WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear arsenal production

  1. Supplying the nuclear arsenal: Production reactor technology, management, and policy, 1942--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, R.P.; Zenzen, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This book focuses on the lineage of America`s production reactors, those three at Hanford and their descendants, the reactors behind America`s nuclear weapons. The work will take only occasional sideways glances at the collateral lines of descent, the reactor cousins designed for experimental purposes, ship propulsion, and electric power generation. Over the decades from 1942 through 1992, fourteen American production reactors made enough plutonium to fuel a formidable arsenal of more than twenty thousand weapons. In the last years of that period, planners, nuclear engineers, and managers struggled over designs for the next generation of production reactors. The story of fourteen individual machines and of the planning effort to replace them might appear relatively narrow. Yet these machines lay at the heart of the nation`s nuclear weapons complex. The story of these machines is the story of arming the winning weapon, supplying the nuclear arms race. This book is intended to capture the history of the first fourteen production reactors, and associated design work, in the face of the end of the Cold War.

  2. Recent and prospective developments in nuclear arsenals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.

    1993-01-01

    Arms controllers have long complained that the only weapons states give up in arms control negotiations are strategically insignificant weapons. This is why the United States and Soviet Union shied away from giving up much in SALT I and SALT II: each side felt that it could not significantly reduce its nuclear forces, or take any step that might give the other side an advantage. Do not be fooled: policy makers in Washington and Moscow still believe that it is important to hang on to strategically significant weapons. But, because the world has changed in fundamental ways, fewer weapons are strategically significant today. Now that extended deterrence requirements have virtually disappeared, the main reason for having nuclear weapons is to deter other nuclear powers from attacking with their nuclear weapons. There is, therefore, no compelling reason for having large nuclear forces. Given concerns about unauthorized attacks, accidental launches, and high levels of defense spending, there are good reasons for deploying smaller forces. This is why Washington and Moscow have been cutting their nuclear arsenals to levels that were unimaginable even in 1990. How far this process will go is impossible to say at this juncture. What is clear is that Washington and Moscow can - and should - make even deeper cuts in their nuclear forces. If the United States and Russia retain arsenals with thousands of nuclear weapons, Britain, France, and China - whose arsenals contain hundreds of nuclear weapons - will not join the arms reduction process. Countries that have promised to give up the nuclear weapons currently stationed on their territory - Kazakhstan, the Ukraine, and Belorussia - will be more inclined to retain them, on the grounds that nuclear weapons are seen to have strategic and political value. For the same reasons, countries on the nuclear threshold, such as India, will be more inclined to acquire nuclear weapons. If the United States and Russia retain massive nuclear

  3. France's Nuclear Arsenal: What Sort of Renewal?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brustlein, Corentin

    2017-01-01

    Over the course of the next few years, France will have to renew its nuclear arsenal to ensure that it remains a credible deterrent in the eyes of its potential enemies. This update must occur within an unfavourable context: the strategic environment, marked by the multiplication of Jihadi fronts, has deteriorated, and budgetary discipline is the order of the day. Sacrificing nuclear deterrence at the altar of the fight against terrorism would, however, be a fatal error

  4. The nuclear arsenals and nuclear disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaby, F

    1998-01-01

    Current world stockpiles of nuclear weapons and the status of treaties for nuclear disarmament and the ultimate elimination of nuclear weapons are summarised. The need for including stockpiles of civil plutonium in a programme for ending production and disposing of fissile materials is emphasized, and the ultimate difficulty of disposing of the last few nuclear weapons discussed.

  5. China's nuclear arsenal and missile defence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rappai, M.V.

    2002-01-01

    Over the last few years, major focus of the nuclear debate has been turned towards the United States' proposal to erect a National Missile Defence (NMD) shield for itself. Of the existing nuclear weapon powers, China has been the most vociferous critic of this proposal. As and when this shield does become a reality, China will be the first to lose credibility as a deterrent against USA's existing nuclear arsenal. Therefore taking countermeasures against such a proposal is quite natural. China's approach towards non-proliferation mechanisms is steeped in realpolitik and its ability to manoeuvre them in its favour as a P5 and N5 power. Further, the Chinese leadership have been clear about the capabilities and limitations of nuclear weapons and treated them as diplomatic and political tools. The underlying aim is to preserve China's status as a dominant player in the international system while checkmating other possible challengers. Such a pragmatic approach is of far-reaching significance to all nations, especially those that possess nuclear weapons themselves. It will also be in India's long-term strategic interest to assess and take necessary corrective measures in its national security strategy, and make the composition of Indian nuclear strategy meet the desired goal. (author)

  6. Nuclear Arsenals at Low Numbers: When Less Is Different

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hustus, Hunter

    2015-01-01

    President Obama's 2009 speech in Prague is remembered as a call for the eventual elimination of nuclear weapons. It reinvigorated a long-overdue policy debate in the United States and Europe. Unfortunately, that debate is characterized by a focus on arsenal size that borders on numerology, a lack of imagination consistent with presentism, and…

  7. The Security of Russia's Nuclear Arsenal: The Human Factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, D.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Assertions by the Russian military that all of their nuclear weapons are secure against theft and that nuclear units within the military are somehow insulated from the problems plaguing the Russian military should not be accepted uncritically. Accordingly, we should not give unwarranted credence to the pronouncements of military figures like Cal.-Gen. Igor Valynkin, Chief of the Defense Ministry's 12th Main Directorate, which oversees the country's nuclear arsenal. He contends that ''Russian nuclear weapons are under reliable supervision'' and that ''talk about the unreliability of our control over nuclear weapons has only one pragmatic goal--to convince international society that the country is incapable of maintaining nuclear safety and to introduce international oversight over those weapons, as it is done, for example, in Iraq.'' While the comparison to Iraq is preposterous, many analysts might agree with Valynkin's sanguine appraisal of the security of Russia's nuclear weapons. In contrast, I argue that the numerous difficulties confronting the military as a whole should cause concern in the West over the security of the Russian nuclear arsenal

  8. The Chinese nuclear arsenal and its second-strike capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabestan, Jean-Pierre

    2013-03-01

    be subject to any restrictions or international scrutiny. A study published in 2011 by Georgetown University (China's Underground Great Wall: Challenge for Nuclear Arms Control) and directed by Phillip Karber announced that the People's Liberation Army was now in possession of some 3000 nuclear weapons, many of them mobile and largely stored in a 3000-mile (4800 km) long network of tunnels. All manner of experts immediately denounced this claim, some of whom quoted the total number of Chinese weapons at 240, of which only 50 are ICBMs capable of reaching American soil. However, shortly afterwards, other experts provided counter proposals: a Russian estimated that the Chinese strategic arsenal comprised 1600 to 1800 warheads. The FAS, citing a figure of 1660, stated nothing else. Furthermore, the (voluntary?) dissemination by China in 2012 of reassuring secret documents, such as 'the Science of campaigns of the Second Artillery' (nuclear weapons) calls for prudence. Finally, according to WikiLeaks, the West believes that China intends to match the United States in terms of its nuclear arsenal and its capability, by henceforth mastering, amongst others, MIRV technology (DF-41). In any case, in January 2013, President Obama asked the Pentagon to prepare a report by 15 August on the tunnels and the United States' conventional and nuclear ability to neutralise them. This constitutes sufficient indirect pressure to compel China into taking part in future negotiations on the reduction of strategic arsenals, pressure that China will no longer be able to completely ignore. (author)

  9. Pakistan's Nuclear Weapons: Proliferation and Security Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kerr, Paul; Nikitin, Mary B

    2007-01-01

    Pakistan's nuclear arsenal consists of approximately 60 nuclear warheads. Pakistan continues fissile material production for weapons, and is adding to its weapons production facilities and delivery vehicles...

  10. O ARSENAL DO ALFEITE

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, José

    2007-01-01

    O Arsenal do Alfeite, estabelecimento fabril da Marinha, constitui o principal órgão de suporte, no âmbito da logística do material naval, que nos últimos setenta anos tem vindo a assegurar a execução da manutenção da Esquadra, bem como a construção e a modernização de várias unidades navais. As preocupações relativamente à eficiência com que utiliza os recursos que lhe são postos ao dispor pela Marinha, e a eficácia que decorre da utilização desses mesmos recursos, em prol da disponibilid...

  11. Application of bacterial cytological profiling to crude natural product extracts reveals the antibacterial arsenal of Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonejuie, Poochit; Trial, Rachelle M; Newton, Gerald L; Lamsa, Anne; Ranmali Perera, Varahenage; Aguilar, Julieta; Liu, Wei-Ting; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Pogliano, Joe; Pogliano, Kit

    2016-05-01

    Although most clinically used antibiotics are derived from natural products, identifying new antibacterial molecules from natural product extracts is difficult due to the complexity of these extracts and the limited tools to correlate biological activity with specific molecules. Here, we show that bacterial cytological profiling (BCP) provides a rapid method for mechanism of action determination on plates and in complex natural product extracts and for activity-guided purification. We prepared an extract from Bacillus subtilis 3610 that killed the Escherichia coli lptD mutant and used BCP to observe two types of bioactivities in the unfractionated extract: inhibition of translation and permeablization of the cytoplasmic membrane. We used BCP to guide purification of the molecules responsible for each activity, identifying the translation inhibitors bacillaene and bacillaene B (glycosylated bacillaene) and demonstrating that two molecules contribute to cell permeabilitization, the bacteriocin subtilosin and the cyclic peptide sporulation killing factor. Our results suggest that bacillaene mediates translational arrest, and show that bacillaene B has a minimum inhibitory concentration 10 × higher than unmodified bacillaene. Finally, we show that BCP can be used to screen strains on an agar plate without the need for extract preparation, greatly saving time and improving throughput. Thus, BCP simplifies the isolation of novel natural products, by identifying strains, crude extracts and fractions with interesting bioactivities even when multiple activities are present, allowing investigators to focus labor-intensive steps on those with desired activities.

  12. Nuclear fuel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randol, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    The production of new fuel for a power plant reactor and its disposition following discharge from the power plant is usually referred to as the ''nuclear fuel cycle.'' The processing of fuel is cyclic in nature since sometime during a power plant's operation old or ''depleted'' fuel must be removed and new fuel inserted. For light water reactors this step typically occurs once every 12-18 months. Since the time required for mining of the raw ore to recovery of reusable fuel materials from discharged materials can span up to 8 years, the management of fuel to assure continuous power plant operation requires simultaneous handling of various aspects of several fuel cycles, for example, material is being mined for fuel to be inserted in a power plant 2 years into the future at the same time fuel is being reprocessed from a discharge 5 years prior. Important aspects of each step in the fuel production process are discussed

  13. Nuclear power production costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erramuspe, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The economic competitiveness of nuclear power in different highly developed countries is shown, by reviewing various international studies made on the subject. Generation costs (historical values) of Atucha I and Embalse Nuclear Power Plants, which are of the type used in those countries, are also included. The results of an international study on the economic aspects of the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle are also reviewed. This study shows its relatively low incidence in the generation costs. The conclusion is that if in Argentina the same principles of economic racionality were followed, nuclear energy would be economically competitive in the future, as it is today. This is of great importance in view of its almost unavoidable character of alternative source of energy, and specially since we have to expect an important growth in the consumption of electricity, due to its low share in the total consumption of energy, and the low energy consumption per capita in Argentina. (Author) [es

  14. Hydrocarbon production with nuclear explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade Watkins, J.

    1970-01-01

    The tremendous energy of nuclear explosives and the small dimensions of the explosive package make an ideal combination for drill-hole explosive emplacement in deep, thick hydrocarbon deposits. Potential applications exist in fracturing low permeability natural-gas and petroleum formations for stimulating production, fracturing oil shale to permit in situ retorting, and creating storage chimneys for natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, petroleum, petroleum products, helium, and other fluids. Calculations show, for example, that less than 100 shots per year would be needed to stabilize the natural gas reserves to production ratio. Under the Government-industry Plowshare program, two experiments, Projects Gasbuggy and Rulison, were conducted to stimulate natural gas production from low-permeability formations. Incomplete information indicates that both were technically successful. Potential problems associated with the use of nuclear explosives for underground engineering applications are radioactive contamination, maximum yield limitations, high costs of detonating contained nuclear explosives, and adverse public opinion. Results at Project Gasbuggy and other considerations indicated that the problem of radioactive contamination was about as predicted and not an insurmountable one. Also, it was demonstrated that shots at adequate depths could be detonated without appreciable damage to existing surface and subsurface buildings, natural features, and equipment. However, costs must be reduced and the public must be better informed before these techniques can be widely used in field operations. On the basis of present knowledge, the potential of nuclear-explosive stimulation of hydrocarbon production appears good. Additional field experiments will be required to adequately explore that potential. (author)

  15. Hydrocarbon production with nuclear explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade Watkins, J [Petroleum Research, Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, DC (United States)

    1970-05-01

    The tremendous energy of nuclear explosives and the small dimensions of the explosive package make an ideal combination for drill-hole explosive emplacement in deep, thick hydrocarbon deposits. Potential applications exist in fracturing low permeability natural-gas and petroleum formations for stimulating production, fracturing oil shale to permit in situ retorting, and creating storage chimneys for natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, petroleum, petroleum products, helium, and other fluids. Calculations show, for example, that less than 100 shots per year would be needed to stabilize the natural gas reserves to production ratio. Under the Government-industry Plowshare program, two experiments, Projects Gasbuggy and Rulison, were conducted to stimulate natural gas production from low-permeability formations. Incomplete information indicates that both were technically successful. Potential problems associated with the use of nuclear explosives for underground engineering applications are radioactive contamination, maximum yield limitations, high costs of detonating contained nuclear explosives, and adverse public opinion. Results at Project Gasbuggy and other considerations indicated that the problem of radioactive contamination was about as predicted and not an insurmountable one. Also, it was demonstrated that shots at adequate depths could be detonated without appreciable damage to existing surface and subsurface buildings, natural features, and equipment. However, costs must be reduced and the public must be better informed before these techniques can be widely used in field operations. On the basis of present knowledge, the potential of nuclear-explosive stimulation of hydrocarbon production appears good. Additional field experiments will be required to adequately explore that potential. (author)

  16. Nuclear techniques in food production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlin, J.P.C.

    1975-01-01

    This study is divided into three parts. The first, devoted to the use of radiations in food production, deals especially with artificial mutagenesis, selectors taking advantage of altered hereditary features in plants from irradiated seed; sterilization of animals to eliminate harmful insects (male sterilization technique); the lethal power of radiations used for the production of animal vaccins, attenuated by irradiation, against organisms which infest or degrade food products. Part two shows that radioactive atoms used as tracers to reveal migrations and chemical transformations of products such as fertilizers and pesticides can speed up all kinds of agronomical research. Their possibilities in research on animal feeding and to detect poisonous substances in foodstuffs are also mentioned. The last part is devoted to the use of nuclear techniques in irrigation and more precisely in the study of underground water flows soil moisture and lastly the future of nuclear desalination [fr

  17. Hydrogen Production Using Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, K. [Research Centre Juelich (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    world. In recent years, the scope of the IAEA's programme has been widened to include other more promising applications such as nuclear hydrogen production and higher temperature process heat applications. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, Euratom and the Generation IV International Forum have also shown interest in the non-electric applications of nuclear power based on future generation advanced and innovative nuclear reactors. This report was developed under an IAEA project with the objective of providing updated, balanced and objective information on the current status of hydrogen production processes using nuclear energy. It documents the state of the art of the development of hydrogen as an energy carrier in many Member States, as well as its corresponding production through the use of nuclear power. The report includes an introduction to the technology of nuclear process heat reactors as a means of producing hydrogen or other upgraded fuels, with a focus on high temperature reactor technology to achieve simultaneous generation of electricity and high temperature process heat and steam. Special emphasis is placed on the safety aspects of nuclear hydrogen production systems.

  18. Nuclear energy for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, K.

    2007-01-01

    In the long term, H 2 production technologies will be strongly focusing on CO 2 -neutral or CO 2 -free methods. Nuclear with its virtually no air-borne pollutants emissions appears to be an ideal option for large-scale centralized H 2 production. It will be driven by major factors such as production rates of fossil fuels, political decisions on greenhouse gas emissions, energy security and independence of foreign oil uncertainties, or the economics of large-scale hydrogen production and transmission. A nuclear reactor operated in the heat and power cogeneration mode must be located in close vicinity to the consumer's site, i.e., it must have a convincing safety concept of the combined nuclear/ chemical production plant. A near-term option of nuclear hydrogen production which is readily available is conventional low temperature electrolysis using cheap off-peak electricity from present nuclear power plants. This, however, is available only if the share of nuclear in power production is large. But as fossil fuel prices will increase, the use of nuclear outside base-load becomes more attractive. Nuclear steam reforming is another important near-term option for both the industrial and the transportation sector, since principal technologies were developed, with a saving potential of some 35 % of methane feedstock. Competitiveness will benefit from increasing cost level of natural gas. The HTGR heated steam reforming process which was simulated in pilot plants both in Germany and Japan, appears to be feasible for industrial application around 2015. A CO 2 emission free option is high temperature electrolysis which reduces the electricity needs up to about 30 % and could make use of high temperature heat and steam from an HTGR. With respect to thermochemical water splitting cycles, the processes which are receiving presently most attention are the sulfur-iodine, the Westinghouse hybrid, and the calcium-bromine (UT-3) cycles. Efficiencies of the S-I process are in the

  19. Hydrogen production by nuclear heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosbie, Leanne M.; Chapin, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    A major shift in the way the world obtains energy is on the horizon. For a new energy carrier to enter the market, several objectives must be met. New energy carriers must meet increasing production needs, reduce global pollution emissions, be distributed for availability worldwide, be produced and used safely, and be economically sustainable during all phases of the carrier lifecycle. Many believe that hydrogen will overtake electricity as the preferred energy carrier. Hydrogen can be burned cleanly and may be used to produce electricity via fuel cells. Its use could drastically reduce global CO 2 emissions. However, as an energy carrier, hydrogen is produced with input energy from other sources. Conventional hydrogen production methods are costly and most produce carbon dioxide, therefore, negating many of the benefits of using hydrogen. With growing concerns about global pollution, alternatives to fossil-based hydrogen production are being developed around the world. Nuclear energy offers unique benefits for near-term and economically viable production of hydrogen. Three candidate technologies, all nuclear-based, are examined. These include: advanced electrolysis of water, steam reforming of methane, and the sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle. The underlying technology of each process, advantages and disadvantages, current status, and production cost estimates are given. (author)

  20. Assessment of Mechanisms Impacting N-Nitrosodimethylamine Fate Within the North Boundary Containment System, Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gunnison, Douglas

    1997-01-01

    Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) was for many years a site of military chemical weapons manufacturing activities, including manufacture and assembly of weapons containing intermediate and toxic chemical end-products, incendiary...

  1. Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Leon; Wade, Dave

    2003-07-01

    During the past decade the interest in hydrogen as transportation fuel has greatly escalated. This heighten interest is partly related to concerns surrounding local and regional air pollution from the combustion of fossil fuels along with carbon dioxide emissions adding to the enhanced greenhouse effect. More recently there has been a great sensitivity to the vulnerability of our oil supply. Thus, energy security and environmental concerns have driven the interest in hydrogen as the clean and secure alternative to fossil fuels. Remarkable advances in fuel-cell technology have made hydrogen fueled transportation a near-term possibility. However, copious quantities of hydrogen must be generated in a manner independent of fossil fuels if environmental benefits and energy security are to be achieved. The renewable technologies, wind, solar, and geothermal, although important contributors, simply do not comprise the energy density required to deliver enough hydrogen to displace much of the fossil transportation fuels. Nuclear energy is the only primary energy source that can generate enough hydrogen in an energy secure and environmentally benign fashion. Methods of production of hydrogen from nuclear energy, the relative cost of hydrogen, and possible transition schemes to a nuclear-hydrogen economy will be presented.

  2. Automatic Requirements Specification Extraction from Natural Language (ARSENAL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    studies: the Time-Triggered Ethernet (TTEthernet) communication platform used in space, and FAA-Isolette infant incubators used in NICU . We...in space, and FAA-Isolette infant incubators used in Neonatal Intensive Care Units ( NICUs ). We systematically evalu- ated various aspects of ARSENAL...effect, we present the ARSENAL methodology. ARSENAL uses state-of-the-art advances in natural language processing (NLP) and formal methods (FM) to

  3. History of Nuclear Weapons Design and Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelrich, Ivan

    2007-04-01

    The nuclear build-up of the United States and the Soviet Union during the Cold War is often portrayed as an arms race. Some part was indeed a bilateral competition, but much was the result of automatic application of technical advances as they became available, without careful consideration of strategic implications. Thus, the history of nuclear weapon design is partly designers responding to stated military needs and partly the world responding to constant innovations in nuclear capability. Today, plans for a new nuclear warhead are motivated primarily by the desire to maintain a nuclear design and production capability for the foreseeable future.

  4. Un proyecto de arsenal para la Barceloneta (1743 / An Arsenal Project in La Barceloneta (1743

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo de la Fuente de Pablo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available En 1743 el ingeniero militar Miguel Marín diseñó un arsenal naval en Barcelona. En este artículo se estudia el contexto inmediato de este proyecto. Primeramente, la voluntad de trasladar la principal base naval mediterránea de Cartagena a la capital catalana. En segundo lugar, la relación centro-periferia y el papel del lobby catalán dentro del proceso.In 1743 Miguel Marín, a military engineer, designed the marine arsenal in Barcelona. In this paper, we study the background of this project. Firstly, the willingness to move the Mediterranean base of the Spanish Navy from Cartagena to the capital of Catalonia. Secondly, the centre-periphery relationship and the role of Catalan lobby in this process.

  5. Nuclear H2 production - a utility perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keuter, D.

    2010-01-01

    Entergy is the second largest nuclear owner/operator in the United States with five nuclear units in the south operating under a cost of service structure and an additional six units in the Northeast and Midwest operating as merchant generating facilities. As a major nuclear operator in the merchant sector, Entergy wears the risk of nuclear operations - revenues are directly dependent upon operational performance. Our investment in merchant nuclear operations reflects our belief that use of nuclear energy in the competitive merchant environment can be an economically viable business venture. Over the past 10 years, our success in the merchant sector has led to our support for the expanded use of nuclear energy and more specifically the development and deployment of advanced nuclear technologies. Of particular interest today is Entergy's support for the development of HTGR - nuclear technologies that can expand the application of nuclear energy into the broader energy marketplace. Studies and economic evaluations, thus far, have indicated that HTGR can compete with premium fossil fuels in supplying process heat for industrial processes and may well become competitive in the production of hydrogen for the bulk market. We believe that the application of nuclear energy in the broader energy marketplace is of vital importance to our nation's energy security and as an experienced merchant nuclear operator, we believe that business opportunities in this broader energy market will emerge. (author)

  6. Productivity studies of the nuclear waste programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, Haakan

    2002-08-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate reviews and supplements the SKB proposal for cost estimations for the nuclear waste programme. These estimations are of great importance for the determination of annual fees to the Nuclear Waste Fund and guarantee amounts in accordance with the Financing Act. The majority of the Nuclear Waste Fund's assets are invested in real interest bonds, issued by the Swedish state. The average duration for the Nuclear Waste Fund investments was 12.8 years at the end of December 2001. From July 1, 2002 on the Nuclear waste Fund investments will consist of nominal and real bonds on the official market. The Fund is increased in line with the Consumer Price Index (KPI). If real costs within the nuclear waste programme increase at a faster rate than the KPI, there is a risk that the Nuclear Waste Fund will be 'under balanced'. SKI has developed a weighted index, the KBS-3-index, to compare the SKB cost re-estimate with. Productivity changes have however no impact on these indices. The KBS-3-index indicates that there might be a risk that the de facto, cost increases will exceed KPI. An improved productivity might however balance the cost escalations. Productivity is normally defined as production divided by the input of production factors. The production can be a quantity measurement or the value added. A common approach is calculation of the labour productivity. The productivity development within different industries in Sweden and in EU varies, and is not only positive. The so called DEA method is used for productivity and efficiency measurements in public and private operations. Efficiency evaluations based on known norms are not made with the DEA models. Instead the evaluation is performed in relation to an empirically based reference technology, a relative efficiency. A selection or an optimisation of output is difficult for the nuclear waste programme. It is not possible to change parts of the nuclear waste programme to something else

  7. Use of nuclear energy for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, Damian

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The potentials of three hydrogen production processes under development for the industrial production of hydrogen using nuclear energy, namely the advanced electrolysis the steam reforming, the sulfur-iodine water splitting cycle, are compared and evaluated in this paper. Water electrolysis and steam reforming of methane are proven and used extensively today for the production of hydrogen. The overall thermal efficiency of the electrolysis includes the efficiency of the electrical power generation and of the electrolysis itself. The electrolysis process efficiency is about 75 % and of electrical power generation is only about 30 %, the overall thermal efficiency for H 2 generation being about 25 %. Steam reforming process consists of reacting methane (or natural gas) and steam in a chemical reactor at 800-900 deg. C, with a thermal efficiency of about 70 %. In a reforming process, with heat supplied by nuclear reactor, the heat must be supplied by a secondary loop from the nuclear side and be transferred to the methane/steam mixture, via a heat exchanger type reactor. The sulfur-iodine cycle, a thermochemical water splitting, is of particular interest because it produces hydrogen efficiently with no CO 2 as byproduct. If heated with a nuclear source it could prove to be an ideal environmental solution to hydrogen production. Steam reforming remains the cheapest hydrogen production method based on the latest estimates, even when implemented with nuclear reactor. The S-I cycle offers a close second solution and the electrolysis is the most expensive of the options for industrial H 2 production. The nuclear plant could power electrolysis operations right away; steam reforming with nuclear power is a little bit further off into the future, the first operation with nuclear facility is expected to have place in Japan in 2008. The S-I cycle implementation is still over the horizon, it will be more than 10 years until we will see that cycle in full scale

  8. Improving animal productivity by nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.; Jayasuriya, M.C.N.; Perera, B.M.A.O.

    1995-01-01

    The IAEA and FAO have run a joint programme for 30 years to assist national agricultural research systems in member states to develop, test and apply nuclear and related techniques for improving the productivity of livestock. Applications of nuclear technologies for improving livestock productivity include: use of radioimmunoassay in animal nutrition researches, animal production, and evaluating feeding and management systems through reproductive performance in a field. Geographic coverage and the type of livestock studies are: grazing animals (cattle, goats and sheep) in Africa, Latin America and Asia, as well as buffalo production in Asia. 6 refs, 8 figs, 6 tabs

  9. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, M.

    1984-09-01

    This is the tenth issue of a report series on Fission Product Data, which informs us about all the activities in this field, which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The types of activities included are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission), neutron reaction cross sections of fission products, data related to the radioactive decay of fission products, delayed neutron data of fission products, lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption, etc.). There is also a section with recent references relative to fission product nuclear data

  10. Logistics of nuclear fuel production for nuclear submarines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Leonam dos Santos

    2000-01-01

    The future acquisition of nuclear attack submarines by Brazilian Navy along next century will imply new requirements on Naval Logistic Support System. These needs will impact all the six logistic functions. Among them, fuel supply could be considered as the one which requires the most important capacitating effort, including not only technological development of processes but also the development of a national industrial basis for effective production of nuclear fuel. This paper presents the technical aspects of the processes involved and an annual production dimensioning for an squadron composed by four units. (author)

  11. Ownership and efficiency in nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollitt, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to the relatively small amount of academic literature on the efficiency of nuclear power production. The author draws on world-wide comparisons to illustrate the situation in the United Kingdom, where the nuclear generating capacity, conceived of and constructed as a public concern, has recently been privatised. The theory and evidence for links between ownership and productive efficiency is received. Efficiency measures used are explained as are the linear programs required to generate them. Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) is used to analyse productive efficiency of nuclear power plants before and after privatisation. Results of the DEA are used to test the hypothesis that ownership has no effect on productive efficiency. (UK)

  12. Nuclear desalination and electricity production for islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Dai Nghiep

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear desalination is an established and commercially proven technology that is now available and has the potential of further improvement. The technology of a small-sized reactor for desalination and electricity production will be an economically viable option and will also be suitable for islands with geographic, climatic, ecological and hydrological specifics. The operating experiences and achieved safety should benefit the early stage of a national nuclear power programme in developing countries. (author)

  13. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, G.

    1976-05-01

    The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on Fission Product Nuclear Data, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. This report consists of reproductions of essentially unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: fission product yields; neutron cross-section data of fission products; data related to β-, γ-decay of fission products; delayed neutron data; and fission product decay-heat

  14. Nuclear energy for sustainable Hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyoshev, G.

    2004-01-01

    There is general agreement that hydrogen as an universal energy carrier could play increasingly important role in energy future as part of a set of solutions to a variety of energy and environmental problems. Given its abundant nature, hydrogen has been an important raw material in the organic chemical industry. At recent years strong competition has emerged between nations as diverse as the U.S., Japan, Germany, China and Iceland in the race to commercialize hydrogen energy vehicles in the beginning of 21st Century. Any form of energy - fossil, renewable or nuclear - can be used to generate hydrogen. The hydrogen production by nuclear electricity is considered as a sustainable method. By our presentation we are trying to evaluate possibilities for sustainable hydrogen production by nuclear energy at near, medium and long term on EC strategic documents basis. The main EC documents enter water electrolysis by nuclear electricity as only sustainable technology for hydrogen production in early stage of hydrogen economy. In long term as sustainable method is considered the splitting of water by thermochemical technology using heat from high temperature reactors too. We consider that at medium stage of hydrogen economy it is possible to optimize the sustainable hydrogen production by high temperature and high pressure water electrolysis by using a nuclear-solar energy system. (author)

  15. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, G.

    1975-01-01

    This is the first issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND), published every six months by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Its purpose is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: fission product yields; neutron cross-section data of fission products; data related to β-, γ-decay of fission products; delayed neutron data; and fission product decay-heat. The present issue includes contributions which were received by NDS before 1 November 1975

  16. Nuclear energy products except the electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Technically the fission reactors, on service or under construction, can produce other products than the electric power. Meanwhile, these applications are known since the beginning of the reactors exploitation, they never have been developed industrially. This report examines the necessary technical characteristics for using the nuclear systems on non electric power applications with an economical efficiency. What are the markets for these products? What are the strategical challenges to favor the development of non electric power applications of the nuclear energy? (A.L.B.)

  17. Medical Radioisotopes Production Without A Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Keur, H.

    2010-05-15

    This report is answering the key question: Is it possible to ban the use of research reactors for the production of medical radioisotopes? Chapter 2 offers a summarized overview on the history of nuclear medicine. Chapter 3 gives an overview of the basic principles and understandings of nuclear medicine. The production of radioisotopes and its use in radiopharmaceuticals as a tracer for imaging particular parts of the inside of the human body (diagnosis) or as an agent in radiotherapy. Chapter 4 lists the use of popular medical radioisotopes used in nuclear imaging techniques and radiotherapy. Chapter 5 analyses reactor-based radioisotopes that can be produced by particle accelerators on commercial scale, other alternatives and the advantages of the cyclotron. Chapter 6 gives an overview of recent developments and prospects in worldwide radioisotopes production. Chapter 7 presents discussion, conclusions and recommendations, and is answering the abovementioned key question of this report: Is it possible to ban the use of a nuclear reactor for the production of radiopharmaceuticals? Is a safe and secure production of radioisotopes possible?.

  18. Technical Integration of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Young; Chang, J. H.; Park, J. K.

    2007-06-01

    These works focus on the development of attainment indices for nuclear hydrogen key technologies, the analysis of the hydrogen production process and the performance estimation for hydrogen production system, and the assessment of the nuclear hydrogen production economy. To estimate the attainments of the key technologies in progress with the performance goals of GIF, itemized are the attainment indices based on SRP published in VHTR R and D steering committee of Gen-IV. For assessing the degree of attainments in comparison with the final goals of VHTR technologies in progress of researches, subdivided are the prerequisite items conformed to the NHDD concepts established in a preconceptual design in 2005. The codes for analyzing the hydrogen production economy are developed for calculating the unit production cost of nuclear hydrogen. We developed basic R and D quality management methodology to meet design technology of VHTR's needs. By putting it in practice, we derived some problems and solutions. We distributed R and D QAP and Q and D QAM to each teams and these are in operation. Computer simulations are performed for estimating the thermal efficiency for the electrodialysis component likely to adapting as one of the hydrogen production system in Korea and EED-SI process known as the key components of the hydrogen production systems. Using the commercial codes, the process diagrams and the spread-sheets were produced for the Bunsen reaction process, Sulphuric Acid dissolution process and HI dissolution process, respectively, which are the key components composing of the SI process

  19. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, M.

    1981-06-01

    This is the seventh issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The present issue contains also a section with some recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission); neutron reaction cross sections of fission products; data related to the radioactive decay of fission products; delayed neutron data of fission products; and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The sixth issue of this series has been published in June 1980 as INDC(NDS)-113/G+P. The present issue includes contributions which were received by NDS between 1 August 1980 and 25 May 1981

  20. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, M.

    1982-07-01

    This is the eighth issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The main part of this report consists of unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. Therefore, the IAEA cannot be held responsible for the information contained nor for any consequences resulting from the use of this information. The present issue contains also a section with some recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: Fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission); Neutron reaction cross sections of fission products; Data related to the radioactive decay of fission products; Delayed neutron data of fission products; and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The seventh issue of this series has been published in July 1981 as INDC(NDS)-116. The present issue includes contributions which were received by NDS between 1 August 1981 and 15 June 1982

  1. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, M.

    1983-08-01

    This is the ninth issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The main part of this report consists of unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. The present issue contains also a section with some recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: Fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission); Neutron reaction cross sections of fission products; Data related to the radioactive decay of fission products; Delayed neutron data of fission products; and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The eighth issue of this series has been published in July 1982 as INDC(NDS)-130. The present issue includes contributions which were received by NDS between 1 August 1982 and 25 June 1983

  2. Simulation methods for nuclear production scheduling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, W.T.; Markel, L.C.

    1975-01-01

    Recent developments and applications of simulation methods for use in nuclear production scheduling and fuel management are reviewed. The unique characteristics of the nuclear fuel cycle as they relate to the overall optimization of a mixed nuclear-fossil system in both the short-and mid-range time frame are described. Emphasis is placed on the various formulations and approaches to the mid-range planning problem, whose objective is the determination of an optimal (least cost) system operation strategy over a multi-year planning horizon. The decomposition of the mid-range problem into power system simulation, reactor core simulation and nuclear fuel management optimization, and system integration models is discussed. Present utility practices, requirements, and research trends are described. 37 references

  3. Production of nuclear grade zirconium: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, L., E-mail: L.Xu-2@tudelft.nl [School of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft 2628 CD (Netherlands); Xiao, Y. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan 243002 (China); Zr-Hf-Ti Metallurgie B.V., Den Haag 2582 SB (Netherlands); Sandwijk, A. van [Zr-Hf-Ti Metallurgie B.V., Den Haag 2582 SB (Netherlands); Xu, Q. [School of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Yang, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft 2628 CD (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    Zirconium is an ideal material for nuclear reactors due to its low absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons, whereas the typically contained hafnium with strong neutron-absorption is very harmful for zirconium as a fuel cladding material. This paper provides an overview of the processes for nuclear grade zirconium production with emphasis on the methods of Zr–Hf separation. The separation processes are roughly classified into hydro- and pyrometallurgical routes. The known pyrometallurgical Zr–Hf separation methods are discussed based on the following reaction features: redox characteristics, volatility, electrochemical properties and molten salt–metal equilibrium. In the present paper, the available Zr–Hf separation technologies are compared. The advantages and disadvantages as well as future directions of research and development for nuclear grade zirconium production are discussed.

  4. Spent nuclear fuel project product specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.

    1999-01-01

    This document establishes the limits and controls for the significant parameters that could potentially affect the safety and/or quality of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) packaged for processing, transport, and storage. The product specifications in this document cover the SNF packaged in Multi-Canister Overpacks to be transported throughout the SNF Project

  5. Ethanol production using nuclear petite yeast mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutter, A.; Oliver, S.G. [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, UMIST, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    Two respiratory-deficient nuclear petites, FY23{Delta}pet191 and FY23{Delta}cox5a, of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were generated using polymerase-chain-reaction-mediated gene disruption, and their respective ethanol tolerance and productivity assessed and compared to those of the parental grande, FY23WT, and a mitochondrial petite, FY23{rho}{sup 0}. Batch culture studies demonstrated that the parental strain was the most tolerant to exogenously added ethanol with an inhibition constant. K{sub i}, of 2.3% (w/v) and a specific rate of ethanol production, q{sub p}, of 0.90 g ethanol g dry cells{sup -1} h{sup -1}. FY23{rho}{sup 0} was the most sensitive to ethanol, exhibiting a K{sub i} of 1.71% (w/v) and q{sub p} of 0.87 g ethanol g dry cells{sup -1} h{sup -1}. Analyses of the ethanol tolerance of the nuclear petites demonstrate that functional mitochondria are essential for maintaining tolerance to the toxin with the 100% respiratory-deficient nuclear petite, FY23{Delta}pet191, having a K{sub i} of 2.14% (w/v) and the 85% respiratory-deficient FY23{Delta}cox5a, having a K{sub i} of 1.94% (w/v). The retention of ethanol tolerance in the nuclear petites as compared to that of FY23{rho}{sup 0} is mirrored by the ethanol productivities of these nuclear mutants, being respectively 43% and 30% higher than that of the respiratory-sufficient parent strain. This demonstrates that, because of their respiratory deficiency, the nuclear petites are not subject of the Pasteur effect and so exhibit higher rates of fermentation. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of Nuclear Hydrogen Production System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Won Seok; Park, C. K.; Park, J. K. and others

    2006-04-01

    The major objective of this work is tow-fold: one is to develop a methodology to determine the best VHTR types for the nuclear hydrogen demonstration project and the other is to evaluate the various hydrogen production methods in terms of the technical feasibility and the effectiveness for the optimization of the nuclear hydrogen system. Both top-tier requirements and design requirements have been defined for the nuclear hydrogen system. For the determination of the VHTR type, a comparative study on the reference reactors, PBR and PBR, was conducted. Based on the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) method, a systematic methodology has been developed to compare the two VHTR types. Another scheme to determine the minimum reactor power was developed as well. Regarding the hydrogen production methods, comparison indices were defined and they were applied to the IS (Iodine-Sulfur) scheme, Westinghouse process, and the, high-temperature electrolysis method. For the HTE, IS, and MMI cycle, the thermal efficiency of hydrogen production were systematically evaluated. For the IS cycle, an overall process was identified and the functionality of some key components was identified. The economy of the nuclear hydrogen was evaluated, relative to various primary energy including natural gas coal, grid-electricity, and renewable. For the international collaborations, two joint research centers were established: NH-JRC between Korea and China and NH-JDC between Korea and US. Currently, several joint researches are underway through the research centers

  7. Nuclear material production cycle vulnerability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bott, T.F.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses a method for rapidly and systematically identifying vulnerable equipment in a nuclear material or similar production process and ranking that equipment according to its attractiveness to a malevolent attacker. A multistep approach was used in the analysis. First, the entire production cycle was modeled as a flow diagram. This flow diagram was analyzed using graph theoretical methods to identify processes in the production cycle and their locations. Models of processes that were judged to be particularly vulnerable based on the cycle analysis then were developed in greater detail to identify equipment in that process that is vulnerable to intentional damage

  8. Oil sand synfuel production using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnert, H.

    1984-10-01

    The importance of oil sand as a primary energy carrier is illustrated. The oil sand mining project 'synfuel' in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, is described. On the basis of a layout of an In-situ-process different possibilities of introducing nuclear energy to the process are described. This leads to an increase of the product yield, leading finally to a doubling of the energy output compared to the reference layout. The introduction of nuclear energy contributes to the reduction of emissions, in particular to the emission of carbon dioxide in the conversion process. (orig.)

  9. JNDC nuclear data library of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, Kanji; Ihara, Hitoshi; Akiyama, Masatsugu; Yoshida, Tadashi; Matumoto, Zyun-itiro; Nakasima, Ryuzo

    1983-10-01

    The JNDC (Japanese Nuclear Data Committee) FP (Fission Product) nuclear data library for 1172 fission products is described in this report. The gross theory of beta decay has been used extensively for estimating unknown decay data and also some of known decay data with poor accuracy. The calculated decay powers of fission products using the present library show excellent agreement with the latest measurements at ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), LANL (Los Alamos National Laboratory) and UTT (University of Tokyo, Tokai) for cooling times shorter than 10 3 s after irradiation. The calculated decay powers by the existing libraries showed systematic deviations at short cooling times; the calculated beta and gamma decay powers after burst fission were smaller than the experimental results for cooling times shorter than 10 s, and in the cooling time range 10 to 10 3 s the beta-decay power was larger than the measured values and the gamma decay power smaller than the measured results. The present JNDC FP nuclear data library resolved these discrepancies in the short cooling time ranges. The decay power of fission products has been calculated for ten fission types and the results have been fitted by an analytical function with 31 exponentials. This permits the easy application of the present results of decay power calculations to a LOCA (Loss-of-Coolant Accident) analysis of a light water reactor and so on. (author)

  10. Safety issues of nuclear production of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piera, Mireia; Martinez-Val, Jose M.; Jose Montes, Ma

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is not an uncommon issue in Nuclear Safety analysis, particularly in relation to severe accidents. On the other hand, hydrogen is a household name in the chemical industry, particularly in oil refineries, and is also a well known chemical element currently produced by steam reforming of natural gas, and other methods (such as coal gasification). In the not-too-distant future, hydrogen will have to be produced (by chemical reduction of water) using renewable and nuclear energy sources. In particular, nuclear fission seems to offer the cheapest way to provide the primary energy in the medium-term. Safety principles are fundamental guidelines in the design, construction and operation both of hydrogen facilities and nuclear power plants. When these two technologies are integrated, a complete safety analysis must consider not only the safety practices of each industry, but any interaction that could be established between them. In particular, any accident involving a sudden energy release from one of the facilities can affect the other. Release of dangerous substances (chemicals, radiotoxic effluents) can also pose safety problems. Although nuclear-produced hydrogen facilities will need specific approaches and detailed analysis on their safety features, a preliminary approach is presented in this paper. No significant roadblocks are identified that could hamper the deployment of this new industry, but some of the hydrogen production methods will involve very demanding safety standards

  11. Chemical immobilization of fission products reactive with nuclear reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.N.; Kaznoff, A.I.; Clukey, H.V.

    1975-01-01

    This invention teaches a method of immobilizing deleterious fission products produced in nuclear fuel materials during nuclear fission chain reactions through the use of additives. The additives are disposed with the nuclear fuel materials in controlled quantities to form new compositions preventing attack of reactor components, especially nuclear fuel cld, by the deleterious fission products. (Patent Office Record)

  12. Some political issues related to future special nuclear materials production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peaslee, A.T. Jr.

    1981-08-01

    The Federal Government must take action to assure the future adequate supply of special nuclear materials for nuclear weapons. Existing statutes permit the construction of advanced defense production reactors and the reprocessing of commercial spent fuel for the production of special materials. Such actions would not only benefit the US nuclear reactor manufacturers, but also the US electric utilities that use nuclear reactors

  13. Production of nuclear graphite in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legendre, P.; Mondet, L.; Arragon, Ph.; Cornuault, P.; Gueron, J.; Hering, H.

    1955-01-01

    The graphite intended for the construction of the reactors is obtained by the usual process: confection of a cake from coke of oil and tar, cooked (in a electric oven) then the product of cook is graphitized, also by electric heating. The use of the air transportation and the control of conditions cooking and graphitization have permitted to increase the nuclear graphite production as well as to better control their physical and mechanical properties and to reduce to the minimum the unwanted stains. (M.B.) [fr

  14. Nuclear hydrogen production and its safe handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hongsuk; Paek, Seungwoo; Kim, Kwang-Rag; Ahn, Do-Hee; Lee, Minsoo; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the hydrogen related research presently undertaken at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute are presented. These encompass nuclear hydrogen production, hydrogen storage, and the safe handling of hydrogen, High temperature gas-cooled reactors can play a significant role, with respect to large-scale hydrogen production, if used as the provider of high temperature heat in fossil fuel conversion or thermochemical cycles. A variety of potential hydrogen production methods for high temperature gas-cooled reactors were analyzed. They are steam reforming of natural gas, thermochemical cycles, etc. The produced hydrogen should be stored safely. Titanium metal was tested primarily because its hydride has very low dissociation pressures at normal storage temperatures and a high capacity for hydrogen, it is easy to prepare and is non-reactive with air in the expected storage conditions. There could be a number of potential sources of hydrogen evolution risk in a nuclear hydrogen production facility. In order to reduce the deflagration detonation it is necessary to develop hydrogen control methods that are capable of dealing with the hydrogen release rate. A series of experiments were conducted to assess the catalytic recombination characteristics of hydrogen in an air stream using palladium catalysts. (author)

  15. Technical Integration of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Young; Park, J. K.; Chang, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    These works focus on the development of attainment indices for nuclear hydrogen key technologies, the analysis of the hydrogen production process and the performance estimation for hydrogen production systems, and the assessment of the nuclear hydrogen production cost. For assessing the degree of attainments in comparison with the final goals of VHTR technologies in progress of researches, subdivided are the prerequisite items confirmed to the NHDD concepts. We developed and applied R and D quality management methodology to meet 'Development of Key Technologies for Nuclear Hydrogen' project. And we also distributed R and D QAM and R and D QAP to each teams and are in operation. The preconceptual flow diagrams of SI, HTSE, and HyS processes are introduced and their material and energy balances have been proposed. The hydrogen production thermal efficiencies of not only the SI process as a reference process but also the HTSE and HyS processes were also estimated. Technical feasibility assessments of SI, HTSE, and HyS processes have been carried out by using the pair-wise comparison and analytic hierarchy process, and it is revealed that the experts are considering the SI process as the most feasible process. The secondary helium pathway across the SI process is introduced. Dynamic simulation codes for the H2S04vaporizer, sulfuric acid and sulfur trioxide decomposers, and HI decomposer on the secondary helium pathway and for the primary and secondary sulfuric acid distillation columns, HIx solution distillation column, and preheater for HI vapor have been developed and integrated

  16. Nuclear fuel particle and method of production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner-Loffler, M.

    1975-01-01

    The core consisting of fuel oxide (UO 2 or Th or Pu oxide) of a fuel particle coated with carbon-contained material is enriched with a small addition (max 6 wt.%) of a Ba or Sr compound (atomic ratio for nuclear fuel oxide Ba being 5 - 10 : 1) which is to prevent fission products breaking the protective carbon and/or silicon carbide coating; the Ba or Sr molybdate generated is to reduce the pressure of the carbon dioxide produced. Methods to manufacture such nuclear fuel particles are proposed where 1) an agglomerisation and shaping of the spheres in a fast cycling bowle and 2) a formation of drops from a colloidal solution which are made to congeal in a liquid paraffin column, take place followed by the pyrolytic coating of the particles. (UWI/LH) [de

  17. Impact of competition on nuclear production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slade, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The Comprehensive National Energy Policy Act of 1992 made access to utility transmission systems by Independent other utilities, and wholesale generators easier and cheaper. Further, the law requires that transmission rates be set to allow recovery of only legitimate and verifiable costs. According to Douglas Smith in the January 1993 issue of Power Engineering, non-utility generators of electricity increased installed capacity by 16% from 1989 to 1990. During that same period, regulated utilities added only 1% of new capacity. By 1993 non-utility generation is expected to supply 62,000 Megawatts of U.S. electric power. It is likely that with the transmission barrier to entry decreased, the non-utility generators will continue to expand even faster. Recent rulings by several public service commissions have put utilities on-notice that future additions to capacity will have to be demonstrated to be the most cost-effective method to serve customers' needs. In the nuclear production part of the business, the author has already started to see some impact from this increased competition: Trojan, Yankee Rowe, San Onofre-1, and Rancho Seco, have either shut down or have announced their imminent shutdown as a result of economic concerns. The paper presents ten years of operating and maintenance costs taken from Utility Data Institute reports of data reported to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) by the utilities who operate the nuclear and fossil production facilities in the United States. It is apparent that the non-fuel costs for nuclear plants have increased substantially. This paper examines the impacts of these cost increases on the ability of nuclear plants to compete in an increasingly competitive marketplace

  18. Molten salts and nuclear energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Brun, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Molten salts (fluorides or chlorides) were considered near the beginning of research into nuclear energy production. This was initially due to their advantageous physical and chemical properties: good heat transfer capacity, radiation insensitivity, high boiling point, wide range solubility for actinides. In addition it was realised that molten salts could be used in numerous situations: high temperature heat transfer, core coolants with solid fuels, liquid fuel in a molten salt reactor, solvents for spent nuclear solid fuel in the case of pyro-reprocessing and coolant and tritium production in the case of fusion. Molten salt reactors, one of the six innovative concepts chosen by the Generation IV international forum, are particularly interesting for use as either waste incinerators or thorium cycle systems. As the neutron balance in the thorium cycle is very tight, the possibility to perform online extraction of some fission product poisons from the salt is very attractive. In this article the most important questions that must be addressed to demonstrate the feasibility of molten salt reactor will be reviewed

  19. Nuclear techniques in animal production and health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moustgaard, J [Institute of Physiology, Endocrinology and Bloodgrouping, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1976-07-01

    In the fight against animal diseases, especially parasitic infections, nuclear techniques have also proved to be of great value, namely in the production of irradiated vaccines against helminthic diseases. In this context it should be stressed that reduced productivity due to protein loss caused by intestinal parasites is a problem of paramount economic importance in developing as well as developed countries. Recently radioisotopes in the so-called radioimmunoassays have also been applied in determination of the hormonal status of farm animals and to elucidate its relation to the environment and to the physiological and nutritional condition of the animal. This rapidly developing technique may make it possible to control the reproductive performance of cattle and sheep more efficiently than has hitherto been the case. Production of animal protein of a high biological value for human nutrition is still a problem of great concern for the less developed countries. Without doubt the use of nuclear techniques, hand in hand with other research methods, will be of great help in overcoming this condition, always provided that the countries in question possess the necessary equipment and trained personnel.

  20. Nuclear techniques in animal production and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustgaard, J.

    1976-01-01

    In the fight against animal diseases, especially parasitic infections, nuclear techniques have also proved to be of great value, namely in the production of irradiated vaccines against helminthic diseases. In this context it should be stressed that reduced productivity due to protein loss caused by intestinal parasites is a problem of paramount economic importance in developing as well as developed countries. Recently radioisotopes in the so-called radioimmunoassays have also been applied in determination of the hormonal status of farm animals and to elucidate its relation to the environment and to the physiological and nutritional condition of the animal. This rapidly developing technique may make it possible to control the reproductive performance of cattle and sheep more efficiently than has hitherto been the case. Production of animal protein of a high biological value for human nutrition is still a problem of great concern for the less developed countries. Without doubt the use of nuclear techniques, hand in hand with other research methods, will be of great help in overcoming this condition, always provided that the countries in question possess the necessary equipment and trained personnel

  1. Detector for gaseous nuclear fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Kubo, Katsumi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the fabrication of a precipitator type detector, as well as improve the reliability. Constitution: Gas to be measured flown in an anode is stored in a gas processing system. By applying a voltage between the anode and the cathode, if positively charged Rb or Cs which is the daughter products of gaseous fission products are present in the gas to be measured, the daughter products are successively deposited electrostatically to the cathode. The daughter products issue beta-rays and gamma-rays to ionize the argon gas at the anode, whereby ionizing current flows between both of the electrodes. Pulses are generated from the ionizing current, and presence or absence, as well as the amount of the gaseous fission products are determined by the value recorded for the number of the pulses to thereby detect failures in the nuclear fuel elements. After the completion of the detection, the inside of the anode is evacuated and the cathode is heated to evaporate and discharge the daughter products externally. This eliminates the effects of the former detection to the succeeding detection. (Moriyama, K.)

  2. Hybrid reactors: Nuclear breeding or energy production?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piera, Mireia; Lafuente, Antonio; Abanades, Alberto; Martinez-Val, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    After reviewing the long-standing tradition on hybrid research, an assessment model is presented in order to characterize the hybrid performance under different objectives. In hybrids, neutron multiplication in the subcritical blanket plays a major role, not only for energy production and nuclear breeding, but also for tritium breeding, which is fundamental requirement in fusion-fission hybrids. All three objectives are better achieved with high values of the neutron multiplication factor (k-eff) with the obvious and fundamental limitation that it cannot reach criticality under any event, particularly, in the case of a loss of coolant accident. This limitation will be very important in the selection of the coolant. Some general considerations will be proposed, as guidelines for assessing the hybrid potential in a given scenario. Those guidelines point out that hybrids can be of great interest for the future of nuclear energy in a framework of Sustainable Development, because they can contribute to the efficient exploitation of nuclear fuels, with very high safety features. Additionally, a proposal is presented on a blanket specially suited for fusion-fission hybrids, although this reactor concept is still under review, and new work is needed for identifying the most suitable blanket composition, which can vary depending on the main objective of the hybrid.

