles are put forward. The purpose is to regulate domestic environmental monitoring vehicle technical criterion. The criterion makes it better able to adapt and serve the environmental monitoring for nuclear facilities. The technical guarantee is provided for the environmental monitoring of the nuclear facilities. (authors)

  17. Status of ANSI standards on decommissioning of nuclear reprocessing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, H.B.

    1975-01-01

    A definition of decommissioning is given, and the preparation of ANSI Standard, ''General Design Criteria for Nuclear Reprocessing Facilities'' (N101.3) is discussed. A Eurochemic report, entitled ''The Shutdown of Reprocessing Facilities--Results of Preliminary Studies on the Installations Belonging to Eurochemic,'' was used in the preparation of this standard. (U.S.)

  18. Safety of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities. Safety Requirements (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This publication covers the broad scope of requirements for fuel cycle facilities that, in light of the experience and present state of technology, must be satisfied to ensure safety for the lifetime of the facility. Topics of specific relevance include aspects of nuclear fuel generation, storage, reprocessing and disposal

  19. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities: Feasibility, needs and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLaney, E.G.; Mickelson, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency's Working Group on Decommissioning is preparing a study entitled ''Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities: Feasibility, Needs and Costs.'' The study addresses the economics, technical feasibility and waste management aspects of decommissioning larger commercial reactors and nuclear support facilities. Experience on decommissioning small reactors and fuel cycle facilities shows that current technology is generally adequate. Several major projects that are either underway or planned will demonstrate decommissioning of the larger and more complex facilities. This experience will provide a framework for planning and engineering the decommissioning of the larger commercial reactors and fuel cycle facilities. Several areas of technology development are desired for worker productivity improvement, occupational exposure reduction, and waste volume reduction. In order to assess and plan for the decommissioning of large commercial nuclear facilities, projections have been made of the capacity of these facilities that may be decommissioned in the future and the radioactive waste that would be produced from the decommissioning of these facilities. These projections through the year 2025 are based on current data and the OECD reactor capacity forecast through the year 2000. A 25-year operating lifetime for electrical power generation was assumed. The possibilities of plant lifetime extension and the deferral of plant dismantlement make this projection very conservative

  20. Epithermal neutron beam design for neutron capture therapy at the Power Burst Facility and the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, F.J.; Parsons, D.K.; Rushton, B.L.; Nigg, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear design studies have been performed for two reactor-based epithermal neutron beams for cancer treatment by neutron capture therapy (NCT). An intermediate-intensity epithermal beam has been designed and implemented at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Measurements show that the BMRR design predictions for the principal characteristics of this beam are accurate. A canine program for research into the biological effects of NCT is now under way at BMRR. The design for a high-intensity epithermal beam with minimal contamination from undesirable radiation components has been finalized for the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This design will be implemented when it is determined that human NCT trials are advisable. The PBF beam will exhibit approximately an order of magnitude improvement in absolute epithermal flux intensity over that available in the BMRR, and its angular distribution and spectral characteristics will be more advantageous for NCT. The combined effects of beam intensity, angular distribution, spectrum, and contaminant level allow the desired tumor radiation dose to be delivered in much shorter times than are possible with the currently available BMRR beam, with a significant reduction (factor of 3 to 5) in collateral dose due to beam contaminants

  1. The 50 MeV Beam Test Facility at LBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leemans, W.; Behrsing, G.; Kim, K.J.; Krupnick, J.; Matuk, C.; Selph, F.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    1993-05-01

    A new beam line, expected to be built by September 1993, will transport the 50 MeV electron beam from the ALS LINAC into an experimental area to support various R ampersand D activities in the Center for Beam Physics at LBL. A variety of experiments are planned involving the interaction of such a relativistic electron beam with plasmas (plasma focusing), laser beams (generation of femtosecond X-ray pulses) and electromagnetic cavities (Crab cavities etc....). The beam line is designed using the measured emittance and Twiss parameters of the ALS linac. It accommodates the different requirements of the various experiments on the electron beam properties (charge, energy, pulse length) and on the handling of the beam before and after the interaction point. Special attention has also been given to incorporate diagnostics for measuring the beam properties (such as the electron energy, bunch length and charge) needed in the interpretation of the experiments

  2. Proton beam characterization in the experimental room of the Trento Proton Therapy facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasino, F.; Rovituso, M.; Fabiano, S.; Piffer, S.; Manea, C.; Lorentini, S.; Lanzone, S.; Wang, Z.; Pasini, M.; Burger, W. J.; La Tessa, C.; Scifoni, E.; Schwarz, M.; Durante, M.