  3. Spent nuclear fuel project product specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajunen, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    Product specifications are limits and controls established for each significant parameter that potentially affects safety and/or quality of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) packaged for transport to dry storage. The product specifications in this document cover the spent fuel packaged in MultiCanister Overpacks (MCOs) to be transported throughout the SNF Project. The SNF includes N Reactor fuel and single-pass reactor fuel. The FRS removes the SNF from the storage canisters, cleans it, and places it into baskets. The MCO loading system places the baskets into MCO/Cask assembly packages. These packages are then transferred to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility. After drying at the CVD Facility, the MCO cask packages are transferred to the Canister Storage Building (CSB), where the MCOs are removed from the casks, staged, inspected, sealed (by welding), and stored until a suitable permanent disposal option is implemented. The key criteria necessary to achieve these goals are documented in this specification

  4. Natural gas production from underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1965-01-01

    A remote location in Rio Arriba County, NW. New Mexico, is being considered as the site for an experiment in the use of a nuclear explosive to increase production from a natural gas field. A feasibility study has been conducted by the El Paso Natural Gas Co., the U.S. Atomic Energy commission, and the U.S. Bureau of Mines. As presently conceived, a nuclear explosive would be set in an emplacement hole and detonated. The explosion would create a cylinder or ''chimney'' of collapsed rock, and a network of fractures extending beyond the chimney. The fractures are the key effect. These would consist of new fractures, enlargement of existing ones, and movement along planes where strata overlap. In addition, there are a number of intangible but important benefits that could accrue from the stimulating effect. Among these are the great increase in recoverable reserves and the deliverability of large volumes of gas during the periods of high demand. It is believed that this type of well stimulation may increase the total gas production of these low permeability natural gas fields by about 7 times the amounts now attainable.

  5. Nuclear techniques in Australian animal production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    In tropical and sub-tropical regions, the production of domestic animals is frequently depressed by the climatic and ecological conditions. These negative effects can be overcome to a great extent by improved methods of animal and land management. In animal research, nuclear techniques are playing an important role in the study of different aspects of nutrition, metabolism, reproduction and health of domestic animals. In response to the need expressed by Member States for more information on these techniques, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture and the IAEA's Division of Technical Assistance organized a study tour to Australia, a country which has developed considerable expertise in agricultural and animal research. The purpose of the study tour was to enable veterinary and animal scientists and administrators from developing countries in Asia and the Far East to observe at first hand the ways in which animal production, particularly meat, milk and wool, can be increased in tropical and sub-tropical areas. Fourteen senior scientists and research directors from seven Asian countries (Bangladesh, India, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Sri Lanka and Thailand) participated. The counterpart organizations in Australia were the Australian Development Assistance Agency (ADAA) and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO). The chief programmer and co-ordinator of the study tour was John E. Vercoe, officer-in-charge of CSIRO's Tropical Cattle Research Centre in Rockhampton, and a former IAEA staff member. The tour was financed by the United Nations Development Programme. The participants visited research facilities of universities, national and state laboratories and commercial cattle producers. The tour started at Sydney and proceeded north along the east coast of Australia to Townsville. On the way, major stops were made in Armidale, Grafton, Wollongbar, Brisbane and Rockhampton. In Rockhampton, a

  6. Cultural Landscape Inventory for Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    hollow clay tile. Each area is significant for the way that the structures within it are interrelated. ERDC/CERL TR-16-17 21 A steep ridge west of...side of Lake Denmark, located at the northeastern corner of the arsenal. The 900 Area includes several hollow clay tile magazines constructed in...Underground Electric Lines 82712 1983 Chilled Water Distribution System 83210 1942 AAL Sanitary Sewer 84210 1942 AAL Potable Water Distribution

  7. Litigation Technical Support and Services, Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    34 d V) W C > - d) 4- -~ 0 - - .4 ..- di L *..L 3~1 3-~ v mi a- a t - --- w- Vdi 4 - ý 0 -4 0 m~ -j m0 m’ .- us 0 Ill i to -v .4 I 4 1 t A ~ 3Ul t -4...2060. Marlow, D. J. 1979g, November 8. Pest control report, October 1979. Rocky Mountain Arsenal. Microfilm RMA182, Franes 2048 -2053 Marlow, D. J

  8. Emerging nuclear energy systems and nuclear weapon proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gsponer, A.; Sahin, S.; Jasani, B.

    1983-01-01

    Generally when considering problems of proliferation of nuclear weapons, discussions are focused on horizontal proliferation. However, the emerging nuclear energy systems currently have an impact mainly on vertical proliferation. The paper indicates that technologies connected with emerging nuclear energy systems, such as fusion reactors and accelerators, enhance the knowledge of thermonuclear weapon physics and will enable production of military useful nuclear materials (including some rare elements). At present such technologies are enhancing the arsenal of the nuclear weapon states. But one should not forget the future implications for horizontal proliferation of nuclear weapons as some of the techniques will in the near future be within the technological and economic capabilities of non-nuclear weapon states. Some of these systems are not under any international control. (orig.) [de

  9. Authentication of gold products by nuclear methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jesus, A.S.M.

    1985-01-01

    The falsification of valuable gold items is a threat to the authenticity of gold products. To solve this, there is a continuous search for reliable, practicle and cost-effective means of identifying forgeries. Because nuclear techniques as applied to elemental analysis have a high degree of specificity, are non-destructive and permit the availability of results within a relatively short time, a few of these techniques were investigated and reviewed in the article. Work on some promising methods in the author's laboratory is also discussed. Constraints such as those imposed by the time taken by the measurement, negligible residual activity within a relatively short time were also considered. The techniques that were investigated include: the transmission of electromagnetic radiation through a medium; scattering of electromagnetic radiation; x-ray fluorescence analysis; neutron activation analysis; activation by the inelastic scattering of gamma radiation; activation by the inelastic scattering of fast neutrons; absorption and scattering of fast neutrons; self-attenuation of gamma radiation. The shape of the object being investigated, should also be considered. It is concluded that a system based on the inelastic scattering of neutrons emitted by a 241 Am/Be source (halflife = 433 years) is practical and capable of authenticating gold and gold alloy coins such as Krugerrands. The feasibility study on the assaying of gold jewelry by means of nuclear methods also showed it to be impractical

  10. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, Hans M. [Federation of American Scientists, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-05-09

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  11. Nuclear compression effects on pion production in nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, M.; Gyulassy, M.; Wakai, M.; Kitazoe, Y.

    1984-11-01

    The pion multiplicity produced in nuclear collisions between 0.2 and 2 AGeV is calculated assuming shock formation. We also correct the procedure of extracting the nuclear equation of state as proposed by Stock et al. The nuclear equation of state would have to be extremely stiff for this model to reproduce the observed multiplicities. The assumptions of this model are critically analyzed. (author)

  12. Countermeasures for dairy products in nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkko, K.; Ammann, M.; Kostiainen, E.; Salo, A.; Liskola, K.; Haemaelaeinen, R.P.; Mustajoki, J.

    2001-01-01

    This work was performed in order to plan countermeasures that, after an accidental release of radioactivity, could reduce the dose to the public due to the consumption of contaminated milk and milk products. The attention was focused on whether there are justified and optimised actions below the international recommended concentration levels in foodstuffs. The analysis was conducted as a case study, i.e., it was assumed that a hypothetical accident had happened in a nuclear power plant leading to a release of radionuclides which severely contaminated a wide area of Ostrobothnia, one of Finland's most important milk production areas. The dose averted by actions, the' monetary costs and the feasibility of actions were assessed. It was also studied what information is needed by decision-makers and in which form this information should be presented. Finally, it was examined how planning of countermeasures could be enhanced by applying decision analysis in establishing actions strategies and valuing attributes considered in decision making. Preparative meetings and a concluding workshop was arranged and all authorities involved in food-related emergency management were invited to jointly analyse different options. According to the query made the participants considered the decision workshop and decision analysis very practicable in exercises. The exercise as a whole was also evaluated useful or very useful. The presented techniques in a real situation were considered applicable but not as useful as in exercises. Thus it can be deduced that the concluding workshop and decision analysis interviews augment well conventional emergency exercises. Realistic dose assessments proved out to be very difficult. The software used was able to calculate the maximum radionuclide concentrations in foodstuffs processed from local raw materials. Radionuclide concentration in food or feedstuffs may, however, change quickly. Also, the production and processing of foodstuffs is a complex

  13. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Product Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.

    2000-01-01

    The process for removal of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from the K Basins has been divided into major sub-systems. The Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) removes fuel from the existing storage canisters, cleans it, and places it into baskets. The multi-canister overpack (MCO) loading system places the baskets into an MCO that has been pre-loaded in a cask. The cask, containing a loaded MCO, is then transferred to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility. After drying at the CVD Facility, the cask, and MCO, are transferred to the Canister Storage Building (CSB), where the MCO is removed from the cask, staged, inspected, sealed (by welding), and stored until a suitable permanent disposal option is implemented. The purpose of this document is to specify the process related characteristics of an MCO at the interface between major process systems. The characteristics are derived from the primary technical documents that form the basis for safety analysis and design calculations. This document translates the calculation assumptions into implementation requirements and describes the method of verifying that the requirement is achieved. These requirements are used to define validation test requirements and describe requirements that influence multiple sub-project safety analysis reports. This product specification establishes limits and controls for each significant process parameter at interfaces between major sub-systems that potentially affect the overall safety and/or quality of the SNF packaged for processing, transport, and interim dry storage. The product specifications in this document cover the SNF packaged in MCOs to be transported throughout the SNF Project. The description of the product specifications are organized in the document as follows: Section 2.0--Summary listing of product specifications at each major sub-system interface. Section 3.0--Summary description providing guidance as to how specifications are complied with by equipment design or processing within a major

  14. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Product Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.

    2000-12-07

    The process for removal of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from the K Basins has been divided into major sub-systems. The Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) removes fuel from the existing storage canisters, cleans it, and places it into baskets. The multi-canister overpack (MCO) loading system places the baskets into an MCO that has been pre-loaded in a cask. The cask, containing a loaded MCO, is then transferred to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility. After drying at the CVD Facility, the cask, and MCO, are transferred to the Canister Storage Building (CSB), where the MCO is removed from the cask, staged, inspected, sealed (by welding), and stored until a suitable permanent disposal option is implemented. The purpose of this document is to specify the process related characteristics of an MCO at the interface between major process systems. The characteristics are derived from the primary technical documents that form the basis for safety analysis and design calculations. This document translates the calculation assumptions into implementation requirements and describes the method of verifying that the requirement is achieved. These requirements are used to define validation test requirements and describe requirements that influence multiple sub-project safety analysis reports. This product specification establishes limits and controls for each significant process parameter at interfaces between major sub-systems that potentially affect the overall safety and/or quality of the SNF packaged for processing, transport, and interim dry storage. The product specifications in this document cover the SNF packaged in MCOs to be transported throughout the SNF Project. The description of the product specifications are organized in the document as follows: Section 2.0--Summary listing of product specifications at each major sub-system interface. Section 3.0--Summary description providing guidance as to how specifications are complied with by equipment design or processing within a major

  15. Potential effects of nuclear war on agricultural productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwell, M.A.; Cropper, W.P. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The authors examine the vulnerabilities of agricultural systems to nuclear war-induced climatic perturbations and to other, indirect effects of nuclear war. Discussion is included of the dependency of agricultural production on technological inputs and the effects of loss or reduction of these inputs in a post-nuclear war world

  16. South Africa's nuclear hydrogen production development programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ravenswaay, J.P.; Van Niekerk, F.; Kriek, R.J.; Blom, E.; Krieg, H.M.; Van Niekerk, W.M.K.; Van der Merwe, F.; Vosloo, H.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    In May 2007 the South African Cabinet approved a National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies R and D and Innovation Strategy. The strategy will focus on research, development and innovation for: i) wealth creation through high value-added manufacturing and developing platinum group metals catalysis; ii) building on the existing knowledge in high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) and coal gasification Fischer-Tropsch technology, to develop local cost-competitive hydrogen production solutions; iii) to promote equity and inclusion in the economic benefits from South Africa's natural resource base. As part of the roll-out strategy, the South African Department of Science and Technology (DST) created three Competence Centres (CC), including a Hydrogen Infrastructure Competence Centre hosted by the North-West University (NWU) and the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR). The Hydrogen Infrastructure CC is tasked with developing hydrogen production, storage, distribution as well as codes and standards programmes within the framework of the DST strategic objectives to ensure strategic national innovation over the next fifteen years. One of the focus areas of the Hydrogen Infrastructure CC will be on large scale CO 2 free hydrogen production through thermochemical water-splitting using nuclear heat from a suitable heat source such as a HTGR and the subsequent use of the hydrogen in applications such as the coal-to-liquid process and the steel industry. This paper will report on the status of the programme for thermochemical water-splitting as well as the associated projects for component and technology development envisaged in the Hydrogen Infrastructure CC. The paper will further elaborate on current and future collaboration opportunities as well as expected outputs and deliverables. (authors)

  17. The behavior of fission products during nuclear rocket reactor tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokor, P.C.; Kirk, W.L.; Bohl, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Fission product release from nuclear rocket propulsion reactor fuel is an important consideration for nuclear rocket development and application. Fission product data from the last six reactors of the Rover program are collected in this paper to provide as basis for addressing development and testing issues. Fission product loss from the fuel will depend on fuel composition and reactor design and operating parameters. During ground testing, fission products can be contained downstream of the reactor. The last Rover reactor tested, the Nuclear Furnance, was mated to an effluent clean-up system that was effective in preventing the discharge of fission products into the atmosphere

  18. Nuclear compression effects on pion production in nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, M.; Gyulassy, M.; Wakai, M.; Kitazoe, Y.

    1985-01-01

    We show that the method of analyzing the pion excitation function proposed by Stock et al. may determine only a part of the nuclear matter equation of state. With the addition of missing kinetic energy terms the implied high density nuclear equation of state would be much stiffer than expected from conventional theory. A stiff equation of state would also follow if shock dynamics with early chemical freeze out were valid. (orig.)

  19. Technological development in the nuclear area: nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Jose Mendonca de.

    1991-01-01

    The factors and obstacles that influence the progress and regress of nuclear power presently are evaluated. The international policies of the industrial conglomerates and the hegemonic countries in the nuclear area are described. In the particular case of Brazil, it was tried to identify the obstacles which must be removed so that the country can reach development in this field. 35 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs

  20. Production of heavy nuclides in nuclear devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eccles, Samuel F [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-15

    Since the last Plowshare Symposium in 1964 a number of experiments have been carried out to study the production of heavy nuclei by rapid multiple neutron capture in specially designed nuclear devices. These experiments listed below were conducted underground at the Nevada Test Site and data were obtained radiochemically after sample recovery by drillback. The main characteristics of these experiments are 1) higher neutron fluxes than in the early events, 2) a variety of targets, including 238-U, 242-Pu, 237-Np, 243-Am, 232-Th, 3) the occurrence of an interesting 'reversal of the odd-even effect' in the mass yield curves, and 4) the absence of nuclei in the debris with (Z,A) greater than (100,257). Analysis of data from these experiments have led to capture cross sections for neutron-rich uranium isotopes (out to 249-U), and capture-to-fission ratios for the odd-A neutron-rich plutonium isotopes (out to 253-Pu). General studies of the fission process in neutron-rich nuclei have also been undertaken using the data from these experiments. The large amounts of 250Cm and 257Fm made in the recent Hutch experiment ({approx}1 x 10{sup 20} and {approx}5 x 10{sup 17} atoms, respectively) make it scientifically exciting, and economically feasible, to mine and recover enough material to produce laboratory targets of these isotopes. These targets would be used in investigations of yet-undiscovered, short-lived isotopes of Fm, Md, and No, as well as the possible production of new isotopes of element 104 and even element 105. (author)

  1. Production of heavy nuclides in nuclear devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccles, Samuel F.

    1970-01-01

    Since the last Plowshare Symposium in 1964 a number of experiments have been carried out to study the production of heavy nuclei by rapid multiple neutron capture in specially designed nuclear devices. These experiments listed below were conducted underground at the Nevada Test Site and data were obtained radiochemically after sample recovery by drillback. The main characteristics of these experiments are 1) higher neutron fluxes than in the early events, 2) a variety of targets, including 238-U, 242-Pu, 237-Np, 243-Am, 232-Th, 3) the occurrence of an interesting 'reversal of the odd-even effect' in the mass yield curves, and 4) the absence of nuclei in the debris with (Z,A) greater than (100,257). Analysis of data from these experiments have led to capture cross sections for neutron-rich uranium isotopes (out to 249-U), and capture-to-fission ratios for the odd-A neutron-rich plutonium isotopes (out to 253-Pu). General studies of the fission process in neutron-rich nuclei have also been undertaken using the data from these experiments. The large amounts of 250Cm and 257Fm made in the recent Hutch experiment (∼1 x 10 20 and ∼5 x 10 17 atoms, respectively) make it scientifically exciting, and economically feasible, to mine and recover enough material to produce laboratory targets of these isotopes. These targets would be used in investigations of yet-undiscovered, short-lived isotopes of Fm, Md, and No, as well as the possible production of new isotopes of element 104 and even element 105. (author)

  2. Production and use of radioactive nuclear beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanihata, Isao

    1994-01-01

    Two different production method of radioactive nuclear beams (RNB) are reviewed, in this paper. One is the secondary beam method that use a high-energy heavy-ion reaction and a separator and the other is the reacceleration method. The RNB is also expected to have following properties that are useful to the application in wider research and technical usage; 1. any elements and isotopes can be used as a beam. 2. it is easy to control a position and a depth of the implantation. 3. an extremely sensitive detection is possible because they emit radiations. 4. one can select the lifetime among the isotopes suitable for a specific phenomenon. 5. one can select a spin among the isotopes for specific selectivity to the phenomenon. These useful properties of the RNB and a few recent examples of study are discussed. Among them are the discovery of the neutron skin and the neutron halo in nuclei near the limit of existence, the first determinations of reactions relevant to the synthesis of the heavy elements in the universe, and an application to the PET. (J.P.N.)

  3. Arsenals : tummalt kõnekas / Lauri Kärk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kärk, Lauri, 1954-

    2008-01-01

    Tänavusel Riia filmifestivalil Arsenals nähtust, eelkõige huvitavatest tummfilmiajastu filmidest, sealhulgas Läti esimesest mängufilmist "Kus on tõde? Või juudi naiskursuslase tragöödia" (produtsent S. Mintus, 1913). Lisatud info "Eesti film võitis Riias mitu auhinda", millest nähtub, et Balti võistlusprogrammis oli parim mängufilm "Sügisball", parim dokfilm "Vastutuulesaal" ja publikupreemia ning ühe oikumeenilise žürii preemia sai "Klass"

  4. Prerequisites for a nuclear weapons convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebert, W.

    1999-01-01

    A Nuclear Weapons Convention (NWC) would prohibit the research, development, production, testing, stockpiling, transfer, use and threat of use of nuclear weapons and would serve their total elimination.' In this fashion it follows the model laid out by the biological and chemical weapons conventions. The NWC would encompass a few other treaties and while replacing them should learn from their experiences. The Nuclear Weapons Convention should at some given point in the future replace the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and so resolve its contradictions and shortcomings. The main objectives of an NWC Would be: reduction of the nuclear arsenals of the 'five' nuclear weapons powers down to zero within a set of fixed periods of time; elimination of stockpiles of weapons-usable materials and, where existent, nuclear warheads in de-facto nuclear weapon and threshold states; providing assurance that all states will retain their non-nuclear status forever

  5. Development of the production of special steels for nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieillard-Baron, B.

    1977-01-01

    The development of electro-nuclear industries has a powerful impact on the production of special steels, although the quantity of material applied to the non-conventional parts of nuclear power plants is quite small as compared to the total production requirements in this industrial field. Evolution bears on the product research, development and testing methods, on the technical and marketing services - in particular the establishment of quality control teams and assurance manuals - and the implementation of high performance production equipments. Manufacturing must however take place under normal work load and productivity conditions of production tools, and thus ensure a satisfactory profitability on investments entailed [fr

  6. Preliminary Cost Estimates for Nuclear Hydrogen Production: HTSE System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, K. J.; Lee, K. Y.; Lee, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    KAERI is now focusing on the research and development of the key technologies required for the design and realization of a nuclear hydrogen production system. As a preliminary study of cost estimates for nuclear hydrogen systems, the hydrogen production costs of the nuclear energy sources benchmarking GTMHR and PBMR are estimated in the necessary input data on a Korean specific basis. G4-ECONS was appropriately modified to calculate the cost for hydrogen production of HTSE (High Temperature Steam Electrolysis) process with VHTR (Very High Temperature nuclear Reactor) as a thermal energy source. The estimated costs presented in this paper show that hydrogen production by the VHTR could be competitive with current techniques of hydrogen production from fossil fuels if CO 2 capture and sequestration is required. Nuclear production of hydrogen would allow large-scale production of hydrogen at economic prices while avoiding the release of CO 2 . Nuclear production of hydrogen could thus become the enabling technology for the hydrogen economy. The major factors that would affect the cost of hydrogen were also discussed

  7. Particle production from nuclear targets and the structure of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialas, A.

    Production processes from nuclear targets allow studying interactions of elementary hadronic constituents in nuclear matter. The information thus obtained on the structure of hadrons and on the properties of hadronic constituents is presented. Both soft (low momentum transfer) and hard (high momentum transfer) processes are discussed. (author)

  8. Nuclear hydrogen production: re-examining the fusion option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baindur, S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a scheme for nuclear hydrogen production by fusion. The basic idea is to use nuclear energy of the fuel (hydrogen plasma) to produce molecular hydrogen fro carbon-free hydrogen compounds. The hydrogen is then stored and utilized electrochemically in fuel cells or chemically as molecular hydrogen in internal combustion engines

  9. Original theatrical production will explore issues surrounding nuclear power

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, Jean

    2007-01-01

    A new, original theatrical production entitled "Nuclear Power Play" will explore the personal and public politics of nuclear power. Uniquely developed by a team of experts in science and technology working alongside theatre arts practitioners, the play will debut on Wednesday, Nov. 7 at 7:30 p.m. in the Haymarket Theatre at the Squires Student Center on the Virginia Tech campus.

  10. Progress in fission product nuclear data. Issue no. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, G.; Lammer, M.

    1980-06-01

    This is the sixth issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed

  11. Applications of nuclear data on short-lived fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudstam, G.; Aagaard, P.; Aleklett, K.; Lund, E.

    1981-01-01

    The study of short-lived fission products gives information about the nuclear structure on the neutron-rich side of stability. The data are also of interest for various applications both to basic science and to nuclear technology. Some of these applications, taken up by the OSIRIS group at Studsvik, are described in the present contribution. (orig.)

  12. Nuclear fuel pellet production method and nuclear fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuda, Ryoichi; Ito, Ken-ichi; Masuda, Hiroshi.

    1993-01-01

    In a method of manufacturing nuclear fuel pellets by compression-molding UO 2 powders followed by sintering, a sintering agent having a composition of about 40 to 80 wt% of SiO 2 and the balance of Al 2 O 3 , a sintering agent at a ratio of 10 to 500 ppm based on the total amount of UO 2 and UO 2 powders are mixed, compression molded and then sintered at a sintering temperature of about 1500 of 1800degC. The UO 2 particles have an average grain size of about 20 to 60μm, most of the crystal grain boundary thereof is coated with a glassy or crystalline alumina silicate phase, and the porosity is about 1 to 4 vol%. With such a constitution, the sintering agent forms a single liquid phase eutectic mixture during sintering, to promote a surface reaction between nuclear fuel powders by a liquid phase sintering mechanism, increase their density and promote the crystal growth. Accordingly, it is possible to lower the softening temperature, improve the creep velocity of the pellets and improve the resistance against pellet-clad interaction. (T.M.)

  13. Dispersion-strengthened aluminium powder products for nuclear application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels

    1967-01-01

    Strength, elongation, corrosion resistance, homogeneity, purity, compatibility with fuel, and resistance to irradiation damage, being main properties of SAP of interest for their application in nuclear technology, are discussed in connection with commercial products; effect on tensile and creep...

  14. Progress in fission product nuclear data. No. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, M.

    1994-06-01

    This is the 14th issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data published by the Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA. The types of activities included are measurements, compilations and evaluations of fission product yields, neutron reaction cross sections of fission products, data related to the radioactive decay of fission products, delayed neutron data from neutron induced and spontaneous fission, lumped fission product data. The first part of the report consists of unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. The second part contains some recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted, and selected papers from conferences. The third part contains requirements for further measurements

  15. Nuclear disarmament or survival of nuclear arms?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroot, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    START II has not yet been ratified by the US or Russian parliaments. Doubts may be raised over whether it will ever be. In the best case there will be more than 20,000 nuclear warheads in the arsenals of these two countries by the year 2003. All five nuclear states consider that nuclear weapons are an essential component of their national defense. It might sound childish but, the whole story is is so often childish: the five powers refuse to break their nuclear toys. They take even all possible measures to maintain and improve them and to ensure the survivability of their arsenals. To prepare for the next arms race..

  16. Developing new products from Canadian nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, S.R.; Lyon, R.B.

    1987-06-01

    By 1990, the Federal Government will have reduced its support for Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's nuclear R and D from the 1985 level of $200 million, to $100 million (1985 dollars). To meet the need for a broadened funding base, AECL Research Company has been restructured to become more responsive to our sponsors and customers. Although supporting the CANDU nuclear power program remains by far our largest R and D activity, we have put in place a comprehensive process for generating new business and commercial activities. Examples of such business opportunities are presented in the paper

  17. Status of hydrogen production by nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jong Wa; Yoo, Kun Joong; Park, Chang Kue

    2001-07-01

    Hydrogen production methods, such as electrolysis, thermochemical method, biological method, and photochemical method, are introduced in this report. Also reviewed are current status of the development of High Temperatrue Gas Coooled Reactor, and it application for hydrogen production

  18. Exposures resulting from nuclear power production. Annex F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This Annex assesses the releases of radioactive materials from the nuclear fuel cycle and their resulting dose commitments to the public. The nuclear fuel cycle includes the mining and milling of uranium ores, conversion to nuclear fuel materials, fabrication of fuel elements, production of power in the nuclear reactor, reprocessing of irradiated fuel and recycling of fissile and fertile nuclides recovered, and disposal of radioactive wastes. This Annex also reviews reactor accidents which have led to unplanned releases of activity into the environment, together with estimates of the resulting collective doses.

  19. Productivity results of nuclear information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groves, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The information necessary to manage a nuclear generation station and multiple stations is greater today than ever before. The management of the processes necessary to develop information from data requires professional management and a programmatic approach. The cost is not insignificant. But the cost of not facing this challenge squarely is greater. The San Onofre Nuclear Generation Plant has developed the Nuclear Information Services function to assist management and professionals at all levels with their information needs. Often, this is merely giving them the tools they need to do it themselves. Herein contains a selection of specific examples that urges officer and senior level management to review the concept of the Nuclear Information Services function in more depth to determine the appropriateness of such an approach within their organizations. The establishment of on line computerized systems for the majority of the work flow processes and administrative process has resulted in an estimate 190 less people needed. The Health Physics Automated Access Control System (AACS) implementation resulted in a savings of $800,000 a year. The implementation of a Site Procedures Information Network (SPIN) has saved $160,000 per year

  20. Production of GMP certified herbal products in Malaysian Nuclear Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daryl Jesus Arapoc; Bohari Yaacob; Zainah Adam

    2015-01-01

    This paper will discuss on up scaling production of herbal product. A pilot scale production plant were developed in Block 37 and equipped with automated and semi-automated production machines which have the capacity to produce 100 thousand pieces of tablet per hour. In order to ensure the quality of the products, raw material inspections, IPQC and FPQC will be done on each batch. Besides that, certification of GMP will be done concurrently. One of the products that will be launch soon is the Mas Cotek tablet. This product is the result of numerous years of researches that had been done in BTP. This includes formulation and production of the product itself. It is hope that more herbal products can be produce in near future. (author)

  1. Nuclear hydrogen: An assessment of product flexibility and market viability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botterud, Audun; Yildiz, Bilge; Conzelmann, Guenter; Petri, Mark C.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear energy has the potential to play an important role in the future energy system as a large-scale source of hydrogen without greenhouse gas emissions. Thus far, economic studies of nuclear hydrogen tend to focus on the levelized cost of hydrogen without accounting for the risks and uncertainties that potential investors would face. We present a financial model based on real options theory to assess the profitability of different nuclear hydrogen production technologies in evolving electricity and hydrogen markets. The model uses Monte Carlo simulations to represent uncertainty in future hydrogen and electricity prices. It computes the expected value and the distribution of discounted profits from nuclear hydrogen production plants. Moreover, the model quantifies the value of the option to switch between hydrogen and electricity production, depending on what is more profitable to sell. We use the model to analyze the market viability of four potential nuclear hydrogen technologies and conclude that flexibility in output product is likely to add significant economic value for an investor in nuclear hydrogen. This should be taken into account in the development phase of nuclear hydrogen technologies

  2. Nuclear De-Alerting and the Search for Post-Cold War Nuclear Policy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fortney, Michael

    1999-01-01

    ...... you just can't seem to get rid of it." While no longer the predominant defense issue, many still grapple with the strategic nuclear issue, wondering what we need to do with our "Cold War" nuclear arsenal...

  3. Plant Design Nuclear Fuel Element Production Capacity Optimization to Support Nuclear Power Plant in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambang Galung Susanto

    2007-01-01

    The optimization production capacity for designing nuclear fuel element fabrication plant in Indonesia to support the nuclear power plant has been done. From calculation and by assuming that nuclear power plant to be built in Indonesia as much as 12 NPP and having capacity each 1000 MW, the optimum capacity for nuclear fuel element fabrication plant is 710 ton UO 2 /year. The optimum capacity production selected, has considered some aspects such as fraction batch (cycle, n = 3), length of cycle (18 months), discharge burn-up value (Bd) 35,000 up 50,000 MWD/ton U, enriched uranium to be used in the NPP (3.22 % to 4.51 %), future market development for fuel element, and the trend of capacity production selected by advances country to built nuclear fuel element fabrication plant type of PWR. (author)

  4. Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy via High Temperature Electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Grant L. Hawkes

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the technical case for high-temperature nuclear hydrogen production. A general thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production based on high-temperature thermal water splitting processes is presented. Specific details of hydrogen production based on high-temperature electrolysis are also provided, including results of recent experiments performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Based on these results, high-temperature electrolysis appears to be a promising technology for efficient large-scale hydrogen production

  5. Analytical measurements of fission products during a severe nuclear accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doizi, D.; Reymond la Ruinaz, S.; Haykal, I.; Manceron, L.; Perrin, A.; Boudon, V.; Vander Auwera, J.; tchana, F. Kwabia; Faye, M.

    2018-01-01

    The Fukushima accident emphasized the fact that ways to monitor in real time the evolution of a nuclear reactor during a severe accident remain to be developed. No fission products were monitored during twelve days; only dose rates were measured, which is not sufficient to carry out an online diagnosis of the event. The first measurements were announced with little reliability for low volatile fission products. In order to improve the safety of nuclear plants and minimize the industrial, ecological and health consequences of a severe accident, it is necessary to develop new reliable measurement systems, operating at the earliest and closest to the emission source of fission products. Through the French program ANR « Projet d'Investissement d'Avenir », the aim of the DECA-PF project (diagnosis of core degradation from fission products measurements) is to monitor in real time the release of the major fission products (krypton, xenon, gaseous forms of iodine and ruthenium) outside the nuclear reactor containment. These products are released at different times during a nuclear accident and at different states of the nuclear core degradation. Thus, monitoring these fission products gives information on the situation inside the containment and helps to apply the Severe Accident Management procedures. Analytical techniques have been proposed and evaluated. The results are discussed here.

  6. Analytical measurements of fission products during a severe nuclear accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doizi D.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fukushima accident emphasized the fact that ways to monitor in real time the evolution of a nuclear reactor during a severe accident remain to be developed. No fission products were monitored during twelve days; only dose rates were measured, which is not sufficient to carry out an online diagnosis of the event. The first measurements were announced with little reliability for low volatile fission products. In order to improve the safety of nuclear plants and minimize the industrial, ecological and health consequences of a severe accident, it is necessary to develop new reliable measurement systems, operating at the earliest and closest to the emission source of fission products. Through the French program ANR « Projet d’Investissement d’Avenir », the aim of the DECA-PF project (diagnosis of core degradation from fission products measurements is to monitor in real time the release of the major fission products (krypton, xenon, gaseous forms of iodine and ruthenium outside the nuclear reactor containment. These products are released at different times during a nuclear accident and at different states of the nuclear core degradation. Thus, monitoring these fission products gives information on the situation inside the containment and helps to apply the Severe Accident Management procedures. Analytical techniques have been proposed and evaluated. The results are discussed here.

  7. Hydrogen and oxygen production with nuclear heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnert, H.

    1979-09-01

    After some remarks on the necessity of producing secondary energy sources for the heat market, the thermodynamic fundamentals of the processes for producing hydrogen and oxygen from water on the basis of nuclear thermal energy are briefly explained. These processes are summarized as one class of the 'thermochemical cycle process' for the conversion of thermal into chemical energy. A number of thermochemical cycle processes are described. The results of the design work so far are illustrated by the example of the 'sulphuric acid hybrid process'. The nuclear heat source of the thermochemical cycle process is the high-temperature reactor. Statements concerning rentability are briefly commented upon, and the research and development efforts and expenditure required are sketched. (orig.) 891 GG/orig. 892 MB [de

  8. Enviromental Development Plan: special nuclear materials production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    This Environmental Development Plan includes the process steps and facilities necessary for the production of plutonium and tritium for Government needs and the production of some other radioactive materials that will be used for heat and radiation sources by domestic and international customers. The production reactors and the spent fuel processing plants and their effluents are discussed, but the defense wastes from them are treated in a separate EDP. The scope does not include transportation, decontamination and decommissioning, safeguards and security, or use of the SNM products

  9. Medical application of nuclear science: nuclear medicine and production of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornet, L.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear science in attendance on medicine or from Radium to Radiopharmaceuticals. By a brief historical reminder of the evolution of the radioactivity and development of nuclear science, we could see a very early interest and application of the radioactivity in the medical field. Main steps: Detection of natural radioactivity/Discovery of artificial radioactivity/First treatment of leukaemia and thyroid/First nuclear reactor/First radioisotope laboratory in hospital/First scintigraphy/First radiopharmaceutical/First cyclotron and cyclotron products/First immunoscintigraphy/Biotechnology and radioisotope/Evolution of technics [equipment for diagnosis (imaging, scintigraphy) and therapy]/Evolution of production technics and concept of products (generators of Technetium) and machines, reactor, cyclotron/Evolution of importance and interest of nuclear medicine/Creation of international association of nuclear medicine and producers (example ARPR)/Evolution of safety and pharmaceuticals regulation. After the sixties, period extremely rich in invention of products, characterized by a high fertility specially due to a non-restrictive regulation in terms of safety and pharmaceutical consideration, the evolution of technics, the importance of costs (investment, research, healthcare and the evolution of the regulations) have smoothly but continuously transformed the contexts and different actors. Consequences and facts: Rationalization and standardization of the catalogues, total integration of radiopharmaceuticals into the pharmaceutical laws, stop of nuclear research reactors, increase of number of cyclotrons, transformation of size and role of the producers and nuclear centers, risk in supply of some raw materials like Molybdenum, medical nuclear application as a worldwide business

  10. Micro-structured nuclear fuel and novel nuclear reactor concepts for advanced power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa-Simil, Liviu

    2008-01-01

    Many applications (e.g. terrestrial and space electric power production, naval, underwater and railroad propulsion and auxiliary power for isolated regions) require a compact-high-power electricity source. The development of such a reactor structure necessitates a deeper understanding of fission energy transport and materials behavior in radiation dominated structures. One solution to reduce the greenhouse-gas emissions and delay the catastrophic events' occurrences may be the development of massive nuclear power. The actual basic conceptions in nuclear reactors are at the base of the bottleneck in enhancements. The current nuclear reactors look like high security prisons applied to fission products. The micro-bead heterogeneous fuel mesh gives the fission products the possibility to acquire stable conditions outside the hot zones without spilling, in exchange for advantages - possibility of enhancing the nuclear technology for power production. There is a possibility to accommodate the materials and structures with the phenomenon of interest, the high temperature fission products free fuel with near perfect burning. This feature is important to the future of nuclear power development in order to avoid the nuclear fuel peak, and high price increase due to the immobilization of the fuel in the waste fuel nuclear reactor pools. (author)

  11. Mesonic atom production in high-energy nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakai, M.; Bando, H.; Sano, M.

    1987-08-01

    The production probability of π-mesonic atom in high-energy nuclear collisions is estimated by a coalescence model. The production cross section is calculated for p + Ne and Ne + Ne systems at 2.1 GeV/A and 5.0 GeV/A beam energy. It is shown that nuclear fragments with larger charge numbers have the advantage in the formation of π-mesonic atoms. The cross section is proportional to Z 3 and of the order of magnitude of 1 ∼ 10 μb in all the above cases. The production cross sections of K-mesonic atoms are also estimated. (author)

  12. Nuclear transparencies from photoinduced pion production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Cosyn; M.C. Martinez; J. Ryckebusch; B. Van Overmeire

    2006-12-01

    We present a relativistic and cross-section factorized framework for computing nuclear transparencies extracted from A({gamma}, {pi} N) reactions at intermediate energies. The proposed quantum mechanical model adopts a relativistic extension to the multiple-scattering Glauber approximation to account for the final state interactions of the ejected nucleon and pion. The theoretical predictions are compared against the experimental {sup 4}He({gamma},p {pi}{sup -}) data from Jefferson Lab. For those data, our results show no conclusive evidence for the onset of mechanisms related to color transparency.

  13. Production of pellets for nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, G.G.

    1982-01-01

    A method for producing nuclear fuel pellets each made up of a central portion and an outer annular portion surrounding the central portion, the two portions differing in composition. Such pellets are termed annular-layered pellets. The method comprises the steps of pressing powdered refractory material which has been granulated to form separately a central portion and an outer annular portion, assembling the portions together, compacting the assembly and sintering the compact. The portions are bonded together during sintering. The difference in composition may include a difference in density or isotopic enrichment as well as a chemical difference. (author)

  14. Shelf life study on Nuclear Malaysia biofertilizer products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phua Choo Kwai Hoe; Ahmad Nazrul Abd Wahid; Khairuddin Abdul Rahim

    2009-01-01

    Phosphate solubilising bacteria and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria are biofertilizer microorganisms known to increase crop yields. It is important to prepare suitable sterile carriers or substrates for these microorganisms into biofertilizer products with long shelf life. Optimum storage conditions, especially storage temperature is needed to improve shelf life of the products. Isolates of two phosphate solubilising bacteria (AP1 and AP3) and one plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (AP2) have been developed into biofertilizer products in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NuclearMalaysia). These isolates were inoculated into a compost-based carrier, sterilised by gamma irradiation at 50 kGy, from MINTec-SINAGAMA, Nuclear Malaysia. Biofertilizer products kept at low temperatures (9 ± 2 degree C) showed better shelf life (storage for six months) as compared to those stored at room temperatures (28 ± 2 degree C). Further observation of the shelf life is still in progress. (Author)

  15. Hydrogen production as a promising nuclear energy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanek, V.

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen production from nuclear is a field of application which eventually can outweigh power production by nuclear power plants. There are two feasible routes of hydrogen production. The one uses heat to obtain hydrogen from natural gas through steam reforming of methane. This is an highly energy-consuming process requiring temperatures up to 900 deg C and producing carbon dioxide as a by-product. The other method includes direct thermochemical processes to obtain hydrogen, using sulfuric acid for instance. Sulfuric acid is decomposed thermally by the reaction: H 2 SO 4 -> H 2 O = SO 2 + (1/2) O 2 , followed by the processes I 2 + SO 2 + 2H O -> 2HI + H 2 SO 4 and 2HI -> H 2 + I 2 . The use of nuclear for this purpose is currently examined in Japan and in the US. (P.A.)

  16. Maintenance in nuclear production power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    This article highlights the importance and quality of maintenance in the complete phases of development, in a sector which has been often questioned by the public opinion, and that is always subject to national and international standards. The aim of maintenance is to guarantee the production of electric power in a reliable, safe, economic and friendly environmentally way, assuring a long-term production. (Author)

  17. Beneficial utilization of nuclear waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dix, G.P.

    1975-01-01

    A sufficient supply of isotopes exists to conduct demonstrational experiments in the 1975-1980 time frame to stimulate a market for waste products. A large potential market exists for a number of waste products, measured in terms of billions of dollars. Actinide by-products can become a feed stock for producing other energy producing isotopes by neutron irradiation whose value may exceed that of the fission products. Commercial reprocessors will not invest in the extraction and separation of isotopes from the waste stream until a proven market has evolved. Economic studies must be performed to establish the trade-offs between the beneficial use or disposal of wastes. Fundamental to these studies are process economics, safety analyses applications studies, and market analyses, both domestic and foreign. Regardless of the degree of beneficial utilization of wastes, some residual material from wastes not utilized and spent by-products after utilization will have to undergo ultimate disposal. Isotopic waste products have the potential for solving a number of societal and national security problems and represent a unique source of energy and materials

  18. Progress in fission product nuclear data. No. 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, M.

    1990-11-01

    This is the 13th issue of a report series published by the Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA. The types of activities included are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: Fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission), neutron reaction cross-sections of fission products, data related to the radioactive decay of fission products, delayed neutron data of fission products and bumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption, etc.). The first part of the report consists of unaltered original data which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. The second part contains some recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted, and selected papers from conferences. Part 3 contains requirements for further measurements

  19. Future electricity production methods. Part 1: Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, Herve

    2011-01-01

    The global warming challenge aims at stabilizing the concentrations of Green House Gas (GHG) in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is the most effective of the anthropogenic GHG and is essentially produced by consumption of fossil fuels. Electricity production is the dominant cause of CO 2 emissions. It is, therefore, crucial that the share of 'carbon less' electricity production techniques increases at a fast pace. This is the more so, that 'clean' electricity would be useful to displace 'dirty' techniques in other fields such as heat production and transportation. Here we examine the extent to which nuclear energy could be operational in providing 'clean' electricity. A nuclear intensive scenario is shown to give the possibility to divide CO 2 emissions by a factor of 2 worldwide, within 50 years. However, the corresponding sharp increase in nuclear power will put a heavy burden on uranium reserves and will necessitate the development of breeding reactors as soon as possible. A review of present and future reactors is given with special attention to the safety issues. The delicate question of nuclear fuel cycle is discussed concerning uranium reserves and management of used fuels. It is shown that dealing with nuclear wastes is more a socio-political problem than a technical one. The third difficult question associated with the development of nuclear energy is the proliferation risk. It is advocated that, while this is, indeed, a very important question, it is only weakly related to nuclear power development. Finally, the possibilities of nuclear fusion are discussed and it is asserted that, under no circumstances, could nuclear fusion give a significant contribution to the solution of the energy problem before 50 years, too late for dealing with the global warming challenge.

  20. Development of indigenous technology at CNEN in the fields of nuclear medicine, nuclear detectors, instrumentation, radioisotope production and application of nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mafra, O.

    1990-01-01

    The main objectives of the program developed at CNEN in the field of nuclear medicine, nuclear detectors, instrumentation, radioisotope production and application of nuclear technique are described. (E.G.) [pt

  1. Equipment for nuclear medical centers, production capabilities of Rosatom enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrish, Yu. N.; Koloskov, S. A.; Smirnov, V. P.; Strokach, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of the capabilities of the State Corporation Rosatom enterprises on the development and production of diagnostic and therapeutic equipment for nuclear medicine centers is presented. Prospects of the development of accelerator equipment for the production of a wide range of radioisotope products are shown, and the trends of its development are determined. A comparative analysis of the technical parameters of domestic tomographs and devices for brachytherapy with foreign counterparts is given

  2. Equipment for nuclear medical centers, production capabilities of Rosatom enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrish, Yu. N.; Koloskov, S. A.; Smirnov, V. P.; Strokach, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of the capabilities of the State Corporation Rosatom enterprises on the development and production of diagnostic and therapeutic equipment for nuclear medicine centers is presented. Prospects of the development of accelerator equipment for the production of a wide range of radioisotope products are shown, and the trends of its development are determined. A comparative analysis of the technical parameters of domestic tomographs and devices for brachytherapy with foreign counterparts is given.

  3. Nuclear hydrogen production programme in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sink, C.

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) is focused on demonstrating the economic, commercial-scale production of hydrogen using process heat derived from nuclear energy. NHI-supported research has concentrated to date on three technologies compatible with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP): high temperature steam electrolysis (HTE); sulphur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical; and hybrid sulphur (HyS) thermochemical. In 2009 NHI will down select to a single technology on which to focus its future development efforts, for which the next step will be a pilot-scale experiment. (author)

  4. High energy photons production in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.; Pinston, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Hard photon production, in nucleus-nucleus collisions, were studied at beam energies between 10 and 125 MeV. The main characteristics of the photon emission are deduced. They suggest that the neutron-proton collisions in the early stage of the reaction are the main source of high energy gamma-rays. An overview of the theoretical approaches is given and compared with experimental results. Theoretical attempts to include the contribution of charged pion exchange currents to photon production, in calculations of proton-nucleus-gamma and nucleus-nucleus-gamma reactions, showed suitable fitting with experimental data

  5. Nuclear reactor structural material forming less radioactive corrosion product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Hiroshi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To provide nuclear reactor structural materials forming less radioactive corrosion products. Constitution: Ni-based alloys such as inconel alloy 718, 600 or inconel alloy 750 and 690 having excellent corrosion resistance and mechanical property even in coolants at high temperature and high pressure have generally been used as nuclear reactor structural materials. However, even such materials yield corrosion products being attacked by coolants circulating in the nuclear reactor, which produce by neutron irradiation radioactive corrosion products, that are deposited in primary circuit pipeways to constitute exposure sources. The present invention dissolves dissolves this problems by providing less activating nuclear reactor structural materials. That is, taking notice on the fact that Ni-58 contained generally by 68 % in Ni changes into Co-58 under irradiation of neutron thereby causing activation, the surface of nuclear reactor structural materials is applied with Ni plating by using Ni with a reduced content of Ni-58 isotopes. Accordingly, increase in the radiation level of the nuclear reactor structural materials can be inhibited. (K.M.)

  6. Low Energy Nuclear Reaction Products at Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, David J.

    2008-03-01

    This paper examines the evidence for LENR occurring on or very near to the surface of materials. Several types of experimental indications for LENR surface reactions have been reported and will be reviewed. LENR result in two types of products, energy and the appearance of new elements. The level of instantaneous power production can be written as the product of four factors: (1) the total area of the surface on which the reactions can occur, (2) the fraction of the area that is active at any time, (3) the reaction rate, that is, the number of reactions per unit active area per second, and (4) the energy produced per reaction. Each of these factors, and their limits, are reviewed. A graphical means of relating these four factors over their wide variations has been devised. The instantaneous generation of atoms of new elements can also be written as the product of the first three factors and the new elemental mass produced per reaction. Again, a graphical means of presenting the factors and their results over many orders of magnitude has been developed.

  7. Integrated approach to economical, reliable, safe nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    An Integrated Approach to Economical, Reliable, Safe Nuclear Power Production is the latest evolution of a concept which originated with the Defense-in-Depth philosophy of the nuclear industry. As Defense-in-Depth provided a framework for viewing physical barriers and equipment redundancy, the Integrated Approach gives a framework for viewing nuclear power production in terms of functions and institutions. In the Integrated Approach, four plant Goals are defined (Normal Operation, Core and Plant Protection, Containment Integrity and Emergency Preparedness) with the attendant Functional and Institutional Classifications that support them. The Integrated Approach provides a systematic perspective that combines the economic objective of reliable power production with the safety objective of consistent, controlled plant operation

  8. Status of the Korean nuclear hydrogen production project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonghwa, Chang; Won-Jae, Lee

    2010-01-01

    The rapid climate changes and the heavy reliance on imported fuel in Korea have motivated interest in the hydrogen economy. The Korean government has set up a long-term vision for transition to the hydrogen economy. To meet the expected demand of hydrogen as a fuel, hydrogen production using nuclear energy was also discussed. Recently the Korean Atomic Energy Committee has approved nuclear hydrogen production development and demonstration which will lead to commercialisation in late 2030's. An extensive research and development programme for the production of hydrogen using nuclear power has been underway since 2004 in Korea. During the first three years, a technological area was identified for the economic and efficient production of hydrogen using a VHTR. A pre-conceptual design of the commercial nuclear hydrogen production plant was also performed. As a result, the key technology area in the core design, the hydrogen production process, the coupling between reactor and chemical side, and the coated fuel were identified. During last three years, research activities have been focused on the key technology areas. A nuclear hydrogen production demonstration plant (NHDD) consisting of a 200 MWth capacity VHTR and five trains of water-splitting plants was proposed for demonstration of the performance and the economics of nuclear hydrogen. The computer tools for the VHTR and the water-splitting process were created and validated to some extent. The TRISO-coated particle fuel was fabricated and qualified. The properties of high temperature materials, including nuclear graphite, were studied. The sulphur-iodine thermochemical process was proved on a 3 litre/ hour scale. A small gas loop with practical pressure and temperature with the secondary sulphur acid loop was successfully built and commissioned. The results of the first phase research increased the confidence in the nuclear hydrogen technology. From 2009, the government decided to support further key technology

  9. Heavy flavor production in nuclear collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto-Pérez, Nestor; Capella, A; Pajares, C; Salgado, C A

    2001-01-01

    Heavy flavor production off nuclei is studied in the small x/sub F/ region of the produced heavy system. Corrections to the usually employed perturbative QCD factorization formula are considered in the framework of the Glauber-Gribov model. Transition from low to high energies is taken into account by using finite energy cutting rules. The low energy limit of the obtained results coincides with the probabilistic formula usually employed for quarkonium absorption. At finite energies both rescattering of the heavy flavor and corrections to nucleon parton densities inside nuclei appear, the latter also affecting lepton pair production. It turns out that at asymptotic energies both open heavy flavor and quarkonium are equally absorbed. The numerical differences between the results obtained with the probabilistic formula and the exact one are <20% up to LHC energies, and ~1/2% at SPS energies. (18 refs).

  10. Carbon-14 production in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The radioactive nuclide 14 C is formed in all nuclear reactors due to absorption of neutrons by carbon, nitrogen, or oxygen. These may be present as components of the fuel, moderator, or structural hardware, or they may be present as impurities. Most of the 14 C formed in the fuels or in the graphite of HTGRs will be converted to a gaseous form at the fuel reprocessing plant, primarily as carbon dioxide; this will be released to the environment unless special equipment is installed to collect it and convert it to a solid for essentially permanent storage. If the 14 C is released as carbon dioxide or in any other chemical form, it will enter the biosphere, be inhaled or ingested as food by nearly all living organisms including man, and will thus contribute to the radiation burden of these organisms. Detailed estimates are presented of the amounts of 14 C formed in LWRs, HTGR, and LMFBR with emphasis on those pathways that are likely to lead to the release of this nuclide, either at the reactor site or at the fuel reprocessing plant. 83 references

  11. Production logistic for an attack nuclear submarine squadron fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Leonam dos Santos

    1999-01-01

    The future acquisition of nuclear attack submarines by Brazilian Navy along next century will imply new requirements on Naval Logistic Support System. These needs will impact all the six logistic functions. Among them, fuel supply could be considered as the one which requires the most important capacitating effort, including not only technological development of processes but also the development of a national industrial basis for effective production of nuclear fuel. This paper presents the technical aspects of the processes involved and an annual production dimensioning for an squadron composed by four units. (author)

  12. Selection and development of advanced nuclear fuel products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stucker, David L.; Miller, Richard S.; Arnsberger, Peter L.

    2004-01-01

    The highly competitive international marketplace requires a continuing product development commitment, short development cycle times and timely, on-target product development to assure customer satisfaction and continuing business. Westinghouse has maintained its leadership position within the nuclear fuel industry with continuous developments and improvements to fuel assembly materials and design. This paper presents a discussion of the processes used by Westinghouse in the selection and refinement of advanced concepts for deployment in the highly competitive US and international nuclear fuel fabrication marketplace. (author)

  13. NPDES Permit for Rocky Mountain Arsenal Recycled Water Pipeline in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit CO-0035009, the U.S. Department of Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service is authorized to discharge from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal recycled water pipeline to Lower Derby Lake in Adams County, Colo.

  14. Bat population monitoring and conservation at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — A study of the bat populations at Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge (RMA) was conducted from 1997–1998, which provided basic population and contaminant...