    2017-10-01

    As proton therapy is becoming an established treatment methodology for cancer patients, the number of proton centres is gradually growing worldwide. The economical effort for building these facilities is motivated by the clinical aspects, but might be also supported by the potential relevance for the research community. Experiments with high-energy protons are needed not only for medical physics applications, but represent also an essential part of activities dedicated to detector development, space research, radiation hardness tests, as well as of fundamental research in nuclear and particle physics. Here we present the characterization of the beam line installed in the experimental room of the Trento Proton Therapy Centre (Italy). Measurements of beam spot size and envelope, range verification and proton flux were performed in the energy range between 70 and 228 MeV. Methods for reducing the proton flux from typical treatments values of 106-109 particles/s down to 101-105 particles/s were also investigated. These data confirm that a proton beam produced in a clinical centre build by a commercial company can be exploited for a broad spectrum of experimental activities. The results presented here will be used as a reference for future experiments.

  3. Uranium Mining and Nuclear Facilities (Prohibitions) Act 1986 No. 194

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this Act is to protect the health and safety of the people of New South Wales and its environment. Accordingly it prohibits prospecting or mining for uranium and the construction and operation of nuclear reactors and other facilities in the nuclear fuel cycle. (NEA) [fr

  4. Safety Analysis of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Radwaste Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poskas, P.; Ragaisis, V.

    2001-01-01

    The overview of the activities in the Laboratory of Heat Transfer in Nuclear Reactors related with the assessment of thermal, neutronic and radiation characteristics in spent nuclear fuel and radwaste facilities are performed. Activities related with decommissioning of Ignalina NPP are also reviewed. (author)

  5. The decommissioning concept for nuclear facilities in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaroslavtsev, G.F.; Korchagin, P.A.

    2000-01-01

    The basic task of the conception is a formulation of the basic directions and priorities, terms of schedules and plans, calculation of costs of works on endurance, preservations, dismantlement of nuclear facilities and returning of territories in the unlimited usage. Independent of the development rate of nuclear energy in Ukraine, this problem must now be solved. (author)

  6. CHANDA and ERINDA: Joint European programs for research on safety of nuclear facilities and waste reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Roland; Hannaske, Roland; Koegler, Toni [Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, Helmholtz Zentrum DD-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, TU Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Grosse, Eckart [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, TU Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Junghans, Arnd R. [Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, Helmholtz Zentrum DD-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    In spite of the planned termination of the German nuclear power program neutron beam facilities in Germany can contribute considerably to research studies on the reduction of hazards due to nuclear waste. Transnational research programs support EU groups who want to carry out projects at the new tof set-up nELBE at HZDR, the calibrated n-flux at PTB and the FRANZ accelerator under construction at Frankfurt. Vice versa various facilities in the EU offer beams for transmutation and safety related studies with neutrons to German scientists under support by ERINDA (2011-2013) and CHANDA (2014-2017; solving challenges in nuclear data for the safety of European nuclear facilities). For work in that field scientific visits are also fostered to improve the exchange of experience between the partners (13 and in future about 35 from 18 countries). Plans for new projects as well as results obtained so far are discussed, and special emphasis is given to the present research performed at nELBE on neutron scattering and absorption.

  7. Emergency preparedness and response plan for nuclear facilities in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Rahmah Hidayati; Pande Made Udiyani

    2009-01-01

    All nuclear facilities in Indonesia are owned and operated by the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN). The programs and activities of emergency planning and preparedness in Indonesia are based on the existing nuclear facilities, i.e. research reactors, research reactor fuel fabrication plant, radioactive waste treatment installation and radioisotopes production installation. The assessment is conducted to learn of status of emergency preparedness and response plan for nuclear facilities in Indonesia and to support the preparation of future Nuclear Power Plant. The assessment is conducted by comparing the emergency preparedness and response system in Indonesia to the system in other countries such as Japan and Republic of Korea, since the countries have many Nuclear Power Plants and other nuclear facilities. As a result, emergency preparedness response plan for existing nuclear facility in Indonesia has been implemented in many activities such as environmental monitoring program, facility monitoring equipment, and the continuous exercise of emergency preparedness and response. However, the implementation need law enforcement for imposing the responsibility of the coordinators in National Emergency Preparedness Plan. It also needs some additional technical support systems which refer to the system in Japan or Republic of Korea. The systems must be completed with some real time monitors which will support the emergency preparedness and response organization. The system should be built in NPP site before the first NPP will be operated. The system should be connected to an Off Site Emergency Center under coordination of BAPETEN as the regulatory body which has responsibility to control of nuclear energy in Indonesia. (Author)

  8. Secondary beam monitors for the NuMI facility at FNAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, S.; Bishai, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Diwan, M.; Erwin, A.R.; Harris, D.A.; Indurthy, D.; Keisler, R.; Kostin, M.; Lang, M.; MacDonald, J.; Marchionni, A.; Mendoza, S.; Morfin, J.; Naples, D.; Northacker, D.; Pavlovic, Z.; Phelps, L.; Ping, H.; Proga, M.; Vellissaris, C.; Viren, B.; Zwaska, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility is a conventional neutrino beam which produces muon neutrinos by focusing a beam of mesons into a long evacuated decay volume. We have built four arrays of ionization chambers to monitor the position and intensity of the hadron and muon beams associated with neutrino production at locations downstream of the decay volume. This article describes the chambers' construction, calibration, and commissioning in the beam

  9. Technical requirement of experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.; Tillak, M.; Gierszwski, P.; Grover, J.; Puigh, R.; Sze, D.K.; Berwald, D.