  15. Nuclear weapons at 70: reflections on the context and legacy of the Manhattan Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, B Cameron

    2015-01-01

    August 2015 marks the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These bombs, the products of the United States Army’s Manhattan Project, helped to end World War II and had enormous long-term effects on global political strategies by setting the stage for the Cold War and nuclear proliferation. This article explores the context and legacy of the Manhattan Project. The state of the war in the summer of 1945 is described, as are how the target cities came to be chosen, deliberations surrounding whether the bombs should be used directly or demonstrated first, and the long-term effects of the Project on individual scientists, the relationship between scientists and society, the subsequent development of nuclear arsenals around the world, and the current status of these arsenals and how they might evolve in the future. (invited comment)

  16. Nuclear weapons at 70: reflections on the context and legacy of the Manhattan Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2015-08-01

    August 2015 marks the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These bombs, the products of the United States Army’s Manhattan Project, helped to end World War II and had enormous long-term effects on global political strategies by setting the stage for the Cold War and nuclear proliferation. This article explores the context and legacy of the Manhattan Project. The state of the war in the summer of 1945 is described, as are how the target cities came to be chosen, deliberations surrounding whether the bombs should be used directly or demonstrated first, and the long-term effects of the Project on individual scientists, the relationship between scientists and society, the subsequent development of nuclear arsenals around the world, and the current status of these arsenals and how they might evolve in the future.

  17. Economical analysis of biofuel products and nuclear plant hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwaren Liun

    2011-01-01

    The increasing in oil prices over the last six years is unprecedented that should be seen as a spur to increased efficiency. The surge in oil prices on the world market today is driven by strong demand factors in the depletion of world oil reserves. To replace the fuel oil from the bowels of the earth the various alternatives should be considered, including other crops or vegetable oil production of bio-fuels and hydrogen are produced by high temperature nuclear reactors. Biofuels in the form of ethanol made from corn or sugar cane and biodiesel made from palm oil or jatropha. With the latest world oil prices, future fuel vegetable oil and nuclear hydrogen-based energy technologies become popular in various parts of the world. Economics of biodiesel will be changed in accordance with world oil prices and subsidy regulations which apply to fuel products. On the other hand the role of nuclear energy in hydrogen production with the most potential in the techno-economics is a form of high temperature steam electrolysis, using heat and electricity from nuclear reactors. The production cost of biodiesel fuel on the basis of ADO type subsidy is 10.49 US$/MMBTU, while the production cost of hydrogen as an energy carrier of high temperature reactor is 15.30 US$/MMBTU. Thus, both types seem to have strong competitiveness. (author)

  18. Historical Review of the Correlation of Ballistic and Metallurgical Characteristics of Domestic Armor at Watertown Arsenal

    Science.gov (United States)

    1945-12-07

    really under- stood. It was learned, then that pearlitic and bainitic microstructures imparted poor impact toughness to steels , pearlitic structures...having a more detrimental effect than bainitic structures, and that a steel could show little or no free ferrite and still pofssess poor shock resistance...arsenal for metallurgical study. The studies at the arsenal revealed that presence of bainitic structures in the core of low alloy NS type steels

  19. Development of interface technology for nuclear hydrogen production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Young; Park, J. K.; Chang, J. H.

    2012-06-01

    These works focus on the development of attainment indices for nuclear hydrogen key technologies, the analysis of the hydrogen production process and the performance estimation for hydrogen production systems, and the assessment of the nuclear hydrogen production economy. The codes for analyzing the hydrogen production economy are developed for calculating the unit production cost of nuclear hydrogen. We developed basic R and D quality management methodology to meet design technology of VHTR's needs. By putting it in practice, we derived some problems and solutions. We distributed R and D QAP and Q and D QAM to each teams and these are in operation. Computer simulations are performed for estimating the thermal efficiency for the electrodialysis component likely to adapting as one of the hydrogen production system in Korea and EED-SI process known as the key components of the hydrogen production systems. Using the commercial codes, the process diagrams and the spread-sheets were produced for the Bunsen reaction process, Sulphuric Acid dissolution process and HI dissolution process, respectively, which are the key components composing of the SI process

  20. Examination of the role of nuclear deterrence in the 21st century: a systems analysis approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martz, Joseph C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stevens, Patrice A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Branstetter, Linda [SNL; Hoover, Edward [SNL; O' Brien, Kevin [SNL; Slavin, Adam [SNL; Caswell, David [STANFORD UNIV

    2010-01-01

    weapons? Many competing objectives have been stated across the spectrum of political, social, and military thought. These objectives include goals of ratification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, recommitment to further downsizing of the nuclear arsenal, embracing a long-term goal of the elimination of nuclear weapons, limitations on both the production complex and upgrades to nuclear weapons and delivery systems, and controls and constraints to limit proliferation of nuclear materials and weapons, particularly to rogue states and terrorist groups.

  1. High energy gamma-ray production in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinston, J.A.; Nifenecker, H.; Nifenecker, H.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental techniques used to study high energy gamma-ray production in nuclear reactions are reviewed. High energy photon production in nucleus-nucleus collisions is discussed. Semi-classical descriptions of the nucleus-nucleus gamma reactions are introduced. Nucleon-nucleon gamma cross sections are considered, including theoretical aspects and experimental data. High energy gamma ray production in proton-nucleus reactions is explained. Theoretical explanations of photon emission in nucleus-nucleus collisions are treated. The contribution of charged pion currents to photon production is mentioned

  2. Is there an antagonism between nuclear safety and productivity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dessus de Cerou, E.; Fourest, B.; Frantzen, C.; Lacoste, A.C.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews the conference organized by the SFEN on November 10, 1998. The object of this meeting was to overview the recent dispositions taken by EdF about the management of its nuclear power plants. The creation of OSD (safety-availability-observatories) in each nuclear plant, whose purpose is to set a dialogue between the demands of safety and the optimization of production shows the importance given by EdF to provide a safe and competitive energy. It shows also the will of EdF to acknowledge the existence of real conflicts between radiation protection, quality assurance and competitiveness in the daily life of a nuclear facility. EdF will face a partial opening of its market by february 2000 within the limits defined by European regulations. This increase of competition could rise problems between the transparency of nuclear activities, patent rights and information reporting. (A.C.)

  3. Production of sestamibi kit for nuclear imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, Hakim; Zakaria, Ahmad; Yaacob, Hadzri; Ramli, Jamaluddin [Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan (Malaysia). School of Medical Sciences

    1997-12-01

    One of the research projects undertaken during the implementation of the IAEA Technical Assistance Cooperation Program in our department was inhouse production of sestamibi (MIBI) kit to be labelled with Tc99m pertechnetate for myocardial studies and for malignant tumor imaging. 100 mg raw materials of sestamibi was supplied by IAEA and the kit was prepared based on Janoki recipe. Using 6 mg MIBI, 192 mg glycine, 3.6 mg stannous chloride, 62.4 mg Na sub 4 Po sub 4 and 24 mg cysteine we have prepared 24 vials of MIBI kit under sterile condition and stored in the freezer at -70 degree C. The sterility of the kit was confirmed by microbiological test using cultured method. The stability test was done by labelling the kit with Tc-99m pertechnetate at day 1, 3, 7, 30 and 60 days after kit preparation. Using two system butanone and saline with ITLC the labelling efficiency of Tc-99m (MIBI) was found to be more than 90% in each case. The labelling efficiency was found to maintain at 90% up to 24 hours post reconstitution at room temperature. Biodistribution study was carried out by administering Tc-99m (MIBI) to mice intravenously at the dosage of IOO {mu} Ci per 20 gm body weight. The mice were sacrificed at 3 hours and 24 hours after the dose administration. Blood, heart, lung, intestine, kidney and stomach samples were obtained, weighed and measured for radioactivity using gamma well counter. The data showed that after 3 hours about 60% of the injected dose accumulated in the intestine which was in agreement with IAEA standard. At 24 hours the amount in the heart still remained about 25% of the 3 hour uptake. In house production of MIBI kit is easy, fast and cost effective. The data suggested that the quality of our kit was good enough to be used for further animal research and clinical trials.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Hydrogen Production Methods with Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, Andrey

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen is highly effective and ecologically clean fuel. It can be produced by a variety of methods. Presently the most common are through electrolysis of water and through the steam reforming of natural gas. It is evident that the leading method for the future production of hydrogen is nuclear energy. Several types of reactors are being considered for hydrogen production, and several methods exist to produce hydrogen, including thermochemical cycles and high-temperature electrolysis. In the article the comparative analysis of various hydrogen production methods is submitted. It is considered the possibility of hydrogen production with the nuclear reactors and is proposed implementation of research program in this field at the IPPE sodium-potassium eutectic cooling high temperature experimental facility (VTS rig). (authors)

  5. Kaon production in intermediate-energy nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russkikh, V.N.; Ivanov, Yu.B.

    1992-01-01

    Production of positive kaons in nuclear collisions at intermediate energies (∝ 1-2 GeV/nucleon) is studied within the 3-dimensional fluid dynamics combined with the hadrochemical kinetics for strangeness production. Sensitivity of the kaon probe to a form of the nuclear equation of state is analyzed. The model reproduces total and differential cross sections of Ne+NaF→K + +X and Ne+Pb→K + +X reactions at E lab =2.1 GeV/nucleon, provided a soft equation of state is used. The pion-production data are also well described employing the same equation of state. Predictions are made for the current experiment on kaon production at the SIS accelerator. The obtained results are compared with the predictions of other models. (orig.)

  6. Quantification of effluents in the production of nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Mayara C.C.B.; Riella, Humberto G.; Carvalho, Elita F.U. de, E-mail: mcostac@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    At the Instituto de Pesquisa Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN), the Centro de Combustível Nuclear (CCN), Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil, is responsible for manufacturing fuels for the IEA-R1 reactor and, possibly, the multipurpose reactor fuels. In order to meet the demand for both reactors, the CCN developed a new plant. The production process of the fuel generates several types of effluents - containing uranium or not - being solid, liquid and gaseous with varied physical and chemical characteristics. The objective of this work is to follow the nuclear fuel production process and to identify, quantify and characterize the effluents, especially the liquid ones, to later elaborate a plan of management of these and eventually dispose in a responsible way in the environment. (author)

  7. Quantification of effluents in the production of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Mayara C.C.B.; Riella, Humberto G.; Carvalho, Elita F.U. de

    2017-01-01

    At the Instituto de Pesquisa Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN), the Centro de Combustível Nuclear (CCN), Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil, is responsible for manufacturing fuels for the IEA-R1 reactor and, possibly, the multipurpose reactor fuels. In order to meet the demand for both reactors, the CCN developed a new plant. The production process of the fuel generates several types of effluents - containing uranium or not - being solid, liquid and gaseous with varied physical and chemical characteristics. The objective of this work is to follow the nuclear fuel production process and to identify, quantify and characterize the effluents, especially the liquid ones, to later elaborate a plan of management of these and eventually dispose in a responsible way in the environment. (author)

  8. Production of beryllium oxide of nuclear purity from beryl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copat, A; Sood, S P

    1984-01-01

    Production of beryllium oxide from beryl by the fluoride process was optimized in this study. Optimum results were obtained using a mixture of sodium hexafluorsilicate and sodium hexafluorferrate as flux and calcinating at 740/sup 0/C for 2 hours. The beryllium concentrate produced was further purified by crystallization as beryllium sulfate to obtain nuclear grade beryllium oxide

  9. Production of beryllium oxide of nuclear purity from beryl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copat, A.; Sood, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Production of beryllium oxide from beryl by the fluoride process was optimized in this study. Optimum results were obtained using a mixture of sodium hexafluorsilicate and sodium hexafluorferrate as flux and calcinating at 740 0 C for 2 hours. The beryllium concentrate produced was further purified by crystallization as beryllium sulfate to obtain nuclear grade beryllium oxide (Author) [pt

  10. Health status of mule deer and white-tailed deer herds on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creekmore, T.E.; Franson, J.C.; Sileo, L. [National Wildlife Health Research Center, Madison, WI (United States); Griess, J.M.; Roy, R.R. [Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, CO (United States); Baker, D.L. [Colorado Division of Wildlife, Ft. Collins, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Rocky Mountain Arsenal is a fenced, 6,900-ha Superfund site under remediation by the US Army and the Shell Oil Company. A variety of environmental contaminants including organochlorine pesticides, metals, and nerve-gas-production by-products are in the soil or in the water on the site. The authors evaluated the health of 18 radio-collared deer (13 mule deer [Odocoileus hemionus] and 5 white-tailed deer [O. virginianus]) collected by gunshot. Prior to collection, more than 4,000 locations of the 18 deer were plotted during a period of more than 2 years. Blood samples from the euthanized animals were collected for serologic, hematologic, and contaminant evaluations. Necropsies were preformed and tissues collected for histopathologic examinations and environmental contaminants analyses. Results indicate that the physical conditions of the mule deer were fair/good and of the white-tailed deer were good. Antibody prevalence against epizootic hemorrhagic disease serotype 2 was 85% and bovine virus diarrhea 56%. Two mule deer had severe testicular atrophy, and one of these animals also had antler deformities. Three mule deer had alopecia with dermatitis and hyperkeratosis. Results of heavy metal, and organochlorine pesticide analyses from blood and tissue samples and other analyses will be presented.

  11. Discrimination symbol applying method for sintered nuclear fuel product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Jin

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a symbol applying method for applying discrimination information such as an enrichment degree on the end face of a sintered nuclear product. Namely, discrimination symbols of information of powders are applied by a sintering aid to the end face of a molded member formed by molding nuclear fuel powders under pressure. Then, the molded product is sintered. The sintering aid comprises aluminum oxide, a mixture of aluminum oxide and silicon dioxide, aluminum hydride or aluminum stearate alone or in admixture. As an applying means of the sintering aid, discrimination symbols of information of powders are drawn by an isostearic acid on the end face of the molded product, and the sintering aid is sprayed thereto, or the sintering aid is applied directly, or the sintering aid is suspended in isostearic acid, and the suspension is applied with a brush. As a result, visible discrimination information can be applied to the sintered member easily. (N.H.)

  12. Economic aspects of radionuclide production for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gallic, Y.; Prospert, J.

    1980-03-01

    In a difficult economic situation it was considered advisable to inform users of certain financial aspects of radionuclide production for nuclear medicine. Two aspects of this vast and many-sided problem are developed here: - The cost price structure of different products (radiopharmaceutical and radioimmunological) which defines the size of the market consistent with a balanced budget. This aspect of the economic analysis seems all the more important as ORIS, although a non profit-making organization, has to balance its production costs. - The effects on the national economy of the nuclear medicine supply market. From this viewpoint it seemed interesting to examine the share-out of the French market between ORIS which is practically the only national producer and importers, as well as the balance of payments situation in this respect [fr

  13. Construction labor productivity during nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, W.B.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the three different types of productivity programs used at the Wm. H. Zimmer Nuclear Power Station construction site. The Standard Cost Estimate as Productivity Measurement compares actual units installed to estimated units. The Manpower and Equipment Utilization Study measures the present utilization level of the construction work force, identifies opportunities for productivity improvement, and establishes a data base against which future improvements could be made. The special productivity program is a specialized and detailed study of first line supervision. Productivity is defined as the degree of efficiency attained in the use of labor, professional and management skills and knowledge, materials and equipment, and time and money to produce an end result. It is concluded that a more consistent system of productivity measurements needs to be developed and promoted for general use in the construction industry

  14. Towards nuclear energy applications other than electricity production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, M.

    2007-01-01

    Use of nuclear energy relies on operation of a boiler, involving practically no greenhouse gas emission. Whereas production of electricity is, nowadays, virtually its sole purpose, demand for heat production could equally arise, particularly with the emergence of high-temperature, or even very-high-temperature reactors. With the abilities this involves, as regards the recovery of heavy crude oils from tar sands, seawater desalination, or, most importantly, production of hydrogen by electrolysis, or thermochemistry, this being the energy carrier of tomorrow. (authors)

  15. Chemistry of fission product iodine under nuclear reactor accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinauskas, A.P.; Bell, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    The radioisotopes of iodine are generally acknowledged to be the species whose release into the biosphere as a result of a nuclear reactor accident is of the greatest concern. In the course of its release, the fission product is subjected to differing chemical environments; these can alter the physicochemical form of the fission product and thus modify the manner and extent to which release occurs. Both the chemical environments which are characteristic of reactor accidents and their effect in determining physical and chemical form of fission product iodine have been studied extensively, and are reviewed in this report. 76 refs

  16. Construction labor productivity during nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, W.B.

    1980-01-01

    There is no single satisfactory way to measure productivity in the construction industry. The industry is too varied, too specialized and too dependent upon vast numbers of interrelations between trades, contractors, designers and owners. Hence, no universally reliable indices for measuring construction productivity has been developed. There are problems that are generic to all large union-built nuclear power plants. The actions of any one owner cannot rectify the shortcomings of the construction industry. The generic problems are being identified, and many national organizations are attempting to make the construction industry more productive by recommending various changes

  17. International economic association on production of nuclear instrumentation - ''INTERINSTRUMENT''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twardon, Z.

    1979-01-01

    History of establishment and development of the International economic association ''Interinstrument'' is stated. Structure of the Association is given and directions of its activity, as well as structure of its budget. List is given of organizations, performing works according to the agreements with the Association. Main directions are stated of activity of the Association in the field of specialization of production of items of nuclear equipment; co-ordination of activity in the sphere of foreign trade; information about new instruments. Activity is stated of the branch offices of the Association, engaged in maintenance of instruments and nuclear equipment [ru

  18. Nuclear data for actinide production and depletion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    The status of nuclear cross section data required for actinide depletion calculations in thermal reactors is summarized, and recommendations are made for future work. The primary fertile and fissile nuclides ( 232 Th, 233 U, 235 U, 238 U, and 239 Pu) are not reviewed. Nuclear data for the transactinium mass region are, with few exceptions, reasonably complete and adequate for current thermal-reactor depletion calculations. There is a real need, however, for well-documented reactor production studies to use as benchmarks for data testing. 3 figures, 6 tables

  19. Comprehensive evaluation method in application of nuclear DCS product design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weixin; Zhao Zhemin; Shi Yingbin

    2014-01-01

    In order to select the best design proposal in short time, the TOPSIS comprehensive evaluation method in the nuclear power plant DCS product design was introduced. It can intuitively show the different design proposals good or not good by data and shorten the time of the design proposal optimization. The design proposal selected by this method will be more reasonable and has good comprehensive performance indexes. The TOPSIS comprehensive evaluation method achieves good result in one of the nuclear power plant DCS cabinet design proposal optimization. (authors)

  20. Production of 15N for nitride type nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, Damian

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Nitride nuclear fuel is the choice for advanced nuclear reactors and ADS, considering its favorable properties as: melting point, excellent thermal conductivity, high fissile density, lower fission gas release and good radiation tolerance. The application of nitride fuels in different nuclear reactors requires use of 15 N enriched nitrogen to suppress 14 C production due to (n,p) reaction on 14 N. Nitride fuel is a promising candidate for transmutation in ADSs of radioactive minor actinides, which are converted into nitrides with 15 N for that purpose. Taking into account that at present the world wide 15 N market is about 20 - 40 Kg 15 N/y, the supply of that isotope for nitride type nuclear fuel, would demand an increase in production capacity by a factor of 1000. For an industrial plant producing 100 t/y 15 N at 99 at. % 15 N concentration, using present technology of 15 N/ 14 N isotopic exchange in Nitrox system, the first separation stage of the cascade would be fed with 10M HNO 3 solution at a 600 m 3 /h flow-rate. If conversion of HNO 3 into NO, NO 2 , at the enriching end of the columns, would be done with gaseous SO 2 , for an industrial plant of 100 t/y 15 N a consumption of 4 million t SO 2 /y and a production of 70 % H 2 SO 4 waste solution of 4.5 million m 3 /y are estimated. The reconversion of H 2 SO 4 into SO 2 in order to recycle SO 2 is a problem to be solved to compensate the cost of sulfur dioxide and to diminish the amount of sulfuric acid waste solution. It should be taken into consideration an important price reduction of 15 N in order to make possible its utilization for industrial production of nitride type nuclear fuel. (authors)

  1. Notice to exporters on products prohibited from export (nuclear material, equipment and large nuclear units)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In order to ensure that the policy to avoid the proliferation of nuclear weapons is complied with, the French Administration applies stricter controls over the export of certain sensitive products, materials and equipment. To this effect, lists of such products, materials and equipment are published in the form of Notices to exporters and periodically revised. This Notice repeals and replaces the previous Notice published in the Official Gazette of 21 January 1986. Annex I contains the list of materials whose export is subject to nuclear non-proliferation controls. Annex II lists the equipment whose export is subject to the same controls. Annex III includes the list of large nuclear units for which an application for prior approval of export must be submitted to the Administrations concerned. (NEA) [fr

  2. Pion production in relativistic collisions of nuclear drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, C.T.; Wilson, J.R.; McAbee, T.L.; Zingman, J.A.

    1988-09-01

    In a continuation of the long-standing effort of the nuclear physics community to model atomic nuclei as droplets of a specialized nuclear fluid, we have developed a hydrodynamic model for simulating the collisions of heavy nuclei at relativistic speeds. Our model couples ideal relativistic hydrodynamics with a new Monte Carlo treatment of dynamic pion production and tracking. The collective flow for low-energy (200 MeV/N) collisions predicted by this model compares favorably with results from earlier hydrodynamic calculations which used quite different numerical techniques. Our pion predictions at these lower energies appear to differ, however, from the experimental data on pion multiplicities. In this case of ultra-relativistic (200 GeV/N) collisions, our hydrodynamic model has produced baryonic matter distributions which are in reasonable agreement with recent experimental data. These results may shed some light on the sensitivity of relativistic collision data to the nuclear equation of state. 20 refs., 12 figs

  3. Dynamic Simulation and Optimization of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul I. Barton; Mujid S. Kaximi; Georgios Bollas; Patricio Ramirez Munoz

    2009-07-31

    This project is part of a research effort to design a hydrogen plant and its interface with a nuclear reactor. This project developed a dynamic modeling, simulation and optimization environment for nuclear hydrogen production systems. A hybrid discrete/continuous model captures both the continuous dynamics of the nuclear plant, the hydrogen plant, and their interface, along with discrete events such as major upsets. This hybrid model makes us of accurate thermodynamic sub-models for the description of phase and reaction equilibria in the thermochemical reactor. Use of the detailed thermodynamic models will allow researchers to examine the process in detail and have confidence in the accurary of the property package they use.

  4. Processes of hydrogen production, coupled with nuclear reactors: Economic perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werkoff, Francois; Avril, Sophie; Mansilla, Christine; Sigurvinsson, Jon

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen production, using nuclear power is considered from a technic-economic (TE) point of view. Three different processes are examined: Alkaline electrolysis, High-temperature steam electrolysis (HTE) and the thermochemical Sulphur-Iodine (S/I) cycle. The three processes differ, in the sense that the first one is operational and both last ones are still at demonstration stages. For them, it is at present only possible to identify key points and limits of competitiveness. The cost of producing hydrogen by alkaline electrolysis is analysed. Three major contributions to the production costs are examined: the electricity consumption, the operation and maintenance expenditures and the depreciation capital expenditures. A technic-economic evaluation of hydrogen production by HTE coupled to a high-temperature reactor (HTR) is presented. Key points appear to be the electrolyser and the high temperature heat exchangers. The S/I thermochemical cycle is based on the decomposition and the re-composition of H 2 SO 4 and HI acids. The energy consumption and the recovery of iodine are key points of the S/I cycle. With the hypothesis that the hydrogen energy will progressively replace the fossil fuels, we give a first estimate of the numbers of nuclear reactors (EPR or HTR) that would be needed for a massive nuclear hydrogen production. (authors)

  5. World Nuclear University School of Uranium Production: Eight years' experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trojacek, J.

    2014-01-01

    The World Nuclear University School of Uranium Production was established by DIAMO, state enterprise in 2006 year under the auspices of the World Nuclear University in London in partnership with international nuclear organizations – OECD/NEA and IAEA. Using the expertise and infrastructure of DIAMO State Enterprise, in conjuction with national and international universities, scientific institutions, regulatory authorities and other individual experts, the “school” covers its mission with the aim to provide world-class training on all aspects of uranium production cycle to equip operators, regulators and executives with the knowledge and expertise needed to provide expanded, environmentally-sound uranium mining throughout the world: • to educate students on all aspects of uranium production cycle including exploration, planning, development, operation, remediation and closure of uranium production facilities; • to improve the state of the art of uranium exploration, mining and mine remediation through research and development; • to provide a forum for the exchange of information on the latest uranium mining technologies and experiences – best practices.

  6. Renewal of nuclear electricity production: an economic trend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debontride, B.; Bouteille, F.; Goebel, A.; Czech, J.

    2004-01-01

    2004 price evolution on the market asks on nuclear generation profitability and competitiveness. There were over installed capacities in Europe since several years, but electricity consumption is steadily increasing and over capacities will disappear more or less at the end of the decade. On a world basis, electricity demand grows twice as much as energy demand, so that there is a need to invest in new electricity generation capacities. The recent US black out events shows the need for securing energy supply in capacities as well as in transmission and distribution. Competitiveness of the different possible sources of energy thus needs to be carefully assessed by all the worldwide decision makers in the field of power generation. In France, the economy of the electricity production is regularly assessed by a French Government study called 'Reference costs for Electricity production' which compares the levelized cost for base load power produced by a nuclear unit (latest design available) and other conventional power stations. In the latest release published in 2003 the nuclear option (the EPR) is compared with three fossil-fired units: A twin 400 MW combined-cycle gas plant, a twin 900 MW pulverized coal station and a 400 MW fluidized bed combustion coal plant. In all cases the nuclear option is the cheapest. If external costs, based on the EU studies (ExternE), are taken into account, the advantage of the nuclear option is significantly increased. In Finland a study performed by the Lappeenranta University in 2000 concluded also in the competitiveness of the Nuclear option. This result was important in the decision making process which resulted in the decision in principle of the Finnish Parliament to allow for the construction of the fifth Nuclear power station for which the EPR was selected. In China, the same kind of economical studies recently led the governmental authorities to launch new nuclear projects. These three examples, in three countries where

  7. Technology selection for hydrogen production using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Alimah; Erlan Dewita

    2008-01-01

    The NPP can either be used to produce electricity, or as heat source for non-electric applications (cogeneration). High Temperature Reactor (HTR) with high outlet coolant temperature around 900~1000 o C, is a reactor type potential for cogeneration purposes such as hydrogen production and other chemical industry processes that need high heat. Considering the national energy policy that a balanced arrangement of renewable and unrenewable natural resources has to be made to keep environmental conservation for the sake of society prosperity in the future, hydrogen gas production using nuclear heat is an appropriate choice. Hydrogen gas is a new energy which is environmentally friendly that it is a prospecting alternative energy source in the future. Within the study, a comparison of three processes of hydrogen gas production covering electrolysis, steam reforming and sulfur-iodine cycle, have been conducted. The parameters that considered are the production cost, capital cost and energy cost, technological status, the independence of fossil fuel, the environmental friendly aspect, as well as the efficiency and the independence of corrosion-resistance material. The study result showed that hydrogen gas production by steam reforming is a better process compared to electrolysis and sulfur-iodine process. Therefore, steam reforming process can be a good choice for hydrogen gas production using nuclear energy in Indonesia. (author)

  8. The safe production of hydrogen by nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, Karl

    2009-01-01

    One of the most promising 'GEN-IV' nuclear reactor concepts is the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). It is characterized by a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor core of 400-600 MW(th). Coolant outlet temperatures of 900-1000 .deg. C ideally suited for a wide spectrum of high temperature process heat or process steam applications, which allow to deliver, besides the classical electricity, also non-electrical products such as hydrogen or other fuels. In a future energy economy, hydrogen as a storable medium could adjust a variable demand for electricity by means of fuel cell power plants providing much more flexibility in optimized energy structures. The mass production of hydrogen is a major goal for Gen-IV systems. In a nuclear hydrogen production facility, the coupling between the nuclear plant and the process heat/steam application side is given by an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), a component which provides a clear separation preventing the primary coolant from accessing the heat application plant and, vice versa, any process gases from being routed through the reactor containment. The physical separation has the advantage that the heat application facility can be conventionally designed, and repair works can be conducted under non-nuclear conditions. With regard to the safety of combined nuclear and chemical facilities, apart from their own specific categories of hazards, a qualitatively new class of events will have to be taken into account characterized by interacting influences. Arising problems to be covered by a decent overall safety concept are the questions of safety of the nuclear plant in case of fire and explosion hazards resulting from the leakage of flammable substances, the tolerable tritium contamination of the product hydrogen, or the situations of thermo-dynamic feedback in case of a loss of heat source (nuclear) or heat sink (chemical) resulting in thermal turbulences. A safety-related issue is the

  9. Major factors influencing craft productivity in nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borcherding, J.D.; Sebastian, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reports on a research study whose objective was to determine the most influential factors adversely affecting craft productivity in nuclear power plant construction from the perspective of the tradesmen employed at the sites. Data were collected through the use of a questionnaire survey and group interview sessions, predominantly with workmen, at six nuclear power plant construction projects. Craftsmen were chosen as the major data base because of their awareness of how their time would actually be spent on the project. Topics considered include the factors influencing craft productivity, material availability, redoing work, crew interfacing, overcrowded work areas, instruction time, inspection delays, craft turnover, craft absenteeism, foreman changes, foreman incompetence, engineering design lead time, comprehensive scheduling of the design function, the responsibility of the utility, value engineering, plant standardization, the effective utilization of the planning and scheduling system, and the labor-management committee

  10. Smoke production from multiple nuclear explosions in nonurban areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small, R.D.; Bush, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    The amount of smoke that may be produced by wildland or rural fires as a consequence of a large-scale nuclear exchange is estimated. The calculation is based on a compilation of rural military facilities, identified from a wide variety of unclassified sources, together with data on their geographic positions, surrounding vegetation (fuel), and weather conditions. The ignition area (corrected for fuel moisture) and the amount of fire spread are used to calculate the smoke production. The results show a substantially lower estimated smoke production (from wildland fires) than in earlier nuclear winter studies. The amount varies seasonally and at its peak is less by an order of magnitude than the estimated threshold level necessary for a major attenuation of solar radiation. 32 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  11. Multiparticle production in particle and nuclear collisions, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanki, Takeshi; Kinoshita, Kisei; Sumiyoshi, Hiroyuki; Takagi, Fujio.

    1990-01-01

    Multiparticle dynamics is related to many branches of particle and nuclear physics. This book provides a comprehensive review which covers the whole domain of multiparticle dynamics. The review consists of five chapters. Chapter D, which is the first chapter of this volume, is titled 'Mechanism of Fragmentation' and contains six sections dealing with 'parton densities inside hadrons', 'hadron fragmentation and quark picture', 'recombination type models', 'quark fragmentation models in soft interaction', 'diquark and its fragmentation' and 'fragmentation in string models'. Chapter E 'Diffractive Production of Hadrons' discusses 'diffractive inelastic processes of composite particles', 'diffractive processes and triple-pomeron coupling', 'properties of diffractive inelastic final states', and 'nature of pomeron'. Chapter F 'Unified Descriptions' focuses on 'general chain picture', 'dual parton model', 'Monte Carlo simulations' and 'unification of hard and soft interactions'. Chapter G, titled 'Multiparticle Production in Hadron-Nucleus Collisions and Other Nuclear Processes' and contains 11 sections. Chapter H presents conclusions. (N.K.)

  12. Utilization of solar and nuclear energy for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.

    1987-01-01

    Although the world-wide energy supply situation appears to have eased at present, non-fossil primary energy sources and hydrogen as a secondary energy carrier will have to take over a long-term and increasing portion of the energy supply system. The only non-fossil energy sources which are available in relevant quantities, are nuclear energy, solar energy and hydropower. The potential of H 2 for the extensive utilization of solar energy is of particular importance. Status, progress and development potential of the electrolytic H 2 production with photovoltaic generators, solar-thermal power plants and nuclear power plants are studied and discussed. The joint German-Saudi Arabian Research, Development and Demonstration Program HYSOLAR for the solar hydrogen production and utilization is summarized. (orig.)

  13. Depleted uranium as a by product of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlic, M.

    2000-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has been used during the War in Yugoslavia in the year 1999 by NATO forces, as well as in Bosnia and Gulf War. In Yugoslavia it has been used in two modalities: as ammunition (mostly caliber 30 mm) and as a part of cruise missiles (counterweight penetrator). Total amount of DU in Yugoslavia was about 10 tons. DU is a by product of nuclear technology and represents low-level nuclear waste. Therefore it should be stored. But, because of military application it is in the environment where it could react chemo toxically or radio toxically and so endanger people and animals. This paper contains all relevant technology parameters of DU created as a by product, DU physical and chemical properties, DU ammunition effects, environmental DU transport, and estimation of consequences on people and environment

  14. Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Secondary Product Market Analysis Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deason, Wesley Ray [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    In order to properly create a program surrounding the development of any technological concept it is necessary to fully understand the market in which it is being developed. In the case of Integrated Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems (HES), there are two economic markets in which it must be able to participate in: the electricity market and the secondary product market associated with the specific system. The purpose of the present report is to characterize the secondary product market in the U.S. and to provide recommendations for further developing the HES program. While HESs have been discussed in depth in many other reports, it is helpful to discuss them briefly in the present work [REF]. The concept of the HES can be deduced to a system, featuring a combination of a nuclear power plant, a renewable energy source, and an industrial manufacturing plant . The system is designed in a fashion that allows it either to produce electricity or to manufacture a secondary product as needed. The primary benefit of this concept lies in its ability to maximize economic performance of the integrated system and to manufacture products in a carbon-free manner. A secondary benefit is the enhanced supply-side flexibility gained by allowing the HES to economically provide grid services. A key tenant to nuclear power plant economics in today’s electricity market is their ability to operate at a very high capacity factor. Unfortunately, in regions with a high penetration of renewable energy, the carbon free energy produced by nuclear power may not be needed at all times. This forces the nuclear power plant to find a user for its excess capacity. This may include paying the electric grid to find a user, releasing energy to the environment by ‘dumping steam’, or reducing power. If the plant is unable to economically or safely do any of these actions, the plant is at risk of being shutdown. In order to allow for nuclear power plants to continue to contribute carbon free

  15. Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Secondary Product Market Analysis Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deason, Wesley Ray

    2015-01-01

    In order to properly create a program surrounding the development of any technological concept it is necessary to fully understand the market in which it is being developed. In the case of Integrated Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems (HES), there are two economic markets in which it must be able to participate in: the electricity market and the secondary product market associated with the specific system. The purpose of the present report is to characterize the secondary product market in the U.S. and to provide recommendations for further developing the HES program. While HESs have been discussed in depth in many other reports, it is helpful to discuss them briefly in the present work [REF]. The concept of the HES can be deduced to a system, featuring a combination of a nuclear power plant, a renewable energy source, and an industrial manufacturing plant . The system is designed in a fashion that allows it either to produce electricity or to manufacture a secondary product as needed. The primary benefit of this concept lies in its ability to maximize economic performance of the integrated system and to manufacture products in a carbon-free manner. A secondary benefit is the enhanced supply-side flexibility gained by allowing the HES to economically provide grid services. A key tenant to nuclear power plant economics in today's electricity market is their ability to operate at a very high capacity factor. Unfortunately, in regions with a high penetration of renewable energy, the carbon free energy produced by nuclear power may not be needed at all times. This forces the nuclear power plant to find a user for its excess capacity. This may include paying the electric grid to find a user, releasing energy to the environment by -dumping steam', or reducing power. If the plant is unable to economically or safely do any of these actions, the plant is at risk of being shutdown. In order to allow for nuclear power plants to continue to contribute carbon free

  16. German foreign trade in nuclear products 1978-1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This statistics of the imports and exports of nuclear products of the Federal Republic of Germany in 1980, compiled by the Federal Minister for Research and Technology (with reference figures for 1978 and 1979) shows that imports have decreased by 23,2% (DM 500,000 million) to DM 1,500,000 million. In contrast between 1978 and 1979 there was a 26,2% increase (DM 400,000 million). (orig./UA) [de

  17. Biological effects induced by low amounts of nuclear fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilenko, I.Ya.; Shishkin, V.F.; Khudyakova, N.V.

    1991-01-01

    The review deals with the problem of biological hazard of low radiation doses for animals and human beings taking into the danger of internal and external irradiation by nuclear fission products under conditions of enhancing anthropogenic radiation contamination of biosphere. An attention is paid to the estimation of life span carcinogenesis, genetic and delayed effects. A conclusion is made on a necessity of multiaspect investigation of biological importance of low radiation doses taking into account modifying effects of other environmental factors

  18. Charged particle radioisotope production at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear - IEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos Junior, O.F.

    1992-05-01

    A variable energy isochronous cyclotron (CV-28) was installed in 1974 at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear in Rio de Janeiro, with the purpose, among others, of irradiating suitable targets to produce radioisotopes for medical diagnostic studies. This papers is an overview of the work done in the last two decades and reports the present status on the production of iodine-123 and gallium-67. (author)

  19. Nuclear Production of Hydrogen Using Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.C.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Schultz, K.R.; Marshall, A.C.; Showalter, S.K.; Pickard, P.S.; Funk, J.F.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high-temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station in a thermochemical water-splitting cycle. We carried out a detailed literature search to create a searchable database with 115 cycles and 822 references. We developed screening criteria to reduce the list to 25 cycles. We used detailed evaluation to select two cycles that appear most promising, the Adiabatic UT-3 cycle and the Sulfur-Iodine cycle. We have selected the Sulfur-Iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle for further development. We then assessed the suitability of various nuclear reactor types to the production of hydrogen from water using the Sulfur-Iodine cycle. A basic requirement is to deliver heat to the process interface heat exchanger at temperatures up to 900 deg. C. We considered nine categories of reactors: pressurized water-cooled, boiling water-cooled, organic-cooled, alkali metal-cooled, heavy metal-cooled, gas-cooled, molten salt-cooled, liquid-core and gas-core reactors. We developed requirements and criteria to carry out the assessment, considering design, safety, operational, economic and development issues. This assessment process led to our choice of the helium gas-cooled reactor for coupling to the Sulfur-Iodine cycle. In continuing work, we are investigating the improvements that have been proposed to the Sulfur-Iodine cycle and will generate an integrated flowsheet describing a hydrogen production plant powered by a high-temperature helium gas-cooled nuclear reactor. This will allow us to size process equipment and calculate hydrogen production efficiency and capital cost, and to estimate the cost of the hydrogen produced as a function of nuclear reactor cost. (authors)

  20. Failures of knowledge production in nuclear power risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanne, Johan M.

    2008-09-01

    Risks are ascribed in processes of knowledge production, where risk objects are defined and measures taken. This knowledge is also the basis for regulatory action. Thus, uncertainties in knowledge production, based upon choices of assumptions, methods, calculations and evidence criteria for reliable data create vulnerabilities for risk management and risk regulation. A recent incident in Swedish nuclear power plant provides an opportunity to develop theories of knowledge production in complex organizations. Knowledge modes within nuclear power can be characterized as either calculated logics where evidence claims need numbers, real time logics based upon subtle signals and tacit knowledge or as policy logics, navigating between internal and external demands for safety, trustworthiness and profit. The plant had neither foreseen the triggering event nor designed the plant to withstand it. I analyze how the plant and the regulator have interpreted the event, its significance and the measures taken to prevent similar events. I also discuss alternative interpretations, lack of knowledge and the generic deficiencies in knowledge production that the event indicates. First, the plant was not as robustly designed as expected. Deficiencies in diversification may have been caused by overconfidence in the reliability of its design. Second, inadequate design was ascribed to various deficient knowledge production processes: original design of the plant, reconstruction or caused by inadequate learning from previous events. The failures in knowledge production were probably caused by insufficient integration of different knowledge processes and limitations in engineering analysis. Knowledge about risks from nuclear power operations is mainly based upon calculations and simulations, not upon real events. But knowledge and design could be improved also without accidents. Control room operators and maintenance staff can provide invaluable knowledge and methods; to improve causal

  1. Failures of knowledge production in nuclear power risk management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanne, Johan M.

    2008-09-15

    Risks are ascribed in processes of knowledge production, where risk objects are defined and measures taken. This knowledge is also the basis for regulatory action. Thus, uncertainties in knowledge production, based upon choices of assumptions, methods, calculations and evidence criteria for reliable data create vulnerabilities for risk management and risk regulation. A recent incident in Swedish nuclear power plant provides an opportunity to develop theories of knowledge production in complex organizations. Knowledge modes within nuclear power can be characterized as either calculated logics where evidence claims need numbers, real time logics based upon subtle signals and tacit knowledge or as policy logics, navigating between internal and external demands for safety, trustworthiness and profit. The plant had neither foreseen the triggering event nor designed the plant to withstand it. I analyze how the plant and the regulator have interpreted the event, its significance and the measures taken to prevent similar events. I also discuss alternative interpretations, lack of knowledge and the generic deficiencies in knowledge production that the event indicates. First, the plant was not as robustly designed as expected. Deficiencies in diversification may have been caused by overconfidence in the reliability of its design. Second, inadequate design was ascribed to various deficient knowledge production processes: original design of the plant, reconstruction or caused by inadequate learning from previous events. The failures in knowledge production were probably caused by insufficient integration of different knowledge processes and limitations in engineering analysis. Knowledge about risks from nuclear power operations is mainly based upon calculations and simulations, not upon real events. But knowledge and design could be improved also without accidents. Control room operators and maintenance staff can provide invaluable knowledge and methods; to improve causal

  2. Nuclear models and data for gamma-ray production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, P.G.

    1975-01-01

    The current Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B, Version IV) contains information on prompt gamma-ray production from neutron-induced reactions for some 38 nuclides. In addition, there is a mass of fission product yield, capture, and radioactive decay data from which certain time-dependent gamma-ray results can be calculated. These data are needed in such applications as gamma-ray heating calculations for reactors, estimates of radiation levels near nuclear facilities and weapons, shielding design calculations, and materials damage estimates. The prompt results are comprised of production cross sections, multiplicities, angular distributions, and energy spectra for secondary gamma-rays from a variety of reactions up to an incident neutron energy of 20 MeV. These data are based in many instances on experimental measurements, but nuclear model calculations, generally of a statistical nature, are also frequently used to smooth data, to interpolate between measurements, and to calculate data in unmeasured regions. The techniques and data used in determining the ENDF/B evaluations are reviewed, and comparisons of model-code calculations and ENDF data with recent experimental results are given. 11 figures

  3. Reprocessing free nuclear fuel production via fusion fission hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotschenreuther, Mike, E-mail: mtk@mail.utexas.edu [Intitute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin (United States); Valanju, Prashant; Mahajan, Swadesh [Intitute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Fusion fission hybrids, driven by a copious source of fusion neutrons can open qualitatively 'new' cycles for transmuting nuclear fertile material into fissile fuel. A totally reprocessing-free (ReFree) Th{sup 232}-U{sup 233} conversion fuel cycle is presented. Virgin fertile fuel rods are exposed to neutrons in the hybrid, and burned in a traditional light water reactor, without ever violating the integrity of the fuel rods. Throughout this cycle (during breeding in the hybrid, transport, as well as burning of the fissile fuel in a water reactor) the fissile fuel remains a part of a bulky, countable, ThO{sub 2} matrix in cladding, protected by the radiation field of all fission products. This highly proliferation-resistant mode of fuel production, as distinct from a reprocessing dominated path via fast breeder reactors (FBR), can bring great acceptability to the enterprise of nuclear fuel production, and insure that scarcity of naturally available U{sup 235} fuel does not throttle expansion of nuclear energy. It also provides a reprocessing free path to energy security for many countries. Ideas and innovations responsible for the creation of a high intensity neutron source are also presented.

  4. Reprocessing free nuclear fuel production via fusion fission hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotschenreuther, Mike; Valanju, Prashant; Mahajan, Swadesh

    2012-01-01

    Fusion fission hybrids, driven by a copious source of fusion neutrons can open qualitatively “new” cycles for transmuting nuclear fertile material into fissile fuel. A totally reprocessing-free (ReFree) Th 232 –U 233 conversion fuel cycle is presented. Virgin fertile fuel rods are exposed to neutrons in the hybrid, and burned in a traditional light water reactor, without ever violating the integrity of the fuel rods. Throughout this cycle (during breeding in the hybrid, transport, as well as burning of the fissile fuel in a water reactor) the fissile fuel remains a part of a bulky, countable, ThO 2 matrix in cladding, protected by the radiation field of all fission products. This highly proliferation-resistant mode of fuel production, as distinct from a reprocessing dominated path via fast breeder reactors (FBR), can bring great acceptability to the enterprise of nuclear fuel production, and insure that scarcity of naturally available U 235 fuel does not throttle expansion of nuclear energy. It also provides a reprocessing free path to energy security for many countries. Ideas and innovations responsible for the creation of a high intensity neutron source are also presented.

  5. Fission product chemistry in severe nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    1990-09-01

    A specialist's meeting was held at JRC-Ispra from 15 to 17 January 1990 to review the current understanding of fission-product chemistry during severe accidents in light water reactors. Discussions focussed on the important chemical phenomena that could occur across the wide range of conditions of a damaged nuclear plant. Recommendations for future chemistry work were made covering the following areas: (a) fuel degradation and fission-product release, (b) transport and attenuation processes in the reactor coolant system, (c) containment chemistry (iodine behaviour and core-concrete interactions)

  6. Spectrophotometry with optical fibers applied to nuclear product processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisde, G.; Perez, J.J.; Velluet, M.T.; Jeunhomme, L.B.

    1988-01-01

    Absorption spectrophotometry is widely used in laboratories for composition analysis and quality control of chemical processes. Using optical fibers for transmitting the light between the instrument and the process line allows to improve the safety and productivity of chemical processes, thanks to real time measurements. Such applications have been developed since 1975 in CEA for the monitoring of nuclear products. This has led to the development of fibers, measurement cells, and optical feedthrough sustaining high radiation doses, of fiber/spectrophotometer couplers, and finally of a photodiode array spectrophotometer optimized for being used together with optical fibers [fr

  7. Once-through hybrid sulfur process for nuclear hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Y. H.

    2008-01-01

    Increasing concern about the global climate change spurs the development of low- or zero-carbon energy system. Nuclear hydrogen production by water electrolysis would be the one of the short-term solutions, but low efficiency and high production cost (high energy consumption) is the technical hurdle to be removed. In this paper the once-through sulfur process composed of the desulfurization and the water electrolysis systems is proposed. Electrode potential for the conventional water electrolysis (∼2.0 V) can be reduced significantly by the anode depolarization using sulfur dioxide: down to 0.6 V depending on the current density This depolarized electrolysis is the electrolysis step of the hybrid sulfur process originally proposed by the Westinghouse. However; recycling of sulfur dioxide requires a high temperature heat source and thus put another technical hurdle on the way to nuclear hydrogen production: the development of high temperature nuclear reactors and corresponding sulfuric acid decomposition system. By the once-through use of sulfur dioxide rather than the closed recycle, the hurdle can be removed. For the sulfur feed, the desulfurization system is integrated into the water electrolysis system. Fossil fuels include a few percent of sulfur by weight. During the refinement or energy conversion, most of the sulfur should be separated The separated sulfur can be fed to the water electrolysis system and the final product would be hydrogen and sulfuric acid, which is number one chemical in the world by volume. Lowered electrode potential and additional byproduct, the sulfuric acid, can provide economically affordable hydrogen. In this study, the once-through hybrid sulfur process for hydrogen production was proposed and the process was optimized considering energy consumption in electrolysis and sulfuric acid concentration. Economic feasibility of the proposed process was also discussed. Based on currently available experimental data for the electrode

  8. Upgrade and Development of Nuclear Data Production Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-04-15

    It is necessary to improve the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF) in order to be used as a nuclear data production facility for users in both domestic and abroad. We improved following items: (1) upgrade the electron linac, (2) collimators inside the TOF beam pipe, (3) the development and installation of an automatic sample changer, (4) the extension of the TOF beam line, and (5) the data acquisition system. We would like to establish a utilization system for users to measure the nuclear data at the PNF. To do this, we made manuals for the accelerator operation and the data acquisition system. We also made an application form to apply for users to measure the nuclear data in both domestic and abroad. The main object of the Pohang Neutron Facility is to measure the nuclear data in the neutron energy region from thermal neutron to few hundreds of eV. In addition to neutron beams produced at the PNF, photon and electron beams are produced in this facility. We thus utilize this facility for other fields, such as test facility for detectors, activation experiments, polarized neutron beam source, and so on. In addition to these, we could use this facility for training students

  9. Upgrade and development of nuclear data production test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namkung, Won; Ko, I. S.; Cho, M. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Kang, H. S. [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G. N. [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Koh, S. K. [Univ. of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Ro, T. I. [Donga Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, G. U. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-04-15

    It is necessary to improve the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF) in order to be used as a nuclear data production facility for users in both domestic and abroad. We improved following items: upgrade the electron linac, collimators inside the TOF beam pipe, the development and installation of an automatic sample changer, the extension of the TOF beam line, and the data acquisition system. We would like to establish a utilization system for users to measure the nuclear data at the PNF. To do this, we made manuals for the accelerator operation and the data acquisition system. We also made an application form to apply for users to measure the nuclear data in both domestic and abroad. The main object of the Pohang Neutron Facility is to measure the nuclear data in the neutron energy region from thermal neutron to few hundreds of eV. In addition to neutron beams produced at the PNF, photon and electron beams are produced in this facility. We thus utilize this facility for other fields, such as test facility for detectors, activation experiments, polarized neutron beam source, and so on. In addition to these, we could use this facility for training students.

  10. SYSTEM ANALYSIS OF NUCLEAR-ASSISTED SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM COAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien

    2008-01-01

    A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via high-temperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. Results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 66.1% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency

  11. System Analysis of Nuclear-Assisted Syngas Production from Coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvego, E.A.; McKellar, M.G.; O'Brien, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via high temperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. Results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 64.4% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

  12. On Cherenkov light production by irradiated nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branger, E.; Grape, S.; Svärd, S. Jacobsson; Jansson, P.; Sundén, E. Andersson

    2017-01-01

    Safeguards verification of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in wet storage is frequently done by measuring the Cherenkov light in the surrounding water produced due to radioactive decays of fission products in the fuel. This paper accounts for the physical processes behind the Cherenkov light production caused by a single fuel rod in wet storage, and simulations are presented that investigate to what extent various properties of the rod affect the Cherenkov light production. The results show that the fuel properties have a noticeable effect on the Cherenkov light production, and thus that the prediction models for Cherenkov light production which are used in the safeguards verifications could potentially be improved by considering these properties. It is concluded that the dominating source of the Cherenkov light is gamma-ray interactions with electrons in the surrounding water. Electrons created from beta decay may also exit the fuel and produce Cherenkov light, and e.g. Y-90 was identified as a possible contributor to significant levels of the measurable Cherenkov light in long-cooled fuel. The results also show that the cylindrical, elongated fuel rod geometry results in a non-isotropic Cherenkov light production, and the light component parallel to the rod's axis exhibits a dependence on gamma-ray energy that differs from the total intensity, which is of importance since the typical safeguards measurement situation observes the vertical light component. It is also concluded that the radial distributions of the radiation sources in a fuel rod will affect the Cherenkov light production.

  13. Pair production from nuclear collisions and cosmic ray transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norbury, John W

    2006-01-01

    Modern cosmic ray transport codes, that are capable of use for a variety of applications, need to include all significant atomic, nuclear and particle reactions at a variety of energies. Lepton pair production from nucleus-nucleus collisions has not been included in transport codes to date. Using the methods of Baur, Bertulani and Baron, the present report provides estimates of electron-positron pair production cross sections for nuclei and energies relevant to cosmic ray transport. It is shown that the cross sections are large compared to other typical processes such as single neutron removal due to strong or electromagnetic interactions. Therefore, lepton pair production may need to be included in some transport code applications involving MeV electrons. (brief report)

  14. Hydrogen production from coal using a nuclear heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quade, R.N.

    1977-01-01

    A strong candidate for hydrogen production in the intermediate time frame of 1990 to 1995 is a coal-based process using a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as a heat source. Expected process efficiencies in the range of 60 to 70% are considerably higher than all other hydrogen production processes except steam reforming of a natural gas - a feedstock which may not be available in large quantities in this time frame. The process involves the preparation of a coal liquid, hydrogasification of that liquid, and steam reforming of the resulting gaseous or light liquid product. Bench-scale experimental work on the hydrogasification of coal liquids is being carried out. A study showing process efficiency and cost of hydrogen vs nuclear reactor core outlet temperature has been completed and shows diminishing returns at process temperatures above about 1500 0 F. (author)

  15. Hydrogen production from coal using a nuclear heat source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    A strong candidate for hydrogen production in the intermediate time frame of 1985 to 1995 is a coal-based process using a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as a heat source. Expected process efficiencies in the range of 60 to 70% are considerably higher than all other hydrogen production processes except steam reforming of a natural gas. The process involves the preparation of a coal liquid, hydrogasification of that liquid, and steam reforming of the resulting gaseous or light liquid product. A study showing process efficiency and cost of hydrogen vs nuclear reactor core outlet temperature has been completed, and shows diminishing returns at process temperatures above about 1500 F. A possible scenario combining the relatively abundant and low-cost Western coal deposits with the Gulf Coast hydrogen users is presented which provides high-energy density transportation utilizing coal liquids and uranium.

  16. Safety, Security, and Stability: The Role of Nuclear Control Regimes in a Proliferated World

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Collins, James

    1995-01-01

    ... with developing and deploying nuclear weapons. The US, in the past, has refused to provide technical assistance to enhance the safety, security, and stability of proliferating countries' nuclear arsenals-we believe this policy...

  17. Nuclear power and health. The implications for health of nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear power production is, in principle, a safe technology when practised in accordance with the well established and very strict national and international rules and regulations. Yet management failures have occurred, resulting in injuries to personnel and, occasionally, escape of radioactive material. Such events may cause potential health problems, affecting physical, mental and social well-being. Public concern still tends to concentrate on nuclear-power-related facilities, yet the public's desire for a reduction in environmental pollution has led to increased demand for the development and use of low-waste or non-waste energy technologies. Nuclear energy production is one such technology, which has become established and well developed, particularly in highly industrialized countries. This was recognized by the WHO Regional Office for Europe as early as the 1970s, and led to a series of scientific working groups to discuss the most urgent issues related to the impact on health of the generation of electrical power by means of nuclear energy. Five major meetings took place between 1975 and 1985, resulting in five publications (1 - 5) covering various aspects of particular concern to the general public (and thus also to national authorities) such as handling plutonium, managing high-level radioactive waste, and preparing for accidental releases of radioactive material. The first such publication was issued in 1977. All five books were based on the collective knowledge and experience of groups of experts, and were published following the meetings of the respective working groups. The project was initiated at the request and with the support of the Government of Belgium, to study and discuss the effects of the nuclear power industry on people and the environment. The project served two objectives. First, it assisted Member States in developing the capacity to understand the public health implications of the widespread use of nuclear power. Second, it

  18. Competitive nuclear production on the nordic deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohl, T.

    2000-01-01

    The Nordic electricity market has been partly deregulated since 1994. Today only Denmark follows the timetable recommended by the European Union, while Sweden, Norway and Finland are completely deregulated. As in most countries, the production of electricity is deregulated while the distribution is still a monopoly. This deregulation of the electricity market has created a new situation for plant life management. In order to be competitive on the market it is important to cut cost down a level when the nuclear power companies earn money again. All means to cut cost have to be used while still maintaining safety and the possibilities for operation over at least 40+ years. The possibilities to invest in modernization are limited to the absolutely necessary modifications. All investments must be very thoroughly questioned and the money can only be spent where most benefit is gained. This means new prerequisites for the absolute necessary long-strategic planning. New safety requirements from the authorities have to be discussed between the industry and the authority. The requirement cost must be compared to the benefit to safety. The authority is today requested to carry out such analyses and do so in most cases. Since the electricity market is international the requirements of the authorities must be harmonized on the whole market. The political threat against nuclear power is serious in many countries and it is important to continue working with public acceptance and lobbying. Especially in Sweden a lot of effort is spent on trying to change the taxation of nuclear power. In the near future increasing electricity demand will make the prices go up to a level when nuclear power companies earn money again. The very serious worries about climate change will also strengthen the competitiveness of nuclear power. (author)

  19. Production of 111In for diagnosis in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osso Junior, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    111 In (t sub(1/2 = 2.82d)) due to its favorable physical decay characteristics, can substitute sup(113m) In (t sub(1/2 = 1.66hr)), whose application is limited to rapid physiological studies, advantageously. A routine production method has been developed by 28 MeV alpha particle bombardment of natural silver at the CV-28 Cyclotron of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear. The target is dissolved in conc. nitric acid, and silver is precipitated with hydrochloric acid. Carrier-free 111 In which remains in solution is separated from 109 Cd, the decay product of 109 In, which is produced simultaneously during the irradiation, by an anion exchange resin. All the production and separation steps are made remotely, with the use of manipulators, tongs and electric and pneumatic systems. The thick target yield is 0.18 mCi/μAh and in each run 16 mCi of 111 In are produced, which can be used in nuclear medicine centers. Methods of labelling 111 In-EDTA and 111 In-DTPA have been developed. 111 In offers a favorable half-life for the study of rather slow biological processes, in which observation periods of 24-72 hrs after administration are required, e.g., cisternography, visualization of the lymphatic system, tumor localization and others. (Author) [pt

  20. Applications of Nuclear Energy to Oil Sands and Hydrogen Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, R.B.; Miller, A.; Kuran, S.

    2011-01-01

    natural gas prices, an unlikely circumstance but one that would undermine the very development of oilsands as surely as high cost and limited availability of natural gas. We examine the applications of nuclear energy to oil sands production, and the concomitant hydrogen production, utilizing realistic reactor designs, modern power and energy market considerations, and environmental constraints on waste and emissions. We cover all aspects of feasibility, specifically technical issues, comparative economics, schedule, regulatory requirements, and other implementation factors. We compare and contrast the claims versus the realities, and also provide the synergistive utilization of co-generation of hydrogen using coupled nuclear and windpower. Among the many non-technological issues expressed by the oil industry are their lack of experience with nuclear technology or nuclear power generation, and with the regulatory framework. The application of any nuclear technology must also consider Government and public support, local and First Nations acceptance, site selection, access to water, oil sands, and transmission, oil industry buy-in on the basis of hard nosed economics, the impacts of oil and gas prices, labour costs and the need for long-term contracts for steam and electricity, together with an experienced nuclear plant owner/operator. (author)

  1. Production of nuclear ceramic fuel for nuclear power plants at 'Ulba metallurgical plant' OSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadeev, V.G.

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes the flow-sheet of production of uranium dioxide powders and nuclear ceramic fuel pellets of them existing at the facility. 'UMP' OSC applies ADU extraction process of UO2 powders production. An indisputable success of the process is the possibility of use of the wide range of raw materials. Uranium hexafluoride, uranium oxides, uranium metal, uranium tetrafluoride, uranyl salts, uranium ore concentrates, all possible types of uranium-containing materials the processing of which by routine methods is difficult (ashes, scraps, etc.) are used as the raw materials. In addition, a reprocessed nuclear fuel can be used for fuel production. The quality of uranium dioxide powder produced does not depend on the type of uranium raw material used. High selectivity of extraction refining makes possible to obtain material with rather low impurities content that meets practically all specifications for uranium dioxide known to us. Ceramic and process features of uranium dioxide powders, namely, specific surface, bulk density, grain size and sinterability make possible to produce nuclear ceramic fuel with specified features. Quality of uranium dioxide powders produced by 'UMP' OSC was highly rated by General Electric company that is one of the leading companies from fuel manufactures in the USA market . It has certified 'UMP' OSC as its supplier. Currently, our company makes great efforts on establishing production of uranium dioxide powders with natural isotopes content for production of fuel for CANDU reactors. Trial lots of such powders are under tests at some companies manufacturing fuel for this type reactors in Canada, USA and Corea

  2. Behavior of Nb fission product during nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gue, J.P.

    1977-02-01

    Investigations on niobium fission product behavior in nitric acid and tributyl phosphate media have been carried out in order to explain the difficulties encountered in separating this element from fissile materials during spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. The studies have shown that in nitric acid solution, pentavalent niobium has a colloidal hydroxide form. The so-obtained sols were characterized by light scattering, electronic microscopy, electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation methods. In heterogeneous extracting media containing tributyl phosphate and dibutyl phosphoric acid the niobium hydroxide sols could be flocculated by low dibutyl phosphoric acid concentration or extracted into the organic phase containing an excess of dibutyl phosphoric acid [fr

  3. 1-4 Strangeness Production in Antiproton Induced Nuclear Reactions.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng; Zhaoqing[1

    2014-01-01

    More localized energy deposition is able to be produced in antiproton-nucleus collisions in comparison withheavy-ion collisions due to annihilation reactions. Searching for the cold quark-gluon plasma (QGP) with antiprotonbeamshas been considered as a hot topic both in experiments and in theretical calculations over the past severaldecades. Strangeness production and hypernucleus formation in antiproton-induced nuclear reactions are importancein exploring the hyperon (antihyperon)-nucleon (HN) potential and the antinucleon-nucleon interaction, whichhave been hot topics in the forthcoming experiments at PANDA in Germany.

  4. Nuclear and related techniques in animal production and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The international symposium was attended by about 130 participants from 45 countries and included 83 scientific presentations of which 42 were posters. This volume covers four principal and interrelated topics: adaptation of animals to the environment, and animal reproduction, health and nutrition. Within each topic, consideration is given to those nuclear and related techniques currently employed in investigative research and their usefulness in studying animal production systems. Progress towards new areas of application and new techniques is also covered, particularly the development and practicability of immunoassay and related biotechnological methods for the diagnosis of livestock diseases. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the papers in this volume

  5. Application of nuclear techniques in animal health and production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-01-01

    Under United Nations Development Programme in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, a beginning was made in the use of nuclear techniques in animal health and production at the Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar. Radioisotopes are being used as tracers for investigations in rumen digestion, metabolism, physiology and endocrinology of animals. Irradiated vaccines against parasitic infestation are being developed. Various facilities available, salient research findings of the studies carried so far and research work under progress and future development plans are described.

  6. Nuclear purity and the production of uranium (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verte, P.

    1962-01-01

    When the production of 'nuclear grade' uranium is dealt with, it is difficult, the author of this study points out, to separate its chemical, technical, and economical bearings. While recalling the evolution of chemical processes in various countries and describing the technic of uranium manufacture in the plant of the French 'Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique' at Le Bouchet, the author outlines the effect of economical contingencies on the problems the chemists and engineer are faced with. The question of cost price is also considered here with particular attention. (author) [fr

  7. Germany's foreign trade with nuclear products, 1979-1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The survey on the foreign trade of the Federal Republic of Germany with nuclear-technical products which was set up by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT) shows for 1981 (with comparative figures for 1979 and 1980) an increase by 35.5% or from 0,5 billion DM to 2.1 billion DM if compared to the previous year while there had been a regression by 23.2%, 0.5 billion DM resp. from 1979 to 1980. (orig./UA) [de

  8. Production of concentrates for supplying a national nuclear electric program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, C.M.

    An analysis was made of the yearly requirements of natural U to satisfy a nuclear power program in Mexico. On the basis of these requirements an evaluation was made of the concentrate production necessary to supply those needs. The lack of known commercial reserves to satisfy the concentrate needs is shown. An estimation is made of the costs for the discovery and exploitation of sufficient reserves. In evaluating the U needs and associated costs, three cases were considered: all BWR or PWR or HWR

  9. Application of nuclear techniques in animal health and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    Under United Nations Development Programme in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, a beginning was made in the use of nuclear techniques in animal health and production at the Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar. Radioisotopes are being used as tracers for investigations in rumen digestion, metabolism, physiology and endocrinology of animals. Irradiated vaccines against parasitic infestation are being developed. Various facilities available, salient research findings of the studies carried so far and research work under progress and future development plans are described. (M.G.B.)

  10. Flexible robotic entry device for a nuclear materials production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckendorn, F.M. II.

    1988-01-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory has developed and is implementing a flexible robotic entry device (FRED) for the nuclear materials production reactors now operating at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). FRED is designed for rapid deployment into confinement areas of operating reactors to assess unknown conditions. A unique smart tether method has been incorporated into FRED for simultaneous bidirectional transmission of multiple video/audio/control/power signals over a single coaxial cable. This system makes it possible to use FRED under all operating and standby conditions, including those where radio/microwave transmissions are not possible or permitted, and increases the quantity of data available

  11. Nuclearization of ionic chromatography system for fission products analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimeglio, Remi

    1996-06-01

    The accident at Tchernobyl in 1986 had entailed the release in the atmosphere of different products coming from the splitting of the fuel. It is to better understand, and also to warn this type of catastrophe that the CEA (Commissariat a L'Energie Atomique) develops many programs of researches, aiming to characterize these fission products and to study their mechanisms of relaxation. Thus, the LESC (Laboratoire d'Etude de la Surete du Combustible) takes part, since several years, in many nuclear safety experiences, and in particular to the project PHEBUS PF, that is a reconstitution, in reduced scale, of an accident entailing the fusion of the reactor core. The aim of the researches that have been led during this training period was to the nuclearization of an HPIC (High Performance Ion Chromatography) system, dedicated to the analysis of the PHEBUS PF fission products analysis. The first step was to develop HPIC lines already settled, so as to reduce the quantity of wastes. Indeed, those one are very difficult to process in a radioactive area. For this purpose, we have implanted a column cationic more effective, so as to decrease analysis times, and, by there even, the quantity of sewage generated. We have equally replaced, on lines cationic and anionic, the system of suppression of the eluent conductivity, to make it thriftier in fluid. But the radioactive products characterization necessitates that all analyses are led within a special box with gloves. The second step of the project was therefore to adapt the system to this type of cell, and to its automation. It has been necessary to modify the system of sample injection, the system of detection, and to put in place a supplementary box with gloves, connected by sieve to the first, for the active products dilution. (author) [fr

  12. Qualified Coatings in Nuclear Power Plants. Commercial products; Qualified Coatings in Nuclear Power Plants. Commercial products. Pinturas homologadas en centrales nucleares. Productos comerciales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcena, J.; Nunez, B.; Romero, M.; Baladiam, M.

    2014-07-01

    Recently, the supplier of paints that were qualified for use in nuclear applications as protective coatings have ceased to supply in Spain the paints that was used in areas or components with special requirements for nuclear power plants (NPPs). This lack of the common commercial products called for the search for and homologation of other products. A study was performed on the current status of the homologation of commercial products for NPPs and on the codes and standards governing them. The criteria to be met have been defined and the results of the tests performed on the selected paints have been compared against the established criteria so as to allow the homologation of the paints. (Author)

  13. NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE THE GELLED PRODUCT OF CANNIZZARO REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Fernández-Sánchez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR of proton 1H, carbon 13C and two dimensional spectrums, product of a green organic synthesis of redox on the Cannizzaro reaction. The product was reported as a tribochemical gel (heterogeneous mixture and confirmed by Infrared Spectroscopy IR, X-ray and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The results in this paper confirm its structure through various techniques of NMR and evaluate the content of sodium benzoate and benzyl alcohol in the spectroscopy sample, examining the values of the integrals on 1H NMR signals. The result of analysis indicates that benzyl alcohol (dispersed phase is in 33.44% mol in comparison with sodium benzoate content (continuous phase. These results confirm that the gel structure over time loses the dispersed phase of the benzyl alcohol producing a xerogel.

  14. Nuclear model calculations on cyclotron production of {sup 51}Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakavand, Tayeb [Imam Khomeini International Univ., Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Physics; Aboudzadeh, Mohammadreza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute/AEOI, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School; Farahani, Zahra; Eslami, Mohammad [Zanjan Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Physics

    2015-12-15

    {sup 51}Cr (T{sub 1/2} = 27.7 d), which decays via electron capture (100 %) with 320 keV gamma emission (9.8 %), is a radionuclide with still a large application in biological studies. In this work, ALICE/ASH and TALYS nuclear model codes along with some adjustments are used to calculate the excitation functions for proton, deuteron, α-particle and neutron induced on various targets leading to the production of {sup 51}Cr radioisotope. The production yields of {sup 51}Cr from various reactions are determined using the excitation function calculations and stopping power data. The results are compared with corresponding experimental data and discussed from point of view of feasibility.

  15. Target-fueled nuclear reactor for medical isotope production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Richard L.; Parma, Edward J.

    2017-06-27

    A small, low-enriched, passively safe, low-power nuclear reactor comprises a core of target and fuel pins that can be processed to produce the medical isotope .sup.99Mo and other fission product isotopes. The fuel for the reactor and the targets for the .sup.99Mo production are the same. The fuel can be low enriched uranium oxide, enriched to less than 20% .sup.235U. The reactor power level can be 1 to 2 MW. The reactor is passively safe and maintains negative reactivity coefficients. The total radionuclide inventory in the reactor core is minimized since the fuel/target pins are removed and processed after 7 to 21 days.

  16. Recoil release of fission products from nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, C.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical approximation is developed for calculating recoil release from nuclear fuel into gas filled interspaces. This expression is evaluated for a number of interspace geometries and shown to be generally accurate to within about 10% by comparison with numerical calculations. The results are applied to situations of physical interest and it is demonstrated that recoil can be important when modelling fission product release from low temperature CAGR pin failures. Furthermore, recoil can contribute significantly in experiments on low temperature fission product release, particularly where oxidation enhancement of this release is measured by exposing the fuel to CO 2 . The calculations presented here are one way of allowing for this, other methods are suggested. (orig.)

  17. Investigation of Rare Particle Production in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, Henry J.; Engelage, Jon M.

    1999-01-01

    Our program is an investigation of the hadronization process through measurement of rare particle production in high energy nuclear interactions. Such collisions of heavy nuclei provide an environment similar in energy density to the conditions in the Big Bang. We are currently involved in two major experiments to study this environment, E896 at the AGS and STAR at RHIC. We have completed our physics running of E896, a search for the H dibaryon and measurement of hyperon production in AuAu collisions, and are in the process of analyzing the data. We have produced the electronics and software for the STAR trigger and will begin to use these tools to search for anti-nuclei and strange hadrons when RHIC turns on later this year

  18. Determining phenols in coal conversion products by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanitskaya, L.V.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Polonov, V.M.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1985-03-01

    Possibility of using nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the hydrogen 1 (/sup 1/H) isotope for a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the hydroxyl groups in the products of coal processing is investigated. The basis of the method is the fact that in NMR spectra of the /sup 1/H in organic compounds with acid protons, the latter are unprotected when strong bases are used as solvents because of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The resin from the medium-temperature semicoking of Cheremkhovskii coals, its hydrogenate, and phenol fraction of the hydrogenate were used for the investigation. The results were compared with the results of other NMR spectroscopy methods. The high solubility of hexamethanol and the fact that the products can be analyzed in the natural state, are some advantages of the method. 18 references.

  19. Consequences of reduced production of electricity in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Power Administration has assessed the possibilities of expanding electric power sources other than nuclear power plants for the years 1980 and 1985. Reports on costs in the form of loss of capital and increased operating costs involved in the dismantling of nuclear power plants are made in Supplement 1. The economics division of the Finance Department, starting with a long-range study model of the Swedish economy, has calculated the consequences of a cutback in electric power up to 1980 for Sweden's economy and employment in that year. The consequences of reduction of electricity supplies up to 1985 are summarized in Supplement 2 in this report. It is concluded that in order to be able to manage the problem of supplying electricity by 1985, it will be necessary to increase oil power above what was assumed in the energy policy program. There will have to be new oil-based power as well. According to the Power Administration, oil-power facilities can be expanded to varying degrees, depending upon when the decision is made. The Power Administration's calculations show that 125 TWh is possible in 1985 without nuclear power only if a decision for discontinuation is made in the fall of 1976. This is based on very optimistic assumptions about the time of execution of a program for oil-steam operation, and also on the assumption that extreme measures will be initiated to force expansion of both district-heating distribution and power + heat facilities. Oil consumption for production of electricity in such an electric power system would be about 9 million m 3 , which is about 5 times more than at present and about one-third of the present total consumption of petroleum products in Sweden

  20. Large-scale hydrogen production using nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryland, D.; Stolberg, L.; Kettner, A.; Gnanapragasam, N.; Suppiah, S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    For many years, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has been studying the feasibility of using nuclear reactors, such as the Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor, as an energy source for large scale hydrogen production processes such as High Temperature Steam Electrolysis and the Copper-Chlorine thermochemical cycle. Recent progress includes the augmentation of AECL's experimental capabilities by the construction of experimental systems to test high temperature steam electrolysis button cells at ambient pressure and temperatures up to 850{sup o}C and CuCl/HCl electrolysis cells at pressures up to 7 bar and temperatures up to 100{sup o}C. In parallel, detailed models of solid oxide electrolysis cells and the CuCl/HCl electrolysis cell are being refined and validated using experimental data. Process models are also under development to assess options for economic integration of these hydrogen production processes with nuclear reactors. Options for large-scale energy storage, including hydrogen storage, are also under study. (author)

  1. High temperature electrolysis for hydrogen production using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, J. Stephen; O'brien, James E.; Stoots, Carl M.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Hartvigsen, Joseph J.

    2005-01-01

    High-temperature nuclear reactors have the potential for substantially increasing the efficiency of hydrogen production from water splitting, which can be accomplished via high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) or thermochemical processes. In order to achieve competitive efficiencies, both processes require high-temperature operation (∼850degC). High-temperature electrolytic water splitting supported by nuclear process heat and electricity has the potential to produce hydrogen with overall system efficiencies of 45 to 55%. At the Idaho National Laboratory, we are developing solid-oxide cells to operate in the steam electrolysis mode. The research program includes both experimental and modeling activities. Experimental results were obtained from ten-cell and 22-cell planar electrolysis stacks, fabricated by Ceramatec, Inc. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte-supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (∼200 μm thick, 64 cm 2 active area), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions, gas glow rates, and current densities. Hydrogen production rates greater than 100 normal liters per hour for 196 hours have been demonstrated. In order to evaluate the performance of large-scale HTE operations, we have developed single-cell models, based on FLUENT, and a process model, using the systems-analysis code HYSYS. (author)

  2. Secondary resources processing in production of nuclear grade yellow cake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivasubramanian, S.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Recovering uranium in a cost competitive manner from sources other than the uranium ore is considered necessary from the point of view of meeting the strategic as well as the nuclear power programme need of the country. Globally, uranium is produced from ores which have more than 10 times uranium content compared to those available in India. Secondary sources of uranium are mostly defined by recycled uranium, from spent fuel of nuclear reactors, re-enriched depleted uranium tails, ex-military weapons grade uranium and stock piles for civilian use. Uranium production from secondary sources in India is largely dependent on processing of monazite, and to a smaller extent it is recovered from waste metallurgical slags generated by BARC and other private industries engaged in extracting niobium tantalum from the ores. The paper gives over view of the commercially successful processes of producing uranium from monazite and other secondary sources along with the details of setting up demonstration units for recovering uranium from wet phosphoric acid. The research and development work carried out to improve the cost economics of uranium production from monazite is also discussed as the total reported quantity of uranium associated with the monazite resources of the country is estimated at 30,000 tons of uranium metal (at the end of X Plan) compared to 75,000 ton of uranium in its primary ores

  3. Cyclotron Production of Radionuclides for Nuclear Medicine at Academic Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    The increase in use of radioisotopes for medical imaging has led to the development of new accelerator targetry and separation techniques for isotope production. For example, the development of longer-lived position emitting radionuclides has been explored to allow for nuclear imaging agents based on peptides, antibodies and nanoparticles. These isotopes (64Cu, 89Zr, 86Y) are typically produced via irradiation of solid targets on smaller cyclotrons (10-25 MeV) at academic or hospital based facilities. Recent research has further expanded the toolbox of PET tracers to include additional isotopes such as 52Mn, 55Co, 76Br and others. The smaller scale of these types of facilities can enable the straightforward involvement of students, thus adding to the next generation of nuclear science leaders. Research pertaining to development of robust and larger scale production technologies including solid target systems and remote systems for transport and purification of these isotopes has enabled both preclinical and clinical imaging research for many diseases. In particular, our group has focused on the use of radiolabeled antibodies for imaging of receptor expression in preclinical models and in a clinical trial of metastatic breast cancer patients.

  4. The prisoner's dilemma in the production of nuclear hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, A.; Francois, J. L.; Martin del Campo, C.

    2011-11-01

    The human beings take to daily decisions, so much at individual as social level, that affect their quality of life in more or minor measure and modify the conditions of their environment. Decisions like to use the car or the public transportation or government policies to adopt and energy development plan that includes technologies like the production of nuclear hydrogen, present a grade of global influence, not only affect or benefit at the person or government that it carries out them, but also present consequences in the individuals and resources of the environment. The hydrogen production using nuclear energy as supply of thermal energy is in itself decision matter; from investing or not in their investigation until fomenting laws and policies that impel their development and incorporation to the industrial panorama. The countries and institutes that opt to impel this technology have the possibility to obtain economic and environmental benefits in contrast with those that do not make it, these last only benefited of the first ones in the environmental aspect. High cost for the technological transfer and economic sanctions sustained in environmental arguments toward those -non cooperators- would be a possible consequence of the cooperators action in the search of a Nash balance. The Prisoner's dilemma exemplifies and increases the comprehension of this type of problems to search for better conditions in the system that improve the situation of all the participants, in this case: governments and institutions. (Author)

  5. Measurements of nuclear data and possibility to construct the nuclear data production facility based on electron linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namkung, Won; Ko, In Soo; Cho, Moo Hyun; Kim, Gui Nyun; Lee, Young Seok; Kang, Heung Sik [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang(Korea)

    2001-04-01

    In order to construct an infrastructure to produce nuclear data, we studied three main items; (1) Study on the possibility to construct a facility for nuclear data production, (2) Production of nuclear data for nuclear power plant, and (3) Pulsed neutron source based on a 100-MeV electron linac at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL). We confirmed the possibility to build a nuclear data production facility utilizing a 100-MeV electron linac at PAL and manpower who wanted to participate the nuclear data production experiments. In order to measure the nuclear data for nuclear power plant, we used several nuclear data production facilities in abroad. We measured total cross sections and neutron caprure cross sections for {sup nat}Dy and {sup nat}Hf using the pulsed neutron facility in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University (KURRI). The neutron capture cross sections for {sup 161,162,163,164}Dy were measured at KURRI in the neutron energy region between 0.001 eV and several tens keV, and at the fast neutron facility in Tokyo Institute of Technology in the neutron energy region between 10 keV and 100 keV. We also measured the neutron capture cross sections and gamma multiplicity of {sup 232}Th at the IBR30 in Dubna, Russia. We have construct a pulsed neutron source using a 100-MeV electron linac at PAL. We measured neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectra in order to check the characteristics of the pulsed neutron source. We also measured a neutron total cross sections of W and Cu. The pulsed neutron facility can be utilized in the education facility for nuclear data production and the test facility for the R and D purpose of the nuclear data production facility. 29 refs., 57 figs., 22 tabs. (Author)

  6. Application of Modern Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Productivity Improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, A. Naser

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear power industry in several countries is concerned about the ability to maintain current high plant performance levels due to aging and obsolescence, knowledge drain, fewer plant staff, new requirements and commitments, unnecessary workloads and stress levels, and human errors. Current plant operations are labor-intensive due to the vast number of operational and support activities required by the commonly used technology in most plants. These concerns increase as plants extend their operating life. In addition, there is the desire by many plants to further improve performance while reducing human errors and increasingly focus on reducing operations and maintenance costs. New productivity improvement capabilities with measurable economic benefits are needed so that a successful business case can be made for their use. Improved and new instrumentation and control, human-system interface, information and communications technologies used properly can address concerns about cost-effectively maintaining current performance levels and enable shifts to even higher performance levels. This can be accomplished through the use of new technology implementations to improve productivity, reduce costs of systemic inefficiencies and avoid unexpected costs. Many of the same type of productivity improvements for operating plants will be applicable for new plants. As new plants are being built, it is important to include these productivity improvements or at least provide the ability to implement them easily later

  7. French perspectives for production of hydrogen using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitart, Xavier; Yvon, Pascal; Carles, Philippe; Naour, Francois Le

    2009-01-01

    The demand for hydrogen, driven by classical applications such as fertilizers or oil refining a well as new applications (synthetic fuels, fuel cells ... ) is growing significantly. Presently, most of the hydrogen produced in the world uses methane or another fossil feedstock, which is not a sustainable option, given the limited fossil resources and need to reduce CO 2 emissions. This stimulates the need to develop alternative processes of production which do not suffer from these drawbacks. Water decomposition combined with nuclear energy appears to be an attractive option. Low temperature electrolysis, even if it is used currently for limited amounts is a mature technology which can be generalized in the near future. However, this technology, which requires about 4 kWh of electricity per Nm 3 of hydrogen produced, is energy intensive and presents a low efficiency. Therefore the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) launched an extensive research and development program in 2001 in order to investigate advanced processes which could use directly the nuclear heat and present better economic potential. In the frame of this program, high temperature steam electrolysis along with several thermochemical cycles has been extensively studied. HTSE offers the advantage of reducing the electrical energy needed by substituting thermal energy, which promises to be cheaper. The need for electricity is also greatly reduced for the leading thermochemical cycles, the iodine-sulfur and the hybrid sulfur cycles, but they require high temperatures and hence coupling to a gas cooled reactor. Therefore interest is also paid to other processes such as the copper-chlorine cycle which operates at lower temperatures and could be coupled to other generation IV nuclear systems. The technical development of these processes involved acquisition of basic thermodynamic data, optimization of flowsheets, design and test of components and lab scale experiments in the kW range. This will demonstrate

  8. Study of Particle Production and Nuclear Fragmentation in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions in Nuclear Emulsions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % EMU11 \\\\ \\\\ We propose to use nuclear emulsions for the study of nuclear collisions of $^{207}$Pb, $^{197}$Au, and any other heavy-ion beams when they are available. We have, in the past, used $^{32}$S at 200A~GeV and $^{16}$O at 200A and 60A~GeV from CERN (Experiment EMU08) and at present the analysis is going on with $^{28}$Si beam from BNL at 14.5A~GeV. It will be important to compare the previous and the present investigations with the new $^{207}$Pb beam at 60-160A~GeV. We want to measure in nuclear emulsion, on an event by event basis, shower particle multiplicity, pseudorapidity density and density fluctuations of charged particles, charge multiplicity and angular distributions of projectile fragments, production and interaction cross-sections of heavily ionizing particles emitted from the target fragmentation. Special emphasis will be placed on the analysis of events produced in the central collisions which are selected on the basis of low energy fragments emitted from the target excitation. It woul...

  9. Hydrogen production through nuclear energy, a sustainable scenario in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega V, E.; Francois L, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    The energy is a key point in the social and economic development of a country, for such motive to assure the energy supply in Mexico it is of vital importance. The hydrogen it is without a doubt some one of the alternating promising fuels before the visible one necessity to decentralize the energy production based on hydrocarbons. The versatility of their applications, it high heating power and having with the more clean fuel cycle of the energy basket with which count at the moment, they are only some examples of their development potential. However the more abundant element of the universe it is not in their elementary form in our planet, it forms molecules like in the hydrocarbons or water and it stops their use it should be extracted. At the present time different methods are known for the extraction of hydrogen, there is thermal, electric, chemical, photovoltaic among others. The election of the extraction method and the primary energy source to carry out it are decisive to judge the sustainability of the hydrogen production. The sustainable development is defined as development that covers the present necessities without committing the necessity to cover the necessities of the future generations, and in the mark of this definition four indicators of the sustainable development of the different cycles of fuel were evaluated in the hydrogen production in Mexico. These indicators take in consideration the emissions of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere (environment), the readiness of the energy resources (technology), the impacts in the floor use (social) and the production costs of the cycles (economy). In this work the processes were studied at the moment available for the generation of hydrogen, those that use coal, natural gas, hydraulic, eolic energy, biomass and nuclear, as primary energy sources. These processes were evaluated with energy references of Mexico to obtain the best alternative for hydrogen production. (Author)

  10. Nuclear techniques in oil and gas exploration and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, R.L.; Mills, W.R. Jr.; Orr, W.L.; Allen, L.S.

    1977-01-01

    A review is given of some of the most significant new developments that have occurred during the past three years in the area of nuclear techniques applied to the exploration for and production of oil and gas deposits. Experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out aimed at improving pulsed neutron logging tools and upgrading interpretation of data from such tools. Pulsed neutron borehole generators and gamma-ray spectroscopy have been combined in carbon/oxygen logging to provide a means of determining formation oil saturation in cased holes that is independent of water salinity. Use of pulsed neutron logs in the log-inject-log technique has been tested and evaluated in several field studies. The combination of a gamma-gamma density log and a borehole gravimeter has been used to detect economically important gas accumulations at distances from a borehole that are well beyond the depth of investigation of conventional logging techniques. The depths of investigation of several commercial nuclear logging tools have been studied in laboratory investigations. Possible geological applications of natural gamma-ray spectral logs have been investigated through the study of large sample suites and in specific field applications. The extensive use of digital recording of logging data and well-site analysis by minicomputer are expected to have a significant influence on future logging programmes and logging sonde designs. The present status of stable isotope geochemistry and radioactive tracer surveys is reviewed. (author)

  11. Preparation of a primary target for the production of fission products in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arino, H.; Cosolito, F.J.; George, K.D.; Thornton, A.K.

    1976-01-01

    A primary target for the production of fission products in a nuclear reactor, such as uranium or plutonium fission products, is comprised of an enclosed, cylindrical vessel, preferably comprised of stainless steel, having a thin, continuous, uniform layer of fissionable material, integrally bonded to its inner walls and a port permitting access to the interior of the vessel. A process is also provided for depositing uranium material on to the inner walls of the vessel. Upon irradiation of the target with neutrons from a nuclear reactor, radioactive fission products, such as molybdenum-99, are formed, and thereafter separated from the target by the introduction of an acidic solution through the port to dissolve the irradiated inner layer. The irradiation and dissolution are thus effected in the same vessel without the necessity of transferring the fissionable material and fission products to a separate chemical reactor. Subsequently, the desired isotopes are extracted and purified. Molybdenum-99 decays to technetium-99m which is a valuable medical diagnostic radioisotope. 3 claims, 1 drawing figure

  12. Aquatic Resources of Rocky Mountain Arsenal Adams County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    Consequently, temperatures rise and oxygen levels fall. Primary producers in these stretches shift from periphyton to phytoplankton (suspended algae ...trees and have rocky substrates. Primary production in these cold- water and coolwater reaches is generally limited to periphyton (attached algae ...Adams County. Biotic components investigated included phytoplankton , zooplankton, aquatic macrophytes, benthic macroinvertebrates, fish eggs and

  13. New production of electric power when accelerating nuclear power phaseout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    This investigation states that it is possible to eliminate nuclear power to the beginning of the year 2000. In this case the time for planning and construction of large coal power plants with condenser turbines should be set at seven years. The production cost excluding fuel will be 0.12 to 0.19 SEK per kWh. Investment cost is estimated to 5 500 to 8 200 SEK per kW. When using wood chips the cost will be 0.30 SEK and 11 300 SEK, respectively. A large part of the increased cost will include substantial flue gas purification. The existing plant of Karlshamn should be maintained with a minimum of charges and extensions

  14. Nuclear techniques in animal production and health and food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetinkaya, N.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear techniques applied to animal production and health are concentrated in three main fields: Animal nutrition, reproduction and animal health. Isotopic markers, both radioactive (''1''4C, ''5 1 Cr, 32 P and 35 S) and stable ( 15 N), have been used in the development of feeding strategies by understanding the rumen fermentation process, and how protein and other nutrients are utilized to determine a balanced diet for meeting animal requirements for growth, pregnancy and lactation. The simple and easily applicable technology was developed for the preparation of a urea mineral multi nutrient block as a supplement and animal cake for the replacement of concentrate feed used by dairy cattle holders. The model was developed in Yerli Kara Cattle and its cross-breeds to estimate protein requirements of animals. Progesterone immunoassays (RIA/EIA) make it possible to control the reproductive performance of cattle, sheep and goats. A milk progesterone enzyme immunoassay kit known as Reprokon was developed at our Center. The kit has licensed by the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs. As for animal diseases, especially parasitic infections, nuclear techniques have proved to be of great value, namely in the production of irradiated vaccines against helminitic diseases. The Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent assay (ELISA) diagnostic techniques were used on the diagnosis of babesiosis, a disease which cause great economic loss in livestock in Turkey. Food irradiation is the treatment of raw, semi-processed or processed food or food ingredients with ionizing radiation to achieve a reduction of losses due to insect infestation, germination of root crops, spoilage and deterioration of perishable produce, and/or the control of microorganisms and other organisms that cause food borne diseases

  15. Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Schey

    2009-07-01

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC07-06ID14788 was executed between the U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Transportation Applications, and Idaho National Laboratory to investigate the economics of producing hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity generated by nuclear power. The work under this agreement is divided into the following four tasks: Task 1 – Produce Data and Analyses Task 2 – Economic Analysis of Large-Scale Alkaline Electrolysis Task 3 – Commercial-Scale Hydrogen Production Task 4 – Disseminate Data and Analyses. Reports exist on the prospect that utility companies may benefit from having the option to produce electricity or produce hydrogen, depending on market conditions for both. This study advances that discussion in the affirmative by providing data and suggesting further areas of study. While some reports have identified issues related to licensing hydrogen plants with nuclear plants, this study provides more specifics and could be a resource guide for further study and clarifications. At the same time, this report identifies other area of risks and uncertainties associated with hydrogen production on this scale. Suggestions for further study in some of these topics, including water availability, are included in the report. The goals and objectives of the original project description have been met. Lack of industry design for proton exchange membrane electrolysis hydrogen production facilities of this magnitude was a roadblock for a significant period. However, recent design breakthroughs have made costing this facility much more accurate. In fact, the new design information on proton exchange membrane electrolyzers scaled to the 1 kg of hydrogen per second electrolyzer reduced the model costs from $500 to $100 million. Task 1 was delayed when the original electrolyzer failed at the end of its economic life. However, additional valuable information was obtained when the new electrolyzer was installed. Products developed during this study

  16. Can we do without nuclear?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cothier, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The author first recalls the background of nuclear deterrence and the history of the French nuclear arsenal within the Cold War context. He comments the evolution of this arsenal after the US initiatives during the 1980's, and then analyses the situation at the beginning of the 21. century: end of the East-West confrontation, increase of NATO's interventions abroad, war against terrorism by the USA. But the Iranian and North-Korean nuclear programs gave a new momentum to the nuclear. The author discusses the various concepts and approaches of nuclear doctrines and deterrence, and wanders whether France still needs a doctrine relying on nuclear weapons as nuclear weapons are actually present, as the French deterrence doctrine is put in question again, and as some countries seem to be an actual nuclear threat (North Korea, Iran)

  17. The future of the NPT and measures to reduce nuclear dangers in the age of Trump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Daryl G.

    2017-11-01

    Through the decades, the international nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation enterprise, though imperfect, has curbed nuclear proliferation and limited the number of nuclear-armed states to nine, forced reductions in major-power nuclear arsenals, ended nuclear testing by all but one state, and created an informal taboo against nuclear weapons use.

  18. Calculation of Direct photon production in nuclear collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Cepila, J

    2012-01-01

    Prompt photons produced in a hard reaction are not expected to be accompanied by any final state interaction, either energy loss or absorption and one should not expect any nuclear effects at high pT . However, data from the PHENIX experiment indicates large-pT suppression in d+Au and central Au+Au collisions that cannot be accompanied by coherent phenomena. We propose a mechanism based on the energy sharing problem at large pT near the kinematic limit that is induced by multiple initial state interactions and that improves the agreement of calculations with PHENIX data. We calculate inclusive direct photon production cross sections in p+p collisions at RHIC and LHC energies using the color dipole approach without any additional parameter. Our predictions are in good agreement with the available data. Within the same framework, we calculate direct photon production rates in d+A and A+A collisions at RHIC energy. We also provide predictions for the same process in p+A collisions at LHC energy. Since the kinema...

  19. Innovative applications of technology for nuclear power plant productivity improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naser, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear power industry in several countries is concerned about the ability to maintain high plant performance levels due to aging and obsolescence, knowledge drain, fewer plant staff, and new requirements and commitments. Current plant operations are labor-intensive due to the vast number of operational and support activities required by commonly used technology in most plants. These concerns increase as plants extend their operating life. In addition, there is the goal to further improve performance while reducing human errors and increasingly focus on reducing operations and maintenance costs. New plants are expected to perform more productively than current plants. In order to achieve and increase high productivity, it is necessary to look at innovative applications of modern technologies and new concepts of operation. The Electric Power Research Inst. is exploring and demonstrating modern technologies that enable cost-effectively maintaining current performance levels and shifts to even higher performance levels, as well as provide tools for high performance in new plants. Several modern technologies being explored can provide multiple benefits for a wide range of applications. Examples of these technologies include simulation, visualization, automation, human cognitive engineering, and information and communications technologies. Some applications using modern technologies are described. (authors)

  20. Fission Product Release from Spent Nuclear Fuel During Melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.P.; Zino, J.F.

    1998-09-01

    The Melt-Dilute process consolidates aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel by melting the fuel assemblies and diluting the 235U content with depleted uranium to lower the enrichment. During the process, radioactive fission products whose boiling points are near the proposed 850 degrees C melting temperature can be released. This paper presents a review of fission product release data from uranium-aluminum alloy fuel developed from Severe Accident studies. In addition, scoping calculations using the ORIGEN-S computer code were made to estimate the radioactive inventories in typical research reactor fuel as a function of burnup, initial enrichment, and reactor operating history and shutdown time.Ten elements were identified from the inventory with boiling points below or near the 850 degrees C reference melting temperature. The isotopes 137Cs and 85Kr were considered most important. This review serves as basic data to the design and development of a furnace off-gas system for containment of the volatile species

  1. Effects of the nuclear disaster on marine products in Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Toshihiro; Nemoto, Yoshiharu; Shimamura, Shinya; Fujita, Tsuneo; Mizuno, Takuji; Sohtome, Tadahiro; Kamiyama, Kyoichi; Morita, Takami; Igarashi, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    After the release of huge amounts of radionuclides into the ocean from the devastated Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), safety concerns have arisen for marine products in Fukushima Prefecture. As of October 2012, we had inspected the radionuclide ( 131 I, 134 Cs and 137 Cs) concentrations in 6462 specimens within 169 marine species collected off the coast of Fukushima Prefecture from April 2011. Only two species exceeded the Japanese provisional regulatory limit for 131 I (2000 Bq/kg-wet) immediately after the FDNPP accident. In 2011 and 2012, 63 and 41 species respectively exceeded the Japanese regulatory limit for radioactive Cs (100 Bq/kg-wet). The overall radioactive Cs concentrations of the total marine products have decreased significantly. However, the time-series trends of radioactive Cs concentrations have differed greatly among taxa, habitats (pelagic/demersal), and spatial distributions. Higher concentrations were observed in shallower waters south of the FDNPP. Radioactive Cs concentrations decreased quickly or were below detection limits in pelagic fishes and some invertebrates, and decreased constantly in seaweed, surf clams, and other organisms. However, in some coastal demersal fishes, the declining trend was much more gradual, and concentrations above the regulatory limit have been detected frequently, indicating continued uptake of radioactive Cs through the benthic food web. The main continuing source of radioactive Cs to the benthic food web is expected to be the radioactive Cs-containing detritus in sediment. Trial fishing operations for several selected species without radioactive Cs contamination were commenced in Soma area, 50 km north of the FDNPP, from June 2012. Long-term and careful monitoring of marine products in the waters off Fukushima Prefecture, especially around the FDNPP, is necessary to restart the coastal fishery reliably and to prevent harmful rumors in the future. -- Highlights: • Radionuclide concentrations

  2. Nuclear technology and biotechnology for enhancing agricultural production in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Osman

    2005-04-01

    The presentation discussed the following subjects: sustainable development, agriculture in Malaysia, role of biotechnology, role of nuclear technology, improving crops through induced mutations with Malaysian experience in rice and roselle, fusion of nuclear and biotechnology challenges and opportunities

  3. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Schenter, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted

  4. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Schenter, R.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-11-01

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

  5. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 279 IMCOM-Southeast Region: Redstone Arsenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatley, Darrel D.; Goddard, James K.

    2010-09-30

    Report describing a building retuning workshop presented to staff at Redstone Arsenal. Document includes issues identified during building audits and recommendations for future activities to reduce energy use at the site.

  6. Establishing and development of nuclear power production in the Republic of Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadyrzhanov, K.K.; Zhotabayev, Zh.R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: As it was stressed by the President of the Republic of Kazakhstan N. Nazarbaev in his address to people of Kazakhstan on February 28 2007, among the most important directions of domestic and foreign policy there is the need in development of power production and creation of conditions for nuclear power production. Intensive development of new and revived sectors such as machine-building, oil chemistry, nuclear, space, information, nano- and bio-technologies would inevitably require growth in power generation. That is why development of power production becomes a priority task. Growth of demand in power consumption worldwide, rise in prices for oil and natural gas, toughening of environmental regulations for utilization of organic fuel, concerns regarding energy supply security in many countries stipulate growth of interest to nuclear power production. International experience in power production shows the advantages and need in development of nuclear power production. In energy production, people currently use organic fuel, hydropower and alternative energy source; current share of nuclear production in the total rate of energy generation comprises about 17%. The Republic has considerable grounds for development of nuclear power production - well-developed uranium mining and processing National Company 'KazAtomProm' and a State Enterprise 'National Nuclear Center'. Creation of nuclear power production sector and development of nuclear power production in the country would help solving a set of inter-related problems aimed to satisfaction of demand in energy production by diversification of energy supply sources. This, in turn, would contribute to effective and balanced utilization of available mineral resources, improve export capacities of the country, assure environmental security at energy production; it would also preserve and develop science and technology in the country in the field of nuclear power production and nuclear industry. Objective and

  7. Nuclear accidents and protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biocanin, R.; Amidzic, B.

    2005-01-01

    The numerous threats are our cruel reality. There is a great arsenal of nuclear weapons. Nuclear terrorism and nuclear accidents are always possible, especially during the transport and handling different nuclear material. Terrorist organisation also goes for coming into the possession of the nuclear means. Specific and important problem is human radioactive contamination in using nuclear energy for peaceful and military purpose. So, realisation of the universal and united system of NBCD gives us a possibility by using the modern communication equipment and very effective mobile units to react in a real time and successfully perform monitoring, alarming, protection and decontamination. (author) [sr

  8. Multiparticle Production in Particle and Nuclear Collisions. I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, T.; Kinoshita, K.; Sumiyoshi, H.; Takagi, F.

    The dominant phenomenon in high-energy particle and nuclear collisions is multiple production of hadrons. This had attracted may physicists in 1950's, the period of the first remarkable development of particle physics. Multiparticle production was already observed in cosmic-ray experiments and expected to be explained as a natural consequence of the strong Yukawa interaction. Statistical and hydrodynamical models were then proposed by Fermi, Landau and others. These theories are still surviving even today as a prototype of modern ``fire-ball'' models. After twenty years, a golden age came in this field of physics. It was closely related to the rapid development of accelerator facilities, especially, the invention of colliding-beam machines which yield high enough center-of-mass energies for studying reactions with high multiplicity. Abundant data on final states of multiparticle production have been accumulated mainly by measuring inclusive cross sections and multiplicity distributions. In super high-energy bar{p}p collisions at CERN S pmacr pS Collider, we confirmed the increasing total cross section and found violations of many scaling laws which seemed to be valid at lower energies. This suggests a fundamental complexity of the multiparticle phenomena and offers new materials for further development of theoretical investigations. In the same period, studies of constituent (quark-gluon) structure of hadrons had also been develped. Nowadays, pysicists believe that the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the fundamental law of the hadronic world. Multiparticle dynamics should also be described by QCD. We have known that the hard-jet phenomena are well explained by the perturbative QCD. On the other hand, the soft processes are considered to be non-perturbative phenomena which have not yet been solved, and related to the mechanism of the color confinement and formation of strings or color-flux tubes. Multiparticle production would offer useful information on this

  9. Multiparticle Production in Particle and Nuclear Collisions. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, T.; Kinoshita, K.; Sumiyoshi, H.; Takagi, F.

    The dominant phenomenon in high-energy particle and nuclear collisions is multiple production of hadrons. This had attracted may physicists in 1950's, the period of the first remarkable development of particle physics. Multiparticle production was already observed in cosmic-ray experiments and expected to be explained as a natural consequence of the strong Yukawa interaction. Statistical and hydrodynamical models were then proposed by Fermi, Landau and others. These theories are still surviving even today as a prototype of modern ``fire-ball'' models. After twenty years, a golden age came in this field of physics. It was closely related to the rapid development of accelerator facilities, especially, the invention of colliding-beam machines which yield high enough center-of-mass energies for studying reactions with high multiplicity. Abundant data on final states of multiparticle production have been accumulated mainly by measuring inclusive cross sections and multiplicity distributions. In super high-energy bar{p}p collisions at CERN S pmacr pS Collider, we confirmed the increasing total cross section and found violations of many scaling laws which seemed to be valid at lower energies. This suggests a fundamental complexity of the multiparticle phenomena and offers new materials for further development of theoretical investigations. In the same period, studies of constituent (quark-gluon) structure of hadrons had also been develped. Nowadays, pysicists believe that the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the fundamental law of the hadronic world. Multiparticle dynamics should also be described by QCD. We have known that the hard-jet phenomena are well explained by the perturbative QCD. On the other hand, the soft processes are considered to be non-perturbative phenomena which have not yet been solved, and related to the mechanism of the color confinement and formation of strings or color-flux tubes. Multiparticle production would offer useful information on this

  10. Subcontinental Nuclear Instability: The Spiralling Nightmare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Shankar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The scheme that carved world order during the Cold War was a pitched battle for 'containment' against burgeoning communism. In turn, rationality gave way to the threat of catastrophic nuclear force as the basis of stability. If at all there is a historical lesson to be learned from that experience then it is that stability begins with serious and sustained dialogue between leadership; the alternative being what Kennedy termed "the peace of the grave." An appraisal of the contemporary global state of nuclear affairs will suggest that the three pillars of nuclear stability, namely, non-proliferation, control of fissile material production, and transparency of nuclear arsenals are wobbly for lack of foundational support. In the truancy of global foundational support the answer may well lie in reconstituting a framework for détente. In the Subcontinental context there looms a very real nuclear nightmare. It takes the form of a hair-trigger, opaque nuclear arsenal that has embraced tactical use under decentralized military control, is steered by an ambiguous doctrine, and guided by a military strategy that carouses with non-state actors. The effect of an weakened civilian leadership in Pakistan that is incapable of action to remove the military finger from the nuclear trigger can do little to dispel the nightmare. A singular feature of the deterrent relationship in the region is its tri-polar character. As is well known today, it is the collusive nature of the Sino-Pak nuclear relationship which created and sustains the Pakistan nuclear weapons program. This in stark contrast to the Indian nuclear doctrine that went public in 2003. The unleashing of Islamic radicals in the wake of US withdrawal from the Af-Pak region and their mounting internalization in the Pakistan military and political establishments brings into question the state and motivation of the nuclear command and control structures there. Stability in this context would suggest the

  11. Production of fast neutron beams for therapy: The application of and need for nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhri, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    A brief review of the historical development of the production of therapy neutron beams is presented, with special reference to the author's contribution, using the available nuclear data. Different nuclear reactions and target systems have been critically examined regarding their suitability for cyclotrons of different sizes. A few current problems in this field, especially relating to the nonavailability of appropriate nuclear data, where the nuclear physics and nuclear data communities can greatly contribute, are highlighted. Specific recommendations are made as to what sort of nuclear data need to be acquired/compiled that would be most useful in the neutron therapy programme. (author). 28 refs

  12. Plans of reorganization of USA nuclear military complex and provision of military program by special nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenovskaya, I.V.

    1996-01-01

    Consideration is given to plans and implementation of the program of reorganization of USA nuclear military complex, related with conducted reduction of nuclear arsenal after concluding the Strategic Nuclear Armament Reduction Treaty. Particular attention is paid to problems of satisfying short-term and long-term requirements in special nuclear materials and in tritium in particular

  13. Virtual nuclear weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat, J.F.

    1997-08-01

    The term virtual nuclear weapons proliferation and arsenals, as opposed to actual weapons and arsenals, has entered in recent years the American lexicon of nuclear strategy, arms control, and nonproliferation. While the term seems to have an intuitive appeal, largely due to its cyberspace imagery, its current use is still vague and loose. The author believes, however, that if the term is clearly delineated, it might offer a promising approach to conceptualizing certain current problems of proliferation. The first use is in a reference to an old problem that has resurfaced recently: the problem of growing availability of weapon-usable nuclear materials in civilian nuclear programs along with materials made `excess` to defense needs by current arms reduction and dismantlement. It is argued that the availability of these vast materials, either by declared nuclear-weapon states or by technologically advanced nonweapon states, makes it possible for those states to rapidly assemble and deploy nuclear weapons. The second use has quite a different set of connotations. It is derived conceptually from the imagery of computer-generated reality. In this use, one thinks of virtual proliferation and arsenals not in terms of the physical hardware required to make the bomb but rather in terms of the knowledge/experience required to design, assemble, and deploy the arsenal. Virtual weapons are a physics reality and cannot be ignored in a world where knowledge, experience, materials, and other requirements to make nuclear weapons are widespread, and where dramatic army reductions and, in some cases, disarmament are realities. These concepts are useful in defining a continuum of virtual capabilities, ranging from those at the low end that derive from general technology diffusion and the existence of nuclear energy programs to those at the high end that involve conscious decisions to develop or maintain militarily significant nuclear-weapon capabilities.

  14. Characteristic relation for the mass and energy distribution of the nuclear fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandru, G.

    1977-01-01

    The dispersion relation for nuclear fission is written in the two part fragmentation approach which allows to obtain the characteristic relation for the mass and energy distribution of the nuclear fission products. One explains the resonance approximation in the mass distribution of the fission products taking into account the high order resonances too. (author)

  15. Nuclear-derived techniques improve cattle productivity and milk quality in Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, Aabha

    2016-01-01

    Increasing agricultural production and improving the quality of milk and meat are key to combating poverty and increasing food security in Africa. Countries such as Cameroon are increasingly turning to innovative, nuclear and nuclear-derived techniques to control and prevent diseases among livestock, and boost cattle and milk production.