    1986-06-01

    The technical issues and requirements of experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology (FNT) have been investigated. The nuclear subsystems addressed are: a) blanket, b) radiation shield, c) tritium processing system, and d) plasma interactive components. Emphasis has been placed on the important and complex development problems of the blanket. A technical planning process for FNT has been developed and applied, including four major elements: 1) characterization of issues, 2) quantification of testing requirements, 3) evaluation of facilities, and 4) development of a test plan to identify the role, timing, characteristics and costs of major experiments and facilities

  10. The nuclear safeguards data flow for the item facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongjun; Chen Desheng

    1994-04-01

    The constitution of nuclear safeguards data flow for the item facilities is introduced and the main contents are the data flow of nuclear safeguards. If the data flow moves positively, i.e. from source data →supporting documents→accounting records→accounting reports, the systems of records and reports will be constituted. If the data flow moves negatively, the way to trace inspection of nuclear material accounting quality will be constituted

  11. Protection of High Ceiling Nuclear Facilities Using Photoelectric Sensors and Infrared Fire Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadoud, A.A.; El Eissawi, H.M.; Saleh, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    A variety of different security systems and components are commercially available and widely used. Before implementing a security system, it is important to understand the characteristics and requirements of the facility area to be protected. Technology and manufacturers of security devices are rapidly changing. It is necessary to use optimal security equipment suitable for the surrounding environment of the facility to be protected. Several security sensors can be used to protect the nuclear facilities, such as passive infrared detectors and glass breakage sensors, vibration detectors, and microwave sensors. This work introduces technical specifications, operation and method of installation for these detectors in nuclear facilities. Also a comparative study of different security sensors or equipment is provided. The photoelectric detectors and infrared fire beam smoke detectors are reliable, suitable and advanced security equipment. They can be used in special cases because of their advantages, this includes their long ranges and accuracy in performance. This paper presents a new concept for adapting the use infrared optical fire beam smoke detector as intrusion detection equipment in high ceiling buildings or towering height facilities. This is in addition to their main function, namely fire detection.The paper also provides a study for their types and installation method. Focus is made on the installation and operation method for two advanced security systems, and wireless control circuit for the overall system operation

  12. Test facilities for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, D.F.; Allen, G.C.; Shipers, L.R.; Dobranich, D.; Ottinger, C.A.; Harmon, C.D.; Fan, W.C.; Todosow, M.

    1992-01-01

    Interagency panels evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) development options have consistently recognized the need for constructing a major new ground test facility to support fuel element and engine testing. This paper summarizes the requirements, configuration, and baseline performance of some of the major subsystems designed to support a proposed ground test complex for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion fuel elements and engines being developed for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. Some preliminary results of evaluating this facility for use in testing other NTP concepts are also summarized

  13. A safety decision analysis for Saudi Arabian nuclear research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abulfaraj, W.H.; Abdul-Fattah, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    Establishment of a nuclear research facility should be the first step in planning for introducing the nuclear energy to Saudi Arabia. The fuzzy set decision theory is selected among different decision theories to be applied for this analysis. Four research reactors from USA are selected for the present study. The IFDA computer code, based on the fuzzy set theory is applied. Results reveal that the FNR reactor is the best alternative for the case of Saudi Arabian nuclear research facility, and MITR is the second best. 17 refs

  14. Nuclear facilities. Revenue Act for 2000 (no. 99-1172)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    The article no. 43 of the Revenue Act for 2000 modifies the existing system of tax for basic nuclear facilities. The articles no. 17 and no. 121 are abrogated. The basic nuclear facilities subjected to an authorization procedure (article no. 8, act no. 61-842 of the 2. of August 1961 concerning the abatement of air pollution and odors) have to pay an annual tax with effect from January 1. 2000. For nuclear reactors, tax has to be paid for each unit of the plant. (O.M.)

  15. Organization of the internal dosimetry in the Spanish nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchena, P.; Soliet, E.

    1998-01-01

    From the beginning of the exploitation of the nuclear energy of Espanna, the nuclear facilities have had Services of Personal Dosimetry with the appropriate means to determine the dose. so much internal as external, of the personnel that mentioned facilities works. All the nuclear power stations use advanced systems of teams with object of detecting the radionuclides incorporation in the organism and calculation programs based on the recent recommendations of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the determination of the derived doses

  16. Technological Advances, Human Performance, and the Operation of Nuclear Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, Jonathan K.