  16. Nuclear techniques in flower production. Soil and irrigation fertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Bad soil management; the nutrients and water used in ornamental cultivation are the cause for considerable reductions in productivity here in Ecuador. It's essential to take measures to reduce the accumulation of salts and the degeneration of soils to minimum, and to put back those nutrients that have been exported by the harvesting of ornamental crops. In this way we can maintain an ecologically, socially and economically sustainable flower industry. Nuclear techniques such as radioisotopes and stable isotopes are used to track the final destination of the fertilizers that have been applied to the soil and to determine the availability of these for plants. The Ecuadorian Atomic Energy Commission (CEEA) in collaboration with the Central University of Ecuador have carried out studies using the isotopic tracers Nitrogen 15 (N-15), Phosforus 32 (P-32), Rubide-85 (Rb-85) as tracers for Potassium (K). These studies have shown that only a part of the nigrogenized fertilizer applied to the soil is useful in the growing of roses, and a large part of the nitrogen escapes in the the environment thereby contaminating the water table in the form of nitrites, depending on he way and the time of year that the fertilizer has been applied. The best form of fertilizer in rose growing for example is with the nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and other nutrients in fractioned from always using fertilized irrigation with a dose of 1300 kg of N, 200 Kg of P, 1600 kg of K per hectare/year. This differs form norm in plantations where a weekly-fertilized irrigation is used whilst on other days only watering is used. A 30% increase in production was achieved with a 50% increase in the absorption of nitrogen and a 40% increase in potassium. These studies have shown the tremendous cost saving in terms of the importing of fertilizers, as well as the decrease in the use of contaminating fertilizers. (The author)

  17. Mortality among workers at a nuclear fuels production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cragle, D.L.; McLain, R.W.; Qualters, J.R.; Hickey, J.L.; Wilkinson, G.S.; Tankersley, W.G.; Lushbaugh, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    A retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted in a population of workers employed at a facility with the primary task of production of nuclear fuels and other materials. Data for hourly and salaried employees were analyzed separately by time period of first employment and length of employment. The hourly (N = 6687 with 728 deaths) and salaried (N = 2745 with 294 deaths) employees had a mortality experience comparable to that of the United States and, in fact, exhibited significant fewer deaths in many categories of diseases that are traditionally associated with the healthy worker effect. Specifically, fewer deaths were noted in the categories of all causes, all cancers, cancer of the digestive organs, lung cancer, brain cancer (hourly workers only), diabetes, all diseases of the circulatory system, all respiratory diseases, all digestive system diseases, all diseases of the genitourinary system (hourly only), and all external causes of death. A statistically significant, and as yet unexplained increase in leukemia mortality (6 observed vs. 2.18 expected) appeared among a subset of the hourly employees, first hired before 1955, and employed between 5-15 years

  18. Climate change adaptation: Boosting quinoa production using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, Aabha

    2015-01-01

    In the battle to help developing countries overcome threats from declining food production caused by climate change, one species of edible grain-like crop has caught international attention because of its unique nutritional value. New and improved varieties of quinoa, historically grown in the highlands of South America, will be made available to farmers in mutations adapted to challenging environments in Bolivia and Peru. Increased genetic diversity is the result of the use of nuclear techniques in collaboration with the IAEA and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), said L. Gomez-Pando, Principal Professor and Head of the Cereals and Native Grains Research programme at the National Agrarian University of La Molina in Peru. “There are 64 mutant lines of quinoa selected by yield potential and quality for the market,” he said. “These mutant lines will be further evaluated and the best lines will be released as new varieties in 2015–2016.”

  19. Nuclear reactors and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagro, J.C.; Estrada Oyuela, M.E.; Garcia Moritan, R.

    1987-01-01

    From a brief analysis of the perspectives of nuclear weapons arsenals reduction, a rational use of the energetic potential of the ogives and the authentic destruction of its warlike power is proposed. The fissionable material conversion contained in the nuclear fuel ogives for peaceful uses should be part of the disarmament agreements. This paper pretends to give an approximate idea on the resources re assignation implicancies. (Author)

  20. Linking legacies: Connecting the Cold War nuclear weapons production processes to their environmental consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US has begun addressing the environmental consequences of five decades of nuclear weapons production. In support of this effort, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1995 directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the waste streams generated during each step in the production of nuclear weapons. Accordingly, this report responds to this mandate, and it is the Department`s first comprehensive analysis of the sources of waste and contamination generated by the production of nuclear weapons. The report also contains information on the missions and functions of nuclear weapons facilities, on the inventories of waste and materials remaining at these facilities, as well as on the extent and characteristics of contamination in and around these facilities. This analysis unites specific environmental impacts of nuclear weapons production with particular production processes. The Department used historical records to connect nuclear weapons production processes with emerging data on waste and contamination. In this way, two of the Department`s legacies--nuclear weapons manufacturing and environmental management--have become systematically linked. The goal of this report is to provide Congress, DOE program managers, non-governmental analysts, and the public with an explicit picture of the environmental results of each step in the nuclear weapons production and disposition cycle.

  1. Linking legacies: Connecting the Cold War nuclear weapons production processes to their environmental consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US has begun addressing the environmental consequences of five decades of nuclear weapons production. In support of this effort, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1995 directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the waste streams generated during each step in the production of nuclear weapons. Accordingly, this report responds to this mandate, and it is the Department's first comprehensive analysis of the sources of waste and contamination generated by the production of nuclear weapons. The report also contains information on the missions and functions of nuclear weapons facilities, on the inventories of waste and materials remaining at these facilities, as well as on the extent and characteristics of contamination in and around these facilities. This analysis unites specific environmental impacts of nuclear weapons production with particular production processes. The Department used historical records to connect nuclear weapons production processes with emerging data on waste and contamination. In this way, two of the Department's legacies--nuclear weapons manufacturing and environmental management--have become systematically linked. The goal of this report is to provide Congress, DOE program managers, non-governmental analysts, and the public with an explicit picture of the environmental results of each step in the nuclear weapons production and disposition cycle

  2. Nuclear reactions (except production) by p,d,α.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavin, A.I.; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette

    1981-07-01

    Various experimental and calculational methods have been used to study some nuclear properties at intermediate energy with light ion probes. Nucleon-nucleon correlations, clustering, and high momentum components of nuclear wave functions are among these properties. A summary of a selection of contributions to this session dealing primarily with these topics will be presented

  3. Comparative gross domestic production and electricity consumption per capita in the context of nuclear power prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib; Maragatham Kumar; Nik Arlina Nik Ali; Abi Muttaqin Jalal Bayar; Aisya Raihan Abdul Kadir; Muhammed Zulfakar Zolkaffly; Azlinda Aziz; Jamal Khaer Ibrahim

    2008-08-01

    Malaysia, based on its economic and industrial growth level should be able to absorb nuclear technology and capacity in implementing a nuclear power programme. Malaysia Gross Domestic Production (GDP) and electricity consumption (kWh per capita is higher compared with other developing countries, which have already announced their plans to implement nuclear power programme. Furthermore, Asia reliance on nuclear power plants to meet growing energy needs in the near future is also significantly increasing. This paper presents the comparative GDP and kWh per capita in Asia and globally in the context of nuclear power prospect in Malaysia. (Author)

  4. Progress in fission product nuclear data. Information about activities in the field of measurements and compilations/evaluations of fission product nuclear data (FPND)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, G.

    1978-07-01

    This is the fourth issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The main part of this report consists of unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: Fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission); neutron reaction cross sections of fission products; data related to the radioactive decay of fission products; delayed neutron data of fission products; and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.)

  5. 25 years of NDE in fabrication of zirconium alloy mill products and nuclear fuel in the Nuclear Fuel Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mistry, R.K.; Laxminarayana, B.; Srivastava, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    Failure of nuclear fuel is highly undesirable from both economic and operational aspects. Hence all the components require rigorous QC and inspection checks. NDT plays a major role in assuring the quality of the products both at final and intermediate stages. This paper gives an overall review of NDT methods employed in achieving the integrity of nuclear products. The NDE procedures followed in NFC are visual inspection, radiography, penetrant testing, eddy current testing, ultrasonic testing and helium leak testing. NFC's quality assurance programme is organised to achieve the desired objectives by carrying out in process and final inspection at all critical steps of fabrication. (author)

  6. Nuclear Effects on Heavy Boson Production at RHIC and LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, X; Zhang, Xiaofei; Fai, George

    2002-01-01

    We predict W and Z transverse momentum distributions from proton-proton and nuclear collisions at RHIC and LHC. A resummation formalism with power corrections to the renormalization group equations is used. The dependence of the resummed QCD results on the non-perturbative input is very weak for the systems considered. Shadowing effects are discussed and found to be unimportant at RHIC, but important for LHC. We study the enhancement of power corrections due to multiple scattering in nuclear collisions and numerically illustrate the weak effects of the dependence on the nuclear mass.

  7. Online marketing for book publishers: a case study of Arsenal Pulp Press and Chronicle Books

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    The internet is changing how we go about our personal and professional lives—not only is web use increasing, the type of online tools that are becoming commonplace and the way they are being used is evolving. This paper examines the online marketing and publicity efforts of Arsenal Pulp Press and Chronicle Books, providing an overview of a number of online tools and considering the role of online marketing and publicity for book publishers in the age of web 2.0. Some of the online marketing t...

  8. Production of nuclear graphite in France; Production de graphite nucleaire en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legendre, P; Mondet, L [Societe Pechiney, 74 - Chedde (France); Arragon, Ph; Cornuault, P; Gueron, J; Hering, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    The graphite intended for the construction of the reactors is obtained by the usual process: confection of a cake from coke of oil and tar, cooked (in a electric oven) then the product of cook is graphitized, also by electric heating. The use of the air transportation and the control of conditions cooking and graphitization have permitted to increase the nuclear graphite production as well as to better control their physical and mechanical properties and to reduce to the minimum the unwanted stains. (M.B.) [French] Le graphite destine a la construction des reacteurs est obtenu par le procede usuel: confection d'une pate a partir de coke de petrole et de brai, cuisson de cette pate (au four electrique) puis graphitation du produit cuit, egalement par chauffage electrique. L'usage du transport pneumatique et le controle des conditions cuisson et de graphitation ont permit d'augmenter la production de graphite nucleaire ainsi que de mieux controler ses proprietes physiques et mecaniques et de reduire au minimum les souillures accidentelles. (M.B.)

  9. Farewell to arms. What's blocking nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Harald

    2005-01-01

    -weapon States could assume a different posture. A quick look at the 'Thirteen Steps' shows that they are largely compatible with such a posture. Nowadays, nuclear-weapon States do not face existential threats against which unfettered options for keeping or acquiring large arsenals or revolutionary new weapons would appear necessary. If there is any concern that nuclear activities in North Korea or Iran may lead to the emergence of new nuclear powers, the world's existing arsenals are more than enough to control that risk. Just as clearly, there is no need for these options in humanitarian intervention or peacekeeping or peace-enforcing missions. To the contrary, considering the employment of nuclear weapons in such contingencies would contradict the 1996 advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice. The Court said that, if at all, the use of nuclear weapons was only justifiable if national survival were at stake. Neither are nuclear weapons needed for keeping a hostile leadership at bay or eliminating it. Even if nuclear deterrence were seen as a needed option, sharply reduced arsenals would still suffice to do the job. And against the scourge of our time, trans national terrorism, nuclear weapons have no use at all. What, then, is holding up nuclear disarmament? In my view, residual distrust is one problem. It persuades some nuclear-weapon States to keep the option for larger arsenals open if ballistic missile defences are introduced. Beyond this specific strategic concern, it appears that keeping freedom of action as such is valued highly by some - so highly that even legal and political undertakings are pushed aside. Fears that disarmament could lead uncontrollably to the untimely elimination of all nuclear weapons run strong. Even the completely reasonable and beneficial measures agreed in 2000 appear as such a big risk that nuclear-weapon States are not willing to take the first step. And of course, the members of the nuclear weapon complexes are happy to supply

  10. Synergistic production of hydrogen using fossil fuels and nuclear energy application of nuclear-heated membrane reformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, M.; Matsui, K.; Tashimo, M.; Yasuda, I.

    2004-01-01

    Processes and technologies to produce hydrogen synergistically by the steam reforming reaction using fossil fuels and nuclear heat are reviewed. Formulas of chemical reactions, required heats for reactions, saving of fuel consumption or reduction of carbon dioxide emission, possible processes and other prospects are examined for such fossil fuels as natural gas, petroleum and coal. The 'membrane reformer' steam reforming with recirculation of reaction products in a closed loop configuration is considered to be the most advantageous among various synergistic hydrogen production methods. Typical merits of this method are: nuclear heat supply at medium temperature below 600 deg. C, compact plant size and membrane area for hydrogen production, efficient conversion of feed fuel, appreciable reduction of carbon dioxide emission, high purity hydrogen without any additional process, and ease of separating carbon dioxide for future sequestration requirements. With all these benefits, the synergistic production of hydrogen by membrane reformer using fossil fuels and nuclear energy can be an effective solution in this century for the world which has to use. fossil fuels any way to some extent while reducing carbon dioxide emission. For both the fossil fuels industry and the nuclear industry, which are under constraint of resource, environment and economy, this production method will be a viable symbiosis strategy for the coming hydrogen economy era. (author)

  11. Thermal insulation product for insulation, especially in nuclear power engineering, and method of its production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veselovsky, P.; Zink, S.; Balacek, P.; Mares, I.

    1989-01-01

    The insulation consists of a sewn fabric cover made of inorganic fibers, in which the fiber filling is reinforced mechanically by dense point interweaving. The inorganic fibers, 1 to 5 μm in diameter, consist of min. 97 wt.% mixture of aluminium and silicon oxides in the vitreous state. The fibers making up the cover consist of min. 95% silicon, aluminium, calcium, magnesium and boron oxides in the vitreous state; the rest can consist of alloy steel fibres. The bulk density of the insulation is 70 to 150 kg/m 3 . The product is highly resistant to temperature and to the action of chemicals, water, and acid and alkaline deactivation solutions. Its manufacture is fast and undemanding. It is designed for thermal insulation of pipes, tanks and valves in nuclear power plants. (M.D.). 2 figs

  12. The role of congress in future disposal of fissile materials from dismantled nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, W.H.; Davis, Z.S.

    1991-01-01

    Assuming the Soviet Union remains intact as a major power and the superpowers do not retrogress to a new Cold War era, it is likely that the United States and the Soviet Union will eventually agree to deep cuts in their nuclear arsenals. Future arms control agreements may be coupled with companion agreements to stop production of fissile materials for nuclear weapons, to dismantle the warheads of the nuclear weapons, and to dispose of their fissile materials to prevent reuse in new warheads. Such agreements would be negotiated by the U.S. executive branch but probably would require ratification, funding, and enabling legislation from the U.S. Congress if they are to succeed. There follows a brief review of the ideas for disposal of fissile materials from dismantled nuclear warheads and the potential role and influence of the Congress in the negotiation, ratification, and implementation of U.S.-Soviet agreements for such disposal

  13. Quality assurance monitoring during nuclear fuel production in JSC 'TVEL'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filimonov, G.; Tchirkov, V.

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes Quality Assurance (QA) monitoring during fabrication of nuclear fuel in Russian Federation. Joint Stock Company 'TVEL', natural state monopoly of the type of holding that fabricates and supplies nuclear fuel for the NPPs of Russia, CIS and Europe, incorporates the major enterprises of the nuclear fuel cycle including JSC 'Mashinostroitelny zavod', Electrostal (fabrication of fuel pellets, rods and assemblies for different types of reactors), JSC 'Novosibirsky zavod khimconcentratov', Novosibirsk (fabrication of fuel rods and assemblies for WWER-440 and WWER-1000), JSC 'Tchepetsky mechanitchesky zavod', Tchepetsk (fabrication of Zr tubing). Monitoring of QA is an important element of Quality Management System (QMS) developed and implemented at the above-mentioned enterprises of the JSC 'TVEL' and it is performed on three levels including external and internal audits and author's supervision. Paper also describes short- and long-term policies of the JSC 'TVEL' in nuclear fuel quality field. (author)

  14. Decontamination of American plants engaged in nuclear weapon production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladislavlev, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    The data on the Americal program dealing with sharp decreasing the levels of radioactive contamination and chemical pollution of soils and ground water in regions, where the plants for nuclear weapon manufacturing are located, are given

  15. Tracking of Nuclear Production using Indigenous Species: Final LDRD Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Todd Michael; Alam, Mary Kathleen; McIntyre, Sarah K.; Volk, David; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Luxon, Bruce A.; Ansari, G. A. Shakeel

    2009-01-01

    Our LDRD research project sought to develop an analytical method for detection of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Our approach is distinctly different than current research involving hardware-based sensors. By utilizing the response of indigenous species of plants and/or animals surrounding (or within) a nuclear processing facility, we propose tracking 'suspicious molecules' relevant to nuclear materials processing. As proof of concept, we have examined TBP, tributylphosphate, used in uranium enrichment as well as plutonium extraction from spent nuclear fuels. We will compare TBP to the TPP (triphenylphosphate) analog to determine the uniqueness of the metabonomic response. We show that there is a unique metabonomic response within our animal model to TBP. The TBP signature can further be delineated from that of TPP. We have also developed unique methods of instrumental transfer for metabonomic data sets.

  16. Tracking of Nuclear Production using Indigenous Species: Final LDRD Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials; Alam, Mary Kathleen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Energetics Characterization Dept.; McIntyre, Sarah K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials; Volk, David [Univ. of Texas, Galveston, TX (United States). Medical Branch; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy [Univ. of Texas, Galveston, TX (United States). Medical Branch; Luxon, Bruce A. [Univ. of Texas, Galveston, TX (United States). Medical Branch; Ansari, G. A. Shakeel [Univ. of Texas, Galveston, TX (United States). Medical Branch

    2009-10-01

    Our LDRD research project sought to develop an analytical method for detection of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Our approach is distinctly different than current research involving hardware-based sensors. By utilizing the response of indigenous species of plants and/or animals surrounding (or within) a nuclear processing facility, we propose tracking 'suspicious molecules' relevant to nuclear materials processing. As proof of concept, we have examined TBP, tributylphosphate, used in uranium enrichment as well as plutonium extraction from spent nuclear fuels. We will compare TBP to the TPP (triphenylphosphate) analog to determine the uniqueness of the metabonomic response. We show that there is a unique metabonomic response within our animal model to TBP. The TBP signature can further be delineated from that of TPP. We have also developed unique methods of instrumental transfer for metabonomic data sets.

  17. Overview of beneficial uses of nuclear fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivinski, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    Recoverable or reprocessed nuclear wastes as conservable resources with significant potential benefits for use as heat sources, or as radiation sources for industrial, agricultural, and medical applications are reviewed

  18. Study of the Brazilian scientific production in the nuclear field from 1970 to 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, M. de J.

    1983-01-01

    The study of some patterns of the Brazilian scientific literature production - e.g., generated and/or published in Brazil - in the nuclear field included in CIN (Nuclear Information Center) / INIS (International Nuclear Information System) data base from 1970 to 1979 is presented. The purpose is to research: - the growth of the production; - the main subject areas; - the language of the publication; - the literature presentation form; - the author's characterization; - the most productive institutions, their geographical distribution and countries where the literature is published. (E.G.) [pt

  19. Influence of the nuclear autocorrelation function on the positron production in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomoda, T.; Weidenmueller, H.A.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of a nuclear reaction on atomic positron production in heavy-ion collisions is investigated. Using statistical concepts, we describe the nuclear S matrix for a heavy-ion induced reaction as a statistically fluctuating function of energy. The positron production rate is then dependent on the autocorrelation function of this S matrix, and on the ratio of the ''direct'' versus the ''fluctuating'' part of the nuclear cross section. Numerical calculations show that in this way, current experimental results on positron production in heavy-ion collisions can be reproduced in a semiquantitative fashion

  20. Plans to expand nuclear power production in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksonen, J.

    2002-01-01

    The Finnish Government made in January 2002 a Decision in Principle which concludes that constructing of a new nuclear power plant in Finland is in line with the overall good of the society. The Finnish Parliament ratified the decision in May 2002. Based on this decision, the electricity generating company TVO is authorised to continue preparations for the construction of a new nuclear power plant unit

  1. Reframing the debate against nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyson, Rhianna

    2005-01-01

    'Some 35,000 nuclear weapons remain in the arsenals of the nuclear powers, with thousands still deployed on hair-trigger alert. Whatever rationale these weapons may once have had has long since dwindled. Political, moral, and legal constraints on actually using them further undermine their strategic utility without, however, reducing the risks of inadvertent war or proliferation. The objective of nuclear non-proliferation is not helped by the fact that the nuclear weapon States continue to insist that those weapons in their hands enhance security, while in the hands of others they are a threat to world peace. If we were making steady progress towards disarmament, this situation would be less alarming. Unfortunately, the reverse is true.' - United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan. 'Something is wrong with the nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation regime. Although seemingly well-equipped with an arsenal of legal and political mechanisms, such as the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the 1996 Advisory Opinion of the International Court of Justice (ICJ), decades' worth of General Assembly (GA) resolutions and even a recent slew of ad-hoc, plurilateral initiatives such as the Proliferation Security Initiative, the regime created to prevent the catastrophe of nuclear war remains inadequate. This insufficiency is even starker when viewed in relation to the regimes controlling other weapons of mass destruction. Despite its own challenges, the Organization for the Prohibition on Chemical Weapons remains relatively well-funded and well-situated to facilitate the implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). Even the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC), while still lacking the necessary verification mechanisms, has managed to effectively criminalize not just the use and threat of use of biological weapons, but also their production, development and stockpiling. Meanwhile, the anti-nuclear regime seems to be faltering. Progress made in

  2. Production of gel 99mTc generators for Nuclear Medicine at the Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, R.E.

    1996-07-01

    The development and testing of the gel-type 99m Tc generator technology has been going on for several years at the Nuclear Power Institute of China. This generator type has already been licensed by the Ministry of Health. With the co-operation of the IAEA, under Model Project CPR/2/006,it is intended to upgrade and optimise the existing facility for large scale production and continue to improve the generator performance in terms of quality and reliability of its use in nuclear medicine. The expert mission objective was to carry out final laboratory tests to assess the performance of the gel- type 99m Tc, locally produced, as well as to assess the suitability of the corresponding 99m Tc eluate for nuclear medicine studies. In particular, the expert tested the suitability of the 99m Tc for the labelling of sensitive biomolecules and its general performance in a nuclear medicine service

  3. G.D.F. Suez view on the nuclear energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rorive, P.

    2009-01-01

    G.D.F. Suez was a pioneer of nuclear energy in Europe. It masters competencies internationally recognized on any part of this sector of energy production ( engineering, services, exploitation, maintenance, nuclear fuels, radioactive waste management, dismantling). it has and exploits 7 units in Belgium, and have capabilities in French nuclear power plants of Chooz and Tricastin. G.D.F. Suez has today ambitious goals in terms of nuclear projects development: to own and operate nuclear power plants of third generation in 2020, to maintain in Europe the share of nuclear in a balanced energy mix and to develop out of Europe a significant capability on several key-markets. To reach these objectives, the group develops an active policy of human resources, research and development and communication in matter of nuclear energy. (N.C.)

  4. Reviving nuclear disarmament, 26 February 2008, Oslo, Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2008-01-01

    powers. Otherwise it would fail to win the confidence of countries on the receiving end, who would perceive it as yet again perpetuating a nuclear order of 'haves and have-nots'. The first step towards disarmament should be significant reductions in nuclear arsenals. Second, the operational status of nuclear weapons systems needs to be changed. There is no reason for nuclear weapons to be on permanent high alert - ready to be launched at perhaps 30 minutes' notice. Russia and the U.S. should introduce 'mutually agreed and verified physical barriers in the command-and-control sequence'. Third, multilateral disarmament negotiations must be resumed without further delay. The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty must be implemented and work should be resumed on a verifiable Fissile Material (Cut-Off) Treaty to ban the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons. The CTBT - signed more than a decade ago and seen by some as the longest sought, hardest fought arms control agreement - must be brought into force as soon as possible. And pending the early start of negotiations on a verifiable Fissile Material (Cut-Off) Treaty, there should be a universal moratorium on the production of fissile material. Fourth, we must develop a new framework for the utilization of nuclear energy. Fifth, we need to improve the security of nuclear materials. Sixth, we must strengthen the verification authority and capability of the IAEA. The measures I have outlined would undoubtedly help to make the world a safer place. But in order to address the threat posed by nuclear weapons in the long term, we should take a hard look at the reasons why countries are tempted to acquire nuclear weapons in the first place. Whether the reason is insecurity - the need to acquire a shield or insurance policy - or the desire to seek stature, prestige, or dominance, we need to re-visit our collective security system to address these various drivers. This means engaging in negotiations to re-engineer our global

  5. Identification of a particular cheese production by trace analysis with nuclear techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvini, A.; Stroppa, A.; Cagnazzo, M.; Pappalardo, P.; Borio, A.; Manera, S.

    2006-05-01

    The counterfeit of a product, in this case a type of cheese, is an economic damage for the trade-mark product. An identification of the product itself by quantification of trace elements could be done. Nuclear techniques are useful and give good results. Some elements are connected to the process so different productions could be identified. Thirty elements and 160 spectrums are analysed. The samples of the same kind of cheese come from different countries and different Italian producers (15 different productions).

  6. Identification of a particular cheese production by trace analysis with nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini, A; Stroppa, A; Cagnazzo, M; Pappalardo, P; Borio, A; Manera, S

    2006-01-01

    The counterfeit of a product, in this case a type of cheese, is an economic damage for the trade-mark product. An identification of the product itself by quantification of trace elements could be done. Nuclear techniques are useful and give good results. Some elements are connected to the process so different productions could be identified. Thirty elements and 160 spectrums are analysed. The samples of the same kind of cheese come from different countries and different Italian producers (15 different productions)

  7. QUARKONIUM PRODUCTION IN RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KHARZEEV,D.

    1999-04-20

    The RIKEN-BNL Workshop on Quarkonium Production in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions was held September 28--October 2, 1998, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Workshop brought together about 50 invited participants from around the world and a number of Brookhaven physicists from both particle and nuclear physics communities.

  8. Simulation of nuclear plant operation into a stochastic energy production model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, R.L.

    1983-04-01

    A simulation model of nuclear plant operation is developed to fit into a stochastic energy production model. In order to improve the stochastic model used, and also reduce its computational time burdened by the aggregation of the model of nuclear plant operation, a study of tail truncation of the unsupplied demand distribution function has been performed. (E.G.) [pt

  9. On-line nuclear half life and spectroscopic measurements on mass-separated fission product nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.; Fogelberg, B.; Baecklin, A.

    1979-01-01

    A description is given of the methods and equipment employed for nuclear spectroscopy studies of short lived fission product nuclei at the OSIRIS ISOL facility in Studsvik, Sweden. Furthermore a table of new nuclear half-lives measured with this equipment is presented. (author)

  10. Quarkonium production in relativistic nuclear collisions. Proceedings of Riken BNL Research Center Workshop,Volume 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharzeev, D.

    1999-01-01

    The RIKEN-BNL Workshop on Quarkonium Production in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions was held September 28--October 2, 1998, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Workshop brought together about 50 invited participants from around the world and a number of Brookhaven physicists from both particle and nuclear physics communities

  11. Engineering and technology in the deconstruction of nuclear materials production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingsley, R.S.; Reynolds, W.E.; Heffner, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    Technology and equipment exist to support nuclear facility deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning. In reality, this statement is not surprising because the nuclear industry has been decontaminating and decommissioning production plants for decades as new generations of production technology were introduced. Since the 1950s, the Babcock and Wilcox Company (B ampersand W) has operated a number of nuclear materials processing facilities to manufacture nuclear fuel for the commercial power industry and the U.S. Navy. These manufacturing facilities included a mixed oxide (PuO 2 -UO 2 ) nuclear fuel manufacturing plant, low- and high-enriched uranium (HEU/LEU) chemical and fuel plants, and fuel assembly plants. In addition, B ampersand W designed and build a major nuclear research center in Lynchburg, Virginia, to support these nuclear fuel manufacturing activities and to conduct nuclear power research. These nuclear research facilities included two research reactors, a hot-cell complex for nuclear materials research, four critical experiment facilities, and a plutonium fuels research and development facility. This article describes the B ampersand W deactivation, decomtanimation, and decommisioning program

  12. Pion production and the nuclear equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.W.; Odyniec, G.; Pugh, H.G.

    1984-10-01

    There has been considerable recent interest in the nuclear equation of state and how it may be determined in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. In these collisions extremely high temperatures are reached and compression to densities several times that of normal nuclear matter are predicted. This affords us the unique opportunity to study, in a somewhat controlled manner, the behavior of nuclear matter under these extreme conditions. If the observables that are measured in experiments can be related in a quantitative way to state variables of the system then the equation of state can be extracted. This relation plays a very important role in understanding the formation and collapse of supernovae and the stability and structure of neutron stars. Furthermore, it can be used to test and constrain field theoretical approaches to nuclear matter and to help to better understand the dynamics of high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. In this presentation the relationship between the nuclear equation of state and relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions will be discussed with an emphasis on how to extract the former. That a high density state of the collision should exist will be shown. One observable, namely the pion multiplicity, will be shown to survive the succeeding stages of the collision process to provide information on the equation of state at high densities. The resulting equation of state will be presented and discussed in the light of recent theoretical development. 34 refs., 12 figs

  13. Atmospheric effects and societal consequences of regional scale nuclear conflicts and acts of individual nuclear terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, O. B.; Turco, R. P.; Robock, A.; Bardeen, C.; Oman, L.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2007-04-01

    We assess the potential damage and smoke production associated with the detonation of small nuclear weapons in modern megacities. While the number of nuclear warheads in the world has fallen by about a factor of three since its peak in 1986, the number of nuclear weapons states is increasing and the potential exists for numerous regional nuclear arms races. Eight countries are known to have nuclear weapons, 2 are constructing them, and an additional 32 nations already have the fissile material needed to build substantial arsenals of low-yield (Hiroshima-sized) explosives. Population and economic activity worldwide are congregated to an increasing extent in megacities, which might be targeted in a nuclear conflict. We find that low yield weapons, which new nuclear powers are likely to construct, can produce 100 times as many fatalities and 100 times as much smoke from fires per kt yield as previously estimated in analyses for full scale nuclear wars using high-yield weapons, if the small weapons are targeted at city centers. A single "small" nuclear detonation in an urban center could lead to more fatalities, in some cases by orders of magnitude, than have occurred in the major historical conflicts of many countries. We analyze the likely outcome of a regional nuclear exchange involving 100 15-kt explosions (less than 0.1% of the explosive yield of the current global nuclear arsenal). We find that such an exchange could produce direct fatalities comparable to all of those worldwide in World War II, or to those once estimated for a "counterforce" nuclear war between the superpowers. Megacities exposed to atmospheric fallout of long-lived radionuclides would likely be abandoned indefinitely, with severe national and international implications. Our analysis shows that smoke from urban firestorms in a regional war would rise into the upper troposphere due to pyro-convection. Robock et al. (2007) show that the smoke would subsequently rise deep into the stratosphere due

  14. Production and radioiodination of monoclonal antibodies and its applications in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Okada, H.

    1988-12-01

    The basis of the monoclonal antibody production methodology, some immunological concepts which are important for the understanding of what is a Monoclonal Antibody, its radioiodination and acceptance as receptor-specific radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine are reviewed. (author) [pt

  15. Nuclear industry and production of energy: arguments for a discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorin, F.

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the advantages of nuclear energy (nuclear energy increases the energy autonomy of France, provides cheap energy, does not generate greenhouse effect gases and concerns an exporting high-tech industry that generates qualified jobs and added-value to French industry) and highlights its ability to fill the gap before renewable energies are efficient and reliable to produce large amounts of electric power and to face the present and future challenges like the progressive running dry of fossil energy sources or the compliance with the Kyoto agreement. The 2 controversial issues: the consequences of a terrorist attack on a nuclear facility and what to do with radioactive wastes are for the first one exaggerated in public opinion (some figures and facts concerning the resistance of the concrete containment that encloses a PWR type reactor are given in this article) and for the second the disposal in deep underground storage sites appears to be a solution. (A.C.)

  16. Nuclear wastes: end product or just the end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Until the nuclear fuel cycle is closed, nuclear power plants will operate at an economic disadvantage relative to fossil-fuel plants. Although eight new reprocessing plants for spent fuel are needed by 1980 to deal with the wastes that are accumulating, public reaction to nuclear wastes and the threat of plutonium proliferation has halted this portion of the cycle and required expanded storage facilities. ERDA expects to have a way to package wastes by 1978, but is still looking for an acceptable place for permanent storage. Public concerns center on the fear that levels of radioactivity will affect present and future generations and the fear that some plutonium will be diverted for use in weapons. These fears are examined and not found to be warranted as long as zero radiation and total safeguards are not the required goal

  17. Calculation of LUEC using HEEP Software for Nuclear Hydrogen Production Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongho; Lee, Kiyoung; Kim, Minhwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    To achieve the hydrogen economy, it is very important to produce a massive amount of hydrogen in a clean, safe and efficient way. Nuclear production of hydrogen would allow massive production of hydrogen at economic prices while avoiding environments pollution by reducing the release of carbon dioxide. A Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is considered as an efficient reactor to couple with the thermo-chemical Sulfur Iodine (SI) cycle to achieve the hydrogen economy. HEEP(Hydrogen Economy Evaluation Program) is one of the software tools developed by IAEA to evaluate the economy of the nuclear hydrogen production system by estimating unit hydrogen production cost. In this paper, the LUHC (Levelized Unit Hydrogen Cost) is calculated by using HEEP for nuclear hydrogen production plant, which consists of 4 modules of 600 MWth VHTR coupled with SI process. The levelized unit hydrogen production cost(LUHC) was calculated by the HEEP software.

  18. Nuclear steam turbines for power production in combination with heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frilund, B.; Knudsen, K.

    1977-01-01

    The general operating conditions for nuclear steam turbines in district heating system are briefly outlined. The turbine plant can consist of essentially the same types of machines as in conventional district heating systems. Some possible arrangements of back-pressure turbines, back-pressure turbines with condensing tails, or condensing turbines with heat extraction are considered for nuclear power and heat stations. Principles of control for hot water temperature and electrical output are described. Optimization of the plant, considering parallel variations during the year between heat load, cooling water temperature, and required outgoing temperature is discussed. (U.K.)

  19. Method of production of granulates of ceramic nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, W.L.

    1975-01-01

    To obtain a classified granulate of ceramic nuclear fuels with narrow grain size spectrum, the nuclear fuel powder is made into a slurry in a non-aqueous solvent with a water content as low as possible (e.g. chlorated hydrocarbon), a binder added to it, and spray-dried. The dry granulate desired is already obtained by this working stage. Polybutyl methacrylate in dibutylphthalate is proposed as binder. An example in which uranium dioxide powder is slurried in trichloro-ethylene is described in detail. (UWI/LH) [de

  20. Research and Production Corporation Radiy activities within Canadian nuclear market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhmach, I.; Siora, O.; Kharchenko, V.; Sklyar, V.; Andrashov, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents key results of RPC Radiy activities within Canadian nuclear market. RPC Radiy (located in Kirovograd, Ukraine) is a vendor which designs and produces digital safety I and C platform as well as turnkey applications, based on the platform, for NPPs (safety systems). The main feature of the Radiy Platform is the application of Field Programmable Gates Arrays (FPGA) as programmable components for logic control operations. Since 2009 RPC Radiy started to explore the possibility to conduct the expansion to Canadian nuclear market. The activities performed by RPC Radiy related to this direction are resulted in several joint projects with Canadian companies. (author)

  1. Softness of Nuclear Matter and the Production of Strange Particles in Neutron Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈伟; 文德华; 刘良钢

    2003-01-01

    In the various models, we study the influences of the softness of nuclear matter, the vacuum fluctuation ofnucleons and σ mesons on the production of strange particles in neutron stars. Wefind that the stiffer the nuclear matter is, the more easily the strange particles is produced in neutron stars. The vacuum fluctuation of nucleons has large effect on strange particle production while that of σ meson has little effect on it.

  2. Fission products in the spent nuclear fuel from czech nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelek, V.; Mikisek, M.; Marek, T.

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear power is expected to become a supply able to cover a significant part of the world energetic demand in future. But its big disadvantage, the risk of the spent nuclear fuel, has to be solved. The aim of this paper is to make simple estimates of the upper limits of amounts of the most dangerous spent fuel components and their compounds produced in Czech Republic until 2040. Our estimates are independent on particular type reactor (only on its power) and so they can be carried out for any nuclear fuel cycle. (Authors)

  3. PLAN 2003. Costs for management of the radioactive waste products from nuclear power production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-01

    The companies that own nuclear power plants in Sweden are responsible for adopting measures needed to manage and dispose of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste from the Swedish nuclear power reactors in a safe manner. The so-called Financing Act (1992:1537) is linked to this responsibility and prescribes that a reactor owner, in consultation with other reactor owners, shall calculate the cost for management and disposal of the spent fuel and radioactive waste and for decommissioning and dismantling of the reactor plant. The reactor owner shall annually submit to the regulatory authority the cost data that are required for calculation of the fees to be imposed on electricity production during the ensuing year and of the guarantees that must be given as security for costs not covered by paid-in fees. The reactor owners have jointly commissioned SKB to calculate and compile these costs. This report presents a calculation of the costs for implementing all of these measures. The cost calculations are based on the plan for management and disposal of the radioactive waste that has been prepared by SKB and is described in this report. The following facilities and systems are in operation: Transportation system for radioactive waste products; Central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel, CLAB; Final repository for radioactive operational waste, SFR 1. Plans also exist for: Canister factory and encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel; Deep repository for spent nuclear fuel; Final repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste; Final repository for decommissioning waste. The cost calculations also include costs for research, development and demonstration, as well as for decommissioning and dismantling the reactor plants. This report is based on the proposed strategy for the activities which is presented in SKB's RD and D-Programme 2001 and in the supplementary account to RD and D-Programme 98 which SKB submitted to the regulatory authority

  4. PLAN 2003. Costs for management of the radioactive waste products from nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    The companies that own nuclear power plants in Sweden are responsible for adopting measures needed to manage and dispose of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste from the Swedish nuclear power reactors in a safe manner. The so-called Financing Act (1992:1537) is linked to this responsibility and prescribes that a reactor owner, in consultation with other reactor owners, shall calculate the cost for management and disposal of the spent fuel and radioactive waste and for decommissioning and dismantling of the reactor plant. The reactor owner shall annually submit to the regulatory authority the cost data that are required for calculation of the fees to be imposed on electricity production during the ensuing year and of the guarantees that must be given as security for costs not covered by paid-in fees. The reactor owners have jointly commissioned SKB to calculate and compile these costs. This report presents a calculation of the costs for implementing all of these measures. The cost calculations are based on the plan for management and disposal of the radioactive waste that has been prepared by SKB and is described in this report. The following facilities and systems are in operation: Transportation system for radioactive waste products; Central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel, CLAB; Final repository for radioactive operational waste, SFR 1. Plans also exist for: Canister factory and encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel; Deep repository for spent nuclear fuel; Final repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste; Final repository for decommissioning waste. The cost calculations also include costs for research, development and demonstration, as well as for decommissioning and dismantling the reactor plants. This report is based on the proposed strategy for the activities which is presented in SKB's RD and D-Programme 2001 and in the supplementary account to RD and D-Programme 98 which SKB submitted to the regulatory authority. The

  5. Complex nuclear-structure phenomena revealed from the nuclide production in fragmentation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricciardi, M.V.; Kelic, A.; Napolitani, P.; Schmidt, K.H.; Yordanov, O.; Ignatyuk, A.V.; Rejmund, F.

    2003-12-01

    Complex structural effects in the nuclide production from the projectile fragmentation of 1 A GeV 238 U nuclei in a titanium target are reported. The structure seems to be insensitive to the excitation energy induced in the reaction. This is in contrast to the prominent structural features found in nuclear fission and in transfer reactions, which gradually disappear with increasing excitation energy. Using the statistical model of nuclear reactions, relations to structural effects in nuclear binding and in the nuclear level density are demonstrated. (orig.)

  6. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  7. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-11-03

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  8. Genetical effects of radiations from products of nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiers, F W

    1955-01-01

    Relative radiation dose-rates to man and to Drosophila are discussed. Data previously presented by Prof. J.B.S. Haldane on the genetical effects of radiation resulting from nuclear explosions are reviewed. A reply from Prof. Haldane presents revised calculations of radiation dose rates.

  9. Training needs for chemists in nuclear medicine research and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    The field Nuclear Medicine has expanded rapidly over the last two decades. Individuals with training in radiochemistry are needed in industry, medical centers and hospitals. Although basic training in organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, biochemistry or pharmacy are required, radiochemistry knowledge is essential for all these individuals. Opportunities and training requirements in these areas will be discussed. (author) 7 refs.; 5 tabs

  10. Mobile fission and activation products in nuclear waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeki, H; Evans, N; Czervinski, K; Bruggeman, Ch; Poineau, F; Breynaert, A; Reiler, P; Pablo, J de; Pipon, Y; Molnar, M; Nishimura, T; Kienzler, B; Van Iseghem, P; Crovisier, J L; Wieland, E; Mace, N; Pablo, J de; Spahiu, K; Cui, D; Lida, Y; Charlet, L; Liu, X; Sato, H; Goutelard, F; Savoye, S; Glaus, M; Poinssot, C; Seby, F; Sato, H; Tournassat, Ch; Montavon, G; Rotenberg, B; Spahiu, K; Smith, G; Marivoet, J; Landais, P; Bruno, J; Johnson, H; Umeki, L; Geckeis, H; Giffaut, E; Grambow, B; Dierckx, A

    2007-07-01

    This document gathers 33 oral presentations that were made at this workshop dedicated to the mobility of some radionuclides in nuclear waste disposal. The workshop was organized into 6 sessions: 1) performance assessment, 2) speciation/interaction in aqueous media, 3) radioactive wastes, 4) redox processes at interfaces, 5) diffusion processes, and 6) retention processes.

  11. Sintered nuclear fuel compact and method for its production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peehs, M.; Dorr, W.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a method of producing a sintered nuclear fuel compact with which reactivity losses in a nuclear reactor having long fuel element cycles are avoided, which comprises, forming a compact of a mixture of powders containing at least one nuclear fuel oxide selected from the group consisting of UO/sub 2/, PuO/sub 2/, ThO/sub 2/, mixed oxide (U, Pu)O/sub 2/ and mixed oxide (U, Th)O/sub 2/, at least one neutron poison selected from the group consisting of UB/sub x/, where x=2; 4 and/or 12 and B/sub 4/C, and sintering the compact of the mixture of powders so that the neutron piston is embedded in a sintered matrix of the nuclear fuel oxide at a treatment temperature in a range from 1000 0 C to 1400 0 C in an oxidizing sintering atmosphere, and then heat treating the sintered compact in a reducing gas atmosphere

  12. Health Consequences of Nuclear Fission Products | Ajlouni | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    effects of these radionuclides enter the human body, a large number of fatalities, malignancies, thyroid cancer, born (genic) defects, etc. Nevertheless, the actual data after Chernobyl and TMI accidents, and nuclear detonations, were not consistent with these models. Deep Atomic Binding Hypothesis (DAB)), interprets the ...

  13. PARTON SATURATION, PRODUCTION, AND EQUILIBRATION IN HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VENUGOPALAN, R.

    1999-01-01

    Deeply inelastic scattering of electrons off nuclei can determine whether parton distributions saturate at HERA energies. If so, this phenomenon will also tell us a great deal about how particles are produced, and whether they equilibrate, in high energy nuclear collisions

  14. Mobile fission and activation products in nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeki, H.; Evans, N.; Czervinski, K.; Bruggeman, Ch.; Poineau, F.; Breynaert, A.; Reiler, P.; Pablo, J. de; Pipon, Y.; Molnar, M.; Nishimura, T.; Kienzler, B.; Van Iseghem, P.; Crovisier, J.L.; Wieland, E.; Mace, N.; Pablo, J. de; Spahiu, K.; Cui, D.; Lida, Y.; Charlet, L.; Liu, X.; Sato, H.; Goutelard, F.; Savoye, S.; Glaus, M.; Poinssot, C.; Seby, F.; Sato, H.; Tournassat, Ch.; Montavon, G.; Rotenberg, B.; Spahiu, K.; Smith, G.; Marivoet, J.; Landais, P.; Bruno, J.; Johnson, H.; Umeki, L.; Geckeis, H.; Giffaut, E.; Grambow, B.; Dierckx, A.

    2007-01-01

    This document gathers 33 oral presentations that were made at this workshop dedicated to the mobility of some radionuclides in nuclear waste disposal. The workshop was organized into 6 sessions: 1) performance assessment, 2) speciation/interaction in aqueous media, 3) radioactive wastes, 4) redox processes at interfaces, 5) diffusion processes, and 6) retention processes

  15. Neutrino interactions, proton production and a nuclear effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, J.; Allport, P.P.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Sansum, R.A.; Venus, W.; Berggren, M.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Parker, M.A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Clayton, E.F.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Hulth, P.O.; Katz, U.; Wittek, W.; Marage, P.; Sacton, J.; Matsinos, E.; Simopoulou, E.; Myatt, G.; Neveu, M.; Apeldoorn, G.W. van

    1989-01-01

    Neutrino interactions are classified by the presence or absence of protons with momentum below 600 MeV/c at the interaction vertex. Interactions producing protons have softer x distributions for hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as for neon. In contrast to a recent claim, the effect is therefore not directly related to any nuclear effect in neon. (orig.)

  16. Neutrino interactions, proton production and a nuclear effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, J.; Allport, P. P.; Berggren, M.; Clayton, E. F.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Hulth, P. O.; Jones, G. T.; Katz, U.; Marage, P.; Matsinos, E.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Myatt, G.; Neveu, M.; O'Neale, S.; Parker, M. A.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, R. A.; Simopoulou, E.; van Apeldoorn, G. W.; Varvell, K.; Venus, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wittek, W.

    1989-10-01

    Neutrino interactions are classified by the presence or absence of protons with momentum below 600 MeV/c at the interaction vertex. Interactions producing protons have softer x distributions for hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as for neon. In contrast to a recent claim, the effect is therefore not directly related to any nuclear effect in neon.

  17. Sulphate in Liquid Nuclear Waste: from Production to Containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenoir, M.; Grandjean, A.; Ledieu, A.; Dussossoy, J.L.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Barre, Y.; Tronche, E. [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM/LDMC, Batiment 208 BP17171, Bagnols sur Ceze, 30207 (France)

    2009-06-15

    Nuclear industry produces a wide range of low and intermediate level liquid radioactive wastes which can include different radionuclides such as {sup 90}Sr. In La Hague reprocessing plant and in the nuclear research centers of CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique), the coprecipitation of strontium with barium sulphate is the technique used to treat selectively these contaminated streams with the best efficiency. After the decontamination process, low and intermediate level activity wastes incorporating significant quantities of sulphate are obtained. The challenge is to find a matrix easy to form and with a good chemical durability which is able to confine this kind of nuclear waste. The current process used to contain sulphate-rich nuclear wastes is bituminization. However, in order to improve properties of containment matrices and simplify the process, CEA has chosen to supervise researches on other materials such as cements or glasses. Indeed, cements are widely used for the immobilization of a variety of wastes (low and intermediate level wastes) and they may be an alternative matrix to bitumen. Even if Portland cement, which is extensively used in the nuclear industry, presents some disadvantages for the containment of sulphate-rich nuclear wastes (risk of swelling and cracking due to delayed ettringite formation), other cement systems, such as calcium sulfo-aluminate binders, may be valuable candidates. Another matrix to confine sulphate-rich waste could be the glass. One of the advantages of this material is that it could also immobilize sulphate containing high level nuclear waste which is present in some countries. This waste comes from the use of ferrous sulfamate as a reducing agent for the conversion of Pu{sup 4+} to Pu{sup 3+} in the partitioning stage of the actinides during reprocessing. Sulphate solubility in borosilicate glasses has already been studied in CEA at laboratory and pilot scales. At a pilot scale, low level liquid waste has been

  18. Fuel production from coal by the Mobil Oil process using nuclear high-temperature process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, G.

    1982-01-01

    Two processes for the production of liquid hydrocarbons are presented: Direct conversion of coal into fuel (coal hydrogenation) and indirect conversion of coal into fuel (syngas production, methanol synthesis, Mobil Oil process). Both processes have several variants in which nuclear process heat may be used; in most cases, the nuclear heat is introduced in the gas production stage. The following gas production processes are compared: LURGI coal gasification process; steam reformer methanation, with and without coal hydrogasification and steam gasification of coal. (orig./EF) [de

  19. South Africa: The Good International Nuclear Citizen?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maitre, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Since South Africa destroyed its nuclear arsenal, it has claimed the status of 'good international nuclear citizen', a position confirmed by its engagement in the nonproliferation regime. Pretoria plays a bridge-building role between states with and without nuclear weapons as well as in instances of proliferation. Recent changes have raised doubts around its position, a movement which could threaten South Africa's nuclear diplomacy

  20. Economics of nuclear energy production systems: reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, J.; Proust, E.; Gautrot, J.J.; Tinturier, B.

    2003-01-01

    The present paper relies on the main European economic studies on the comparative costs of electricity generation, published over the last six years, to show that nuclear power meets the challenge and is an economically competitive choice in the European electricity market. Indeed, although these studies were made for different purposes, by different actors and based on different methods, they all converge to show that the total base-load generation cost for new nuclear plants build in Europe is projected to be in the range of 22 to 32 euros/MWh, a total generation cost that may be 20% cheaper than the cost for combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) units. Moreover, the prospects of internalization of the greenhouse gas emission cost in the total generation cost will boost even further the competitiveness of nuclear against gas-fired plants in Europe. All this is confirmed by the most recent French detailed study (DIDEME 2003), essentially performed from an investor standpoint, which concludes, for base-load generation units starting operation around 2015, that nuclear power, with a levelled generation cost of 28,4 euros/MWh, is more competitive than CCGTs (35 euros/MWh). This study also shows an overnight investment cost for nuclear power, based on the considered scenario (a series of 10 EPR units including a ''demonstrator''), of less than 1300 euros/kWe. The other major challenge, waste management obviously also includes an economic dimension. This issue is addressed in the present paper which provides a synthesis of relevant detailed French and OECD economic studies on the cost assessment of the fuel cycle back-end. (author)

  1. Nuclear photo-meson productions in the 1 GeV energy region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Kazushige

    1991-01-01

    Experimental studies of nuclear photomeson productions in the 1 GeV energy region are discussed. In this energy region, π ± , K + and (η) mesons whose life time (or widths) are enough long (narrow) to use spectroscopic study can be produced. This report focuses a possibility of electro-magnetic K + . productions on nuclei. A preliminary result of a photo-kaon test experiment carried out at electron synchrotron laboratory, Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo are presented. In this experiment, the particle identification method to select Kaon events has been established. We have performed a first measurement of nuclear photo-kaon cross section. (author)

  2. Material science as basis for nuclear medicine: Holmium irradiation for radioisotopes production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Ahmed Rufai; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Haba, Hiromitsu; Otuka, Naohiko

    2018-05-01

    Material Science, being an interdisciplinary field, plays important roles in nuclear science. These applications are seen in weaponry, armoured vehicles, accelerator structure and development, semiconductor detectors, nuclear medicine and many more. Present study presents the applications of some metals in nuclear medicine (radioisotope production). The charged-particle-induced nuclear reactions by using cyclotrons or accelerators have become a very vital feature of the modern nuclear medicine. Realising the importance of excitation functions for the efficient production of medical radionuclides, some very high purity holmium metals are generally prepared or purchased for bombardment in nuclear accelerators. In the present work, various methods to obtain pure holmium for radioisotope production have been discussed while also presenting details of our present studies. From the experimental work of the present studies, some very high purity holmium foils have been used in the work for a comprehensive study of residual radionuclides production cross-sections. The study was performed using a stacked-foil activation technique combined with γ-ray spectrometry. The stack was bombarded with 50.4 MeV alpha particle beam from AVF cyclotron of RI Beam Factory, Nishina Centre for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Japan. The work produced thulium radionuclides useful in nuclear medicine.

  3. France [National and regional programmes on the production of hydrogen using nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-03-15

    Consumption of primary energy in France amounted to 278 Mtoe in 2005, with an average increase of 1.3%/a between 1990 and 2005. The breakdown of primary energy is 42% nuclear energy, 33% oil, 15% natural gas, 6% renewables and 4% coal. France is comparatively poor in domestic energy resources. French coal production, which was still around 40 million t/a at the end of the 1970s, was terminated in 2004. Also, domestic natural gas contributes not more than 2% of France's primary energy production. With the general objectives being to control energy demand, diversify sources of energy, increase research into energy, and provide methods of transporting and storing energy, the French energy policy has given priority to the development of a national energy supply with a strong focus on nuclear energy and renewable energies. These energies are seen to provide a reliable long term supply without GHG emissions and to ensure stable electricity prices. The first nuclear power plants built in France were gas cooled reactors and the country also participated in the OECD Dragon project. Today France is the world's second largest producer of nuclear energy (after the USA) with an electricity share of 78%. France operates 58 nuclear power stations with a total capacity of 63.2 GW. One Gen- III reactor (EPR) is currently under construction. Since nuclear energy is not always fully used, interest is growing in using excess nuclear electricity, apart from export, for hydrogen production to regulate the electricity production.

  4. Nuclear fission and fission-product spectroscopy: 3. International workshop on nuclear fission and fission-product spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutte, Heloise; Fioni, Gabriele; Faust, Herbert; Goutte, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    The present book contains the proceedings of the third workshop in a series of workshops previously held in Seyssins in 1994 and 1998. The meeting was jointly organized by different divisions of CEA and two major international laboratories. In the opening address, Prof. B. Bigot, the French High Commissioner for Atomic Energy, outlined France's energy policy for the next few decades. He emphasized the continuing progress of nuclear fission in both technical and economic terms, allowing it to contribute to the energy needs of the planet even more in the future than it does today. Such progress implies a very strong link between fundamental and applied research based on experimental and theoretical approaches. The workshop gathered the different nuclear communities studying the fission process, including topics as the following: - nuclear fission experiments, - spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei, - fission data evaluation, - theoretical aspects of nuclear fission, - and innovative nuclear systems and new facilities. The scientific program was suggested by an International Advisory Committee. About 100 scientists from 13 different countries attended the conference in the friendly working atmosphere of the Castle of Cadarache in the heart of the Provence. The proceedings of the workshop were divided into 11 sections addressing the following subject matters: 1. Cross sections and resonances (5 papers); 2. Fission at higher energies - I (5 papers); 3. Fission: mass and charge yields (4 papers); 4. Light particles and cluster emission (4 papers); 5. Spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei (5 papers); 6. Resonances, barriers, and fission times (5 papers); 7. Fragment excitation and neutron emission (4 papers); 8. Mass and energy distributions (4 papers); 9. Needs for nuclear data and new facilities - I (4 papers); 10. Angular momenta and fission at higher Energies - II (3 papers); 11. New facilities - II (2 papers). A poster session of 8 presentations completed the workshop

  5. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow, Picatinny Arsenal and vicinity, Morris County, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, L.M.; Rice, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water flow in glacial sediments and bedrock at Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., was simulated by use of a three-dimensional finite-difference ground- water-flow model. The modeled area includes a 4.3-square-mile area that extends from Picatinny Lake to the Rockaway River. Most of the study area is bounded by the natural hydrologic boundaries of the ground-water system. eophysical logs, lithologic logs, particle-size data, and core data from selected wells and surface geophysical data were analyzed to define the hydrogeologic framework. Hydrogeologic sections and thickness maps define six permeable and three low-permeability layers that are represented in the model as aquifers and confining units, respectively. Hydrologic data incorporated in the model include a rate of recharge from precipitation of 22 inches per year, estimated from long-term precipitation records and estimates of evapotranspiration. Additional recharge from infiltration along valleys was estimated from measured discharge of springs along the adjacent valley walls and from estimates of runoff from upland drainage that flows to the valley floor. Horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities of permeable and low-permeability layers were estimated from examination of aquifer-test data, gamma-ray logs, borehole cuttings, and previously published data. Horizontal hydraulic conductivities in glacial sediments range from 10 to 380 feet per day. Vertical hydraulic conductivities of the low-permeability layers range from 0.01 to 0.7 feet per day. The model was calibrated by simulating steady-state conditions during 1989-93 and by closely matching simulated and measured ground-water levels, vertical ground-water-head differences, and streamflow gain and loss. Simulated steady-state potentiometric- surface maps produced for the six permeable layers indicate that ground water in the unconfined material within Picatinny Arsenal flows predominantly toward the center of the valley, where it discharges to Green

  6. Nuclear power production: The financial costs. Background paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, P.

    1993-11-01

    For many years, the Canadian nuclear industry has priced itself on its ability to provide safe, reliable and low-cost electricity to consumers. While nuclear power has indeed proved to be a relatively safe generator of electricity, its performance with respect to reliability and cost has declined noticeably in recent years. This paper documents the deteriorating cost performance of the industry, in comparison with that of its traditional competitor in power generation. It also breaks down the total costs into its component parts, assessing the key factors underlying the trends that are worsening the competitive position of the industry: a rise in initial capital costs, unanticipated technical difficulties resulting in additional capital costs, and the increasing operating expenses associated with poorer-than-expected reactor performance. (author). 8 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  7. Intermittency in the particle production and in the nuclear multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, P.; Ploszajczak, M.

    1991-01-01

    Intermittency is a manifestation of scale invariance and randomness in physical systems. Intermittency in relativistic heavy-ion collisions and, in particular, the projectile dependence, multiplicity dependence and source-size dependence are discussed in the frame of the model of spatio-temporal intermittency. Moreover, recent theoretical results in intermittency studies of the nuclear multifragmentation are presented. (author) 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  8. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djurcic, Zelimir; Detwiler, Jason A.; Piepke, Andreas; Foster Jr., Vince R.; Miller, Lester; Gratta, Giorgio

    2008-08-06

    Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in {bar {nu}}{sub e} detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties, and their relevance to reactor {bar {nu}}{sub e} experiments.

  9. Nuclear Stockpile Management: A Technical and Political Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitt, Bernard; Grand, Camille

    2009-10-01

    Stewardship strategies. In fact, its effective implementation has resulted in the actual freezing of nuclear States' capacities, while allowing for somewhat different situations in Nuclear Weapon States and de facto nuclear States. The second structuring element of nuclear stockpile management is the ban on the production of fissile materials for nuclear weapons (FMCT), which has been on the agenda of the international community for fourteen years. But its negotiation at the Conference on Disarmament still has not managed to get started because the CD is still in a stalemate even today after the adoption of its program of work last May. The Stockpile Stewardship concept emerged rather belatedly in the history of nuclear arsenals, since it was introduced by the USA in 1992, as well as by other nuclear powers. The concept itself gradually evolved, until 1995 when the US Science Based Stockpile Stewardship policy and the French one in particular found their full expression: managing potential problems due to aging stockpiles, refurbishing weapons and components as required, maintaining the science and the engineering agencies supporting the national deterrent. As a matter of fact, the maintenance in operational condition of nuclear weapons presents, contrary to classical weapon systems, specific and increased challenges, owing to the sophistication of the technologies involved and because of the aging processes of nuclear and other materials in the weapons. We then try to review briefly in this paper the Stockpile Stewardship and Simulation context and policies in the Nuclear Weapon States and in three other de facto nuclear States considered as such, although very little is known in certain cases. (authors)

  10. Energy distribution of antineutrinos originating from the decay of fission products in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudstam, G.; Aleklett, K.

    1979-01-01

    The energy spectrum of antineutrinos around a nuclear reactor has been derived by summing contributions from individual fission products. The resulting spectrum is weaker at energies above approx. 8 MeV than earlier published antineutrino spectra. The reason may be connected to the strong feeding of high-lying daughter states in the beta decay of fission products with high disintegration energies

  11. Advice on the disposal of radioactive by-products arising in the use of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyermann, M.; Goergner, D.

    1989-01-01

    Based on the current legislation in the GDR advice is given on the classification and disposal of radioactive by-products from the utilization of nuclear energy with special emphasis on the different procedures for products which require a disposal licence by the National Board for Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection and those which do not need such an authorization. (author)

  12. Heavy flavours production in quark-gluon plasma formed in high energy nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloskinski, J.

    1985-01-01

    Results on compression and temperatures of nuclear fireballs and on relative yield of strange and charmed hadrons are given . The results show that temperatures above 300 MeV and large compressions are unlikely achieved in average heavy ion collision. In consequence, thermal production of charm is low. Strange particle production is, however, substantial and indicates clear temperature - threshold behavior.

  13. Corrosion products in the coolant circuits of PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darras, R.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of corrosion products formed in the primary and secondary circuits of pressurized light water nuclear power plants are first briefly recalled. The problem set by the pollution of coolants and metallic surfaces is then examined. Finally, the measures of precaution to take and the possible solutions to minimize the disturbing effects of this pollution by corrosion products are presented [fr

  14. Tables and figures from JNDC Nuclear Data Library of fission products, version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Hitoshi

    1989-11-01

    The content of JNDC (Japanese Nuclear Data Committee) FP (Fission Product) Nuclear Data Library version 2 for 1227 fission products is presented in the form of tables and figures. The library is inclusive of evaluated decay data such as decay constant, Q-value, average energies of beta, gamma and internal conversion electron, spin-parity, branching ratio of each decay mode and fission yield. The neutron capture cross-sections are also contained for 166 nuclides. The mass number of the fission product nuclides ranges from A = 66 to A = 172. (author)

  15. Discovery of Ubiquitin Deamidases in the Pathogenic Arsenal of Legionella pneumophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan Valleau

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Legionella pneumophila translocates the largest known arsenal of over 330 pathogenic factors, called “effectors,” into host cells during infection, enabling L. pneumophila to establish a replicative niche inside diverse amebas and human macrophages. Here, we reveal that the L. pneumophila effectors MavC (Lpg2147 and MvcA (Lpg2148 are structural homologs of cycle inhibiting factor (Cif effectors and that the adjacent gene, lpg2149, produces a protein that directly inhibits their activity. In contrast to canonical Cifs, both MavC and MvcA contain an insertion domain and deamidate the residue Gln40 of ubiquitin but not Gln40 of NEDD8. MavC and MvcA are functionally diverse, with only MavC interacting with the human E2-conjugating enzyme UBE2N (Ubc13. MavC deamidates the UBE2N∼Ub conjugate, disrupting Lys63 ubiquitination and dampening NF-κB signaling. Combined, our data reveal a molecular mechanism of host manipulation by pathogenic bacteria and highlight the complex regulatory mechanisms integral to L. pneumophila’s pathogenic strategy. : Legionella pneumophila, possessing the largest known arsenal of effectors, continues to reveal unique approaches to host cell control. Valleau et al. decrypt the functions of a trio of effectors, discovering a pair of ubiquitin-specific deamidases, their regulation by a neighboring dual-specificity protein inhibitor, and a mechanism of NF-κB suppression. Keywords: pathogen-host interaction, ubiquitination, Legionella, UBE2N/Ubc13, NF-κB signaling, Type IV secretion system, effectors, metaeffector, cycle inhibiting factor

  16. Statistical process control: An approach to quality assurance in the production of vitrified nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsipher, B.A.; Kuhn, W.L.

    1987-01-01

    Current planning for liquid high-level nuclear wastes existing in the United States includes processing in a liquid-fed ceramic melter to incorporate it into a high-quality glass, and placement in a deep geologic repository. The nuclear waste vitrification process requires assurance of a quality product with little or no final inspection. Statistical process control (SPC) is a quantitative approach to one quality assurance aspect of vitrified nuclear waste. This method for monitoring and controlling a process in the presence of uncertainties provides a statistical basis for decisions concerning product quality improvement. Statistical process control is shown to be a feasible and beneficial tool to help the waste glass producers demonstrate that the vitrification process can be controlled sufficiently to produce an acceptable product. This quantitative aspect of quality assurance could be an effective means of establishing confidence in the claims to a quality product

  17. Statistical process control: An approach to quality assurance in the production of vitrified nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsipher, B.A.; Kuhn, W.L.

    1987-02-01

    Current planning for liquid high-level nuclear wastes existing in the US includes processing in a liquid-fed ceramic melter to incorporate it into a high-quality glass, and placement in a deep geologic repository. The nuclear waste vitrification process requires assurance of a quality product with little or no final inspection. Statistical process control (SPC) is a quantitative approach to one quality assurance aspect of vitrified nuclear waste. This method for monitoring and controlling a process in the presence of uncertainties provides a statistical basis for decisions concerning product quality improvement. Statistical process control is shown to be a feasible and beneficial tool to help the waste glass producers demonstrate that the vitrification process can be controlled sufficiently to produce an acceptable product. This quantitative aspect of quality assurance could be an effective means of establishing confidence in the claims to a quality product. 2 refs., 4 figs

  18. Qualitative and quantitative characteristics of fission products in spent nuclear fuel from RBMK-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adlys, G.; Adliene, D.

    2002-01-01

    Well-known empirical models or experimental instruments and methods for the estimation of fission product yields do not allow prediction of the behavior and evaluation of the time-dependent qualitative and quantitative characteristics of all fission products in spent nuclear fuel during long-term storage. Several computer codes were developed in different countries to solve this problem. French codes APOLLO1 and PEPIN were used in this work for modeling the characteristics of spent nuclear fuel in the RBMK reactor. The modeling results of qualitative and quantitative characteristics of long-lived fission products for different cooling periods of spent nuclear fuel, including 50-year cooling period, are presented in this paper. The 50-year cooling period conforms to the foreseen time of storage of spent nuclear fuel in CONSTOR and CASTOR casks at the Ignalina NPP. These results correlate well with evaluated quantities for the well-known yields of the nuclides and could be used for the compilation of the database for long-lived fission products in spent nuclear fuel from the RBMK-type reactor. They allow one to predict and to solve effectively safety problems concerning with long-term spent nuclear fuel storage in casks. (author)

  19. Stochastic aspects of multiparticle production in relativistic nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachung, M.

    1988-01-01

    Midrapidity multiparticle production process in ordinary hadron and heavy-ion induced reactions at sufficiently high incident energies are analyzed. It is shown that stochastic aspects of multiparticle production process in relativistic range plays a dominating role in understanding the observable phenomena. The basic idea and the main results of the multisource model for hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are shown. The concept of the NES (number of effective sources) scaling is discussed. 16 refs.; 7 figs

  20. Laser application for nuclear reaction product detecting system alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantsev, V.I.; Dryapachenko, I.P.; Kornilov, V.A.; Nemets, O.F.; Rudenko, B.A.; Sokolov, M.V.; Struzhko, B.G.; Gnatovskij, A.V.; Bojchuk, V.N.

    1982-01-01

    A method for optical alignment of nuclear particle detector system using a laser beam and hologram is described. The method permits to arrange detectors very precisely in accordance with any chosen space coordinate values. The results of modelling the geometry of an experiment based on using the suggested method on cyclotron beams are described. A gas helium-neon laser with wavelength of 0.63 μm radiation power of an order of 2 MW and angular beam divergence less than 10 angular minutes is used for modelling. It is concluded that the laser and hologram application provides large possibilities for the modelling the geometry of experiments on nuclear reaction investigation. When necessary it is possible to obtain small nonius scale of reference beams by means of multiplicating properties of the wave front modulator-hologram system. It is also possible to record holograms shaping the reference beams in two or several planes crossing along the central beam direction. Such holograms can be used for modelling the noncoplanar geometry of correlation experiments [ru

  1. Hybrid systems to address seasonal mismatches between electricity production and demand in nuclear renewable electrical grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, Charles

    2013-01-01

    A strategy to enable zero-carbon variable electricity production with full utilization of renewable and nuclear energy sources has been developed. Wind and solar systems send electricity to the grid. Nuclear plants operate at full capacity with variable steam to turbines to match electricity demand with production (renewables and nuclear). Excess steam at times of low electricity prices and electricity demand go to hybrid fuel production and storage systems. The characteristic of these hybrid technologies is that the economic penalties for variable nuclear steam inputs are small. Three hybrid systems were identified that could be deployed at the required scale. The first option is the gigawatt-year hourly-to-seasonal heat storage system where excess steam from the nuclear plant is used to heat rock a kilometer underground to create an artificial geothermal heat source. The heat source produces electricity on demand using geothermal technology. The second option uses steam from the nuclear plant and electricity from the grid with high-temperature electrolysis (HTR) cells to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Hydrogen is primarily for industrial applications; however, the HTE can be operated in reverse using hydrogen for peak electricity production. The third option uses variable steam and electricity for shale oil production. -- Highlights: •A system is proposed to meet variable hourly to seasonal electricity demand. •Variable solar and wind electricity sent to the grid. •Base-load nuclear plants send variable steam for electricity and hybrid systems. •Hybrid energy systems can economically absorb gigawatts of variable steam. •Hybrid systems include geothermal heat storage, hydrogen, and shale-oil production

  2. High-temperature nuclear reactor power plant cycle for hydrogen and electricity production – numerical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudek Michał

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (called HTR or HTGR for both electricity generation and hydrogen production is analysed. The HTR reactor because of the relatively high temperature of coolant could be combined with a steam or gas turbine, as well as with the system for heat delivery for high-temperature hydrogen production. However, the current development of HTR’s allows us to consider achievable working temperature up to 750°C. Due to this fact, industrial-scale hydrogen production using copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle is considered and compared with high-temperature electrolysis. Presented calculations show and confirm the potential of HTR’s as a future solution for hydrogen production without CO2 emission. Furthermore, integration of a hightemperature nuclear reactor with a combined cycle for electricity and hydrogen production may reach very high efficiency and could possibly lead to a significant decrease of hydrogen production costs.

  3. Summary report of the consultants' meeting on nuclear data for production of therapeutic radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, R.C.; Paviotti-Corcuera, R.

    2002-04-01

    This report summarizes the presentations, recommendations and conclusions of the Consultants' Meeting on Nuclear Data for Production of Therapeutic Radioisotopes. The purpose of this meeting was to discuss scientific and technical matters related to the subject and to advise the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) on the need and possible formation of a Coordinated Research Programme (CRP). Accurate and complete knowledge of nuclear data are essential for the production of radionuclides for therapy to achieve the specific activity and purity required for efficient and safe clinical application. The Consultants recommended updating and completing the data for production of radionuclides that are recognized to be important in therapy. In addition, the consultants recommend investigating other radionuclides that have a potential interest and for which there exists a medical rationale for therapeutic use. To date no serious effort has been devoted to evaluation of nuclear data for the reactor and accelerator production of therapeutic radionuclides. The IAEA is in the unique and privileged position to address this important public health related problem. Therefore, the consultants highly recommend the formation of a CRP with the title: 'Nuclear Data for Production of Therapeutic Radionuclides.' (author)

  4. Application of nuclear techniques in improving agricultural productivity with particular reference to pasture management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majid Ajorlo; Ramdzani Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear techniques are appropriate tools to settle problems for agriculture or natural resources which cannot be solved using conventional agricultural techniques. In this paper, the research activities carried out and the achievements so far obtained in the agricultural specialties -all by using nuclear techniques- with particular reference to pasture management are discussed. Insect pest control by Sterile Insect Techniques (SIT); soil and water management using neutron moisture probes; determining N-fixation capacity of legumes using N-15 isotope and nuclear methods; soil erosion measurement using of fallout radionuclide such as Cs-137; monitoring the movement of saline water in salt-affected land using isotopes of chlorine; livestock production and health by RIA and ELISA are some of achievements so far obtained in improving agricultural productivity. The ultimate goal of the nuclear technique investigation in agriculture is to use the resources efficiently in obtaining higher plant and livestock yields while increasing the quality and protecting them against insects, diseases and weeds. (Author)

  5. Membrane steam reforming of natural gas for hydrogen production by utilization of medium temperature nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djati Hoesen Salimy

    2010-01-01

    The assessment of steam reforming process with membrane reactor for hydrogen production by utilizing of medium temperature nuclear reactor has been carried out. Difference with the conventional process of natural gas steam reforming that operates at high temperature (800-1000°C), the process with membrane reactor operates at lower temperature (~500°C). This condition is possible because the use of perm-selective membrane that separate product simultaneously in reactor, drive the optimum conversion at the lower temperature. Besides that, membrane reactor also acts the role of separation unit, so the plant will be more compact. From the point of nuclear heat utilization, the low temperature of process opens the chance of medium temperature nuclear reactor utilization as heat source. Couple the medium temperature nuclear reactor with the process give the advantage from the point of saving fossil fuel that give direct implication of decreasing green house gas emission. (author)

  6. Nuclear elastic scattering effects on fusion product transport in compact tori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVeaux, J.; Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper seeks to advance previous work including the effects of nuclear elastic scattering (NES) on fusion-product transport. We have found that NES may dominate the slowing-down process for high-temperature, advance-fuel plasmas which burn Cat.D or D- 3 He. A modified version of the Monte Carlo fusion product transport code, MCFRM, was used to evaluate the effects of NES on discrete fusion-product orbits in the FRM

  7. High temperature corrosion in the thermochemical hydrogen production from nuclear heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coen-Porisini, F.; Imarisio, G.

    1976-01-01

    In the production of hydrogen by water decomposition utilizing nuclear heat, a multistep process has to be employed. Water and the intermediate chemical products reach in chemical cycles giving hydrogen and oxygen with regeneration of the primary products used. Three cycles are examined, characterized by the presence of halide compounds and particularly hydracids at temperatures up to 800 0 C. Corrosion tests were carried out in hydrobromic acid, hydrochloric acid, ferric chloride solutions, and hydriodic acid

  8. Innovative automation solutions applied to nuclear fuel production and inspection processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vas, Ananth

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear industry in India is slated for fast paced growth in the coming years, with a great focus on increasing the capacity for producing, inspecting and finally reprocessing of nuclear fuel. Modern techniques of industrial automation such as robotics, machine vision and laser based systems have been deployed extensively to improve the productivity and output of existing and future installations, particularly for the fuel handling stages mentioned

  9. Production of radionuclides and preparation of labelled compounds. Nuclear chemical technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    A general review is presented of methods of producing radionuclide preparations and labelled compounds, such as their production from natural raw materials, from a nuclear reactor, a particle accelerator, and using radioisotope generators. Also described are the fundamental kinetic relations of nuclear reactions. Basic methods are surveyed of obtaining labelled compounds by chemical synthesis, biosynthesis, exchange reactions, recoil reactions, by the Wilzbach method and the Szillard-Chalmers reaction. (L.K.)

  10. Allocation of fossil and nuclear fuels. Heat production from chemically and physically bound energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, U.

    2008-01-01

    The first part of the book presents the broad field of allocation, transformation, transport and distribution of the most important energy carriers in the modern power industry. The following chapters cover solid fossil fuel, liquid fuel, gaseous fuel and nuclear fuel. The final chapters concern the heat production from chemically and physically bound energy, including elementary analysis, combustion calculations, energy balance considerations in fossil fuel fired systems, and fundamentals of nuclear physics

  11. $Z^{0}$ production as a test of nuclear effects at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao Fei Zhang

    2002-01-01

    We predict the Z/sup 0/ transverse momentum distribution from proton- proton and nuclear collisions at the LHC. After demonstrating that higher-twist nuclear effects are very small, we propose Z/sup 0/ production as a precision test for leading-twist pQCD in the TeV energy region. We also point out that shadowing may result in unexpected phenomenology at the LHC. (21 refs).

  12. Z Production as a Test of Nuclear Effects at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, X; Zhang, Xiaofei; Fai, George

    2002-01-01

    We predict the Z transverse momentum distribution from proton-proton and nuclear collisions at the LHC. After demonstrating that higher-twist nuclear effects are very small, we propose $Z^0$ production as a precision test for leading-twist pQCD in the TeV energy region. We also point out that shadowing may result in unexpected phenomenology at the LHC.

  13. Decontaminating products for routine decontamination in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, K.

    2001-01-01

    Routine decontamination work that has to be carried out in practical operation includes the cleaning of all kinds of surfaces such as floors, walls and apparatus, the decontamination of professional clothes and of the personnel. In order to ensure a trouble-free functioning of plants for the treatment of waste water and concentrate in nuclear power plants, radioactive liquid wastes appearing in the controlled area should be compatible with the treatment methods in practice. Radioactive concentrates and resides obtained from the treatment methods are mixed with matrix materials like cement or bitumen or treated by roller frame drying and thus are conditioned for intermediate or final storage. Several requirements should be made on decontaminating agents used in the controlled area. Some of these physical-chemical criteria will be described in detail. (R.P.)

  14. International recommendations for managing environmental risk from nuclear energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The establishment of any recommendations relating to the control of radiation exposure requires decisions on the management of the associated risk. Those decisions must reflect attitudes towards the acceptable levels of risk for both workers and the public. The environmental impact of nuclear energy principally concerns radiation doses and risks to members of the public. The author shows how the considerations of risk and acceptability are used internationally to set standards for protection. The results differ as between limiting doses for normal operations, for restricting the likelihood of accidents, intervening after an accident, or reducing doses from a chronic exposure situation. It is concluded that there is a coherent pattern in the resulting protection system

  15. Numerical modeling of a nuclear production reactor cooling lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, L.L.; Pepper, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    A finite element model has been developed which predicts flow and temperature distributions within a nuclear reactor cooling lake at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. Numerical results agree with values obtained from a 3-D EPA numerical lake model and actual measurements obtained from the lake. Because the effluent water from the reactor heat exchangers discharges directly into the lake, downstream temperatures at mid-lake could exceed the South Carolina DHEC guidelines for thermal exchanges during the summer months. Therefore, reactor power was reduced to maintain temperature compliance at mid-lake. Thermal mitigation measures were studied that included placing a 6.1 m deep fabric curtain across mid-lake and moving the reactor outfall upstream. These measurements were calculated to permit about an 8% improvement in reactor power during summer operation

  16. Improvement of uranium production efficiency to meet China's nuclear power requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.

    1997-01-01

    Recently China put the Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, with an installed capacity of 300 MW, in the province of Zhejiang and the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant, with a total installed capacity of 2 x 900 MW, in commercial operation. China plans a rapid growth in nuclear power from 1995 to 2010. China's uranium production will therefore also enter a new period with nuclear power increasing. In order to meet the demand of nuclear power for uranium special attention has been paid to both technical progress improvement using management with the aim of reducing the cost of uranium production. The application of the trackless mining technique has enhanced the uranium mining productivity significantly. China has produced a radiometric sorter, model 5421-2 for pre-concentrating uranium run-of-mine ore. This effectively increases the uranium content in mill feed and decreases the operating cost of hydrometallurgical treatment. The in situ leach technique after blasting is applied underground in the Lantian Mine, in addition to the surface heap leaching, and has obtained a perfect result. The concentrated acid-curing, and ferric sulphate trickle leaching process, will soon be used in commercial operation for treating uranium ore grading -5 to -7 mm in size. The annual production capability of the Yining Mine will be extended to 100 tonnes U using improving in situ leaching technology. For the purpose of improving the uranium production efficiency much work has been done optimizing the distribution of production centres. China plans to expand its uranium production to meet the uranium requirements of the developing nuclear power plants. (author). 4 tabs

  17. Monochromatic neutron beam production at Brazilian nuclear research reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiulevicius, Roberto; Rodrigues, Claudio; Parente, Carlos B. R.; Voi, Dante L.; Rogers, John D.

    2000-12-01

    Monochomatic beams of neutrons are obtained form a nuclear reactor polychromatic beam by the diffraction process, suing a single crystal energy selector. In Brazil, two nuclear research reactors, the swimming pool model IEA-R1 and the Argonaut type IEN-R1 have been used to carry out measurements with this technique. Neutron spectra have been measured using crystal spectrometers installed on the main beam lines of each reactor. The performance of conventional- artificial and natural selected crystals has been verified by the multipurpose neutron diffractometers installed at IEA-R1 and simple crystal spectrometer in operator at IEN- R1. A practical figure of merit formula was introduced to evaluate the performance and relative reflectivity of the selected planes of a single crystal. The total of 16 natural crystals were selected for use in the neutron monochromator, including a total of 24 families of planes. Twelve of these natural crystal types and respective best family of planes were measured directly with the multipurpose neutron diffractometers. The neutron spectrometer installed at IEN- R1 was used to confirm test results of the better specimens. The usually conventional-artificial crystal spacing distance range is limited to 3.4 angstrom. The interplane distance range has now been increased to approximately 10 angstrom by use of naturally occurring crystals. The neutron diffraction technique with conventional and natural crystals for energy selection and filtering can be utilized to obtain monochromatic sub and thermal neutrons with energies in the range of 0.001 to 10 eV. The thermal neutron is considered a good tool or probe for general applications in various fields, such as condensed matter, chemistry, biology, industrial applications and others.

  18. Decadal reduction of Chinese agriculture after a regional nuclear war

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lili; Robock, Alan; Mills, Michael; Stenke, Andrea; Helfand, Ira

    2015-02-01

    A regional nuclear war between India and Pakistan could decrease global surface temperature by 1°C-2°C for 5-10 years and have major impacts on precipitation and solar radiation reaching Earth's surface. Using a crop simulation model forced by three global climate model simulations, we investigate the impacts on agricultural production in China, the largest grain producer in the world. In the first year after the regional nuclear war, a cooler, drier, and darker environment would reduce annual rice production by 30 megaton (Mt) (29%), maize production by 36 Mt (20%), and wheat production by 23 Mt (53%). With different agriculture management—no irrigation, auto irrigation, 200 kg/ha nitrogen fertilizer, and 10 days delayed planting date—simulated national crop production reduces 16%-26% for rice, 9%-20% for maize, and 32%-43% for wheat during 5 years after the nuclear war event. This reduction of food availability would continue, with gradually decreasing amplitude, for more than a decade. Assuming these impacts are indicative of those in other major grain producers, a nuclear war using much less than 1% of the current global arsenal could produce a global food crisis and put a billion people at risk of famine.

  19. Comparison of electricity production costs of nuclear and coal-fired power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltzer, M.

    1980-01-01

    Electricity production costs of nuclear and coal-fired power plants their structure and future development are calculated and compared. Assumed beginning of operation is in the mid-1980. The technical and economical data are based on a nuclear power unit of 1 300 MW and on a coal-fired twin plant of 2 x 750 MW. The study describes and discusses the calculational method and the results. The costs for the electricity generation show an economic advantage for nuclear power. A sensitivity analysis shows that these results are valid also for changed input parameters. (orig.) [de

  20. Review of the book: Vasilenko, I.Ya. Toxicology of nuclear fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, K.I.

    2001-01-01

    Review on monograph of Vasilenko, I.Ya. Toxicology of nuclear fission (Moscow, Medicine, 1999) is presented. Data of longevity full-scale investigations during nuclear explosions on the Semipalatinsk test site are given. Classified, complex investigations into the effect of nuclear fission products mixtures on different kinds of laboratory animals are described, transfer of radiobiological researches to organism of man is scientific valid. The most complicate radiobiological problem of low dose is analyzed. The being investigated monograph contains unique scientific information and makes a heavy contribution in radiobiology [ru

  1. Accelerator driven systems for energy production and waste incineration: Physics, design and related nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, M; Stanculescu, A [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Paver, N [University of Trieste and INFN, Trieste (Italy)

    2003-06-15

    This volume contains the notes of lectures given at the workshops 'Hybrid Nuclear Systems for Energy Production, Utilisation of Actinides and Transmutation of Long-lived Radioactive Waste' and 'Nuclear Data for Science and Technology: Accelerator Driven Waste Incineration', held at the Abdus Salam ICTP in September 2001. The subject of the first workshop was focused on the so-called Accelerator Driven Systems, and covered the most important physics and technological aspects of this innovative field. The second workshop was devoted to an exhaustive survey on the acquisition, evaluation, retrieval and validation of the nuclear data relevant to the design of Accelerator Driven Systems.

  2. Accelerator driven systems for energy production and waste incineration: Physics, design and related nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, M.; Stanculescu, A.; Paver, N.

    2003-01-01

    This volume contains the notes of lectures given at the workshops 'Hybrid Nuclear Systems for Energy Production, Utilisation of Actinides and Transmutation of Long-lived Radioactive Waste' and 'Nuclear Data for Science and Technology: Accelerator Driven Waste Incineration', held at the Abdus Salam ICTP in September 2001. The subject of the first workshop was focused on the so-called Accelerator Driven Systems, and covered the most important physics and technological aspects of this innovative field. The second workshop was devoted to an exhaustive survey on the acquisition, evaluation, retrieval and validation of the nuclear data relevant to the design of Accelerator Driven Systems

  3. Graphical analysis of French nuclear power plant production date

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jourdan, J.P. [Electricite de France (EDF), Projet Production EPR 1, 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2001-07-01

    The analysis of values of plant production uses here an original method of graphical analysis. This method clarifies various difficulties of analysing big experience feedback databases among which the language interpretation and distinctions between scarce events and multi-annual events. In general, the method shows the logical processes that production values obey (pure chance logic, administrative logic, and willpower) This method of graphical analysis provides a tool to observe and question in a concrete way so that each person involved can put the events in which he played a role into the general context of other plants. It is a deductible method to improve this big and complex system. (author)

  4. Graphical analysis of French nuclear power plant production date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jourdan, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The analysis of values of plant production uses here an original method of graphical analysis. This method clarifies various difficulties of analysing big experience feedback databases among which the language interpretation and distinctions between scarce events and multi-annual events. In general, the method shows the logical processes that production values obey (pure chance logic, administrative logic, and willpower) This method of graphical analysis provides a tool to observe and question in a concrete way so that each person involved can put the events in which he played a role into the general context of other plants. It is a deductible method to improve this big and complex system. (author)

  5. Design of containment system of nuclear fuel attacked by corrosion with leaking fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poblete Maturana, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    The following report presents the design of an innovative confinement system for the nuclear fuel attacked by corrosion, with leakage of fission products to be used in the RECH-1 nuclear experimental reactor of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, is currently within the framework of the international nuclear waste management program developed by the member countries of the IAEA, including Chile. The main objective of this project is the development of a system that is capable of containing, in the smallest possible volume, the fission products that are released to the reactor coolant medium from the nuclear fuel that are attacked by corrosion. Among the tasks carried out for the development of the project are: the compilation of the necessary bibliography for the selection of the most suitable technology for the retention of the fission products, the calculation of the most important parameters to ensure that the system will operate within ranges that do not compromise the radiological safety, and the design of the hydraulic circuit of the system. The results obtained from the calculations showed that the fuel element confinement system is stable from a thermal point of view since the refrigerant does not under any circumstances reach the saturation temperature and, in addition, from a hydraulic point of view, since the rate at which the refrigerant flows through the hydraulic circuit is low enough so that the deformation of the fuel plates forming the nuclear fuel does not occur. The most appropriate technology for the extraction of fission products according to the literature consulted is by ion exchange. The calculations developed showed that with a very small volume of resins, it is possible to capture all of the non-volatile fission products of a nuclear fuel

  6. Natural radiation - a perspective to radiological risk factors of nuclear energy production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustonen, R.; Christensen, T.; Stranden, E.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation doses from natural radiation and from man-made modifications on natural radiation, and different natural radiological environments in the Nordic countries are summarized and used as a perspective for the radiological consequences of nuclear energy production. The significance of different...... radiation sources can be judged against the total collective effective dose equivalent from natural radiation in the Nordic countries, 92 000 manSv per year. The collective dose from nuclear energy production during normal operation is estimated to 20 manSv per year and from non-nuclear energy production...... to 80 manSv per year. The increase in collective dose due to the conservation of heating energy in Nordic dwellings is estimated to 23 000 manSv per year, from 1973 to 1984. An indirect radiological danger index is defined in order to be able to compare the significance of estimated future releases...

  7. Some nuclear chemical aspects of medical generator nuclide production at the Los Alamos hot cell facility

    CERN Document Server

    Fassbender, M; Heaton, R C; Jamriska, D J; Kitten, J J; Nortier, F M; Peterson, E J; Phillips, D R; Pitt, L R; Salazar, L L; Valdez, F O; 10.1524/ract.92.4.237.35596

    2004-01-01

    Generator nuclides constitute a convenient tool for applications in nuclear medicine. In this paper, some radiochemical aspects of generator nuclide parents regularly processed at Los Alamos are introduced. The bulk production of the parent nuclides /sup 68/Ge, /sup 82/Sr, /sup 109/Cd and /sup 88/Zr using charged particle beams is discussed. Production nuclear reactions for these radioisotopes, and chemical separation procedures are presented. Experimental processing yields correspond to 80%-98% of the theoretical thick target yield. Reaction cross sections are modeled using the code ALICE-IPPE; it is observed that the model largely disagrees with experimental values for the nuclear processes treated. Radionuclide production batches are prepared 1-6 times yearly for sales. Batch activities range from 40MBq to 75 GBq.

  8. Some nuclear chemical aspects of medical generator nuclide production at the Los Alamos hot cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassbender, M.; Nortier, F.M.; Phillips, D.R.; Hamilton, V.T.; Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J.; Kitten, J.J.; Pitt, L.R.; Salazar, L.L.; Valdez, F.O.; Peterson, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Generator nuclides constitute a convenient tool for applications in nuclear medicine. In this paper, some radiochemical aspects of generator nuclide parents regularly processed at Los Alamos are introduced. The bulk production of the parent nuclides 68 Ge, 82 Sr, 109 Cd and 88 Zr using charged particle beams is discussed. Production nuclear reactions for these radioisotopes, and chemical separation procedures are presented. Experimental processing yields correspond to 80%-98% of the theoretical thick target yield. Reaction cross sections are modeled using the code ALICE-IPPE; it is observed that the model largely disagrees with experimental values for the nuclear processes treated. Radionuclide production batches are prepared 1-6 times yearly for sales. Batch activities range from 40 MBq to 75 GBq. (orig.)

  9. Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on J/psi Production: Intrinsic and Extrinsic Transverse Momentum Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreiro, E.G.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Fleuret, F.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Lansberg, J.P.; /Heidelberg U.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; /SPhN, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2010-08-26

    Cold nuclear matter effects on J/{psi} production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are evaluated taking into account the specific J/{psi}-production kinematics at the partonic level, the shadowing of the initial parton distributions and the absorption in the nuclear matter. We consider two different parton processes for the c{bar c}-pair production: one with collinear gluons and a recoiling gluon in the final state and the other with initial gluons carrying intrinsic transverse momentum. Our results are compared to RHIC observables. The smaller values of the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} in the forward rapidity region (with respect to the mid rapidity region) are partially explained, therefore potentially reducing the need for recombination effects.

  10. Marginalization and challenge: the production of knowledge and landscape in Canadian nuclear waste management policy making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, A.E.

    2006-01-01

    Aboriginal peoples have recently become politically significant in Canadian nuclear fuel waste (NFW) management policy making. Their newfound significance comes on the heels of an important challenge to the knowledge and authority of the nuclear industry with respect to its plans for NFW lead by a number of public groups and Aboriginal peoples from across Canada, including the Serpent River First Nation. This dissertation examines the relationships between the discourses of the Serpent River First Nation (SRFN) about their experiences of the nuclear fuel chain and the discourses of the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) about the management of NFW. Two trends are found to characterize these relationships: marginalization and challenge. The discourses of the NWMO marginalize the SRFN, excluding their experiences of the nuclear fuel chain, radioactivity, and the effects of nuclear industries from the policy making process. The discourses of the SRFN challenge the claims of the NWMO about the effects of nuclear wastes and radioactivity, as well as about the safe and beneficial development of the nuclear fuel chain. I identify discourses of 'modern risk' and 'citizenship' found in the work of the NWMO as instrumental for maintaining the nuclear industry's control over the production of knowledge about NFW and its effects and subjugating the knowledge of the SRFN. I also identify discourses of identity, oppression, and 'situated knowledge' as important challenges to the content, method and premises of the claims of the nuclear industry about the management of NFW. While I conclude that the NWMO's discourses of risk and citizenship constitute a colonial politics of exclusion, I note that their discourses are contingent on the exclusion of the experiences of the SRFN with the fuel chain. For their accounts to be coherent, the NWMO need to maintain a strategic silence on the overwhelming implication Aboriginal peoples, as a category, in the nuclear fuel chain

  11. Analysis of economic and infrastructure issues associated with hydrogen production from nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, W.A.; Gorensek, M.B.; Danko, E.; Schultz, K.R.; Richards, M.B.; Brown, L.C.

    2004-01-01

    Consideration is being given to the large-scale transition of the world's energy system from one based on carbon fuels to one based on the use of hydrogen as the carrier. This transition is necessitated by the declining resource base of conventional oil and gas, air quality concerns, and the threat of global climate change linked to greenhouse gas emissions. Since hydrogen can be produced from water using non-carbon primary energy sources, it is the ideal sustainable fuel. The options for producing the hydrogen include renewables (e.g. solar and wind), fossil fuels with carbon sequestration, and nuclear energy. A comprehensive study has been initiated to define economically feasible concepts and to determine estimates of efficiency and cost for hydrogen production using next generation nuclear reactors. A unique aspect of the study is the assessment of the integration of a nuclear plant, a hydrogen production process and the broader infrastructure requirements. Hydrogen infrastructure issues directly related to nuclear hydrogen production are being addressed, and the projected cost, value and end-use market for hydrogen will be determined. The infrastructure issues are critical, since the combined cost of storing, transporting, distributing, and retailing the hydrogen product could well exceed the cost of hydrogen production measured at the plant gate. The results are expected to be useful in establishing the potential role that nuclear hydrogen can play in the future hydrogen economy. Approximately half of the three-year study has been completed. Results to date indicate that nuclear produced hydrogen can be competitive with hydrogen produced from natural gas for use at oil refineries or ammonia plants, indicating a potential early market opportunity for large-scale centralized hydrogen production. Extension of the hydrogen infrastructure from these large industrial users to distributed hydrogen users such as refueling stations and fuel cell generators could

  12. Investigation reactor D-2201 polypropylene production unit using nuclear technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wibisono; Sugiharto; Jefri Simanjuntak

    2016-01-01

    D-2201 reactor is a unit in the polypropylene production process at Pertamina Refinery Unit III Plaju. Reactor with a capacity of 45 kilo liter is not operated in normal operation condition. The validity of liquid level indicator on the unit is doubtful when refers to the production quality. Gamma source of 150 mCi Cobalt-60 and a scintillation detector had been used to scan the outer wall of the reactor to detect the liquid level during operation with a capacity of 40 %. Measurements were made along the reactor walls with 25 mm scan resolution and 5 seconds time sampling. Experiment result shows that the liquid level at the position of 40 % and at normal level position are not observed. Investigation did not find the liquid level above normal. D-2201 is diagnose not normal operating condition diagnosed with liquid abundant passed the recommended limits. Investigation advised to repair or to calibrate the liquid level indicator which is currently installed. (author)

  13. Agriculture and food production after a nuclear power accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulvsand, T.; Preuthun, J.; Rosen, K.; Svensson, Kettil

    1999-02-01

    In a situation with radioactive fall-out in agricultural areas in Sweden, many organisations will be engaged. The authorities in the field of agriculture and food will give advices and recommendations, the producers will see to their interests, the consumers will react and researchers and experts will be engaged. A combined game and seminar was carried through in the city of Huskvarna 17 - 18 March, 1998 with participation from the responsible authorities: Swedish Board of Agriculture, National Food Administration, Swedish Radiation Protection Institute and from producers, organisations and the government and with researchers and people from contract laboratories. The game and seminar was based upon a scenario with a release of radioactivity from the nuclear power plant of Ignalina in early July and focused on the threat phase and the time close to the deposition. The release and the weather condition resulted in a deposition of 137 Cs and 131 I in agricultural areas in southern Sweden. The biggest levels of deposition took place in the county of Oestergoetland, where the resulting levels were three times the highest levels in Sweden after the Chernobyl-accident The seminar combined lectures, group-work and discussions and actualised a great number of issues that should be further investigated. The report ends with a factual part about possible countermeasures in agriculture

  14. A step toward nuclear sanity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottfried, K.; Long, F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports that Reykjavik formally ended as a diplomatic failure, but it has begun an overdue revolution in perceptions. At long last, both superpowers have the in concrete terms that vastly smaller nuclear arsenals would make them safer. Implicitly, they are saying that nuclear weapons are not useful weapons. Those insights are a prerequisite to nuclear sanity. The United States has proposed to eliminate all strategic ballistic missiles, on land and submarines, in two five-year steps. During that period, we (and presumably the Soviet Union) would develop missile defenses to be deployed in ten years. The first part of this plan makes excellent sense. Ballistic missiles explode on their targets ten to thirty minutes after launch. Today's huge and accurate missile arsenals have forced both superpowers to adopt a hair-trigger stance: they might launch missiles simply on warning of attack

  15. Synthetic and bioengineered products in nuclear medicine and drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frier, M.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. The supply of radio pharmaceuticals based on pooled human blood products, for example human serum albumin (H S A) and fibrinogen, has previously met with some problems due to the possibility of donor infection A common feature of all biologicals of animal or human origin is the potential risk of viral contamination from the source material. Recombinant DNA technology provides an alternative source of biological materials that have applications throughout medicine. Micro capsules prepared from recombinant human serum albumin (r H S A) are currently under development as ultrasound contrast agents. Similar products would serve as an alternative source of material to serum albumin pooled from human donors and would offer great potential in the production of radio pharmaceuticals. There is a growing interest in the use of macromolecular carriers for therapeutic agents. When labelled with and appropriate gamma-emitter, their biodistribution can be be followed by scintigraphy. The biodistribution of a synthetic branched polypeptide, based on a poly-L-lysine backbone (average molecular mass 45 kDa) is described. The polymer was conjugated to diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid and labelled by chelation with Indium-111. Mice were injected i.v. with labelled material and imaged with a gamma camera with a pin hole collimator. Images showed the majority of tracer remaining in the blood poll, but about 35% appeared in the urinary bladder within 1.5 h

  16. UPVapor: Cofrentes nuclear power plant production results analysis software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curiel, M.; Palomo, M. J.; Baraza, A.; Vaquer, J.

    2010-10-01

    UPVapor software version 02 has been developed for the Cofrentes nuclear power plant Data Analysis Department (Spain). It is an analysis graphical environment in which users have available all the plant variables registered in the process computer system (SIEC). In order to perform this, UPVapor software has many advanced graphic tools for work simplicity, as well as a friendly environment easy to use and with many configuration possibilities. Plant variables are classified in the same way that they are in SIEC computer and these values are taken from it through the network of Iberdrola. UPVapor can generate two different types of graphics: evolution graphs and X Y graphs. The first ones analyse the evolution up to twenty plant variables in a user's defined time period and according to historic plant files. Many tools are available: cursors, graphic configuration, mobile means, non valid data visualization ... Moreover, a particular analysis configuration can be saved, as a pre selection, giving the possibility of charging pre selection directly and developing quick monitoring of a group of preselected plant variables. In X Y graphs, it is possible to analyse a variable value against another variable in a defined time. As an option, users can filter previous data depending on a variable certain range, with the possibility of programming up to five filters. As well as the other graph, X Y graph has many configurations, saving and printing options. With UPVapor software, data analysts can save a valuable time during daily work and, as it is of easy utilization, it permits to other users to perform their own analysis without ask the analysts to develop. Besides, it can be used from any work centre with access to network framework. (Author)

  17. UPVapor: Cofrentes nuclear power plant production results analysis software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curiel, M. [Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales SAU, Sorolla Center, local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain); Palomo, M. J. [ISIRYM, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, Valencia (Spain); Baraza, A. [Iberdrola Generacion S. A., Central Nuclear Cofrentes, Carretera Almansa Requena s/n, 04662 Cofrentes, Valencia (Spain); Vaquer, J., E-mail: m.curiel@lainsa.co [TITANIA Servicios Tecnologicos SL, Sorolla Center, local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    UPVapor software version 02 has been developed for the Cofrentes nuclear power plant Data Analysis Department (Spain). It is an analysis graphical environment in which users have available all the plant variables registered in the process computer system (SIEC). In order to perform this, UPVapor software has many advanced graphic tools for work simplicity, as well as a friendly environment easy to use and with many configuration possibilities. Plant variables are classified in the same way that they are in SIEC computer and these values are taken from it through the network of Iberdrola. UPVapor can generate two different types of graphics: evolution graphs and X Y graphs. The first ones analyse the evolution up to twenty plant variables in a user's defined time period and according to historic plant files. Many tools are available: cursors, graphic configuration, mobile means, non valid data visualization ... Moreover, a particular analysis configuration can be saved, as a pre selection, giving the possibility of charging pre selection directly and developing quick monitoring of a group of preselected plant variables. In X Y graphs, it is possible to analyse a variable value against another variable in a defined time. As an option, users can filter previous data depending on a variable certain range, with the possibility of programming up to five filters. As well as the other graph, X Y graph has many configurations, saving and printing options. With UPVapor software, data analysts can save a valuable time during daily work and, as it is of easy utilization, it permits to other users to perform their own analysis without ask the analysts to develop. Besides, it can be used from any work centre with access to network framework. (Author)

  18. Nuclear reactor and production systems with flux-optical digitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luger, P.P.; Nealen, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    Several digital sensing devices are described for use in automated production systems. The first described is for use in the automatic operation of a reactor. This device employs a binant electrometer using a quartz fiber mounted at one end but free to vibrate at the other in an AC field. The fiber oscillates if a charge is placed upon it. An optical slit replaces the ordinary eyepiece reticule scale. With the quartz fiber adjusted so its image is in focus at the optical slit, photoelectric signals are obtained at null charge on the fiber. The quartz fiber is repeatedly charged and allowed to discharge by collecting ions from a source under measurement. Each photoelectric signal causes a digital time reading to be taken. The time readings are used to evaluate the current due to the electric charge. The photoelectric signals, by feedback, also operate the electrometer for continuous intermittent-continuous operation. Basically the current is a current digitizer. Application is made to reactor monitoring and control as well as to other types of production systems. The flux-optical digitizer is a radiometer-like-structure carryig rotating fins that may be coated with fissionable material, such as 235 U for the purpose of neutron flux measurements. The rotating fins are mounted on a shaft that also carries an arm that produces photoelectric signals whenever the arm overlaps an optical slit and thus diminishes light from an auxiliary light flux source incident on the slit. Between successive photoelectric signals, time interval measurements are obtained. This and other sensing devices are fully described for various automated, controlled, production processes

  19. Phase Analysis of Corrosion Products from Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipka, J.; Slugen, V.; Toth, I.; Hascik, J.; Lehota, M.

    2002-01-01

    The variability of the properties and the composition of the corrosion products of the stainless CrNi and mild steels in dependence on the conditions (temperature, acidity, etc.) is of such a range that, in practice, it is impossible to determine the properties of the corrosion products for an actual case from the theoretical data only. Since the decontamination processes for the materials of the water-cooled reactor (VVER-440) secondary circuits are in a process of development, it is necessary to draw the needed information by the measurement and analysis of the real specimens. The corrosion layer was separated by scraping the rust off the surface and the powder samples were studied by transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy. It should be noted that the gamma spectroscopic measurements give no evidence of the presence of low-energy gamma radiation emitted from the samples. The scrapped specimen powder was homogenised (using the 50 μm sieve) and fixed into the special holder. The 57 Co in Rh matrix was used as the radioactive Moessbauer source. Measured spectra were fitted using program NORMOS SITE. According to the results obtained from Moessbauer spectra, it is possible to establish that the main component of secondary circuit's corrosion products is magnetite Fe 3 O 4 . Next components are hematite α-Fe 2 O 3 and hydroxide akagenite β-FeOOH, which is characterised by a significant paramagnetic doublet in the middle of the spectra. The sextets corresponding to base materials (martensite and austenite steels) were identified in all measured spectra.

  20. Nuclear data relevant to the production and application of diagnostic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qaim, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    The types of nuclear data and their quality required in the production and application of diagnostic radionuclides are outlined. The radioactive decay data determine the suitability of a radioisotope for in vivo tracer studies, both from the imaging and internal radiation dose considerations. The nuclear reaction cross section data allow optimisation of production routes. Both reactors and cyclotrons are used for production purposes. The nuclear data needed in the two cases and their present status are discussed. Special attention is paid to radionuclides suitable for emission tomography (PET and SPECT). The controversy about reactor vs cyclotron production of the widely used sup 9 sup 9 Mo/ sup 9 sup 9 sup m Tc generator system is discussed. Some special considerations in cyclotron production of radionuclides are outlined. The need of accurate data near reaction thresholds, the constraint of available particles and their energies at a small cyclotron, the influence of increasing incident particle energy, and the formation of isomeric impurities are discussed in detail. The role of nuclear model calculations in predicting unknown data is considered. (author)

  1. Strangeness production in nuclear collisions: Color rope formations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toneev, V.D.; Amelin, N.S.; Csernai, L.P.; Gudima, K.K.; Sivoklokov, S.Yu.

    1992-12-01

    Strangeness production at SPS-CERN energies is studied within the Quark Gluon String Model. This analysis indicates that the observed shape of rapidity and transverse mass distributions are reproduced fairly well for both peripheral and central heavy ion collisions. However, for central collisions the model underpredicts strange particles abundance by a factor of about 2:2:4 for K S 0 , Λ and anti Λ, respectively. This discrepancy can be considered as a possible manifestation of string-string interactions of a collective type similar to the formation of a color rope. The model predictions for coming experiments with the Pb beam at CERN are given. (orig.)

  2. HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. O& #39; Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

    2005-10-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. Results presented in this paper were obtained from a ten-cell planar electrolysis stack, with an active area of 64 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte-supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (~140 µm thick), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 - 0.6), gas flow rates (1000 - 4000 sccm), and current densities (0 to 0.38 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Hydrogen production rates up to 90 Normal liters per hour were demonstrated. Values of area-specific resistance and stack internal temperatures are presented as a function of current density. Stack performance is shown to be dependent on inlet steam flow rate.

  3. Nuclear reactor and production systems with digital controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luger, P.P.