    Many unfortunate and unintended adverse industrial incidents occur across the United States each year, and the nuclear industry is no exception. Depending on their severity, these incidents can be problematic for people, the facilities, and surrounding environments. Human error is a contributing factor in many such incidents. This dissertation first explored the hypothesis that technological changes that affect how operators interact within the systems of the nuclear facilities exacerbate the cost of incidents caused by human error. I conducted a review of nuclear incidents in the United States from 1955 through 2010 that reached Level 3 (serious incident) or higher on the International Nuclear Events Scale (INES). The cost of each incident at facilities that had recently undergone technological changes affecting plant operators' jobs was compared to the cost of events at facilities that had not undergone changes. A t-test determined a statistically significant difference between the two groups, confirming the hypothesis. Next, I conducted a follow-on study to determine the impact of the incorporation of new technologies into nuclear facilities. The data indicated that spending more money on upgrades increased the facility's capacity as well as the number of incidents reported, but the incident severity was minor. Finally, I discuss the impact of human error on plant operations and the impact of evolving technology on the 21st-century operator, proposing a methodology to overcome these challenges by applying the systems engineering process.

  17. Strategy selection for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    As modern nuclear power programmes mature and large, commercial nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities approach the end of their useful life by reason of age, economics or change of policy on the use of nuclear power, new challenges associated with decommissioning and dismantling come to the fore. Politicians and the public may expect there to be a 'right answer' to the choice of strategy for a particular type of facility, or even all facilities. Both this seminar and wider experience show that this is not the case. Local factors and national political positions have a significant input and often result in widely differing strategy approaches to broadly similar decommissioning projects. All facility owners represented at the seminar were able to demonstrate a rational process for strategy selection and compelling arguments for the choices made. In addition to the papers that were presented, these proceedings include a summary of the discussions that took place. (author)

  18. Construction Cost Growth for New Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubic, Jr., William L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-05-25

    Cost growth and construction delays are problems that plague many large construction projects including the construction of new Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. A study was conducted to evaluate cost growth of large DOE construction projects. The purpose of the study was to compile relevant data, consider the possible causes of cost growth, and recommend measures that could be used to avoid extreme cost growth in the future. Both large DOE and non-DOE construction projects were considered in this study. With the exception of Chemical and Metallurgical Research Building Replacement Project (CMRR) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), cost growth for DOE Nuclear facilities is comparable to the growth experienced in other mega construction projects. The largest increase in estimated cost was found to occur between early cost estimates and establishing the project baseline during detailed design. Once the project baseline was established, cost growth for DOE nuclear facilities was modest compared to non-DOE mega projects.

  19. Accidents in nuclear facilities: classification, incidence and impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galicia A, J.; Paredes G, L. C.

    2012-10-01

    A general analysis of the 146 accidents reported officially in nuclear facilities from 1945 to 2012 is presented, among them some took place in: power or research nuclear reactors, critical and subcritical nuclear assemblies, handling of nuclear materials inside laboratories belonging to institutes or universities, in radiochemistry industrial plants and nuclear fuel factories. In form graph the incidence of these accidents is illustrated classified for; category, decades, geographical localization, country classification before the OECD, failure type, and the immediate or later victims. On the other hand, the main learned lessons of the nuclear accidents of Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima are stood out, among those that highlight; the human factors, the necessity of designs more innovative and major technology for the operation, control and surveillance of the nuclear facilities, to increase the criterions of nuclear, radiological and physics safety applied to these facilities, the necessity to carry out probabilistic analysis of safety more detailed for cases of not very probable accidents and their impact, to revalue the selection criterions of the sites for nuclear locations, the methodology of post-accident sites recovery and major instrumentation for parameters evaluation and the radiological monitoring among others. (Author)

  20. Enhancement of safety at nuclear facilities in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.A.; Hayat, T.; Azhar, W.

    2006-01-01

    Pakistan is benefiting from nuclear technology mostly in health and energy sectors as well as agriculture and industry and has an impeccable safety record. At the national level uses of nuclear technology started in 1955 resulting in the operation of Karachi Radioisotope Center, Karachi, in December 1960. Pakistan Nuclear Safety Committee (PNSC) was formulated in 1964 with subsequent promulgation of Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) Ordinance in 1965 to cope with the anticipated introduction of a research reactor, namely PARR-I, and a nuclear power plant, namely KANUPP. Since then Pakistan's nuclear program has expanded to include numerous nuclear facilities of varied nature. This program has definite economic and social impacts by producing electricity, treating and diagnosing cancer patients, and introducing better crop varieties. Appropriate radiation protection includes a number of measures including database of sealed radiation sources at PAEC operated nuclear facilities, see Table l, updated during periodic physical verification of these sources, strict adherence to the BSS-115, IAEA recommended enforcement of zoning at research reactors and NPPs, etc. Pakistan is party to several international conventions and treaties, such as Convention of Nuclear Safety and Early Notification, to improve and enhance safety at its nuclear facilities. In addition Pakistan generally and PAEC particularly believes in a blend of prudent regulations and good/best practices. This is described in this paper. (Author)