    1976-01-01

    Several digital sensing devices are described for use in automated production systems. The first described is for use in the automatic operation of a reactor. This device employs a binant electrometer using a quartz fiber mounted at one end but free to vibrate at the other in an AC field. The fiber oscillates if a charge is placed upon it. An optical slit replaces the ordinary eyepiece reticule scale. With the quartz fiber adjusted so its image is in focus at the optical slit, photoelectric signals are obtained at null charge on the fiber. The quartz fiber is repeatedly charged and allowed to discharge by collecting ions from a source under measurement. Each photoelectric signal causes a digital time reading to be taken. The time readings are used to evaluate the current due to the collected charge. The photoelectric signals, by feedback, also operate the electrometer for continuous or intermittent-continuous operation. Basically, the system is a current digitizer. Application is made to reactor monitoring and control as well as to other types of production systems. Finally, other types of sensing devices are also described and their use in automated controlled processes is shown. 3 claims, 19 figures

  4. Draft comprehensive conservation plan and environmental impact statement-Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Complex, consisting of some of the newer properties in the National Wildlife Refuge System, is a work in progress. Offering unique assets to surrounding communities, these lands promise to become some of the premier urban wildlife refuges in the country. At the heart of the refuge complex is the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge: 16,000 acres of shortgrass and mixed-grass prairie that is home to bison, bald eagles, migratory songbirds, prairie dogs, and much more—all within the Denver Metropolitan area.This comprehensive conservation plan will be the first in the country designed to begin implementing the Refuge System’s new Urban Refuge Initiative. To accomplish this, we analyzed a wide range of options on how best to support up to one million visitors per year without compromising our principal purposes to protect and preserve fish and wildlife and their habitats. We are fortunate to have inherited a great deal of infrastructure from the U.S. Army, but we are also constrained by the current condition and layout of these facilities. Some of this infrastructure may be acting as barriers to the public—a condition inconsistent with the purposes of the refuge. Accordingly, we have developed a goal to increase and improve suitable access to the refuge, develop sustainable transportation options, and provide more connections among the units of the refuge complex. This increased access will enable people from all walks of life to visit the refuge. The vision we have developed for the refuge complex calls for the restoration of the refuge’s historical habitats, and the reconnection of people with the natural lands of the refuge and of the region at large using a network consisting of multimodal trails, a far-reaching light-rail system, and the Denver International Airport. This refuge is well positioned to leverage and catalyze early investments to create world-class wildlife habitat and a

  5. DPRK's 4{sup th} Nuclear Test and its Tritium Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Soo; Lee, Sang Joon; Chang, Sun Young [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    On January 6, 2016 at 10:30am, the artificial earthquake in the DPRK was detected by multiple international seismic organizations. After 2 hours, the DPRK announced on state TV that 'The first H-bomb test was successfully conducted in the DPRK at 10:00 am on Wednesday, Juche 105(2016), pursuant to the strategic determination of the ruling communist party.' There has been a doubt about the real nature of the DPRK's 4th nuclear test, since 2 months have been passed after its nuclear test. To analyze the nature of the DPRK's nuclear test, it is necessary to check possible options for production of essential materials. The pathways to produce nuclear fusion material (tritium) and to have a relatively high possibility for the DPRK are described in this article. Tritium is key material for H-bomb. And there are two options for the DPRK which are 1) production and 2) illicit trafficking. And this study is focused on production possibility of DPRK. Determination of the nature of DPRK's nuclear test is very hard issue.

  6. DPRK's 4"t"h Nuclear Test and its Tritium Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Soo; Lee, Sang Joon; Chang, Sun Young

    2016-01-01

    On January 6, 2016 at 10:30am, the artificial earthquake in the DPRK was detected by multiple international seismic organizations. After 2 hours, the DPRK announced on state TV that 'The first H-bomb test was successfully conducted in the DPRK at 10:00 am on Wednesday, Juche 105(2016), pursuant to the strategic determination of the ruling communist party.' There has been a doubt about the real nature of the DPRK's 4th nuclear test, since 2 months have been passed after its nuclear test. To analyze the nature of the DPRK's nuclear test, it is necessary to check possible options for production of essential materials. The pathways to produce nuclear fusion material (tritium) and to have a relatively high possibility for the DPRK are described in this article. Tritium is key material for H-bomb. And there are two options for the DPRK which are 1) production and 2) illicit trafficking. And this study is focused on production possibility of DPRK. Determination of the nature of DPRK's nuclear test is very hard issue

  7. Influence of radioactive contamination to agricultural products by rainfall during a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, W. T.; Han, M. H.; Choi, Y. H.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, C. W.

    2001-01-01

    For the consideration of the effects on radioactive contamination of agricultural products by rainfall during a nuclear accident, the wet interception coefficients for the plants were derived, and the previous dynamic food chain model was also modified. From the results, radioactive contamination of agricultural products was greatly decreased by rainfall, and it decreased dramatically according to increase of rainfall amount. It means that the predictive contamination in agricultural products using the previous dynamic food chain model, in which dry interception to the plants is only considered, can be overestimated. Influence of rainfall on the contamination of agricultural products was the most sensitive for 131 I, and the least sensitive for 90 Sr

  8. A combined hydro-nuclear-solar project for electric power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiftah, S.

    1985-01-01

    Some of the main, general-perspective themes of Dr. Alvin Weinberg's leadership and long and varied work are: the effect of present and future nuclear energy projects on society, not only in the United States but throughout the world; analysis, comparison, and combination of various sources of energy; extensive multiple use of nuclear energy complexes (so-called NUPLEX, for nuclear complex) for various areas of the world; and use of ''Big Technology'' and ''Big Science'' for solving, or helping to solve, political problems. A combined hydro-nuclear-solar project for electric power production is discussed, as well as two other energy-related engineering projects. Some of the projects originated or were inspired by work done at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the leadership of Dr. Alvin Weinberg. Also reported are the technical characteristics and interrelationships of the three components of the envisaged hydronuclear-solar project

  9. Sharing product data of nuclear power plants across their lifecycles by utilizing a neutral model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Duhwan [WIG Craft Research Division, Maritime and Ocean Engineering Research Institute, KORDI, 171 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: dhmun@moeri.re.kr; Hwang, Jinsang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: mars@icad.kaist.ac.kr; Han, Soonhung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: shhan@kaist.ac.kr; Seki, Hiroshi [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd. (Japan)], E-mail: hiroshi.seki.mf@hitachi.com; Yang, Jeongsam [Industrial and Information Systems Engineering, Ajou University (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jyang@ajou.ac.kr

    2008-02-15

    Many public and private Korean organizations are involved during the lifecycle of a domestic nuclear power plant. Korea Plant Engineering Co. (KOPEC) participates in the design stage, Korea Hydraulic and Nuclear Power (KHNP) operates and manages all nuclear power plants in Korea, Doosan Heavy Industry and Construction Co. manufactures the main equipment, and a construction company constructs the plant. Even though each organization has its own digital data management system and obtains a certain level of automation, data sharing among organizations is poor. KHNP obtains drawings and technical specifications from KOPEC in the form of paper. This results in manual re-work of definitions, and errors can potentially occur in the process. In order to establish an information bridge between design and operation and maintenance (O and M) phases, a generic product model (GPM), a data model from Hitachi, is extended for constructing a neutral data warehouse and the Korean Nuclear Power Plant Information Sharing System (KNPISS) is implemented.

  10. Sharing product data of nuclear power plants across their lifecycles by utilizing a neutral model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, Duhwan; Hwang, Jinsang; Han, Soonhung; Seki, Hiroshi; Yang, Jeongsam

    2008-01-01

    Many public and private Korean organizations are involved during the lifecycle of a domestic nuclear power plant. Korea Plant Engineering Co. (KOPEC) participates in the design stage, Korea Hydraulic and Nuclear Power (KHNP) operates and manages all nuclear power plants in Korea, Doosan Heavy Industry and Construction Co. manufactures the main equipment, and a construction company constructs the plant. Even though each organization has its own digital data management system and obtains a certain level of automation, data sharing among organizations is poor. KHNP obtains drawings and technical specifications from KOPEC in the form of paper. This results in manual re-work of definitions, and errors can potentially occur in the process. In order to establish an information bridge between design and operation and maintenance (O and M) phases, a generic product model (GPM), a data model from Hitachi, is extended for constructing a neutral data warehouse and the Korean Nuclear Power Plant Information Sharing System (KNPISS) is implemented

  11. Transverse energy production in high energy nuclear collisions and the equation of state of nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doss, K.G.R.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Kolb, B.; Ludewigt, B.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Ritter, H.G.; Schmidt, H.R.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA; Kampert, K.H.; Loehner, H.

    1987-08-01

    In nuclear collisions of AU+Au, Nb+Nb and Ca+Ca at bombarding energies between 150 and 800 MeV per nucleon transverse energy and transverse momenta of light particles are studied event by event at θ = 90 0 in the center of mass system. At all energies a rise of the mean transverse energy per nucleon is observed with increasing charged particle multiplicity. Particularly large values of E perpendicular to have been found for 3 He-fragments. The hydrodynamical picture is discussed for a possible separation of the collective flow and the thermal parts of the E perpendicular to -spectrum. From this, evidence for a rather stiff equation of state is found. (orig.)

  12. Analytic control during the production of nuclear purity compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caracotche de Perez, Norma; Lando, E.R.A.; Lorenzatto, R.L.P.A.; Serrichio, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    U02 compound is obtained from yellow cake at the Cordoba Production Complex, (Argentina). Analysis and controls during the process are described. Yellow cake is dissolved with sulphuric acid and then a leaching precipitation process originally developed in that complex takes place. In this process ammonium uranyl tricarbonate (AUC) is obtained by the addition of CO3(NH4)2 and SO4(NH4)2. During the whole process samples are sent to the laboratory for the determinations of humidity, uranium and impurities. In the solvent extraction plant determinations of Uranium are made with dibenzoilmethane and H2O2. In the fresh-eluting total amount of solids as well as Si, Fe, Ca, CO3, OH - and SO4 -- are determined. Uranium (U3O8) and carbonates are investigated in the AUTC by gravimetry, ammonium and water are obtained by Kjeldall and Xylol distillation proceses respectively. Controls of Si and Fe by colorimetry and of Ca by atomic absorption permit eventual detections of accidental contaminations. After UO3 is obtained by calcination at 300 deg C, gravimetric determination of U3O8 is made. In this step of the process, CO3, NH4, H2O, Si, Fe, Ca and SO4 -- are also detected. UO2 is the final product obtained by reduction of UO3 at 700 deg C. Physical characteristics as fluidity, apparent, TAP and real densities, half diameter of particles, granulometry and microscopic properties are verified. Normally in the UO2 process a series of routine chemical controls are made to determine U3O8, rate O/U, SO4 -- , Si, Fe Ca, Mo, Cd, Cr, Ni and water (E.A.C.) [es

  13. Productivity of a nuclear chemical reactor with gamma radioisotopic sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anguis T, C.

    1975-01-01

    According to an established mathematical model of successive Compton interaction processes the made calculations for major distances are extended checking the acceptability of the spheric geometry model for the experimental data for radioisotopic sources of Co-60 and Cs-137. Parameters such as the increasing factor and the absorbed dose served as comparative base. calculations for the case of a punctual source succession inside a determined volume cylinder are made to obtain the total dose, the deposited energy by each photons energetic group and the total absorbed energy inside the reactor. Varying adequately the height/radius relation for different cylinders, the distinct energy depositions are compared in each one of them once a time standardized toward a standard value of energy emitted by the reactor volume. A relation between the quantity of deposited energy in each point of the reactor and the conversion values of chemical species is established. They are induced by electromagnetic radiation and that are reported as ''G'' in the scientific literature (number of molecules formed or disappeared by each 100 e.v. of energy). Once obtained the molecular performance inside the reactor for each type of geometry, it is optimized the height/radius relation according to the maximum production of molecules by unity of time. It is completed a bibliographical review of ''G'' values reported by different types of aqueous solutions with the purpose to determine the maximum performance of molecular hydrogen as a function of pH of the solution and of the used type of solute among other factors. Calculations for the ethyl bromide production as an example of one of the industrial processes which actually work using the gamma radiation as reactions inductor are realized. (Author)

  14. Hydrogen co-production from subcritical water-cooled nuclear power plants in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanapragasam, N.; Ryland, D.; Suppiah, S., E-mail: gnanapragasamn@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    Subcritical water-cooled nuclear reactors (Sub-WCR) operate in several countries including Canada providing electricity to the civilian population. The high-temperature-steam-electrolysis process (HTSEP) is a feasible and laboratory-demonstrated large-scale hydrogen-production process. The thermal and electrical integration of the HTSEP with Sub-WCR-based nuclear-power plants (NPPs) is compared for best integration point, HTSEP operating condition and hydrogen production rate based on thermal energy efficiency. Analysis on integrated thermal efficiency suggests that the Sub-WCR NPP is ideal for hydrogen co-production with a combined efficiency of 36%. HTSEP operation analysis suggests that higher product hydrogen pressure reduces hydrogen and integrated efficiencies. The best integration point for the HTSEP with Sub-WCR NPP is upstream of the high-pressure turbine. (author)

  15. Nuclear security and law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gozal, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study is to show that the classical distinction between the military nuclear law and the civil nuclear law is outdated. The technologies are dual and might be misused from a pacific to a military goal. The central element of the nuclear law is thus the integration of the safety rules: the nuclear risk being universal, it has created an universal law (first part) that reflects our scientific knowledge and might thus evaluate. This universal law has been a factor of nuclear security (part 2), as in 50 years, there had been only one major nuclear accident and no nuclear conflict. The horizontal proliferation has been limited and the international community has understood that time had come to reduce our arsenals. (author)

  16. Mathematical modelling of heat production in deep geological repository of high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovanda, O.

    2017-01-01

    Waste produced by nuclear industry requires special handling. Currently, there is a research taking place, focused at possibilities of nuclear waste storage in deep geological repositories, hosted in stable geological environment. The high-level nuclear waste produces significant amount of heat for a long time, which can affect either environment outside of or within the repository in a negative way. Therefore to reduce risks, it is desirable to know the principles of such heat production, which can be achieved using mathematical modeling. This thesis comes up with a general model of heat production-time dependency, dependable on initial composition of the waste. To be able to model real situations, output of this thesis needs to be utilized in an IT solution. (authors)

  17. Method of manufacturing gadolinium oxide-incorporated nuclear fuel sintering products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komono, Akira; Seki, Makoto; Omori, Sadayuki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To manufacture nuclear fuel sintering products excellent in burning property and mechanical property. Constitution: In the manufacturing step for nuclear fuel sintering products, specific metal oxides are added for promoting the growth of crystal grains in the sintering. Those metal oxides melted at a temperature lower than the sintering temperature of a mixture of nuclear fuel oxide powder and oxide power, or those metal oxides causing eutectic reaction are used as the metal oxide. Particularly, those compounds having oxygen atom - metal atom ratio (O/M) of not less than 2 are preferably used. As such metal oxides usable herein transition metal oxides, e.g., Nb 2 O 5 , TiO 2 , MoO 3 and WO 3 are preferred, with Nb 2 O 3 and TiO 2 being preferred particularly. (Seki, T.)

  18. Nuclear data for the production of therapeutic radionuclides. Summary report of first research coordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sublet, J.-Ch.; Paviotti-Corcuera, R.

    2003-06-01

    Presentations, discussions and conclusions from the First Co-ordination Meeting on Nuclear Data for the Production of Therapeutic Radionuclides are summarised in this report. The main purpose of the meeting was to discuss scientific and technical matters related to the subject and to co-ordinate related tasks. Programmes of work were agreed and assigned, and deadlines were set. Participants emphasized the importance of the completeness and accuracy of the resulting nuclear data for the production of these radionuclides to appropriate specific activities and purity along with the relevant decay data. The recommended data from this Coordinated Research Project should meet the requirements for the safe and efficacious application of therapeutic treatments in nuclear medicine. (author)

  19. Nuclear energy contribution to restraining greenhouse gas emissions and long-term energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoda-Bakhsh, R.

    2004-01-01

    An important source of greenhouse gases, in particular Co 2 , is fossil fuel combustion for energy applications. Since nuclear power is an energy source that does not produce Co 2 , nuclear energy is already making a contribution to restraining greenhouse gas emissions. Because it has been internationally decided to reduce carbon dioxide emission before the year 2005 in order to avoid the green house catastrophy of the earth's atmosphere, and since there is an urgent need of energy especially in the developing countries, there is now a strong demand for alternative energy sources. While the established low cost energy production by light water nuclear fission reactors could be a solution for a period of transition (limited by resources of the light Uranium isotope), fusion energy is of interest for long- term and large scale energy production to provide the increased energy demand

  20. Modelling study on production cross sections of {sup 111}In radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kara, Ayhan; Korkut, Turgay [Sinop Univ. (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering; Yigit, Mustafa [Aksaray Univ. (Turkey). Faculty of Science and Arts; Tel, Eyyup [Osmaniye Korkut Ata Univ. (Turkey). Faculty of Science and Arts

    2015-07-15

    Radiopharmaceuticals are radioactive drugs used for diagnosis or treatment in a tracer quantity with no pharmacological action. The production of radiopharmaceuticals is carried out in the special research centers generally using by the cyclotron systems. Indium-111 is one of the most useful radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine. In this paper, we calculated the production cross sections of {sup 111}In radioisotope via {sup 111-114}Cd(p,xn) nuclear reactions up to 60 MeV energy. In the model calculations, ALICE/ASH, TALYS 1.6 and EMPIRE 3.2 Malta nuclear reaction code systems were used. The model calculation results were compared to the experimental literature data and TENDL-2014 (TALYS-based) data.

  1. Advanced concepts for waste management and nuclear energy production in the EURATOM 5. framework programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugon, M.; Bhatnagar, V.P.; Martin Bermejon, J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarises the objectives of the research projects on partitioning and transmutation (P and T) of long-lived radionuclides in nuclear waste and advanced systems for nuclear energy production in the key action on nuclear fission of the EURATOM 5. Framework Programme (FP5) (1998-2002). As these FP5 projects cover the main aspects of P and T, they should provide a basis for evaluating the practicability, on an industrial scale, of P and T for reducing the amount of long-lived radionuclides to be disposed of. Concerning advanced concepts, a cluster of projects is addressing the key technical issues to be solved before implementing high-temperature reactors (HTRs) commercially for energy production. Finally, the European Commissions proposal fora New Framework Programme (2002-2006) is briefly outlined. (authors)

  2. Advanced concepts for waste management and nuclear energy production in the EURATOM fifth framework programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugon, M.; Bhatnagar, V.P.; Martin Bermejo, J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarises the objectives of the research projects on Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) of long lived radionuclides in nuclear waste and advanced systems for nuclear energy production in the key action on nuclear fission of the EURATOM Fifth Framework Programme (FP5) (1998-2002). As these FP5 projects cover the main aspects of P and T, they should provide a basis for evaluating the practicability, on an industrial scale, of P and T for reducing the amount of long lived radionuclides to be disposed of. Concerning advanced concepts, a cluster of projects is addressing the key technical issues to be solved before implementing High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) commercially for energy production. Finally, the European Commission(tm)s proposal for a New Framework Programme (2002-2006) is briefly outlined. (author)

  3. Beijing's nuclear strategy makes China a major player

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, J.

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses China's nuclear strategy which is a subject of debate among Asia experts, even as Sino-Soviet relations warm to a point unseen since the 1950s. China lags in the number and sophistication of its weapons. But modernization, national pride and the shrinking U.S. and Soviet arsenals have made Beijing and an increasingly important player. Beijing insists that its arsenal is strictly for defensive purposes; they have signed an agreement to make the South Pacific a nuclear-free zone

  4. Radiation protection in cyclotron and radioisotope production laboratories of IEN - (Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear - CNEN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, P.W.; Silva, J.J.G.

    1988-01-01

    The Cyclotron at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear is used for the radioisotope production, neutron production and irradiation damages analysis, etc. The risks associated with the operation and maintenance of cyclotron and the neutron radiation of wide energy spectrum, external and internal contamination. A summary of the radioprotection program for these areas are show and the results obtained from the air and surface analysis, liquid efluents and equivalentes doses of workers of the several activities are given. (Author) [pt

  5. Agriculture products as source of radionuclides and some monitoring principles of agriculture near nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksakhin, R.M.; Korneev, N.A.; Panteleev, L.I.; Shukhovtsev, B.I.

    1985-01-01

    Migration of radionuclides into agriculture products in regions adjoining the nuclear facilities depends on a large number of factors. Among them is the complex of ecological conditions: meteorological factors, type of soils etc., as well as biological peculiarities of agriculture plants and animals. It is possible to control the radionuclide content administered to man's organism with agriculture products changing large branches of agriculture and varying within the range of seprate branches of industry, taking into account the most effective ways of radionuclide pathways

  6. Materials characterization capabilities at DOE Nuclear Weapons Laboratories and Production Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyper, J.W.

    1984-06-01

    The materials characterization and analytical chemistry capabilities at the 11 DOE Nuclear Weapons Laboratories or Production Plants have been surveyed and compared. In general, all laboratories have similar capabilities and equipment. Facilities or capabilities that are unique or that exist at only a few laboratories are described in detail

  7. Nuclear tourists: the challenge of EDF's production sites accessibility, 1974-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Fanny

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the evolution of accessibility of Electricite de France (EDF) production sites when the country chose energy independence in 1974. If the nuclear program seems to be at the origins of French industrial tourism, which process made these energy plants a touristic attraction?

  8. Spread of fission products after a nuclear melt-down accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriesse, C.D.; Tanke, R.H.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this article experimental investigation is described into the spread of fission products within a nuclear power plant, which after an accident involving melting of the nucleus, will be possible in spite of prohibiting constructions for the case of severe unbalancing of generated and carried-off energy. 6 refs.; 4 figs

  9. 3H, 14C, 85Kr and 129I production in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, F.; Ocone, R.

    1984-01-01

    The production of 3 H, 14 C, 85 Kr and 129 I in nuclear power plants is evaluated. In particular the plant components where these radioisotopes can be formed and the formation processes, with corresponding cross sections, are considered. Furthermare their release in the plants and the fraction transfered to the reprocessing are examined

  10. Nuclear elastic scattering effects on fusion product transport in the FRM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVeaux, J.C.; Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    Large energy transfer (LET) events such as nuclear elastic scatterng (NES) are shown to have significant effects on fusion product transport in the field-reversed mirror. The method used and preliminary results obtained from the study on NES effects on f/sub p/ orbits are described

  11. Agricultural production - Phase 2. Indonesia. Rice - azolla - fish culture - use of nuclear technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Iwao.

    1991-01-01

    The primary aim of the expert mission was to provide advice on the use of nuclear techniques to study rice-azolla-fish culture. Results of the work performed so far show that basal application of azolla gives similar or better yields of rice than basal application of urea. Fish productivity was also found to be significantly higher when azolla is present. 2 tabs

  12. Nuclear data project in Korea and resonance parameter evaluation of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jonghwa; Oh, Soo-Youl

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear data activities in the fields of evaluation, processing, measurement, and service in Korea are presented in this paper. As one of the current activities, the neutron resonance parameters for stable or long-lived nineteen fission products have been evaluated and the results are presented here. (author)

  13. Properties of neutron-rich nuclei studied by fission product nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.A.; Henry, E.A.; Griffin, H.C.; Lien, O.G. III; Lane, S.M.; Stevenson, P.C.; Yaffe, R.P.; Skarnemark, G.

    1979-09-01

    A review is given of the properties of neutron-rich nuclei studied by fission product nuclear chemistry and includes the techniques used in elemental isolation and current research on the structure of nuclei near 132 Sn, particle emission, and coexisting structure in both neutron-poor and neutron-rich nuclei. 35 references

  14. On the production of thick pellicles of Kodak NTB-3 nuclear track emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claesson, G.; Soederstroem, K.; Ingelman, G.

    1980-11-01

    We describe procedures for making thick pellicles of Kodak NTB-3 nuclear emulsion. The technique has successfully been applied for the production of a 15 liter emulsion target, consisting of 600 μm thick pellicles. Melting and pouring of the gel is discussed as well as the conditions during the drying and processing. (author)

  15. Technology of thorium concentrates purification and their transformation in pure nuclear products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, A.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study for the purification of thorium concentrates by solvent extraction is presented. The product of purification is appropriate for utilization in the fabrication of nuclear reactor fuel elements. The experiments are carried out in a laboratory scale and the following operations are studied: dissolution, extraction-scrubbing, stripping-scrubbing, thorium oxalate precipitation, and thorium nitrate coagulation [pt

  16. LARGE-SCALE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN BY NUCLEAR ENERGY FOR THE HYDROGEN ECONOMY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHULTZ, K.R.; BROWN, L.C.; BESENBRUCH, G.E.; HAMILTON, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    OAK B202 LARGE-SCALE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN BY NUCLEAR ENERGY FOR THE HYDROGEN ECONOMY. The ''Hydrogen Economy'' will reduce petroleum imports and greenhouse gas emissions. However, current commercial hydrogen production processes use fossil fuels and releases carbon dioxide. Hydrogen produced from nuclear energy could avoid these concerns. The authors have recently completed a three-year project for the US Department of Energy whose objective was to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source''. Thermochemical water-splitting, a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen, met this objective. The goal of the first phase of this study was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen and to select one for further detailed consideration. The authors selected the Sulfur-Iodine cycle, In the second phase, they reviewed all the basic reactor types for suitability to provide the high temperature heat needed by the selected thermochemical water splitting cycle and chose the helium gas-cooled reactor. In the third phase they designed the chemical flowsheet for the thermochemical process and estimated the efficiency and cost of the process and the projected cost of producing hydrogen. These results are summarized in this paper

  17. Scientific and technical production of IPEN - Nuclear and Energetic Research Institute, SP, Brazil. 1997-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This document reports the general activities results of technical and scientific research production of the Institute for Energetic and Nuclear Researches, IPEN, Brazil, during the year of 1997-1999, listing journal articles, scientific events (complete texts, communications, abstracts and panels), thesis and dissertations, books, technical and scientific reports

  18. Mitigation of climate change via a copper-chlorine hybrid thermochemical water splitting cycle for hydrogen production from nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orhan, M.F.; Dincer, I.; Rosen, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Concerns regarding climate change have motivated research on clean energy resources. While many energy resources have limitations, nuclear energy has the potential to supply a significant share of energy supply without contributing to climate change. Nuclear energy has been used mainly for electric power generation, but hydrogen production via thermochemical water decomposition provides another option for the utilization of nuclear thermal energy. This paper describes nuclear-based hydrogen production technologies and discusses the role of the Cu-Cl cycle for thermochemical water decomposition, potentially driven in part by waste heat from a nuclear generating station, in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. (author)

  19. Tritium recovery as waste sub product in the Fluorine 18 production in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores R, H.; Palma G, F.A.; Ramirez, F.M.

    1990-09-01

    The tritium is a radioisotope that can be used to carry out basic as applied research. The current researches on the labelling of the organic molecules as well as its application in diagnostic, radiotherapy and hydrology among others confirm the before said. Due to their utility, they have been carried out studies to recover it of radioactive or nuclear waste as well as, to concentrate it of the natural water, the one which due to the nuclear tests in the last decades has gotten rich in tritium. In this work previous studies to recover the tritium coming from the process that was used to produce F-18 following the reaction 6 Li (n, α) 3 H, 16 O (t, n) 18 F in made up of lithium oxygenated, in the TRIGA Mark III Nuclear Reactor of the Nuclear Center of Mexico. The method consists on purifying by ion exchange the waste solutions where F-18 took place, to distill them and to concentrate them for an electrochemical method. It was already adapts a system reported to concentrate big volumes (approximately 250 ml) in such a way that could be used for small volumes. It was recovered 30% of the considered initial quantity of tritium. A modification to the proposed methodology will allow to recover the waste tritium in a percentage greater to 80%. (Author)

  20. Cost Evaluation with G4-ECONS Program for SI based Nuclear Hydrogen Production Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-ho; Lee, Ki-young; Kim, Yong-wan

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary hydrogen is production is primarily based on fossil fuels, which is not considered as environments friendly and economically efficient. To achieve the hydrogen economy, it is very important to produce a massive amount of hydrogen in a clean, safe and efficient way. Nuclear production of hydrogen would allow massive production of hydrogen at economic prices while avoiding environments pollution reducing the release of carbon dioxide. Nuclear production of hydrogen could thus become the enabling technology for the hydrogen economy. The economic assessment was performed for nuclear hydrogen production plant consisting of VHTR coupled with SI cycle. For the study, G4-ECONS developed by EMWG of GIF was appropriately modified to calculate the LUHC, assuming 36 months of plant construction time, 5 % of annual interest rate and 12.6 % of fixed charge rate. In G4-ECONS program, LUHC is calculated by the following formula; LUHC = (Annualized TCIC + Annualized O-M Cost + Annualized Fuel Cycle Cost + Annualized D-D Cost) / Annual Hydrogen Production Rate

  1. Transport and release of fission products during nuclear reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.W.; Kuhlman, M.R.; Gieseke, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    This study represents the identification and formulation of a systematic, mechanistic approach to estimating source terms and the implementation of this approach through calculations of fission products release to the environment for a large PWR reactor under a selected set of accident conditions. The development and improvement of calculational procedures is an evolutionary process and in the long term must be verified through experimental studies. It is anticipated that as additional information is obtained the accuracy of predictions can be improved and uncertainties reduced. Transport and deposition of radionuclides were found to be quite dependent on the accident sequences and the corresponding thremal hydraulic conditions. Reduced temperatures led to increased deposition of vapor species, and reduced flow rates to increased aerosol deposition. It is to be recognized that the estimates of release fractions are subject to uncertainties in the data and computer models employed in the calculations and are expected to have been influenced by assumptions regarding plant geometry, thermal hydraulics, deposition mechanisms, and sequence events. The effects of these assumptions will be investigated as this study continues. (Author)

  2. New filterability and compressibility test cell design for nuclear products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Féraud, J.P. [CEA Marcoule, DTEC/SGCS/LGCI, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Bourcier, D., E-mail: damien.bourcier@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DTEC/SGCS/LGCI, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Ode, D. [CEA Marcoule, DTEC/SGCS/LGCI, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Puel, F. [Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS, UMR5007, Laboratoire d‘Automatique et de Génie des Procédés (LAGEP), CPE-Lyon, 43 bd du 11 Novembre 1918, 69100 Villeurbanne (France)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Test easily usable without tools in a glove box. • The test minimizes the slurry volume necessary for this type of study. • The test characterizes the flow resistance in a porous medium in formation. • The test is performed at four pressure levels to determine the compressibility. • The technical design ensures reproducible flow resistance measurements. -- Abstract: Filterability and compressibility tests are often carried out at laboratory scale to obtain data required to scale up solid/liquid separation processes. Current technologies, applied with a constant pressure drop, enable specific resistance and cake formation rate measurement in accordance with a modified Darcy's law. The new test cell design described in this paper is easily usable without tools in a glove box and minimizes the slurry volume necessary for this type of study. This is an advantage for investigating toxic and hazardous products such as radioactive materials. Uranium oxalate precipitate slurries were used to test and validate this new cell. In order to reduce the test cell volume, a statistical approach was applied on 8 results obtained with cylindrical test cells of 1.8 cm and 3 cm in diameter. Wall effects can therefore be ignored despite the small filtration cell diameter, allowing tests to be performed with only about one-tenth of the slurry volume of a standard commercial cell. The significant reduction in the size of this experimental device does not alter the consistency of filtration data which may be used in the design of industrial equipment.

  3. Effective-energy budget in multiparticle production in nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Aditya Nath; Sahoo, Raghunath [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Discipline of Physics, School of Basic Sciences, Indore (India); Sarkisyan, Edward K.G. [CERN, Department of Physics, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); The University of Texas at Arlington, Department of Physics, Arlington, TX (United States); Sakharov, Alexander S. [CERN, Department of Physics, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Kyungpook National University, Department of Physics, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The dependencies of charged particle pseudorapidity density and transverse energy pseudorapidity density at midrapidity on the collision energy and on the number of nucleon participants, or centrality, measured in nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied in the energy range spanning a few GeV to a few TeV per nucleon. The approach in which the multiparticle production is driven by the dissipating effective energy of participants is introduced. This approach is based on the earlier proposed consideration, combining the constituent quark picture together with Landau relativistic hydrodynamics shown to interrelate the measurements from different types of collisions. Within this picture, the dependence on the number of participants in heavy-ion collisions are found to be well described in terms of the effective energy defined as a centrality-dependent fraction of the collision energy. For both variables under study, the effective-energy approach reveals a similarity in the energy dependence obtained for the most central collisions and centrality data in the entire available energy range. Predictions are made for the investigated dependencies for the forthcoming higher-energy measurements in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. (orig.)

  4. Effective-energy budget in multiparticle production in nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Aditya Nath; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sarkisyan, Edward K.G.; Sakharov, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    The dependencies of charged particle pseudorapidity density and transverse energy pseudorapidity density at midrapidity on the collision energy and on the number of nucleon participants, or centrality, measured in nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied in the energy range spanning a few GeV to a few TeV per nucleon. The approach in which the multiparticle production is driven by the dissipating effective energy of participants is introduced. This approach is based on the earlier proposed consideration, combining the constituent quark picture together with Landau relativistic hydrodynamics shown to interrelate the measurements from different types of collisions. Within this picture, the dependence on the number of participants in heavy-ion collisions are found to be well described in terms of the effective energy defined as a centrality-dependent fraction of the collision energy. For both variables under study, the effective-energy approach reveals a similarity in the energy dependence obtained for the most central collisions and centrality data in the entire available energy range. Predictions are made for the investigated dependencies for the forthcoming higher-energy measurements in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. (orig.)

  5. New filterability and compressibility test cell design for nuclear products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Féraud, J.P.; Bourcier, D.; Ode, D.; Puel, F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Test easily usable without tools in a glove box. • The test minimizes the slurry volume necessary for this type of study. • The test characterizes the flow resistance in a porous medium in formation. • The test is performed at four pressure levels to determine the compressibility. • The technical design ensures reproducible flow resistance measurements. -- Abstract: Filterability and compressibility tests are often carried out at laboratory scale to obtain data required to scale up solid/liquid separation processes. Current technologies, applied with a constant pressure drop, enable specific resistance and cake formation rate measurement in accordance with a modified Darcy's law. The new test cell design described in this paper is easily usable without tools in a glove box and minimizes the slurry volume necessary for this type of study. This is an advantage for investigating toxic and hazardous products such as radioactive materials. Uranium oxalate precipitate slurries were used to test and validate this new cell. In order to reduce the test cell volume, a statistical approach was applied on 8 results obtained with cylindrical test cells of 1.8 cm and 3 cm in diameter. Wall effects can therefore be ignored despite the small filtration cell diameter, allowing tests to be performed with only about one-tenth of the slurry volume of a standard commercial cell. The significant reduction in the size of this experimental device does not alter the consistency of filtration data which may be used in the design of industrial equipment

  6. Inventing an arsenal: adaptive evolution and neofunctionalization of snake venom phospholipase A2 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Vincent J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplication followed by functional divergence has long been hypothesized to be the main source of molecular novelty. Convincing examples of neofunctionalization, however, remain rare. Snake venom phospholipase A2 genes are members of large multigene families with many diverse functions, thus they are excellent models to study the emergence of novel functions after gene duplications. Results Here, I show that positive Darwinian selection and neofunctionalization is common in snake venom phospholipase A2 genes. The pattern of gene duplication and positive selection indicates that adaptive molecular evolution occurs immediately after duplication events as novel functions emerge and continues as gene families diversify and are refined. Surprisingly, adaptive evolution of group-I phospholipases in elapids is also associated with speciation events, suggesting adaptation of the phospholipase arsenal to novel prey species after niche shifts. Mapping the location of sites under positive selection onto the crystal structure of phospholipase A2 identified regions evolving under diversifying selection are located on the molecular surface and are likely protein-protein interactions sites essential for toxin functions. Conclusion These data show that increases in genomic complexity (through gene duplications can lead to phenotypic complexity (venom composition and that positive Darwinian selection is a common evolutionary force in snake venoms. Finally, regions identified under selection on the surface of phospholipase A2 enzymes are potential candidate sites for structure based antivenin design.

  7. The arsenal of pathogens and antivirulence therapeutic strategies for disarming them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brannon JR

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available John R Brannon,1 Maria Hadjifrangiskou1,21Division of Molecular Pathogenesis, Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, 2Department of Urologic Surgery, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Pathogens deploy an arsenal of virulence factors (VFs to establish themselves within their infectious niche. The discovery of antimicrobial compounds and their development into therapeutics has made a monumental impact on human and microbial populations. Although humans have used antimicrobials for medicinal and agricultural purposes, microorganism populations have developed and shared resistance mechanisms to persevere in the face of classical antimicrobials. However, a positive substitute is antivirulence therapy; antivirulence therapeutics prevent or interrupt an infection by counteracting a pathogen’s VFs. Their application can reduce the use of broad-spectrum antimicrobials and dampen the frequency with which resistant strains emerge. Here, we summarize the contribution of VFs to various acute and chronic infections. In correspondence with this, we provide an overview of the research and development of antivirulence strategies.Keywords: virulence factors, antivirulence therapeutics, biofilms, regulation, Escherichia coli, quorum sensing, persister cells

  8. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Pine Bluff, Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensminger, J.T.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.D.; Morrisey, J.A.; Staub, W.P.; Boston, C.R.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Leibsch, E.; Rickert, L.W.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1991-09-01

    The Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, is one of eight continental United States (CONUS) Army installations where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at PBA consists of approximately 12%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts). The purpose of this report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at PBA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those on which the FPEIS is based. New population data were used to compute fatalities using the same computation methods and values for all other parameters as in the FPEIS. Results indicate that all alternatives are indistinguishable when the potential health impacts to the PBA community are considered. However, risks from on-site disposal are in all cases equal to or less than risks from other alternatives. Furthermore, no unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at PBA have been identified.

  9. Introduction [Nuclear data for the production of therapeutic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qaim, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactivity plays an important role in medical science in terms of beneficial applications in both diagnosis and therapy. The former entails the introduction of a short lived radionuclide attached to a suitable pharmaceutical into the patient, and measurement of the accumulation and movement of activity from outside. This process is called emission tomography and involves the measurement of either a single low energy γ ray (i.e. single photon computed emission tomography) or coincidences between the two 511 keV photons formed in the annihilation of a positron (i.e. positron emission tomography (PET)). The major governing principle in all diagnostic studies is that the radiation dose to the patient is as low as possible. Two modalities exist in the therapeutic use of radioactivity. The first and most commonly followed procedure involves the use of external beams of electrons, X rays and γ rays from radioactive sources (e.g. 60 Co), high energy γ rays from accelerators, and hadrons (e.g. neutrons, protons and heavy ions). The second modality involves the introduction of certain radionuclides to a given part of the body (e.g. joints, organ and tumour) either mechanically or via a biochemical pathway. Mechanical introduction is called brachytherapy, whereas the biochemical pathway is known as endoradiotherapy. External radiation therapy is outside the scope of the present studies. The concerted and collaborative efforts described here deal specifically with the production and use of radionuclides. An earlier coordinated research project (CRP) of the IAEA was devoted to diagnostic radionuclides. The present effort is related to therapeutic radionuclides.

  10. Plasma production and hadronization in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataja, M.

    1990-01-01

    We study the color confinement and hadronization in the thermodynamic limit of the flux tube model, which was recently developed to describe the energy deposition, particle production and the early expansion of plasma in the central region of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. In this purpose, we introduce a concept of an intermediate 'mixed state', which is formed when the original giant flux tube is fragmented into many smaller tubes which contain the plasma and the Abelian color-electric field and which coexist with a dilute hadron gas. This mixed state is an extension of the mixed phase used in the pure hydrodynamic description utilizing the bag equation of state. We study the thermodynamics of this mixed state making use of the bag model and the classical models of color confinement. It appears that in the thermodynamic limit, the mixed state can be considered as a dielectric medium in which the color dielectric constant takes the values between 0 and 1. We also study how the 'equations of electrohydrodynamics', which were formulated in earlier works to describe the evolution of the giant flux tube and plasma, are to be modified due to the dielectric nature of the new transient mixed state. A numeric simulation of a one-dimensional scaling expansion demonstrates the dynamic transition of the system from plasma to hadron phase and the characteristic reheating effect due to this hadronization transition. It is also shown that in the limit of low temperature or large bag constant, this formalism is reduced to the hydrodynamics of hadron gas produced by the fragmentation of multiple strings. (orig.)

  11. Particle production in hot and dense nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eklund, A.

    1992-08-01

    The charged particle production in heavy ion reactions at 200 A GeV has been studied for projectiles of 16 O and 32 S on targets of Al, Cu, Ag and Au. Up to 700 charged particles are measured in the pseudorapidity region -1.7 32 S+Au. The measured particle density is used to estimate the energy density attained in central collisions and gives a values of ≅2 GeV/fm 3 . This is close to the energy density predicted for the phase transition from hadronic matter to a quark-gluon plasma. To measure the large number of charged particle produced, finely granulated detector systems are employed. Streamer tube detectors with pad readout and large area, multi-step avalanche chambers with optical readout have been developed for the measurements. The widths of the pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles increase with decreasing centrality of the collision as well as with increasing mass of the target nucleus. This behaviour is assumed to be due to the target fragmentation. The Monte-Carlo model for nucleus-nucleus collisions, VENUS 3.11, which includes rescattering, is in reasonable agreement with the data. The yield of charged particles for central collisions of the heavy targets with 33 S is found to be proportional to the target mass, A, at target rapidity. At midrapidity it is approximately proportional to A 0.3 . At midrapidity the charged particle measurements are supplemented by measurements of the transverse energy. The dimensionless, normalized variances of the multiplicity and transverse energy distributions are, to a large extent, governed by the collision geometry. The change in the normalized variance when studying the charged particle distribution in a narrow angular region is explained as being of statistical nature. (au)

  12. Production of /sup 77/Br for nuclear medicine using the CV-28 cyclotron of Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (RJ, Brazil)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos, M A.V.; Silva, A.G. da [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Newton, W A [Manchester Univ. (UK)

    1984-06-01

    The reaction /sup 75/As (..cap alpha..,2n)/sup 77/Br with 28 MeV alpha particles is used to obtain /sup 77/Br with the CV-28 cyclotron of Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). A production method has been developed, using 200 mg of arsenium metal, electroplated on platinum. These targets can withstand 25 ..mu..A beams for several hours, yielding 0.29 mCi/..mu..A h. The /sup 77/Br which is separated by coprecipitation with AgCl, is recovered as NaBr with yields better than 98%. Measures have been taken to obtain a product which is pure, sterile and carrier-free.

  13. The political economics of the permanent war and the political economics of the nuclear war. Strategic approaches for Latin America; La economia politica de la guerra permanente y la economia politica de la guerra nuclear. Aproximaciones estrategicas para America Latina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez L, I.I

    2005-07-01

    This work treats on the hypothesis that the American imperialism uses its nuclear arsenal for reforming geographical spaces that allow him to impel its economic development in the context of the progressive exhaustion of the natural resources of the planet and of the ferocious dispute for market niches and investment destinations, and like the political and military decisions crawl to the different scenarios of economic competition. In the chapter 1 it is insinuated like has been reproduced the Warlike-industrial Complex (CBI) American from the second world postwar period until the present time in the idea of explaining like it is that it is valorized to the capital in scale enlarged starting from the denominated sector producing of destruction means and understanding that the system specifically capitalist is a system where continually the is destroyed previously taken place to manufacture a new merchandise in a luck of creative destruction. In the chapter 2, the topic of the specific contradictions of the CBI is approached that disable him to be the tip of lance of the world imperialism. The chapter 3 try on the productive linkages in the production of nuclear bombs, as well as in the production of the vectors of nuclear transportation and on the implications derived for the world security of the different industries associated to the nuclear energy (as the petroleum, the electricity, the natural gas) and to the transportation vectors of these locating which you/they are the different States where the world supremacy is disputed and that they have like one of its so many negotiation-confrontation letters its nuclear strategic arsenals. What is looked for in a thermonuclear war is the enemy's total elimination, from their offensive capacity, their defensive capacity, until their supplies, their reservations, etc., with the result that the chapters 4 and 5 of this thesis are presented to offer a better understanding that they mean the nuclear arsenals in the

  14. Fission product release from defected nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The release of gaseous (krypton and xenon) and iodine radioactive fission products from defective fuel elements is described with a semi-empirical model. The model assumes precursor-corrected 'Booth diffusional release' in the UO 2 and subsequent holdup in the fuel-to-sheath gap. Transport in the gap is separately modelled with a phenomenological rate constant (assuming release from the gap is a first order rate process), and a diffusivity constant (assuming transport in the gap is dominated by a diffusional process). Measured release data from possessing various states of defection are use in this analysis. One element (irradiated in an earlier experiment by MacDonald) was defected with a small drilled hole. A second element was machined with 23 slits while a third element (fabricated with a porous end plug) displayed through-wall sheath hydriding. Comparison of measured release data with calculated values from the model yields estimates of empirical diffusion coefficients for the radioactive species in the UO 2 (1.56 x 10 -10 to 7.30 x 10 -9 s -1 ), as well as escape rate constants (7.85 x 10 -7 to 3.44 x 10 -5 s -1 ) and diffusion coefficients (3.39 x 10 -5 to 4.88 x 10 -2 cm 2 /s) for these in the fuel-to-sheath gap. Analyses also enable identification of the various rate-controlling processes operative in each element. For the noble gas and iodine species, the rate-determining process in the multi-slit element is 'Booth diffusion'; however, for the hydrided element an additional delay results from diffusional transport in the fuel-to-heath gap. Furthermore, the iodine species exhibit an additional holdup in the drilled element because of significant trapping on the fuel and/or sheath surfaces. Using experimental release data and applying the theoretical results of this work, a systematic procedure is proposed to characterize fuel failures in commercial power reactors (i.e., the number of fuel failures and average leak size)

  15. The political economics of the permanent war and the political economics of the nuclear war. Strategic approaches for Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez L, I.I.

    2005-01-01

    This work treats on the hypothesis that the American imperialism uses its nuclear arsenal for reforming geographical spaces that allow him to impel its economic development in the context of the progressive exhaustion of the natural resources of the planet and of the ferocious dispute for market niches and investment destinations, and like the political and military decisions crawl to the different scenarios of economic competition. In the chapter 1 it is insinuated like has been reproduced the Warlike-industrial Complex (CBI) American from the second world postwar period until the present time in the idea of explaining like it is that it is valorized to the capital in scale enlarged starting from the denominated sector producing of destruction means and understanding that the system specifically capitalist is a system where continually the is destroyed previously taken place to manufacture a new merchandise in a luck of creative destruction. In the chapter 2, the topic of the specific contradictions of the CBI is approached that disable him to be the tip of lance of the world imperialism. The chapter 3 try on the productive linkages in the production of nuclear bombs, as well as in the production of the vectors of nuclear transportation and on the implications derived for the world security of the different industries associated to the nuclear energy (as the petroleum, the electricity, the natural gas) and to the transportation vectors of these locating which you/they are the different States where the world supremacy is disputed and that they have like one of its so many negotiation-confrontation letters its nuclear strategic arsenals. What is looked for in a thermonuclear war is the enemy's total elimination, from their offensive capacity, their defensive capacity, until their supplies, their reservations, etc., with the result that the chapters 4 and 5 of this thesis are presented to offer a better understanding that they mean the nuclear arsenals in the

  16. Yersinia virulence factors - a sophisticated arsenal for combating host defences [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Atkinson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The human pathogens Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica cause enterocolitis, while Yersinia pestis is responsible for pneumonic, bubonic, and septicaemic plague. All three share an infection strategy that relies on a virulence factor arsenal to enable them to enter, adhere to, and colonise the host while evading host defences to avoid untimely clearance. Their arsenal includes a number of adhesins that allow the invading pathogens to establish a foothold in the host and to adhere to specific tissues later during infection. When the host innate immune system has been activated, all three pathogens produce a structure analogous to a hypodermic needle. In conjunction with the translocon, which forms a pore in the host membrane, the channel that is formed enables the transfer of six ‘effector’ proteins into the host cell cytoplasm. These proteins mimic host cell proteins but are more efficient than their native counterparts at modifying the host cell cytoskeleton, triggering the host cell suicide response. Such a sophisticated arsenal ensures that yersiniae maintain the upper hand despite the best efforts of the host to counteract the infecting pathogen.

  17. Production of Radioisotopes and Radiopharmaceuticals at the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duong Van Dong; Pham Ngoc Dien; Bui Van Cuong; Mai Phuoc Tho; Nguyen Thi Thu; Vo Thi Cam Hoa

    2014-01-01

    After reconstruction, the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) was inaugurated on March 20th, 1984 with the nominal power of 500 kW. Since then the production of radioisotopes and labelled compounds for medical use was started. Up to now, DNRR is still the unique one in Vietnam. The reactor has been operated safely and effectively with the total of about 37,800 hrs (approximately 1,300 hours per year). More than 90% of its operation time and over 80% of its irradiation capacity have been exploited for research and production of radioisotopes. This paper gives an outline of the radioisotope production programme using the DNRR. The production laboratory and facilities including the nuclear reactor with its irradiation positions and characteristics, hot cells, production lines and equipment for the production of Kits for labelling with 99m Tc and for quality control, as well as the production rate are mentioned. The methods used for production of 131 I, 99m Tc, 51 Cr, 32 P, etc. and the procedures for preparation of radiopharmaceuticals are described briefly. Status of utilization of domestic radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals in Vietnam is also reported. (author)

  18. Estimation of effective dose from the atmospheric nuclear tests due to the intake of marine products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masanao

    2008-01-01

    The worldwide environmental protection is required by the public. A long-term environmental assessment from nuclear fuel cycle facilities to the aquatic environment also becomes more important to understand long-term risk of nuclear energy. Evaluation of long-term risk including not only in Japan but also in neighboring countries is considered to be necessary in order to develop sustainable nuclear power industry. The author successfully simulated the distribution of radionuclides in seawater and seabed sediment produced by atmospheric nuclear tests using LAMER (Long-term Assessment ModEl of Radionuclides in the oceans). A part of the LAMER calculated the advection-diffusion-scavenging processes for radionuclides in the oceans and the Japan Sea in cooperate with Oceanic General Circulation Model (OGCM) and was validated. The author is challenging to calculate probabilistic effective dose suggested by ICRP from intake of marine products due to atmospheric nuclear tests using the Monte Carlo method in the other part of LAMER. Depending on the deviation of each parameter, the 95th percentile of the probabilistic effective dose was from one third to two thirds of the 95th percentile of the deterministic effective dose in proforma calculation. It means that probabilistic assessment can contribute to the design and optimisation of a nuclear fuel cycle facility. (author)

  19. Production of hyperfragments by antiprotons at rest annihilating on nuclei in nuclear photoemulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batusov, Yu.A.; Bunyatov, S.A.; Pontecorvo, G.B.

    1992-01-01

    Events have been observed, for the first time, of the production, departure and mesonic decay of the light hyperfragments Λ 3 H and Λ 4 H in the annihilation on the light (C, N, O, S)-nuclei of antiprotons stopping in nuclear photoemulsion. The lower limit of the production probability of Λ 3 H and Λ 4 H hyperfragments per single antiproton stopping in nuclear photoemulsion has been determined to be (6.1±3.5)x10 -4 . The charge exchange, on nucleons of the residual nucleus, of K - -mesons resulting from the annihilation process has been demonstrated to be the most probable mechanism of hyperfragment production. 17 refs.; 9 figs

  20. The value of product flexibility in nuclear hydrogen technologies: A real options analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botterud, Audun; Yildiz, Bilge; Conzelmann, Guenter; Petri, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    Previous economic studies of nuclear hydrogen technologies focused on levelized costs without accounting for risks and uncertainties faced by potential investors. To address some of these risks and uncertainties, we used real options theory to assess the profitability of three nuclear hydrogen production technologies in evolving electricity and hydrogen markets. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to represent the uncertainty in hydrogen and electricity prices. The model computes both the expected value and the distribution of discounted profits from the production plant. It also quantifies the value of the option to switch between hydrogen and electricity production. Under these assumptions, we conclude that investors will find significant value in the capability to switch plant output between electricity and hydrogen. (author)

  1. 2012: the world on the brink of a nuclear proliferation crisis; Annee 2012: le monde au bord d'une crise de proliferation nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norlain, Bernard

    2012-02-15

    The author's determined plea that France gives up its dogmatic position on nuclear weapons and takes the lead in a nuclear disarmament movement is based on a conviction that the concept of nuclear deterrence is outdated, the fear of rapidly-growing proliferation in 2012 and the excessive cost of ownership of the French nuclear arsenal

  2. Fast accelerator driven subcritical system for energy production: nuclear fuel evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Graiciany de P.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria A.F.; Costa, Antonella L.