  1. Environmental licensing of nuclear facilities: compatibility of technical competencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, J.; Paiva, R.L.C. de; Mezrahi, A.; Cardoso, E.M.; Aquino, W.P.; Deppe, A.L.; Menezes, R.M.; Prado, V.; Franco, N.M.F.L.; Nouailhetas, Y.; Xavier, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) has the technical competency for diagnosing environmental radiological impacts, as well as evaluating the safety and requiring adequate control of the facilities which, due to their activities, represent a potential risk of radiological contamination for the environment. The institution is responsible for emission of radioprotection guidelines, controls and surveys in nuclear safety according to the country's regulations and international recommendations. The methodology to assure the limitation of radiation exposure is consequence from shared control over the nuclear activities, in special the nuclear facilities. According to the Federal Constitution of 1988, the nuclear activities must be under exclusive control of the Union in special related to the nuclear policies, economical, laboral and nuclear safety aspects, while the health and environmental controls of these activities are shared by the Federation, Union, States, Federal District and Counties. The controls related to specific aspects have to be harmonized in such a way to be optimized and effective. In this paper the results of compatibilization of nuclear legislation and environmental legislation are presented aiming to optimize the licensing of nuclear facilities. (author)

  2. Study on archive management for nuclear facility decommissioning projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Ling; Gong Jing; Luo Ning; Liao Bing; Zhou Hao

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the main features and status of the archive management for nuclear facility decommissioning projects, and explores and discusses the countermeasures in its archive management. Taking the practice of the archive management system of a reactor decommissioning project as an example, the paper illustrates the establishment of archive management system for the nuclear facility decommissioning projects. The results show that the development of a systematic archive management principle and system for nuclear decommissioning projects and the construction of project archives for the whole process from the design to the decommissioning by digitalized archive management system are one effective route to improve the complete, accurate and systematic archiving of project documents, to promote the standardization and effectiveness of the archive management and to ensure the traceability of the nuclear facility decommissioning projects. (authors)

  3. Nuclear facility safeguards systems modeling using discrete event simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engi, D.

    1977-01-01

    The threat of theft or dispersal of special nuclear material at a nuclear facility is treated by studying the temporal relationships between adversaries having authorized access to the facility (insiders) and safeguards system events by using a GASP IV discrete event simulation. The safeguards system events--detection, assessment, delay, communications, and neutralization--are modeled for the general insider adversary strategy which includes degradation of the safeguards system elements followed by an attempt to steal or disperse special nuclear material. The performance measure used in the analysis is the estimated probability of safeguards system success in countering the adversary based upon a predetermined set of adversary actions. An exemplary problem which includes generated results is presented for a hypothetical nuclear facility. The results illustrate representative information that could be utilized by safeguards decision-makers

  4. Characterization of a 5-eV neutral atomic oxygen beam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, J. A.; Linton, R. C.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Whitaker, A. F.; Cuthbertson, J. W.; Langer, W. D.; Motley, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental effort to characterize an existing 5-eV neutral atomic oxygen beam facility being developed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is described. This characterization effort includes atomic oxygen flux and flux distribution measurements using a catalytic probe, energy determination using a commercially designed quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), and the exposure of oxygen-sensitive materials in this beam facility. Also, comparisons were drawn between the reaction efficiencies of materials exposed in plasma ashers, and the reaction efficiencies previously estimated from space flight experiments. The results of this study show that the beam facility is capable of producing a directional beam of neutral atomic oxygen atoms with the needed flux and energy to simulate low Earth orbit (LEO) conditions for real time accelerated testing. The flux distribution in this facility is uniform to +/- 6 percent of the peak flux over a beam diameter of 6 cm.

  5. Reliability analysis of minimum energy on target for laser facilities with more beam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guangyu

    2008-01-01

    Shot reliability performance measures of laser facilities with more beam lines pertain to three categories: minimum-energy-on-target, power balance, and shot diagnostics. Accounting for symmetry of NIF beam line design and similarity of subset reliability in a same partition, a fault tree of meeting minimum-energy-on-target for the large laser facility shot of type K and a simplified method are presented, which are used to analyze hypothetic reliability of partition subsets in order to get trends of influences increasing number of beam lines and diverse shot types of large laser facilities on their shot reliability. Finally, it finds that improving component reliability is more crucial for laser facilities with more beam lines in comparison with those with beam lines and functional diversity from design flexibility is greatly helpful for improving shot reliability. (authors)

  6. Treatment facilities, human resource development, and future prospect of particle beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Tomoaki; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The number of particle beam therapy facilities is increasing globally. Among the countries practicing particle beam therapy, Japan is one of the leading countries in the field with four operating carbon-ion therapy facilities and ten operating proton therapy facilities. With the increasing number of particle beam therapy facilities, the human resource development is becoming extremely important, and there has been many such efforts including the Gunma University Program for Cultivating Global Leaders in Heavy Ion Therapeutics and Engineering, which aimed to educate and train the radiation oncologists, medical physicists, accelerator engineers, and radiation biologists to become global leaders in the field of particle beam therapy. In the future, the benefit and effectiveness of particle beam therapy should be discussed and elucidated objectively in a framework of comprehensive cancer care. (author)

  7. Feedback experience from the decommissioning of Spanish nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    The Spain has accumulated significant experience in the field of decommissioning of nuclear and radioactive facilities. Relevant projects include the remediation of uranium mills and mines, the decommissioning of research reactors and nuclear research facilities and the decommissioning of gas-graphite nuclear power plants. The decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Spain is undertaken by ENRESA, who is also responsible for the management of radioactive wastes. The two most notable projects are the decommissioning of the Vandellos I nuclear power plant and the decommissioning of the CIEMAT nuclear research centre. The Vandellos I power plant was decommissioned in about five years to what is known as level 2. During this period, the reactor vessel was confined, most plant systems and components were dismantled, the facility was prepared for a period of latency and a large part of the site was restored for subsequent release. In 2005 the facility entered into the phase of dormancy, with minimum operating requirements. Only surveillance and maintenance activities are performed, among which special mention should be made to the five-year check of the leak tightness of the reactor vessel. After the dormancy period (25 - 30 years), level 3 of decommissioning will be initiated including the total dismantling of the remaining parts of the plant and the release of the whole site for subsequent uses. The decommissioning of the CIEMAT Research Centre includes the dismantling of obsolete facilities such as the research reactor JEN-1, a pilot reprocessing plant, a fuel fabrication facility, a conditioning plant for liquid and a liquid waste storage facility which were shutdown in the early eighties. Dismantling works have started in 2006 and will be completed by 2009. On the basis of the experience gained in the above mentioned sites, this paper describes the approaches adopted by ENRESA for large decommissioning projects. (author)

  8. Design requirements for new nuclear reactor facilities in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, S.; Ohn, M.; Harwood, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) has been establishing the regulatory framework for the efficient and effective licensing of new nuclear reactor facilities. This regulatory framework includes the documentation of the requirements for the design and safety analysis of new nuclear reactor facilities, regardless of size. For this purpose, the CNSC has published the design and safety analysis requirements in the following two sets of regulatory documents: 1. RD-337, Design of New Nuclear Power Plants and RD-310, Safety Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants; and 2. RD-367, Design of Small Reactor Facilities and RD-308, Deterministic Safety Analysis for Small Reactor Facilities. These regulatory documents have been modernized to document past practices and experience and to be consistent with national and international standards. These regulatory documents provide the requirements for the design and safety analysis at a high level presented in a hierarchical structure. These documents were developed in a technology neutral approach so that they can be applicable for a wide variety of water cooled reactor facilities. This paper highlights two particular aspects of these regulatory documents: The use of a graded approach to make the documents applicable for a wide variety of nuclear reactor facilities including nuclear power plants (NPPs) and small reactor facilities; and, Design requirements that are new and different from past Canadian practices. Finally, this paper presents some of the proposed changes in RD-337 to implement specific details of the recommendations of the CNSC Fukushima Task Force Report. Major changes were not needed as the 2008 version of RD-337 already contained requirements to address most of the lessons learned from the Fukushima event of March 2011. (author)

  9. Examination of Beryllium Under Intense High Energy Proton Beam at CERN's HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Ammigan, K.; Hurh, P.; Zwaska, R.; Atherton, A.; Caretta, O.; Davenne,T.; Densham, C.; Fitton, M.; Loveridge, P.; O'Dell, J.; Roberts, S.; Kuksenko, V.; Butcher, M.; Calviani, M.; Guinchard, M.; Losito, R.

    2017-01-01

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as material for beam win- dows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle produc- tion targets. With increasing beam intensities of future ac- celerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to avoid compro- mising particle production efficiency by limiting beam pa- rameters. As a result, the planned experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility will take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several grades of beryllium. The test matrix will consist of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. Online instrumentations will acquire real time temperature, strain, and vibration data of the cylinders, while Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) of the discs will exploit advanced microstructural characteri- zation and imagin...

  10. Examination of Beryllium Under Intense High Energy Proton Beam at CERN's HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Ammigan, K; Hurh, P; Zwaska, R; Atherton, A; Caretta, O; Davenne, t; Densham, C; Fitton, M; Loveridge, P; O'Dell, J; Roberts, S; Kuksenko, v; Butcher, M; Calviani, M; Guinchard, M; Losito, R

    2015-01-01

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as material for beam win- dows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle produc- tion targets. With increasing beam intensities of future ac- celerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to avoid compro- mising particle production efficiency by limiting beam pa- rameters. As a result, the planned experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility will take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several grades of beryllium. The test matrix will consist of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. Online instrumentations will acquire real time temperature, strain, and vibration data of the cylinders, while Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) of the discs will exploit advanced microstructural characteri- zation and imagin...