    2011-01-01

    Accelerators Driven Systems (ADS) are an innovative type of nuclear system, which is useful for long-lived fission product transmutation and fuel regeneration. The ADS consist of a coupling of a sub-critical nuclear core reactor and a proton beam produced by a particle accelerator. These particles are injected into a target for the neutrons production by spallation reactions. The neutrons are then used to maintain the fission chain in the sub-critical core. The aim of this study is to investigate the nuclear fuel evolution of a lead cooled accelerator driven system used for energy production. The fuel studied is a mixture based upon "2"3"2Th and "2"3"3U. Since thorium is an abundant fertile material, there is hope for the thorium-cycle fuels for an accelerator driven sub-critical system. The target is a lead spallation target and the core is filled with a hexagonal lattice. High energy neutrons are used to reduce the negative reactivity caused by the presence of protoactinium, since this effect is most pronounced in the thermal range of the neutron spectrum. For that reason, such material is not added moderator to the system. In this work is used the Monte Carlo code MCNPX 2.6.0, that presents the the depletion/ burnup capability. The k_e_f_f evolution, the neutron energy spectrum in the core and the nuclear fuel evolution using ADS source (SDEF) and kcode-mode are evaluated during the burnup. (author)

  3. Efficiency and cost advantages of an advanced-technology nuclear electrolytic hydrogen-energy production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donakowski, T. D.; Escher, W. J. D.; Gregory, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of an advanced-technology (viz., 1985 technology) nuclear-electrolytic water electrolysis facility was assessed for hydrogen production cost and efficiency expectations. The facility integrates (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) operating a binary work cycle, (2) direct-current (d-c) electricity generation via acyclic generators, and (3) high-current-density, high-pressure electrolyzers using a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE). All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced for hydrogen production alone (i.e., without separate production of electrical power). Pipeline-pressure hydrogen and oxygen are produced at 6900 kPa (1000 psi). We found that this advanced facility would produce hydrogen at costs that were approximately half those associated with contemporary-technology nuclear electrolysis: $5.36 versus $10.86/million Btu, respectively. The nuclear-heat-to-hydrogen-energy conversion efficiency for the advanced system was estimated as 43%, versus 25% for the contemporary system.

  4. Application of the discounted value flows method in production cost calculations for Czechoslovak nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majer, P.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamentals are outlined of the discounted value flows method, which is used in industrial countries for calculating the specific electricity production costs. Actual calculations were performed for the first two units of the Temelin nuclear power plant. All costs associated with the construction, operation and decommissioning of this nuclear power plant were taken into account. With a high degree of certainty, the specific production costs of the Temelin nuclear power plant will lie within the range of 0.32 to 0.36 CSK/kWh. Nearly all results of the sensitivity analysis performed for the possible changes in the input values fall within this range. An increase in the interest rate to above 8% is an exception; this, however, can be regarded as rather improbable on a long-term basis. Sensitivity analysis gave evidence that the results of the electricity production cost calculations for the Temelin nuclear power plant can be considered sufficiently stable. (Z.M.). 7 figs., 2 tabs., 14 refs

  5. PROLIB: code to create production library of nuclear data for design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittkopf, W.A.; Tilford, J.M.; Furtney, M.

    1977-02-01

    The PROLIB program creates, updates, and edits the production library used in the B and W nuclear design system. The production library contains the material cross section data required to perform the thermal and epithermal spectrum calculations in the NULIF program. PROLIB collapses cross section data from the master libraries, produced by the ETOGM and THOR programs, to the desired production library group structures. The physics models that are used, the calculations that are performed in PROLIB, the input, and the output are described. Information that is required to use PROLIB along with a sample problem that illustrates the input and output formats and that provides a benchmark problem are given

  6. Measuring nuclear transparency from exclusive vector meson production in lepton-nucleus scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, G.Y. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Preliminary results on the measurement of nuclear transparencies from exclusive {rho}{sup 0} meson production from E665 at Fermilab are reported. The data were collected on hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, calcium, and lead targets with a mean beam energy of 470 GeV. Increases in the transparencies are observed in both coherent and incoherent production channels as the virtuality of the photon increases, as expected of color transparency. Ideas of systematic studies of color transparency in exclusive vector meson production at CEBAF are discussed.

  7. Measuring nuclear transparency from exclusive vector meson production in lepton-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, G.Y.

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary results on the measurement of nuclear transparencies from exclusive ρ 0 meson production from E665 at Fermilab are reported. The data were collected on hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, calcium, and lead targets with a mean beam energy of 470 GeV. Increases in the transparencies are observed in both coherent and incoherent production channels as the virtuality of the photon increases, as expected of color transparency. Ideas of systematic studies of color transparency in exclusive vector meson production at CEBAF are discussed

  8. Measurement of nuclear transparencies from exclusive ρ0 meson production in muon-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, G.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Preliminary results on the measurement of nuclear transparencies from exclusive incoherent ρ 0 meson production off deuterium, carbon, calcium, and lead, normalized to hydrogen, and coherent ρ 0 meson production off calcium and lead, normalized to carbon, in deep-inelastic muon-nucleus scattering are reported. The data were collected with the E665 spectrometer using the Fermilab Tevatron muon beam with a mean beam energy of 470 GeV. Increases in the transparencies are observed in both coherent and incoherent production as the virtuality of the photon increases, as expected of color transparency. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  9. Population distribution, food production and other aspects in the vicinity of the Embalse Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancio, D.; Ciallella, N.R.; Zunino, R.; Perez, T.; Jordan, O.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents some of the results of the pre-operational studies carried out in the vicinity of the site of the Embalse Nuclear Power Station, which is being built in the Province of Cordoba, Rio Tercero, next to the lake Embalse. The studies cover population distribution, food production, and other local aspects. The low population in the vicinity of the site increases in summer due to tourism. Main use of the land is grazing and cereal production. Milk production is small, but some is produced near the site. Other aspects of the study are presented in other papers of the Seminar. (author)

  10. Process simulation of nuclear-based thermochemical hydrogen production with a copper-chlorine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chukwu, C.C.; Naterer, G.F.; Rosen, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermochemical processes for hydrogen production driven by nuclear energy are promising alternatives to existing technologies for large-scale commercial production of hydrogen without fossil fuels. The copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) cycle, in which water is decomposed into hydrogen and oxygen, is promising for thermochemical hydrogen production in conjunction with a Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor. Here, the cycle efficiency is examined using the Aspen Plus process simulation code. Possible efficiency improvements are discussed. The results are expected to assist the development of a lab-scale cycle demonstration, which is currently being undertaken at University of Ontario Institute of Technology in collaboration with numerous partners. (author)

  11. Transportation cost of nuclear off-peak power for hydrogen production based on water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Saburo; Ueno, Shuichi

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes transportation cost of the nuclear off-peak power for a hydrogen production based on water electrolysis in Japan. The power could be obtainable by substituting hydropower and/or fossil fueled power supplying peak and middle demands with nuclear power. The transportation cost of the off-peak power was evaluated to be 1.42 yen/kWh when an electrolyser receives the off-peak power from a 6kV distribution wire. Marked reduction of the cost was caused by the increase of the capacity factor. (author)

  12. Reactor production and processing of radioisotopes for therapeutic applications in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Mirzadeh, S.; Beets, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear reactors continue to play an important role in providing radioisotopes for nuclear medicine. Many reactor-produced radioisotopes are ''neutron rich'' and decay by beta-emission and are thus of interest for therapeutic applications. This talk discusses the production and processing of a variety of reactor-produced radioisotopes of current interest, including those produced by the single neutron capture process, double neutron capture and those available from beta-decay of reactorproduced radioisotopes. Generators prepared from reactorproduced radioisotopes are of particular interest since repeated elution inexpensively provides many patient doses. The development of the alumina-based W-188/Re-188 generator system is discussed in detail

  13. Evaluation Of Electricity Production Cost Of Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Models

    OpenAIRE

    DÖNER, Nimeti

    2017-01-01

    The level of the development of countries is being measured by thecountry’s quantity of production and consumption energy. Concerning Turkey,according to an energy report of The World Energy Council Turkish NationalCommittee in order to meet the electricity needs of the country in 2010, there should befounded a 2000 MW(e) capacity nuclear power plant. For the nuclear electric powerplant considered to be founded in Turkey, three types of commercial reactor models,that are Pressiued Water React...

  14. Transfer parameters of fission and activation products present in effluents of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancio, D.; Menossi, C.A.; Ciallella, N.R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents results of research carried out in Argentina on transfer parameters of fission and activation products which may be present in the effluents of nuclear power reactors. For some nuclides, as Sr-90, Co-137 and I-131, the parameters were obtained by studies of the fallout, from measurements of integrated levels in the environment and in the food chains. Other values are concentration factors derived from laboratory and field experiments. They refer to fish, molluscs, crustaces and fresh water plants, for several fission and activation nuclides. Transfer parameters obtained have been of significant importance for environmental assessments, relating to nuclear installations in Argentina. (author)

  15. Refurbishing of a Freeze Drying Machine, used in Nuclear Medicine for Radiopharmaceuticals Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaytan-Gallardo, E.; Desales-Galeana, G.

    2006-01-01

    The refurbishing of a freeze drying machine used in the radiopharmaceuticals production, applied in nuclear medicine in the Radioactive Materials Department of the Nuclear Research National Institute in Mexico (ININ in Spanish), is presented. The freeze drying machine was acquired in the 80's decade and some components started having problems. Then it was necessary to refurbish this equipment by changing old cam-type temperature controllers and outdated recording devices, developing a sophisticated software system that substitutes those devices. The system is composed by a freeze drying machine by Hull, AC output modules for improved temperature control, a commercial data acquisition card, and the software system

  16. Securing a safer, greener, expandable nuclear fuel cycle supply chain for future power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capus, Georges

    2009-01-01

    After looking at what is necessary to sustainably ensure the global nuclear power plant fleet expansion, it becomes appearant that advanced reactor design should be accompanied with a greener and more flexible fuel cycle capability. The financial crisis has invaded all the front pages and our thoughts. However it has not rescheduled the growth of world population or reduced the desire of people in emerging economies to achieve a higher level of 'development'; nor has it alleviated climate change issues that demand CO2 constrained power sources. What is the outlook for nuclear power? On a worldwide basis, we have today a significant fleet of nuclear power plants, operating well, upgrading output, extending lifetime, and producing not only a safe reliable flow of electricity but a good flow of cash as well. For the countries hosting significant shares of this fleet, their nuclear power plants are increasingly precious assets, and despite the financial crisis, most of them are considering expansion of their nuclear fleets. For the others, the desire to access such a reliable and ultimately cheap source of energy will last longer than the temporary difficulties to get its financing. In short, the outlook for a massive phase of new nuclear builds remains very likely. Then comes the consequential issue of the nuclear fuel supply chain. From uranium exploration and production to back end solutions, most of the existing facilities were designed and startup decades ago. The question is therefore, does this supply chain offer the requested characteristics to sustain the nuclear power plants fleet for the long run? By requested characteristics, it is meant not only adequate capacity and improvement of quality, but also environmentally friendly new designs and processes. This paper is aimed at recalling the current situation of the supply chain, then at describing the status of major projects, and finally at identifying some gaps and issues

  17. Nuclear Energy - Hydrogen Production - Fuel Cell: A Road Towards Future China's Sustainable Energy Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhiwei Zhou

    2006-01-01

    Sustainable development of Chinese economy in 21. century will mainly rely on self-supply of clean energy with indigenous natural resources. The burden of current coal-dominant energy mix and the environmental stress due to energy consumptions has led nuclear power to be an indispensable choice for further expanding electricity generation capacity in China and for reducing greenhouse effect gases emission. The application of nuclear energy in producing substitutive fuels for road transportation vehicles will also be of importance in future China's sustainable energy strategy. This paper illustrates the current status of China's energy supply and the energy demand required for establishing a harmonic and prosperous society in China. In fact China's energy market faces following three major challenges, namely (1) gaps between energy supply and demand; (2) low efficiency in energy utilization, and (3) severe environmental pollution. This study emphasizes that China should implement sustainable energy development policy and pay great attention to the construction of energy saving recycle economy. Based on current forecast, the nuclear energy development in China will encounter a high-speed track. The demand for crude oil will reach 400-450 million tons in 2020 in which Chinese indigenous production will remain 180 million tons. The increase of the expected crude oil will be about 150 million tons on the basis of 117 million tons of imported oil in 2004 with the time span of 15 years. This demand increase of crude oil certainly will influence China's energy supply security and to find the substitution will be a big challenge to Chinese energy industry. This study illustrates an analysis of the market demands to future hydrogen economy of China. Based on current status of technology development of HTGR in China, this study describes a road of hydrogen production with nuclear energy. The possible technology choices in relation to a number of types of nuclear reactors are

  18. Economic Analysis for Nuclear Hydrogen Production System Based on HyS Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Ki Young; Lee, Tae Hoon; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2009-01-01

    The current promising base for massive hydrogen production on high temperature environment derives primarily from three sources: the commercial production of chemicals for the sulfur-iodine (SI) process, the development of solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC), and the hybrid method of chemicals and fuel cells. The three kinds of process requires high temperature heat energy over 850∼950 .deg. C for the efficient and economic hydrogen production. One of the clean, economic, and moreover promising heat sources supplied to the process is nuclear plants. The nuclear plants producing high temperature heat energy over 950 .deg. C are well known as Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) which could have two types of prismatic and pebble-bed cores along reactor core shape. In this paper, we report on the Hybrid Sulfur Process (HyS), and the estimated costs for the system which composes of VHTR of prismatic core type and HyS plant. Nuclear hydrogen production system based on HyS process has been configured to optimally use the thermal energy from VHTR and electric energy to produce hydrogen and oxygen from clean water. High temperature thermal energy is transferred to the HyS process by way of intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) with associated piping. In this paper, the hydrogen production costs for a system composed of a VHTR with six 600MWth module, a power conversion unit (PCU) and a HyS plant are presented, where the thermal energy produced in two module was converted to electric energy in PCU and then transferred to the electrolysis cells for hydrogen production and circulating units on HyS plant, and the remaining thermal energy was supplied to chemical process on HyS plants. As a preliminary study of cost estimates for nuclear hydrogen systems, the hydrogen production costs of the nuclear energy sources benchmarking GT-MHR are estimated in the necessary input data on a Korean specific basis. G4- ECONS was appropriately modified to calculate the cost for hydrogen production

  19. The US department of energy's research and development plans for the use of nuclear energy for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, A.D.; Pickard, P.S.; Park, C.V.; Kotek, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    The potential of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and for stationary power applications has generated significant interest in the United States. President George W. Bush has set the transition to a 'hydrogen economy' as one of the Administration's highest priorities. A key element of an environmentally-conscious transition to hydrogen is the development of hydrogen production technologies that do not emit greenhouse gases or other air pollutants. The Administration is investing in the development of several technologies, including hydrogen production through the use of renewable fuels, fossil fuels with carbon sequestration, and nuclear energy. The US Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology initiated the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative to develop hydrogen production cycles that use nuclear energy. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative has completed a Nuclear Hydrogen R and D Plan to identify candidate technologies, assess their viability, and define the R and D required to enable the demonstration of nuclear hydrogen production by 2016. This paper gives a brief overview of the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, describes the purposes of the Nuclear Hydrogen R and D Plan, explains the methodology followed to prepared the plan, presents the results, and discusses the path forward for the US programme to develop technologies which use nuclear energy to produce hydrogen. (author)

  20. Performances of nuclear power plants for combined production of electricity and hot water for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronzen, S.

    The possibilities for using nuclear power plants for combined production of heat and power seem to be very good in the future. With the chosen 600 MWsub (e) BWR plant a heat output up to 1200 MW can be arranged. An alternative, consisting of steam extractions from the low-pressure turbine, offers a flexible solution for heat and power generation. With this alternative the combined plant can use components from normal condensing nuclear power plants. The flexible extraction design also offers a real possibility for using the combined plant in electric peak generation. However, urban siting requires long distance heat transmission and the pipe design for this transmission is a major problem when planning and optimizing the whole nuclear combined heat and power plant. (author)

  1. Refining of crude uranium by solvent extraction for production of nuclear pure uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Manna, S.; Singha, M.; Hareendran, K.N.; Chowdhury, S.; Satpati, S.K.; Kumar, K.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium is the primary fuel material for any nuclear fission energy program. Natural uranium contains only 0.712% of 235 U as fissile constituent. This low concentration of fissile isotope in natural uranium calls for a very high level of purity, especially with respect to neutron poisons like B, Cd, Gd etc. before it can be used as nuclear fuel. Solvent extraction is a widely used technique by which crude uranium is purified for reactor use. Uranium metal plant (UMP), BARC, Trombay is engaged in refining of uranium concentrate for production of nuclear pure uranium metal for fabrication of fuel for research reactors. This paper reviews some of the fundamental aspects of this refining process with some special references to UMP, BARC. (author)

  2. The production costs of the French nuclear fleet. Synthesis and conclusions. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-09-01

    Whereas the French Energy Multi-year Programming (PPE) notably aims at preserving the purchasing power of consumers and the competitiveness of energy prices, this note aims at reporting an assessment of the production cost of the French present nuclear fleet, i.e. the electric power cost at the output of the production installation. The authors first discuss the choice for the methodology of 'cash costs' for the decision to continue of not the exploitation of existing units. They propose a mean assessment of about 33 euro/MWh, state that the present nuclear-based power production in France is profitable, and consider that there is no 'investment wall' to be faced in the near future. They also state that nuclear costs are hardly supposed to increase because they are little sensitive to uranium prices. They consider that dismantling and waste costs are covered at more than 100 per cent by dedicated assets. A technical note comes with this discussion. It discusses cost calculation methods, the assessment of the production cost of French existing reactors (second generation), and some additional elements regarding some cost components

  3. INTERNET and information about nuclear sciences. The world wide web virtual library: nuclear sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this work author proposes to constitute new virtual library which should centralize the information from nuclear disciplines on the INTERNET, in order to them to give first and foremost the connection on the most important links in set nuclear sciences. The author has entitled this new virtual library The World Wide Web Library: Nuclear Sciences. By constitution of this virtual library next basic principles were chosen: home pages of international organizations important from point of view of nuclear disciplines; home pages of the National Nuclear Commissions and governments; home pages of nuclear scientific societies; web-pages specialized on nuclear problematic, in general; periodical tables of elements and isotopes; web-pages aimed on Chernobyl crash and consequences; web-pages with antinuclear aim. Now continue the links grouped on web-pages according to single nuclear areas: nuclear arsenals; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear aspects of biology (radiobiology); nuclear chemistry; nuclear company; nuclear data centres; nuclear energy; nuclear energy, environmental aspects of (radioecology); nuclear energy info centres; nuclear engineering; nuclear industries; nuclear magnetic resonance; nuclear material monitoring; nuclear medicine and radiology; nuclear physics; nuclear power (plants); nuclear reactors; nuclear risk; nuclear technologies and defence; nuclear testing; nuclear tourism; nuclear wastes; nuclear wastes. In these single groups web-links will be concentrated into following groups: virtual libraries and specialized servers; science; nuclear societies; nuclear departments of the academic institutes; nuclear research institutes and laboratories; centres, info links

  4. United States of America [National and regional programmes on the production of hydrogen using nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-03-15

    The USA uses more energy than any other country in the world. Energy consumption exceeds domestic supply, which continuously declines. Currently, 27% of the energy needs are imported, a share which will rise to 31% by 2020. In 2007, the USA consumed in total 2337 Mtoe of primary energy. An estimate of the energy use in 2008 is given. The country's largest source representing 39% of the energy demand is crude oil, of which 60% must be imported. About 66% of the oil is consumed in the transportation sector and 24% in the industrial sector, while the remainder is used for residential and commercial heating. The USA is also the largest consumer of natural gas, with 27% of the world's annual production. Natural gas is increasingly used for electricity production (almost doubled to 21% in 2007 compared to 1990) and will remain in the nearer term the fuel of choice for new electric power plants. About 16% of the natural gas consumed is imported, partly in the form of LNG. Regasification of LNG is a growing industry. Coal is the most abundantly available energy resource in the USA. About 50% of the electricity production is from coal, which is responsible for a relatively high level of pollutant emissions. The USA will need approximately 400 GW of new power generation capacity by 2020. In 2007, nuclear energy accounted for 837 TW-h or 19% of the total electricity production from the operation of 104 nuclear reactors with a capacity of 101.2 GW(e). To maintain this nuclear share, the equivalent of 30 1000 MW nuclear reactors will have to be built. Renewables are basically used for electricity production with a share of 9% (with 6% from hydro and 3% from other renewables).

  5. Security with nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karp, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    Recent improvements in East-West relations and the process of dramatic political change in Europe may result in unprecedented opportunities to reduce the global arsenal of nuclear weapons. Despite these welcome developments, the prospects for effectively controlling the spread of nuclear capability in the Third World have remained much less encouraging. The possibility of large reductions in nuclear weapons poses fundamental questions about their purpose. Why have some states chosen to acquire nuclear weapons? How and why have these decisions been maintained over time? Why have some states elected to approach, but not cross, the nuclear threshold? This book examines the commonalities and differences in political approaches to nuclear weapons both within and between three groups of states: nuclear, non-nuclear and threshold. The chapters explore the evolution of thinking about nuclear weapons and the role these weapons play in national security planning, and question the official security rationales offered by the nuclear weapon states for the maintenance of nuclear capabilities. For the non-nuclear weapon states, the book presents an analysis of alternative ways of assuring security and foreign policy effectiveness. For the threshold states, it examines the regional contexts within which these states maintain their threshold status. This book transcends traditional East-West approaches to analysis of nuclear issues by giving equal prominence to the issues of nuclear proliferation and non-nuclearism. The book also provides a comprehensive analysis of how current approaches to nuclear weapons have evolved both within and among the groups of countries under study

  6. South Africa [National and regional programmes on the production of hydrogen using nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-03-15

    South Africa has only small deposits of oil and natural gas and relies on coal production for most of its energy needs. South Africa's economy is structured around large scale, energy-intensive mining and primary minerals industries having a high commercial primary energy intensity. The supply of primary energy in 2007 was 128 Mtoe at a growth rate of 4.4 %/a. The main shares were given by coal (68%), crude oil (19%), renewables (8%), nuclear (3%) and natural gas (2%). South Africa accounts for a major fraction of the CO{sub 2} emissions of the whole continent. Due to its large coal deposits, South Africa is one of the cheapest electricity suppliers in the world. The main reason is its coal based power generating capacity, whose share is 79% (of {approx}40 GW(e)), followed by crude oil (10%), renewables (6%), nuclear (3%) and natural gas (2%). Eskom Holdings Ltd, the State owned power utility that supplies 95% of South Africa's electricity, is planning to increase the current generation capacity of 40 GW by 4%/a to 80 GW by 2025. The power supply crisis in January 2008, which forced shutdowns at mines, has accelerated recognition of the need to diversify the energy mix, such as with nuclear power and natural gas, as well as various forms of renewable energy. Starting in 1984, the national utility ESKOM has been successfully operating the Koeberg nuclear power station consisting of two 900 MW(e) PWR units which generated {approx}6.5% of the electricity needs. In addition, ESKOM has been pursuing the project of modular HTGRs for electricity production to meet the demand of its growing economy. In 2007-2008, the demand for electricity in South Africa started to exceed supply when the economy was growing and, at the same time, existing plants went out for maintenance. As a result, ESKOM and the South African Government decided to request proposals for new nuclear capacity and to expand the nuclear component in the energy supply mix of the country. In the strategic plan

  7. Development of a nuclear spallation simulation code and calculations of primary spallation products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Takahiko; Nakahara, Yasuaki; Tsutsui, Tsuneo

    1986-08-01

    In order to make evaluations of computational models for the nuclear spallation reaction from a nuclear physics point of view, a simulation code NUCLEUS has been developed by modifying and combining the Monte Carlo codes NMTC/JAERI and NMTA/JAERI for calculating only the nuclear spallation reaction (intranuclear cascade + evaporation and/or fast fission) between a nucleus and a projectile without taking into consideration of internuclear transport. New several plotting routines have been provided for the rapid process of much more event data, obtained by using the ARGUS plotting system. The results obtained by our code can be directly compared with the experimental results using by thin foil experiments in which internuclear multiple collisions have little effects, and will serve to upgrade the calculational methods and the values of nuclear parameters currently used in the calculations. Some discussions are done about the preliminary computational results obtained by using NUCLEUS. The mass distribution and charge dispersion of reaction products are examined in some detail for the nuclear spallation reaction between incident protons and target nuclei, such as U, Pb and Ag, in the energy range from 0.5 GeV to 3.0 GeV. These results show that the distribution of reaction products ceases to change its form as the proton energy increases over about 2 GeV. The same tendency is seen in the energy dependence of the number of primary particles emitted from a nucleus. After spallation reactions, a variety of nuclei, especially many neutron deficient nuclides with nuclear charges nearly equal to ones of a target nucleus, are produced. Due to their short lifetime most of them will change to stable nuclides in due time. Finally, some important issues are discussed to improve the present simulation method. (author)

  8. PLAN 98 - Costs for management of the radioactive waste from nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    The nuclear utilities in Sweden are responsible for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste from the nuclear power reactors in a safe manner. The most important measures are to plan, build and operate the facilities and systems needed, and to conduct related R and D. This report presents a calculation of the costs for implementing all of these measures. The following facilities and systems are in operation: Transportation system for radioactive waste products. Central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel, CLAB. Final repository for radioactive operational waste, SFR I. Plans also exist for: Encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel. Deep repository for spent fuel and other long-lived waste. Final repository for decommissioning waste. The cost calculations also include costs for research, development and demonstration, as well as for decommissioning and dismantling the reactor plants etc. At the end of 1995, certain amendments were made in the Financing Act which influence the calculations presented in this report. The most important amendment is that the reactor owners, besides paying a fee or charge on nuclear energy production, must also give guarantees as security for remaining costs. In this way the fee can be based on a probable cost for waste management. This cost includes uncertainties and variations that are normal for this type of project. Cost increases as a consequence of major changes, disruptions etc. can instead be covered via the given guarantees. The total future costs, in January 1998 prices, for the Swedish waste management system from 1999 onward has been calculated to be SEK 45.8 billion. The total costs apply for the waste obtained from 25 years of operation of all Swedish reactors. They will fall due over a total period of approximately 50 years up to the middle of the 2l st century, but the greater part will fall due during the next 20 years. It is estimated that SEK 12.1 billion in current money terms

  9. Uptake of actinides and nuclear fission products in graminaceous and nongraminaceous plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Stephanie Lynn

    Radionuclides exist within the environment naturally and also from release during nuclear power and weapons production. The ability of plants to uptake radionuclides may prove beneficial for exploitation in the field of phytoremediation and as a biomonitor within the field of nuclear forensics. The fact that plants have the ability to take up radionuclides as an unintended metabolic process is well known, however, the mechanisms through which uptake occur present large gaps within the current research. Therefore, gaining further knowledge regarding overall plant radionuclide uptake and specific mechanisms may prove as an invaluable tool to enhance phytoremediation and nuclear forensic efforts. Within this work, controlled laboratory experiments were conducted in order to determine any uptake differences between graminaceous (rye grass) and nongraminaceous (cucumber) plants. A matrix of samples were individually spiked with known amounts of Sr, Cs, Th, U as well as ligands of acetate, citrate, DFOB. Uptake was compared through the calculation and analysis of distribution coefficients within the roots and shoots of each plant sample. A variety of trends were observed throughout this study. Overall, it was determined that the cucumber plant takes up slightly higher concentrations within both the roots and the shoots, except for within the Cs set of samples. Within the Cs samples it was determined that uptake was much higher in the rye grass than in the cucumber plant. Therefore, it was concluded that it may be more beneficial to focus on the collection of grasses and other graminaceous plants when the goal is to collect a plant to determine nuclear activity within the vicinity of a facility. This is due to the fact that Cs is generally released at higher concentrations than other radionuclides during the process of nuclear power and energy production. Similarly, grasses may also be desired as the main focus for phytoremediation efforts due to the fact that Cs is a

  10. Proceedings of the fourth information exchange meeting on nuclear production of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The use of hydrogen, both as feedstock for the industry (oil and chemical) and as an energy carrier, is expected to grow substantially during the coming decades. The current predominant method of producing hydrogen by steam-reforming methane (from natural gas) is not sustainable and has environmental drawbacks, including the emission of greenhouse gasses (GHGs). Nuclear energy offers a way to produce hydrogen from water without depleting natural gas, a valuable natural resource, and without the emission of GHGs. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has conducted a number of information exchange meetings with the objective of stimulating progress in the development of nuclear production of hydrogen. These meetings, held in 2000 in Paris, France, in 2003 in Argonne, Illinois, USA, and in 2005 in Oarai, Japan, were well-attended and very successful. It is hoped that the information presented at fourth meeting and contained in these proceedings may be useful in advancing the objective of achieving economically viable, sustainable and emission-free production of hydrogen. The need for a sustainable supply of clean energy is one of the main problems facing the world. Among the various energy technologies which may be considered (including hydro, wind, solar, geo-thermal, wave and tidal), only nuclear - through the use of fast-neutron fission reactors - is capable of delivering the copious quantities of sustainable energy that will be required. In view of this, one of the means under consideration for achieving the objective of nuclear-produced hydrogen is enhanced international cooperation, including the establishment of one or more OECD/NEA joint projects. In this respect, it is worth noting that similar joint projects undertaken in the past (for example, the Dragon Project and the Halden Reactor Project) have been highly beneficial and have provided significant amounts of useful information to the sponsoring countries at shared costs. This report describes the

  11. Advanced Intermediate Heat Transport Loop Design Configurations for Hydrogen Production Using High Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh; Cliff Davis; Rober Barner; Paul Pickard

    2005-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the high-temperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic evaluations and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various

  12. Development of computer-aided design and production system for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Masanori

    1983-01-01

    The technically required matters related to the design and production of nuclear power stations tended to increase from the viewpoint of the safety and reliability, and it is indispensable to cope with such technically required matters skillfully for the rationalization of the design and production and for the construction of highly reliable plants. Ishikawajima Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., has developed the computer-aided design data information and engineering system which performs dialogue type design and drawing, and as the result, the design-production consistent system is developed to do stress analysis, production design, production management and the output of data for numerically controlled machine tools consistently. In this paper, mainly the consistent system in the field of plant design centering around piping and also the computer system for the design of vessels and others are outlined. The features of the design works for nuclear power plants, the rationalization of the design and production management of piping and vessels, and the application of the CAD system to other general equipment and improvement works are reported. This system is the powerful means to meet the requirement of heightening quality and reducing cost. (Kako, I.)

  13. Production and validation of nuclear data for reactor and fuel cycle applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trakas, C.; Verwaerde, D.; Toubon, H.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this technical meeting is the improvement of the existing nuclear data and the production of new data of interest for the upstream and downstream of the fuel cycle (enrichment, fabrication, management, storage, transport, reprocessing), for the industrial reactors, the research reactors and the new reactor concepts (criticality, dimensioning, exploitation), for the instrumentation systems (external and internal sensors), the radioprotection, the residual power, the structures (neutron bombardment effect on vessels, rods etc..), and for the activation of steel structures (Fr, Ni, Co). The expected result is the collection of more reliable and accurate data in a wider spectrum of energies and temperatures thanks to more precise computer codes and measurement techniques. This document brings together the communications presented at this meeting and dealing with: the process of production and validation of nuclear data; the measurement facilities and the big international programs; the users needs and the industrial priorities; the basic nuclear data (BND) needs at Cogema; the expression and evaluation of BND; the evaluation work: the efficient cross-sections; the processing of data and the creation of activation libraries; from the integral measurement to the qualification and the feedback on nuclear data. (J.S.)

  14. Transverse Characteristics of Hadron Production in Elementary and Nuclear Collisions at the CERN SPS Energies

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2076476; Bialkowska, H

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive study of transverse phenomena at CERN-SPS energies has been performed using data collected by the NA49 experiment. Results on p, p, pi+ and pi- production in elementary hadronic interactions (p + p, pi+ +p and pi- + p) as well as in nuclear collisions (centrality-defined p + Pb, C + C, Si + Si And Pb + Pb) are presented. The dependence of transverse momentum spectra, and in particular the - xF correlations, on particle species, collision energy, size and structure of the colliding objects has been investigated. Particle composition, in terms of the nuclear modification factors RpA (pT) for different xF regions – and particle ratios, has been also studied. The whole set of experimental data puts strong constraints on theoretical models aiming at the description of hadron production in the studied reactions.

  15. Charmonium production and nuclear absorption in p-A interactions at 450 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Alessandro, B; Arnaldi, R; Atayan, M; Baglin, C; Baldit, A; Beolè, S; Boldea, V; Bordalo, P; Borenstein, S R; Borges, G; Bussière, A; Capelli, L; Castanier, C; Castor, J I; Chaurand, B; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Cicalò, C; Claudino, T; Comets, M P; Constans, N; Constantinescu, S; Cortese, P; Cruz, J; De Falco, A; De Marco, N; Dellacasa, G; Devaux, A; Dita, S; Drapier, O; Espagnon, B; Fargeix, J; Force, P; Gallio, M; Gerschel, C; Giubellino, P; Golubeva, M B; Gonin, M; Grigorian, A A; Grigorian, S; Grossiord, J Y; Guber, F F; Guichard, A; Gulkanian, H R; Idzik, M; Jouan, D; Karavitcheva, T L; Kluberg, L; Kurepin, A B; Le, Y; Le Bornec, Y; Lourenço, C; Macciotta, P; MacCormick, M; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Monteno, M; Musso, A; Petiau, P; Piccotti, A; Pizzi, J R; Prino, F; Puddu, G; Quintans, C; Ramello, L; Ramos, S; Rato-Mendes, P; Riccati, L; Romana, A; Santos, H; Saturnini, P; Scomparin, E; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Sigaudo, F; Sitta, M; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Topilskaya, N S; Usai, G L; Vercellin, Ermanno; Villatte, L; Willis, N

    2004-01-01

    The production of J/psi and psi' charmonium states in proton-nucleus interactions has been investigated by the NA50 experiment, at the CERN SPS. High statistics data sets were collected with collisions induced by 450GeV protons incident on Be, Al, Cu, Ag and W targets. The J/psi and psi' production cross-sections have been determined for each p-A system and their dependences on the nucleus size have been studied, leading to the so-called normal nuclear absorption. Comparing the two patterns we see that the nuclear absorption is stronger for the psi' than for the J/psi. Given the high statistics of the data samples, the x_F (or rapidity) differential cross-sections of the J/psi and psi' states have also been studied, for each of the target nuclei.

  16. The economic and community impacts of closing Hanford's N Reactor and nuclear materials production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, M.J.; Belzer, D.B.; Nesse, R.J.; Schultz, R.W.; Stokowski, P.A.; Clark, D.C.

    1987-08-01

    This study discusses the negative economic impact on local cities and counties and the State of Washington of a permanent closure of nuclear materials production at the Hanford Site, located in the southeastern part of the state. The loss of nuclear materials production, the largest and most important of the five Department of Energy (DOE) missions at Hanford, could occur if Hanford's N Reactor is permanently closed and not replaced. The study provides estimates of statewide and local losses in jobs, income, and purchases from the private sector caused by such an event; it forecasts impacts on state and local government finances; and it describes certain local community and social impacts in the Tri-Cities (Richland, Kennewick, and Pasco) and surrounding communities. 33 refs., 8 figs., 22 tabs

  17. Energy Production and Transmutation of Nuclear Waste by Accelerator Driven Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhivkov, P. K.

    2018-05-01

    There is a significant amount of highly radiotoxic long-life nuclear waste (NW) produced by NPP (Nuclear Power Plants). Transmutation is a process which transforms NW into less radiotoxic nuclides with a shorter period of half-life by spallation neutrons or radiative capture of neutrons produced by ADS (Accelerator Driven System). In the processes of transmutation new radioactive nuclides are produced. ADS is big energy consumer equipment. It is a method for production of a high-flux and high-energy neutron field. All these processes occur in ADS simultaneously. ADS is able to transmute actinides and produce energy simultaneously. The article considers the energy production problems in ADS. Several ideas are developed regarding the solution of the global energy supply.

  18. Evaluation of the electric power production cost growth due to decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basso, G.

    1982-01-01

    The increase of production cost for electric power generated by nuclear plants, due to their decommissioning and the end of operating life, is analysed in respect to (a) waiting time from indefinite shut-down date to the start of dismantlement, (b) financing method, (c) interest and inflation rates. The analysis shows that the additional cost is always small for those solutions which have higher probability to be adopted

  19. Design and construction of demineralized water production and maintenance system for RA-O nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumis, D.; Martin, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    The normal operation of zero power RA-O Nuclear Reactor requires a production and maintenance of demineralized water system. This system was designed and built-up during the works for actualization, upgrading and new start up at Cordoba National University of this facility. This paper comments the relevant aspects about the didactical purpose of that system and the details considered for training and practices with it. Similarly, considerations about solids wastes and effluents treatment are discussed. (Author)

  20. Production of 48V in a nuclear reactor via secondary tritons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siri, S.; Cohen, I.M.

    2009-01-01

    The production of 48 V in a nuclear reactor, induced on titanium by tritons generated from the 6 Li(n, t) 4 He reaction, and eventually 7 Li(n, n't) 4 He, is described. Samples of lithium titanate were irradiated for an irradiation cycle (120 h) in the RA-3 reactor, belonging to Ezeiza Atomic Centre. After a radiochemical separation, the characteristic radiations from 48 V were identified in the gamma ray spectra of the vanadium fractions. (orig.)

  1. Expert system and knowledge acquisition technology in ENEA program on nuclear and conventional energy production processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balducelli, C.; Federico, A.; Sapia, R.Di.

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of some experiences performed in ENEA (Thermal Reactor Department) revelant to the project and development of experts systems to support the operator activities in nuclear and conventional energy production processes, the paper tries to point out the outline of a 'generic' plant operator cognitive structure. For this type of expert systems an implementation strategy and a knowledge elicitation methodology are proposed with the intention of giving a support to the knowledge engineer work

  2. IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares) technical-scientific production - 1995-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    The biannual report of 1995-1996 of IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares) - Brazilian organization - presents the technical and scientific production accomplished in the period - 975 woks - and introduces the next main topics: articles of periodicals; scientific events - complete texts; dissertations and thesis; scientific events - complete texts - communications, summaries and panels; IPEN publications; books; authors index; scientific events index; subjects index; and periodicals index

  3. Database 'catalogue of techniques applied to materials and products of nuclear engineering'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedeva, E.E.; Golovanov, V.N.; Podkopayeva, I.A.; Temnoyeva, T.A.

    2002-01-01

    The database 'Catalogue of techniques applied to materials and products of nuclear engineering' (IS MERI) was developed to provide informational support for SSC RF RIAR and other enterprises in scientific investigations. This database contains information on the techniques used at RF Minatom enterprises for reactor material properties investigation. The main purpose of this system consists in the assessment of the current status of the reactor material science experimental base for the further planning of experimental activities and methodical support improvement. (author)

  4. Nuclear power and nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described

  5. Numerology in the second nuclear age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krepon, M.

    2009-07-01

    The nuclear numbers game has changed. During the Cold War - the first nuclear age - deterrence strategists such as Henry Kissinger, Paul Nitze and Albert Wohlstetter claimed that the nuclear balance mattered, even at extraordinarily high numbers. ' As a result, one great irony of the first nuclear age was that the 'absolute' weapon still lent itself to the twin impulses of seeking advantage and seeking to avoid being placed at a disadvantage. This factor, among others, led to the production of approximately 125,000 U.S. and Soviet nuclear weapons during the Cold War. Nuclear 'numerology' during the Cold War centered around deployed capabilities in various categories, especially 'prompt hard-target kill' capabilities, missile 'throw-weight' and nuclear exchange ratios. By this musty logic, the United States now has more deterrence leverage against Russia than at any time since the Soviet nuclear build-up in the 1960's. This may help explain why the Kremlin feels so protective of its large stocks of tactical nuclear weapons, despite Washington's preferences. US leverage on Moscow also appears to be limited on other matters pertaining to the nuclear order, including ways to persuade North Korea and Iran to adhere to UN Security Council resolutions. Critics of the Obama administration ascribe this lack of suasion to 'soft' leadership that does not command respect or compel preferred behavior. But the 'hard' policies they preferred during the presidency of George W. Bush produced, to put it charitably, mixed results. Whatever value the nuclear numbers game had during the first nuclear age related primarily to contests played out with computers and hand calculators, not to real battlefields where nuclear-armed states fought with weaker foes, including contests between states with and without nuclear weapons. Numerical imbalances have been far more profound between the United States and China. For

  6. Numerology in the second nuclear age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krepon, M.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear numbers game has changed. During the Cold War - the first nuclear age - deterrence strategists such as Henry Kissinger, Paul Nitze and Albert Wohlstetter claimed that the nuclear balance mattered, even at extraordinarily high numbers. ' As a result, one great irony of the first nuclear age was that the 'absolute' weapon still lent itself to the twin impulses of seeking advantage and seeking to avoid being placed at a disadvantage. This factor, among others, led to the production of approximately 125,000 U.S. and Soviet nuclear weapons during the Cold War. Nuclear 'numerology' during the Cold War centered around deployed capabilities in various categories, especially 'prompt hard-target kill' capabilities, missile 'throw-weight' and nuclear exchange ratios. By this musty logic, the United States now has more deterrence leverage against Russia than at any time since the Soviet nuclear build-up in the 1960's. This may help explain why the Kremlin feels so protective of its large stocks of tactical nuclear weapons, despite Washington's preferences. US leverage on Moscow also appears to be limited on other matters pertaining to the nuclear order, including ways to persuade North Korea and Iran to adhere to UN Security Council resolutions. Critics of the Obama administration ascribe this lack of suasion to 'soft' leadership that does not command respect or compel preferred behavior. But the 'hard' policies they preferred during the presidency of George W. Bush produced, to put it charitably, mixed results. Whatever value the nuclear numbers game had during the first nuclear age related primarily to contests played out with computers and hand calculators, not to real battlefields where nuclear-armed states fought with weaker foes, including contests between states with and without nuclear weapons. Numerical imbalances have been far more profound between the United States and China. For financial and other reasons, Beijing did not play the nuclear numbers game

  7. FPFPspace2: A code for following airborne fission products in generic nuclear plant flow paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owcarski, P.C.; Burk, K.W.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Yasuda, D.D.

    1991-03-01

    In order to assure that a nuclear power plant control room remains habitable during certain types of postulated accidents, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has undertaken a special study for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This purpose of this study is to develop software that can aid in the analyses of control room habitability during accidents in which airborne fission products could challenge internal air pathways to the control room. PNL has completed an initial version (FPFP) and final version (FPFP 2) of a software package that can estimate the unsteady-state invasion of quantities of fission products into the control room or any other destination within the nuclear plant via generic internal flow paths. This report consists of three parts: Section 2.0, Technical Bases, describes the flow path components and mechanisms of natural fission product deposition; Section 3.0, FPFP 2 Code Description, describes code organization and the functions of the subroutines; and Section 4.0, Code Operation, discusses details of input requirements, code output, and a sample case demonstration. The appendices consist of an FPFP 2 Fortran code listing, a listing of a code for building input files, forms for building input files, and the sample case input and output files. 7 refs., 3 figs

  8. Hydrogen as an energy carrier and its production by nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The impact of power generation on environment is becoming an ever increasing concern in decision making when considering the energy options and power systems required by a country in order to sustain its economic growth and development. Hydrogen is a strong emerging candidate with a significant role as a clean, environmentally benign and safe to handle major energy carrier in the future. Its enhanced utilization in distributed power generation as well as in propulsion systems for mobile applications will help to significantly mitigate the strong negative effects on the environment. It ia also the nuclear power that will be of utmost importance in the energy supply of many countries over the next decades. The development of new, innovative reactor concepts utilizing passive safety features for process heat and electricity generation are considered by many to play a substantial role in the world`s energy future in helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This report produced by IAEA documents past and current activities in Member States in the development of hydrogen production as an energy carrier and its corresponding production through the use of nuclear power. It provides an introduction to nuclear technology as a means of producing hydrogen or other upgraded fuels and to the energy carries hydrogen and its main fields of application. Emphasis is placed on high-temperature reactor technology which can achieve the simultaneous generation of electricity and the production of high-temperature process heat Refs, figs, tabs

  9. Hydrogen as an energy carrier and its production by nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    The impact of power generation on environment is becoming an ever increasing concern in decision making when considering the energy options and power systems required by a country in order to sustain its economic growth and development. Hydrogen is a strong emerging candidate with a significant role as a clean, environmentally benign and safe to handle major energy carrier in the future. Its enhanced utilization in distributed power generation as well as in propulsion systems for mobile applications will help to significantly mitigate the strong negative effects on the environment. It ia also the nuclear power that will be of utmost importance in the energy supply of many countries over the next decades. The development of new, innovative reactor concepts utilizing passive safety features for process heat and electricity generation are considered by many to play a substantial role in the world's energy future in helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This report produced by IAEA documents past and current activities in Member States in the development of hydrogen production as an energy carrier and its corresponding production through the use of nuclear power. It provides an introduction to nuclear technology as a means of producing hydrogen or other upgraded fuels and to the energy carries hydrogen and its main fields of application. Emphasis is placed on high-temperature reactor technology which can achieve the simultaneous generation of electricity and the production of high-temperature process heat

  10. High Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy – TechnologySummary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; M. S. Sohal; K. G. Condie

    2010-02-01

    The Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has requested that a Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection be performed to identify the hydrogen production technology that has the best potential for timely commercial demonstration and for ultimate deployment with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). An Independent Review Team has been assembled to execute the down-selection. This report has been prepared to provide the members of the Independent Review Team with detailed background information on the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process, hardware, and state of the art. The Idaho National Laboratory has been serving as the lead lab for HTE research and development under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The INL HTE program has included small-scale experiments, detailed computational modeling, system modeling, and technology demonstration. Aspects of all of these activities are included in this report. In terms of technology demonstration, the INL successfully completed a 1000-hour test of the HTE Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) technology demonstration experiment during the fall of 2008. The HTE ILS achieved a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5.7 Nm3/hr, with a power consumption of 18 kW. This hydrogen production rate is far larger than has been demonstrated by any of the thermochemical or hybrid processes to date.

  11. High Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy - Technology Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, J.E.; Stoots, C.M.; Herring, J.S.; McKellar, M.G.; Harvego, E.A.; Sohal, M.S.; Condie, K.G.

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has requested that a Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection be performed to identify the hydrogen production technology that has the best potential for timely commercial demonstration and for ultimate deployment with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). An Independent Review Team has been assembled to execute the down-selection. This report has been prepared to provide the members of the Independent Review Team with detailed background information on the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process, hardware, and state of the art. The Idaho National Laboratory has been serving as the lead lab for HTE research and development under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The INL HTE program has included small-scale experiments, detailed computational modeling, system modeling, and technology demonstration. Aspects of all of these activities are included in this report. In terms of technology demonstration, the INL successfully completed a 1000-hour test of the HTE Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) technology demonstration experiment during the fall of 2008. The HTE ILS achieved a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5.7 Nm3/hr, with a power consumption of 18 kW. This hydrogen production rate is far larger than has been demonstrated by any of the thermochemical or hybrid processes to date.

  12. Radioecological studies of activation products released from a nuclear power plant into the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattsson, S.; Nilsson, M.; Holm, E.

    1980-01-01

    Since 1967 samples of Fucus serratus and Fucus vesi--culosus from the Swedish west-coast were collected for analysis of the concentration of fallout products, natural actinides and products released by the nuclear industry. During this time two nuclear power stations were built and began operation in this area, ''Ringhals'' in 1974 and ''Barseback'' in 1975. When detectable concentrations of Co-60 and other activation products were found in Fucus, the sampling program was intensified, both in the vicinity of ''Barseback'' and at localities up to 150 km north. Our studies have shown that measurements on Fucus can be used to map the distribution of various radionuclides from a nuclear power station in the marine environment. Knowledge of this distribution and of factors affecting it are needed to construct a radioecological model for the estimation of individual and collective dose equivalent commitment arising from intake of food and water from the marine environment of the south-west of Sweden. (H.K.)

  13. Nuclear data for the production of therapeutic radionuclides. Summary report of third research coordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sublet, J.-Ch.; Capote Noy, R.

    2006-08-01

    A summary is given of the Third Research Coordination Meeting on Nuclear Data for the Production of Therapeutic Radionuclides. The new library of evaluated cross-section will cover reactor and accelerator production of therapeutic radionuclides to appropriate specific activities and purity, along with the relevant decay data. A few new reactions were added at this meeting. Technical discussions and the resulting work plan to conclude the data evaluation activities are summarized for every reaction path. Timescales and agreed actions to deliver the database and Technical Report are also given. (author)

  14. Measurement of delayed neutron-emitting fission products in nuclear reactor coolant water during reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The method covers the detection and measurement of delayed neutron-emitting fission products contained in nuclear reactor coolant water while the reactor is operating. The method is limited to the measurement of the delayed neutron-emitting bromine isotope of mass 87 and the delayed neutron-emitting iodine isotope of mass 137. The other delayed neutron-emitting fission products cannot be accurately distinguished from nitrogen 17, which is formed under some reactor conditions by neutron irradiation of the coolant water molecules. The method includes a description of significance, measurement variables, interferences, apparatus, sampling, calibration, standardization, sample measurement procedures, system efficiency determination, calculations, and precision

  15. Automation drying unit molybdenum-zirconium gel radioisotope production technetium-99M for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrova, Y.; Khromushin, I.; Medvedeva, Z.; Fettsov, I.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : Since 2001 the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Republic of Kazakhstan has began production of radiopharmaceutical based on technetium-99m from irradiated reactor WWR-K of natural molybdenum, which allows to obtain a solution of technetium-99m of the required quality and high volume activity. In 2013 an automated system is started, which is unique and urgent task is to develop algorithms and software in Python, as well as the manufacture of certain elements of technological systems for automated production

  16. Studies of the use of high-temperature nuclear heat from an HTGR for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, D. D.; Fontaine, R. W.; Quade, R. N.; Halvers, L. J.; Jahromi, A. M.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study which surveyed various methods of hydrogen production using nuclear and fossil energy are presented. A description of these methods is provided, and efficiencies are calculated for each case. The process designs of systems that utilize the heat from a general atomic high temperature gas cooled reactor with a steam methane reformer and feed the reformer with substitute natural gas manufactured from coal, using reforming temperatures, are presented. The capital costs for these systems and the resultant hydrogen production price for these cases are discussed along with a research and development program.

  17. Studies of the use of high-temperature nuclear heat from an HTGR for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterman, D.D.; Fontaine, R.W.; Quade, R.N.; Halvers, L.J.; Jahromi, A.M.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study which surveyed various methods of hydrogen production using nuclear and fossil energy are presented. A description of these methods is provided, and efficiencies are calculated for each case. The process designs of systems that utilize the heat from a general atomic high temperature gas cooled reactor with a steam methane reformer and feed the reformer with substitute natural gas manufactured from coal, using reforming temperatures, are presented. The capital costs for these systems and the resultant hydrogen production price for these cases are discussed along with a research and development program

  18. The production and recovery of 77Br at Los Alamos for nuclear medicine studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, P.M.; Whipple, R.E.; Barnes, J.W.; Bentley, G.E.; Wanek, P.M.; O'Brien, H.A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure for the synthesis and isolation of 77 Br for nuclear medicine research has been developed at LASL. Metallic Mo targets are irradiated at LAMPF with medium-energy protons at high beam current. Following dissolution, volatilization, precipitation, and ion exchange techniques, 77 Br is recovered with a (91 +- 7)% chemical yield and is completely free of all other radioactive species with the exception of small levels of 76 Br and 82 Br. Ci-quantity production capabilities have been demonstrated, and the product is proving successful for the labelling of diverse radiopharmaceuticals. Future improvements in the process are also discussed. (author)

  19. The NPT and nuclear testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howlett, D.; Simpson, J.

    1992-01-01

    One of the oldest unachieved aims of international nuclear disarmament and arms limitation negotiations is a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The history of the international negotiations, their outcomes and the consequences of Test Ban for the nuclear arsenals of the nuclear weapons states is discussed. The linkage between a CTBT and the Non-Proliferation Treaty is examined. Two strategies for moving towards a CTBT are compared; one a direct one, the other an incremental route. Both have several alternatives which are considered. (UK)

  20. Routine inspection effort required for verification of a nuclear material production cutoff convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.; Fainberg, A.; Sanborn, J.; Allentuck, J.; Sun, C.

    1996-11-01

    On 27 September 1993, President Clinton proposed open-quotes... a multilateral convention prohibiting the production of highly enriched uranium or plutonium for nuclear explosives purposes or outside of international safeguards.close quotes The UN General Assembly subsequently adopted a resolution recommending negotiation of a non-discriminatory, multilateral, and internationally and effectively verifiable treaty (hereinafter referred to as open-quotes the Cutoff Conventionclose quotes) banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons. The matter is now on the agenda of the Conference on Disarmament, although not yet under negotiation. This accord would, in effect, place all fissile material (defined as highly enriched uranium and plutonium) produced after entry into force (EIF) of the accord under international safeguards. open-quotes Productionclose quotes would mean separation of the material in question from radioactive fission products, as in spent fuel reprocessing, or enrichment of uranium above the 20% level, which defines highly enriched uranium (HEU). Facilities where such production could occur would be safeguarded to verify that either such production is not occurring or that all material produced at these facilities is maintained under safeguards