  11. Seismic reevaluation of nuclear facilities worldwide: Overview and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, R.D.; Hardy, G.S.; Ravindra, M.K.; Johnson, J.J.; Hoy, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Existing nuclear facilities throughout the world are being subjected to severe scrutiny of their safety in tile event of an earthquake. In the United States, there have been several licensing and safety review issues for which industry and regulatory agencies have cooperated to develop rational and economically feasible criteria for resolving the issues. Currently, all operating nuclear power plants in the United States are conducting an Individual Plant Examination of External Events, including earthquakes beyond tile design basis. About two-thirds of tile operating plants are conducting parallel programs for verifying, tile seismic adequacy of equipment for the design basis earthquake. The U.S. Department of Energy is also beginning to perform detailed evaluations of their facilities, many of which had little or no seismic design. Western European countries also have been reevaluating their older nuclear power plants for seismic events often adapting the criteria developed in the United States. With the change in tile political systems in Eastern Europe, there is a strong emphasis from their Western European neighbors to evaluate and Upgrade tile safely of their operating nuclear power plants. Finally, nuclear facilities in Asia are, also, being evaluated for seismic vulnerabilities. This paper focuses oil tile methodologies that have been developed for reevaluation of existing nuclear power plants and presents examples of the application of these methodologies to nuclear facilities worldwide. (author)

  12. Seismic reevaluation of nuclear facilities worldwide: Overview and status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, R D; Hardy, G S; Ravindra, M K [EQE International, Irvine, CA (United States); Johnson, J J [EQE International, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hoy, A J [EQE International Ltd., Birchwood, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    1995-07-01

    Existing nuclear facilities throughout the world are being subjected to severe scrutiny of their safety in tile event of an earthquake. In the United States, there have been several licensing and safety review issues for which industry and regulatory agencies have cooperated to develop rational and economically feasible criteria for resolving the issues. Currently, all operating nuclear power plants in the United States are conducting an Individual Plant Examination of External Events, including earthquakes beyond tile design basis. About two-thirds of tile operating plants are conducting parallel programs for verifying, tile seismic adequacy of equipment for the design basis earthquake. The U.S. Department of Energy is also beginning to perform detailed evaluations of their facilities, many of which had little or no seismic design. Western European countries also have been reevaluating their older nuclear power plants for seismic events often adapting the criteria developed in the United States. With the change in tile political systems in Eastern Europe, there is a strong emphasis from their Western European neighbors to evaluate and Upgrade tile safely of their operating nuclear power plants. Finally, nuclear facilities in Asia are, also, being evaluated for seismic vulnerabilities. This paper focuses oil tile methodologies that have been developed for reevaluation of existing nuclear power plants and presents examples of the application of these methodologies to nuclear facilities worldwide. (author)

  13. Cost estimate of Olkiluoto disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukkola, T.; Saanio, T.

    2005-03-01

    The cost estimate covers the underground rock characterisation facility ONKALO, the investment and the operating costs of the above and underground facilities, the decommissioning of the encapsulation plant and the closure costs of the repository. The above ground facility is a once-investment; a re-investment takes place after 37 years operation. The repository is extended stepwise thus also the investment take place in stages. Annual operating costs are calculated with different operating efficiencies. The total investment costs of the disposal facility are estimated to be 503 M euro (Million Euros), the total operating costs are 1,923 M euro and the decommissioning and the closure costs are 116 M euro totaling 2,542 M euro. The investment costs of the above ground facility are 142 M euro, the operating costs are 1,678 M euro. The repository investment costs are 360 M euro and the operating costs are 245 M euro. The decommissioning costs are 7 M euro and the closure costs are 109 M euro. The costs are calculated by using the price level of December 2003. The cost estimate is based on a plan, where the spent fuel is encapsulated and the disposal canisters are disposed into the bedrock at a depth of about 420 meters in one storey. In the encapsulation process, the fuel assemblies are closed into composite canisters, in which the inner part of the canister is made of nodular cast iron and the outer wall of copper having a thickness of 50 mm. The inner canister is closed gas-tight by a bolted steel lid, and the electron beam welding method is used to close the outer copper lid. The encapsulation plant is independent and located above the deep repository spaces. The disposal canisters are transported to the repository by the lift. The disposal tunnels are constructed and closed in stages according the disposal canisters disposal. The operating time of the Loviisa nuclear power plant units is assumed to be 50 years and the operating time of the Olkiluoto nuclear power

  14. Automated approach to nuclear facility safeguards effectiveness evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Concern over the security of nuclear facilities has generated a need for a reliable, time efficient, and easily applied method of evaluating the effectiveness of safeguards systems. Such an evaluation technique could be used (1) by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to evaluate a licensee's proposal, (2) to assess the security status of a system, or (3) to design and/or upgrade nuclear facilities. The technique should be capable of starting with basic information, such as the facility layout and performance parameters for physical protection components, and analyzing that information so that a reliable overall facility evaluation is obtained. Responding to this expressed need, an automated approach to facility safeguards effectiveness evaluation has been developed. This procedure consists of a collection of functional modules for facility characterization, critical path generation, and path evaluation combined into a continuous stream of operations. The technique has been implemented on an interactive computer-timesharing system and makes use of computer graphics for the handling and presentation of information. Using this technique a thorough facility evaluation can be made by systematically varying parameters that characterize the physical protection components of a facility according to changes in perceived adversary attributes and strategy, environmental conditions, and site status

  15. Standard Guide for Preparing Characterization Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This standard guide applies to developing nuclear facility characterization plans to define the type, magnitude, location, and extent of radiological and chemical contamination within the facility to allow decommissioning planning. This guide amplifies guidance regarding facility characterization indicated in ASTM Standard E 1281 on Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Plans. This guide does not address the methodology necessary to release a facility or site for unconditional use. This guide specifically addresses: 1.1.1 the data quality objective for characterization as an initial step in decommissioning planning. 1.1.2 sampling methods, 1.1.3 the logic involved (statistical design) to ensure adequate characterization for decommissioning purposes; and 1.1.4 essential documentation of the characterization information. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate saf...

  16. Potential Benefits to the Philippines of a Nuclear Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asuncion-Astronomo, A.; Romallosa, K.M.D.; Olivares, R.U.

    2015-01-01

    During the late 1950’s, the Philippines was one of the many countries which began the pursuit of the beneficial applications of atomic energy. With the commissioning of the first Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) which attained its first criticality in 1963, our country had the capability for radioisotope production, activation analysis of materials, irradiation studies and various opportunities for basic and applied nuclear science research. The Nuclear Power Plant (PNNP-1) in training plant operators and regulators for the first Philippine Nuclear Power Plant (PNPP-1) in Bataan, which was eventually mothballed in 1986. It is thus unfortunate that the only operating nuclear facility in the country, the PRR-1 encountered technical problems during an upgrade and was shut down in 1988. The problem was not resolved and eventually led to the decommissioning of the PRR-1 in 2005. Without an operating nuclear facility available in the country, the number of personnel knowledgeable and skilled in reactor and nuclear science and engineering has greatly declined and lagged behind our counterparts. This has been the situation for more than two decaded and can only be addressed if the country decides to put up a new nuclear facility. It is acknowledged that putting up a nuclear facility is a major undertaking which requires careful planning, preparation and investment. Thus, a decision by any country to embark on this poster, we will provide an overview of the many potential benefits as well as challenges of establishing a new research reactor and/or accelerator facility in the country. The global distribution, comparisons, capabilities and the different application of these facilities will presented as well.(author)

  17. Applying new safeguards technology to existing nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.; Wagner, E.P.

    1979-01-01

    The application and operation of safeguards instrumentation in a facility containing special nuclear material is most successful when the installation is designed for the operation of the specific facility. Experience at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory demonstrates that installation designs must consider both Safeguards and Production requirements of specific facilities. Equipment selection and installation design influenced by the training and experience of production operations and safeguards personnel at a specific facility help assure successful installation, reliable operation, and minimal operator training. This minimizes impacts on existing plant production activities while maximizing utility of the safeguards information obtained

  18. Applying new safeguards technology to existing nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, W.J.; Wagner, E.P.

    1979-01-01

    The application and operation of safeguards instrumentation in a facility containing special nuclear material is most successful when the installation is desinged for the operation of the specific facility. Experience at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory demonstrates that installation designs must consider both safeguards and production requirements of specific facilities. Equipment selection and installation design influenced by the training and experience of production operations and safeguards personnel at a specific facility help assure successful installation, reliable operation, and minimal operator training. This minimizes impacts on existing plant production activities while maximizing utility of the safeguards information obtained

  19. Siting of nuclear facilities. Selections from Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, J.R.

    1976-07-01

    The report presented siting policy and practice for nuclear power plants as developed in the U.S. and abroad. Twenty-two articles from Nuclear Safety on this general topic are reprinted since they provide a valuable reference source. The appendices also include reprints of some relevant regulatory rules and guides on siting. Advantages and disadvantages of novel siting concepts such as underground containment, offshore siting, and nuclear energy parks are addressed. Other topics include site criteria, risk criteria, and nuclear ship criteria

  20. Siting of nuclear facilities. Selections from Nuclear Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, J.R.

    1976-07-01

    The report presented siting policy and practice for nuclear power plants as developed in the U.S. and abroad. Twenty-two articles from Nuclear Safety on this general topic are reprinted since they provide a valuable reference source. The appendices also include reprints of some relevant regulatory rules and guides on siting. Advantages and disadvantages of novel siting concepts such as underground containment, offshore siting, and nuclear energy parks are addressed. Other topics include site criteria, risk criteria, and nuclear ship criteria.